WorldWideScience

Sample records for rf cavity design

  1. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM 210 mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities

  2. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.

    1992-08-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity toning and matching problems

  3. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.

    1992-01-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity tuning and matching problems. (Author) 8 refs., 10 figs

  4. Tuner Design for PEFP Superconducting RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yazhe; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Cho, Yong Sub

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity will be used to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV at 700 MHz in a linac of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) and its extended project. In order to control the SRF cavity's operating frequency at a low temperature, a new tuner has been developed for the PEFP SRF cavities. Each PEFP superconducting RF cavity has one tuner to match the cavity resonance frequency with the desired accelerator operating frequency; or to detune a cavity frequency a few bandwidths away from a resonance, so that the beam will not excite the fundamental mode, when the cavity is not being used for an acceleration. The PEFP cavity tuning is achieved by varying the total length of the cavity. The length of the cavity is controlled differentially by tuner acting with respect to the cavity body. The PEFP tuner is attached to the helium vessel and drives the cavity Field Probe (FP) side to change the frequency of the cavity

  5. R.F. cavity design for the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Galayda, J.; Hawrylak, R.

    1981-01-01

    The r.f cavity design for the Booster, vuv ring and x-ray ring of the NSLS is described together with the mechanical design of tuners, coupling and monitoring loops and the temperature control systems. The results of higher order mode measurements as compared with Superfish calculations are also presented

  6. Cavity design and beam simulations for the APS rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borland, M.

    1991-01-01

    An earlier note discussed the preliminary design of the 1-1/2 cell RF cavity for the APS RF gun. This note describes the final design, including cavity properties and simulation results from the program rf gun. The basic idea for the new design was that the successful SSRL design could be improved upon by reducing fields that had nonlinear dependence on radius. As discussed previously, this would reduce the emittance and produce tighter momentum and time distributions. In addition, it was desirable to increase the fields in the first half-cell relative to the fields in the second half-cell, in order to allow more rapid initial acceleration, which would reduce the effects of space charge. Both of these goals were accomplished in the new design

  7. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, V., E-mail: paramono@inr.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Philipp, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-05-11

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  8. Physics design of APT linac with normal conducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, S.; Billen, J.H.; Stovall, J.E.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    The accelerator based production of tritium calls for a high-power, cw proton linac. Previous designs for such a linac use a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL) to an intermediate energy and a coupled-cavity linc (CCL) to the final energy. The Los Alamos design uses a high-energy (6.7 MeV) RFQ followed by the newly developed coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) and a CCL. This design accommodates external electromagnetic quadrupole lenses which provide a strong uniform focusing lattice from the end of the RFQ to the end of the CCL. The cell lengths in linacs of traditional design are typically graded as a function of particle velocity. By making groups of cells symmetric in both the CCDTL and CCL, the cavity design as well as mechanical design and fabrication is simplified without compromising the performance. At higher energies, there are some advantages of using superconducting rf cavities. Currently, such schemes are under vigorous study. This paper describes the linac design based on normal conducting cavities and presents simulation results

  9. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H

    2014-01-01

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties

  10. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padamsee, H [Cornell University, CLASSE (United States)

    2014-07-01

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties.

  11. Design and development of RF system for vertical test stand for characterization of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Rajput, Vikas; Baxy, Deodatta; Agrawal, Ankur; Mahawar, Ashish; Adarsh, Kunver; Singh, Pratap; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2011-01-01

    RRCAT is developing a Vertical Test Stand (VTS) to test and qualify 1.3 GHz/650 MHz, SCRF Cavities in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) under Indian Institutions' Fermilab Collaboration. The technical details for VTS is being provided by FNAL, USA. The RF System of VTS needs to provide stable RF power to SCRF cavity with control of amplitude, relative phase and frequency. The incident, reflected, transmitted power and field decay time constant of the cavity are measured to evaluate cavity performance parameters (E, Qo). RF Power is supplied via 500 W Solid State amplifier, 1270-1310 MHz being developed by PHPMS, RRCAT. VTS system is controlled by PXI Platform and National Instruments LabVIEW software. Low Level RF (LLRF) system is used to track the cavity frequency using Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The system is comprised of several integrated functional modules which would be assembled, optimized, and tested separately. Required components and instruments have been identified and procurement for the same is underway. Inhouse development for the Solid State RF amplifier and instrument interfacing is in progress. This paper describes the progress on the development of the RF system for VTS. (author)

  12. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  13. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q ext and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes

  14. Conceptual design of the RF accelerating cavities for a superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, M.; Calabretta, L.; Di Giacomo, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Battaglia, D.; Piazza, L.

    2006-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron accelerating ions up to 250 A MeV, for medical applications and radioactive ions production is being studied at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania. The radio frequency (RF) system, working in the fourth harmonic, is based on four normal conducting radio frequency cavities operating at 93 MHz. This paper describes an unusual multi-stem cavity design, performed with 3D electromagnetic codes. Our aim is to obtain a cavity, completely housed inside the cyclotron, with a voltage distribution ranging from 65 kV in the injection region to a peak value of 120 kV in the extraction region, and having a low power consumption

  15. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  16. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-01-01

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  17. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  18. Mechanical design of 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity for RHIC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X.; McIntyre, G.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wu, Q.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Cavity operating at 4.4K is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator with beam transmission along the centerline. This cavity will increase collision luminosity by providing a large longitudinal bucket for stored bunches of RHIC ion beam. The major components of this assembly are the niobium cavity with the mechanical tuner, its titanium helium vessel and vacuum cryostat, the support system, and the ports for HOM and fundamental dampers. The cavity and its helium vessel must meet equivalent safety with the ASME pressure vessel code and it must not be sensitive to frequency shift due to pressure fluctuations from the helium supply system. Frequency tuning achieved by a two stage mechanical tuner is required to meet performance parameters. This tuner mechanism pushes and pulls the tuning plate in the gap of niobium cavity. The tuner mechanism has two separate drive systems to provide both coarse and fine tuning capabilities. This paper discusses the design detail and how the design requirements are met.

  19. Design, fabrication and low power RF testing of a prototype beta=1, 1050 MHz cavity developed for electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K.C.

    2013-01-01

    A single cell 1050 MHz β = 1 elliptical cavity has been designed for possible use in High energy electron accelerator. A prototype Aluminium cavity has been fabricated by die punch method and low power testing of the cavity has been carried out by using VNA. The fundamental mode frequency of the prototype cavity is found out to be 1051.38 MHz and Q (loaded) and Q0 values corresponding to 2 modes are 8439 and 10013 respectively. Cell to cell coupling coefficient is 1.82 % from measurement which matches with the designed value (1.84%). The higher order mode frequencies are also measured and electric field of the cavity is confirmed by bead pull method. Low power RF measurements on the prototype cavity indicate that the critical RF parameters (Qo, f, Kc etc) for the cavity are consistent with the designed value. (author)

  20. Computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a high-power S-band klystron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, D.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Pal, D.; Meena, R.; Nangru, S. C.; Joshi, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a S-band klystron operating at 2856 MHz. State-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools SUPERFISH, CST Microwave studio, HFSS and MAGIC have been used for cavity design. After finalising the geometrical details of the cavity through simulation, it has been fabricated and characterised through cold testing. Detailed results of the computer-aided simulation and cold measurements are presented in this article.

  1. A 201 MHz RF cavity design with non-stressed pre-curved Be windows for muon cooling channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Ladran, A.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.; Rimmer, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a 201-MHz RF cavity design for muon cooling channels with non-stressed and pre-curved Be foils to terminate the beam apertures. The Be foils are necessary to improve the cavity shunt impedance with large beam apertures needed for accommodating large transverse size muon beams. Be is a low-Z material with good electrical and thermal properties. It presents an almost transparent window to muon beams, but terminates the RF cavity electro-magnetically. Previous designs use pre-stressed flat Be foils in order to keep cavity from detuning resulted from RF heating on the window surface. Be foils are expensive, and it is difficult to make them under desired tension. An alternative design is to use pre-curved and non-stressed Be foils where the buckling direction is known, and frequency shifts can be properly predicted. We will present mechanical simulations on the Be foils in this paper

  2. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, K.

    1995-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.)

  3. Design of rf-cavities in the funnel of accelerators for transmutation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Bultman, N.K.; Chan, K.D.C.; Martineau, R.L.; Nath, S.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Funnels are a key component of accelerator structures proposed for transmutation technologies. In addition to conventional accelerator elements, specialized rf-cavities are needed for these structures. Simulations were done to obtain their electromagnetic field distribution and to minimize the rf-induced heat loads. Using these results a structural and thermal analysis of these cavities was performed to insure their reliability at high average power and to determine their cooling requirements. For one cavity the thermal expansion data in return was used to estimate the thermal detuning

  4. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Gao, Zhiqiang, E-mail: z.gao@csuohio.edu [Center for Advanced Control Technologies, Fenn College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 (United States); Zhao Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng Qinling [Center for Advanced Control Technologies, Fenn College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as 'Active Disturbance Rejection Control' (ARDC) to this problem.

  5. RF cavity design exploiting a new derivative-free trust region optimization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Karim S.O. Hassan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a novel derivative-free (DF surrogate-based trust region optimization approach is proposed. In the proposed approach, quadratic surrogate models are constructed and successively updated. The generated surrogate model is then optimized instead of the underlined objective function over trust regions. Truncated conjugate gradients are employed to find the optimal point within each trust region. The approach constructs the initial quadratic surrogate model using few data points of order O(n, where n is the number of design variables. The proposed approach adopts weighted least squares fitting for updating the surrogate model instead of interpolation which is commonly used in DF optimization. This makes the approach more suitable for stochastic optimization and for functions subject to numerical error. The weights are assigned to give more emphasis to points close to the current center point. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated by applying it to a set of classical bench-mark test problems. It is also employed to find the optimal design of RF cavity linear accelerator with a comparison analysis with a recent optimization technique.

  6. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    1.3 GHz RF test cell capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum with replaceable electrodes was designed, built, and power tested in preparation for testing the frequency and geometry effects of RF breakdown at Argonne National Lab. At the time of this report this cavity is still waiting for the 1.3 GHz klystron to be available at the Wakefield Test Facility. (3) Under a contract with Los Alamos National Lab, an 805 MHz RF test cavity, known as the All-Seasons Cavity (ASC), was designed and built by Muons, Inc. to operate either at high pressure or under vacuum. The LANL project to use the (ASC) was cancelled and the testing of the cavity has been continued under the grant reported on here using the Fermilab Mucool Test Area (MTA). The ASC is a true pillbox cavity that has performed under vacuum in high external magnetic field better than any other and has demonstrated that the high required accelerating gradients for many muon cooling beam line designs are possible. (4) Under ongoing support from the Muon Acceleration Program, microscopic surface analysis and computer simulations have been used to develop models of RF breakdown that apply to both pressurized and vacuum cavities. The understanding of RF breakdown will lead to better designs of RF cavities for many applications. An increase in the operating accelerating gradient, improved reliability and shorter conditioning times can generate very significant cost savings in many accelerator projects.

  7. Design study of an S-band RF cavity of a dual-energy electron LINAC for the CIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong-No; Park, Hyungdal; Song, Ki-baek; Li, Yonggui; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Sung-su; Lee, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seung-Wook; Chai, Jong-seo

    2014-01-01

    The design of a resonance frequency (RF) cavity for the dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator (LINAC) has been carried out for the cargo inspection system (CIS). This Standing-wave-type RF cavity is operated at a frequency under the 2856-MHz resonance frequency and generates electron beams of 9 MeV (high mode) and 6 MeV (low mode). The electrons are accelerated from the initial energy of the electron gun to the target energy (9 or 6 MeV) inside the RF cavity by using the RF power transmitted from a 5.5-MW-class klystron. Then, electron beams with a 1-kW average power (both high mode and low mode) bombard an X-ray target a 2-mm spot size. The proposed accelerating gradient was 13 MV/m, and the designed Q value was about 7100. On going research on 15-MeV non-destructive inspections for military or other applications is presented.

  8. New achievements in RF cavity manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, G.; Pimiskern, K.; Kaiser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Dornier has been engaged in development, manufacturing and testing of Cu-, Cu/Nb- and Nb-cavities for many years. Recently, several different types of RF cavities were manufactured. A prototype superconducting (s.c.) B-Factory accelerating cavity (1-cell, 500 MHz) was delivered to Cornell University, Laboratory of Nuclear Studies. A second lot of 6 s.c. cavities (20-cell, 3000 MHz) was fabricated on contract from Technical University of Darmstadt for the S-DALINAC facility. Finally, the first copper RF structures (9-cell, 1300 MHz) for TESLA were finished and delivered to DESY, two s.c. niobium structures of the same design are in production. Highlights from the manufacturing processes of these cavities are described and first performance results will be reported

  9. Field emission in RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible 'remedies' to field emission are discussed. (author)

  10. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C

  11. Design of a high-power test model of the PEP-II rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Bell, R.A.; Hodgson, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The design of a normal-conducting high-power test cavity (HPTC) for PEP-II is described. The cavity includes HOM loading waveguides and provisions for testing two alternate input coupling schemes. 3-D electromagnetic field simulations provided input information for the surface power deposition. Finite element codes were utilized for thermal and stress analyses of the cavity to arrive at a suitable mechanical design capable of handling the high power dissipation. The mechanical design approach with emphasis on the cooling channel layout and mechanical stress reduction is described

  12. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Yuuji; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Ishimaru, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cryogenic system consisting of a helium refrigerator (4 kW at 4.4 K) and a liquid helium distribution transfer system for TRISTAN 508 MHz 32 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities was designed and constructed. After the performance test of the cryogenic system, 16 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities in 8 cryostats were installed in underground TRISTAN electron-positron collider and connected to the helium refrigerator on the ground level through the transfer line (total length about 330 m) and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling in parallel. The cryogenic system and its operation experience are described. (author)

  13. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity

  14. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  15. RF cavity evaluation with the code SUPERFISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Ueda, N.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code SUPERFISH calculates axisymmetric rf fields and is most applicable to re-entrant cavities of an Alvarez linac. Some sample results are shown for the first Alvarez's in NUMATRON project. On the other hand the code can also be effectivily applied to TE modes excited in an RFQ linac when the cavity is approximately considered as positioning at an infinite distance from the symmetry axis. The evaluation was made for several RFQ cavities, models I, II and a test linac named LITL, and useful results for the resonator design were obtained. (author)

  16. PEP-II RF cavity revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Folwell, N.; Hodgson, J.; Ko, K.; McCandless, B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed

  17. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  18. RF Power Requirements for PEFP SRF Cavity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2011-01-01

    For the future extension of the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) Proton linac, preliminary study on the SRF (superconducting radio-frequency) cavity is going on including a five-cell prototype cavity development to confirm the design and fabrication procedures and to check the RF and mechanical properties of a low-beta elliptical cavity. The main parameters of the cavity are like followings. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m (1.21 Kilp.) - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m For the test of the cavity at low temperature of 4.2 K, many subsystems are required such as a cryogenic system, RF system, vacuum system and radiation shielding. RF power required to generate accelerating field inside cavity depends on the RF coupling parameters of the power coupler and quality factor of the SRF cavity and the quality factor itself is affected by several factors such as operating temperature, external magnetic field level and surface condition. Therefore, these factors should be considered to estimate the required RF power for the SRF cavity test

  19. RF control studies for moderate beamtime coupling between SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.; Wang, D.X.

    1998-01-01

    When an SRF accelerator is designed, there is motivation to move the cavities close together on the beamline. Assuming the beamline apertures are not shrunk as well, this compaction (which will increase the overall accelerating gradient and/or lower the dynamic cryogenic heat load) increases the inter-cavity coupling. Within certain limits, the control system can compensate for this coupling by retuning each of the cavities. This paper describes constraints on the RF system, tuners, couplers, and control systems that are required to provide stable operation of cavities in the presence of inter-cavity coupling that exceeds the loaded bandwidth of an individual cavity

  20. Progress on a prototype main ring rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, G.; Kandarian, R.; Thiessen, H.A.; Poirier, R.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype rf cavity and rf drive system for a hadron facility main ring has been designed and will be tested in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos as a part of a collaborative effort between LANL and TRIUMF. The cavity uses an orthogonally biased ferrite tuner. The design provides for accelerating gap voltages up to 200 kV for the 49.3 to 50.8 MHz range. Progress on the cavity construction and testing is described. 13 refs., 5 figs

  1. Tunable Q-Factor RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Kazakevitch, Gregory [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    Intense neutrino beam is a unique probe for researching beyond the standard model. Fermilab is the main institution to produce the most powerful and widespectrum neutrino beam. From that respective, a radiation robust beam diagnostic system is a critical element in order to maintain the quality of the neutrino beam. Within this context, a novel radiation-resistive beam profile monitor based on a gasfilled RF cavity is proposed. The goal of this measurement is to study a tunable Qfactor RF cavity to determine the accuracy of the RF signal as a function of the quality factor. Specifically, measurement error of the Q-factor in the RF calibration is investigated. Then, the RF system will be improved to minimize signal error.

  2. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  3. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  4. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Matsumoto, K.

    1993-01-01

    A large cryogenic system has been designed, constructed and operated in the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at KEK for 508 MHz, 32x5-cell superconducting RF cavities. A 6.5 kW, 4.4 K helium refrigerator with 5 turbo-expanders on the ground level supplies liquid helium in parallel to the 16 cryostats in the TRISTAN tunnel through about 250 m long multichannel transfer line. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat and cooled by about 830 L pool boiling liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen circulation system with a turbo-expander has been adopted for 80 K radiation shields in the multichannel transfer line and the cryostats to reduce liquid nitrogen consumption and to increase the operation stability of the system. The cryogenic system has a total of about 18 000 hours of operating time from the first cool down test in August 1988 to November 1991. The design principle and outline of the cryogenic system and the operational experience are presented. (orig.)

  5. Automated Hydroforming of Seamless Superconducting RF Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Tomohiko; Shinozawa, Seiichi; Abe, Noriyuki; Nagakubo, Junki; Murakami, Hirohiko; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Hitoshi; Yamanaka, Masashi; Ueno, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We are studying the possibility of automated hydroforming process for seamless superconducting RF cavities. Preliminary hydroforming tests of three-cell cavities from seamless tubes made of C1020 copper have been performed. The key point of an automated forming is to monitor and strictly control some parameters such as operation time, internal pressure and material displacements. Especially, it is necessary for our studies to be able to control axial and radial deformation independently. We plan to perform the forming in two stages to increase the reliability of successful forming. In the first stage hydroforming by using intermediate constraint dies, three-cell cavities were successfully formed in less than 1 minute. In parallel, we did elongation tests on cavity-quality niobium and confirmed that it is possible to achieve an elongation of >64% in 2 stages that is required for our forming of 1.3 GHz cavities.

  6. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  7. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)˜ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3-2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  8. HOM Coupler Optimisation for the Superconducting RF Cavities in ESS

    CERN Document Server

    Ainsworth, R; Calaga, R

    2012-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will be the world’s most powerful next generation neutron source. It consists of a linear accelerator, target, and instruments for neutron experiments. The linac is designed to accelerate protons to a final energy of 2.5 GeV, with an average design beam power of 5 MW, for collision with a target used to produce a high neutron flux. A section of the linac will contain Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities designed at 704 MHz. Beam induced HOMs in these cavities may drive the beam unstable and increase the cryogenic load, therefore HOM couplers are installed to provide sufficient damping. Previous studies have shown that these couplers are susceptible to multipacting, a resonant process which can absorb RF power and lead to heating effects. This paper will show how a coupler suffering from multipacting has been redesigned to limit this effect. Optimisation of the RF damping is also discussed.

  9. A New RF System for the CEBAF Normal Conducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curt Hovater; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; George Lahti; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2004-01-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. CEBAF also has numerous normal conducting cavities for beam conditioning in the injector and for RF extraction to the experimental halls. The RF systems that presently control these cavities are becoming expensive to maintain, therefore a replacement RF control system is now being developed. For the new RF system, cavity field control is maintained digitally using an FPGA which contains the feedback algorithm. The system incorporates digital down conversion, using quadrature under-sampling at an IF frequency of 70 MHz. The VXI bus-crate was chosen as the operating platform because of its excellent RFI/EMI properties and its compatibility with the EPICS control system. The normal conducting cavities operate at both the 1497 MHz accelerating frequency and the sub-harmonic frequency of 499 MHz. To accommodate this, the ne w design will use different receiver-transmitter daughter cards for each frequency. This paper discusses the development of the new RF system and reports on initial results

  10. Development of a high-power RF cavity for the PEP-II B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Allen, M.A.; Saba, J.; Schwarz, H.

    1995-03-01

    The authors describe the development and fabrication of the first high-power RF cavity for PEP-II. Design choices and fabrication technologies for the first cavity and subsequent production cavities are described. Conditioning and high-power testing of the first and subsequent cavities are discussed, as well as integration of the cavity into modular RF systems for both high-energy and low-energy rings. Plans for installation of the cavity raft assemblies in the RF sections of the PEP tunnel are also considered

  11. Synchronization of RF fields of Indus 2 RF cavities for proper injection and acceleration of beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Nitesh; Bagduwal, Pritam S.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Indus-2 is a synchrotron light source with designed parameters of 2.5 GeV, 300 mA beam current. Four RF cavities fed from four RF power stations have been used for beam acceleration from 550 MeV to 2.5 GeV and synchrotron loss compensation. Particle should reach the RF cavity at the proper phase for proper acceptance of the beam in ring. At injection if the phase is not proper the acceptance efficiency reduces and the maximum stored current in the ring also gets limited. Equal contribution from four cavities at every value of current and energy level is very important. Improper phase will cause the imbalance of the power among different station hence will limit maximum stored current and reduce life time of the stored beam. Phase optimization was done in two-step, first at injection to have better injection rate and the stations were operated at the sufficient power for control loops to operate. Then at 2 GeV and 2.5 GeV energy so that beam extracts equal power from all four RF stations. Phase synchronization of all four cavities from injection to 2.5 GeV has already been done at 50 mA stored beam current. If phases of RF fields inside four RF cavities is not proper then beam will not see the total RF voltage as summation of all four cavity gap voltages, hence it is a very important parameter to be optimized and maintained during operation. (author)

  12. Eccentric superconducting rf cavity separator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggus, J.R.; Giordano, S.T.; Halama, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerator apparatus is described having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects

  13. RF-cavity for the X-ray generator NESTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Gvozd, A.M.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Chernov, K.N.; Ostreyko, G.N.; Sedlyarov, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology 225 MeV electron storage ring NESTOR is under development. The paper describes the design and parameters of a 700 MHz cavity that has been fabricated at BINP for the NESTOR RF-system. Now the low-power and vacuum tests of the cavity are under way at BINP. We present here the results of 3D simulations of the cavity with ANSYS code. The problem of multibunch instabilities in NESTOR is also discussed

  14. Practical RF system design

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, William F

    2003-01-01

    he ultimate practical resource for today's RF system design professionals Radio frequency components and circuits form the backbone of today's mobile and satellite communications networks. Consequently, both practicing and aspiring industry professionals need to be able to solve ever more complex problems of RF design. Blending theoretical rigor with a wealth of practical expertise, Practical RF System Design addresses a variety of complex, real-world problems that system engineers are likely to encounter in today's burgeoning communications industry with solutions that are not easily available in the existing literature. The author, an expert in the field of RF module and system design, provides powerful techniques for analyzing real RF systems, with emphasis on some that are currently not well understood. Combining theoretical results and models with examples, he challenges readers to address such practical issues as: * How standing wave ratio affects system gain * How noise on a local oscillator will affec...

  15. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  16. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  17. Superconducting rf and beam-cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Beam-cavity interactions can limit the beam quality and current handling capability of linear and circular accelerators. These collective effects include cumulative and regenerative transverse beam breakup (BBU) in linacs, transverse multipass beam breakup in recirculating linacs and microtrons, longitudinal and transverse coupled-bunch instabilities in storage rings, and a variety of transverse and longitudinal single-bunch phenomena (instabilities, beam breakup, and energy deposition). The superconducting radio frequency (SRF) environment has a number of features which distinguish it from room temperature configuration with regard to these beam-cavity interactions. Typically the unloaded Qs of the lower higher order modes (HOM) are at the 10 9 level and require significant damping through couplers. High gradient CW operation, which is a principal advantage of SRF, allows for better control of beam quality, which for its preservation requires added care which respect to collective phenomena. Gradients are significantly higher than those attainable with copper in CW operation but remain significantly lower than those obtainable with pulsed copper cavities. Finally, energy deposition by the beam into the cavity can occur in a cryogenic environment. In this note those characteristics of beam-cavity interactions which are of particular importance for superconducting RF cavities are highlighted. 6 refs., 4 figs

  18. Beam induced rf cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Wang, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    The authors calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ω r of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω ο . The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(hω ο t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting rf cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kinds of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  19. Radiation measurements during cavities conditioning on APS RF test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzien, D.M.; Kustom, R.L.; Moe, H.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the shielding structure around the Advanced Photon Source (APS) synchrotron and storage ring RF stations, the X-ray radiation has been measured in the near field and far field regions of the RF cavities during the normal conditioning process. Two cavity types, a prototype 352-MHz single-cell cavity and a 352-MHz five-cell cavity, are used on the APS and are conditioned in the RF test stand. Vacuum measurements are also taken on a prototype 352-MHz single-cell cavity and a 352-MHz five-cell cavity. The data will be compared with data on the five-cell cavities from CERN

  20. Evaluation of a new method of RF power coupling to acceleration cavity of charged particles accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poursaleh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility studty of a new method of RF power coupling to acceleration cavity of charged particles accelerator will be evaluated. In this method a slit is created around the accelerator cavity, and RF power amplifier modules is connected directly to the acceleration cavity. In fact, in this design, the cavity in addition to acting as an acceleration cavity, acts as a RF power combiner. The benefits of this method are avoiding the use of RF vacuum tubes, transmission lines, high power combiner and coupler. In this research, cylindrical and coaxial cavities were studied, and a small sample coaxial cavity is build by this method. The results of the resarch showed that compact, economical and safe RF accelerators can be achieved by the proposed method

  1. PEP-II RF Cavity Revisited (LCC-0032)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmer, R.

    2004-03-23

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed.

  2. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  3. Material studies for CLIC RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Following the EST/SM suggestion of replacing copper by molybdenum or tungsten for the construction of the RF cavity irises, different CLIC main beam accelerating structures were produced, extensively operated and disassembled for iris surface inspection. The observed surface modifications were found to be very similar to those obtained by sparking in a dedicated laboratory set-up, showing the superior behaviour of both Mo and W with respect to Cu, in terms of surface erosion and conditioning. The iris thermomechanical fatigue due to RF heating was simulated by high power pulsed laser irradiation. A CuZr alloy was found to be much more resistant than pure Cu. Measurements at higher pulse number will be performed on CuZr in order to extrapolate its fatigue behaviour up to the nominal CLIC duration. Finally a possible future development of a hybrid probe beam acceleration structure will be presented.

  4. RF field control for Kaon Factory booster cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, S.T.; de Jong, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    A conceptual design is developed for control of the Kaon Factory booster rf accelerating fields. This design addresses control of cavity: tuning, voltage amplitude, and voltage phase angle. Time-domain simulations were developed to evaluate the proposed controllers. These simulations indicate that adequate tuning performance can be obtained with the combination of adaptive feed forward and proportional feedback control. Voltage amplitude and voltage phase can be adequately controlled using non-adaptive feed forward and proportional feedback control. (Author) (figs., tabs.)

  5. RF field control for KAON Factory booster cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, S.T.; de Jong, M.S.

    1990-11-01

    A conceptual design is developed for control of the KAON Factory Booster rf accelerating fields. This design addresses control of cavity: tuning, voltage amplitude, and voltage phase angle. Time-domain simulations were developed to evaluated the proposed controllers. These simulations indicated that adequate tuning performance can be obtained with the combination of adaptive feed-forward and proportional feedback control. Voltage amplitude and voltage phase can be adequately controlled using non-adaptive feedforward and proportional feedback control

  6. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  7. Perpendicular biased ferrite tuned RF cavity for the TRIUMF KAON Factory booster ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enegren, T.; Haddock, C.

    1989-03-01

    The rf cavity for the booster ring requires a frequency swing of 46 MHz to 62 MHz at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The possibility of using the LANL booster cavity design with a yttrium garnet ferrite tuner biased perpendicular to the rf field, in the longitudinal direction, is being investigated. In order to minimize the stray magnetic biasing field on the beam axis, an alternative scheme similar to the design being proposed for the LANL main ring cavity in which the ferrite is perpendicular biased in the radial direction, is being considered. The behaviour of the rf cavity and the magnetizing circuit for both designs are discussed

  8. Criteria for vacuum breakdown in rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.; Kadish, A.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    A new high-voltage scaling based on Kilpatrick's criterion is presented that suggests that voltages more than twice the Kilpatrick limit can be obtained with identical initial conditions of vacuum and surface cleanliness. The calculations are based on the experimentally observed decrease in secondary electron emission with increasing ion-impact energy above 100 keV. A generalized secondary-emission package has been developed to simulate actual cavity dynamics in conjunction with our 2 1/2-dimensional fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code CEMIT. The results are discussed with application to the suppression of vacuum breakdown in rf accelerator devices

  9. Calculation of rf fields in axisymmetric cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashita, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A new code, PISCES, has been developed for calculating a complete set of rf electromagnetic modes in an axisymmetric cavity. The finite-element method is used with up to third-order shape functions. Although two components are enough to express these modes, three components are used as unknown variables to take advantage of the symmetry of the element matrix. The unknowns are taken to be either the electric field components or the magnetic field components. The zero-divergence condition will be satisfied by the shape function within each element

  10. Multi-Physics Analysis of the Fermilab Booster RF Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awida, M.; Reid, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Champion, M.

    2012-01-01

    After about 40 years of operation the RF accelerating cavities in Fermilab Booster need an upgrade to improve their reliability and to increase the repetition rate in order to support a future experimental program. An increase in the repetition rate from 7 to 15 Hz entails increasing the power dissipation in the RF cavities, their ferrite loaded tuners, and HOM dampers. The increased duty factor requires careful modelling for the RF heating effects in the cavity. A multi-physic analysis investigating both the RF and thermal properties of Booster cavity under various operating conditions is presented in this paper.

  11. Microscopic Investigation of Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-08-04

    Our overall goal is to contribute to the understanding of defects that limit the high accelerating gradient performance of Nb SRF cavities. Our approach is to develop a microscopic connection between materials defects and SRF performance. We developed a near-field microwave microscope to establish this connection. The microscope is based on magnetic hard drive write heads, which are designed to create very strong rf magnetic fields in very small volumes on a surface.

  12. ACCELERATORS: RF system design and measurement of HIRF-CSRe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Xia, Jia-Wen; Zhan, Wen-Long; Bian, Zhi-Bin

    2009-05-01

    An RF system for the CSRe (cooling storage experimental ring) is designed and manufactured domestically. The present paper mainly describes the RF system design in five main sections: ferrite ring, RF cavity, RF generator, low level system and cavity cooling. The cavity is based on a type of coaxial resonator which is shorted at the end with one gap and loaded with domestic ferrite rings. The RF generator is designed in the push-pull mode and the low level control system is based on a DSP+FGPA+DDS+USB interface and has three feedback loops. Finally we give the results of the measurement on our system.

  13. Conventional RF system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a conventional RF system is always complex and must fit the needs of the particular machine for which it is planned. It follows that many different design criteria should be considered and analyzed, thus exceeding the narrow limits of a lecture. For this reason only the fundamental components of an RF system, including the generators, are considered in this short seminar. The most common formulas are simply presented in the text, while their derivations are shown in the appendices to facilitate, if desired, a more advanced level of understanding. (orig.)

  14. RF cavity for the Novosibirsk race-track microtron-recuperator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, N.; Kuptsov, I.; Kurkin, G.; Mironenko, L.; Petrov, V.; Sedlyarov, I.; Veshcherevich, V.

    1994-01-01

    Geometry, engineering design and characteristics of a 181 MHz RF cavity are described. The cavity has copper clad stainless steel walls and has a Q of 42,000 and a shunt impedance of 8.5 MOhm. The cavities of that type are parts of an RF system of a CW race-track microtron-recuperator (RTMR). 10 refs.; 16 figs.; 1 tab

  15. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Milorad [Warrenville, IL; Johnson, Rolland P [Newport News, VA

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  16. Adaptive compensation of Lorentz force detuning in superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities and considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate. Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  17. High-power RF cavity R ampersand D for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.; Lambertson, G.; Hodgson, J.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the development of a high-power test model of the 476 MHz RF cavity for the PEP-II B Factory. This cavity is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a high-power design with higher-order mode (HOM) damping waveguides and the fabrication technologies involved, and it can also be used to evaluate aperture or loop couplers and various RF windows. Changes to the RF design to reduce peak surface heating are discussed and results of finite-element analyses of temperature and stress are presented. Fabrication methods for the prototype and subsequent production cavities are discussed

  18. A 201-MHz Normal Conducting RF Cavity for the International MICE Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.J.; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael S.; Rimmer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    MICE is a demonstration experiment for the ionization cooling of muon beams. Eight RF cavities are proposed to be used in the MICE cooling channel. These cavities will be operated in a strong magnetic field; therefore, they must be normal conducting. The cavity design and construction are based on the successful experience and techniques developed for a 201-MHz prototype cavity for the US MUCOOL program. Taking advantage of a muon beamΛ s penetration property, the cavity employs a pair of curved thin beryllium windows to terminate conventional beam irises and achieve higher cavity shunt impedance. The cavity resembles a round, closed pillbox cavity. Two half-shells spun from copper sheets are joined by e-beam welding to form the cavity body. There are four ports on the cavity equator for RF couplers, vacuum pumping and field probes. The ports are formed by means of an extruding technique.

  19. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  20. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  1. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2012-01-01

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  2. Designing focusing solenoids for superconducting RF accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; Wokas, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The design of a focusing solenoid for use in a superconducting RF linac requires resolving a range of problems with conflicting requirements. Providing the required focusing strength contradicts the goal of minimizing the stray field on the surfaces of adjacent superconducting RF cavities. The requirement of a compact solenoid, able to fit into a gap between cavities, contradicts the need of mechanical support necessary to restrain electromagnetic forces that can result in coil motion and subsequent quenching. In this report we will attempt to address these and other issues arising during the development of focusing solenoids. Some relevant test data will also be presented.

  3. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-01-01

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities

  4. An RF cavity for barrier bucket experiment in the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujieda, M.; Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Mori, Y. [and others

    1998-11-01

    A barrier bucket experiment in the AGS is planed in 1998. An accumulation of the beam, which intensity of 1.0 x 10{sup 14}ppp is, acceleration after the injection with a barrier bucket scheme and other RF gymnastics experiments will be studied. An isolated RF pulse of 40 kV per cavity is necessary for the experiment. The RF frequency is 2 MHz and the isolated pulse is generated at the repetition rate of the revolution frequency of 357 kHz. We have developed the barrier cavity for this experiment. The cavity is loaded with FINEMET core. It has low Q value but high shunt impedance. It makes the necessary power less than that of ferrite-loaded cavity for an isolated RF pulse. (author)

  5. Finite element analyses for RF photoinjector gun cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper details electromagnetical, thermal and structural 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA) for normal conducting RF photoinjector gun cavities. The simulation methods are described extensively. Achieved results are presented. (orig.)

  6. Finite element analyses for RF photoinjector gun cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marhauser, F. [Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft fuer Synchrotronstrahlung mbH (BESSY), Berlin (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    This paper details electromagnetical, thermal and structural 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA) for normal conducting RF photoinjector gun cavities. The simulation methods are described extensively. Achieved results are presented. (orig.)

