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Sample records for reynolds number limit

  1. Reynolds number limits for jet propulsion: A numerical study of simplified jellyfish

    CERN Document Server

    Herschlag, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The Scallop Theorem states that reciprocal methods of locomotion, such as jet propulsion or paddling, will not work in Stokes flow (Reynolds number = 0). In nature the effective limit of jet propulsion is still in the range where inertial forces are significant. It appears that almost all animals that use jet propulsion swim at Reynolds numbers (Re) of about 5 or more. Juvenile squid and octopods hatch from the egg already swimming in this inertial regime. The limitations of jet propulsion at intermediate Re is explored here using the immersed boundary method to solve the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equations coupled to the motion of a simplified jellyfish. The contraction and expansion kinematics are prescribed, but the forward and backward swimming motions of the idealized jellyfish are emergent properties determined by the resulting fluid dynamics. Simulations are performed for both an oblate bell shape using a paddling mode of swimming and a prolate bell shape using jet propulsion. Average forward veloc...

  2. Reynolds number limits for jet propulsion: a numerical study of simplified jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschlag, Gregory; Miller, Laura

    2011-09-21

    The Scallop theorem states that reciprocal methods of locomotion, such as jet propulsion or paddling, will not work in Stokes flow (Reynolds number=0). In nature the effective limit of jet propulsion is still in the range where inertial forces are significant. It appears that almost all animals that use jet propulsion swim at Reynolds numbers (Re) of about 5 or more. Juvenile squid and octopods hatch from the egg already swimming in this inertial regime. Juvenile jellyfish, or ephyrae, break off from polyps swimming at Re greater than 5. Many other organisms, such as scallops, rarely swim at Re less than 100. The limitations of jet propulsion at intermediate Re is explored here using the immersed boundary method to solve the 2D Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the motion of a simplified jellyfish. The contraction and expansion kinematics are prescribed, but the forward and backward swimming motions of the idealized jellyfish are emergent properties determined by the resulting fluid dynamics. Simulations are performed for both an oblate bell shape using a paddling mode of swimming and a prolate bell shape using jet propulsion. Average forward velocities and work put into the system are calculated for Re between 1 and 320. The results show that forward velocities rapidly decay with decreasing Re for all bell shapes when Rejellyfish after two pulse cycles are comparable to those reported for Aurelia aurita, but discrepancies are observed in the vortex dynamics between when the 2D model oblate jellyfish and the organism. This discrepancy is likely due to a combination of the differences between the 3D reality of the jellyfish and the 2D simplification, as well as the rigidity of the time varying geometry imposed by the idealized model.

  3. Large scale motions of multiple limit-cycle high Reynolds number annular and toroidal rotor/stator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridel-Bertomeu, Thibault; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Staffelbach, G.

    2017-06-01

    Rotating cavity flows are essential components of industrial applications but their dynamics are still not fully understood when it comes to the relation between the fluid organization and monitored pressure fluctuations. From computer hard-drives to turbo-pumps of space launchers, designed devices often produce flow oscillations that can either destroy the component prematurely or produce too much noise. In such a context, large scale dynamics of high Reynolds number rotor/stator cavities need better understanding especially at the flow limit-cycle or associated statistically stationary state. In particular, the influence of curvature as well as cavity aspect ratio on the large scale organization and flow stability at a fixed rotating disc Reynolds number is fundamental. To probe such flows, wall-resolved large eddy simulation is applied to two different rotor/stator cylindrical cavities and one annular cavity. Validation of the predictions proves the method to be suited and to capture the disc boundary layer patterns reported in the literature. It is then shown that in complement to these disc boundary layer analyses, at the limit-cycle the rotating flows exhibit characteristic patterns at mid-height in the homogeneous core pointing the importance of large scale features. Indeed, dynamic modal decomposition reveals that the entire flow dynamics are driven by only a handful of atomic modes whose combination links the oscillatory patterns observed in the boundary layers as well as in the core of the cavity. These fluctuations form macro-structures, born in the unstable stator boundary layer and extending through the homogeneous inviscid core to the rotating disc boundary layer, causing its instability under some conditions. More importantly, the macro-structures significantly differ depending on the configuration pointing the need for deeper understanding of the influence of geometrical parameters as well as operating conditions.

  4. Propulsion at low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, Ali [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Science, Zanjan University, Zanjan 313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golestanian, Ramin [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-04-13

    We study the propulsion of two model swimmers at low Reynolds number. Inspired by Purcell's model, we propose a very simple one-dimensional swimmer consisting of three spheres that are connected by two arms whose lengths can change between two values. The proposed swimmer can swim with a special type of motion, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry. We also show that an ellipsoidal membrane with tangential travelling wave on it can also propel itself in the direction preferred by the travelling wave. This system resembles the realistic biological animals like Paramecium.

  5. Low-Reynolds-number predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Mehran; Yekehzare, Mohammad; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    To generalize simple bead-linker model of swimmers to higher dimensions and to demonstrate the chemotaxis ability of such swimmers, here we introduce a low-Reynolds predator, using a two-dimensional triangular bead-spring model. Two-state linkers as mechanochemical enzymes expand as a result of interaction with particular activator substances in the environment, causing the whole body to translate and rotate. The concentration of the chemical stimulator controls expansion versus the contraction rate of each arm and so affects the ability of the body for diffusive movements; also the variation of activator substance's concentration in the environment breaks the symmetry of linkers' preferred state, resulting in the drift of the random walker along the gradient of the density of activators. External food or danger sources may attract or repel the body by producing or consuming the chemical activators of the organism's enzymes, inducing chemotaxis behavior. Generalization of the model to three dimensions is straightforward.

  6. Boundary induced nonlinearities at small Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbragaglia, M.; Sugiyama, K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the importance of boundary slip at finite Reynolds numbers for mixed boundary conditions. Nonlinear effects are induced by the non-homogeneity of the boundary condition and change the symmetry properties of the flow with an overall mean flow reduction. To explain the observed drag

  7. Room Airflows with Low Reynolds Number Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Davidson, Lars

    The behaviour of room airflows under fully turbulent conditions is well known both in terms of experiments and, numerical calculations by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). For room airflows where turbulence is not fully developed though, i.e. flows at low Reynolds numbers, the existing knowledge...

  8. Numerical simulation of LBGK model for high Reynolds number flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Yang; Shi Bao-Chang; Wang Neng-Chao

    2004-01-01

    A principle of selecting relaxation parameter was proposed to observe the limit computational capability of the incompressible LBGK models developed by Guo ZL (Guo model) and He SY (He model) for high Reynolds number flow.To the two-dimensional driven cavity flow problem, the highest Reynolds numbers covered by Guo and He models are in the range 58000-52900 and 28000-29000, respectively, at 0.3 Mach number and 1/256 lattice space. The simulation results also show that the Guo model has stronger robustness due to its higher accuracy.

  9. Flapping hydrofoil performance at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedro, G.; Suleman, A.; Djilali, N. [Univ. of Victoria, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: gpedro@uvic.ca; suleman@uvic.ca; ndjilali@uvic.ca

    2003-07-01

    This paper relates the study of unsteady flow past oscillating hydrofoils at low Reynolds numbers using a computational fluid dynamics research code based on structured grids. The solver utilizes an explicit, time-stepping algorithm with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation to account for mesh movement. The viscous flow past a NACA0012 hydrofoil at various pitching and heaving frequencies and other design parameters is simulated. The effect of these parameters on thrust, power and efficiency is studied along with flow field visualisations to account for these variations. (author)

  10. Reynolds number influences on turbulent boundary layer momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshana, Paththage A.

    There are many engineering applications at Reynolds numbers orders of magnitude higher than existing turbulent boundary layer studies. Currently, the mechanisms for turbulent transport and the Reynolds number dependence of these mechanisms are not well understood. This dissertation presents Reynolds number influences on velocity and vorticity statistics, Reynolds shear stress, and velocity-vorticity correlations for turbulent boundary layers. Well resolved hot-wire data for this study were acquired in the atmospheric surface layer at the SLTEST facility in western Utah. It is shown that during near neutral thermal stability, the flow behaves as a canonical zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer, in which the Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Rtheta, is approximately 2 x 106. The present study also provides information regarding the effects of wall roughness over a limited range of roughness. It is observed that with increasing Rtheta, the inner normalized streamwise intensity increases. This statistic is less sensitive to wall roughness away from the roughness sublayer. In contrast, the inner normalized wall normal intensity is less sensitive to the variation of Rtheta, and it is significantly sensitive to wall roughness. Outside the viscous sublayer, the inner normalized vorticity intensity is less sensitive to both Rtheta and roughness. A primary observation of the Reynolds stress study is that the predominant motions underlying the Reynolds shear stress undergo a significant shift from large to intermediate scales as Rtheta becomes large, irrespective of surface roughness. Quadrant analysis shows that types of motions contributing to the Reynolds stress change significantly at comparable wall normal locations with increasing Rtheta. The mean wall normal gradients of the Reynolds shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy have direct connections to the transport mechanisms of the turbulent boundary layer. These gradients can be expressed in

  11. Revolutionary Performance For Ultra Low Reynolds Number Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel technique for controlling transition from laminar to turbulent flow in very low Reynolds number conditions has been developed. Normally flows with Reynolds...