  7. Development of the RF cavity for the SKKUCY-9 compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seungwook; Lee, Jongchul; LEE, Byeong-No; Ha, Donghyup; Namgoong, Ho; Chai, Jongseo

    2015-01-01

    A 9 MeV compact cyclotron, named SKKUCY-9, for a radiopharmaceutical compound especially fludeoxyglucose (FDG) production for a positron emission tomography (PET) machine was developed at Sungkyunkwan University. H − ions which are produced from a Penning Ionization Gauge(PIG) ion source, travel through a normal conducting radio frequency (RF) cavity which operates at 83.2 MHz for an acceleration and electro-magnet for a beam focusing until the ions acquire energy of about 9 MeV. For installation at a small local hospital, our SKKUCY-9 cyclotron is developed to be compact and light-weight, comparable to conventional medical purpose cyclotrons. For compactness, we adapted a deep valley and large angle hill type for the electro-magnet design. Normally a RF cavity is installed inside of the empty space of the magnet valley region, which is extremely small in our case. We faced problems such as difficulties of installing the RF cavity, low Q-value. Despite of those difficulties, a compact RF cavity and its system including a RF power coupler to feed amplified RF power to the RF cavity and a fine tuner to compensate RF frequency variations was successfully developed and tested

  8. Development of the RF cavity for the SKKUCY-9 compact cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seungwook; Lee, Jongchul; LEE, Byeong-No; Ha, Donghyup; Namgoong, Ho; Chai, Jongseo

    2015-09-01

    A 9 MeV compact cyclotron, named SKKUCY-9, for a radiopharmaceutical compound especially fludeoxyglucose (FDG) production for a positron emission tomography (PET) machine was developed at Sungkyunkwan University. H- ions which are produced from a Penning Ionization Gauge(PIG) ion source, travel through a normal conducting radio frequency (RF) cavity which operates at 83.2 MHz for an acceleration and electro-magnet for a beam focusing until the ions acquire energy of about 9 MeV. For installation at a small local hospital, our SKKUCY-9 cyclotron is developed to be compact and light-weight, comparable to conventional medical purpose cyclotrons. For compactness, we adapted a deep valley and large angle hill type for the electro-magnet design. Normally a RF cavity is installed inside of the empty space of the magnet valley region, which is extremely small in our case. We faced problems such as difficulties of installing the RF cavity, low Q-value. Despite of those difficulties, a compact RF cavity and its system including a RF power coupler to feed amplified RF power to the RF cavity and a fine tuner to compensate RF frequency variations was successfully developed and tested.

  9. Electron-beam direct drive for rf accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahemow, M.D.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a Program to Demonstrate Electron-Beam Direct Drive for Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerators at the Westinghouse R and D Center. The experimental program was undertaken using an existing electron beam facility at the Westinghouse R and C Center to demonstrate the potential of the Direct Drive RF Cavities for High Power Beams concept discussed as part of a program to develop a viable alternate concept for driving RF linear accelerators

  10. Test results of the Los Alamos ferrite-tuned rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichs, C.C.; Spalek, G.; Carlini, R.D.; Smythe, W.R.

    1987-03-01

    An rf accelerating cavity appropriate for use in a 20% frequency bandwidth synchrotron has been designed, fabricated, and is now being tested at Los Alamos. The cavity-amplifier system was designed to produce a peak rf gap voltage of 90 kV over the range from 50 to 60 MHz. Special features of the system are the transversely biased ferrite tuner, capacitive coupling of the amplifier to the cavity, and a 15-cm beam pipe. High-power rf testing of the cavity-amplifier system started in August 1986, using an adjustable dc power supply to bias the ferrite. This paper describes the cavity-amplifier circuit and the test results to the present time. Future plans are also discussed

  11. RF system design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design of the RF system for the PEP-II B Factory. An RF station consists of either two or four single-cell cavities driven by a 1.2 MW klystron through a waveguide distribution network. A variety of feedback loops stabilize the RF and its interaction with the beam. System parameters and all the relevant parameters of klystron and cavities are given

  12. A beamline design and data acquisition with the 20-MeV, 20-ps electron beam for the higher-order mode studies of the APS SR-rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.; Nassiri, A.; Daly, R.

    1993-01-01

    A beamline has been designed and assembled to use the ANL Chemistry Division 20-MeV electron linac for the testing of higher-order mode excitation and damping in rf cavities. The beamline consists of two sections (a beam collimating section with a 1.5 inches-OD vacuum line, and a cavity test section with a 3 inches-OD vacuum line), separated by two double aluminum foil windows. The beam diagnostics consist of a stripline beam position monitor, integrating current transformers, fluorescent screens, and a Faraday cup. EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used for beamline control, monitoring, and data acquisition. Also described is the diagnostic system used for beam image capture and analysis using EPICS-controlled hardware and PV-WAVE software. The rf cavity measurement will be described in a separate paper

  13. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  14. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  15. Comparison Of RF Cavity Transport Models For BBU Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilkyoung; Yunn, Byung; Satogata, Todd; Ahmed, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  16. High Pressure, High Gradient RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R P

    2004-01-01

    High intensity, low emittance muon beams are needed for new applications such as muon colliders and neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. Ionization cooling, where muon energy is lost in a low-Z absorber and only the longitudinal component is regenerated using RF cavities, is presently the only known cooling technique that is fast enough to be effective in the short muon lifetime. RF cavities filled with high-pressure hydrogen gas bring two advantages to the ionization technique: the energy absorption and energy regeneration happen simultaneously rather than sequentially, and higher RF gradients and better cavity breakdown behavior are possible than in vacuum due to the Paschen effect. These advantages and some disadvantages and risks will be discussed along with a description of the present and desired RF R&D efforts needed to make accelerators and colliders based on muon beams less futuristic.

  17. Modeling high-power RF accelerator cavities with SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical interactions between RF accelerator cavities and high-power beams can be treated on personal computers using a lumped circuit element model and the SPICE circuit analysis code. Applications include studies of wake potentials, two-beam accelerators, microwave sources, and transverse mode damping. This report describes the construction of analogs for TM mn0 modes and the creation of SPICE input for cylindrical cavities. The models were used to study continuous generation of kA electron beam pulses from a vacuum cavity driven by a high-power RF source

  18. Auto-tuning systems for J-PARC LINAC RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Anami, S.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.

    2014-01-01

    The 400-MeV proton linear accelerator (LINAC) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) consists of 324-MHz low-β and 972-MHz high-β accelerator sections. From October 2006 to May 2013, only the 324-MHz low-β accelerator section was in operation. From the summer of 2013 the J-PARC LINAC was upgraded by installing the 972-MHz high-β accelerator section, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Auto-tuning systems for the J-PARC LINAC RF cavities have been successfully developed. A first generation design, an auto-tuning system using a mechanical tuner controller, was developed and operated for the first 3 years. Then the second-generation auto-tuning system was developed using a new approach to the RF cavity warm-up process, and this was applied to the accelerator operation for the subsequent 4 years. During the RF cavity warm-up process in this system, the mechanical tuner is constantly fixed and the input RF frequency is automatically tuned to the cavity resonance frequency using the FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) of the digital feedback RF control system. After the input power level reaches the required value, input RF frequency tuning is stopped and it is switched to the operation frequency. Then, the mechanical tuner control begins operation. This second-generation auto-tuning system was extremely effective for the 324-MHz cavity operation. However, if we apply this approach to the 972-MHz RF cavities, an interlock due to the RF cavity reflection amplitude occasionally occurs at the end of the warm-up process. In order to solve this problem a third generation novel auto-tuning system was successfully developed in December 2013 and applied to the operation of the J-PARC LINAC, including the 972-MHz ACS RF cavities. During the warm-up process both the mechanical tuner controller and the input RF frequency tuning are in operation, and good matching between the input RF frequency and the RF cavity is

  19. Auto-tuning systems for J-PARC LINAC RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z., E-mail: fang@post.kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Anami, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Suzuki, H.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-12-11

    The 400-MeV proton linear accelerator (LINAC) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) consists of 324-MHz low-β and 972-MHz high-β accelerator sections. From October 2006 to May 2013, only the 324-MHz low-β accelerator section was in operation. From the summer of 2013 the J-PARC LINAC was upgraded by installing the 972-MHz high-β accelerator section, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Auto-tuning systems for the J-PARC LINAC RF cavities have been successfully developed. A first generation design, an auto-tuning system using a mechanical tuner controller, was developed and operated for the first 3 years. Then the second-generation auto-tuning system was developed using a new approach to the RF cavity warm-up process, and this was applied to the accelerator operation for the subsequent 4 years. During the RF cavity warm-up process in this system, the mechanical tuner is constantly fixed and the input RF frequency is automatically tuned to the cavity resonance frequency using the FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) of the digital feedback RF control system. After the input power level reaches the required value, input RF frequency tuning is stopped and it is switched to the operation frequency. Then, the mechanical tuner control begins operation. This second-generation auto-tuning system was extremely effective for the 324-MHz cavity operation. However, if we apply this approach to the 972-MHz RF cavities, an interlock due to the RF cavity reflection amplitude occasionally occurs at the end of the warm-up process. In order to solve this problem a third generation novel auto-tuning system was successfully developed in December 2013 and applied to the operation of the J-PARC LINAC, including the 972-MHz ACS RF cavities. During the warm-up process both the mechanical tuner controller and the input RF frequency tuning are in operation, and good matching between the input RF frequency and the RF cavity is

  20. Cavity design programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous computer programs are available to help accelerator physicists and engineers model and design accelerator cavities and other microwave components. This article discusses the problems these programs solve and the principles upon which these programs are based. Some examples of how these programs are used in the design of accelerator cavities are also given

  1. RF cavity R and D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings, FY2000/2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Atkinson, D.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.; Weidenbach, W.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the R and D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal years 2000/2001. This work is a continuation of the NLC RF system R and D of the previous year [1]. These activities include the further optimization and fine tuning of the RF cavity design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order modes (HOMs). The cavity wall surface heating and stresses were reduced at the same time as the HOM damping was improved over previous designs. Final frequency tuning was performed using the high frequency electromagnetic analysis capability in ANSYS. The mechanical design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. The cavity ancillary components including the RF window, coupling box, HOM loads, and tuners have been studied in more detail. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either further lower the HOM impedance or increase the stored energy for reduced transient response. Superconducting designs and the use of external ''energy storage'' cavities are discussed. A section is included in which the calculation method is summarized and its accuracy assessed by comparisons with the laboratory measurements of the PEP-II cavity, including errors, and with the beam-sampled spectrum

  2. Frequency control of RF booster cavity in TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.

    1993-01-01

    A booster is used in the TRIUMF cyclotron to increase the energy gain per turn for beam orbits corresponding to energies greater than 370 MeV. It operates at 92.24 MHz, the 4 th harmonic of the cyclotron main rf, and at a nominal voltage of 150 kV. Excitation is provided by a 90 kW rf system that is phase locked to the main rf. When the main rf is interrupted due to sparking or other causes, a controller built into the low frequency source of the booster rf system disables the phase-locked loop, and reconfigures the source as a temperature stabilized oscillator operating at the last locked frequency. When the cyclotron rf is restored it usually will be at different frequency. The oscillator tunes automatically to this new frequency. The acquisition time is extended by the controller to match the response time of the mechanical tuner in the cavity

  3. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  4. Measurement of RF characteristics of magnetic alloys for an RF cavity of the accumulator cooler ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, M.; Chiba, Y.; Katayama, T.; Koseki, T.; Ohtomo, K.; Tsutsui, H.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic alloy (MA)-loaded RF cavity has been studied for an RF stacking system of the accumulator cooler ring (ACR). RF characteristics of several high-permeability MA cores were measured in the frequency range between 1 and 50 MHz. The effects of the cut-core configuration, cutting the core and leaving air gaps between two circular halves, were also investigated. The results show that the shunt impedance remains high and the appropriate inductance and Q-value can be obtained by increasing the gap width of the cut core in the frequency region of the ACR cavity

  5. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takaaki

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  6. Fabrication process for the PEP II RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, R.M.; Rimmer, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Schwarz, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1997-06-05

    This paper presents the major steps used in the fabrication of the 26 RF Cavities required for the PEP-II B-factory. Several unique applications of conventional processes have been developed and successfully implemented: electron beam welding (EBW), with minimal porosity, of .75 inch (19 mm) copper cross-sections; extensive 5-axis milling of water channels; electroplating of .37 inch (10 mm) thick OFE copper; tuning of the cavity by profiling beam noses prior to final joining with the cavity body; and machining of the cavity interior, are described here.

  7. Fundamental mode rf power dissipated in a waveguide attached to an accelerating cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.

    1993-01-01

    An accelerating RF cavity usually requires accessory devices such as a tuner, a coupler, and a damper to perform properly. Since a device is attached to the wall of the cavity to have certain electrical coupling of the cavity field through the opening. RF power dissipation is involved. In a high power accelerating cavity, the RF power coupled and dissipated in the opening and in the device must be estimated to design a proper cooling system for the device. The single cell cavities of the APS storage ring will use the same accessories. These cavities are rotationally symmetric and the fields around the equator can be approximated with the fields of the cylindrical pillbox cavity. In the following, the coupled and dissipated fundamental mode RF power in a waveguide attached to a pillbox cavity is discussed. The waveguide configurations are (1) aperture-coupled cylindrical waveguide with matched load termination; (2) short-circuited cylindrical waveguide; and (3) E-probe or H-loop coupled coaxial waveguide. A short-circuited, one-wavelength coaxial structure is considered for the fundamental frequency rejection circuit of an H-loop damper

  8. Circuit design for RF transceivers

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaerts, Domine; Vaucher, Cicero S

    2007-01-01

    Second edition of this successful 2001 RF Circuit Design book, has been updated, latest technology reviews have been added as well as several actual case studies. Due to the authors being active in industry as well as academia, this should prove to be an essential guide on RF Transceiver Design for students and engineers.

  9. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-11

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push–pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  10. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  11. RF Behavior of Cylindrical Cavity Based 240 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron for Future Tokamak System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Bera, Anirban; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present the RF behavior of conventional cylindrical interaction cavity for 240 GHz, 1 MW gyrotron for futuristic plasma fusion reactors. Very high-order TE mode is searched for this gyrotron to minimize the Ohmic wall loading at the interaction cavity. The mode selection process is carried out rigorously to analyze the mode competition and design feasibility. The cold cavity analysis and beam-wave interaction computation are carried out to finalize the cavity design. The detail parametric analyses for interaction cavity are performed in terms of mode stability, interaction efficiency and frequency. In addition, the design of triode type magnetron injection gun is also discussed. The electron beam parameters such as velocity ratio and velocity spread are optimized as per the requirement at interaction cavity. The design studies presented here confirm the realization of CW, 1 MW power at 240 GHz frequency at TE46,17 mode.

  12. Study of thermal effects in superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousson, S.; Caruette, A.; Fouaidy, M.; Hammoudi, N.; Junquera, T.; Lesrel, J.; Yaniche, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A high speed thermometric system equipped with 64 fixed surface thermometers is used to investigate thermal effects in several 3 GHz cavities. An evaluation of the time response of our thermometers is presented. A method based on RF signal analysis is proposed to evaluate the normal zone propagation rate during thermal breakdown. (authors)

  13. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  14. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  15. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  16. Computational Tools for RF Structure Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2004-01-01

    The Finite Differences Method and the Finite Element Method are the two principally employed numerical methods in modern RF field simulation programs. The basic ideas behind these methods are explained, with regard to available simulation programs. We then go through a list of characteristic parameters of RF structures, explaining how they can be calculated using these tools. With the help of these parameters, we introduce the frequency-domain and the time-domain calculations, leading to impedances and wake-fields, respectively. Subsequently, we present some readily available computer programs, which are in use for RF structure design, stressing their distinctive features and limitations. One final example benchmarks the precision of different codes for calculating the eigenfrequency and Q of a simple cavity resonator.

  17. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-06-26

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within {approx} 10% and {approx} 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from {approx} 100 to {approx} 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities.

  18. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within ∼ 10% and ∼ 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from ∼ 100 to ∼ 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities

  19. Superconducting RF Cavities Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    In the last two decades many laboratories around the world, notably Argonne (ANL), TJNAF (formerly CEBAF), CERN, DESY and KEK, decided to develop the technology of superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities. The aim was either to increase the accelerator energy or to save electrical consumption or both. This technology has been used extensively in the operating machines showing good performances and strong reliability. At present, the technology using bulk niobium (Nb) or Nb coated on copper (Cu) is mature enough to be applied for many different applications, such as synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron drivers. Results, R&D work and future projects will be presented with emphasis on application to linear accelerators.

  20. Electromagnetic Design of a Radiofrequency Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya Soto, G. R.; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Monzon, Ildefonso Leon; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis manuel; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2017-10-01

    Electromagnetic and mechanical studies have been performed with the aim of build a RF cavity in the S-Band (2998 MHz), the design takes into consideration the relativistic change in the electron velocity through the acceleration cavity. Four cavity cases were considered at different input energies, 50 KeV, 100 KeV, 150 KeV, with output energies of 350 KeV, the designs show good acceleration efficiency and beam coherence comparable to the one created in the cathode.

  1. Status of superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    For several reasons, a brief historical review seems appropriate at this time. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the first acceleration of beam with a superconducting cavity will occur shortly [1,2,3]. Also, the scope of accelerator applications of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) devices has, within the last few months, begun to increase rapidly [4] - to the point that it seems likely that early expectations for this technology will largely be fulfilled. Since the object is to accelerate beam, a simple one parameter measure of the technology is the total of how much beam has been accelerated. Figure 1 shows the total accumulated voltage in tests and/or operation of superconducting accelerating cavities with beam, up to the time indicated, as reported in the open literature [4-35]. This parameter has been divided into two terms: first, the subtotal for electron accelerating velocity-of-light structures, and second the subtotal for low-velocity, ion accelerating structures. To restate: each of these terms represents as a function of time an integrated, accumulative total voltage produced by SRF hardware and demonstrated with beam. 56 refs., 4 figs

  2. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday’s law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  3. Linear collider RF structure design using ARGUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok Ko

    1991-01-01

    In a linear collider, both the driving system (klystrons) and the accelerating system (linac) consists of RF structures that are inherently three-dimensional. These structures which are responsible for power input/output, have to satisfy many requirements in order that instabilities, beam or RF related, are to be avoided. At the same time, system efficiencies have to be maintained at optimal to minimize cost. Theoretical analysis on these geometrically complex structures are difficult and until recently, numerical solutions have been limited. At SLAC, there has been a continuing and close collaboration among accelerator physicists, engineers and numericists to integrate supercomputing into the design procedure which involves 3-D RF structures. The outcome is very encouraging. Using the 3-D/electromagnetic code ARGUS (developed by SAIC) on the Cray computers at NERSC in conjunction with supporting theories, a wide variety of critical components have been simulated and evaluated. Aside from structures related to the linear collider, the list also includes the RF cavity for the proposed Boson Factory and the anode circuit for the Cross-Field Amplifier, once considered as an alternative to the klystron as a possible power source. This presentation will focus on two specific structures: (1) the klystron output cavity; and (2) the linac input coupler. As the results demonstrate, supercomputing is fast becoming a viable technology that could conceivably replace actual cold-testing in the near future

  4. Numerical simulation of a split cavity oscillator and rf conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, R.W.

    1991-07-01

    We have conducted an extensive investigation of the split cavity oscillator (SCO) using particle-in-cell simulation. The goal of this work is to test and optimize an inverse diode rf convertor for use with a cylindrical SCO, while simultaneously determining factors that control rf extraction efficiency. We present results from simulations of several configurations including the SCO with inverse diode extractor, the SCO in conjunction with post-acceleration and inverse diode extraction, and the SCO, using electron beams with a variety of currents, voltages, and radii. 7 refs., 8 figs

  5. Travelling Wave Structure of an SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The RF cavities for acceleration of particles in the SPS have a travelling-wave structure. They operate at a fixed frequency of 200 MHz (h = 4620). With a quality factor of Q = 100, the bandwidth covers the small frequency swing for the acceleration of protons from as low as 10 GeV to the top energy of 450 GeV. Later on, for the acceleration of ions, with a larger frequency swing, turn-to-turn phase jumps did the trick. Two cavities, each consisting of 5 tank sections, were installed in long straight section 3. Each cavity is driven by a power amplifier of 750 kW CW (1 MW pulsed). Another 2 cavities were added later on. See also 7411033 and 7802190.

  6. Development of a Solid State RF Amplifier in the kW Regime for Application with Low Beta Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Christian; Borisov, A; Kolesov, Sergej; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Projects based on the use of low beta superconducting cavities for ions are under operation or development at several labs worldwide. Often these cavities are individually driven by RF power sources in the kW regime. For an ongoing project a modular 2 kW, 176 MHz unconditionally stable RF amplifier for CW and pulsed operation was designed, built, and tested. Extended thermal analysis was used to develop a water cooling system in order to optimize the performance of the power transistors and other thermally loaded components. The paper will outline the design concept of the amplifier and present first results on the test of the amplifier with a superconducting cavity.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF HIGH Q RF CAVITY IMPEDANCE WITH BEAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limborg, Cecile

    2003-01-01

    An inexpensive method to measure, with beam, the Rs and Q of narrow-band high order resonances in RF cavities was developed on SPEAR. The two main results of this study are: (1) an improved operational stability of SPEAR; and (2) the decision to keep the present cavities for the proposed SPEAR upgrade. SPEAR3 will be run initially at 200 mA, twice the present current. Just beyond the current threshold, and before step loss, there is a regime in which the beam performs large amplitude, low frequency oscillations. Detailed measurements were performed to characterize the frequency, amplitude, growth and damping time of these relaxation oscillations

  8. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  9. Design and development of Low Level RF (LLRF) control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandi, T.K.; Suman, S.; Pandey, H.K.; Bandyopadhyay, A.

    2015-01-01

    All the linear accelerator cavities of Radioactive Ion Beam have separate RF power amplifiers. In these accelerators, high stabilities of the order of ± 0.5% in amplitude and ± 0.5° in phase of RF signal inside the cavities are required for proper and efficient acceleration of RIB. For this purpose, a low level RF (LLRF) control system is being designed which includes amplitude and phase controllers to ensure efficient and stable operation of the RF accelerators. The RF output of the LLRF system is finally amplified and fed to the accelerator cavities. The LLRF system is based on IQ (In-phase and Quadrature) modulation-demodulation technique in which an IQ modulator and a demodulator has been used to control the amplitude and phase of the RF carrier signal. The HigH-speed DAC and ADC have been used for processing the in-phase (I) and quadrature-phase (Q) components of the RF signal. This system is a closed-loop feedback control system. The feedback signal is obtained from the pick-up of accelerator cavity. PID control method is used to regulate the amplitude and phase of the RF signal to the desired/set value. The control system is optimized for minimum response time with satisfactory performance. The transfer function of the PID controller and the RF cavity is compared with the transfer function of a first order system and the values of proportional gain (Kp), integral gain (Ti) and derivative gain (Td) are obtained from Matlab- Simulink Simulation. The PID controller has been implemented into a high speed microcontroller (LPC2478) for fast operation. A GUI has been developed in NI LabView software to monitor the Amplitude and Phase of the RF signal and control manually if required. The detailed design and development of the control system will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. Operating experience with high beta superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The number of installed and operational β=1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the U.S. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  11. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; Samulyak, R.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.

    2018-01-01

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  12. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Initiative; Samulyak, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Initiative; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Statistics; Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freemire, B. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2018-01-11

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have also been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  13. Operating experience with high beta superconducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    The number of installed and operational β = 1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the US. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  14. Measurement and identification of HOM's in RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    One of the major sources of beam impedance in accelerators is the higher-order modes (HOM's) of the RF cavities. We report here on a number of techniques for the identification of HOM's and measurement of their properties. Central to these techniques is the application of symmetry principles and the effects of symmetry-breaking perturbations (including mode-mixing) to the 'standard' techniques of spectrum measurements and bead pulls

  15. On losses caused in RF cavities by longitudinal electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1976-02-01

    Rf modes with large longitudinal electric fields (div E vector unequal to 0) at the cavity wall systematically show worse rf properties than modes with div E vector identical with 0; e.g. enlarged rf residual losses. While magnetic residual losses R sub(res) proportional f 2 are due to uncharged inhomogeneities in the oxide coating the metal, the electric residual losses R sub(orthogonal) occur via charged states in the oxide: the recharging of those states by tunnel exchange causes excitation across the energy gap of the superconductor yielding residual losses at high rf field strengths. The interaction of E sub(orthogonal) with the charges generate (longitudinal) phonons showing up as contribution to R sub(orthogonal). The resulting R sub(orthogonal) increases with E sub(orthogonal) and is nearly independent of frequency f, indicating the importance of R sub(orthogonal) for low frequency sc cavities, especially at high field strengths. In addition R sub(orthogonal) can account for the observed large residual losses of strip line modes in narrow junctions and joints between superconductors. (orig.) [de

  16. RF cavity R and D at LBNL for the NLC damping rings, FY1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the R and D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal year19999. These activities include the optimization of the RF design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order (HOMs), by systematic study of the cavity profile, the effect of the beam pipe diameter, nosecone angle and gap, the cross section and position of the HOM damping waveguides and the coupler. The effect of the shape of the HOM waveguides and their intersection with the cavity wall on the local surface heating is also an important factor, since it determines the highest stresses in the cavity body. This was taken into account during the optimization so that the stresses could be reduced at the same time as the HOP damping was improved over previous designs. A new method of calculating the RF heating was employed, using a recently released high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS. This greatly facilitates the thermal and stress analysis of the design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. Preliminary designs are described for the cavity ancillary components including the RF window, HOM loads, and tuners. A preliminary manufacturing plan is included, with an initial estimate of the resource requirements. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either lower the R/Q, for reduced transient response, or lower the residual HOM impedance to reduce coupled-bunch growth rates further still

  17. Localization of rf breakdowns in a standing wave cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faya Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available At SLAC, a five-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  18. Wireless overhead line temperature sensor based on RF cavity resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, Maryam; Nezhad, Abolghasem Zeidaabadi; Bridges, Greg E; Thomson, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of maximizing power transfer through overhead transmission lines necessitates the use of dynamic power control to keep transmission line temperatures within acceptable limits. Excessive conductor operating temperatures lead to an increased sag of the transmission line conductor and may reduce their expected life. In this paper, a passive wireless sensor based on a resonant radio frequency (RF) cavity is presented which can be used to measure overhead transmission line temperature. The temperature sensor does not require a power supply and can be easily clamped to the power line with an antenna attached. Changing temperature causes a change of cavity dimensions and a shift in resonant frequency. The resonant frequency of the cavity can be interrogated wirelessly. This temperature sensor has a resolution of 0.07 °C and can be interrogated from distances greater than 4.5 m. The sensor has a deviation from linearity of less than 2 °C. (paper)

  19. Elliptical superconducting RF cavities for FRIB energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Contreras, C.; Plastun, A. S.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Taylor, A.; Wei, J.; Xu, M.; Xu, T.; Zhao, Q.; Gonin, I. V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2018-04-01

    The multi-physics design of a five cell, βG = 0 . 61, 644 MHz superconducting elliptical cavity being developed for an energy upgrade in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is presented. The FRIB energy upgrade from 200 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u for heaviest uranium ions will increase the intensities of rare isotope beams by nearly an order of magnitude. After studying three different frequencies, 1288 MHz, 805 MHz, and 644 MHz, the 644 MHz cavity was shown to provide the highest energy gain per cavity for both uranium and protons. The FRIB upgrade will include 11 cryomodules containing 5 cavities each and installed in 80-meter available space in the tunnel. The cavity development included extensive multi-physics optimization, mechanical and engineering analysis. The development of a niobium cavity is complete and two cavities are being fabricated in industry. The detailed design of the cavity sub-systems such as fundamental power coupler and dynamic tuner are currently being pursued. In the overall design of the cavity and its sub-systems we extensively applied experience gained during the development of 650 MHz low-beta cavities at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) for the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) II.

  20. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-01-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemuende, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell's single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high-k cc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low-k cc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology

  1. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenci, S.J.; Eisen, E.L.; Dickey, D.L.; Sainz, J.E.; Utay, P.F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-01-01

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system

  2. Multiplacting analysis on 650 MHz, BETA 0.61 superconducting RF LINAC cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Mandal, Aditya; Ghosh, Surajit; Saha, S.

    2013-01-01

    Design, analysis and development of high-β multi-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity has been taken up by VECC, Kolkata as a part of IIFC collaboration. The project aims to provide the-art technology achieving very high electric field gradient in superconducting linac cavity, which can be used in high energy high current proton linear accelerator to be built for ADSS/SNS programme in India and in Project-X at Fermilab, USA. The performance of this type of superconducting RF structure can be greatly affected due to multipacting when we feed power to the cavity. Multipacting is a phenomenon of resonant electron multiplication in which a large number of electrons build up an electron Avalanche which absorbs RF Energy leading to remarkable power losses and heating of the walls, making it impossible to raise the electric field by increasing the RF Power. Multipacting analysis has been carried out for 650 MHz, β=0.61, superconducting elliptical cavity using 2D code MultiPac 2.1 and 3 D code CST particle studio and the result is presented in this paper. (author)

  3. Basic principles of RF superconductivity and superconducting cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Schmüser, P

    2006-01-01

    The basics of superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the features which are relevant for the application of superconductors in radio frequency cavities for particle acceleration. For a cylindrical resonator (“pill box cavity”) the electromagnetic field in the cavity and important parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor and shunt impedance are calculated analytically. The design and performance of practical cavities is shortly addressed.

  4. Vacuum characteristics of the rf cavity for TRISTAN main ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H.; Akemoto, M.; Sakai, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Takata, K.

    1987-01-01

    In the TRISTAN main ring 52 accelerating units of alternating periodic structure (APS) are to be installed into the 6 straight sections around the Fuji, Tsukuba and Oho experimental areas. An accelerating unit which is 5365 mm long is composed of two 9 accelerating cell structures. At present (Jan. 1987) 32 units have been installed and under operation at a beam energy of 25 GeV. The remaining 20 units will be set up in this summer. To achieve the necessary beam life longer than 5 hours, the cavity sections should be pumped down to the pressure less than 5 X 10 -9 Torr with an operating RF power of 200 kW per each 9-cell cavity and the e+- beam. For this purpose a sufficient baking which is the most efficient method of reducing the outgassing rates of the parts of vacuum system is required for the APS cavity. A circulating water boiler system with electric heaters and a water pump was developed for the easy operation and maintenance of the RF vacuum system. The cavity unit is made of low-carbon steel S25C, and inner surface is electro-plated with copper of 100 μm thickness in a pyrophosphorous-acid bath. The area of inner surface and the volume of the cavity are about 18 M 2 and 1 m 3 , respectively. The unit is baked at 135 0 C by circulating 145 0 C hot water in the cooling channel. After the bake-out process for 24 hours the outgassing rate is dominated by the hydrogen permeation from the cooling water channel through the iron wall into the vacuum. to suppress this permeation, the anti-corrosion agent is added to the water by 5% in volume. All of the units were baked for 10 days at 135 0 C before they were installed into the straight sections

  5. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, G S; Aksun, M I

    2015-11-02

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user.

  6. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souli, M.

    2007-07-01

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q c in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  7. Development of Infrastructure Facilities for Superconducting RF Cavity Fabrication, Processing and 2 K Characterization at RRCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. C.; Raghavendra, S.; Jain, V. K.; Puntambekar, A.; Khare, P.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Kush, P. K.; Shrivastava, P.; Lad, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-02-01

    An extensive infrastructure facility is being established at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) for a proposed 1 GeV, high intensity superconducting proton linac for Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The proton linac will comprise of a large number of superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities ranging from low beta spoke resonators to medium and high beta multi-cell elliptical cavities at different RF frequencies. Infrastructure facilities for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and performance characterization at 2 K are setup to take-up manufacturing of large number of cavities required for future projects of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). RRCAT is also participating in a DAE’s approved mega project on “Physics and Advanced technology for High intensity Proton Accelerators” under Indian Institutions-Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). In the R&D phase of IIFC program, a number of high beta, fully dressed multi-cell elliptical SCRF cavities will be developed in collaboration with Fermilab. A dedicated facility for SCRF cavity fabrication, tuning and processing is set up. SCRF cavities developed will be characterized at 2K using a vertical test stand facility, which is already commissioned. A Horizontal Test Stand facility has also been designed and under development for testing a dressed multi-cell SCRF cavity at 2K. The paper presents the infrastructure facilities setup at RRCAT for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and testing at 2K.

  8. Asymmetric focusing study from twin input power couplers using realistic rf cavity field maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced simulation codes now exist that can self-consistently solve Maxwell’s equations for the combined system of an rf cavity and a beam bunch. While these simulations are important for a complete understanding of the beam dynamics in rf cavities, they require significant time and computing power. These techniques are therefore not readily included in real time simulations useful to the beam physicist during beam operations. Thus, there exists a need for a simplified algorithm which simulates realistic cavity fields significantly faster than self-consistent codes, while still incorporating enough of the necessary physics to ensure accurate beam dynamics computation. To this end, we establish a procedure for producing realistic field maps using lossless cavity eigenmode field solvers. This algorithm incorporates all relevant cavity design and operating parameters, including beam loading from a nonrelativistic beam. The algorithm is then used to investigate the asymmetric quadrupolelike focusing produced by the input couplers of the Cornell ERL injector cavity for a variety of beam and operating parameters.

  9. DESIGN OF A DC/RF PHOTOELECTRON GUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YU, D.; NEWSHAM, Y.; SMIRONOV, A.; YU, J.; SMEDLEY, J.; SRINIVASAN RAU, T.; LEWELLEN, J.; ZHOLENTS, A.

    2003-01-01

    An integrated dc/rf photoelectron gun produces a low-emittance beam by first rapidly accelerating electrons at a high gradient during a short (∼1 ns), high-voltage pulse, and then injecting the electrons into an rf cavity for subsequent acceleration. Simulations show that significant improvement of the emittance appears when a high field (∼ 0.5-1 GV/m) is applied to the cathode surface. An adjustable dc gap ((le) 1 mm) which can be integrated with an rf cavity is designed for initial testing at the Injector Test Stand at Argonne National Laboratory using an existing 70-kV pulse generator. Plans for additional experiments of an integrated dc/rf gun with a 250-kV pulse generator are being made

  10. A design and performance analysis tool for superconducting RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilcher, T.; Simrock, S.N.; Merminga, L.; Wang, D.X.

    1997-01-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall wall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper the authors describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyze the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise.An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse structure and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feed forward can be added to further suppress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented

  11. Numerical design of an rf-coupling Iris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaki, H.

    1991-07-01

    For an rf coupler of an rf system in high-quality transmission an analytical method may be applied to treat the design problem, if a coupling hole between cavities or waveguides is small enough. However, in most cases of accelerator engineering the dimensions of the coupling slots are not so small compared with the size of a cavity and a waveguide. Numerical design of rf coupling slots for a few cases is tried basically according to Henke's method using an equivalent circuit to treat the matching of microwave components, but taking account of beam loading expressed by the coupling coefficient β. The MAFIA code has been applied for the design. (R.P.) 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Mechanical design of a RF electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodle, M.H.; Batchelor, K.; Sheehan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is building an Accelerator Test Facility at which we plan to study laser acceleration of electrons, inverse free electron lasers and the production of X-rays by non-linear Compton scattering. The facility contains an electron gun, linac, lasers and ancillary systems which will enable the production of 6 ps duration pulses of 50-100 MeV electrons. The electron source is an one and one half cell RF Electron gun which utilizes either a thermionic or photoemissive cathode to produce 5 MeV electrons. This paper discusses how gun mechanical design considerations such as material, vacuum maintenance, surface finish, fabrication methods, cavity tuning, and cathode replacement were reconciled to arrive at the final design. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Mechanical design of a rf electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodle, M.H.; Batchelor, K.; Sheehan, J.