  12. Pair separation in high Reynolds number turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgoin, M O; Xu, H; Joergensen, J B; Bodenschatz, E; Bourgoin, Mickael; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Xu, Haitao; Joergensen, Jacob B.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The separation of two nearby particles in a turbulent flow is fundamental in our everyday lives. Turbulent mixing is important everywhere from mundane applications like stirring milk into a cup of tea to technological processes such as the mixing of chemicals in reactors, combustion engines, or jet turbines. Environmental problems such as the spread of pollutants or bioagents in the atmosphere and oceans are fundamentally turbulent mixing processes. Even biological organisms use it to survive in marine ecosystems. Despite intense scientific inquiry, however, no convincing agreement has been found with the Richardson and Batchelor two-particle dispersion predictions over a wide range of timescales. Here we report measurements in a laboratory water flow at very high turbulence intensities (Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers of R_lambda = 690 and 815) that show excellent agreement with a refinement of Batchelor's prediction. We find that even for large initial spatial separations Batchelor scaling is fulfilled. ...

  13. Holography of the QGP Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Brett

    2017-08-01

    The viscosity of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is usually described holographically by the entropy-normalized dynamic viscosity η / s. However, other measures of viscosity, such as the kinematic viscosity ν and the Reynolds number Re, are often useful, and they too should be investigated from a holographic point of view. We show that a simple model of this kind puts an upper bound on Re for nearly central collisions at a given temperature; this upper bound is in very good agreement with the observational lower bound (from the RHIC facility). Furthermore, in a holographic approach using only Einstein gravity, η / s does not respond to variations of other physical parameters, while ν and Re can do so. In particular, it is known that the magnetic fields arising in peripheral heavy-ion collisions vary strongly with the impact parameter b, and we find that the holographic model predicts that ν and Re can also be expected to vary substantially with the magnetic field and therefore with b.

  14. Holography of the QGP Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The viscosity of the Quark–Gluon Plasma (QGP is usually described holographically by the entropy-normalized dynamic viscosity η/s. However, other measures of viscosity, such as the kinematic viscosity ν and the Reynolds number Re, are often useful, and they too should be investigated from a holographic point of view. We show that a simple model of this kind puts an upper bound on Re for nearly central collisions at a given temperature; this upper bound is in very good agreement with the observational lower bound (from the RHIC facility. Furthermore, in a holographic approach using only Einstein gravity, η/s does not respond to variations of other physical parameters, while ν and Re can do so. In particular, it is known that the magnetic fields arising in peripheral heavy-ion collisions vary strongly with the impact parameter b, and we find that the holographic model predicts that ν and Re can also be expected to vary substantially with the magnetic field and therefore with b.

  15. Reynolds number and geometry effects in laminar axisymmetric isothermal counterflows

    KAUST Repository

    Scribano, Gianfranco

    2016-12-29

    The counterflow configuration is a canonical stagnation flow, featuring two opposed impinging round jets and a mixing layer across the stagnation plane. Although counterflows are used extensively in the study of reactive mixtures and other applications where mixing of two streams is required, quantitative data on the scaling properties of the flow field are lacking. The aim of this work is to characterize the velocity and mixing fields in isothermal counterflows over a wide range of conditions. The study features both experimental data from particle image velocimetry and results from detailed axisymmetric simulations. The scaling laws for the nondimensional velocity and mixture fraction are obtained as a function of an appropriate Reynolds number and the ratio of the separation distance of the nozzles to their diameter. In the range of flow configurations investigated, the nondimensional fields are found to depend primarily on the separation ratio and, to a lesser extent, the Reynolds number. The marked dependence of the velocity field with respect to the separation ratio is linked to a high pressure region at the stagnation point. On the other hand, Reynolds number effects highlight the role played by the wall boundary layer on the interior of the nozzles, which becomes less important as the separation ratio decreases. The normalized strain rate and scalar dissipation rate at the stagnation plane are found to attain limiting values only for high values of the Reynolds number. These asymptotic values depend markedly on the separation ratio and differ significantly from the values produced by analytical models. The scaling of the mixing field does not show a limiting behavior as the separation ratio decreases to the smallest practical value considered.

  16. Reynolds number and geometry effects in laminar axisymmetric isothermal counterflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Gianfranco; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    The counterflow configuration is a canonical stagnation flow, featuring two opposed impinging round jets and a mixing layer across the stagnation plane. Although counterflows are used extensively in the study of reactive mixtures and other applications where mixing of two streams is required, quantitative data on the scaling properties of the flow field are lacking. The aim of this work is to characterize the velocity and mixing fields in isothermal counterflows over a wide range of conditions. The study features both experimental data from particle image velocimetry and results from detailed axisymmetric simulations. The scaling laws for the nondimensional velocity and mixture fraction are obtained as a function of an appropriate Reynolds number and the ratio of the separation distance of the nozzles to their diameter. In the range of flow configurations investigated, the nondimensional fields are found to depend primarily on the separation ratio and, to a lesser extent, the Reynolds number. The marked dependence of the velocity field with respect to the separation ratio is linked to a high pressure region at the stagnation point. On the other hand, Reynolds number effects highlight the role played by the wall boundary layer on the interior of the nozzles, which becomes less important as the separation ratio decreases. The normalized strain rate and scalar dissipation rate at the stagnation plane are found to attain limiting values only for high values of the Reynolds number. These asymptotic values depend markedly on the separation ratio and differ significantly from the values produced by analytical models. The scaling of the mixing field does not show a limiting behavior as the separation ratio decreases to the smallest practical value considered.

  17. Hybrid RANS/LES method for high Reynolds numbers, applied to atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

      The use of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to predict wall-bounded flows has presently been limited to low Reynolds number flows. Since the number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-wall turbulent structures increase rapidly with Reynolds number, LES has been unattainable for...

  18. Comments on Reynolds number effects in wall-bounded shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Reynolds number on the structure of turbulent boundary layers and channel flows is discussed. Published data are reexamined in light of the following questions: (1) does the boundary layer turbulence structure change after the well known Reynolds number limit viz, when Re(theta) is greater than 6000?; (2) is it possible to disturb a high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layer near the wall such that the recovery length is O(100 delta)?; and (3) how close is the numerically simulated low Reynolds number flat plate turbulence structure to that observed experimentally? The turbulence structure appears to change continuously with Reynolds number virtually throughout the bounday layer and sometimes in unexpected manners at high Reynolds numbers.

  19. Experimental studies of Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing & transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warhaft, Z. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An overview of recent experiments, in which the author generated high Reynolds number homogeneous grid turbulence, is provided. The author shows that in a small wind tunnel, Reynolds numbers that are sufficiently high (R{sub {lambda}} {approximately} 800, R{sub {ell}} {approximately} 36, 000) such that many of the aspects of turbulence that hitherto have only been observed in large scale anisotropic shear flows, are obtained. In particular the author studied the evolution of the spectrum with Reynolds number, the Kolmogorov constant and the internal intermittency, showing the way they tend to their high Reynolds number asymptotes. Thus the author links previous low Reynolds number laboratory experiments with large scale environmental measurements.

  20. Crossover from High to Low Reynolds Number Turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef

    1994-01-01

    The Taylor-Reynolds and Reynolds number (Re lambda and Re) dependence of the dimensionless energy dissipation rate c epsilon = epsilon L / u31,rms is derived for statistically stationary isotropic turbulence, employing the results of a variable range mean field theory. Here epsilon is the energy di

  1. Numerical investigation of transition critical Reynolds number of channel flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming

    2015-11-01

    Two critical Reynolds numbers are mentioned in investigation of laminar-turbulent transition. One is instability critical Reynolds number from linear stability theory (LST). The other is transition critical Reynolds number at which transition occurs in reality, which is significantly lower than the former in general. The determination of transition critical Reynolds number is of important practical significance in some engineering problems. Theoretical method has not been proposed for its determination, so it has to depend on experiments. However, for some flows with important practical significance, such as hypersonic boundary layer, transition critical Reynolds number cannot be determined by experiments in current situation. In this paper, transition critical Reynolds number of incompressible channel flow is determined by direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found as Re =1114, which agrees with experimental data. In subsequent paper, transition critical Reynolds number of boundary layer will be investigation by the similar method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11202147, 11332007, 11172203, and 91216111) and the Specialized Research Fund (New Teacher Class) for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20120032120007).

  2. Fabrication and control of simple low Reynolds number microswimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    The development of miniaturized robotic swimmers is hindered by technical limitations in micro- and nanofabrication. To circumvent these limitations, we investigated the minimal geometrical requirements for swimming in low Reynolds number. Micro- and nanofabrication of complex shapes, such as helices, on a massive scale requires sophisticated state of the art technologies and has size limitations. In contrast, simple shaped structures, such as spherical particles, can be fabricated massively using chemical synthesis with relative ease. Here, simple microswimmers were fabricated using two microparticles with debris attached to their surface. The debris on the microswimmer's surface creates a geometry with two or more planes of symmetry, allowing the microswimmer to swim in bulk fluid at low Reynolds number. The microswimmers are magnetically actuated and controlled via a uniform rotating magnetic field generated by an approximate Helmholtz electromagnetic coil system. We characterized the microswimmer's velocity profile with respect to rotating frequency and analyzed the motion of the microswimmer using image processing. Finally, we demonstrated the controllability of the microswimmers by freely steering them in any desired directions.

  3. Reynolds number effects on near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Meredith; Klewicki, Joseph

    2001-11-01

    Reynolds number effects in the zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are presented in the context of near-wall axial velocity data. Complementary experiments were conducted in a boundary layer wind tunnel and in the atmospheric surface layer over Utah's western desert yielding a total Reynolds number range over three orders of magnitude (2 × 10^3 hot-wires spanning 1 convection velocities. Event detection analyses are used to examine Reynolds number differences in the nature of sweeps related to these observations.

  4. ON THE EFFECT OF REYNOLDS NUMBER ON VON KARMAN'S CONSTANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵金印; 解茂昭; F.Durst

    2002-01-01

    Fully developed turbulence measurements in pipe flow were made in the Reynolds number ranging from 10× 103 to 350 × 103 with a hot-wire anemometer and a Pitot tube. Comparisons were made with the experimental results of previous work. The mean velocity profile and the turbulent intensity in the experiments indicate that for the mean velocity profile, in the fully developed turbulent pipe flow,with the Reynolds number. The empirical relationships could not be considered to be accurate enough to describe the fully developed turbulence over the whole Reynolds number range in pipe flow.

  5. Hydrodynamic synchronization of nonlinear oscillators at low Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, M; Liverpool, T B

    2012-04-01

    We introduce a generic model of a weakly nonlinear self-sustained oscillator as a simplified tool to study synchronization in a fluid at low Reynolds number. By averaging over the fast degrees of freedom, we examine the effect of hydrodynamic interactions on the slow dynamics of two oscillators and show that they can lead to synchronization. Furthermore, we find that synchronization is strongly enhanced when the oscillators are nonisochronous, which on the limit cycle means the oscillations have an amplitude-dependent frequency. Nonisochronity is determined by a nonlinear coupling α being nonzero. We find that its (α) sign determines if they synchronize in phase or antiphase. We then study an infinite array of oscillators in the long-wavelength limit, in the presence of noise. For α>0, hydrodynamic interactions can lead to a homogeneous synchronized state. Numerical simulations for a finite number of oscillators confirm this and, when α<0, show the propagation of waves, reminiscent of metachronal coordination.

  6. Theoretical models in low-Reynolds-number locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, On Shun

    2014-01-01

    The locomotion of microorganisms in fluids is ubiquitous and plays an important role in numerous biological processes. In this chapter we present an overview of theoretical modeling for low-Reynolds-number locomotion.

  7. The Influence of Realistic Reynolds Numbers on Slat Noise Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system has been computed using a computational fluid dynamics code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver. Varying the Reynolds number from 1.71 to 12.0 million based on the stowed chord resulted in slight changes in the radiated noise. Tonal features in the spectra were robust and evident for all Reynolds numbers and even when a spanwise flow was imposed. The general trends observed in near-field fluctuations were also similar for all the different Reynolds numbers. Experiments on simplified, subscale high-lift systems have exhibited noticeable dependencies on the Reynolds number and tripping, although primarily for tonal features rather than the broadband portion of the spectra. Either the 30P/30N model behaves differently, or the computational model is unable to capture these effects. Hence, the results underscore the need for more detailed measurements of the slat cove flow.

  8. Vortex Shedding from Tapered Cylinders at high Reynolds Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Andersen, Michael Styrk; Christensen, Silas Sverre

    2015-01-01

    percent for strakes of circular cross section. The present paper argues that this height can be reduced for structures where the critical wind velocity for vortex shedding is in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime. The present investigations are aimed for suppressing VIV on offshore wind turbine......^5 (Supercritical). Results indicate that circular strakes with a diameter corresponding to 3 percent of the structures mean diameter can be used to efficiently reduce VIV in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime....

  9. The wake of falling disks at low Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Jie Zhong; Cun-Biao Lee

    2012-01-01

    We visualized the wake structure of circular disks falling vertically in quiescent water.The evolution of the wake was shown to be similar to the flow patterns behind a fixed disk.The Reynolds number,Re =Ud/v,is in the range of 40- 200.With the ascension of Reynolds numbers,a regular bifurcation occurred at the first critical Reynolds number Rec1,leading to a transition from an axisymmetric wake structure to a plane symmetric one; A Hopf bifurcation took place at the second critical Reynolds number Rec2,as the wake structure became unsteady.Plane symmetry of the wake structure was first lost as periodic voaex shedding appeared,but recovered at higher Reynolds number.The difference between the two critical Reynolds numbers was found to be shape-dependent,as we compared our results for thin discs with those for other falling bodies,such as spheres and cones.This observation could be understood in terms of the instability mechanism of the vortical structure.

  10. 76 FR 54801 - Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a Subsidiary of Reynolds Group Holding Limited, Grove City, PA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a Subsidiary of Reynolds Group Holding... Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a subsidiary of Reynolds Group Holding Limited, Grove City, Pennsylvania... disposable food service containers or bulk sheet, meet the worker group certification criteria under...

  11. Vortex shedding from slender cones at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papangelou, A.

    1992-09-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments on the flows created by a number of slightly tapered models of circular cross-section have shown the presence of spanwise cells (regions of constant shedding frequency) at Reynolds numbers of the order of 100. The experiments have also shown a number of other interesting features of these flows: the cellular flow configuration is dependent on the base Reynolds number and independent of the tip Reynolds number, the frequency jump between adjacent cells is a function of flow speed, taper angle and kinematic viscosity, but is constant along a cone's span, and the unsteady hot-wire anemometer signal is both amplitude and phase modulated. A mathematical model is proposed based on the complex Landau-Stuart equation with a spanwise diffusive coupling term. Numerical solutions of this equation have shown many of the qualitative features observed in the experiments.

  12. Quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, B F N; Cambon, C; Delache, A; Bos, W J T

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the anisotropy of homogeneous turbulence in an electrically conducting fluid submitted to a uniform magnetic field, for low magnetic Reynolds number, in the quasi- static approximation. We interpret disagreeing previous predictions between linearized theory and simulations: in the linear limit, the kinetic energy of transverse velocity components, normal to the magnetic field, decays faster than the kinetic energy of the axial component, along the magnetic field (Moffatt (1967)); whereas many numerical studies predict a final state characterised by dominant energy of transverse velocity components. We investigate the corresponding nonlinear phenomenon using Direct Numerical Simulations of freely-decaying turbulence, and a two-point statistical spectral closure based on the Eddy Damped Quasi-Normal Markovian model. The transition from the three-dimensional turbulent flow to a "two-and-a-half-dimensional" flow (Montgomery & Turner (1982)) is a result of the combined effects of short-time linear J...

  13. Small scale turbulence and the finite Reynolds number effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Djenidi, L.; Danaila, L.; Tang, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Failure to recognize the importance of the finite Reynolds number effect on small scale turbulence has, by and large, resulted in misguided assessments of the first two hypotheses of Kolmogorov ["Local structure of turbulence in an incompressible fluid for very large Reynolds numbers," Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 299-303 (1941)] or K41 as well as his third hypothesis [A. N. Kolmogorov, "A refinement of previous hypotheses concerning the local structure of turbulence in a viscous incompressible fluid at high Reynolds number," J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82-85 (1962)] or K62. As formulated by Kolmogorov, all three hypotheses require local isotropy to be valid and the Reynolds number to be very large. In the context of the first hypothesis, there is now strong evidence to suggest that this requirement can be significantly relaxed, at least for dissipative scales and relatively low order moments of the velocity structure function. As the scale increases, the effect of the large scale motion on these moments becomes more prominent and higher Reynolds numbers are needed before K41 and K62 can be tested unambiguously.