    1988-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is building an Accelerator Test Facility at which we plan to study laser acceleration of electrons inverse free electron lasers and the production of X-rays by non- linear Compton scattering. The facility contains an electron gun, linac, lasers and ancillary systems which will enable the production of 6 ps duration pulses of 50--100 MeV electrons. The electron source is an one and one half cell RF Electron gun which utilizes either a thermionic or photoemissive cathode to produce 5 MeV electrons. This paper discusses how gun mechanical design considerations such as material, vacuum maintenance, surface finish, fabrication methods, cavity tuning, and cathode replacement were reconciled to arrive at the final design. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Adaptive Feedforward Cancellation of Sinusoidal Disturbances in Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kandil, T H; Hartung, W; Khalil, H; Popielarski, J; Vincent, J; York, R C

    2004-01-01

    A control method, known as adaptive feedforward cancellation (AFC) is applied to damp sinusoidal disturbances due to microphonics in superconducting RF (SRF) cavities. AFC provides a method for damping internal, and external sinusoidal disturbances with known frequencies. It is preferred over other schemes because it uses rudimentary information about the frequency response at the disturbance frequencies, without the necessity of knowing an analytic model (transfer function) of the system. It estimates the magnitude and phase of the sinusoidal disturbance inputs and generates a control signal to cancel their effect. AFC, along with a frequency estimation process, is shown to be very successful in the cancellation of sinusoidal signals from different sources. The results of this research may significantly reduce the power requirements and increase the stability for lightly loaded continuous-wave SRF systems.

  15. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  16. RF front-end world class designs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  17. Design, fabrication and comparison of two power combiners: cylindrical and coaxial cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poursaleh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Resonant structure is one of the proposed methods in combining power in RF systems of  RF accelerators. In this structure, fabrication of RF power divider or combiner using coaxial and cylindrical cavity is important. In this study, two combiners, in the same frequency band, are designed and fabricated; and their results are compared. The experimental results confirmed the simulation results and showed that compared with cyclical cavity, the power combiner with coaxial cavity is smaller, more easily adjustable, and is more suitable for use in RF systems of RF accelerators

  18. MECHANICAL CAVITY DESIGN FOR 100MV UPGRADE CRYOMODULE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.M. Wilson; G. Ciovati; E. F. Daly; J. Henry; R. Hicks; J. Hogan; D. Machie; P. Kneisel; C. Reece; J. Sekutowicz; T. Whitlatch

    2003-01-01

    To achieve up to 6 GeV, each cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator currently provides about 30 MV of acceleration. To raise the accelerator energy to 12 GeV, ten additional cryomodules capable of providing over 100 MV of acceleration are required. A prototype of the 100 MV cryomodule has been designed, is presently under construction, and will be completed in 2004. This prototype cryomodule comprises two new cavity designs, four cavities of the low loss design and four cavities of the high gradient design. Although the cavity shapes were designed for their RF properties, the mechanical implications must be considered. In addition to the new cavity shapes, changes have also been made to the cavity end dish assemblies, weld joints, and stiffening rings. This paper will present the results of the stress and vibration analyses used for designing the cryomodule

  19. Development of high pressure rinsing set up for 650 MHz, 5- cell superconducting RF cavity cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhane, S.K.; Chauhan, S.K.; Bose, A.; Kokil, S.V.; Rajput, D.S.; Oraon, B.; Md Hussain; Sahu, A.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    High pressure rinsing (HPR) is an ultra-cleanliness process for the surface preparation of high field superconducting RF cavities. Any dust particle or chemical residue on the interior of cavity causes field emission. Jets of high pressure (80-100 bar) ultra pure water dislodge surface contaminants that normally resist removal with conventional rinsing procedures, leading to substantial reduction in field emission and better cavity performance. For cleaning of 650 MHz, 5-cell SRF cavities, a high pressure rinsing set up has been developed at RRCAT. The HPR tool has a rotating wand coaxial with the vertically mounted SRF cavity that is moving up and down. Fan style spray nozzles are attached to the end of the rotating wand and the water jets emerging from spray nozzles scan the entire internal surface of the cavity. The set-up was installed in a specially built clean area meeting cleanliness class 100 standards. The ultrapure water with resistivity 2 ≥ 18 MΩ-cm required for rinsing is obtained from a dedicated water purification system installed for this purpose. The paper describes the salient design and constructional details of the high pressure rinsing set up. Characterization of water jet parameters based on the momentum transfer between the water jet and a load cell is also presented. (author)

  20. High power tests of dressed supconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocker, A.; Harms, E.R.; Lunin, A.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A single-cavity test cryostat is used to conduct pulsed high power RF tests of superconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities at 2 K. The cavities under test are welded inside individual helium vessels and are outfitted ('dressed') with a fundamental power coupler, higher-order mode couplers, magnetic shielding, a blade tuner, and piezoelectric tuners. The cavity performance is evaluated in terms of accelerating gradient, unloaded quality factor, and field emission, and the functionality of the auxiliary components is verified. Test results from the first set of dressed cavities are presented here.

  1. Room temperature RF characterization of niobium SCRF cavities and their prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahawar, Ashish; Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, P.; Yadav, Anand; Puntambekar, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology is working on development of 1.3 GHz and 650 MHz multi-cell SCRF cavities. The multi-cell cavities require RF characterization at various stages of fabrication to ensure that the final welded cavity has the right resonant frequency. The prototype cavities as well as the final cavities were extensively characterized at each stage of half cell, dumb bell and end group development and assembly stages. The paper will provide details of the RF characterizations done and the final results achieved. (author)

  2. Evaluation of RF properties by orifice design for IFMIF RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, Sunao; Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2005-03-01

    Orifices for the IFMIF RFQ have been designed and fabricated, and RF properties have been evaluated by a network analyzer. The designed orifices were installed into a vacuum port of the 1.1m-long RFQ mock-up module, and the resonant frequency and the phase difference between cavities were measured for a quadrupole operation mode of TE 210 . It was found that the RF properties are not affected on condition that slit direction with the same direction of current flow at the RFQ wall. Orifice conductance from 0.22 to 0.25 m 3 /sec by nitrogen conversion at room temperature was designed, and an ultimate pressure level of 5x10 -7 [Pa] was evaluated for the 4.1m-long central module for the IFMIF RFQ. It was concluded that the designed orifices are effective for RF properties and vacuum conductance in the IFMIF RFQ. (author)

  3. Low-Level RF Control of Microphonics in Superconducting Spoke-Loaded Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, Z.A.; Kelly, M.P.; Sharamentov, S.I.; Shepard, K.W.; Davis, G.; Delayen, Jean; Doolittle, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cw RF frequency control and RF phase-stabilization experiments performed with a piezoelectric fast tuner mechanically coupled to a superconducting, 345 MHz, < = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity operating at 4.2K. The piezoelectric fast tuner damped low-frequency microphonic-noise by an order of magnitude. Two methods of RF phase-stabilization were characterized: overcoupling with negative phase feedback, and also fast mechanical tuner feedback. The = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity RF field amplitude and phase errors were controlled to ±0.5% and ±30 respectively.

  4. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  5. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  6. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.

    1997-01-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning

  7. Beam self-excited rf cavity driver for a deflector or focusing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bunched beam from and accelerator can excite and power an rf cavity which then drives either a deflecting or focusing (including nonlinear focusing) rf cavity with and amplitude related to beam current. Rf power, generated when a bunched beam loses energy to an rf field when traversing an electric field that opposes the particle's motion, is used to drive a separate (or the same) cavity to either focus or deflect the beam. The deflected beam can be stopped by an apertures or directed to a different area of a target depending on beam current. The beam-generated rf power can drive a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) that can change the focusing properties of a beam channel as a function of beam current (space- charge force compensation or modifying the beam distribution on a target). An rf deflector can offset a beam to a downstream sextupole, effectively producing a position-dependent quadrupole field. The combination of rf deflector plus sextupole will produce a beam current dependent quadropole-focusing force. A static quadrupole magnet plus another rf deflector can place the beam back on the optic axis. This paper describes the concept, derives the appropriate equations for system analysis, and fives examples. A variation on this theme is to use the wake field generated in an rf cavity to cause growth in the beam emittance. The beam current would then be apertured by emittance defining slits

  8. Beam self-excited rf cavity driver for a deflector or focusing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bunched beam from an accelerator can excite and power an rf cavity which then drives either a deflecting or focusing (including nonlinear focusing) rf cavity with an amplitude related to beam current. Rf power, generated when a bunched beam loses energy to an rf field when traversing an electric field that opposes the particle's motion, is used to drive a separate (or the same) cavity to either focus or deflect the beam. The deflected beam can be stopped by an aperture or directed to a different area of a target depending on beam current. The beam-generated rf power can drive a radiofrequency quadrupole that can change the focusing properties of a beam channel as a function of beam current (space-charge-force compensation or modifying the beam distribution on a target). An rf deflector can offset a beam to a downstream sextupole, effectively producing a position-dependent quadrupole field. The combination of rf deflector plus sextupole will produce a beam current dependent quadrupole-focusing force. A static quadrupole magnet plus another rf deflector can place the beam back on the optic axis. This paper describes the concept, derives the appropriate equations for system analysis, and gives examples. A variation on this theme is to use the wake field generated in an rf cavity to cause growth in the beam emittance. The beam current would then be apertured by emittance defining slits. (author)

  9. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben Carcagno

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented

  10. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  11. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation

  12. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  13. Industrial production of SC RF accelerating cavities at CERCA. Latest results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutes, J.L.; Maccioni, P.

    1996-01-01

    CERCA is one of the most experienced companies throughout the world for the manufacture of superconducting RF accelerating devices. The latest results obtained during the past 2 years on CERCA's superconducting cavities are presented. (K.A.)

  14. Study of Electron Swarm in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Notani, M.; Oka, T.; Wang, H.

    2010-01-01

    A high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed for use in the muon collection system for a muon collider. It allows for high electric field gradients in RF cavities located in strong magnetic fields, a condition frequently encountered in a muon cooling channel. In addition, an intense muon beam will generate an electron swarm via the ionization process in the cavity. A large amount of RF power will be consumed into the swarm. We show the results from our studies of the HV RF breakdown in a cavity without a beam and present some results on the resulting electron swarm dynamics. This is preliminary to actual beam tests which will take place late in 2010.

  15. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  16. On a possibility of using a superconducting cavity in the RF system of the storage ring LESR-N100

    CERN Document Server

    Androsov, V P; Telegin, Yu P

    2002-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology the design project of the 200 MeV electron storage ring LESR-N100 is under development. The essential feature of this facility is the large beam energy spread (of about 1%). To ensure a reasonable beam lifetime the RF-system should provide the accelerating voltage of about 0.5 MV, while the total energy losses do not exceed approx 700 eV/turn. The power dissipated in two 700 MHz normal-conducting (NC) cavities much exceeds the power transmitted to the beam. We considered a possibility to use in LESR-N100 a high-Q superconducting RF-cavity (SRF-cavity) in which the dissipated power is the same order of magnitude as the beam-transmitted power. The studies show that the system with SRF-cavity cannot operate in the standard mode when the cavity is matched to the power transmission line at some nominal beam current. The optimal operation mode with high overcoupling is proposed that requires the RF-power one order of magnitude less than in the case of Nc-cavities.

  17. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland Johnson

    2006-01-01

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling

  18. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Im, Do; Phillips, H. L.; Vušković, L.

    2017-12-01

    An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity's inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  19. Design of an rf quadrupole for Landau damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, K.; Grudiev, A.

    2017-08-01

    The recently proposed superconducting quadrupole resonator for Landau damping in accelerators is subjected to a detailed design study. The optimization process of two different cavity types is presented following the requirements of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) with the main focus on quadrupolar strength, surface peak fields, and impedance. The lower order and higher order mode (LOM and HOM) spectrum of the optimized cavities is investigated and different approaches for their damping are proposed. On the basis of an example the first two higher order multipole errors are calculated. Likewise on this example the required rf power and optimal external quality factor for the input coupler is derived.

  20. Harmonic Kicker RF Cavity for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider EM Simulation, Modification, and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Sarah; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-09-01

    An important step in the conceptual design for the future Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is the development of supporting technologies for the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Electron Cooling Facility. The Harmonic Radiofrequency (RF) kicker cavity is one such device that is responsible for switching electron bunches in and out of the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) from and to the ERL, which is a critical part of the ion cooling process. Last year, a half scale prototype of the JLEIC harmonic RF kicker model was designed with resonant frequencies to support the summation of 5 odd harmonics (95.26 MHz, 285.78 MHz, 476.30 MHz, 666.82 MHz, and 857.35 MHz); however, the asymmetry of the kicker cavity gives rise to multipole components of the electric field at the electron-beam axis of the cavity. Previous attempts to symmetrize the electric field of this asymmetrical RF cavity have been unsuccessful. The aim of this study is to modify the existing prototype for a uniform electric field across the beam pathway so that the electron bunches will experience nearly zero beam current loading. In addition to this, we have driven the unmodified cavity with the harmonic sum and used the wire stretching method for an analysis of the multipole electric field components.

  1. Design of 325 MHz spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Peng; Huang Hong; Dai Jianping; Zu Guoquan; Li Han

    2012-01-01

    Spoke cavity can be used in the low-energy section of the proton accelerator. It has many significant advantages: compact structure, high value of R/Q, etc. The ADS (Accelerator Driven System) project will adopt many spoke cavities with different β values. Therefore, IHEP has began the research of β=0.14, 325 MHz spoke cavity. In this pa per, the dimensions, RF performances and mechanical properties of it are studied. (authors)

  2. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity’s inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  3. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  4. Calculation of wake field and couple impedance of upgraded and old RF cavity in Hefei electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hongliang; Wang Lin; Sun Baogen; Li Weimin; Liu Jinying; He Duohui

    2003-01-01

    The phase II upgrading project of Hefei 800 MeV electron storage ring is being done, and the important component of the project, the RF cavity, will be finished soon. The old RF cavity with many disadvantages will be replaced by the new one. To estimate the effect of RF cavity coupling impedance to storing bunch intensity fully, the wake potential and the broad band couple impedance of RF cavity were calculated with MAFIA program. And the calculation results were compared between new and old cavity, it is found that the impedance of the new is bigger than that of the old

  5. Development of a movable plunger tuner for the high-power RF cavity for the PEP-II B-factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Fant, K.; Judkins, J.G.

    1997-05-01

    A 10 cm diameter by 5 cm travel plunger tuner was developed for the PEP-II RF copper cavity system. The single cell cavity including the tuner is designed to operate up to 150 kW of dissipated RF power are specially placed 8.5 cm away from the inside wall of the cavity to avoid fundamental and higher order mode resonances. The spring fingers are made of dispersion-strengthened copper to accommodate relatively high heating. The design, alignment, testing and performance of the tuner is described

  6. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  7. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminski, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. Additional measurements of mechanical stability under RF operation (frequency variation with He pressure, Lorentz detuning) and cryogenic and electric measurements of power dissipation are presented. (author)

  8. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminski, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. (author)

  9. Research and development of an ultra clean surface for RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Hajime; Ikeda, Tokumi; Suzuki, Takafusa; Kurosawa, Kiyosi; Kako, Eiji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Saito, Kenji; Kneisel, P.

    1993-01-01

    Suppression of field emission is essentially important in order to attain higher accelerating gradients. Therefore, elimination of residual dust particles on the inner surface of RF cavities is necessary. Surface of a niobium cavity was simulated in silicon wafers, and analysis of dust particles was performed by a particle counter used for semiconductor industries. Experimental results in various surface treatments and applications to niobium cavities are described in this paper. (author)

  10. Study of influences of the first bunching cavity and injection conditions of rf SW linacs on particle transverse motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuzheng; Tong Dechun; Sun Xiang; Xu Guanghua; Zhao Zhentang

    1990-01-01

    For both medical and radiographic standing wave linear accelerators, a small beam spot diameter is always pursued. In order to minimize the size and weight of the machine and reduce the power dissipation, rf focusing is preferred to the focusing solenoid coil. Therefore, it is important to study behaviours of beam transverse motions in the rf fields for the design of SW linacs. The research shows that the transverse motion behaviours of the electron beam in the compact linac is mainly determined by the rf field distribution on the first bunching cavity and injection conditions of the beam. In this paper, a beam envelope equation is presented,the proprties of the E z , E r , H θ field distributions of various first bunching cavities of both symmetric and asymmetric are studied, and then the rf electric force and rf magnetic force exerting on the beam with a different injection time are analysed. It is demonstrated that the asymmetric first bunching cavity with a small gradient of E z (z) field will provide a larger transverse emittance. And an asymmetric cavity with a larger front aperture and a small back aperture is favourable to make a smaller gradient of E z (z) field. For both symmetric and asymmetric first bunching cavity, by adopting an appropriate negative injection angle the envelopes of the beam are all decreased obviously, the optimum injection angle being always around -3 deg. The measured result of the beam spot of a 4 MeV SW linac shows that the mentioned simulation calculation of the radial dynamics above is in good agreement with the measured result

  11. Progress on the RF Coupling Coil Module Design for the MICE Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Green, M.A.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S.; Lau, W.; White, A.E.; Yang, S.Q.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the progress on the design of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The MICE cooling channel design consists of one SFOFO cell that is similar to that of the US Study-II of a neutrino factory. The MICE RFCC module comprises a superconducting solenoid, mounted around four normal conducting 201.25-MHz RF cavities. Each cavity has a pair of thin curved beryllium windows to close the conventional open beam irises, which allows for independent control of the phase in each cavity and for the RF power to be fed separately. The coil package that surrounds the RF cavities is mounted on a vacuum vessel. The RF vacuum is shared between the cavities and the vacuum vessel around the cavities such that there is no differential pressure on the thin beryllium windows. This paper discusses the design progress of the RFCC module and the fabrication progress of a prototype 201.25-MHz cavity

  12. Design of 118 MHz twelfth harmonic cavity of APS PAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Bridges, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Two radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed in the Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source. One is for the first harmonic frequency at 9.8 MHz, and the other is for the twelfth harmonic frequency at 118 MHz. This note reports on the design of the 118 MHz RF cavity. Computer models are used to find the mode frequencies, impedances, Q-factors, and field distributions in the cavity. The computer codes MAFIA, URMEL, and URMEL-T are useful tools which model and simulate the resonance characteristics of a cavity. These codes employ the finite difference method to solve Maxwell's equations. MAFIA is a three-dimensional problem solver and uses square patches to approximate the inner surface of a cavity. URMEL and URMEL-T are two-dimensional problem solvers and use rectangular and triangular meshes, respectively. URMEL-T and MAFIA can handle problems with arbitrary dielectric materials located inside the boundary. The cavity employs a circularly cylindrical ceramic window to limit the vacuum to the beam pipe. The ceramic window used in the modeling will have a wall thickness of 0.9 cm. This wall thickness is not negligible in determining the resonant frequencies of the cavity. In the following, results of two- and three-dimensional modeling of the cavities using the URMEL-T and MAFIA codes are reported

  13. Suppression of multipacting in high power RF couplers operating with superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostroumov, P.N., E-mail: ostroumov@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kazakov, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Morris, D.; Larter, T.; Plastun, A.S.; Popielarski, J.; Wei, J.; Xu, T. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Capacitive input couplers based on a 50 Ω coaxial transmission line are frequently used to transmit RF power to superconducting (SC) resonators operating in CW mode. It is well known that coaxial transmission lines are prone to multipacting phenomenon in a wide range of RF power level and operating frequency. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University includes two types of quarter wave SC resonators (QWR) operating at 80.5 MHz and two types of half wave SC resonators (HWR) operating at 322 MHz. As was reported in ref. [1] a capacitive input coupler used with HWRs was experiencing strong multipacting that resulted in a long conditioning time prior the cavity testing at design levels of accelerating fields. We have developed an insert into 50 Ω coaxial transmission line that provides opportunity to bias the RF coupler antenna and protect the amplifier from the bias potential in the case of breakdown in DC isolation. Two of such devices have been built and are currently used for the off-line testing of 8 HWRs installed in the cryomodule.

  14. An rf cavity for the B-Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.; Voelker, F.; Lambertson, G.; Allen, M.; Hodgeson, J.; Ko, K.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H.; Kroll, N.

    1991-04-01

    The paper describes the proposed design for the 476 MHz accelerating cavity for the SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory. This machine will require a high power throughput to the beam because of the large synchrotron radiation losses, and very low impedances for the higher order modes because of the high current proposed. Use of conventional construction in copper means that careful consideration has to be paid to the problem of cooling. The need for a high shunt impedance for the accelerating mode dictated the use of a re-entrant shape. This maximized the impedance of the fundamental mode with respect to the troublesome longitudinal and deflecting higher order modes, when compared to open or ''bell shaped'' designs. A specialized damping scheme was employed to reduce the higher order mode impedances while sacrificing as little of the fundamental mode power as possible. This was required to suppress the growth of coupled bunch beam instabilities and minimize the workload of the feedback system needed to control them. A window design capable of handling the high power was also required. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. Linear beam dynamics and ampere class superconducting RF cavities at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaga, Rama R.

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a hadron collider designed to collide a range of ions from protons to gold. RHIC operations began in 2000 and has successfully completed five physics runs with several species including gold, deuteron, copper, and polarized protons. Linear optics and coupling are fundamental issues affecting the collider performance. Measurement and correction of optics and coupling are important to maximize the luminosity and sustain stable operation. A numerical approach, first developed at SLAC, was implemented to measure linear optics from coherent betatron oscillations generated by ac dipoles and recorded at multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) distributed around the collider. The approach is extended to a fully coupled 2D case and equivalence relationships between Hamiltonian and matrix formalisms are derived. Detailed measurements of the transverse coupling terms are carried out at RHIC and correction strategies are applied to compensate coupling both locally and globally. A statistical approach to determine BPM reliability and performance over the past three runs and future improvements also discussed. Aiming at a ten-fold increase in the average heavy-ion luminosity, electron cooling is the enabling technology for the next luminosity upgrade (RHIC II). Cooling gold ion beams at 100 GeV/nucleon requires an electron beam of approximately 54 MeV and a high average current in the range of 50-200 mA. All existing e-Coolers are based on low energy DC accelerators. The only viable option to generate high current, high energy, low emittance CW electron beam is through a superconducting energy-recovery linac (SC-ERL). In this option, an electron beam from a superconducting injector gun is accelerated using a high gradient (˜ 20 MV/m) superconducting RF (SRF) cavity. The electrons are returned back to the cavity with a 180° phase shift to recover the energy back into the cavity before being dumped. A design and development of a half

  16. Researches on bake effect on RF superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jiankui; Zhao Kui; Zhu Feng

    2005-01-01

    The Q-slope at high gradient affects the performance of superconducting cavity greatly. Recent researches show that low temperature (100-150) degree C heat treatment (bake) has positive effects on the performance of superconducting cavities. A lot of cavity tests are analyzed based on bake treatment. The average gradient E acc,max and E acc at Q=1 x 10 10 are increased by more than 3.5 MV/m. Q at E acc,max is increased and the Q-slope is improved. Analysis on bake temperature shows that higher bake temperature leads to higher Q value. Comparison of BCP and EP cavities shows that at least 60-80 μm EP is needed for BCP surface. More than 10-15 μm removal of the surface by BCP will degrade the performance of an EP cavity. Oxygen diffusion model is used to illustrate bake effect. (authors)

  17. Design Considerations for the LHC 200 MHz RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Kindermann, H P; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Marque, S; Tückmantel, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    The longitudinal beam transfer from the SPS into the LHC 400 MHz buckets will not be free of losses without a lower frequency capture system and a fast longitudinal damping system in LHC. We present a complete study of a combined system using four identical copper cavities at 200 MHz delivering 3 MV total CW voltage and having still enough bandwidth to achieve fast longitudinal damping. The shape of a cavity was designed according to the accelerating mode performance, its tuning and the higher order mode spectrum with respect to the LHC beam lines and their possible attenuation. The possibility to park the cavities during coast was included. The local heat load and the corresponding cooling water distribution as well as deformations were studied and techniques to build the cavity with all ports at low cost are proposed. The parameters of the RF generators, couplers and detuning are determined. Simulations of the total LHC RF system incorporating real delays, generator bandwidth and the control loops confirm t...

  18. Room temperature RF characterization of Nb make super conducting radio frequency cavities at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahawar, Ashish; Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Yadav, Anand; Puntambekar, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    In order to ensure that the final welded Nb superconducting RF cavities are at the correct frequency the cavity structures are measured at various development stages for their resonant frequency. These measurements are performed at room temperature using a cavity measurement setup developed in house and a VNA. These measurements are critical to identify the length a cavity structure needs to be trimmed before welding. Measurement of resonant frequencies of Nb made cavity structures were performed for half cell, dumb bell, single cell, long end cell and short end cell structures. These structures were then joined to develop single cell and multi-cell 650 MHz/1300 MHz cavities. The present paper describes room temperature cavity characterization being carried out at RRCAT. (author)

  19. Preparation of niobium coated copper superconducting rf cavities for the large electron positron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Chiaveri, E.; Hilleret, N.; Minestrini, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1980 development work has been carried out at CERN aiming at producing niobium coated superconducting RF cavities in the framework of the foreseen LEP energy upgrading above the initial 55 GeV. During 1987 a 4-cell LEP cavity without coupling ports has been successfully coated for the first time. Meanwhile, cathodes for coating the coupling ports were built and tested. The effort has been subsequently directed to preparing at least one (possibly 2) coated cavity(ies) to be installed in LEP during 1989. In this paper the various production steps of these cavities are reconsidered in view of industrial production

  20. Prediction of multipactor in the iris region of rf deflecting mode cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Burt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipactor is a major cause of field limitation in many superconducting rf cavities. Multipacting is a particular issue for deflecting mode cavities as the typical behavior is not well studied, understood, or parametrized. In this paper an approximate analytical model for the prediction of multipactor in the iris region of deflecting mode cavities is developed. This new but simple model yields a clear explanation on the broad range of rf field levels over which the multipactor can occur. The principle multipactors under investigation here are two-point multipactors associated with cyclotron motion in the cavity’s rf magnetic field. The predictions from the model are compared to numerical simulations and good agreement is obtained. The results are also compared to experimental results previously reported by KEK and are also found in good agreement.

  1. Design for the National RF Test Facility at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual and preliminary engineering design for the National RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed. The facility will comprise a single mirror configuration embodying two superconducting development coils from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program on either side of a cavity designed for full-scale antenna testing. The coils are capable of generating a 1.2-T field at the axial midpoint between the coils separated by 1.0 m. The vacuum vessel will be a stainless steel, water-cooled structure having an 85-cm-radius central cavity. The facility will have the use of a number of continuous wave (cw), radio-frequency (rf) sources at levels including 600 kW at 80 MHz and 100 kW at 28 GHz. Several plasma sources will provide a wide range of plasma environments, including densities as high as approx. 5 x 10 13 cm -3 and temperatures on the order of approx. 10 eV. Furthermore, a wide range of diagnostics will be available to the experimenter for accurate appraisal of rf testing

  2. Shunt impedance of spiral loaded resonant rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peebles, P.Z. Jr.; Parvarandeh, M.

    1975-01-01

    Based upon a treatment of the spiral loaded resonant radio frequency cavity as a shorted quarter-wave transmission line, a model for shunt impedance is developed. The model is applicable to loosely wound spirals in large diameter containers. Theoretical shunt impedance is given for spirals wound from tubing of circular or rectangular cross section. The former produces higher shunt impedance. Measurements made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on 17 copper cavities are described which support the theoretical results. Theoretical results are also compared to data from twenty-three additional cavities measured at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It is shown that the theoretical function forms a useful means of interpreting the quality of constructed cavities. (author)

  3. Mechanical design of SXLS [Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source] radio-frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, P.; Sharma, S.; Keane, J.; Thomas, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design of a Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to be used on a compact storage ring for Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source (SXLS). Various design features of this cavity are discussed, including basic geometrical configuration, structural design, initial and operational tuning, vacuum multipactoring, power window, and damping of higher order modes. A second application of this cavity design for beam life extension in an existing storage ring is also described. 2 refs., 6 figs

  4. Mechanical design of SXLS (Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source) radio-frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, P.; Sharma, S.; Keane, J.; Thomas, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design of a Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to be used on a compact storage ring for Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source (SXLS). Various design features of this cavity are discussed, including basic geometrical configuration, structural design, initial and operational tuning, vacuum multipactoring, power window, and damping of higher order modes. A second application of this cavity design for beam life extension in an existing storage ring is also described. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Design of 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell SRF cavity and development of single cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Bhattacharyya, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    In India, DAE laboratories and other institutes are now actively involved in research and development activities on SRF cavities and associated technologies for the proposed high current, high energy proton linear accelerators like ISNS/IADS and also for the FERMILAB PIP-II program under Indian institutions-Fermilab collaboration (IIFC). As part of the above activities, VECC, Kolkata, has been involved in the design, analysis and development of a 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity. RF design involves optimization of the geometry to get acceptable values of field enhancement factors (magnetic and electric), R/Q , Geometric factor, coupling factor and field flatness. This paper describes the RF design using 2-D superfish and 3-D CST Microwave studio and multipacting analysis using 2-D Multipac2.1 and 3-D CST Particle Studio. A prototype 1-cell aluminum cavity and a prototype 5-cell copper cavity have been fabricated using die-punch assembly designed for fabrication of elliptical half-cells to check the procedures for forming and to make sure the desired frequency and field flatness could be obtained. RF characterization has been carried out for both the prototypes using Vector Network Analyzer and Bead pull measurement set up.The fabrication of a single-cell niobium cavity has been carried out indigenously and with the help of Electron Beam Welding (EBW) facility at IUAC, New Delhi. CMM measurement and RF characterization of the niobium half cells and full cell cavities have been carried out. This paper describes the development and measurement of prototype cavities and single cell niobium cavity. (author)

  6. Magnetic losses and instabilities in ferrite garnet tuned RF cavities for synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce basic notions and elucidate the main features of magnetic losses and nonlinear effects in high power rf cavities with perpendicularly biased ferrite garnet used for varying the frequency in rapid cycling synchrotrons. A method of analysis is developed using a minimum of specific details. Simple formulae and estimates of the trend of magnetic loss, nonlinear frequency shift and possible instabilities in the cavities as a function of rf power level and ferrite garnet parameters are presented. Numerical examples correspond to the TRIUMF KAON Booster synchrotron. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  7. The application of system identification techniques to an R.F. Cavity tuning loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1989-09-01

    System identification is the terminology used for the process of characterising a given control system. A mathematical representation of the frequency response characteristic is obtained to utilise all the known design techniques to arrange the feed-back loop to meet required control performance criterion. This is known as parametric system identification. The intention of this paper is to speed up the process of identifying the R.F. Cavity tuning system of the 800 MeV accelerator, ISIS. While achieving this goal the computer must not disturb noticeably the normal function set out by the system. This task of automatic characterisation is necessary so that a self-adapting feed-back loop can be arranged to adjust itself without human interference and meet severe R.F. tuning requirements on ISIS. In any case the results of parametric identifications are useful in designing a robust feed-back loop with appropriate gain and phase margins. The approach using a Pseudo Random Signal is currently practised in Process Industries. (author)

  8. High-Q operation of superconducting rf cavities: Potential impact of thermocurrents on the rf surface resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Vogt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For many new accelerator applications, superconducting radio frequency systems are the enabling technology. In particular for CW applications, much effort is being expended to minimize the power dissipation (surface resistance of niobium cavities. Starting in 2009, we suggested a means of reducing the residual resistance by performing a thermal cycle [O. Kugeler et al., in Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on RF Superconductivity (2009, p. 352], a procedure of warming up a cavity after initial cooldown to about 20 K and cooling it down again. In subsequent studies [J. M. Vogt, O. Kugeler, and J. Knobloch, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 16, 102002 (2013], this technique was used to manipulate the residual resistance by more than a factor of 2. It was postulated that thermocurrents during cooldown generate additional trapped magnetic flux that impacts the cavity quality factor. Here, we present a more extensive study that includes measurements of two additional passband modes and that confirms the effect. In this paper, we also discuss simulations that support the claim. While the layout of the cavity LHe tank system is cylindrically symmetric, we show that the temperature dependence of the material parameters results in a nonsymmetric current distribution. Hence a significant amount of magnetic flux can be generated at the rf surface.

  9. Status of rf development work on a ferrite tuned amplifier cavity for the TRIUMF KAON factory booster ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enegren, T.

    1987-01-01

    Of the five synchrotron rings in the proposed TRIUMF KAON factory, the Booster ring to accelerate the proton beam from 440 MeV to 3 GeV has the most demanding rf requirements, primarily because of the relatively large frequency swing of 46.1 MHz to 61.1 MHz at a high repetition rate of 50 Hz. In the current reference design, the Booster lattice has twelve 3.9 m drift spaces with 2.5 m in each drift space available for installation of rf cavities to provide a required effective acceleration voltage of up to 600 kV per turn i.e. 50 kV per cavity. Design and development studies of a suitable cavity-amplifier system are in progress. For the initial reference design a system based on the one used in the Fermilab booster synchrotron has been chosen. That is, a double-gap drift-tube cavity with parallel-biased ferrite tuners and excited with a directly coupled Eimac Y567B tetrode. To meet the tuning and voltage requirements within the various mechanical and other constraints such as tube-to-gap voltage ratio, ferrite power density and available space, the reference design had to be further modified and a cold model of the cavity and tuners was constructed from copper-covered cardboard cylinders. From the results of the cold model measurements a new reference design was established and design work has begun on a full power prototype of the cavity-amplifier system

  10. MA-core loaded untuned RF compression cavity for HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Lirong; Xu Zhe; Yuan Youjin; Jin Peng; Bian Zhibin; Zhao Hongwei; Xia Jiawen

    2012-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high energy density physics and plasma physics research at HIRFL-CSR the goal of achieving a higher accelerating gap voltage was proposed. Therefore, a magnetic alloy (MA)-core loaded radio frequency (RF) cavity that can provide a higher accelerating gap voltage compared to standard ferrite loaded cavities has been studied at IMP. In order to select the proper magnetic alloy material to load the RF compression cavity, measurements of four different kinds of sample MA-cores have been carried out. By testing the small cores, the core composition was selected to obtain the desired performance. According to the theoretical calculation and simulation, which show reasonable consistency for the MA-core loaded cavity, the desired performance can be achieved. Finally about 1000 kW power will be needed to meet the requirements of 50 kV accelerating gap voltage by calculation.

  11. Beam Acceleration by a Multicell RF Cavity Structure Proposed for an Improved Yield in Hydroforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yoon W.; Shin, Ki; Fathy, A.E.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    We study the accelerating properties of a new multicell cavity structure with irises forming a rectangular aperture between the cavity cells. We are interested in this structure because, from a mechanical point of view, it may be possible to manufacture with high quality using a hydroforming process. RF analysis shows that the rectangular iris shape provides some asymmetric transverse focusing per half RF period, particularly for low beam energies. If the horizontal and vertical rectangular irises are interleaved, the net transverse focusing could be increased. Here we present studies of the acceleration and transport properties of these cavities by tracking particles using the ORBIT Code through time-dependent 3D cavity fields taken from CST MWS.

  12. Characterization of a superconducting Pb photocathode in a superconducting rf photoinjector cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A; Neumann, A; Schmeißer, M; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Schubert S; Smedley J; Sekutowicz, J; Will, I

    2014-01-01

    Photocathodes are a limiting factor for the next generation of ultrahigh brightness photoinjectors. We studied the behavior of a superconducting Pb cathode in the cryogenic environment of a superconducting rf gun cavity to measure the quantum efficiency, its spatial distribution, and the work function. We will also discuss how the cathode surface contaminants modify the performance of the photocathode as well as the gun cavity and we discuss the possibilities to remove these contaminants.