  14. Analysis of low Reynolds number separation bubbles using semiempirical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gordon S.; Mueller, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The formation and growth of transitional separation bubbles can significantly affect boundary-layer development on airfoils operating at low chord Reynolds numbers. Of primary concern is the change in boundary-layer thickness between laminar separation and turbulent reattachment. This can be estimated using semiempirical methods, such as the one devised by Horton (1968), which are based on solutions to the integral forms of the boundary-layer equations. The applicability of these methods at low Reynolds numbers was investigated using hot-wire measurements of bubbles formed on an NACA 66(3)-018 airfoil at chord Reynolds numbers of 50,000-200,000. The momentum thickness growth between separation and transition was found to be similar to that predicted for a laminar half-jet and appears to be influenced by the momentum thickness Reynolds number at separation. This parameter also was found to have a noticeable effect on the Reynolds number based on the length of a bubble's laminar portion.

  15. Simulating High Reynolds Number Flow by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Xiu-Ying; LIU Da-He; ZHOU Jing; JIN Yong-Juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A two-dimensional channel flow with different Reynolds numbers is tested by using the lattice Boltzmann method under different pressure and velocity boundary conditions. The results show that the simulation error increases,and the pressure and the flow rate become unstable under a high Reynolds number. To improve the simulation precision under a high Reynolds number, the number of fluid nodes should be enlarged. For a higher Reynoldsnumber flow, the velocity boundary with an approximately parabolic velocity profile is found to be more adaptive.Blood flow in an artery with cosine shape symmetrical narrowing is then simulated under a velocity boundary condition. Its velocity, pressure and wall shear stress distributions are consistent with previous studies.

  16. The Aerodynamics of Deforming Wings at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Albert

    responsive to flexibility satisfying an inverse proportionality to stiffness. In hover, an effective pitch angle can be defined in a flexible wing that accounts for deflection which shifts results toward trend lines of rigid wings. Three-dimensional simulations examining the effects of two distinct deformation modes undergoing prescribed deformation associated with root and tip deflection demonstrated a greater aerodynamic response to tip deflection in hover. Efficiency gains in flexion wings over rigid wing counterpart were shown to be dependent on Reynolds number with efficiency in both modes increasing with increased Reynolds number. Additionally, while the leading-edge vortex axis proved insensitive to deformation, the shape and orientation of the LEV core is modified. Experiments on three-dimensional dynamically-scaled fruit fly wings with passive deformation operating in the bursting limit Reynolds number regime revealed enhanced leading-edge vortex bursting with tip deflection promoting greater LEV core flow deceleration in stroke. Experimental studies on rotary wings highlights a universal formation time of the leading-edge vortex independent of Reynolds number, acceleration profile and aspect ratio. Efforts to replicate LEV bursting phenomena of higher aspect ratio wings in a unity aspect ratio wing such that LEV growth is no limited by span but by the LEV traversing the chord revealed a flow regime of oscillatory lift generation reminiscent of behavior exhibited in translating wings that also maintains magnitude peak to peak.

  17. The Performance of Discrete Models of Low Reynolds Number Swimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qixuan

    2015-01-01

    Swimming by shape changes at low Reynolds number is widely used in biology and understanding how the efficiency of movement depends on the geometric pattern of shape changes is important to understand swimming of microorganisms and in designing low Reynolds number swimming models. The simplest models of shape changes are those that comprise a series of linked spheres that can change their separation and/or their size. Herein we compare the efficiency of three models in which these modes are used in different ways.

  18. Resolving high Reynolds numbers in SPH simulations of subsonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Accounting for the Reynolds number is critical in numerical simulations of turbulence, particularly for subsonic flow. For Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) with constant artificial viscosity coefficient alpha, it is shown that the effective Reynolds number in the absence of explicit physical viscosity terms scales linearly with the Mach number - compared to mesh schemes, where the effective Reynolds number is largely independent of the flow velocity. As a result, SPH simulations with alpha=1 will have low Reynolds numbers in the subsonic regime compared to mesh codes, which may be insufficient to resolve turbulent flow. This explains the failure of Bauer and Springel (2011, arXiv:1109.4413v1) to find agreement between the moving-mesh code AREPO and the GADGET SPH code on simulations of driven, subsonic (v ~ 0.3 c_s) turbulence appropriate to the intergalactic/intracluster medium, where it was alleged that SPH is somehow fundamentally incapable of producing a Kolmogorov-like turbulent cascade. We show tha...

  19. Stokesian swimming of a sphere at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    Explicit expressions are derived for the matrices determining the mean translational and rotational swimming velocities and the mean rate of dissipation for Stokesian swimming at low Reynolds number of a distorting sphere in a viscous incompressible fluid. As an application an efficient helical propeller-type stroke is found and its properties are calculated.

  20. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. O

  1. Bifurcation to forward flapping flight at intermediate Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Zhang, Jun; Childress, Stephen

    2003-11-01

    The locomotion of most fish and birds is realized by flapping wings or fins transverse to the direction of travel. According to early theoretical studies, a flapping wing translating at finite speed in an inviscid fluid experiences a propulsive force. In steady forward flight this thrust is balanced by drag. Such "lift-based mechanisms" of thrust production are characteristic of the Eulerian realm, where discrete vortical structures are shed. But, when the Reynolds number is small, viscous forces dominate and reciprocal flapping motions are ineffective. A flapping wing experiences a net drag and cannot be used to propel an organism. We have devised an experiment to bridge the two regimes, and to examine the transition to forward flight at intermediate Reynolds numbers. We study the dynamics of an horizontal wing that is flapped up and down and is free to move either forwards or backwards. This very simple kinematics emphasizes the demarcation between low and high Reynolds number because it is effective in the Eulerian realm but has no effect in the Stokesian realm. We show that flapping flight occurs abruptly as a symmetry breaking bifurcation at a critical flapping frequency. Beyond the bifurcation the forward speed increases linearly with the flapping frequency. The experiment establishes a clear demarcation between the different strategies of locomotion at large and small Reynolds number.

  2. Swimming of a circular disk at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2014-01-01

    The swimming of a circular disk at low Reynolds number is studied for distortion waves along its two planar surfaces with wavelength much smaller than the size of the disk. The calculation is based on an extension of Taylor's work for a planar sheet. It is shown that in general the disk performs both translational and rotational swimming, resulting in a circular orbit.

  3. The structure of the velocity and passive scalar fields in high Reynolds number and high Peclet number grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlarski, Laurent Bernard

    1998-10-01

    Turbulence theories are generally posed for isotropic turbulence in the limit of infinite turbulent Reynolds and Peclet numbers. Until now, it has been impossible to satisfy these constraints simultaneously in either experiments or simulations. By use of an active grid, devised by Makita, nearly isotropic turbulence with large turbulent Reynolds and Peclet numbers is generated. Turbulent Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor microscale, Rλ, in excess of 700 are achieved. The evolution of the velocity and passive scalar fields from low to high Reynolds and Peclet numbers is studied by generating turbulent fields in wind tunnels. The measurements are made by hot-wire anemometry and cold- wire thermometry. The passive scalar (generated by a mean scalar gradient) is temperature in air. The velocity field shows significant variation with Reynolds number. The slope of the inertial subrange is a function of Reynolds number and is noticeably below the Kolmogorov value of 5/3 for Rλconvective scaling range for the scalar (with slope close to 5/3) is observed for all Peclet numbers. The effects of the internal intermittency of the scalar are present at all Peclet numbers. The scalar field exhibits some (Peclet-number- independent) violations of local isotropy in the direction of the imposed gradient for odd-ordered statistics. The understanding of the 'ramp-cliff' structures (to which this anisotropy is attributed) is extended by describing it in terms of three-point statistics-the most fundamental order at which the odd- ordered statistics can be examined.

  4. Reynolds and froude number effect on the flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo Bonguk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The two-phase turbulent flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder is studied using a high-fidelity orthogonal curvilinear grid solver with a Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model for large-eddy simulation and a coupled level set and volume of fluid method for air-water interface tracking. The simulations cover the sub-critical and critical and post critical regimes of the Reynolds and sub and super-critical Froude numbers in order to investigate the effect of both dimensionless parameters on the flow. Significant changes in flow features near the air-water interface were observed as the Reynolds number was increased from the sub-critical to the critical regime. The interface makes the separation point near the interface much delayed for all Reynolds numbers. The separation region at intermediate depths is remarkably reduced for the critical Reynolds number regime. The deep flow resembles the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder, but includes the effect of the free-surface and the limited span length for sub-critical Reynolds numbers. At different Froude numbers, the air-water interface exhibits significantly changed structures, including breaking bow waves with splashes and bubbles at high Froude numbers. Instantaneous and mean flow features such as interface structures, vortex shedding, Reynolds stresses, and vorticity transport are also analyzed. The results are compared with reference experimental data available in the literature. The deep flow is also compared with the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder in the similar ranges of Reynolds numbers. Discussion is provided concerning the limitations of the current simulations and available experimental data along with future research

  5. The Variation of Slat Noise with Mach and Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P30N high-lift system has been computed using a computational fluid dynamics code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver. By varying the Mach number from 0.13 to 0.25, the noise was found to vary roughly with the 5th power of the speed. Slight changes in the behavior with directivity angle could easily account for the different speed dependencies reported in the literature. Varying the Reynolds number from 1.4 to 2.4 million resulted in almost no differences, and primarily served to demonstrate the repeatability of the results. However, changing the underlying hybrid Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes/Large-Eddy-Simulation turbulence model significantly altered the mean flow because of changes in the flap separation. However, the general trends observed in both the acoustics and near-field fluctuations were similar for both models.

  6. Local Reynolds number and thresholds of transition in shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, JianJun; Chen, ShiYi; Su, WeiDong

    2013-02-01

    Recent experimental and numerical investigations reveal that the onset of turbulence in plane-Poiseuille flow and plane-Couette flow has some similar stages separated with different threshold Reynolds numbers. Based on these observations and the energy equation of a disturbed fluid element, a local Reynolds number Re L is derived to represent the maximum ratio of the energy supplement to the energy dissipation in a cross section. It is shown that along the sequence of transition stages, which include transient localized turbulence, "equilibrium" localized turbulence, spatially intermittent but temporally persistent turbulence and uniform turbulence, the corresponding thresholds of Re L for plane-Couette flow, Hagen-Poiseuille flow and plane-Poiseuille flow are consistent, indicating that the critical (threshold) states during the laminar-turbulent transition are determined by the local properties of the base flow and are independent of global features, such as flow geometries (pipe or channel) and types of driving forces (shear driving or pressure driving).

  7. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  8. Numerical simulations of undulatory swimming at moderate Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jeff D

    2006-12-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the swimming of a three-linkage articulated system in a moderately viscous regime. The computational methodology focuses on the creation, diffusion and transport of vorticity from the surface of the bodies into the fluid. The simulations are dynamically coupled, in that the motion of the three-linkage swimmer is computed simultaneously with the dynamics of the fluid. The novel coupling scheme presented in this work is the first to exploit the relationship between vorticity creation and body dynamics. The locomotion of the system, when subject to undulatory inputs of the hinges, is computed at Reynolds numbers of 200 and 1000. It is found that the forward swimming speed increases with the Reynolds number, and that in both cases the swimming is slower than in an inviscid medium. The vortex shedding is examined, and found to exhibit behavior consistent with experimental flow visualizations of fish.

  9. Vortex Tubes in Turbulence Velocity Fields at High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Mouri, H

    2008-01-01

    The elementary structures of turbulence, i.e., vortex tubes, are studied using velocity data obtained in laboratory experiments for boundary layers and duct flows at microscale Reynolds numbers 332-1934. While past experimental studies focused on intense vortex tubes, the present study focuses on all vortex tubes with various intensities. We obtain the mean velocity profile. The radius scales with the Kolmogorov length. The circulation velocity scales with the Kolmogorov velocity, in contrast to the case of intense vortex tubes alone where the circulation velocity scales with the rms velocity fluctuation. Since these scaling laws are independent of the configuration for turbulence production, they appear to be universal at high Reynolds numbers.

  10. Reynolds number scaling of velocity increments in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Kartik P.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Using the largest database of isotropic turbulence available to date, generated by the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations on an 81923 periodic box, we show that the longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale identically in the inertial range. By examining the DNS data at several Reynolds numbers, we infer that the contradictory results of the past on the inertial-range universality are artifacts of low Reynolds number and residual anisotropy. We further show that both longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale on locally averaged dissipation rate, just as postulated by Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypothesis, and that, in isotropic turbulence, a single independent scaling adequately describes fluid turbulence in the inertial range.

  11. Lagrangian coherent structures in low Reynolds number swimming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Megan M; Eldredge, Jeff D [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Peng Jifeng; Dabiri, John O [Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-05-20

    This work explores the utility of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for revealing flow structures in low Reynolds number biological locomotion. Previous studies of high Reynolds number unsteady flows have demonstrated that ridges of the FTLE field coincide with transport barriers within the flow, which are not shown by a more classical quantity such as vorticity. In low Reynolds number locomotion (O(1)-O(100)), in which viscous diffusion rapidly smears the vorticity in the wake, the FTLE field has the potential to add new insight to locomotion mechanics. The target of study is an articulated two-dimensional model for jellyfish-like locomotion, with swimming Reynolds number of order 1. The self-propulsion of the model is numerically simulated with a viscous vortex particle method, using kinematics adapted from previous experimental measurements on a live medusan swimmer. The roles of the ridges of the computed forward- and backward-time FTLE fields are clarified by tracking clusters of particles both backward and forward in time. It is shown that a series of ridges in front of the jellyfish in the forward-time FTLE field transport slender fingers of fluid toward the lip of the bell orifice, which are pulled once per contraction cycle into the wake of the jellyfish, where the fluid remains partitioned. A strong ridge in the backward-time FTLE field reveals a persistent barrier between fluid inside and outside the subumbrellar cavity. The system is also analyzed in a body-fixed frame subject to a steady free stream, and the FTLE field is used to highlight differences in these frames of reference.

  12. Reynolds number effects on mixing due to topological chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Spencer A.; Warrier, Sangeeta [Department of Physics, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts 01075 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Topological chaos has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate fluid mixing. While this theory can guarantee a lower bound on the stretching rate of certain material lines, it does not indicate what fraction of the fluid actually participates in this minimally mandated mixing. Indeed, the area in which effective mixing takes place depends on physical parameters such as the Reynolds number. To help clarify this dependency, we numerically simulate the effects of a batch stirring device on a 2D incompressible Newtonian fluid in the laminar regime. In particular, we calculate the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for three different stirring protocols, one topologically complex (pseudo-Anosov) and two simple (finite-order), over a range of viscosities. After extracting appropriate measures indicative of both the amount of mixing and the area of effective mixing from the FTLE field, we see a clearly defined Reynolds number range in which the relative efficacy of the pseudo-Anosov protocol over the finite-order protocols justifies the application of topological chaos. More unexpectedly, we see that while the measures of effective mixing area increase with increasing Reynolds number for the finite-order protocols, they actually exhibit non-monotonic behavior for the pseudo-Anosov protocol.

  13. Qualification of a Method to Calculate the Irrecoverable Pressure Loss in High Reynolds Number Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, K. C.; Coffield, R. D.

    2002-09-01

    High Reynolds number test data has recently been reported for both single and multiple piping elbow design configurations at earlier ASME Fluid Engineering Division conferences. The data of these studies ranged up to a Reynolds number of 42 x 10[sup]6 which is significantly greater than that used to establish design correlations before the data was available. Many of the accepted design correlations, based on the lower Reynolds number data, date back as much as fifty years. The new data shows that these earlier correlations are extremely conservative for high Reynolds number applications. Based on the recent high Reynolds number information a new recommended method has been developed for calculating irrecoverable pressure loses in piping systems for design considerations such as establishing pump sizing requirements. This paper describes the recommended design approach and additional testing that has been performed as part of the qualification of the method. This qualification testing determined the irrecoverable pressure loss of a piping configuration that would typify a limiting piping section in a complicated piping network, i.e., multiple, tightly coupled, out-of-plane elbows in series under high Reynolds number flow conditions. The overall pressure loss measurements were then compared to predictions, which used the new methodology to assure that conservative estimates for the pressure loss (of the type used for pump sizing) were obtained. The recommended design methodology, the qualification testing and the comparison between the predictions and the test data are presented. A major conclusion of this study is that the recommended method for calculating irrecoverable pressure loss in piping systems is conservative yet significantly lower than predicted by early design correlations that were based on the extrapolation of low Reynolds number test data.

  14. Optimal translational swimming of a sphere at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2015-01-01

    Swimming velocity and rate of dissipation of a sphere with surface distortions are discussed on the basis of the Stokes equations of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. At first the surface distortions are assumed to cause an irrotational axisymmetric flow pattern. The efficiency of swimming is optimized within this class of flows. Subsequently more general axisymmetric polar flows with vorticity are considered. This leads to a considerably higher maximum efficiency. An additional measure of swimming performance is proposed based on the energy consumption for given amplitude of stroke.

  15. Collinear swimmer propelling a cargo sphere at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2014-01-01

    The swimming velocity and rate of dissipation of a linear chain consisting of two or three little spheres and a big sphere is studied on the basis of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The big sphere is treated as a passive cargo, driven by the tail of little spheres via hydrodynamic and direct elastic interaction. The fundamental solution of Stokes' equations in the presence of a sphere with no-slip boundary condition, as derived by Oseen, is used to model the hydrodynamic interactions between the big sphere and the little spheres.

  16. High Reynolds number liquid layer flow with flexible walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S B Gajjar

    2015-05-01

    The stability of liquid layer flow over an inclined flexible wall is studied using asymptotic methods based on the assumption that the Reynolds number is large. The flexible wall behaviour is described by a spring-plate model, and parameters chosen so that the wall flexibility affects the governing boundary layer problem. For the case of a rigid wall, the problem reverts to one studied by Gajjar. Asymptotic analysis of the governing equations leads to the triple-deck equations governing the interaction between the wall layer and the free-surface. The linearised and other solution properties of these set of equations are discussed.