  13. Pre-tuning of TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Furuya, Takaaki; Suzuki, Toshiji; Iino, Yohsuke.

    1990-01-01

    Pre-tuning of thirty-two TRISTAN superconducting cavities has been done. In this paper are described the pre-tuning system and the results of all the cavities. The average field flatness was 1.4 % after pre-tuning. From our experience, the followings are important, 1) to evacuate the cavity during the process of the pre-tuning to avoid the uncertainty in evacuation, 2) pre-tuning is needed after annealing because it causes changes of the cell length and the field profile and 3) field flatness sometimes changes when expanded and 4) cells should not be expanded more than 1.5 mm after pre-tuning since inelastic deformation occurs. (author)

  14. Physics and chemistry of niobium materials in the context of superconducting RF cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities excel over the normal conducting RF cavities in the long pulse or continuous wave high energy particle accelerations, and niobium (Nb) is currently the material of choice for fabrication of such SCRF cavities. However the accelerating gradients attained in the Nb SCRF cavities deployed in various high energy particle accelerators are significantly below the theoretical limit predicted by the superconducting properties of Nb. Thus it is very important to understand the physics and chemistry of Nb materials in some details so as to maximize the SCRF cavity performance. This abstract will discuss some issues which help in the development of high gradient and energy efficient Nb SCRF cavities in a cost effective manner. (author)

  15. Modeling and design of an X-band rf photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marsh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A design for an X-band rf photoinjector that was developed jointly by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is presented. The photoinjector is based around a 5.59 cell rf gun that has state-of-the-art features including: elliptical contoured irises; improved mode separation; an optimized initial half cell length; a racetrack input coupler; and coupling that balances pulsed heating with cavity fill time. Radio-frequency and beam dynamics modeling have been done using a combination of codes including PARMELA, HFSS, IMPACT-T, ASTRA, and the ACE3P suite of codes developed at SLAC. The impact of lower gradient operation, magnet misalignment, solenoid multipole errors, beam offset, mode beating, wakefields, and beam line symmetry have been analyzed and are described. Fabrication and testing plans at both LLNL and SLAC are discussed.

  16. Design of RF structures for a superconducting proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Rajni; Roy, Shweta; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main components of the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) programme in India is a 1 GeV, high intensity CW proton accelerator that will be superconducting after the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), i.e. after 3 MeV. The superconducting linac will consist of various superconducting structures like Half Wave Resonators, Spoke Resonators and elliptical cavities, operating at RF frequencies of 162.5 MHz, 325 MHz and 650 MHz. The paper will discuss the optimization of the electromagnetic design of the various superconducting structures. (author)

  17. Mechanical design and fabrication processes for the ALS third-harmonic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, M.; Henderson, T.; Hernandez, K.; Otting, D.; Plate, D.; Rimmer, R.

    1999-01-01

    It is planned to install five third-harmonic (1.5 GHz) RF Cavities in May/June 1999 as an upgrade to the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This paper presents mechanical design features, their experiences in using electronic design models to expedite the manufacturing process, and the fabrication processes employed to produce these cavities for the ALS. They discuss some of the lessons learned from the PEP-II RF Cavity design and fabrication, and outline the improvements incorporated in the new design. They also report observations from the current effort

  18. Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory coupled-cavity linac mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starling, W.J.; Cain, T.

    1992-01-01

    A collaboration between the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the engineering and mechanical design of the SSCL Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) has yielded an innovative example of the well known side coupled-cavity type of linear accelerator. The SSCL CCL accelerates an H - beam from 70 MeV to 600 MeV with an rf cavity structure consisting of eight tanks in each of nine modules for a total length of about 112 meters. Magnetically-coupled bridge couplers transfer power from tank to tank within a module. A single rf power input is located at the center bridge coupler of each module. The bridge couplers permit placement along the beam line of combined function focusing/steering electromagnets and diagnostic pods for beam instrumentation. Each tank and bridge coupler is rf frequency stabilized, nominally to 1,283 MHz, by water pumped through integral water passages. Air isolation grooves surround the water passages at each braze joint so that water-to-vacuum interfaces are avoided. Each tank is supported by adjustable spherical bearing rod end struts to permit alignment and accommodate thermal expansion and contraction of the rf structure. Tank struts, electromagnet/diagnostic pod support frames, vacuum manifolds and utilities are all mounted to a girder-and-leg support stand running the full length of the CCL. (Author) tab., fig

  19. RF MEMS theory, design, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Rebeiz, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasmall Radio Frequency and Micro-wave Microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMs), such as switches, varactors, and phase shifters, exhibit nearly zero power consumption or loss. For this reason, they are being developed intensively by corporations worldwide for use in telecommunications equipment. This book acquaints readers with the basics of RF MEMs and describes how to design practical circuits and devices with them. The author, an acknowledged expert in the field, presents a range of real-world applications and shares many valuable tricks of the trade.

  20. RF Circuit Design in Nanometer CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    With CMOS technology entering the nanometer regime, the design of analog and RF circuits is complicated by low supply voltages, very non-linear (and nonquadratic) devices and large 1/f noise. At the same time, circuits are required to operate over increasingly wide bandwidths to implement modern

  1. Modeling and simulation for RF system design

    CERN Document Server

    Frevert, Ronny; Jancke, Roland; Knöchel, Uwe; Schwarz, Peter; Kakerow, Ralf; Darianian, Mohsen

    2005-01-01

    Focusing on RF specific modeling and simulation methods, and system and circuit level descriptions, this work contains application-oriented training material. Accompanied by a CD- ROM, it combines the presentation of a mixed-signal design flow, an introduction into VHDL-AMS and Verilog-A, and the application of commercially available simulators.

  2. Modeling the interaction of a heavily beam loaded SRF cavity with its low-level RF feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Yeh, Meng-Shu; Chang, Fu-Yu; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Chang, Shian-Wen; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Lo, Chih-Hung; Yu, Tsung-Chi

    2018-06-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity provides superior stability to power high intensity light sources and can suppress coupled-bunch instabilities due to its smaller impedance for higher order modes. Because of these features, SRF cavities are commonly used for modern light sources, such as the TLS, CLS, DLS, SSRF, PLS-II, TPS, and NSLS-II, with an aggressive approach to operate the light sources at high beam currents. However, operating a SRF cavity at high beam currents may result with unacceptable stability problems of the low level RF (LLRF) system, due to drifts of the cavity resonant frequency caused by unexpected perturbations from the environment. As the feedback loop gets out of control, the cavity voltage may start to oscillate with a current-dependent characteristic frequency. Such situations can cause beam abort due to the activation of the interlock protection system, i.e. false alarm of quench detection. This malfunction of the light source reduces the reliability of SRF operation. Understanding this unstable mechanism to prevent its appearance becomes a primary task in the pursuit of highly reliable SRF operation. In this paper, a Pedersen model, including the response of the LLRF system, was used to simulate the beam-cavity interaction of a SRF cavity under heavy beam loading. Causes for the onset of instability at high beam current will be discussed as well as remedies to assure the design of a stable LLRF system.

  3. Study of thermal effects in superconducting RF cavities; Etude des effets thermiques dans le cavites supraconductrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, S.; Caruette, A.; Fouaidy, M.; Hammoudi, N.; Junquera, T.; Lesrel, J.; Yaniche, J.F. [Services Techniques, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    A high speed thermometric system equipped with 64 fixed surface thermometers is used to investigate thermal effects in several 3 GHz cavities. An evaluation of the time response of our thermometers is presented. A method based on RF signal analysis is proposed to evaluate the normal zone propagation rate during thermal breakdown. (authors) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  4. RF cavities of CESAR (2 MeV electron storage ring).

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  5. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; construction period; RF cavity.

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1962-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  6. Proton acceleration by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Masuda, Kai [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    1997-03-01

    We found that protons are accelerated significantly by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity. In this method, protons get the perpendicular kinetic energy, so we thought it might be a compact accelerator, and studied the feasibility by numerical simulation. (author)

  7. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator

  8. SNS Superconducting RF cavity modeling-iterative learning control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.-I.; Regan, Amy; Wang, Y.-M.

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Superconducting RF (SRF) linear accelerator is operated with a pulsed beam. For the SRF control system to track the repetitive electromagnetic field reference trajectory, both feedback and feedforward controllers have been proposed. The feedback controller is utilized to guarantee the closed loop system stability and the feedforward controller is used to improve the tracking performance for the repetitive reference trajectory and to suppress repetitive disturbances. As the iteration number increases, the feedforward controller decreases the tracking error. Numerical simulations demonstrate that inclusion of the feedforward controller significantly improves the control system performance over its performance with just the feedback controller

  9. SNS Superconducting RF cavity modeling-iterative learning control

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, S I; Wang, Y M

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Superconducting RF (SRF) linear accelerator is operated with a pulsed beam. For the SRF control system to track the repetitive electromagnetic field reference trajectory, both feedback and feedforward controllers have been proposed. The feedback controller is utilized to guarantee the closed loop system stability and the feedforward controller is used to improve the tracking performance for the repetitive reference trajectory and to suppress repetitive disturbances. As the iteration number increases, the feedforward controller decreases the tracking error. Numerical simulations demonstrate that inclusion of the feedforward controller significantly improves the control system performance over its performance with just the feedback controller.

  10. Rf transfer in the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A significant technical problem associated with the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator is the transfer of RF energy from the drive accelerator to the high-gradient accelerator. Several concepts have been advanced to solve this problem. This paper examines one possible solution in which the drive and high-gradient cavities are directly coupled to one another by means of holes in the cavity walls or coupled indirectly through a third intermediate transfer cavity. Energy cascades through the cavities on a beat frequency time scale which must be made small compared to the cavity skin time but large compared to the FEL pulse length. The transfer is complicated by the fact that each of the cavities in the system can support many resonant modes near the chosen frequency of operation. A generalized set of coupled-cavity equations has been developed to model the energy transfer between the various modes in each of the cavities. For a two cavity case transfer efficiencies in excess of 95% can be achieved. 3 refs., 2 figs

  11. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  12. Design of an rf quadrupole for Landau damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Papke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The recently proposed superconducting quadrupole resonator for Landau damping in accelerators is subjected to a detailed design study. The optimization process of two different cavity types is presented following the requirements of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC with the main focus on quadrupolar strength, surface peak fields, and impedance. The lower order and higher order mode (LOM and HOM spectrum of the optimized cavities is investigated and different approaches for their damping are proposed. On the basis of an example the first two higher order multipole errors are calculated. Likewise on this example the required rf power and optimal external quality factor for the input coupler is derived.

  13. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  14. Development of L-band niobium superconducting RF cavities with high accelerating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suzuki, Takafusa; Higuchi, Tamawo.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavity is a candidate for the TeV energy e + /e - linear collider of next generation if the accelerating field is improved to 25-30 MV/m and much cost down is achieved in cavity fabrication. Since 1990, KEK has continued R and D of L-band niobium superconducting cavities focusing on the high field issue. A serious problem like Q-degradation due to vacuum discharge came out on the way, however, it has been overcome and presently all of cavities which were annealed at 1400degC achieved the accelerating field of >25 MV/m with enough Qo value. Recent results on single cell cavities are described in this paper. (author)

  15. Plasma processing of large curved surfaces for superconducting rf cavity modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities. We have demonstrated surface layer removal in an asymmetric nonplanar geometry, using a simple cylindrical cavity. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (rf circuit elements, gas pressure, rf power, chlorine concentration in the Cl_{2}/Ar gas mixtures, residence time of reactive species, and temperature of the cavity. Using variable radius cylindrical electrodes, large-surface ring-shaped samples, and dc bias in the external circuit, we have measured substantial average etching rates and outlined the possibility of optimizing plasma properties with respect to maximum surface processing effect.

  16. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  17. RF microwave circuit design for wireless applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rohde, Ulrich L

    2012-01-01

    Provides researchers and engineers with a complete set of modeling, design, and implementation tools for tackling the newest IC technologies Revised and completely updated, RF/Microwave Circuit Design for Wireless Applications, Second Edition is a unique, state-of-the-art guide to wireless integrated circuit design that provides researchers and engineers with a complete set of modeling, design, and implementation tools for tackling even the newest IC technologies. It emphasizes practical design solutions for high-performance devices and circuitry, incorporating ample exa

  18. Evaluation of RF seals for resonant cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnak, B.; Spalek, G.; Bolme, G.O.; Bultman, N.; Klapetkzy, A.; Kemp, E.L.; Stovall, J.E.; Rose, J.

    1991-01-01

    In radio-frequency quadrupoles (RFQ) and drift-tube linacs (DTL), electrical seals are required at mechanical interfaces to preserve the cavity quality factor (Q). Studies determined the response of copper-plated C-seals to continuous wave (cw), highfield operating conditions. In addition, low-power evaluations of machined-surface, knife-edge, indium wire, C-type, and multilam seals were done at room temperature and cryogenic (25 K) temperatures. For the high-field tests, the Q as well as seal temperature, was measured with power. For the low power test, the Q was measured as a function of temperature

  19. Design of a higher harmonic RF system for the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, J M; De Santis, S; Kosta, S; Lo, C C; Plate, D; Rimmer, R A; Franks, M

    2000-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a third harmonic radiofrequency (RF) system for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to be used for lengthening the bunch and increasing the Touschek-dominated beam lifetime. We plan to install five single-cell 1.5 GHz copper RF cavities in one-half of an ALS straight section with a predicted increase in the lifetime by a factor of 3. Each RF cell is designed to sustain a maximum voltage of 125 kV with a power dissipation of 5 kW. We present measurements made on an aluminum cavity model characterizing the RF properties of cavity such as the cavity R/Q and higher-order modes (HOMs). In particular, resonances in the cavity tuners were studied in order to avoid heating of the tuner bellows. Initial measurements of the copper cavities indicate a Q value of 21 000, resulting in a shunt impedance of 1.69 M OMEGA per cell

  20. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Opanasenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  1. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-01-01

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun (1), referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee (2). Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF RF LOSSES DUE TO TRAPPED FLUX IN A LARGE-GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Alex Gurevich

    2008-01-01

    Trapped magnetic field in superconducting niobium is a well known cause of radio-frequency (RF) residual losses. In this contribution, we present the results of RF tests on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large grain niobium before and after allowing a fraction of the Earth's magnetic field to be trapped in the cavity during the cooldown below the critical temperature Tc. This experiment has been done on the cavity before and after a low temperature baking. Temperature mapping allowed us to determine the location of hot-spots with high losses and to measure their field dependence. The results show not only an increase of the low-field residual resistance, but also a larger increase of the surface resistance for intermediate RF field (higher ''medium field Qslope''), which depends on the amount of the trapped flux. These additional field-dependent losses can be described as losses of pinned vortices oscillating under the applied RF magnetic field

  3. B factory rf system design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss the issues of relevance to the design of a B factory RF system. First, the general parameter regime is outlined, and the reasons behind certain commonly made choices are indicated. This regime involves high beam currents, and many relatively short bunches. Next, the physics difficulties associated with coupled-bunch instabilities are described briefly. We then describe in general terms the alternative approaches taken by various B factory designers, the motivation for these choices, and the technical issues raised by them. Technical solutions have been proposed for both the room-temperature and the superconducting RF scenarios, and considerable R ampersand D is being carried out worldwide to confirm and optimize these solutions

  4. B factory RF system design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the issues of relevance to the design of a B factory RF system. First, the general parameter regime is outlined, and the reasons behind certain commonly made choices are indicated. This regime involves high beam currents, and many relatively short bunches. Next, the physics difficulties associated with coupled-bunch instabilities are described briefly. We then describe in general terms the alternative approaches taken by various B factory designers, the motivation for these choices, and the technical issues raised by them. Technical solutions have been proposed for both the room-temperature and the superconducting RF scenarios, and considerable R ampersand D is being carried out worldwide to confirm and optimize these solutions

  5. RF subsystem design for microwave communication receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, W. J.; Brodsky, W. G.

    A system review of the RF subsystems of (IFF) transponders, tropscatter receivers and SATCOM receivers is presented. The quantity potential for S-band and X-band IFF transponders establishes a baseline requirement. From this, the feasibility of a common design for these and other receivers is evaluated. Goals are established for a GaAs MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) device and related local oscillator preselector and self-test components.

  6. Development of superconducting RF cavity at 1050 MHz frequency for an electron LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.G.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design of a prototype superconducting cavity at 1050 MHz and design of associated die punch and machining fixtures for the cavity fabrication. The cavity is of β= 1 and elliptical in shape. The circle-straight line-ellipse-type structure design has been optimized by 'SUPERFISH' - a 2 dimensional code for cavity tuning. The 3 Dimensional EM field analysis of the cavity structure has been done using 'CST' software. The ratio of the maximum surface electric field to the accelerating gradient, E pk /E acc , is optimised to 1.984 and H pk /E acc is optimised to 4.141 mT/(MV/m). Bore radius of the cavity has been chosen such a way so that the cell-to-cell coupling remains as high as 1.85%. The cavity is designed to achieve 25 MV/m accelerating gradient. (author)

  7. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sojeong, E-mail: sojung8681@postech.ac.kr; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-11

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  8. Automatic Phase Calibration for RF Cavities using Beam-Loading Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Chase, B. E. [Fermilab

    2017-10-01

    Precise calibration of the cavity phase signals is necessary for the operation of any particle accelerator. For many systems this requires human in the loop adjustments based on measurements of the beam parameters downstream. Some recent work has developed a scheme for the calibration of the cavity phase using beam measurements and beam-loading however this scheme is still a multi-step process that requires heavy automation or human in the loop. In this paper we analyze a new scheme that uses only RF signals reacting to beam-loading to calculate the phase of the beam relative to the cavity. This technique could be used in slow control loops to provide real-time adjustment of the cavity phase calibration without human intervention thereby increasing the stability and reliability of the accelerator.

  9. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-21

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 μA. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  10. Vacuum characteristics of the RF-cavity for TRISTAN main ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H.

    1987-10-01

    Vacuum characteristics of the RF-cavity for TRISTAN main ring were tested. An APS (Alternating Periodic Structure) 18-cell cavity unit was made of low carbon steel S25C, and inner surface was electro-plated with copper of 100 μm in a pyrophosphorous-acid bath. After 24-hours bake-out at 140 deg C by a boiler, the outgassing rate of a test cavity was mainly dominated by the hydrogen permeation from the cooling water channel through the low carbon steel wall into the vacuum. By the use of anti-corrosion agent, the outgassing rate of the test cavity was decreased down to 1 x 10 -13 Torr · l/sec · cm 2 , after the bake-out at 140 deg C for 24 hours. After hydrogen degassing at 140 deg C for 10-days, the APS cavity unit was baked at 140 deg C for 24 hours, the ultimate pressure of the cavity reached down to 6 x 10 -10 Torr, and 2.7 x 10 -10 Torr, pumped by four 300 l/sec ion-pumps and by two 300 l/sec ion-pumps and two Ti-sublimation pumps with liquid nitrogen shroud respectively. The APS cavity unit was conditioned up to 250 kW/9-cell for 36 hours pumped by four 300 l/sec ion pumps, the ultimate pressure of the cavity was 5 x 10 -9 Torr with the RF power of 150 kW/9-cell on. (author)

  11. RF, Thermal and Structural Analysis of the 201.25 MHz Muon Ionization Cooling Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virostek, S.; Li, D.

    2005-01-01

    A finite element analysis has been carried out to characterize the RF, thermal and structural behavior of the prototype 201.25 MHz cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. A single ANSYS model has been developed to perform all of the calculations in a multi-step process. The high-gradient closed-cell cavity is currently being fabricated for the MICE (international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) and MUCOOL experiments. The 1200 mm diameter cavity is constructed of 6 mm thick copper sheet and incorporates a rounded pillbox-like profile with an open beam iris terminated by 420 mm diameter, 0.38 mm thick curved beryllium foils. Tuning is accomplished through elastic deformation of the cavity, and cooling is provided by external water passages. Details of the analysis methodology will be presented including a description of the ANSYS macro that computes the heat loads from the RF solution and applies them directly to the thermal model. The process and results of a calculation to determine the resulting frequency shift due to thermal and structural distortion of the cavity will also be presented

  12. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models

  13. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H.; Adams, F.; De Jong, M.

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q's of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods

  14. Analysis of a grid window structure for RF cavities in a Muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladran, A.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Rimmer, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the electromagnetic and thermal analysis of a grid window structure for high gradient, low frequency RF cavities. Windows may be utilized to close the beam iris and increase shunt impedance of closed-cell RF cavities. This work complements previous work presented for windows made of solid beryllium foil. An electromagnetic and thermal analysis of the thin wall tubes in a grid pattern was conducted using both MAFIA4 and ANSYS finite element analyses. The results from both codes agreed well for a variety of grid configurations and spacing. The grid configuration where the crossing tubes touched was found to have acceptable E-Fields and H-Fields performance. The thermal profiles for the grid will also be shown to determine a viable cooling profile

  15. Testing of inductive output tube based RF amplifier for 650 MHz SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, A.; Som, S.; Manna, S.K.; Ghosh, S.; Seth, S.; Thakur, S.K.; Saha, S.; Panda, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    A 650 MHz IOT based RF amplifier has been developed in VECC. It can be used to power several cavity modules in high energy high current proton linear accelerator to be built for ADSS programme in India and in Project-X at Fermilab, USA. The IOT based amplifier requires different powers supplies, water cooling and forced air cooling for its operation. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based interlocks has been incorporated to take care of systematic on/off of the power supplies and driver amplifier, water flow, air flow and other interlocks for the safe operation of the RF System. In addition to that EPICS based RF operating console and data logging/monitoring system has been added. (author)

  16. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 μs and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures

  17. RF Feedback Analysis for 4 cavities per klystron in PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    Lattice changes in the PEP-II high energy ring have made the concept of driving four cavities with a single klystron an attractive option. This paper examines the topology from a RF feedback point of view. Sources of error are identified and their magnitudes are estimated. The effect on the performance of the longitudinal impedance reducing feedback loops is calculated using control theory and Mathematica

  18. RF cavities for the positron accumulator ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Nassiri, A.; Bridges, J.F.; Smith, T.L.; Song, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The cavities for the dual frequency system of the APS PAR are described. The system uses two frequencies: a 9.78MHz fundamental system for the particle accumulation and a 117.3MHz twelfth harmonic system for the bunch compression. The cavities have been built, installed, tested, and used for storing the beam in the PAR for about a year. The fundamental cavity is a reentrant coaxial type with a capacitive loading plunger and has 1.6m length. The harmonic cavity is a symmetrical reentrant coaxial type and is 0.8m long. Ferrite tuners are used for frequency tuning. During the accumulation period, the ferrite tuner of the harmonic cavity works as a damper to disable the cavity. During an injection cycle the 9.78MHz system accumulates 24 positron bunches in a bucket and the 117.3MHz system compresses the bunch into a shorter bunch. Measurements were made on the rf properties of the cavities

  19. A conceptual design of the RF system for the NSP high intensity proton accelerator at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chishiro, Etsuji; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Touchi, Yutaka; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Takado, Hiroshi; Sawada, Junichi

    1999-03-01

    JAERI has been proposing the Neutron Science Project which aims at exploring the fields of basic science and nuclear technology using a high power spallation neutron source. The neutron source will be driven by a high intensity linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam current of 5.33 mA and beam power of 8 MW. The RF system for the accelerator consists of a high-energy accelerator part and a low energy accelerator part. The maximum RF power requirements at the high and low energy accelerator parts are 25 MW and 8.3 MW, respectively. In this report, we describe the conceptual design of the RF system. In the low energy accelerator part, we estimated the requirement for the high-power amplifier tube and made the basis design for RF components. In the high energy accelerator part, we studied the effect of tuning errors, Lorentz forces and microphonics in the superconducting cavity. We calculated the klystron efficiency and supply power in the arrangement of where one klystron distributes the RF power to four cavities. We also considered an IOT RF system. Finally, we describe the electrical capacity and quantity of cooling water in the RF system. (author)

  20. RF Tests of an 805 MHz Pillbox Cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Li; J. Corlett; R. MacGill; M. Zisman; J. Norem; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; J. Wallig; V. Wu; Y. Torun; R.A. Rimmer

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows over beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, following several weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested with and without the external magnetic field. 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, indicating that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emission significantly. A gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection of the Be window surface found no visual damage, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning the cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More thorough window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  1. RF tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Rimmer, R.; Norem, J.; Torun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows for beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, and it had to take many weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during the processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested at conditions of with and without the external magnetic field. A conservative 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, it indicated that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emissions significantly. A modest gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection on Be windows surface found no damage at all, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More through window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  2. Design of large aperture 500 MHz 5-cell superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yelong; Feng Ziqiang; Lu Changwang; Yu Haibo; Liu Jianfei; Hou Hongtao; Ma Zhenyu; Mao Dongqing

    2012-01-01

    With the potential application of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), the superconducting (SC) cavities were developed to deliver much higher current than before. Nowadays, the current of the international SC accelerator designed has already exceeded 100 mA. This paper presents the design of a new 500 MHz 5-cell SC cavity (SINAP 5-cell cavity), in which the parameters r/Q= 515.5 Ω of the fundamental mode and the geometry factor G=275.8 are under an acceptable Radio Frequency (RF) field level. (B peak /E acc =4.31 mT/MV/m and E peak /E acc =2.48). This design employs a larger beam pipe to propagate the Higher Order Modes (HOMs) out of the cavity and increases the damping efficiently for the dangerous HOMs. By simulation technique, it has been found that almost all the dangerous HOMs (including TE 111 , TM 110 , and TM 011 ) can be propagated into the beam pipe and are absorbed by ferrite absorbers, when the beam pile is enlarged. Finally, the loss factor for the new 5-cell cavity is also calculated. (authors)

  3. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of gridded radio-frequency cavity windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsharo' a, Mohammad M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses of radio-frequency (RF) cavities were performed as part of a developmental RF cavity program for muon cooling. RF cavities are necessary to provide longitudinal focusing of the muons and to compensate for their energy loss. Closing the cavity ends by electrically conducting windows reduces the power requirement and increases the on-axis electric field for a given maximum surface electric field. Many factors must be considered in the design of RF cavity windows. RF heating can cause the windows to deform in the axial direction of the cavity. The resulting thermal stresses in the window must be maintained below the yield stress of the window material. The out-of-plane deflection must be small enough so that the consequent frequency shift is tolerable. For example, for an 805 MHz cavity, the out-of-plane deflection must be kept below 25 microns to prevent the frequency of the cavity from shifting more than 10 kHz. In addition, the window design should yield smooth electric and magnetic fields, terminate field leakage beyond the window, and minimize beam scattering. In the present thesis, gridded-tube window designs were considered because of their high structural integrity. As a starting point in the analysis, a cylindrical pillbox cavity was considered as a benchmark problem. Analytical and finite element solutions were obtained for the electric and magnetic fields, power loss density, and temperature profile. Excellent agreement was obtained between the analytical and finite element results. The finite element method was then used to study a variety of gridded-tube windows. It was found that cooling of the gridded-tube windows by passing helium gas inside the tubes significantly reduces the out-of-plane deflection and the thermal stresses. Certain tube geometries and grid patterns were found to satisfy all of the design requirements.

  4. Design and development of R.F. LINAC accelerator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhay Kumar; Guha, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Jawale, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radio frequency linear accelerator, a high power electron LINAC technology, is being developed at BARC. These accelerators are considered to be the most compact and effective for a given power capacity. Important application areas of this LINAC include medical sterilization, food preservation, pollution control, semiconductor industries, radiation therapy and material science. Center for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC has been entrusted with the design, development and manufacturing of various mechanical components of the accelerator. Most critical and precision components out of them are Diagnostic chamber, Faraday cup, Drift tube and R.F. cavities. This paper deals with the design aspects in respect of Ultra high vacuum compatibility and the mechanism of operation. Also this paper discusses the state-of-art technology for machining of intricate contour using specially designed poly crystalline diamond tool and the inspection methodology developed to minimize the measurement errors on the machined contour. Silver brazing technique employed to join the LINAC cavities is also described in detail

  5. Sub-micron resolution rf cavity beam position monitor system at the SACLA XFEL facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesaka, H.; Ego, H.; Inoue, S.; Matsubara, S.; Ohshima, T.; Shintake, T.; Otake, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed and constructed a C-band (4.760 GHz) rf cavity beam position monitor (RF-BPM) system for the XFEL facility at SPring-8, SACLA. The demanded position resolution of the RF-BPM is less than 1 μm, because an electron beam and x-rays must be overlapped within 4 μm precision in the undulator section for sufficient FEL interaction between the electrons and x-rays. In total, 57 RF-BPMs, including IQ demodulators and high-speed waveform digitizers for signal processing, were produced and installed into SACLA. We evaluated the position resolutions of 20 RF-BPMs in the undulator section by using a 7 GeV electron beam having a 0.1 nC bunch charge. The position resolution was measured to be less than 0.6 μm, which was sufficient for the XFEL lasing in the wavelength region of 0.1 nm, or shorter.

  6. Design and Calibration of an RF Actuator for Low-Level RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zheqiao; Hong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    X-ray free electron laser (FEL) machines like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC require high-quality electron beams to generate X-ray lasers for various experiments. Digital low-level RF (LLRF) systems are widely used to control the high-power RF klystrons to provide a highly stable RF field in accelerator structures for beam acceleration. Feedback and feedforward controllers are implemented in LLRF systems to stabilize or adjust the phase and amplitude of the RF field. To achieve the RF stability and the accuracy of the phase and amplitude adjustment, low-noise and highly linear RF actuators are required. Aiming for the upgrade of the S-band Linac at SLAC, an RF actuator is designed with an I/Qmodulator driven by two digital-to-analog converters (DAC) for the digital LLRF systems. A direct upconversion scheme is selected for RF actuation, and an on-line calibration algorithm is developed to compensate the RF reference leakage and the imbalance errors in the I/Q modulator, which may cause significant phase and amplitude actuation errors. This paper presents the requirements on the RF actuator, the design of the hardware, the calibration algorithm, and the implementation in firmware and software and the test results at LCLS.

  7. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  8. Design and modeling of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.L.; Chen, S.C.; Wurtele, J.S.; Temkin, R.; Danly, B.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a high-frequency (17 GHz), high accelerating gradient (250 MV/m) photocathode RF gun is studied with the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. For the parameter regime of interest, i.e. bunch charge smaller than 1 nC and bunch length shorter than 2 ps, space-charge forces and finite bunch length effects are less significant in determining the beam quality than nonlinear RF forces are. The cavity geometry, RF phase for photoemission, cathode size, and current density are being optimized to obtain high quality beams. Preliminary results are presented

  9. Reduction of field emission in superconducting cavities with high power pulsed RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Crawford, C.; Kirchgessner, J.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Schmueser, P.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the effects of pulsed high power RF processing (HPP) as a method of reducing field emission (FE) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to reach higher accelerating gradients for future particle accelerators. The processing apparatus was built to provide up to 150 kW peak RF power to 3 GHz cavities, for pulse lengths from 200 μs to 1 ms. Single-cell and nine-cell cavities were tested extensively. The thermal conductivity of the niobium for these cavities was made as high as possible to ensure stability against thermal breakdown of superconductivity. HPP proves to be a highly successful method of reducing FE loading in nine-cell SRF cavities. Attainable continuous wave (CW) fields increase by as much as 80% from their pre-HPP limits. The CW accelerating field achieved with nine-cell cavities improved from 8-15 MV/m with HPP to 14-20 MV/m. The benefits are stable with subsequent exposure to dust-free air. More importantly, HPP also proves effective against new field emission subsequently introduced by cold and warm vacuum ''accidents'' which admitted ''dirty'' air into the cavities. Clear correlations are obtained linking FE reduction with the maximum surface electric field attained during processing. In single cells the maximums reached were E peak =72 MV/m and H peak =1660 Oe. Thermal breakdown, initiated by accompanying high surface magnetic fields is the dominant limitation on the attainable fields for pulsed processing, as well as for final CW and long pulse operation. To prove that the surface magnetic field rather than the surface electric fields is the limitation to HPP effectiveness, a special two-cell cavity with a reduced magnetic to electric field ratio is successfully tested. During HPP, pulsed fields reach E peak =113 MV/m (H peak =1600 Oe) and subsequent CW low power measurement reached E peak =100 MV/m, the highest CW field ever measured in a superconducting accelerator cavity. ((orig.))

  10. Dynamic compensation of an rf cavity failure in a superconducting linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Biarrotte

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator driven system (ADS for transmutation of nuclear waste typically requires a 600 MeV–1 GeV accelerator delivering a proton flux of a few mA for demonstrators, and of a few tens of mA for large industrial systems. Such a machine belongs to the category of the high-power proton accelerators, with an additional requirement for exceptional “reliability”: because of the induced thermal stress to the subcritical core, the number of unwanted “beam trips” should not exceed a few per year, a specification that is several orders of magnitude above usual performance. In order to meet this extremely high reliability, the accelerator needs to implement, to the maximum possible extent, a fault-tolerance strategy that would allow beam operation in the presence of most of the envisaged faults that could occur in its beam line components, and in particular rf systems’ failures. This document describes the results of the simulations performed for the analysis of the fault-tolerance capability of the XT-ADS superconducting linac in the case of an rf cavity failure. A new simulation tool, mixing transient rf behavior of the accelerating cavities with full 6D description of the beam dynamics, has been developed for this purpose. Fast fault-recovery scenarios are proposed, and required research and development is identified.

  11. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint

  12. Design and construction of the advanced photon source 352-MHz rf system switching control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Solita, L.; Reigle, D.; Dimonte, N.

    1997-01-01

    A switching control system has been designed and built to provide the capability of rapidly switching the waveguide and low-level cabling between different klystrons to operate the Advanced Photon Source storage ring in the event of a failure of a klystron system or to perform necessary repairs and preventative maintenance. The twelve possible modes of operation allow for complete redundancy of the booster synchrotron rf system and either a maximum of two storage ring rf systems to be completely off-line or one system to be used as a power source for an rf test stand. A programmable controller is used to send commands to intermediate control panels which interface to WR2300 waveguide switches and phase shifters, rf cavity interlock and low-level rf distribution systems, and klystron power supply controls for rapid reconfiguration of the rf systems in response to a mode-selection command. Mode selection is a local manual operation using a keyswitch arrangement which prevents more than one mode from being selected at a time. The programmable controller also monitors for hardware malfunction and guards against open-quotes hot-switchingclose quotes of the rf systems. The rf switching controls system is monitored via the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for remote system status check

  13. Microprocessor-based control for independently-phased RF linac cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A microprocessor based system has been built to control the RF amplifiers associated with independently phased linac cavities. The system has an 8080A at each amplifier station, together with associated ROM, RAM, I/O, etc. At a central NOVA 3 computer an additional 8080A system is incorporated in the interface to the NOVA I/O bus. The NOVA interface is connected by a bus of eighteen twisted pairs to each amplifier station, providing bilateral transmission between each station and the NOVA. The system architecture, bus protocol, and operating characteristics are described

  14. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  15. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Deepender, E-mail: dkc@ceeri.ernet.in; Joshi, L. M. [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani (India); Janyani, Vijay [Department of ECE, MNIT, Jaipur (India)

    2016-03-09

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  16. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Deepender; Joshi, L. M.; Janyani, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  17. Design and research of RF system for 10 MeV compact cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A 10 MeV compact cyclotron (CYCHU-10) has been developing in Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). The RF system includes a 10 kW RF power generator and a resonance cavity. There is no automatic frequency tuning equipment in the cavity due to space limitations, so the generator must search and track the cavity resonant frequency. AD9850 synthesizer is used to generate RF signal in the experimental prototype, and a fine sinusoidal waveform around 99 MHz is obtained with the method of picking up a special aliased signal from the synthesizer’s output, and the output power level can be set by regulating the resistor connected to the Pin ’Rset’. The final stage amplifier based on tetrode operates in the grounded cathode configuration, and the schematic of the tetrode circuit is illustrated. The method of searching the resonant frequency is discussed in detail. For the sake of a compact and robust structure, the resonance cavity will adopt non-uniform characteristic impedance coaxial structure, and the magnet surface electroplated with copper will be used as dummy Dees. The precise shapes and dimensions of the cavity are designed and simulation results are carried out in this paper. The distributions of electromagnetic field are illustrated by means of numerical calculation analysis, and the wooden model test is preformed as well.