  17. The effect of collision, Stokes and Reynolds numbers on turbophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Migration of inertial particles toward solid boundaries in turbulent flows is known as turbophoresis. In this study, we investigate the effect of various parameters on turbophoresis through direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow laden with Lagrangian point-particles. We consider a flow of air in a square duct at a bulk Reynolds number of 5,000 to 20,000 dispersed with nickel particles ranging in size from 4 to 16 micron in diameter. We examine the effect of the Stokes and Reynolds numbers on the near-wall particle concentration and its relationship to the turbophoretic velocity. Our results are consistent with the previously published results pertaining to the saturation of the turbophoretic velocity for Stokes numbers larger than 10. Adopting a hard sphere collision model, we examine the role of collisions on the near wall concentration and demonstrate the sensitivity of the results to the restitution coefficient. Our findings show that while reducing the restitution coefficient leads to a higher degree of turbophoresis; collision can decrease the near wall concentration by orders of magnitude for a global particle volume fraction of O (10-5) . This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program 2 (PSAAP2) at Stanford University.

  18. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20 Reynolds number range of 2800 < Reτ < 30000 , targeting areas in the parameter space identified by Jimenez (2004) as being sparsely populated by pre-existing data. Smooth-wall data are also obtained across a similar Reynolds number range to enable comparison of smooth- and rough-wall structural features. Generally, the data indicate similarity in the outer-layer of smooth- and fully-rough wall-bounded flows.

  19. Reynolds number effects on mixing due to topological chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Spencer A

    2016-01-01

    Topological chaos has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate fluid mixing. While this theory can guarantee a lower bound on the stretching rate of certain material lines, it does not indicate what fraction of the fluid actually participates in this minimally mandated mixing. Indeed, the area in which effective mixing takes place depends on physical parameters such as the Reynolds number. To help clarify this dependency, we numerically simulate the effects of a batch stirring device on a 2D incompressible Newtonian fluid in the laminar regime. In particular, we calculate the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for three different stirring protocols, one topologically complex (pseudo-Anosov) and two simple (finite-order), over a range of viscosities. After extracting appropriate measures indicative of both the amount of mixing and the area of effective mixing from the FTLE field, we see a clearly defined Reynolds number range in which the relative efficacy of the pseudo-Anosov protocol over the finite...

  20. The random walk of a low-Reynolds-number swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaï, Salima; Garcia, Michaël; Berti, Stefano; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    Swimming at a micrometer scale demands particular strategies. Indeed when inertia is negligible as compared to viscous forces (i.e. Reynolds number Re is lower than unity), hydrodynamics equations are reversible in time. To achieve propulsion a low Reynolds number, swimmers must then deform in a way that is not invariant under time reversal. Here we investigate the dispersal properties of self propelled organisms by means of microscopy and cell tracking. Our system of interest is the microalga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a motile single celled green alga about 10 micrometers in diameter that swims with two flagellae. In the case of dilute suspensions, we show that tracked trajectories are well modelled by a correlated random walk. This process is based on short time correlations in the direction of movement called persistence. At longer times, correlations are lost and a standard random walk caracterizes the trajectories. Moreover, high speed imaging enables us to show how speed fluctuations at very short times affect the statistical description of the dynamics. Finally we show how drag forces modify the characteristics of this particular random walk.

  1. Design of a High-Reynolds Number Recirculating Water Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Libin; Elbing, Brian

    2014-11-01

    An experimental fluid mechanics laboratory focused on turbulent boundary layers, drag reduction techniques, multiphase flows and fluid-structure interactions has recently been established at Oklahoma State University. This laboratory has three primary components; (1) a recirculating water tunnel, (2) a multiphase pipe flow loop, and (3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. The design of the water tunnel is the focus of this talk. The criteria used for the water tunnel design was that it had to produce a momentum-thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104, negligible flow acceleration due to boundary layer growth, maximize optical access for use of the flow visualization system, and minimize inlet flow non-uniformity. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university/commercial water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105) . These objectives were achieved with a 152 mm (6-inch) square test section that is 1 m long and has a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. The flow non-uniformity was mitigated with the use of a tandem honeycomb configuration, a settling chamber and an 8.5:1 contraction. The design process that produced this final design will be presented along with its current status.

  2. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  3. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  4. Low Reynolds number flow near tiny leaves, stems, and trichomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Christopher; Pasour, Virginia; Miller, Laura

    2016-11-01

    In terrestrial and aquatic environments such as forest canopies, grass fields, and seagrass beds, the density and shape of trunks, branches, stems, leaves and trichomes (the hairs or fine outgrowths on plants) can drastically alter both the average wind speed and profile through these environments and near each plant. While many studies of flow in these environments have focused on bulk properties of the flow at scales on the order of meters, the low Reynolds number flow close to vegetative structures is especially complex and relevant to nutrient exchange. Using three-dimensional immersed boundary simulations, we resolve the flow around trichomes and small leaves and quantify velocities, shear stresses, and mixing while varying the height and density of idealized structures. National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1127914 to the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute, and the Army Research Office.

  5. Stokesian swimming of a prolate spheroid at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a spheroid immersed in a viscous fluid and performing surface deformations periodically in time is studied on the basis of Stokes equations of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The average over a period of time of the swimming velocity and the rate of dissipation are given by integral expressions of second order in the amplitude of surface deformations. The first order flow velocity and pressure, as functions of spheroidal coordinates, are expressed as sums of basic solutions of Stokes equations. Sets of superposition coefficients of these solutions which optimize the mean swimming speed for given power are derived from an eigenvalue problem. The maximum eigenvalue is a measure of the efficiency of the optimal stroke within the chosen class of motions. The maximum eigenvalue for sets of low order is found to be a strongly increasing function of the aspect ratio of the spheroid.

  6. Swimming with a friend at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Pooley, C M; Yeomans, J M

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between microorganisms swimming at low Reynolds number. By considering simple model swimmers, and combining analytic and numerical approaches, we investigate the time-averaged flow field around a swimmer. At short distances the swimmer behaves like a pump. At large distances the velocity field depends on whether the swimming stroke is invariant under a combined time-reversal and parity transformation. We then consider two swimmers and find that the interaction between them consists of two parts; a dead term, independent of the motion of the second swimmer, which takes the expected dipolar form and a live term resulting from the simultaneous swimming action of both swimmers which does not. We argue that, in general, the latter dominates. The swimmer--swimmer interaction is a complicated function of their relative displacement, orientation and phase, leading to motion that can be attractive, repulsive or oscillatory.

  7. Shrimp theorem: paddle swimming at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A large variety of aquatic organisms, such as small planktonic crustaceans, use multiple legs as paddles; however the resultant dynamics and efficiency of locomotion are not yet clear. I will present a simple model of swimming with multiple pairs of stiff legs. The legs are assumed to oscillate in a metachronal pattern in a model based on slender-body theory for Stokes flow. The model predicts locomotion in the direction of the metachronal wave, as frequently observed in nature. Unlike scallops undergoing reciprocal motion, shrimp can swim at low Reynolds number. This study offers a possible explanation why crustaceans thrive in aquatic environments, and could inspire a new generation of powerful biomimetic robots.

  8. Effects of viscoelasticity in the high Reynolds number cylinder wake

    KAUST Repository

    Richter, David

    2012-01-16

    At Re = 3900, Newtonian flow past a circular cylinder exhibits a wake and detached shear layers which have transitioned to turbulence. It is the goal of the present study to investigate the effects which viscoelasticity has on this state and to identify the mechanisms responsible for wake stabilization. It is found through numerical simulations (employing the FENE-P rheological model) that viscoelasticity greatly reduces the amount of turbulence in the wake, reverting it back to a state which qualitatively appears similar to the Newtonian mode B instability which occurs at lower Re. By focusing on the separated shear layers, it is found that viscoelasticity suppresses the formation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which dominates for Newtonian flows, consistent with previous studies of viscoelastic free shear layers. Through this shear layer stabilization, the viscoelastic far wake is then subject to the same instability mechanisms which dominate for Newtonian flows, but at far lower Reynolds numbers. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2012.

  9. There can be turbulence in microfluidics at low Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G R; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Wei

    2014-04-21

    Turbulence is commonly viewed as a type of macroflow, where the Reynolds number (Re) has to be sufficiently high. In microfluidics, when Re is below or on the order of 1 and fast mixing is required, so far only chaotic flow has been reported to enhance mixing based on previous publications since turbulence is believed not to be possible to generate in such a low Re microflow. There is even a lack of velocimeter that can measure turbulence in microchannels. In this work, we report a direct observation of the existence of turbulence in microfluidics with Re on the order of 1 in a pressure driven flow under electrokinetic forcing using a novel velocimeter having ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolution. The work could provide a new method to control flow and transport phenomena in lab-on-a-chip and a new perspective on turbulence.