  18. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K

    2008-01-01

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm

  19. Design of radio-frequency cavities and Tera-Hertz electron injectors for advanced applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedfakhari, Seyedmoein

    2016-06-15

    Design of three accelerator components including a buncher cavity for REGAE, a normal conducting cavity for arrival time stabilization at FLASH and ultra-fast guns for the AXSIS project is presented in this thesis. Using RF cavities caused a revolution in accelerators and made it possible to generate high energy particle beams. In advanced accelerators, cavities are not only used to increase the particle energy but they are also widely used to improve the beam quality and additionally for beam diagnostic purposes. In the present dissertation, such applications are discussed. First, design of a buncher cavity which compresses the bunch at the REGAE facility is presented. The design pursues improving the mode separation of the cavity. The simulation result illustrates that the difference between the operating mode and its adjacent mode has been increased from 2 MHz for the existing cavity to 9.5 MHz for the new design. In the second part, a normal conducting cavity is discussed, which will be used to regulate the arrival time ofthe bunches at FLASH and at the European XFEL. The designed cavity is able to correct the arrival time jitter of ± 150 fs in order to provide femtosecond precision synchronization between the electron beam and the external laser pulses. Thermal, wakefield and multipacting simulations have also been performed for the designed cavity in order to evaluate its operation efficiency. In advanced accelerators however RF cavities should be replaced by novel structures to accelerate the particles in shorter distances using higher operating frequency. To this end, ultra-fast guns are designed which will be discussed in the last part of this work. The designed guns accelerate the electrons from their rest mass up to 2 MeV using a single cycle THz signal with a total energy of 2 mJ.

  20. Design of radio-frequency cavities and Tera-Hertz electron injectors for advanced applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedfakhari, Seyedmoein

    2016-06-01

    Design of three accelerator components including a buncher cavity for REGAE, a normal conducting cavity for arrival time stabilization at FLASH and ultra-fast guns for the AXSIS project is presented in this thesis. Using RF cavities caused a revolution in accelerators and made it possible to generate high energy particle beams. In advanced accelerators, cavities are not only used to increase the particle energy but they are also widely used to improve the beam quality and additionally for beam diagnostic purposes. In the present dissertation, such applications are discussed. First, design of a buncher cavity which compresses the bunch at the REGAE facility is presented. The design pursues improving the mode separation of the cavity. The simulation result illustrates that the difference between the operating mode and its adjacent mode has been increased from 2 MHz for the existing cavity to 9.5 MHz for the new design. In the second part, a normal conducting cavity is discussed, which will be used to regulate the arrival time ofthe bunches at FLASH and at the European XFEL. The designed cavity is able to correct the arrival time jitter of ± 150 fs in order to provide femtosecond precision synchronization between the electron beam and the external laser pulses. Thermal, wakefield and multipacting simulations have also been performed for the designed cavity in order to evaluate its operation efficiency. In advanced accelerators however RF cavities should be replaced by novel structures to accelerate the particles in shorter distances using higher operating frequency. To this end, ultra-fast guns are designed which will be discussed in the last part of this work. The designed guns accelerate the electrons from their rest mass up to 2 MeV using a single cycle THz signal with a total energy of 2 mJ.

  1. MgB2 for Application to RF Cavities for Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Canabal, A.; Zhao, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Moeckly, B.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.; Phillips, L.; Iwashita, Y.; Campisi, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) has a transition temperature (T c ) of ∼40 K, i.e., about 4 times as high as that of niobium (Nb).We have been evaluating MgB 2 as a candidate material for radio-frequency (RF) cavities for future particle accelerators. Studies in the last 3 years have shown that it could have about one order of magnitude less RF surface resistance (Rs) than Nb at 4 K. A power dependence test using a 6 GHz TE011 mode cavity has shown little power dependence up to ∼12 mT (120 Oe), limited by available power, compared to other high-Tc materials such as YBCO. A recent study showed, however, that the power dependence of Rs is dependent on the coating method. A film made with on-axis pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has showed rapid increase in Rs compared to the film deposited by reactive evaporation method. This paper shows these results as well as future plans

  2. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed

  3. High-power RF window design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, M.; Hodgson, J.; Ng, C.; Schwarz, H.; Skarpaas, K.; Kroll, N.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the design of RF windows to transmit up to 500 kW CW to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. RF analysis of the windows using high-frequency simulation codes are described. These provide information about the power loss distribution in the ceramic and tim matching properties of the structure. Finite-element analyses of the resulting temperature distribution and thermal stresses are presented. Fabrication methods including a proposed scheme to compensate for thermal expansion s are discussed and hardware tests to validate this approach are described. The effects of surface coatings (intentional and otherwise) and the application of air cooling are considered

  4. Optimization of the RF cavity heat load and trip rates for CEBAF at 12 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Freyberger, Arne P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at JLab has 200 RF cavities in the north linac and the south linac respectively after the 12 GeV upgrade. The purpose of this work is to simultaneously optimize the heat load and the trip rate for the cavities and to reconstruct the pareto-optimal front in a timely manner when some of the cavities are turned down. By choosing an efficient optimizer and strategically creating the initial gradients, the pareto-optimal front for no more than 15 cavities down can be re-established within 20 seconds.

  5. A 2 MW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron - experimental verification of the design of main components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piosczyk, B [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institut fuer Hochleistungsimpuls- und Mikrowellentechnik (IHM), Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dammertz, G [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institut fuer Hochleistungsimpuls- und Mikrowellentechnik (IHM), Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dumbrajs, O [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Helsinki University of Technology, Association EURATOM-TEKES, FIN-02150 Espoo (Finland)] (and others)

    2005-01-01

    A 2 MW, CW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron is under development in cooperation between European Research Institutions (FZK Karlsruhe, CRPP Lausanne, HUT Helsinki) and the European tube industry (TED, Velizy, France). The design of critical components has recently been examined experimentally at FZK Karlsruhe with a short pulse ({approx} few ms) coaxial cavity gyrotron. This gyrotron uses the same cavity and the same quasioptical (q.o.) RF-output system as designed for the industrial prototype and a very similar electron gun.

  6. RF power harvesting: a review on designing methodologies and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Le-Giang; Cha, Hyouk-Kyu; Park, Woo-Tae

    2017-12-01

    Wireless power transmission was conceptualized nearly a century ago. Certain achievements made to date have made power harvesting a reality, capable of providing alternative sources of energy. This review provides a summ ary of radio frequency (RF) power harvesting technologies in order to serve as a guide for the design of RF energy harvesting units. Since energy harvesting circuits are designed to operate with relatively small voltages and currents, they rely on state-of-the-art electrical technology for obtaining high efficiency. Thus, comprehensive analysis and discussions of various designs and their tradeoffs are included. Finally, recent applications of RF power harvesting are outlined.

  7. Structural and superconducting properties of sputter-deposited niobium films for applications in RF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Peck, M A

    2000-01-01

    The present work presents the results of a systematic study of superconducting and structural properties of niobium films sputter deposited onto the inner walls of radiofrequency copper resonators. The measured superconducting quantities include the surface resistance, the critical temperature, the penetration depth and the upper and lower critical fields. In addition to films grown with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and Ar-Ne mixtures) and to films grown on substrates prepared under different conditions, the study also includes massive niobium cavities. The surface resistance is analysed in terms of its dependence on the temperature and on the rf field amplitude and, when possible, compared to theoretical predictions. In general, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. All experimental results are presented in the form of a simple, but adequate parameterisation. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially uncorrelated with the other variables, but strongly dependent on the macroscop...

  8. Mechanical Design of a New Injector Cryomodule 2-Cell Cavity at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Guangfeng G. [JLAB; Henry, James E. [JLAB; Mammosser, John D. [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB; Wiseman, Mark A. [JLAB; Yang, Shuo [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    As a part of Jefferson Lab’s 12 GeV upgrade, a new injector superconducting RF cryomodule is required. This unit consists of a 2-cell and 7-cell cavity, with the latter being refurbished from an existing cavity. The new 2-cell cavity requires electromagnetic design and optimization followed by mechanical design analyses. The electromagnetic design is reported elsewhere. This paper aims to present the procedures and conclusions of the analyses on cavity tuning sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, upset condition pressure induced stresses, and structural vibration frequencies. The purposes of such analyses include: 1) provide reference data for cavity tuner design; 2) examine the structural integrity of the cavity; and 3) evaluate the 2-cell cavity’s resistance to microphonics. Design issues such as the location of stiffening rings, effect of tuner stiffness on cavity stress, choice of cavity wall thickness, etc. are investigated by conducting extensive finite element analyses. Progress in fabrication of the 2-cell cavity is also reported.

  9. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  10. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-01-01

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here

  11. Final Report for 'Design calculations for high-space-charge beam-to-RF conversion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerator facility upgrades, new accelerator applications, and future design efforts are leading to novel klystron and IOT device concepts, including multiple beam, high-order mode operation, and new geometry configurations of old concepts. At the same time, a new simulation capability, based upon finite-difference 'cut-cell' boundaries, has emerged and is transforming the existing modeling and design capability with unparalleled realism, greater flexibility, and improved accuracy. This same new technology can also be brought to bear on a difficult-to-study aspect of the energy recovery linac (ERL), namely the accurate modeling of the exit beam, and design of the beam dump for optimum energy efficiency. We have developed new capability for design calculations and modeling of a broad class of devices which convert bunched beam kinetic energy to RF energy, including RF sources, as for example, klystrons, gyro-klystrons, IOT's, TWT's, and other devices in which space-charge effects are important. Recent advances in geometry representation now permits very accurate representation of the curved metallic surfaces common to RF sources, resulting in unprecedented simulation accuracy. In the Phase I work, we evaluated and demonstrated the capabilities of the new geometry representation technology as applied to modeling and design of output cavity components of klystron, IOT's, and energy recovery srf cavities. We identified and prioritized which aspects of the design study process to pursue and improve in Phase II. The development and use of the new accurate geometry modeling technology on RF sources for DOE accelerators will help spark a new generational modeling and design capability, free from many of the constraints and inaccuracy associated with the previous generation of 'stair-step' geometry modeling tools. This new capability is ultimately expected to impact all fields with high power RF sources, including DOE fusion research, communications, radar and other

  12. Beyond the Interconnections: Split Manufacturing in RF Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the globalization of the integrated circuit (IC design flow of chip fabrication, intellectual property (IP piracy is becoming the main security threat. While most of the protection methods are dedicated for digital circuits, we are trying to protect radio-frequency (RF designs. For the first time, we applied the split manufacturing method in RF circuit protection. Three different implementation cases are introduced for security and design overhead tradeoffs, i.e., the removal of the top metal layer, the removal of the top two metal layers and the design obfuscation dedicated to RF circuits. We also developed a quantitative security evaluation method to measure the protection level of RF designs under split manufacturing. Finally, a simple Class AB power amplifier and a more sophisticated Class E power amplifier are used for the demonstration through which we prove that: (1 the removal of top metal layer or the top two metal layers can provide high-level protection for RF circuits with a lower request to domestic foundries; (2 the design obfuscation method provides the highest level of circuit protection, though at the cost of design overhead; and (3 split manufacturing may be more suitable for RF designs than for digital circuits, and it can effectively reduce IP piracy in untrusted off-shore foundries.

  13. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q., E-mail: tengjian@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-11-21

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  14. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  15. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  16. RF Design and Operating Performance of the BNL/AES 1.3 GHz Single Cell Superconducting RF Photocathode Electron Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Michael; Kneisel, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Burrill, Andrew; Hahn, H.; Rao, Triveni; Zhao, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past several years Advanced Energy Systems and BNL have been collaborating on the development and testing of a fully superconducting photocathode electron gun. Over the past year we have begun to realize significant results which have been published elsewhere (1). This paper will review the RF design of the gun under test and present results of its performance under various operating conditions. Results for cavity quality factor will be presented for various operating temperatures and cavity field gradients. We will also discuss future plans for testing using this gun.

  17. RF system modeling and controller design for the European XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The European XFEL is being constructed at the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron DESY to generate intense, ultrashort pulses of highly coherent and monochromatic X-Rays for material science research. X-ray flashes are generated by accelerating electron bunches within superconducting cavities with radio frequency (RF) fields to energies up to 17.5 GeV. The digital control of these fields requires extremely high quality in order to achieve the physical processes of photon generation. DESY offers with FLASH a pilot test facility, allowing to test and develop most necessary components, even before the XFEL is conducted. Current field control is based on a proportional feedback controller in addition to a constant feedforward drive, which do not meet the high requirements of the XFEL. This thesis shows that a model based controller design can achieve the necessary field regulation requirements. A linear, time invariant ''black box model'' is estimated, which characterizes the essential dynamic behavior. This model is not based on physical assumptions, but describes exclusively the transfer behavior of the plant. The acceleration modules are operated in a pulsed mode, in which the RF field must be kept constant for a finite period. The character of the disturbances and variations from pulse-to-pulse, together with the properties of the system, require a combination of controlled feedforward drive and feedback. Generally unpredictable, low frequency pulse-to-pulse variations are suppressed by the feedback controller. The structural design of the complex multivariable feedback controller is given, which constrains the model based design approach to assign the controller parameters only. Estimation of the parameters, which can not be tuned manually, is done by the method of H loop shaping which is often applied in modern control theory. However, disturbances within a pulse are in a high frequency range concerning the short pulse duration. They are not sufficiently suppressed

  18. RF system modeling and controller design for the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Christian

    2011-06-15

    The European XFEL is being constructed at the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron DESY to generate intense, ultrashort pulses of highly coherent and monochromatic X-Rays for material science research. X-ray flashes are generated by accelerating electron bunches within superconducting cavities with radio frequency (RF) fields to energies up to 17.5 GeV. The digital control of these fields requires extremely high quality in order to achieve the physical processes of photon generation. DESY offers with FLASH a pilot test facility, allowing to test and develop most necessary components, even before the XFEL is conducted. Current field control is based on a proportional feedback controller in addition to a constant feedforward drive, which do not meet the high requirements of the XFEL. This thesis shows that a model based controller design can achieve the necessary field regulation requirements. A linear, time invariant ''black box model'' is estimated, which characterizes the essential dynamic behavior. This model is not based on physical assumptions, but describes exclusively the transfer behavior of the plant. The acceleration modules are operated in a pulsed mode, in which the RF field must be kept constant for a finite period. The character of the disturbances and variations from pulse-to-pulse, together with the properties of the system, require a combination of controlled feedforward drive and feedback. Generally unpredictable, low frequency pulse-to-pulse variations are suppressed by the feedback controller. The structural design of the complex multivariable feedback controller is given, which constrains the model based design approach to assign the controller parameters only. Estimation of the parameters, which can not be tuned manually, is done by the method of H{sub {infinity}} loop shaping which is often applied in modern control theory. However, disturbances within a pulse are in a high frequency range concerning the short pulse duration

  19. RF properties of 700 MHz, β= 0.42 elliptical cavity for high current ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator-driven subcritical system ...

  20. Design and manufacture of the RF power supply and RF transmission line for SANAEM project Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turemen, G.; Ogur, S.; Ahiska, F.; Yasatekin, B.; Cicek, E.; Ozbey, A.; Kilic, I.; Unel, G.; Alacakir, A.

    2017-08-01

    A 1-5 MeV proton beamline is being built by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority in collaboration with a number of graduate students from different universities. The primary goal of the project, is to acquire the design ability and manufacturing capability of all the components locally. SPP will be an accelerator and beam diagnostics test facility and it will also serve the detector development community with its low beam current. This paper discusses the design and construction of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line components such as its waveguide converters and its circulator. Additionally low and high power RF test results are presented to compare the performances of the locally produced components to the commercially available ones.

  1. Dynamics and performance of the free electron laser at Super-Aco with a harmonic RF cavity set on 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutarelli, D.

    2000-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the development of the potentialities of the free electron laser that has been installed on the storage ring Super-Aco at Orsay university. We have studied the dynamics of the electron beam inside a harmonic RF cavity set on 500 MHz. The impact of the geometric characteristics of the optical cavity on the transverse overlapping between laser radiation and the electron beam has been studied in details. An important part of the work has been the assessment of the optical characterization of the dielectric multi-layer mirrors of the cavity. For that purpose a complete system has been designed to assess the changes in optical properties of mirrors during laser operation. Another important part of this work was the study of the interaction process between laser radiation and the electron bunch leading to saturation. This interaction process has been simulated through a new model and some predictions given by this model have been successfully confronted to experimental data. The installation of the harmonic RF cavity has led to a significant increase of the laser radiation gain and the value of the mean power of the laser radiation has reached 300 mW. An interesting application of this technique is the generation of high energy gamma photons through Compton backscattering. A collimated 35 MeV-energy photon beam has been produced at Super-Aco with a rate of 5.10 6 photons per second. (A.C.)

  2. The design and development of a multilayer RF circuit card

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, John Francis

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design an airborne radio frequency circuit card that was very light weight, occupied a small volume, and operated from 20 Mhz to 1500 Mhz. The circuit card being reported on is called an RF multicoupler, and is one of two cards used in a radio frequency distribution unit (RFD). This unit interfaces a large number of receivers to various antennas. In the past this type of circuitry was done by cascading discrete connectorized RF compo...

  3. Design of Flexible RF Building Blocks : A Method for Implementing Configurable RF Transceiver Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidojkovic - Andjelovic, M.; Tang, van der J.D.; Baltus, P.G.M.; Roermund, van A.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    In today's world, new communication standards evolve fast, putting a significant burden on set makers and RFIC designer houses to bring integrated and cheap solutions quickly into the market place. The shift towards flexible RF systems that can support a range of applications via adjustability and

  4. The TFTR RF Limiter upgrade design and installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.W.; Fan, H.M.; Ulrickson, M.

    1991-01-01

    The RF Limiters originally installed at Bays K-L and N-O[1] were upgraded to a new configuration and six new limiters of similar design were added. The RF Limiter upgrade protects the (2) existing RF Launchers and with a minor addition will protect the (2) RF Launchers to be installed in FY92 and will permit 50 Megawatts of auxiliary input power for two seconds during plasma operation. Each of the new RF Limiters are comprised of 18 tiles for a total of 108. The design provides for revised and strengthened supporting mounts because of additional forces induced in the tiles. Tile material is a 2D carbon-carbon composite identical to the original tile material. The channel shaped tile is geometrically the same as the original design. Subassembly of the panels took place outside the vessel in order to minimize exposure levels to the workers. Tooling was designed to replicate the vessel hardpoints and ease the subassembly tasks. Installation of the entire system occurred during the FY 91 opening. Integrated into the design are provisions to eliminate plasma damage to the insulators at the mounts. Detail design philosophy and an overview of the project are addressed by this paper. 2 refs., 2 figs

  5. RF-Frontend Design for Process-Variation-Tolerant Receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Sakian, Pooyan; van Roermund, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    This book discusses a number of challenges faced by designers of wireless receivers, given complications caused by the shrinking of electronic and mobile devices circuitry into ever-smaller sizes and the resulting complications on the manufacturability, production yield, and the end price of the products.  The authors describe the impact of process technology on the performance of the end product and equip RF designers with countermeasures to cope with such problems.  The mechanisms by which these problems arise are analyzed in detail and novel solutions are provided, including design guidelines for receivers with robustness to process variations and details of circuit blocks that obtain the required performance level. Describes RF receiver frontends and their building blocks from a system- and circuit-level perspective; Provides system-level analysis of a generic RF receiver frontend with robustness to process variations; Includes details of CMOS circuit design at 60GHz and reconfigurable circuits at 60GHz...

  6. Control Instabilities in a Pulsed Multi-Cavity RF System with Vector Sum Feedback (A Mathematical Analysis)

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming projects relying on pulsed linear accelerators intend to use superconducting RF systems. Cost reasons suggest driving several cavities by a common transmitter, controlled over a vector sum feedback system, possibly supported by a feed forward system. Numerical simulations hint that such a system may become uncontrollable under certain conditions. In the present paper, for a model very close to reality, we will present a mathematical proof that in fact spontaneous symmetry braking is possible for these configurations, defining also the precise conditions under which it will take place. These can be used as an estimate for the real RF system stability limits. The listing of a small program demonstrating the mechanism numerically for two cavities is attached.

  7. Control Instabilities in a Pulsed Multi-Cavity RF System with Vector Sum Feedback (A Mathematical Analysis) 052

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming projects relying on pulsed linear accelerators intend to use superconducting RF systems. Cost reasons suggest driving several cavities by a common transmitter, controlled over a vector sum feedback system, possibly supported by a feed forward system. Numerical simulations hint that such a system may become uncontrollable under certain conditions. In the present paper, for a model very close to reality, we will present a mathematical proof that in fact spontaneous symmetry braking is possible for these configurations, defining also the precise conditions under which it will take place. These can be used as an estimate for the real RF system stability limits. The listing of a small program demonstrating the mechanism numerically for two cavities is attached.

  8. Modeling and design techniques for RF power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Arvind; Laskar, Joy

    2008-01-01

    The book covers RF power amplifier design, from device and modeling considerations to advanced circuit design architectures and techniques. It focuses on recent developments and advanced topics in this area, including numerous practical designs to back the theoretical considerations. It presents the challenges in designing power amplifiers in silicon and helps the reader improve the efficiency of linear power amplifiers, and design more accurate compact device models, with faster extraction routines, to create cost effective and reliable circuits.

  9. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C., E-mail: a.dexter@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K. [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jones, R. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  10. PSpice modeling of broadband RF cavities for transient and frequency domain simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harzheim, Jens [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Fachgebiet Beschleunigertechnik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the future accelerator facility FAIR, Barrier-Bucket Systems will play an important role for different longitudinal beam manipulations. As the function of this type of system is to provide single sine gap voltages, the components of the system have to operate in a broad frequency range. To investigate the different effects and to design the different system components, the whole Barrier-Bucket System is to be modeled in PSpice. While for low power signals, the system shows linear behavior, nonlinear effects arise at higher amplitudes. Therefore, simulations in both, frequency and time domain are needed. The highly frequency dependent magnetic alloy ring cores of the future Barrier-Bucket cavity have been mod eled in a first step and based on these models, the whole cavity was analyzed in PSpice. The simulation results show good agreement with former measurements.

  11. Designing the Four Rod Crab Cavity for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the design for a novel compact crab cavity for the HL-LHC upgrade at CERN, Geneva. The LHC requires 400MHz RF cavities that can provide up to 10MV transverse gradient across two to three cavities with suit- ably low surface fields for continual operation. As a result, a cavity design was required that would be optimised to these new parameters. From initial design studies based on Jefferson Laboratory’s CEBAF deflector, extensive optimiza- tion was carried out to design a superconducting crab cavity, dubbed the Four Rod Crab Cavity (4RCC). The design underwent several iterations throughout the course of the project due to changing requirements from CERN, particularly space requirements inside the LHC. In addition, it was decided that a focus on field flatness was required. An aluminium prototype was then constructed from the finalised and computer-simulated design to confirm the designed field flat- ness. Additional computer simulation studies using CST were performed to en-...

  12. Theory, analysis and design of RF interferometric sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Cam

    2012-01-01

    Theory, Analysis and Design of RF Interferometric Sensors presents the theory, analysis and design of RF interferometric sensors. RF interferometric sensors are attractive for various sensing applications that require every fine resolution and accuracy as well as fast speed. The book also presents two millimeter-wave interferometric sensors realized using RF integrated circuits. The developed millimeter-wave homodyne sensor shows sub-millimeter resolution in the order of 0.05 mm without correction for the non-linear phase response of the sensor's quadrature mixer. The designed millimeter-wave double-channel homodyne sensor provides a resolution of only 0.01 mm, or 1/840th of the operating wavelength, and can inherently suppress the non-linearity of the sensor's quadrature mixer. The experimental results of displacement and velocity measurement are presented as a way to demonstrate the sensing ability of the RF interferometry and to illustrate its many possible applications in sensing. The book is succinct, ye...

  13. RF control at SSCL - an object oriented design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohan, D.A.; Osberg, E.; Biggs, R.; Bossom, J.; Chillara, K.; Richter, R.; Wade, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) in Texas, the construction of which was stopped in 1994, would have represented a major challenge in accelerator research and development. This paper addresses the issues encountered in the parallel design and construction of the control systems for the RF equipment for the five accelerators comprising the SSC. An extensive analysis of the components of the RF control systems has been undertaken, based upon the Schlaer-Mellor object-oriented analysis and design (OOA/OOD) methodology. The RF subsystem components such as amplifiers, tubes, power supplies, PID loops, etc. were analyzed to produce OOA information, behavior and process models. Using these models, OOD was iteratively applied to develop a generic RF control system design. This paper describes the results of this analysis and the development of 'bridges' between the analysis objects, and the EPICS-based software and underlying VME-based hardware architectures. The application of this approach to several of the SSCL RF control systems is discussed. ((orig.))

  14. Introduction to RF power amplifier design and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Eroglu, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction to RF Power Amplifier Design and Simulation fills a gap in the existing literature by providing step-by-step guidance for the design of radio frequency (RF) power amplifiers, from analytical formulation to simulation, implementation, and measurement. Featuring numerous illustrations and examples of real-world engineering applications, this book:Gives an overview of intermodulation and elaborates on the difference between linear and nonlinear amplifiersDescribes the high-frequency model and transient characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistorsDetails activ

  15. SPEAR 2 RF SYSTEM LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The design and performance of higher order mode (HOM) dampers for the SPEAR 2 RF system is presented. The SPEAR beam had experienced occasional periods of instability due to transverse oscillations which were driven by HOMs in the RF cavities. A substantial fraction of this RF energy was coupled out of the cavity into the waveguide connecting the cavity to the klystron. This waveguide was modified by adding a stub of smaller cross section, terminated by a ferrite tile load, to the system. Design considerations of the load, and its effect on HOMs and beam stability will be discussed

  16. New design concepts for ferrite-tuned low-energy-booster cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, G.

    1991-05-01

    The design concepts for ferrite-tuned accelerating cavities discussed in this paper differ from conventional solutions using thick ferrite toroids for frequency tuning. Instead, tuners consisting of an array of ferrite-loaded striplines are investigated. These promise more efficient cooling and higher operational reliability. Layout examples for the SSC-LEB rf system are presented (tuning range 47.5 to 59.8 MHz, repetition frequency 10 Hz). 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Design and results of the radio frequency quadrupole RF system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippe, J.; Marsden, E.; Marrufo, O.; Regan, A.; Rees, D.; Ziomek, C.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) entered into a joint venture to design and develop a 600 kW amplifier and its low-level controls for use in the Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating cavity of the SSC. The design and development work has been completed. After being tested separately, the high power amplifier and low level RF control system were integrated and tested on a test cavity. Results of that tests are given. Tests were then carried out on the actual RFQ with and without the presence of the accelerated beam. Results of these tests are also given, along with the phase and amplitude information

  18. AnalogRF and mixed-signal circuit systematic design

    CERN Document Server

    Tlelo-Cuautle, Esteban; Castro-Lopez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that in the digital domain, designers can take full benefits of IPs and design automation tools to synthesize and design very complex systems, the analog designers’ task is still considered as a ‘handcraft’, cumbersome and very time consuming process. Thus, tremendous efforts are being deployed  to develop new design methodologies in the analog/RF and mixed-signal domains. This book collects 16 state-of-the-art contributions devoted to the topic of systematic design of analog, RF and mixed signal circuits. Divided in the two parts Methodologies and Techniques recent theories, synthesis techniques and design methodologies, as well as new sizing approaches in the field of robust analog and mixed signal design automation are presented for researchers and R/D engineers.  

  19. The Design and Performance of the Spallation Neutron Source Low-Level RF Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, M; Kasemir, K; Ma, H; Piller, C

    2004-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator low-level RF control system has been developed within a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge national laboratories. Three distinct generations of the system, described in a previous publication [1], have been used to support beam commissioning at Oak Ridge. The third generation system went into production in early 2004, with installation in the coupled-cavity and superconducting linacs to span the remainder of the year. The final design of this system will be presented along with results of performance measurements.

  20. Fermilab 500 GeV main accelerator rf cavity 128 MHz mode damper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Fermilab 500-GeV main accelerating system has been operating for a year now with the aid of 128-MHz mode dampers. Such dampers proved to be necessary to achieve stable operation and a reasonably smooth slow spill at intensities of approximately 2 x 10 13 protons per pulse, and furthermore are low-cost and reliable. The approach used to identify troublesome modes, the observed beam blow-up without dampers, and the steps taken to design and install suitable dampers on eighteen main ring cavities are discussed. Spectrum analyzer pictures help illustrate the performance

  1. Status report on CERN activities aiming at the production of sputter-coated copper superconducting RF cavities for LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Chiaveri, E.; Hilleret, N.; Minestrini, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1990-01-01

    To upgrade LEP energy above 55 GeV, the first step will consist in installing 32 SC cavities of 352 MHz frequency at Point 2 of the machine. This operation will be carried out in steps and should be completed by the end of 1991. It has been decided that 8 of the 32 cavities will be Nb coated copper cavities, the crucial part of which (i.e. the cavity proper) will be manufactured and coated at CERN. For the time being, 4 of these 8 cavities have been prepared. They present Q 0 values at low field of about 10 10 , while at the specified operating field of 5 MV/m their Q 0 range between 5 and 7 x 10 9 . In order to carry out assembly, coating and rinsing of cavities in better (i.e. cleaner) conditions, an experimental hall is being prepared, which will become operational after summer 1989, such as to be used for the manufacturing of the second batch of 4 coated cavities. In parallel with this main activity, some work is also being devoted to the study of coatings of higher T c materials, namely NbTiN. Due to the higher T c , these new coatings should present a lower BCS RF resistivity, a necessary condition to obtain higher Q 0 values. The first cavity coated so far with NbTiN (a single cell cavity of 500 MHz frequency) gave encouraging results, which however are not better than what was obtained with a Nb film. (author)

  2. Design and analysis of magnetic shield for 650 MHz SCRF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Vanshree; Jain, Vikas; Das, S.; Shinde, R.S.; Joshi, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Five-cell, 650 MHz Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavity is being developed at RRCAT for the Injector Linac of proposed ISNS project. The SCRF cavity needs to be shielded effectively from earth magnetic field. The external magnetic field can cause magnetic field trapping that limits the performance of SCRF cavity. The allowable limit of earth magnetic field in the cavity surface is < 10 mG. The magnetic shielding analysis carried out for 650 MHz dressed SCRF cavity is presented in this paper. For axial magnetic field shielding analysis, 2-D code PANDIRA has been used. A 2-D axisymmetric geometry (cylinder of Cryoperm10 sheet with 460 mm diameter of various thickness and 1100 mm length) has been modelled and analyzed in the presence of 240 mG external axial magnetic field. The influence of partial opening of 120 mm diameter at both ends of the cylinder on magnetic field pattern inside the shielded region has been evaluated. The transverse magnetic shielding analysis in the presence of 500 mG transverse external field has been carried out using OPERA 3D code. The flux leakage through the major openings for cavity supports, ports on the shield is investigated and accordingly the openings are designed to minimize the leakage. Inference of material thickness on the magnetic shielding for reducing magnetic field below specified limit has been investigated. Details of design and analysis of magnetic shield for SCRF cavity will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Design approach for the development of a cryomodule for compact crab cavities for Hi-Lumi LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattalwar, Shrikant; Jones, Thomas; Templeton, Niklas; Goudket, Philippe; McIntosh, Peter; Wheelhouse, Alan; Burt, Graeme; Hall, Ben; Wright, Loren; Peterson, Tom

    2014-01-01

    A prototype Superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule, comprising multiple compact crab cavities is foreseen to realise a local crab crossing scheme for the "Hi-Lumi LHC", a project launched by CERN to increase the luminosity performance of LHC. A cryomodule with two cavities will be initially installed and tested on the SPS drive accelerator at CERN to evaluate performance with high-intensity proton beams. A series of boundary conditions influence the design of the cryomodule prototype, arising from; the complexity of the cavity design, the requirement for multiple RF couplers, the close proximity to the second LHC beam pipe and the tight space constraints in the SPS and LHC tunnels. As a result, the design of the helium vessel and the cryomodule has become extremely challenging. This paper assesses some of the critical cryogenic and engineering design requirements and describes an optimised cryomodule solution for the evaluation tests on SPS.

  4. RF quadrupole beam dynamics design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, K.R.; Stokes, R.H.; Wangler, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator structure is expected to permit considerable flexibility in achieving linac design objectives at low velocities. Calculational studies show that the RFQ can accept a high-current, low-velocity, dc beam, bunch it with high efficiency, and accelerate it to a velocity suitable for injection into a drift-tube linac. Although it is relatively easy to generate a satisfactory design for an RFQ linac for low beam currents, the space-charge effects produced by high currents dominate the design criteria. Methods have been developed to generate solutions that make suitable compromises between the effects of emittance growth, transmission efficiency, and overall structure length. Results are given for a test RFQ linac operating at 425 MHz

  5. Submacropulse electron-beam dynamics correlated with higher-order modes in Tesla-type superconducting rf cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Lumpkin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the direct observations of submacropulse beam centroid oscillations correlated with higher order modes (HOMs which were generated by off-axis electron beam steering in TESLA-type superconducting rf cavities. The experiments were performed at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST facility using its unique configuration of a photocathode rf gun injecting beam into two separated nine-cell cavities in series with corrector magnets and beam position monitors (BPMs located before, between, and after them. Oscillations of ∼100  kHz in the vertical plane and ∼380  kHz in the horizontal plane with up to 600-μm amplitudes were observed in a 3-MHz micropulse repetition rate beam with charges of 100, 300, 500, and 1000  pC/b. However, the effects were much reduced at 100  pC/b. The measurements were based on HOM detector circuitry targeting the first and second dipole passbands, rf BPM bunch-by-bunch array data, imaging cameras, and a framing camera. Calculations reproduced the oscillation frequencies of the phenomena in the vertical case. In principle, these fundamental results may be scaled to cryomodule configurations of major accelerator facilities.

  6. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  7. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  8. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  9. Design and development progress of a LLRF control system for a 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Kim, H. W.; Song, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Park, K. H.; Yu, I. H.; Chai, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    The LLRF (low-level radio-frequency) control system which regulates the amplitude and the phase of the accelerating voltage inside a RF cavity is essential to ensure the stable operation of charged particle accelerators. Recent advances in digital signal processors and data acquisition systems have allowed the LLRF control system to be implemented in digitally and have made it possible to meet the higher demands associated with the performance of LLRF control systems, such as stability, accuracy, etc. For this reason, many accelerator laboratories have completed or are completing the developments of digital LLRF control systems. The digital LLRF control system has advantages related with flexibility and fast reconfiguration. This paper describes the design of the FPGA (field programmable gate array) based LLRF control system and the status of development for this system. The proposed LLRF control system includes an analog front-end, a digital board (ADC (analog to digital converter), DAC (digital to analog converter), FPGA, etc.) and a RF & clock generation system. The control algorithms will be implemented by using the VHDL (VHSIC (very high speed integrated circuits) hardware description language), and the EPICS (experiment physics and industrial control system) will be ported to the host computer for the communication. In addition, the purpose of this system is to control a 500 MHz RF cavity, so the system will be applied to the superconducting cavity to be installed in the PLS storage ring, and its performance will be tested.

  10. Upgrade of the cryogenic infrastructure of SM18, CERN main test facility for superconducting magnets and RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, A.; Dhalla, F.; Gayet, P.; Serio, L.

    2017-12-01

    SM18 is CERN main facility for testing superconducting accelerator magnets and superconducting RF cavities. Its cryogenic infrastructure will have to be significantly upgraded in the coming years, starting in 2019, to meet the testing requirements for the LHC High Luminosity project and for the R&D program for superconducting magnets and RF equipment until 2023 and beyond. This article presents the assessment of the cryogenic needs based on the foreseen test program and on past testing experience. The current configuration of the cryogenic infrastructure is presented and several possible upgrade scenarios are discussed. The chosen upgrade configuration is then described and the characteristics of the main newly required cryogenic equipment, in particular a new 35 g/s helium liquefier, are presented. The upgrade implementation strategy and plan to meet the required schedule are then described.

  11. Characterization technique for long optical fiber cavities based on beating spectrum of multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser and beating spectrum in the RF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of long fiber cavities is essential for many systems to predict the system practical performance. The conventional techniques for optical cavity characterization are not suitable for long fiber cavities due to the cavities' small free spectral ranges and due to the length variations caused by the environmental effects. In this work, we present a novel technique to characterize long fiber cavities using multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser source and RF spectrum analyzer. The fiber laser source is formed in a ring configuration, where the fiber laser cavity length is chosen to be 15 km to ensure that the free spectral range is much smaller than the free spectral range of the characterized passive fiber cavities. The method has been applied experimentally to characterize ring cavities with lengths of 6.2 m and 2.4 km. The results are compared to theoretical predictions with very good agreement.

  12. Baking effect on Niobium superconducting RF cavities and its physical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility, VA, (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Recently a very surprising phenomenon has been discovered at JLab and Saclay with chemically polished niobium cavities, which the baking during vacuum evacuation has benefits to improve the cavity performance: high Q and high gradient. We have confirmed the same effect on the electropolished niobium cavities. We have analyzed the temperature dependence of the surface resistance in order to understand this effect in the frame or BCS theory. In this paper these results will be presented. (author)

  13. Scaled RF cavity for the Vinca cyclotron; Modelni poskusi visokofrekvencnega dela za ciklotron u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulin, A [VTS, Univerza Maribor, Maribor (Yugoslavia); Bezic, N; Anicin, I [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1983-07-01

    RF resonator reduced five times is described. The model was constructed according to former considerations. The measurements have shown that the predictions had been correct with respect to the capacitively terminated as well as the helix coaxial guide. (author)

  14. Design and construction of cavity frequency measurement and tuning systems of traveling wave electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ahmadiannamin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose for designing and constructing electroradio frequency linear accelerators is to reach better beam quality with higher power and energy by lower RF power consumption. The main step for this purpose is doing research and development in the area of designing, constructing, measuring and tuning of accelerator RF cavities. Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM linear accelerator projecta is the first Iranian project for construction of electrolinear accelerator. In this paper, a brief introduction to construction procedure has been given. Then, the measurement and tuning of a disk-loaded periodic structure before and after tuning was reported. In addition, the detailed design and measurement setup for electric field measurement by perturbation method was investigated  

  15. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  16. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Arsenyev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of higher order mode (HOM damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs. Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  17. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  18. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented

  19. Design and construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHz klystron to be used as RF power source for LHC/RF component tests

    CERN Document Server

    Frischholz, Hans; Pearson, C

    1998-01-01

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with t...

  20. Nonlinear Near-Field Microwave Microscopy for RF Defect Localization in Nb-Based Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Tamin

    2011-03-01

    Niobium Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are very sensitive to localized defects that give rise to quenches at high accelerating gradients. In order to identify these defects via scanning microscopy, and to further understand the origins of the quench under high radio frequency excitation (1-3 GHz), a scanning probe with localized and up to ~ 200 mT RF magnetic field is required for low temperature microscopy to achieve sub-micron resolution. For this purpose, we developed a micro loop probe on silicon substrate with outer diameter 20 μ m and inner diameter 17 μ m and successfully fabricated it by lithography. The probe has been used to identify a signal arising from the nonlinear Meissner effect in a Nb thin film. In addition, a magnetic write head is another promising candidate to achieve this goal of understanding localized defect behavior under high RF magnetic field at low temperatures. We will discuss and compare both types of probe for nonlinear scanning microscopy and RF defect localization in superconductors. We acknowledge the support of DOE/HEP.

  1. A new interlock design for the TESLA RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leich, H.; Kahl, J.; Choroba, S.; Grevsmuehl, T.; Heidbrook, N.

    2001-01-01

    The RF system for TESLA requires a comprehensive interlock system. Usually interlock systems are organized in a hierarchical way. In order to react to different fault conditions in a fast and flexible manner a nonhierarchical organization seems to be the better solution. At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY the authors will install a nonhierarchical interlock system that is based on user designed reprogrammable gate-arrays (FPGA's) which incorporate an embedded microcontroller system. This system could be used later for the TESLA linear collider replacing a strictly hierarchical design

  2. Reducing field emission in the superconducting rf cavities for the next generation of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Q.S.; Hartung, W.; Leibovich, A.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on field emission, which is an obstacle to reaching the higher fields called for in future applications of superconducting radio frequency cavities to particle accelerators. The authors used heat treatment up to 1500 degrees C in an ultra-high vacuum furnace, along with processing of cavities and temperature mapping, to suppress field emission and analyze emitter properties. In 27 tests of 1-cell 1500 MHz fired accelerating cavities, on the average the accelerating field E acc increased to 24 MV/m (H pk = 1250 Oe) from 13 MV/m with chemical treatment alone; the highest E acc reached was 30.5 MV/m

  3. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; /DESY

    2009-05-01

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  4. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.

    2009-01-01

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  5. Optimizing Centrifugal Barrel Polishing For Mirror Finish SRF Cavity And RF Tests At Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli; Tian, Hui

    2012-01-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on a 1.3 GHz fine grain TESLA single cell cavity and 1.5 GHz fine grain CEBAF high gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) single cell cavity following a modified recipe originally developed at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL). We were able to obtain a mirror like surface similar to that obtained at FNAL, while reducing the number of CBP steps and total processing time. This paper will discuss the change in surface and subsequent cavity performance post CBP, after a 800 C bake (no pre-bake chemistry) and minimal controlled electro-polishing (10 micron). In addition to Q vs. E ACC thermometry mapping with preheating characteristics and optical inspection of the cavity after CBP will also be shown.

  6. RF properties of 700 MHz, β = 0.42 elliptical cavity for high current ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, ... has been taken up as a part of the accelerator-driven subcritical system project. ... cavity's peak electric and magnetic fields, power dissipation Pc, quality factor Q and.

  7. Investigation of Plasma Etching for Superconducting RF Cavities Surface Preparation. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuskovic, Leposava

    2009-01-01

    Our results show that plasma-treated samples are comparable or superior to a BCP sample, both in the size of features and sharpness of the boundaries between individual features at the surface. Plasma treatment of bulk Nb cavities is a promising technique for microwave cavities preparation used in particle acceleration application. Etching rates are sufficiently high to enable efficient removal of mechanically damaged surface layer with high reproducibility. No impurities are deposited on the bulk Nb surface during plasma treatment. Surface topology characteristic are promising for complex cavity geometry, since discharge conforms the profile of the reaction chamber. In view of these experimental results, we propose plasma treatment for producing microwave cavities with high Q factor instead of using bulk Nb treated with wet etching process.

  8. Design and development of low level S-Band RF control system for IRFEL injector LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Singh, Adarsh Pratap; Namdeo, Rajkumar; Baxy, Deodatta; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    A low level RF system has been designed and developed for phase and amplitude stabilization of S- Band microwave power being fed to fundamental buncher cavity and the injector LINAC structure of the Infra Red Free Electron Laser being developed at RRCAT Indore. The system uses analog phase shifters and voltage variable attenuators to control the phase and amplitude respectively, the control voltages for phase shifters and attenuators are generated using a 12 Bit ADC and is software controlled. The system has a slow feedback to correct phase and amplitude drifts occurring due to thermal variations and a fast feed forward mechanism to vary amplitude and phase of the output pulse to compensate beam loading and to shape the klystron output power. The present paper describes the design aspects of the LLRF system. (author)

  9. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. M.; Liu, Kexin; Geng, Rongli

    2014-01-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6A-1.6 MV/m, 21A-34 MV/m, 32A-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6A-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MPA's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model

  10. Mirror-smooth surfaces and repair of defects in superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C. A. [Fermilab; Cooley, L. D. [Fermilab

    2012-11-22

    Mechanical techniques for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities have been systematically explored. By extending known techniques to fine polishing, mirror-like finishes were produced, with <15 nm RMS (root mean square) roughness over 1 mm2 scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by the electropolishing of niobium cavities. The extended mechanical polishing (XMP) process was applied to several SRF cavities which exhibited equator defects that caused quench at <20 MV m-1 and were not improved by further electropolishing. Cavity optical inspection equipment verified the complete removal of these defects, and minor acid processing, which dulled the mirror finish, restored performance of the defective cells to the high gradients and quality factors measured for adjacent cells when tested with other harmonics. This innate repair feature of XMP could be used to increase manufacturing yield. Excellent superconducting properties resulted after initial process optimization, with quality factor Q of 3 × 1010 and accelerating gradient of 43 MV m-1 being attained for a single-cell TESLA cavity, which are both close to practical limits. Several repaired nine-cell cavities also attained Q > 8 × 109 at 35 MV m-1, which is the specification for the International Linear Collider. Future optimization of the process and pathways for eliminating requirements for acid processing are also discussed.

  11. Comparative simulation studies of multipacting in higher-order-mode couplers of superconducting rf cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multipacting (MP in higher-order-mode (HOM couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6–1.6  MV/m, 21–34   MV/m, 32–35  MV/m and >40  MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6–13  MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high-energy pulsed as well as medium-energy continuous wave accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP’s predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CEBAF upgrade, Spallation Neutron Source (SNS, and Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  12. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  13. An updated overview of the LEB RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Ferrell, J.H.; Curbow, J.E.; Friedrichs, C.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) rf systems consists of the following major subsystems: a vacuum tube final rf amplifier driven by a solid state rf amplifier, a ferrite-tuned rf cavity used to bunch and accelerate the beam, a low-level rf system including rf feedback systems, a computer-based supervisory control system, and associated power supplies. The LEB rf system is broadband with the exception of the rf cavity, which is electronically tuned from approximately 47.5 MHz to 59.7 MHz in 50 ms. The design and development status of the LEB rf system is presented, with particular emphasis on the cavity and tuner, and the tuner bias power supply

  14. Designing RF control subsystems using the VXIbus standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Vong, F.C.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Various components are being designed to control the RF system of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS). The associated control electronics (phase shifters, amplitude modulators, phase detectors, automatic tuning control, and local feedback control) are designed as modular cards with multiple channels for ease of replacement as well as for compact design. Various specifications of the VXIbus are listed and the method used to simplify the design of the control subsystem is shown. A commercial VXI interface board was used to speed the design cycle. Required manpower and actual task times are included. A discussion of the computer architecture and software development of the device drivers which allowed computer control from a VME processor located in a remote crate operating under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls Software (EPICS) program is also presented

  15. 3-D electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical simulation of a RF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Launay, F

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D thermo-mechanical study of the edge of entrance blade of IPHI's RFQ was conducted by means of I-DEAS code. The aim is to compare the temperatures reached, the constraints, and the deformations calculated on the basis of RF power density stored on the blade obtained by means of two different electromagnetic computational codes, SOPRANO and MAFIA.

  16. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  17. State-Of High Brightness RF Photo-Injector Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Massimo; Clendenin, Jym; Palmer, Dennis; Rosenzweig, James; Serafini, Luca

    2000-04-01

    The art of designing optimized high brightness electron RF Photo-Injectors has moved in the last decade from a cut and try procedure, guided by experimental experience and time consuming particle tracking simulations, up to a fast parameter space scanning, guided by recent analytical results and a fast running semi-analytical code, so to reach the optimum operating point which corresponds to maximum beam brightness. Scaling laws and the theory of invariant envelope provide to the designers excellent tools for a first parameters choice and the code HOMDYN, based on a multi-slice envelope description of the beam dynamics, is tailored to describe the space charge dominated dynamics of laminar beams in presence of time dependent space charge forces, giving rise to a very fast modeling capability for photo-injectors design. We report in this talk the results of a recent beam dynamics study, motivated by the need to redesign the LCLS photoinjector. During this work a new effective working point for a split RF photoinjector has been discovered by means of the previous mentioned approach. By a proper choice of rf gun and solenoid parameters, the emittance evolution shows a double minimum behavior in the drifting region. If the booster is located where the relative emittance maximum and the envelope waist occur, the second emittance minimum can be shifted at the booster exit and frozen at a very low level (0.3 mm-mrad for a 1 nC flat top bunch), to the extent that the invariant envelope matching conditions are satisfied.

  18. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  19. Control electronics of the PEP RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and field level of the PEP RF cavities is described. The control electronics of one RF station is composed of several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the fields of each cavity balanced; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is regulated by a gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain, the klystron and the cavities are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented

  20. RF structure design of the China Material Irradiation Facility RFQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxing; He, Yuan; Xu, Xianbo; Zhang, Zhouli; Wang, Fengfeng; Dou, Weiping; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-10-01

    The radio frequency structure design of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the front end of China Material Irradiation Facility (CMIF), which is an accelerator based neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor material qualification, has been completed. The RFQ is specified to accelerate 10 mA continuous deuteron beams from the energies of 20 keV/u to 1.5 MeV/u within the vane length of 5250 mm. The working frequency of the RFQ is selected to 162.5 MHz and the inter-vane voltage is set to 65 kV. Four-vane cavity type is selected and the cavity structure is designed drawing on the experience of China Initiative Accelerator Driven System (CIADS) Injector II RFQ. In order to reduce the azimuthal asymmetry of the field caused from errors in fabrication and assembly, a frequency separation between the working mode and its nearest dipole mode is reached to 17.66 MHz by utilizing 20 pairs of π-mode stabilizing loops (PISLs) distributed along the longitudinal direction with equal intervals. For the purpose of tuning, 100 slug tuners were introduced to compensate the errors caused by machining and assembly. In order to obtain a homogeneous electrical field distribution along cavity, vane cutbacks are introduced and output endplate is modified. Multi-physics study of the cavity with radio frequency power and water cooling is performed to obtain the water temperature tuning coefficients. Through comparing to the worldwide CW RFQs, it is indicated that the power density of the designed structure is moderate for operation under continuous wave (CW) mode.

  1. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  2. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor specific surface properties which allow to perform a quality control and assurance during the production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ of the integrated grain boundary area ΣA versus the maximal achievable accelerating field E{sub acc,max} has been found.

  3. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor specific surface properties which allow to perform a quality control and assurance during the production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ of the integrated grain boundary area ΣA versus the maximal achievable accelerating field E acc,max has been found.

  4. Design and Optimization of Thermophotovoltaic System Cavity with Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermophotovoltaic (TPV systems can convert radiant energy into electrical power. Here we explore the design of the TPV system cavity, which houses the emitter and the photovoltaic (PV cells. Mirrors are utilized in the cavity to modify the spatial and spectral distribution within. After discussing the basic concentric tubular design, two novel cavity configurations are put forward and parametrically studied. The investigated variables include the shape, number, and placement of the mirrors. The optimization objectives are the optimized efficiency and the extended range of application of the TPV system. Through numerical simulations, the relationship between the design parameters and the objectives are revealed. The results show that careful design of the cavity configuration can markedly enhance the performance of the TPV system.

  5. Design of the Advanced Virgo non-degenerate recycling cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granata, M; Barsuglia, M; Flaminio, R; Freise, A; Hild, S; Marque, J

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is the project to upgrade the interferometric gravitational wave detector Virgo, and it foresees the implementation of power and signal non-degenerate recycling cavities. Such cavities suppress the build-up of high order modes of the resonating sidebands, with some advantage for the commissioning of the detector and the build-up of the gravitational signal. Here we present the baseline design of the Advanced Virgo non-degenerate recycling cavities, giving some preliminary results of simulations about the tolerances of this design to astigmatism, mirror figure errors and thermal lensing.

  6. Comparative Study of Antenna Designs for RF Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sika Shrestha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, several antenna designs of rectenna that meet various objectives have been proposed for use in RF energy harvesting. Among various antennas, microstrip patch antennas are widely used because of their low profile, light weight, and planar structure. Conventional patch antennas are rectangular or circular in shape, but variations in their basic design are made for different purposes. This paper begins with an explanation and discussion of different designs, put forward with an aim of miniaturization, harmonic rejection, and reconfigurability. Finally, microstrip patch structured rectennas are evaluated and compared with an emphasis on the various methods adopted to obtain a compact rectenna, harmonic rejection functionality, and frequency and polarization selectivity.

  7. Design development and testing of high voltage power supply with crowbar protection for IOT based RF amplifier system in VECC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, S. K.; Kumar, Y.

    2018-05-01

    This paper described the detailed design, development and testing of high voltage power supply (‑30 kV, 3.2 A) and different power supplies for biasing electrodes of Inductive Output Tube (IOT) based high power Radio Frequency (RF) amplifier. This IOT based RF amplifier is further used for pursuing research and development activity in superconducting RF cavity project at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) Kolkata. The state-of-the-art technology of IOT-based high power RF amplifier is designed, developed, and tested at VECC which is the first of its kind in India. A high voltage power supply rated at negative polarity of 30 kV dc/3.2 A is required for biasing cathode of IOT with crowbar protection circuit. This power supply along with crowbar protection system is designed, developed and tested at VECC for testing the complete setup. The technical difficulties and challenges occured during the design of cathode power supply, its crowbar protection techniques along with other supported power supplies i.e. grid and ion pump power supplies are discussed in this paper.

  8. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser and the International Linear Collider HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot ’optical bench for automated cavity inspection with high resolution on short timescales’ OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor-specific surface properties which allow the performance of quality control and assurance during production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ =-0.93 with a significance of 6 σ of the integrated grain boundary area \\sum {A} versus the maximal achievable accelerating field {{E}}{acc,\\max } has been found.

  9. Effect of the Tuner on the Field Flatness of SNS Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, A

    2004-01-01

    Field flatness in a multi-cell superconducting cavity affects not only the net accelerating voltage, but also the peak surface field and the Lorenz Force detuning coefficient. Our measurement indicates that the field flatness changes both external Q of the Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and external Q of the Field Probe (FP). The field amplitude tilts linearly to the distance between the cell center and the cavity’s geometry center (pivot point). The tilt rate has been measured in a cryomodule cold (2 K) test, being about 2%/100 kHz, relative the field flatness at the cavity’s center frequency of 805 MHz. Bead-pull measurements confirmed that the field flatness change is 2.0%/100 kHz for a medium β cavity with helium vessel, and 1.72%/100 kHz without helium vessel. These results matched the predictions of simulations using ANSYS and SUPERFISH. A detailed analysis reveals that longitudinal capacitive gap deformation is the main cause of the frequency change. Field flatness change ...

  10. Superconducting radio frequency cavities: design, development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, P.N.; Mistri, K.K.; Sonti, S.S.K.; Sacharias, J.; Raiand, A.; Kanjilal, D.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the development of superconducting niobium cavities has evoked a lot of interest among the accelerator physics community of India. Many laboratories are planning to develop superconducting niobium cavities for new accelerators and applications. Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) has been engaged in the indigenous development of niobium resonators for over a decade. During this period, several quarter wave resonators have been successfully built, tested and installed in the superconducting linac at IUAC. A new niobium low beta resonator for the High Current Injector (HCI) project has been designed, prototyped and tested. In addition to the in-house projects, IUAC is nearing completion of two niobium single spoke resonators (SSR1) for Fermi Lab, USA. Under the Indian Institutions and Fermi Lab Collaboration (IIFC), Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore and Inter-University Accelerator Centre have jointly developed TESLA-type 1.3 GHz single cell cavities which have achieved very high accelerating gradients. Buoyed by the success of this work, a 5-cell 1.3 GHz cavity with simple end tubes has been successfully built. This cavity is presently at Fermi Lab for 2 K tests. Recently, a 650 MHz, β=0.9 single cell cavity has also been successfully completed and is ready for cold tests. There are plans to develop a 650 MHz, β=0.6 single cell cavity in collaboration with VECC, Kolkata. This paper presents the status of the niobium cavities developed at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. (author)

  11. Surface Characterization of Impurities in Superconducting Niobium for Radio Frequency (RF) Cavities used in Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Prateek

    Niobium (Nb) is the material of choice for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities used in particle accelerators owing to its high critical temperature (Tc = 9.2 K) and critical magnetic field (≈ 200mT). However, niobium tends to harbor interstitial impurities such as H, C, O and N, which are detrimental to cavity performance. Since the magnetic field penetration depth (lambda) of niobium is 40nm, it is important to characterize these impurities using surface characterization techniques. Also, it is known that certain heat treatments improve cavity efficiency via interstitial impurity removal from the surface of niobium. Thus, a systematic study on the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurity levels is needed. In this work, surface analysis of both heat treated and non heat treated (120°C-1400°C) large grain (single crystal) bulk niobium samples was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Impurity levels were compared on the surface using SIMS after various types of heat treatments expected to improve cavity performance, and the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurities were examined. SIMS characterization of ion implanted standards of C, N, O, D showed that quantification of C, N and O impurities in Nb is achievable and indicated that H is very mobile in Nb. It was hence determined that quantification of H in Nb is not possible using SIMS due to its high diffusivity in Nb. However, a comparative study of the high temperature heat treated (600°C-1400°C) and non heat treated (control) samples revealed that hydrogen levels decreased by upto a factor of 100. This is attributed to the dissociation of the niobium surface oxide layer, which acts as a passivating film on the surface, and subsequent desorption of hydrogen. Reformation of this oxide layer on cool down disallows any re-absorption of hydrogen, indicating that the oxide acts as a surface barrier for

  12. Design study of 'HIBLIC-I' reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiie, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design of a reactor cavity for HIBLIC-1, a heavy ion fusion reactor system, was carried out. Design efforts have been concentrated mainly on the feasibility study of the physical scenario adopted and also on the system integration of the structures and components into a compact reactor cavity. The design features of the reactor are a compact reactor cavity, maximum coolant temperature up to 500 deg C, the protection of the sacrificial wall and cavity wall from radiation, the protection of the sacrificial wall from the pressure transient due to rapid heating, the selection of a ferritic steel HT-9 as the structural material and impurity control, and tritium breeding and recovery. The purpose of this paper is to describe the outline of the reactor cavity design of HIBLIC-1. The objectives of the preliminary conceptual design were to propose the idea and concept in order to constitute the physical scenario without contradiction and to find out the critical and fundamental problems to be studied in future. The cavity configuration and dynamics, tritium breeding and radiation damage, the behavior of a structural material in liquid lithium and tritium recovery are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. SNS Low-Level RF Control System Design and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hengjie; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; Piller, Maurice; Ratti, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    A full digital Low-Level RF controller has been developed for SNS LINAC. Its design is a good example of a modern digital implementation of the classic control theory. The digital hardware for all the control and DSP functionalities, including the final vector modulation, is implemented on a single high-density FPGA. Two models for the digital hardware have been written in VHDL and Verilog respectively, based on a very low latency control algorithm, and both have been being used for supporting the testing and commissioning the LINAC to the date. During the commissioning, the flexibility and ability for precise controls that only digital design on a larger FPGA can offer has proved to be a necessity for meeting the great challenge of a high-power pulsed SCL.

  14. RF linac designs with beams in thermal equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.; Brown, N.

    1996-01-01

    Beams in conventional radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf linacs) usually have a transverse temperature which is much larger than the longitudinal temperature. With high currents, space charge forces couple the transverse and longitudinal particle motions, driving the beam toward thermal equilibrium, which leads to emittance growth and halo formation. A design strategy is proposed in which the beam has equal transverse and longitudinal temperatures through the entire linac, avoiding these undesirable effects. For such equipartitioned linac beams, simple analytical relationships can be derived for the bunch size, tune depression, and other parameters as a function of beam intensity, emittance, and external focusing. These relations were used to develop three conceptual designs for a 938 MeV, 100 mA proton linac with different tune depressions, which are presented in this paper. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Chen; Stony Brook University, NY; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Stony Brook University, NY; Hao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    The term “real-estate gradient” is used to describe the energy gain provided by an accelerating structure per actual length it takes in the accelerator. given that the length of the tunnel available for the accelerator is constrained, the real-estate gradient is an important measure of the efficiency of a given accelerator structure. When designing an accelerating cavity to be efficient in this sense, the unwanted Higher Order Mode (HOM) fields should be reduced by suitable HOM dampers. This is a particularly important consideration for high current operation. The additional RF components might take longitude space and reduce the total accelerating efficiency. We describe a new high efficiency 5-cell cavity with the dampers included. The total length of the cavity is reduced by 13% as compared to a more conventional design without compromising the cavity fundamental-mode performance. In addition, the HOM impedance is reduced for a higher Beam-Break-Up (BBU) threshold of operating current. In this article, we consider an example, a possible application at the eRHIC Energy Recovery Linac (ERL).

  16. Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Hao, Yue; Xin, Tianmu; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-10-01

    The term "real-estate gradient" is used to describe the energy gain provided by an accelerating structure per actual length it takes in the accelerator. given that the length of the tunnel available for the accelerator is constrained, the real-estate gradient is an important measure of the efficiency of a given accelerator structure. When designing an accelerating cavity to be efficient in this sense, the unwanted Higher Order Mode (HOM) fields should be reduced by suitable HOM dampers. This is a particularly important consideration for high current operation. The additional RF components might take longitude space and reduce the total accelerating efficiency. We describe a new high efficiency 5-cell cavity with the dampers included. The total length of the cavity is reduced by 13% as compared to a more conventional design without compromising the cavity fundamental-mode performance. In addition, the HOM impedance is reduced for a higher Beam-Break-Up (BBU) threshold of operating current. In this paper, we consider an example, a possible application at the eRHIC Energy Recovery Linac (ERL).

  17. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris, and the beam pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray for elemental analysis was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S were found covering the samples nonuniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  18. Magnetic field measurements on the perpendicular biased RF booster cavity for the proposed TRIUMF KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enchevich, I.B.; Poirier, R.L.

    1992-08-01

    The successful operation of the full scale KAON Factory Ferrite tuned Booster Accelerating Cavity Prototype allowed us to do ac magnetic field measurements in the tuner. The field measured is close to that calculated. The measured data are discussed. They may be used for reliable computation of the perturbation of the beam dynamics due to the ferrite biasing magnetic field. Methods to compensate the disturbing magnetic fields are discussed. 7 refs., 7 figs

  19. Design optimization of structural parameters in double gate MOSFETs for RF applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jiale; Xiao Han; Huang Ru; Wang Pengfei; Wang Yangyuan

    2008-01-01

    Double gate (DG) MOSFETs have recently attracted much attention for both logic and analog/RF applications. In this paper we focus on the design consideration of DG devices for RF applications. The different influences of key structural parameters on RF characteristics are comprehensively studied and optimized, including body thickness, spacer length and source/drain raised height. The impact of the fluctuation of geometrical parameters of DG devices on RF figures-of-merit are estimated. In addition, different dominance of structural parameters for RF applications is studied in DG devices with different channel lengths. The dependence of RF performance on the gate length downscaling of DG devices is also discussed. The obtained results give the design guidelines for DG devices for RF applications

  20. Analysis of eddy currents in the walls of the ferrite tuned RF cavity for the TRIUMF Kaon factory booster synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enchevich, I.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Poirier, R.L.

    1991-05-01

    In the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavity of the proposed TRIUMF Kaon Factory Booster Synchrotron, magnetizing flux passes through the cavity walls. If special care is not taken to minimize eddy current loss in the walls, the dissipated power would be excessive and the magnetic fields set up by the eddy currents would disturb the magnetic field being applied. By electrically isolating the cooling structure from the cavity walls and introducing slots in the walls it is possible to bring to an acceptable level both the power loss and the maximal temperatures. Based on the measurements, an analytical model - essentially 3D - was derived and the eddy currents were predicted using the circuit analysis program PSpice. The calculated surface current and power distribution agree with measurements. PSpice can now be used to determine the effect of design changes on the eddy current and power distribution. (Author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  1. Electron bunch train excited higher-order modes in a superconducting RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Feng; Huang, Sen-Lin; Wang, Fang; Feng, Li-Wen; Zhuang, De-Hao; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Jian-Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2017-04-01

    Higher-order mode (HOM) based intra-cavity beam diagnostics has been proved effective and convenient in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators. Our recent research shows that the beam harmonics in the bunch train excited HOM spectrum, which have much higher signal-to-noise ratio than the intrinsic HOM peaks, may also be useful for beam diagnostics. In this paper, we will present our study on bunch train excited HOMs, including a theoretical model and recent experiments carried out based on the DC-SRF photoinjector and SRF linac at Peking University. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275014)

  2. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  3. Digitally-assisted analog and RF CMOS circuit design for software-defined radio

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the state-of-the-art in RF, analog, and mixed-signal circuit design for Software Defined Radio (SDR). It synthesizes for analog/RF circuit designers the most important general design approaches to take advantage of the most recent CMOS technology, which can integrate millions of transistors, as well as several real examples from the most recent research results.

  4. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  5. Hearthfire design base for the high current low velocity rf linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Khoe, T.K.; Kustom, R.L.; Martin, R.L.; Moretti, A.

    1977-01-01

    The particle beam parameters needed for inertial fusion can be achieved with conventional accelerator technology if heavy ion machines attain the level of performance of the most intense high energy proton machines. Many of the problems posed by this goal pertain to the low energy portions of the accelerator system. In particular, the implied particle current in the rf linac is 10 3 --10 4 times the values achieved with existing heavy ion machines. Much of this discrepancy is simply attributable to the great differences between the design considerations relevant to accelerators for fusion and those which have determined the performance of the existing machines. The basic concept chosen at Argonne National Laboratory is cavities containing single drift tubes mounted on lambda/4 supports. Such structures pose the least problem for the beam transport system, and one cavity is placed between adjacent quadrupole magnets. The average voltage gain of the first cells of the low velocity section is moderate; and, although probably acceptable and improved by the end of the 10 MV section, the low initial gain adds to the motivation provided by the transport problem to increase the preinjector voltage substantially above 750 kV

  6. Automated bead-positioning system for measuring impedances of R-F cavity modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a fully automated bead puller system which uses stepping motors to position the bead, and an HP-8510 network analyzer to measure the resulting frequency shifts, both devices being under computer control. Longitudinal motion of the bead is used for measurement of cavity shunt impedance. In addition, azimuthal scans at fixed longitudinal position aid in determining the multipole character of higher-order modes. High sensitivity/accuracy is made possible by measuring phase shifts at the unperturbed resonant frequencies (rather than frequency shifts themselves), thereby permitting averaging factors of > 500 with only modest increases in data acquisition time. Sample measurements will be presented. A comprehensive analysis of the experimental results is presented in an accompanying paper

  7. Prototype development of radio frequency cavity and quadrupole for ADSS - initial efforts by mechanical design and prototype development section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Kamble, Sunil; Choughule, L.S.; Kumar, Sunil; Patankar, S.R.; Phalke, V.M.; Dharmik, D.A.; Singh, Tejinder; Ram, Y.; Chaudhari, A.T.; Pathak, Kavindra; Prasad, N.K.; Marathe, V.V.; Matkar, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical Design and Prototype Development Section has participated in the efforts for development of RF cavity and Quadrupole for ADSS. Recently prototype Super conducting RF cavity, Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) Simulation Chamber and related experimental setups were developed, fabricated and delivered for the characterisation of various relevant parameters. Under the program for development of Super conducting RF Cavity for high-energy section of LINAC of ADS first prototype RF Cavity of ETP copper was developed by machining and brazing process. The prototype cavity having elliptical and circular profile is the heart of this setup. The cavity is made up of two symmetrical cups joined together by welding or brazing. Various methods are being tried out by MD and PDS for the fabrication of cups and joining them together. Manufacturing of cup by machining and joining them by conventional brazing technique to make the cavity was the first step in this direction. Another method of manufacturing and joining viz forming of cup by deep drawing and joining them by EB welding is in progress. RFQ is a versatile and efficient system for accelerating ion beams especially at low energy. It works in quadrupole mode, which is at 350M Hz. RFQ Focuses, Bunches and Accelerates the beam simultaneously. The bunching is done in this RFQ, which results in more than 95% transmission where as in the normal buncher the transmission is less than 40%. The actual RFQ, which is designed for the PURNIMA facility, will be fabricated from OFHC copper that will accelerate a deuteron (D+) ion beam from 50keV to 400keV over its 1.37meter length. For the validation of manufacturing process and characterisation of various parameters at low frequency a 500mm long prototype RFQ in Aluminium with an accuracy of ± 25microns and surface finish of 1.6 micron has been fabricated by MD and PDS. A simplified simulation chamber to facilitate the development of RFQ for

  8. RFTech report on cavity design, LLRF & HPRF systems and design integration, & costing

    CERN Document Server

    De Conto, J M; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    This report highlights results from the EuCARD WP4.3 RFTech network, which was active from April 2009 to July 2013. The objective of RFTech was bringing together RF experts from different laboratories and communities, e.g. proton & electron accelerators, or storage rings & linacs, to exchange ideas and to promote innovation on all aspects of RF technology. RFTech organized 4 primary annual workshops and the organized or co-organized several topical workshops or dedicated sessions in larger conferences, like MIXDES, ICAP 12 etc. The present document highlights the main topics covered during this networking activity. The RFTech activities related to superconducting RF infrastructures are described in the EuCARD report “European Infrastructures for R&D and Test of Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities and Cryo-modules” (Wolfgang Weingarten, ISBN 978-83-7207-952-7).

  9. Development of a multi-scale simulation model of tube hydroforming for superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sumption, M.D., E-mail: sumption.3@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Bong, H.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lim, H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collings, E.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-01-02

    This work focuses on finite element modeling of the hydroforming process for niobium tubes intended for use in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The hydroforming of tubular samples into SRF-relevant shapes involves the complex geometries and loading conditions which develop during the deformation, as well as anisotropic materials properties. Numerical description of the process entails relatively complex numerical simulations. A crystal plasticity (CP) model was constructed that included the evolution of crystallographic orientation during deformation as well as the anisotropy of tubes in all directions and loading conditions. In this work we demonstrate a multi-scale simulation approach which uses both microscopic CP and macroscopic continuum models. In this approach a CP model (developed and implemented into ABAQUS using UMAT) was used for determining the flow stress curve only under bi-axial loading in order to reduce the computing time. The texture of the materials obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and tensile test data were inputs for this model. Continuum FE analysis of tube hydroforming using the obtained constitutive equation from the CP modeling was then performed and compared to the results of hydraulic bulge testing. The results show that high quality predictions of the deformation under hydroforming of Nb tubes can be obtained using CP-FEM based on their known texture and the results of tensile tests. The importance of the CP-FEM based approach is that it reduces the need for hydraulic bulge testing, using a relatively simple computational approach.

  10. Bulge testing of copper and niobium tubes for hydroformed RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S., E-mail: kim.3237@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sumption, M.D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Susner, M.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collings, E.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-01-27

    The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to gain experience for the subsequent hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for high energy particle acceleration. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. In the final part of the study finite-element models (FEM) incorporating constitutive (stress–strain) relationships analytically derived from the tensile and bulge tests, respectively, were used to replicate the bulge test. As expected, agreement was obtained between the experimental bulge parameters and the FEM model based on the bulge-derived constitutive relationship. Not so for the FEM model based on tensile-test data. It is concluded that a constitutive relationship based on bulge testing is necessary to predict a material's performance under hydraulic deformation.

  11. Development of a multi-scale simulation model of tube hydroforming for superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.S.; Sumption, M.D.; Bong, H.J.; Lim, H.; Collings, E.W.

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on finite element modeling of the hydroforming process for niobium tubes intended for use in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The hydroforming of tubular samples into SRF-relevant shapes involves the complex geometries and loading conditions which develop during the deformation, as well as anisotropic materials properties. Numerical description of the process entails relatively complex numerical simulations. A crystal plasticity (CP) model was constructed that included the evolution of crystallographic orientation during deformation as well as the anisotropy of tubes in all directions and loading conditions. In this work we demonstrate a multi-scale simulation approach which uses both microscopic CP and macroscopic continuum models. In this approach a CP model (developed and implemented into ABAQUS using UMAT) was used for determining the flow stress curve only under bi-axial loading in order to reduce the computing time. The texture of the materials obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and tensile test data were inputs for this model. Continuum FE analysis of tube hydroforming using the obtained constitutive equation from the CP modeling was then performed and compared to the results of hydraulic bulge testing. The results show that high quality predictions of the deformation under hydroforming of Nb tubes can be obtained using CP-FEM based on their known texture and the results of tensile tests. The importance of the CP-FEM based approach is that it reduces the need for hydraulic bulge testing, using a relatively simple computational approach.