  10. Magnetic propulsion of robotic sperms at low-Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Fatih Tabak, Ahmet; Klingner, Anke; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the microswimming behaviour of robotic sperms in viscous fluids. These robotic sperms are fabricated from polystyrene dissolved in dimethyl formamide and iron-oxide nanoparticles. This composition allows the nanoparticles to be concentrated within the bead of the robotic sperm and provide magnetic dipole, whereas the flexibility of the ultra-thin tail enables flagellated locomotion using magnetic fields in millitesla range. We show that these robotic sperms have similar morphology and swimming behaviour to those of sperm cells. Moreover, we show experimentally that our robotic sperms swim controllably at an average speed of approximately one body length per second (around 125 μm s-1), and they are relatively faster than the microswimmers that depend on planar wave propulsion in low-Reynolds number fluids.

  11. Quadroar: a versatile low-Reynolds-number swimmer

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Mousavi, SeyyedHossein

    2014-01-01

    We design and simulate the motion of a new swimmer, the Quadroar, with three dimensional translation and reorientation capabilities in low Reynolds number conditions. The Quadroar is composed of an $\\texttt{I}$-shaped frame whose body link is a simple linear actuator, and four disks that can rotate about the axes of flange links. The time symmetry is broken by a combination of disk rotations and the one-dimensional expansion/contraction of the body link. The Quadroar propels on forward and transverse straight lines and performs full three dimensional reorientation maneuvers, which enable it to swim along arbitrary trajectories. We find continuous operation modes that propel the swimmer on planar and three dimensional rosette orbits, which can be periodic or quasi-periodic. Precessing rosette orbits consist of slow lingering phases with cardioid or multiloop turns followed by directional propulsive phases. Quasi-periodic orbits allow the swimmer to access large parts of its neighboring space without using comp...

  12. Elastic Turbulence in Channel Flows at Low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the existence of elastic turbulence in straight channel flow at low Reynolds numbers. Velocimetry measurements show non-periodic fluctuations in the wake of curved cylinders as well as in a parallel shear flow region. The flow in these two locations of the channel is excited over a broad range of frequencies and wavelengths, consistent with the main features of elastic turbulence. However, the decay of the initial elastic turbulence around the cylinders is followed by a growth downstream in the straight region. The emergence of distinct flow characteristics both in time and space suggests a new type of elastic turbulence, markedly different from that near the curved cylinders. We propose a self-sustaining mechanism to explain the sustained fluctuations in the parallel shear region.

  13. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, J.B. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  14. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  15. Influence of Reynolds number on coalescence of droplets with particle in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Yatagawa, Yuta; Kumagai, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence of droplets in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number is potentially useful for different purposes including the handling of fluids, control of chemical reaction, and in drug delivery systems. The phenomenon is also the basis for analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media such as in enhanced oil recovery and the breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers. With regard to examples of studies on the creeping motion of droplets in a flow through a tube, Hetsroni G. et al.[1] theoretically examined the motion of a spherical droplet or bubble with small d/D, where d is the undeformed diameter of the droplet or bubble, and D is the tube diameter. Higdon J.J.L. and Muldowney G.P. [2] numerically obtained the resistance functions for a spherical particle, droplet, and bubble. Olbricht, W.L. and Kung D.M.[3] and Aul R.W. and Olbricht, W.L.[4] mainly investigated the coalescence time of droplets. Aul R.W. and Olbricht W.L. proposed a semi-theoretical formula of the coalescence time. Based on the formula by them, Muraoka, M. et al.[5] proposed other semi-theoretical formulas of the coalescence time in terms of the resistance experienced by the liquid droplet in creeping flow through a tube. The latter formulas take the eccentricity of the following droplets into consideration. In the present study, a glass tube of inner diameter 2.0mm, outer diameter 7.0mm, and length 1500 mm was used as the test tube. Silicon oil with a kinematic viscosity of 3000cSt was employed as the test fluid of the droplet. A mixture of glycerol and pure water was used as the surrounding fluid of the creeping flow through a tube. A large volumetric syringe pump was used to maintain steady flow through the tube at a designated average velocity. The test tube was immersed in temperature-controlled water contained in a tank to maintain constant temperature of the system. The droplets were injected into the test tube. The behaviors of the droplets were monitored by a

  16. Performance and slipstream characteristics of small-scale propellers at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deters, Robert W.

    The low Reynolds number effects of small-scale propellers were investigated. At the Reynolds numbers of interest (below 100,000), a decrease in lift and an increase in drag is common making it difficult to predict propeller performance characteristics. A propeller testing apparatus was built to test small scale propellers in static conditions and in an advancing flow. Twenty-seven off-the-shelf propellers, with diameters ranging from 2.25 in to 9 in, were tested in order to determine the general effects of low Reynolds numbers on small propellers. From these tests, increasing the Reynolds number for a propeller increases its efficiency by either increasing the thrust produced or decreasing the power. By doubling the Reynolds number of a propeller, it is not uncommon to increase the efficiency by more the 10%. Using off-the-shelf propellers limits the geometry available and finding propellers of the same geometry but of different scale is very difficult. To solve this problem, four propellers were design and built using a 3D printer. Two of the propellers were simple rectangular twisted blades of different chords. Another propeller was modeled after a full-scale propeller. The fourth propeller was created using inverse design to minimize power loss. Each propeller was built in a 5-in and 9-in diameter version in order to test a larger range of Reynolds numbers. A separate propeller blade and hub system was created to allow each propeller to be tested with different pitch angles and to test each propeller in a 2-, 3-, and 4-blade version. From the performance results of the 3D printed propellers, it was shown that propellers of different scale, but tested at the same Reynolds number, had about the same performance results. Finally, the slipstreams of different propellers were measured using a 7-hole probe. Propeller slipstreams can have a large effect on the aerodynamics of lifting surfaces downstream of the propeller. Small UAVs and MAVs flying in close proximity

  17. Reynolds and Atwood Numbers Effects on Homogeneous Rayleigh Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Atwood numbers on turbulent mixing of a heterogeneous mixture of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities are investigated by using high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The flow occurs in a triply periodic 3D domain, with the two fluids initially segregated in random patches, and turbulence is generated in response to buoyancy. In turn, stirring produced by turbulence breaks down the scalar structures, accelerating the molecular mixing. Statistically homogeneous variable-density (VD) mixing, with density variations due to compositional changes, is a basic mixing problem and aims to mimic the core of the mixing layer of acceleration driven Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI). We present results covering a large range of kinematic viscosity values for density contrasts including small (A =0.04), moderate (A =0.5), and high (A =0.75 and 0.9) Atwood numbers. Particular interest will be given to the structure of the turbulence and mixing process, including the alignment between various turbulence and scalar quantities, as well as providing fidelity data for verification and validation of mix models. Arindam Banerjee acknowledges support from NSF CAREER award # 1453056.

  18. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  19. High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a Lagrangian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J Pietarila; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2011-07-01

    With the help of a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence tested previously, we explore high Reynolds number regimes up to equivalent resolutions of 6000(3) grid points in the absence of forcing and with no imposed uniform magnetic field. For the given initial condition chosen here, with equal kinetic and magnetic energy, the flow ends up being dominated by the magnetic field, and the dynamics leads to an isotropic Iroshnikov-Kraichnan energy spectrum. However, the locally anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the local mean field follow a Kolmogorov law. We find that the ratio of the eddy turnover time to the Alfvén time increases with wave number, contrary to the so-called critical balance hypothesis. Residual energy and helicity spectra are also considered; the role played by the conservation of magnetic helicity is studied, and scaling laws are found for the magnetic helicity and residual helicity spectra. We put these results in the context of the dynamics of a globally isotropic MHD flow that is locally anisotropic because of the influence of the strong large-scale magnetic field, leading to a partial equilibration between kinetic and magnetic modes for the energy and the helicity.

  20. Exact two-dimensionalization of rapidly rotating large-Reynolds-number flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile

    2015-01-01

    We consider the flow of a Newtonian fluid in a three-dimensional domain, rotating about a vertical axis and driven by a vertically invariant horizontal body-force. This system admits vertically invariant solutions that satisfy the 2D Navier-Stokes equation. At high Reynolds number and without global rotation, such solutions are usually unstable to three-dimensional perturbations. By contrast, for strong enough global rotation, we prove rigorously that the 2D (and possibly turbulent) solutions are stable to vertically dependent perturbations: the flow becomes 2D in the long-time limit. These results shed some light on several fundamental questions of rotating turbulence: for arbitrary Reynolds number and small enough Rossby number, the system is attracted towards purely 2D flow solutions, which display no energy dissipation anomaly and no cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry. Finally, these results challenge the applicability of wave turbulence theory to describe stationary rotating turbulence in bounded domains.