  12. Bulge testing of copper and niobium tubes for hydroformed RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.S.; Sumption, M.D.; Susner, M.A.; Lim, H.; Collings, E.W.

    2016-01-01

    The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to gain experience for the subsequent hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for high energy particle acceleration. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. In the final part of the study finite-element models (FEM) incorporating constitutive (stress–strain) relationships analytically derived from the tensile and bulge tests, respectively, were used to replicate the bulge test. As expected, agreement was obtained between the experimental bulge parameters and the FEM model based on the bulge-derived constitutive relationship. Not so for the FEM model based on tensile-test data. It is concluded that a constitutive relationship based on bulge testing is necessary to predict a material's performance under hydraulic deformation.

  13. Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, A.; Ferrari, A.; Tsoulou, E.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wijnands, T.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the radiation damage induced by high-energy hadrons in the digital electronics of the RF low-level systems in the LHC cavities. High-energy hadrons are generated when the proton beams interact with the residual gas. The contributions from various elements - vacuum chambers, cryogenic cavities, wideband pickups and cryo-module beam tubes - have been considered individually, with each contribution depending on the gas composition and density. The probability of displacement damage and single event effects (mainly single event upsets) is derived for the LHC start-up conditions. (authors)

  14. Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, A; Ferrari, A; Tsoulou, E; Vlachoudis, V; Wijnands, T

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the radiation damage induced by high-energy hadrons in the digital electronics of the RF low-level systems in the LHC cavities. High-energy hadrons are generated when the proton beams interact with the residual gas. The contributions from various elements-vacuum chambers, cryogenic cavities, wideband pickups and cryomodule beam tubes-have been considered individually, with each contribution depending on the gas composition and density. The probability of displacement damage and single event effects (mainly single event upsets) is derived for the LHC start-up conditions.

  15. Meeting to discuss laser cavity design for photon linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linear collider – Daresbury, UK, 10 January 2006. ALEXANDER JOHN FINCH ... On 10 January 2006, a meeting to discuss laser cavity design for the photon linear collider was held at the Daresbury .... important to continue making contact with people in fields outside the accelerator community. Few experts at this meeting ...

  16. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information.

  17. Designing of RF ion source and the power sources system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusdiyanto.

    1978-01-01

    An RF ion source prototype is being developed for the particle accelerator at the Gama Research Centre. Supply of the gas is fed into the plasma chamber by means of neadle valve system. Magnetic field strength of about 500 gauss is applied to the system to improve the ionization efficiency. Components and spare parts of the RF ion source are made based on locally available materials and are discussed in this report. (author)

  18. Water cooling of RF structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battersby, G.; Zach, M.

    1994-06-01

    We present computer codes for heat transfer in water cooled rf cavities. RF parameters obtained by SUPERFISH or analytically are operated on by a set of codes using PLOTDATA, a command-driven program developed and distributed by TRIUMF [1]. Emphasis is on practical solutions with designer's interactive input during the computations. Results presented in summary printouts and graphs include the temperature, flow, and pressure data. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  19. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  20. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

  1. Design and measurement of signal processing system for cavity beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baopeng; Leng Yongbin; Yu Luyang; Zhou Weimin; Yuan Renxian; Chen Zhichu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, in order to achieve the output signal processing of cavity beam position monitor (CBPM), we develop a digital intermediate frequency receiver architecture based signal processing system, which consists of radio frequency (RF) front end and high speed data acquisition board. The beam position resolution in the CBPM signal processing system is superior to 1 μm. Two signal processing algorithms, fast Fourier transform (FFT) and digital down converter (DDC), are evaluated offline using MATLAB platform, and both can be used to achieve, the CW input signal, position resolutions of 0.31 μm and 0.10 μm at -16 dBm. The DDC algorithm for its good compatibility is downloaded into the FPGA to realize online measurement, reaching the position resolution of 0.49 μm due to truncation error. The whole system works well and the performance meets design target. (authors)

  2. Design study on an independently-tunable-cells thermionic RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, H.; Tanaka, T.; Hinode, F.; Kawai, M.

    2006-01-01

    Characteristics of a thermionic RF gun have been studied by a 3-D simulation code developed using an FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method as a Maxwell's equations solver. The gun is consists of two independent power feeding cavities, so that we call it independently-tunable-cells (ITC)'-RF gun. The first cell is the cathode cell and the second one is an accelerating cell. The ITC gun can be operated at various modes of different RF-power ratio and phase between two cavities. Simulation study shows a velocity-bunching like effect may be occurred in the gun, so that the short pulse beam from the thermionic RF gun is a better candidate to produce the coherent THz synchrotron radiation. Expected bunch length with a total charge of ∼20 pC (1% energy width from the top energy) is around 200 fs (fwhm). Even the beam energy extracted from the gun is varied by which the input powers are changed, almost same shape of the longitudinal phase space can be produced by tuning the phase. (author)

  3. Design of cavities of a standing wave accelerating tube for a 6 MeV electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Zarei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Side-coupled standing wave tubes in  mode are widely used in the low-energy electron linear accelerator, due to high accelerating gradient and low sensitivity to construction tolerances. The use of various simulation software for designing these kinds of tubes is very common nowadays. In this paper, SUPERFISH code and COMSOL are used for designing the accelerating and coupling cavities for a 6 MeV electron linear accelerator. Finite difference method in SUPERFISH code and Finite element method in COMSOL are used to solve the equations. Besides, dimension of accelerating and coupling cavities and also coupling iris dimension are optimized to achieve resonance frequency of 2.9985 MHz and coupling constant of 0.0112. Considering the results of this study and designing of the RF energy injection port subsequently, the construction of 6 MeV electron tube will be provided

  4. High gradient RF test results of S-band and C-band cavities for medical linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiovanni, A.; Bonomi, R.; Garlasché, M.; Verdú-Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.; Amaldi, U.

    2018-05-01

    TERA Foundation has proposed and designed hadrontherapy facilities based on novel linacs, i.e. high gradient linacs which accelerate either protons or light ions. The overall length of the linac, and therefore its cost, is almost inversely proportional to the average accelerating gradient. With the scope of studying the limiting factors for high gradient operation and to optimize the linac design, TERA, in collaboration with the CLIC Structure Development Group, has conducted a series of high gradient experiments. The main goals were to study the high gradient behavior and to evaluate the maximum gradient reached in 3 and 5.7 GHz structures to direct the design of medical accelerators based on high gradient linacs. This paper summarizes the results of the high power tests of 3.0 and 5.7 GHz single-cell cavities.

  5. Study of field-limiting defects in superconducting RF cavities for electron-accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency resonators made from niobium are an integral part of many accelerator projects. Their main advantage are the low ohmic losses resulting in the possibility for a long pulse structure and high duty cycles up to continous wave (cw) operation. The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) are based on this technology. In some cases the resonators reach accelerating electric fields close to the theoretical limit of bulk niobium. Yet most resonators are limited at lower fields and mass production for large scale accelerator projects suffers from the spread in the achievable gradient per resonator. The main limitations are field emission and the breakdown of superconductivity (quench). While field emission is mostly attributed to the overall surface cleanliness of the resonator, quench is usually associated with local defects. Optical inspection of the inner surface of the resonators with unprecedented resolution, accuracy and a special illumination has been established at DESY and used to study such local surface defects. More than 30 resonators have been inspected. Distinctive features from these inspections have been catalogued and assessed for their potential risk for the performance of the resonator. Several confirmed quenching defects could be extracted for further analysis and could be traced back to likely origins in the production process. A new, automated set-up for optical inspection of large series of resonators, named OBACHT, has been developed and successfully commissioned. Its design includes the minimal need for operator interference, reproducibility, robustness and versatility, in order to fit the requirements for application both in a laboratory and in a production environment. To facilitate the comparison of the results obtained during the global R and D effort on resonators for the ILC, the ILC global yield database has been established. The yield and selection rules for the

  6. Design and analysis of PCRV core cavity closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.T.; Schwartz, A.A.; Koopman, D.C.A.

    1980-05-01

    Design requirements and considerations for a core cavity closure which led to the choice of a concrete closure with a toggle hold-down as the design for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) plant are discussed. A procedure for preliminary stress analysis of the closure by means of a three-dimensional finite element method is described. A limited parametric study using this procedure indicates the adequacy of the present closure design and the significance of radial compression developed as a result of inclined support reaction

  7. The TESLA RF System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-01-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ∼600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components

  8. Architecture design of the application software for the low-level RF control system of the free-electron laser at Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Z.; Ayvazyan, V.; Simrock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting linear accelerator of the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH) provides high performance electron beams to the lasing system to generate synchrotron radiation to various users. The Low-Level RF (LLRF) system is used to maintain the beam stabilities by stabilizing the RF field in the superconducting cavities with feedback and feed forward algorithms. The LLRF applications are sets of software to perform RF system model identification, control parameters optimization, exception detection and handling, so as to improve the precision, robustness and operability of the LLRF system. In order to implement the LLRF applications in the hardware with multiple distributed processors, an optimized architecture of the software is required for good understandability, maintainability and extendibility. This paper presents the design of the LLRF application software architecture based on the software engineering approach for FLASH. (authors)

  9. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  10. Engineering, design and prototype tests of a 3.9 GHz transverse-mode superconducting cavity for a radiofrequency-separated kaon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark S. Champion et al.

    2001-01-01

    A research and development program is underway to construct superconducting cavities to be used for radiofrequency separation of a Kaon beam at Fermilab. The design calls for installation of twelve 13-cell cavities operating in the 3.9 GHz transverse mode with a deflection gradient of 5 MV/m. They present the mechanical, cryogenic and vacuum design of the cavity, cryomodule, rf power coupler, cold tuner and supporting hardware. The electromagnetic design of the cavity is presented in a companion paper by Wanzenberg and McAshan. The warm tuning system (for field flatness) and the vertical test system is presented along with test results of bench measurements and cold tests on single-cell and five-cell prototypes

  11. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  12. Design of ITER-FEAT RF heating and current drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosia, G.; Kobayashi, N.; Ioki, K.; Bibet, P.; Koch, R.; Chavan, R.; Tran, M.Q.; Takahashi, K.; Kuzikov, S.; Vdovin, V.

    2001-01-01

    Three radio frequency (RF) heating and current drive (H and CD) systems are being designed for ITER-FEAT: an electron cyclotron (EC), an ion cyclotron (IC) and a lower hybrid (LH) System. The launchers of the RF systems use four ITER equatorial ports and are fully interchangeable. They feature equal power outputs (20 MW/port), similar neutron shielding performance, and identical interfaces with the other machine components. An outline of the design is given in the paper. (author)

  13. Design of a 1.42 GHZ spin-flip cavity for antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F; Juhasz, B; Mahner, E; Widmann, E

    2010-01-01

    The ground state hyperfine transition frequency of hydrogen is known to a very high precision and therefore the measurement of this transition frequency in antihydrogen is offering one of the most accurate tests of CPT symmetry. The ASACUSA collaboration at CERN will run an experiment designed to produce ground state antihydrogen atoms in a cusp trap. These antihydrogen atoms will pass with a low rate in the order of 1 per second through a spin-flip cavity where they get excited depending on their polarization by a 1.42 GHz magnetic field. Due to the small amount of antihydrogen atoms that will be available the requirement of good field homogeneity is imposed in order to obtain an interaction with as many antihydrogen atoms as possible. This leads to a requirement of an RF field deviation of less than ±10% transverse to the beam direction over a beam aperture with 10 cm diameter. All design aspects of this new spin-flip cavity, including the required field homogeneity and vacuum aspects, are discussed.

  14. Advanced Receiver Design for Mitigating Multiple RF Impairments in OFDM Systems: Algorithms and RF Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Kiayani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct-conversion architecture-based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM systems are troubled by impairments such as in-phase and quadrature-phase (I/Q imbalance and carrier frequency offset (CFO. These impairments are unavoidable in any practical implementation and severely degrade the obtainable link performance. In this contribution, we study the joint impact of frequency-selective I/Q imbalance at both transmitter and receiver together with channel distortions and CFO error. Two estimation and compensation structures based on different pilot patterns are proposed for coping with such impairments. The first structure is based on preamble pilot pattern while the second one assumes a sparse pilot pattern. The proposed estimation/compensation structures are able to separate the individual impairments, which are then compensated in the reverse order of their appearance at the receiver. We present time-domain estimation and compensation algorithms for receiver I/Q imbalance and CFO and propose low-complexity algorithms for the compensation of channel distortions and transmitter IQ imbalance. The performance of the compensation algorithms is investigated with computer simulations as well as with practical radio frequency (RF measurements. The performance results indicate that the proposed techniques provide close to the ideal performance both in simulations and measurements.

  15. Design of RF Systems for the RTD Mission VASIMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; McCaskill, G.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The first flight test of the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR) is tentatively scheduled for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) in 2003. This mission to map the radiation environment out to several earth radii will employ both a Hall thruster and a VASIMR during its six months duration, beginning from low earth orbit. The mission will be powered by a solar array providing 12 kW of direct current electricity at 50 V. The VASIMR utilizes radiofrequency (RF) power both to generate a high-density plasma in a helicon source and to accelerate the plasma ions to high velocity by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The VASIMR concept is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with national laboratories and universities. Prototype plasma sources, RF amplifiers, and antennas are being developed in the experimental facilities of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL)

  16. Design of a cavity heat pipe receiver experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael G.; Brege, Mark H.; Greenlee, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A cavity heat pipe experiment has been designed to test the critical issues involved with incorporating thermal energy storage canisters into a heat pipe. The experiment is a replication of the operation of a heat receiver for a Brayton solar dynamic power cycle. The heat receiver is composed of a cylindrical receptor surface and an annular heat pipe with thermal energy storage canisters and gaseous working fluid heat exchanger tubes surrounding it. Hardware for the cavity heat pipe experiment will consist of a sector of the heat pipe, complete with gas tube and thermal energy storage canisters. Thermal cycling tests will be performed on the heat pipe sector to simulate the normal energy charge/discharge cycle of the receiver in a spacecraft application.

  17. Novel Ion Trap Design for Strong Ion-Cavity Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Márquez Seco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel ion trap design which facilitates the integration of an optical fiber cavity into the trap structure. The optical fibers are confined inside hollow electrodes in such a way that tight shielding and free movement of the fibers are simultaneously achievable. The latter enables in situ optimization of the overlap between the trapped ions and the cavity field. Through numerical simulations, we systematically analyze the effects of the electrode geometry on the trapping characteristics such as trap depths, secular frequencies and the optical access angle. Additionally, we simulate the effects of the presence of the fibers and confirm the robustness of the trapping potential. Based on these simulations and other technical considerations, we devise a practical trap configuration that isviable to achieve strong coupling of a single ion.

  18. Formulation of electromagnetic-wave analysis by boundary element method and its application to the analysis of RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washizu, Masao; Tanabe, Yoshio.

    1986-01-01

    In a system handling the electromagnetic waves of large power such as the cavity resonator for a high energy accelerator and the high frequency heater for a nuclear fusion apparatus, the margin in the thermal and mechanical design of a wave guide system cannot be taken large, accordingly, the detailed analysis of electromagnetic waves is required. When the analysis in a general form is carried out, boundary element method may be a useful method of solution. This time, the authors carried out the formulation of steady electromagnetic wave problems by boundary element method, and it was shown that the formulation was able to be carried out under the physically clear boundary condition also in this case, and especially in the case of a perfect conductor system, a very simple form was obtained. In this paper, first, the techniques of formulation in a general case, and next, as a special case, the formulation for a perfect conductor system are described. Taking the analysis of the cavity resonators of cylindrical and rectangular parallelepiped forms as examples, the comparison with the analytical solution was carried out. (Kako, I.)

  19. CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

  20. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  1. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S(1 ,1 ) varying from 0 to -30 db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  2. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S_{(1,1} varying from 0 to −30  db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  3. Short-range wireless communication fundamentals of RF system design and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bensky, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The Complete "Tool Kit” for the Hottest Area in RF/Wireless Design!Short-range wireless-communications over distances of less than 100 meters-is the most rapidly growing segment of RF/wireless engineering. Alan Bensky is an internationally recognized expert in short-range wireless, and this new edition of his bestselling book is completely revised to cover the latest developments in this fast moving field.You'll find coverage of such cutting-edge topics as: architectural trends in RF/wireless integrated circuits compatibility and conflict issues between differen

  4. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  5. Optimization of Helium Vessel Design for ILC Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratangelo, Enrico [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2009-01-01

    certify the compliance of the Helium vessel and the cavity to the ASME code standard. After briefly recalling to the main contents of the the ASME Code (Sections II and Vlll - Division ll), the procedure used for finding all relevant stresses and comparing the obtained results with the maximum values allowed are explained. This part also includes the buckling verification of the cavity. In Chapter 5 the manufacturing process of the cavity end-caps, whose function is to link the Helium vessel with the cavity, is studied. The present configuration of the dies is described and the manufacturing process is simulated in order to explain the origin of some defects fol.llld on real parts. Finally a new design of the dies is proposed and the resulting deformed piece is compared with the design requirements. Chapter 6 describes a finite elements analysis to assess the efficiency and the stiffness of the Helium vessel. Furthermore the results of the optimization of the Helium vessel (in order to increase the value of the efficiency) are reported. The same stiffness analysis is used in Chapter 7 for the Blade-Tuner study. After a description of this tuner and of its function, the preliminary analyses done to confirm the results provided by the vendor are described and then its limiting load conditions are found. Chapter 8 shows a study of the resistance of all the welds present in between the cavity and the end-cap and between the end-caps and the He vessel for a smaller superconducting cavity operating at 3.9 GHz. Finally Chapter 9 briefly describes some R&D activities in progress at INFN (Section of Pisa) and Fermilab that could produce significant cost reductions of the Helium vessel design. All the finite elements analyses contained and described in this thesis made possible the certification of the whole superconducting cavity-Helium vessel assembly at Fermilab. Furthermore they gave several useful indications to the Fermilab staff to improve the performance of the Helium

  6. Thermo mechanical design of normal-conducting deflecting cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for short x-ray pulse generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajuskovic, B.; Collins, J.; Den Hartog, P.; Morrison, L.; Waldschmidt, G.

    2008-01-01

    A normal-conducting deflecting cavity is being designed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) as a part of the short x-ray pulse project intended to provide users with approximately 2 picosecond x-rays. The system will use two pairs of 3-cell cavities in sectors 6ID and 7ID for the generation of the x-ray pulse in the 7ID beamline. The 3-cell cavities are designed to provide the desired beam deflection while absorbing in excess of 4 kW of power from a pulsed rf system and up to 2.6 kW in the damper system of high-order mode (HOM) and low-order mode (LOM) waveguides. Since the cavity frequency is very sensitive to thermal expansion, the cooling water system is designed so that it is able to control cavity temperature to within 0.1 C. This paper describes the optimization of the thermomechanical design of the cavity based on calculation of thermal stresses and displacement caused by the generated heat loads, and presents the design of a cooling water system required for the proper operation of the cavities.

  7. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  8. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T.; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths (∼300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell π-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure

  9. Multiharmonic rf feedforward system for compensation of beam loading and periodic transient effects in magnetic-alloy cavities of a proton synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Tamura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beam loading compensation is a key for acceleration of a high intensity proton beam in the main ring (MR of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC. Magnetic alloy loaded rf cavities with a Q value of 22 are used to achieve high accelerating voltages without a tuning bias loop. The cavity is driven by a single harmonic (h=9 rf signal while the cavity frequency response also covers the neighbor harmonics (h=8,10. Therefore the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam consists of the three harmonics, h=8,9,10. The beam loading of neighbor harmonics is the source of periodic transient effects and a possible source of coupled bunch instabilities. In the article, we analyze the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam. We employ the rf feedforward method to compensate the beam loading of these three harmonics (h=8,9,10. The full-digital multiharmonic feedforward system was developed for the MR. We describe the system architecture and the commissioning methodology of the feedforward patterns. The commissioning of the feedforward system has been performed by using high intensity beams with 1.0×10^{14} proteins per pulse. The impedance seen by the beam is successfully reduced and the longitudinal oscillations due to the beam loading are reduced. By the beam loading compensation, stable high power beam operation is achieved. We also report the reduction of the momentum loss during the debunching process for the slow extraction by the feedforward.

  10. Beam dynamics study and superconducting triple spoke cavity design for the EURISOL driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponton, A.

    2009-07-01

    EURISOL will be the next generation source of intense radioactive ion beams. Its accelerator complex consists of a driver linac, a set of targets and sources and a post-accelerator linac which aims at supplying different experimental areas with the exotic ions. The presented study deals with the driver accelerator: a superconducting RF linac capable of accelerating different ion kinds (D + , 3 He 2+ and H - ) up to a maximal power of 4 MW. First beam dynamics studies pointed out a very good acceleration efficiency when triple spoke cavities working at a frequency of 352 MHz are used in the medium energy part (0.2 < beta < 0.4). Thanks to a novel geometry, the electromagnetic design of the proposed cavity leads to 33 MV/m and 72 mT for the peak electric field and magnetic induction respectively at an ambitious accelerating field of 8 MV/m. The beam transport was then simulated and optimized in the original layout and calculations were also performed considering an alternative, periodic solution, for the low energy part. The 'all-periodic' linac keeps the beam qualities better by strongly reducing the emittance growth and the halo formation. (author)

  11. Design of a Novel W-Sinker RF LDMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangming Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RF LDMOS device structure and corresponding manufacturing process are presented in this paper. Deep trench W-sinker (tungsten sinker is employed in this technology to replace the traditional heavily doped diffusion sinker which can shrink chip size of the LDMOS transistor by more than 30% and improve power density. Furthermore, the W-sinker structure reduces the parasitic resistance and inductance and improves thermal conductivity of the device as well. Combined with the adoption of the techniques, like grounded shield, step gate oxide, LDD optimization, and so forth, an advanced technology for RF LDMOS based on conventional 0.35 μm CMOS technology is well established. An F+A power amplifier product with frequency range of 1.8–2.1 GHz is developed for the application of 4G LTE base station and industry leading performance is achieved. The qualification results show that the device reliability and ruggedness can also meet requirement of the application.

  12. Development of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of high power RF source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. O.; Shin, H. M.; Chung, I. Y. [KAPRA, Seoul (Korea); Kim, D. I. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea); Noh, S. J. [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Ko, S. K. [Ulsan University, Ulsan (Korea); Lee, H. J. [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea); Choi, W. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    This study was performed with objective to design and develop the KOMAC proton accelerator RF system. For the development of the high power RF source for CCDTL(coupled cavity drift tube linac), the medium power RF system using the UHF klystron for broadcasting was integrated and with this RF system we obtained the basic design data, operation experience and code-validity test data. Based on the medium power RF system experimental data, the high power RF system for CCDTL was designed and its performed was analyzed. 16 refs., 64 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  13. Multiple-bunch-length operating mode design for a storage ring using hybrid low alpha and harmonic cavity method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weiwei, E-mail: gaomqr@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Mathematics and Physics, Fujian University of Technology, Fuzhou 350118 (China); Wang, Lin; Li, Heting [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

    2017-03-11

    In this paper we design a simultaneous three bunch length operating mode at the HLS-II (Hefei Light Source II) storage ring by installing two harmonic cavities and minimizing the momentum compaction factor. The short bunches (2.6 mm) presented in this work will meet the requirement of coherent millimeter-wave and sub-THz radiation experiments, while the long bunches (20 mm) will efficiently increase the total beam current. Therefore, this multiple-bunch-length operating mode allows present synchrotron users and coherent millimeter-wave users (or sub THz users) to carry out their experiments simultaneously. Since the relatively low energy characteristic of HLS-II we achieve the multiple-bunch-length operating mode without multicell superconducting RF cavities, which is technically feasible.

  14. Design and test of SX-FEL cavity BPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Renxian; Zhou Weimin; Chen Zhichu; Yu Luyang; Wang Baopen; Leng Yongbin

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the design and cold test of the cavity beam position monitor (CBPM) for SX-FEL to fulfill the requirement of beam position measurement resolution of less than 1 μm, even 0.1 μm. The CBPM was optimized by using a coupling slot to damp the TM 010 mode in the output signal. The isolation of TM 010 mode is about 117 dB, and the shunt impedance is about 200 Ω@4.65 GHz with the quality factor 80 from MAFIA simulation and test result. A special antenna was designed to load power for reducing excitation of other modes in the cavity. The resulting output power of TM 110 mode was about 90 mV/mm when the source was 6 dBm, and the accomplishable minimum voltage was about 200 μV. The resolution of the CBPM was about 0.1 μm from the linear fitting result based on the cold test. (authors)

  15. Superconducting versus normal conducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Podlech, Holger

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important issues of high-power hadron linacs is the choice of technology with respect to superconducting or room-temperature operation. The favour for a specific technology depends on several parameters such as the beam energy, beam current, beam power and duty factor. This contribution gives an overview of the comparison between superconducting and normal conducting cavities. This includes basic radiofrequency (RF) parameters, design criteria, limitations, required RF and plug power as well as case studies.

  16. Experimental Validation of Topology Optimization for RF MEMS Capacitive Switch Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippine, Mandy Axelle; Zareie, Hosein; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present 30 distinct RF MEMS capacitive switch designs that are the product of topology optimizations that control key mechanical properties such as stiffness, response to intrinsic stress gradients, and temperature sensitivity. The designs were evaluated with high-accuracy simul...

  17. Efficient Direct-Matching Rectenna Design for RF Power Transfer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyrouz, Shady; Visser, Huib

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design, simulation, fabrication and measurements of a 50 ohm rectenna system. The paper investigates each part (in terms of input impedance) of the rectenna system starting from the antenna, followed by the matching network, to the rectifier. The system consists of an antenna, which captures the transmitted RF signal, connected to a rectifier which converts the AC captured signal into a DC power signal. For maximum power transfer, a matching network is designed between the rectifier and the antenna. At an input power level of -10 dBm, the system is able to achieve an RF/DC power conversion efficiency of 49.7%.

  18. Efficient Direct-Matching Rectenna Design for RF Power Transfer Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyrouz, Shady; Visser, Huib

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design, simulation, fabrication and measurements of a 50 ohm rectenna system. The paper investigates each part (in terms of input impedance) of the rectenna system starting from the antenna, followed by the matching network, to the rectifier. The system consists of an antenna, which captures the transmitted RF signal, connected to a rectifier which converts the AC captured signal into a DC power signal. For maximum power transfer, a matching network is designed between the rectifier and the antenna. At an input power level of −10 dBm, the system is able to achieve an RF/DC power conversion efficiency of 49.7%

  19. Advances in analog and RF IC design for wireless communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Manganaro, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Analog and RF IC Design for Wireless Communication Systems gives technical introductions to the latest and most significant topics in the area of circuit design of analog/RF ICs for wireless communication systems, emphasizing wireless infrastructure rather than handsets. The book ranges from very high performance circuits for complex wireless infrastructure systems to selected highly integrated systems for handsets and mobile devices. Coverage includes power amplifiers, low-noise amplifiers, modulators, analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and digital-to-analog converters

  20. PASTA - An RF Phase and Amplitude Scan and Tuning Application

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, J; Deibele, C; Henderson, S

    2005-01-01

    To assist the beam commissioning in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac, a general purpose RF tuning application has been written to help set RF phase and amplitude. It follows the signature matching procedure described in Ref.* The method involves varying an upstream Rf cavity amplitude and phase settings and comparing the measured downstream beam phase responses to model predictions. The model input for cavity phase and amplitude calibration and for the beam energy are varied to best match observations. This scheme has advantages over other RF tuning techniques of not requiring intercepting devices (e.g. Faraday Cups), and not being restricted to a small linear response regime near the design values. The application developed here is general and can be applied to different RF structure types in the SNS linac. Example applications in the SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures will be shown.

  1. Superconducting cavities for HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwersteg, B.; Ebeling, W.; Moeller, W.D.; Renken, D.; Proch, D.; Sekutowicz, J.; Susta, J.; Tong, D.

    1988-01-01

    Superconducting 500 MHz cavities are developed to demonstrate the feasibility of upgrading the e-beam energy of the HERA storage ring. A prototype module with 2 x 4 cell resonators and appropriate fundamental and higher mode couplers has been designed at DESY and is being built by industrial firms. The design and results of RF and cryogenic measurements are reported in detail. 17 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  2. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  3. Design and Optimization of AlN based RF MEMS Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan Ziko, Mehadi; Koel, Ants

    2018-05-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical system (RF MEMS) switch technology might have potential to replace the semiconductor technology in future communication systems as well as communication satellites, wireless and mobile phones. This study is to explore the possibilities of RF MEMS switch design and optimization with aluminium nitride (AlN) thin film as the piezoelectric actuation material. Achieving low actuation voltage and high contact force with optimal geometry using the principle of piezoelectric effect is the main motivation for this research. Analytical and numerical modelling of single beam type RF MEMS switch used to analyse the design parameters and optimize them for the minimum actuation voltage and high contact force. An analytical model using isotropic AlN material properties used to obtain the optimal parameters. The optimized geometry of the device length, width and thickness are 2000 µm, 500 µm and 0.6 µm respectively obtained for the single beam RF MEMS switch. Low actuation voltage and high contact force with optimal geometry are less than 2 Vand 100 µN obtained by analytical analysis. Additionally, the single beam RF MEMS switch are optimized and validated by comparing the analytical and finite element modelling (FEM) analysis.

  4. Conceptual design of independently tunable cells RF gun with external injecting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Junjun; Feng Guangyao; Pei Yuanji; Pang Jian

    2012-01-01

    To obtain the micro-pulse bunch with the order of hundred femtoseconds length and high repetition rate, the pa- per proposes the independently tunable cells (ITC) RF gun, which has a double-cell structure with the cells being power fed independently. By choosing appropriate feeding power and phase of the two cells, this ITC-RF gun can achieve bunches of excellent characteristics. Additionally, the application of a-magnet and laser system can be avoided, which leads to more compact layout. An external injecting ITC-RF gun (DC-ITC-RF gun) structure is designed accordingly. The external injecting structure can increase beam current, decrease energy spread, and cancel the back-bombardment effect almost completely. By means of 1-D and 3- D beam dynamics calculation with different structure parameters, a group of RF parameters are obtained for better beam characteristics. Then the paper designs a pre-injector so that particles can be accelerated to 10 MeV. By choosing appropriate feeding power and incident particle phase for the pre-injector, the bunch length can be further compressed. (authors)

  5. An algorithm for the design and tuning of RF accelerating structures with variable cell lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    An algorithm is proposed for the design of a π mode standing wave buncher structure with variable cell lengths. It employs a two-parameter, multi-step approach for the design of the structure with desired resonant frequency and field flatness. The algorithm, along with analytical scaling laws for the design of the RF power coupling slot, makes it possible to accurately design the structure employing a freely available electromagnetic code like SUPERFISH. To compensate for machining errors, a tuning method has been devised to achieve desired RF parameters for the structure, which has been qualified by the successful tuning of a 7-cell buncher to π mode frequency of 2856 MHz with field flatness algorithm and tuning method have demonstrated the feasibility of developing an S-band accelerating structure for desired RF parameters with a relatively relaxed machining tolerance of ∼ 25 μm. This paper discusses the algorithm for the design and tuning of an RF accelerating structure with variable cell lengths.

  6. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 108, in agreement with prediction.

  7. Linear CMOS RF power amplifiers a complete design workflow

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Hector Solar

    2013-01-01

    The work establishes the design flow for the optimization of linear CMOS power amplifiers from the first steps of the design to the final IC implementation and tests. The authors also focuses on design guidelines of the inductor's geometrical characteristics for power applications and covers their measurement and characterization. Additionally, a model is proposed which would facilitate designs in terms of transistor sizing, required inductor quality factors or minimum supply voltage. The model considers limitations that CMOS processes can impose on implementation. The book also provides diffe

  8. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  9. Optimal Design of Dual-Hop VLC/RF Communication System With Energy Harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Rakia, Tamer

    2016-07-28

    In this letter, we consider a dual-hop heterogeneous visible light communication (VLC)/radio frequency (RF) communication system to extend the coverage of VLC systems. Besides detecting the information over VLC link, the relay is able to harvest energy from the first-hop VLC link, by extracting the direct current component of the received optical signal, and uses the harvested energy to retransmit the data to a mobile terminal over the second-hop RF link. We investigate the optimal design of the hybrid system in terms of data rate maximization.

  10. Design considerations for RF power amplifiers demonstrated through a GSM/EDGE power amplifier module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltus, P.G.M.; Bezooijen, van A.; Huijsing, J.H.; Steyaert, M.; Roermund, van A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design considerations for RF power amplifiers in general, including trends in systems, linearity and efficiency, the PA environment, implementation is sues and technology. As an example a triple-band (900/1800/1900MHz) dual mode (GSMIEdge) power amplifier module is described

  11. Beam physics design strategy for a high-current rf linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The high average beam power of an rf linac system for transmutation of nuclear waste puts very stringent requirements on beam quality and beam control. Fractional beam losses along the accelerator must be kept at extremely low levels to assure {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} maintenance. Hence, halo formation and large-amplitude tails in the particle distribution due to beam mismatch and equipartitioning effects must be avoided. This implies that the beam should ideally be in near-perfect thermal equilibrium from injection to full energy - in contrast to existing rf linacs in which the transverse temperature, T {sub {perpendicular}}, is higher than the longitudinal temperature, T{sub {parallel}}. The physics and parameter scaling for such a system will be reviewed using the results of recent work on high-intensity bunched beams. A design strategy for a high-current rf linac with equilibrated beam will be proposed.

  12. System-in-package RF design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gaynor, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    In the past few years, System in Package (SiP) design has fueled a revolution in the use of modules in wireless devices due its effectiveness in meeting the increasingly demanding requirements for reliability, shielding, performance, size, and cost. Here's the first comprehensive resource on SiP design techniques that offers designers state-of-the-art packaging know-how. Moreover, the book provides numerous examples that illustrate real-world capabilities, constraints, trade-offs, and options at every step.

  13. Infrastructure for the design and fabrication of MEMS for RF/microwave and millimeter wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerguizian, Vahe; Rafaf, Mustapha

    2004-08-01

    This article describes and provides valuable information for companies and universities with strategies to start fabricating MEMS for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave applications. The present work shows the infrastructure developed for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS platforms, which helps the identification, evaluation and selection of design tools and fabrication foundries taking into account packaging and testing. The selected and implemented simple infrastructure models, based on surface and bulk micromachining, yield inexpensive and innovative approaches for distributed choices of MEMS operating tools. With different educational or industrial institution needs, these models may be modified for specific resource changes using a careful analyzed iteration process. The inputs of the project are evaluation selection criteria and information sources such as financial, technical, availability, accessibility, simplicity, versatility and practical considerations. The outputs of the project are the selection of different MEMS design tools or software (solid modeling, electrostatic/electromagnetic and others, compatible with existing standard RF/Microwave design tools) and different MEMS manufacturing foundries. Typical RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS solutions are introduced on the platform during the evaluation and development phases of the project for the validation of realistic results and operational decision making choices. The encountered challenges during the investigation and the development steps are identified and the dynamic behavior of the infrastructure is emphasized. The inputs (resources) and the outputs (demonstrated solutions) are presented in tables and flow chart mode diagrams.

  14. Deflecting cavity for beam diagnostics at Cornell ERL injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belomestnykh, Sergey; Bazarov, Ivan; Shemelin, Valery; Sikora, John; Smolenski, Karl; Veshcherevich, Vadim

    2010-01-01

    A single-cell, 1300-MHz, TM110-like mode vertically deflecting cavity is designed and built for beam slice emittance measurements, and to study the temporal response of negative electron affinity photocathodes in the ERL injector at Cornell University. We describe the cavity shape optimization procedure, RF and mechanical design, its performance with beam.

  15. Analog/RF Circuit Design Techniques for Nanometerscale IC Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram; Annema, Anne J.

    CMOS evolution introduces several problems in analog design. Gate-leakage mismatch exceeds conventional matching tolerances requiring active cancellation techniques or alternative architectures. One strategy to deal with the use of lower supply voltages is to operate critical parts at higher supply

  16. Study of RF system of Hefei storage ring under injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hongliang; Wang Lin; Li Yongjun; Huang Guirong; Zhang Pengfei; Li Weimin; Liu Zuping; He Duohui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the beam loading effect of RF system and the conditions of Robinson instability are analyzed in detail. By the study of the injection beam intensity limit dependent on detune angle and visible detune angle, it is found that the storage ring can be injected to more than 300 mA current intensity to attain the design target of phase II project in the lower energy injection situation of Hefei Storage Ring if a certain power is feed in the RF cavity and a certain tuning angle of the RF cavity is set

  17. Investigation of a 2K superfluid liquid helium refrigerator system and research of superconducting RF cavities. Report from the short visiting and research program aboard supported by the Japanese education ministry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    The author visited at Jefferson Lab for two months from July 5 '99 to September 2 by the short visit and research program financed by the Japanese Education Ministry for the investigation the CEBAF 2K refrigerator system and research superconducting RF cavities. Here, the result will be presented. (author)

  18. Design and Development of RF Structures for Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, M; Gerigk, F; Pasini, M; Wegner, R

    2006-01-01

    Linac4 is a new 160 MeV H− linac proposed at CERN to replace the 50 MeV Linac2 as injector to the PS Booster, with the goal of doubling its brightness and intensity. The present design foresees after RFQ and chopping line a sequence of three accelerating structures: a Drift Tube Linac (DTL) from 3 to 40 MeV, a Cell-Coupled DTL (CCDTL) to 90 MeV and a Side Coupled Linac (SCL) up to the final energy. The DTL and CCDTL operate at 352 MHz, while in the SCL the frequency is doubled to 704 MHz. Although the injection in the PS Booster requires only a low duty cycle, the accelerating structures are designed to operate at the high duty cycle required by a possible future extension to a high-power linac driver for a neutrino facility. This paper presents the different accelerating structures, underlining the progress in the design of critical resonator elements, like post-couplers in the DTL, coupling slots in the CCDTL and bridge couplers for the SCL. Prototyping progress for the different structures is reported...

  19. Design of the New Wideband RF System for the CERN PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Paoluzzi, Mauro; Angoletta, Maria Elena; Arnaudon, Luca; Energico, Salvatore; Findlay, Alan; Haase, Matthias; Jaussi, Michael; Jones, Anthony; Landré, David; Molendijk, John; Quartullo, Danilo; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    For the renovation and upgrade of the CERN PS Booster (PSB) RF systems a development project was launched in 2012. The design, based on a new approach, aimed at replacing the existing tuned, narrowband RF systems with wideband, modular, solid-state driven units. A wide range of issues had to be addressed spanning from RF power production, radiation hardness of solid-state devices, active cancellation of beam-induced voltages, dedicated low-level electronics allowing multi-harmonic operation and beam stability. Following a three-year prototyping and testing campaign and two international reviews, the project endorsement came at the end of year 2015. It foresees the complete removal of present h1, h2 and h10 systems and the deployment of a new one covering all the frequency ranges from 1 MHz to 18 MHz. The four PSB rings will be equipped with 144 identical acceleration cells providing 24 kV total RF voltage per ring. This paper describes the design concepts, the retained solutions, the expected performances and...

  20. Design of resonant converter based DC power supply for RF amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Kartik; Suthar, Gajendra; Dalicha, Hrushikesh; Agarwal, Rohit; Trivedi, R.G.; Mukherjee, Aparajita

    2017-01-01

    ITER require 20 MW of RF power to a large variety of plasmas in the Ion Cyclotron frequency range for heating and driving plasma current. Nine RF sources of 2.5MW RF power level each collectively will accomplish the above requirement. Each RF source consists of SSPA, driver and end stage, above which driver and end stage amplifier are tube (Tetrode/Diacrode) based which requires auxiliary DC power source viz. filament, screen grid and control grid DC power supply. DC power supply has some stringent requirements like low stored energy, fast turn off, and low ripple value, etc. This paper will focus only on Zero Current Switching (ZCS) resonant converter based buck converter. This can serve the purpose of control grid and screen grid DC power supply for above requirement. IGBT switch will be used at 20 kHz so as to lower the filter requirement hence low stored energy and ripple in the output voltage. ZCS operation will also assist us in reducing EMI/EMC effect. Design of resonant tank circuit is important aspect of the converter as it forms the backbone of the complete system and basis of selection of other important parameters as well hence mathematical model analysis with the help of circuit equations for various modes have been shown as a part of selection criteria. Peak current through the switch, duty cycle, switching frequency will be the design parameters for selecting resonant tank circuit

  1. Impact of cool-down conditions at T_{c} on the superconducting rf cavity quality factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Vogt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many next-generation, high-gradient accelerator applications, from energy-recovery linacs to accelerator-driven systems (ADS rely on continuous wave (CW operation for which superconducting radio-frequency (SRF systems are the enabling technology. However, while SRF cavities dissipate little power, they must be cooled by liquid helium and for many CW accelerators the complexity as well as the investment and operating costs of the cryoplant can prove to be prohibitive. We investigated ways to reduce the dynamic losses by improving the residual resistance (R_{res} of niobium cavities. Both the material treatment and the magnetic shielding are known to have an impact. In addition, we found that R_{res} can be reduced significantly when the cool-down conditions during the superconducting phase transition of the niobium are optimized. We believe that not only do the cool-down conditions impact the level to which external magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity but also that thermoelectric currents are generated which in turn create additional flux that can be trapped. Therefore, we investigated the generation of flux and the dynamics of flux trapping and release in a simple model niobium-titanium system that mimics an SRF cavity in its helium tank. We indeed found that thermal gradients along the system during the superconducting transition can generate a thermoelectric current and magnetic flux, which subsequently can be trapped. These effects may explain the observed variation of the cavity’s R_{res} with cool-down conditions.

  2. Application of RF Superconductivity to High-Current Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program

  3. The Prototype Fundamental Power Coupler For The Spallation Neutron Source Superconducting Cavities: Design And Initial Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. M. Wilson; I. E. Campisi; E. F. Daly; G. K. Davis; M. Drury; J. E. Henry; P. Kneisel; G. Myneni; T. Powers; W. J. Schneider; M. Stirbet; Y. Kang; K. Cummings; T. Hardek

    2001-01-01

    Each of the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is powered via a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) with a 50 Omega impedance and a warm planar alumina window. The design is derived from the experience of other laboratories; in particular, a number of details are based on the coupler developed for the KEK B-Factory superconducting cavities. However, other design features have been modified to account for the fact that the SNS FPC will transfer a considerably lower average power than the KEK-B coupler. Four prototypes have been manufactured so far, and preliminary tests performed on two of them at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). During these tests, peak powers of over 500 kW were transferred through the couplers in the test stand designed and built for this purpose. This paper gives details of the coupler design and of the results obtained from the RF tests on the test stand during the last few months. A more comprehensive set of tests is planned for the near future

  4. Performance of the AC perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavity for the TRIUMF KAON factory booster synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enchevich, I.B.; Mitra, A.K.; Fong, K.; Blaker, G.C.; Fang, S.

    1992-11-01

    The rf cavity for the Booster Synchrotron requires a frequency swing from 46 Mhz to 61 Mhz at a repetition rate of 50 Hz and a maximum accelerating voltage of 62.5 kV. These requirements were achieved on the prototype ferrite tuned cavity[1] for a short period of time and without any fast rf feedback or cavity tuning loops. Initially fast rf feedback and cavity tuning loops were closed at fixed frequencies (ferrite tuner dc biased ) to measure some of the response characteristics of the amplifier-cavity chain. Then a major effort was put into measuring the bandwidth response of the tuner in order to design the rf control loops for ac bias operation at 50 Hz. The performance of these control loops and results from long term running of the rf system are reported. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs

  5. Progress on the Design of a Perpendicularly Biased 2nd Harmonic Cavity for the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, R. L. [Fermilab; Dey, J. E. [Fermilab; Duel, K. L. [Fermilab; Kuharik, J. C. [Fermilab; Pellico, W. A. [Fermilab; Reid, J. S. [Fermilab; Romanov, G. [Fermilab; Slabough, M. [Fermilab; Sun, D. [Fermilab; Tan, C. Y. [Fermilab; Terechkine, I. [Fermilab

    2016-10-01

    perpendicularly biased 2nd harmonic cavity is being designed and built for the Fermilab Booster. Its purpose is to flatten the bucket at injection and thus change the longitudinal beam distribution to decrease space charge effects. It can also help at extraction. The cavity frequency range is 76 – 106 MHz. The power amplifier will be built using the Y567B tetrode, which is also used for the fundamental mode cavities in the Fermilab Booster. We discuss recent progress on the cavity, the biasing solenoid design and plans for testing the tuner's garnet material

  6. Design of a high-power Nd:YAG Q-switched laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ikbal; Kumar, Avinash; Nijhawan, O. P.

    1995-06-01

    An electro-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser resonator that uses two end prisms placed orthogonally perpendicular to each other has been designed. This configuration improves the stability of the resonator and does not alter the characteristics of the electro-optical Q switch. The outcoupling ratio of the cavity is optimized by a change in the azimuthal angle of a phase-matched Porro prism placed at one end of the cavity. The prism placed at the other end of the cavity is designed so that it introduces a phase change of Pi , regardless of its orientation and index of refraction, resulting in a more efficient and stable cavity.

  7. RF Design of the TW Buncher for the CLIC Drive Beam Injector (2nd report)

    CERN Document Server

    Shaker, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    CLIC is based on the two beams concept that one beam (drive beam) produces the required RF power to accelerate another beam (main beam). The drive beam is produced and accelerated up to 50MeV inside the CLIC drive beam injector. The drive beam injector main components are a thermionic electron gun, three sub-harmonic bunchers, a pre-buncher, a TW buncher, 13 accelerating structures and one magnetic chicane. This document is the second report of the RF structure design of the TW buncher. This design is based on the beam dynamic design done by Shahin Sanaye Hajari due to requirements mentioned in CLIC CDR. A disk-loaded tapered structure is chosen for the TW buncher. The axial electric field increases strongly based on the beam dynamic requirements. This second report includes the study of HOM effects, retuning the cells, study of dimensional tolerances and the heat dissipation on the surface.

  8. Challenges in resonant cavity biosensor design: collection efficiency and specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armani, Andrea M.; Mehrabani, Simin; Sun, Victoria; McBirney, Samantha; Hawk, Rasheeda M.; Gungor, Eda; Lee, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Optical cavities have successfully demonstrated the ability to detect a wide range of analytes with exquisite sensitivity. However, optimizing other parameters of the system, such as collection efficiency and specificity, have remained elusive. This presentation will discuss some of the recent work in this area, including 3D COMSOL Multiphysics models including mass transfer and binding kinetics of different cavity geometries and covalent attachment methods for a wide range of biological and synthetic moieties. A few representative experimental demonstrations will also be presented.

  9. Protocol Design and Performance Analysis of Multiuser Mixed RF and Hybrid FSO/RF Relaying With Buffers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Eryani, Yasser F.

    2018-03-07

    In this paper, a multiuser mixed radio frequency (RF) and hybrid free-space optical (FSO)/RF system is considered, where multiple mobile users transmit their data to an intermediate decode-and-forward relay node through RF links using a virtual multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) system, and the relay node forwards the multiplexed data of all users through a FSO link that is supported by a RF MIMO backup system to the destination. The relay node is equipped with a buffer in the physical layer for temporal storage of the users\\' data until the best channel conditions at the relay-destination link aremet. For this communication setup, we first propose a transmission protocol that achieves a multiplexing gain through a virtual MIMO system. After that, we derive closed-form expressions for the end-to-end outage probability, asymptotic outage probability, average symbol error rate, and the ergodic capacity when considering the delay-tolerant (finite buffer size) scenario. The results show that buffering in the physical layer provides a significant enhancement to the system performance (outage, error rate, and ergodic capacity). It is also found that pointing error and severe weather turbulence conditions become more tolerable with the existence of the relay\\'s buffer and RF backup link (in the second hop). In addition, the proposed virtual MIMO scheme shows a significant performance enhancement at a high number of receiving antennas, which introduces potential lowcomplexity diversity gain-based massive MIMO schemes.

  10. Protocol Design and Performance Analysis of Multiuser Mixed RF and Hybrid FSO/RF Relaying With Buffers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Eryani, Yasser F.; Salhab, Anas; Zummo, Salam A.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a multiuser mixed radio frequency (RF) and hybrid free-space optical (FSO)/RF system is considered, where multiple mobile users transmit their data to an intermediate decode-and-forward relay node through RF links using a virtual multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) system, and the relay node forwards the multiplexed data of all users through a FSO link that is supported by a RF MIMO backup system to the destination. The relay node is equipped with a buffer in the physical layer for temporal storage of the users' data until the best channel conditions at the relay-destination link aremet. For this communication setup, we first propose a transmission protocol that achieves a multiplexing gain through a virtual MIMO system. After that, we derive closed-form expressions for the end-to-end outage probability, asymptotic outage probability, average symbol error rate, and the ergodic capacity when considering the delay-tolerant (finite buffer size) scenario. The results show that buffering in the physical layer provides a significant enhancement to the system performance (outage, error rate, and ergodic capacity). It is also found that pointing error and severe weather turbulence conditions become more tolerable with the existence of the relay's buffer and RF backup link (in the second hop). In addition, the proposed virtual MIMO scheme shows a significant performance enhancement at a high number of receiving antennas, which introduces potential lowcomplexity diversity gain-based massive MIMO schemes.

  11. Tailoring design and fabrication of capacitive RF MEMS switches for K-band applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Fabio; Persano, Anna; Capoccia, Giovanni; Taurino, Antonietta; Cola, Adriano; Siciliano, Pietro; Lucibello, Andrea; Marcelli, Romolo; Proietti, Emanuela; Bagolini, Alvise; Margesin, Benno; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Iannacci, Jacopo

    2015-05-01

    Shunt capacitive radio-frequency microelectromechanical (RF MEMS) switches were modelled, fabricated and characterized in the K-band domain. Design allowed to predict the RF behaviour of the switches as a function of the bridge geometric parameters. The modelled switches were fabricated on silicon substrate, using a surface micromachining approach. In addition to the geometric parameters, the material structure in the bridge-actuator area was modified for switches fabricated on the same wafer, thanks to the removal/addition of two technological steps of crucial importance for RF MEMS switches performance, which are the use of the sacrificial layer and the deposition of a floating metal layer on the actuator. Surface profilometry analysis was used to check the material layer structure in the different regions of the bridge area as well as to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the moveable bridge under the application of a loaded force. The RF behaviour of all the fabricated switches was measured, observing the impact on the isolation of the manipulation of the bridge size and of the variations in the fabrication process.

  12. Superconducting rf activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Hakimi, M.; Kirchgessner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Development of rf superconductivity for high energy accelerators has been a robust activity at the Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (LNS) for many years. In order to realize the potential of rf superconductivity, a two-pronged approach has been followed. On the one hand accelerator applications were selected where the existing state-of-the art of superconducting rf is competitive with alternate technologies, then LNS engaged in a program to design, construct and test suitable superconducting cavities, culminating in a full system test in an operating accelerator. On the second front the discovery and invention of ideas, techniques and materials required to make superconducting rf devices approach the ideal in performance has been aggressively pursued. Starting with the development of superconducting cavities for high energy electron synchrotrons, the technology was extended to high energy e + e - storage rings. The LE5 cavity design has now been adopted for use in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). When completed, this project will be one of the largest applications of SRF technology, using 440 LE5 modules[4]. In the last two years, the cavity design and the technology have been transferred to industry and CEBAF. Cornell has tested the early industrial prototypes and cavity pairs. LNS has developed, in collaboration with CEBAF, designs and procedures for cavity pair and cryomodule assembly and testing. Advanced research for future electron accelerators is badly needed if particle physicists hope to expand the energy frontier. Superconducting cavity technology continues to offer attractive opportunities for further advances in achievable voltage at reasonable cost for future accelerators. For Nb, the full potential implies an order of magnitude increase over current capabilities. 20 references, 11 figures

  13. The Spallation Neutron Source RF Reference System

    CERN Document Server

    Piller, Maurice; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Ma, Hengjie

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) RF Reference System includes the master oscillator (MO), local oscillator(LO) distribution, and Reference RF distribution systems. Coherent low noise Reference RF signals provide the ability to control the phase relationships between the fields in the front-end and linear accelerator (linac) RF cavity structures. The SNS RF Reference System requirements, implementation details, and performance are discussed.

  14. Design, construction and test of RF solid state power amplifier for IRANCYC-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, H.; Dehghan, M.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Ghasemi, F.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, design, simulation and construction of a high power amplifier to provide the required power of a cyclotron accelerator (IRANCYC-10) is presented step-by-step. The Push-Pull designed amplifier can generate 750 W at the operating frequency of 71 MHz continous wave (CW). In this study, achieving the best efficiency of the amplifier, as well as reducing overall volume using baluns, were two important goals. The new offered water-cooled heat sink was used for cooling the amplifier which increases the operating life of the transistor. The gain and PAE of the SSPA were obtained 20 dB and 77.7%, respectively. The simulated and measured RF results are in good agreement with each other. The results show that, using an RF transformer in matching impedance of matching networks, it causes a smaller size and also a better amplifier performance.

  15. A New Vacuum Brazing Route for Niobium-316L Stainless Steel Transition Joints for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Bhatnagar, V. K.; Yedle, K.; Ram Sankar, P.; Sindal, B. K.; Kumar, K. V. A. N. P. S.; Singh, M. K.; Rai, S. K.; Bose, A.; Veerbhadraiah, T.; Ramteke, S.; Sridhar, R.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S. C.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes a new approach for vacuum brazing of niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints for application in superconducting radiofrequency cavities. The study exploited good wettability of titanium-activated silver-base brazing alloy (CuSil-ABA®), along with nickel as a diffusion barrier, to suppress brittle Fe-Nb intermetallic formation, which is well reported during the established vacuum brazing practice using pure copper filler. The brazed specimens displayed no brittle intermetallic layers on any of its interfaces, but instead carried well-distributed intermetallic particles in the ductile matrix. The transition joints displayed room temperature tensile and shear strengths of 122-143 MPa and 80-113 MPa, respectively. The joints not only exhibited required hermeticity (helium leak rate high vacuum but also withstood twelve hour degassing heat treatment at 873 K (suppresses Q-disease in niobium cavities), without any noticeable degradation in the microstructure and the hermeticity. The joints retained their leak tightness even after undergoing ten thermal cycles between the room temperature and the liquid nitrogen temperature, thereby establishing their ability to withstand service-induced low cycle fatigue conditions. The study proposes a new lower temperature brazing route to form niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints, with improved microstructural characteristics and acceptable hermeticity and mechanical properties.

  16. Electromagnetic design issues in elliptic superconducting radio frequency cavity for H- LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Jana, A.R.; Gaur, R.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-cell elliptic superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) cavities are used for efficient acceleration of a high power charged particle beam for a wide range of velocities, typically corresponding to β = 0.5 to ∼ 1, where β is the particle speed in unit of speed of light. Electromagnetic design of such cavities involves careful optimization of the cavity geometry with several design constraints. In this paper, we discuss a generalized approach to optimize the design to achieve maximum acceleration gradient and field flatness, while ensuring that the effect due to higher order modes supported by the cavity are within acceptable limits. Study of detuning in the cavity resonance frequency due to mechanical pressure associated with electromagnetic field inside the cavity, known as Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD), plays an important role in optimizing the scheme for stiffening of the cavity. Electromagnetic design calculations performed for SCRF cavities of medium energy section of 1 GeV H - injector linac for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source (ISNS) at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology are presented in the paper highlighting all these important design issues. (author)

  17. Creating geometrically robust designs for highly sensitive problems using topology optimization: Acoustic cavity design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus E.; Lazarov, Boyan S.; Jensen, Jakob S.

    2015-01-01

    Resonance and wave-propagation problems are known to be highly sensitive towards parameter variations. This paper discusses topology optimization formulations for creating designs that perform robustly under spatial variations for acoustic cavity problems. For several structural problems, robust...... and limitations are discussed. In addition, a known explicit penalization approach is considered for comparison. For near-uniform spatial variations it is shown that highly robust designs can be obtained using the double filter approach. It is finally demonstrated that taking non-uniform variations into account...... further improves the robustness of the designs....

  18. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a π mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note (1).

  19. High beta lasing in micropillar cavities with adiabatic layer design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lermer, M.; Gregersen, Niels; Lorke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on lasing in optically pumped adiabatic micropillar cavities, based on the AlAs/GaAs material system. A detailed study of the threshold pump power and the spontaneous emission β factor in the lasing regime for different diameters dc is presented. We demonstrate a reduction of the thresh...... of the threshold pump power by over 2 orders of magnitude from dc = 2.25 μm down to 0.95 μm. Lasing with β factors exceeding 0.5 shows that adiabatic micropillars are operating deeply in the cavity quantum electrodynamics regime....

  20. RF Energy Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1980-02-01

    The RF Energy Compressor, REC described here, transforms cw rf into periodic pulses using an energy storage cavity, ESC, whose charging is controlled by 180 0 bi-phase modulation, PSK, and external Q switching, βs. Compression efficiency, C/sub e/, of 100% can be approached at any compression factor C/sub f/

  1. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  2. Steam exit flow design for aft cavities of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, James Michael; Tesh, Stephen William

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. A skirt or flange structure is provided for shielding the steam cooling impingement holes adjacent the inner wall aerofoil fillet region of the nozzle from the steam flow exiting the aft nozzle cavities. Moreover, the gap between the flash rib boss and the cavity insert is controlled to minimize the flow of post impingement cooling media therebetween. This substantially confines outflow to that exiting via the return channels, thus furthermore minimizing flow in the vicinity of the aerofoil fillet region that may adversely affect impingement cooling thereof.

  3. Design of RF energy harvesting platforms for power management unit with start-up circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Alessandra; Masotti, Diego

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution we discuss an unconventional rectifier design dedicated to RF energy harvesting from ultra-low sources, such as ambient RF sources which are typically of the order of few to few tens of μW. In such conditions unsuccessful results may occur if the rectenna is directly connected to its actual load since either the minimum power or the minimum activation voltage may not be simultaneously available. For this reason a double-branch rectifier topology is considered for the power management unit (PMU), instead of traditional single-branch one. The new PMU, interposed between the rectenna and application circuits, allows the system to operate with significantly lower input power with respect to the traditional solution, while preserving efficiency during steady-state power conversion.

  4. Design of RF energy harvesting platforms for power management unit with start-up circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanzo, Alessandra; Masotti, Diego

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we discuss an unconventional rectifier design dedicated to RF energy harvesting from ultra-low sources, such as ambient RF sources which are typically of the order of few to few tens of μW. In such conditions unsuccessful results may occur if the rectenna is directly connected to its actual load since either the minimum power or the minimum activation voltage may not be simultaneously available. For this reason a double-branch rectifier topology is considered for the power management unit (PMU), instead of traditional single-branch one. The new PMU, interposed between the rectenna and application circuits, allows the system to operate with significantly lower input power with respect to the traditional solution, while preserving efficiency during steady-state power conversion

  5. Design of a 5 GHz window in a lower hybrid r.f. system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Seki, M.; Imai, T.

    1995-01-01

    A new pill-box window at a frequency of 5GHz, which has an oversized length in both the axial and the radial direction, has been designed to reduce the r.f. power density and the electric field strength at the ceramics. The dimension of the new pill-box is optimized from the numerical calculation and a voltage standing-wave ratio of less than 1.02 is obtained. The r.f. power density and the maximum electric field strength are reduced to about 40% and 66% of the standard pill-box window respectively. It is evaluated that the power capability of the new oversized pill-box window by cooling edge of ceramics is more than 500kW with continuous-wave operation. ((orig.))

  6. Design and commissioning of Fermilab's vertical test stand for ILC SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Carcagno, Ruben; Ginsburg, Camille M.; Huang, Yuenian; Norris, Barry; Peterson, Thomas; Poloubotko, Valeri; Rabehl, roger; Rakhno, Igor; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of its ILC program, Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities. It operates at a nominal temperature of 2K, using a cryoplant that can supply LHe in excess of 20g/sec and provide bath pumping capacity of 125W at 2K. The below-grade cryostat consists of a vacuum vessel and LHe vessel, equipped with magnetic shielding to reduce the ambient magnetic field to <10mG. Internal fixed and external movable radiation shielding ensures that exposure to personnel is minimized. The facility features an integrated personnel safety system consisting of RF switches, interlocks, and area radiation monitors.

  7. Design and commissioning of Fermilab's vertical test stand for ILC SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Carcagno, Ruben; Ginsburg, Camille M.; Huang, Yuenian; Norris, Barry; Peterson, Thomas; Poloubotko, Valeri; Rabehl, roger; Rakhno, Igor; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of its ILC program, Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities. It operates at a nominal temperature of 2K, using a cryoplant that can supply LHe in excess of 20g/sec and provide bath pumping capacity of 125W at 2K. The below-grade cryostat consists of a vacuum vessel and LHe vessel, equipped with magnetic shielding to reduce the ambient magnetic field to <10mG. Internal fixed and external movable radiation shielding ensures that exposure to personnel is minimized. The facility features an integrated personnel safety system consisting of RF switches, interlocks, and area radiation monitors

  8. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Binping; Alberty, Luis; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdu-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC) shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity's electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  9. Electromagnetic design of a β=0.9, 650 MHz elliptic superconducting radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, Arup Ratan; Kumar, V.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently performed two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic design studies of a β=0.9, 650 MHz, elliptic superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity using electromagnetic field solver code SUPERFISH. We have evolved the design starting from the design parameters of β=1, 1300 MHz, TESLA design SCRF cavity and then scaled it for the β=0.9 and 650 MHz case. The design has been optimized for minimizing the SCRF cavity power loss. One of the important parameters in the design of such elliptic SCRF cavities is the wall angle, which is defined as the vertical angle made by the common tangent to the iris and equator ellipses. Generally, there is a constraint on the minimum value of the wall angle, which is decided by the mechanical considerations, ease of chemical cleaning etc. In our optimization studies, we have first explored the case when there is no such constraint on wall angle. We find that from the point of view of low cavity power dissipation, the optimized design has a re-entrant geometry, where the wall angle is negative. We then perform design optimization, keeping the constraint that the wall angle should be greater than 5 degree. Keeping this constraint, we find that our optimized design parameters for the single cell match closely with the design parameters reported for Project-X. We discuss the results of 2D electromagnetic field calculations for this design using SUPERFISH. In the next, we have performed the design studies of the multi-cell β=0.9, 650 MHz, elliptic SCRF cavity. The design parameters of end-cells are optimized such that the frequency of the end-cell is matched to that of mid-cells. We have studied all the normal modes for the multi-cell cavity. The frequency of different normal modes is also calculated using a finite element code ANSYS and results are compared with those obtained using SUPERFISH. The field flatness, which is an important design criterion, is also studied. For multi-cell cavity, another important aspect is the cell

  10. Rectifier Design Challenges for RF Wireless Power Transfer and Energy Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Collado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The design of wireless power transfer (WPT and energy harvesting (EH solutions poses different challenges towards achieving maximum RF-DC conversion efficiency in these systems. This paper covers several selected challenges when developing WPT and electromagnetic EH solutions, such as the design of multiband and broadband rectifiers, the minimization of the effect that load and input power variations may have on the system performance and finally the most optimum power combining mechanisms that can be used when dealing with multi-element rectifiers.

  11. Design of traveling wave windows for the PEP-II RF coupling network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroll, N.M.; Ng, C.K.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, M.

    1995-05-01

    The waveguide windows in the PEP-II RF coupling network have to withstand high power of 500 kW. Traveling wave windows have lower power dissipation than conventional self-matched windows, thus rendering the possibility of less stringent mechanical design. The traveling wave behavior is achieved by providing a reflecting iris on each side of the window, and depending on the configuration of the irises, traveling wave windows are characterized as inductive or capacitive types. A numerical design procedure using MAFIA has been developed for traveling wave windows. The relative advantages of inductive and capacitive windows are discussed. Furthermore, the issues of bandwidth and multipactoring are also addressed

  12. Mechanical Design and Fabrication of a New RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zukun

    2011-01-01

    A Full-scale prototype of a new 201.25 MHz RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, assembled and installed in the test facility. This prototype was successfully tested and met the physics and electronics design criteria. The team faced design and manufacturing challenges, having a goal to produce 2 MW peak power at 13% duty factor, at the elevation of over 2 km in Los Alamos. The mechanical design of the final power amplifier was built around a Thales TH628 Diacrode R , a state-of-art tetrode power tube. The main structure includes Input circuit, Output circuit, Grid decoupling circuit, Output coupler, Tuning pistons, and a cooling system. Many types of material were utilized to make this new RF amplifier. The fabrication processes of the key components were completed in the Prototype Fabrication Division shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The critical plating procedures were achieved by private industry. The FPA mass is nearly 600 kg and installed in a beam structural support stand. In this paper, we summarize the FPA design basis and fabrication, plating, and assembly process steps with necessary lifting and handling fixtures. In addition, to ensure the quality of the FPA support structure a finite element analysis with seismic design forces has also been carried out.

  13. Mechanical Design and Fabrication of a New RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zukun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    A Full-scale prototype of a new 201.25 MHz RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, assembled and installed in the test facility. This prototype was successfully tested and met the physics and electronics design criteria. The team faced design and manufacturing challenges, having a goal to produce 2 MW peak power at 13% duty factor, at the elevation of over 2 km in Los Alamos. The mechanical design of the final power amplifier was built around a Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R}, a state-of-art tetrode power tube. The main structure includes Input circuit, Output circuit, Grid decoupling circuit, Output coupler, Tuning pistons, and a cooling system. Many types of material were utilized to make this new RF amplifier. The fabrication processes of the key components were completed in the Prototype Fabrication Division shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The critical plating procedures were achieved by private industry. The FPA mass is nearly 600 kg and installed in a beam structural support stand. In this paper, we summarize the FPA design basis and fabrication, plating, and assembly process steps with necessary lifting and handling fixtures. In addition, to ensure the quality of the FPA support structure a finite element analysis with seismic design forces has also been carried out.

  14. Detailed design of the RF source for the 1 MV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcuzzi, D.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pavei, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the EU activities for the development of the Neutral Beam Injector for ITER, the detailed design of the Radio Frequency (RF) driven negative ion source to be installed in the 1 MV ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) has been carried out. Results coming from ongoing R and D on IPP test beds [A. Staebler et al., Development of a RF-Driven Ion Source for the ITER NBI System, this conference] and the design of the new ELISE facility [B. Heinemann et al., Design of the Half-Size ITER Neutral Beam Source Test Facility ELISE, this conference] brought several modifications to the solution based on the previous design. An assessment was carried out regarding the Back-Streaming positive Ions (BSI+) that impinge on the back plates of the ion source and cause high and localized heat loads. This led to the redesign of most heated components to increase cooling, and to different choices for the plasma facing materials to reduce the effects of sputtering. The design of the electric circuit, gas supply and the other auxiliary systems has been optimized. Integration with other components of the beam source has been revised, with regards to the interfaces with the supporting structure, the plasma grid and the flexible connections. In the paper the design will be presented in detail, as well as the results of the analyses performed for the thermo-mechanical verification of the components.

  15. The design of a 3 GHz thermionic RF-gun and energy filter for MAX-lab

    CERN Document Server

    Anderberg, B; Demirkan, M; Eriksson, M; Malmgren, L; Werin, S

    2002-01-01

    A new pre-injector has been designed for the MAX-laboratory. It consists of an RF-gun and a magnetic energy filter. The newly designed RF-gun geometry will be operated at 3 GHz in the thermionic mode using a BaO cathode. The pre-injector will provide a 2.3 MeV electron beam in 3 ps micro pulses to a new injector system currently under construction.

  16. Optimizing RF energy transport : channel modelling and transmit antenna and rectenna design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    For powering wireless sensors in buildings rechargeable batteries may be used, being charged remotely by dedicated RF sources. RF energy transport suffers from path loss and therefore the RF power available on a rectenna will be very low. As a consequence, the RF-to-DC conversion efficiency will

  17. RF characterization and testing of ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jose, Mentes; Singh, G.N. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Girish [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076,India (India); Bhagwat, P.V. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-01

    RF characterization of rectangular to ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers has been carried out by connecting them back to back. Rectangular waveguide to N type adapters are first calibrated by TRL method and then used for RF measurements. Detailed information is obtained about their RF behavior by measurements and full wave simulations. It is shown that the two transitions can be characterized and tuned for required return loss at design frequency of 352.2 MHz. This opens the possibility of testing and conditioning two transitions together on a test bench. Finally, a RF coupler based on these transitions is coupled to an accelerator cavity. The power coupler is successfully tested up to 200 kW, 352.2 MHz with 0.2% duty cycle.

  18. Availability, reliability and logistic support studies of the RF power system design options for the IFMIF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargallo, E.; Giralt, A.; Martinez, G.; Weber, M.; Regidor, D.; Arroyo, J.M.; Abal, J.; Dies, J.; Tapia, C.; De Blas, A.; Mendez, P.; Ibarra, A.; Molla, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Current RF system design based on tetrodes chains is evaluated. ► Alternative solid state power amplifiers RF system design is analyzed. ► Both designs are compared in terms of availability, logistics and cost. ► It is concluded that solid state option presents relevant improvements. -- Abstract: The current design of the radio frequency (RF) power system for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is based upon tetrodes technology. Due to the improvement in the solid state amplifiers technology, the possibility of using this option for IFMIF RF system is becoming a very competitive alternative presenting from the beginning several advantages in terms of availability, reliability and logistics. The current design based on RF tetrodes chains leads no room for substantial improvements in terms of availability being the requirement for the RF system hard to achieve. The principal goals of this paper are to use RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectionability) analysis in the solid state amplifier design, and to compare the availability, reliability and logistic performances for both alternatives

  19. Availability, reliability and logistic support studies of the RF power system design options for the IFMIF accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargallo, E., E-mail: enric.bargallo-font@upc.edu [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Giralt, A.; Martinez, G. [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, M.; Regidor, D.; Arroyo, J.M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Madrid (Spain); Abal, J.; Dies, J.; Tapia, C.; De Blas, A. [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Mendez, P.; Ibarra, A.; Molla, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Current RF system design based on tetrodes chains is evaluated. ► Alternative solid state power amplifiers RF system design is analyzed. ► Both designs are compared in terms of availability, logistics and cost. ► It is concluded that solid state option presents relevant improvements. -- Abstract: The current design of the radio frequency (RF) power system for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is based upon tetrodes technology. Due to the improvement in the solid state amplifiers technology, the possibility of using this option for IFMIF RF system is becoming a very competitive alternative presenting from the beginning several advantages in terms of availability, reliability and logistics. The current design based on RF tetrodes chains leads no room for substantial improvements in terms of availability being the requirement for the RF system hard to achieve. The principal goals of this paper are to use RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectionability) analysis in the solid state amplifier design, and to compare the availability, reliability and logistic performances for both alternatives.

  20. Design and Prototype Progress toward a Superconducting Crab Cavity Cryomodule for the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Henry, James; Kneisel, Peter; Rimmer, Robert; Slack, Gary; Turlington, Larry; waldschmidt, Geoff; Nassiri, Alireza

    2010-01-01

    A squashed, elliptical supercondconducting (SC) cavity with waveguide dampers on the beam pipes has currently been chosen as the baseline design for the Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). An alternate cavity design, with a waveguide damper located directly on the cavity cell for improved damping characteristics, has also been designed and cold-tested with promising results. In either case, eight cavities would be operated CW in a single cryomodule at 2K to produce an electron bunch chirp of 4MV at a frequency of 2.815 GHz. Detailed analysis of multipactoring (MP), Lorentz force detuning (LFD), and the thermal properties of the baseline design has led to an engineering specification of the basic parameters of the cryomodule.