  1. Low-Reynolds number modelling of flows with transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C. B.; Lin, C. A.

    2000-03-01

    An improved low-Reynolds number model was adopted to predict the dynamic and thermal fields in flows with transpiration. The performance of the adopted model was first contrasted with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of channel flow with uniform wall injection and suction. The validity of the present model applied to flows with a high level of transpiration was further examined. To explore the model's performance in complex environments, the model was applied to simulate a transpired developing channel flow. By contrasting the predictions with DNS data and measurements, the results indicated that the present model reproduced correctly the deceleration and acceleration of the flow caused by the injection and suction from the permeable part of the wall. The turbulence structure of transpired flows was also well captured and the superior performance of the adopted model was reflected by the predicted correct level of with the maximum being located at both the injection and the suction walls. The predicted thermal field by the present model also compared favourably with the DNS data and measurements. Copyright

  2. Unsteady flow over flexible wings at different low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, unsteady flow around flexible membrane wing which had aspect ratio of 1 (AR=1 was investigated experimentally at various Reynolds numbers (Re = 25000 and Re = 50000. Smoke-wire technique for flow visualization over the flexible membrane wing was utilized in the experiments. Digital Image Correlation system (DIC was used for measuring deformation of AR = 1 flexible membrane wing. Instantaneous deformation measurements of membrane wing were combined with the flow field measurements. In low aspect ratio flexible membrane wings, unsteadiness includes tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices. In these types of wings, complex unsteady deformations occurred due to vortex shedding. The results showed that the increasing angle of attack results in increase of membrane deformation. Moreover, it was concluded that analysis of the instantaneous deformation revealed chordwise and spanwise, modes which were due to the shedding of leading-edge vortices as well as tip vortices. Consequently, vibrational mode decreased and maximum standard deviation location approached to the trailing edge by reason of increasing angle of attack.

  3. Effects of Reynolds Number on Mixing and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, H. W.

    2001-12-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method was used to estimate the effects of Reynolds number (Re), and sidewall boundaries, on dispersion of gases in fractured and porous media. The systems studied ranged from idealized channels with parallel grooves and honeycomb structures, to casts of natural fractures and aggregates of sedimented, quasi-spherical particles. For specific configurations of rough, intersecting fractures, Re variation from 0 to 100 causes only a factor ~2 variation in the mixing ratio C2/(C1+C2), where C1 and C2 are the concentrations of solute in the outlet legs of the fracture intersection. However, slight changes in the intersection alignment yield up to factor 5 range in the mixing ratio, for the geometries studied. For both individual fractures and fracture intersections, sidewall boundary effects tend to be overwhelmed by velocity variations within the fracture planes. LB simulations for porous aggregates give good agreement with experimental studies. However, in random aggregates at high Re, it becomes impractical to obtain dispersion coefficients by LB and the method of moments. Alternative LB methods are discussed.

  4. Interaction of two high Reynolds number axisymmetric turbulent wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obligado, M.; Klein, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With the recent discovery of non-equilibrium high Reynolds number scalings in the wake of axisymmetric plates (Nedic et al., PRL, 2013), it has become of importance to develop an experimental technique that permits to easily discriminate between different wake scalings. We propose an experimental setup that tests the presence of non-equilibrium turbulence using the streamwise variation of velocity fluctuations between two bluff bodies facing a flow. We have studied two different sets of plates (one with regular and another with irregular peripheries) with Hot-Wire Anemometry in a wind tunnel. By acquiring streamwise profiles for different plate separations and identifying the wake interaction length for each separation it is possible to estimate the streamwise evolution of the single wake width. From this evolution it is also possible to deduce the turbulence dissipation scalings. This work generalizes previous studies on the interaction of plane wakes (see Gomes-Fernandes et al., JFM, 2012) to include axisymmetric wakes. We find that the wake interaction length proposed in this cited work and a constant anisotropy assumption can be used to collapse the streamwise developments of the first three moments.

  5. A coin vibrational motor swimming at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Quillen, Alice C; Kelley, Douglas H; Friedmann, Tamar; Oakes, Patrick W

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost coin vibrational motors, used in haptic feedback, exhibit rotational internal motion inside a rigid case. Because the motor case motion exhibits rotational symmetry, when placed into a fluid such as glycerin, the motor does not swim even though its vibrations induce steady streaming in the fluid. However, a piece of rubber foam stuck to the curved case and giving the motor neutral buoyancy also breaks the rotational symmetry allowing it to swim. We measured a 1 cm diameter coin vibrational motor swimming in glycerin at a speed of a body length in 3 seconds or at 3 mm/s. The swim speed puts the vibrational motor in a low Reynolds number regime similar to bacterial motility, but because of the vibration it is not analogous to biological organisms. Rather the swimming vibrational motor may inspire small inexpensive robotic swimmers that are robust as they contain no external moving parts. A time dependent Stokes equation planar sheet model suggests that the swim speed depends on a steady streaming veloc...

  6. Unsteady flow over flexible wings at different low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Mustafa Serdar; Özden, Mustafa; Hakan Açikel, Halil; Demir, Hacımurat; Isabekov, Iliasbek

    2016-03-01

    In this study, unsteady flow around flexible membrane wing which had aspect ratio of 1 (AR=1) was investigated experimentally at various Reynolds numbers (Re = 25000 and Re = 50000). Smoke-wire technique for flow visualization over the flexible membrane wing was utilized in the experiments. Digital Image Correlation system (DIC) was used for measuring deformation of AR = 1 flexible membrane wing. Instantaneous deformation measurements of membrane wing were combined with the flow field measurements. In low aspect ratio flexible membrane wings, unsteadiness includes tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices. In these types of wings, complex unsteady deformations occurred due to vortex shedding. The results showed that the increasing angle of attack results in increase of membrane deformation. Moreover, it was concluded that analysis of the instantaneous deformation revealed chordwise and spanwise, modes which were due to the shedding of leading-edge vortices as well as tip vortices. Consequently, vibrational mode decreased and maximum standard deviation location approached to the trailing edge by reason of increasing angle of attack.

  7. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  8. Shear-driven dynamo waves at high magnetic Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S M; Cattaneo, F

    2013-05-23

    Astrophysical magnetic fields often display remarkable organization, despite being generated by dynamo action driven by turbulent flows at high conductivity. An example is the eleven-year solar cycle, which shows spatial coherence over the entire solar surface. The difficulty in understanding the emergence of this large-scale organization is that whereas at low conductivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm) dynamo fields are well organized, at high Rm their structure is dominated by rapidly varying small-scale fluctuations. This arises because the smallest scales have the highest rate of strain, and can amplify magnetic field most efficiently. Therefore most of the effort to find flows whose large-scale dynamo properties persist at high Rm has been frustrated. Here we report high-resolution simulations of a dynamo that can generate organized fields at high Rm; indeed, the generation mechanism, which involves the interaction between helical flows and shear, only becomes effective at large Rm. The shear does not enhance generation at large scales, as is commonly thought; instead it reduces generation at small scales. The solution consists of propagating dynamo waves, whose existence was postulated more than 60 years ago and which have since been used to model the solar cycle.

  9. Propulsion at low Reynolds number via beam extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Frederick; Neetzow, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results on the extrusion of a slender beam in a viscous fluid. We are particularly interested in the force necessary to extrude the beam as it buckles with large amplitude due to viscous friction. The problem is inspired by the propulsion of Paramecium via trichocyst extrusion. Self-propulsion in micro-organisms is mostly achieved through the beating of flagella or cilia. However, to avoid a severe aggression, unicellular Paramecium has been observed to extrude trichocysts in the direction of the aggression to burst away. These trichocysts are rod-like organelles which, upon activation, grow to about 40 μm in length in 3 milliseconds before detaching from the animal. The drag force created by these extruding rods pushing against the viscous fluid generates thrust in the opposite direction. We developed an experimental setup to measure the force required to push a steel piano wire into an aquarium filled with corn syrup. This setup offers a near-zero Reynolds number, and allows studying deployments for a range of constant extrusion speeds. The experimental results are reproduced with a numerical model coupling a large amplitude Euler-Bernoulli beam theory with a fluid load model proportional to the local beam velocity. This study was funded in part by the The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  10. Reynolds number dependence of thermal diffusion from a line source in decaying grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erika; Warhaft, Zellman

    2008-11-01

    Existing experiments on line source dispersion in isotropic turbulence are for low Reynolds numbers (Taylor scale Reynolds numbers of less than 100) and there has been no attempt to systematically vary the Reynolds number. Here we present new results of passive temperature fluctuations produced by a fine heated wire in decaying grid turbulence. The Taylor Reynolds number is varied from approximately 50 to 500 by means of active and passive grids. We study the dependence of the mean and r.m.s. temperature profiles on the Reynolds number. The effects of source size are also investigated. The results are compared with the recent modeling work of Viswanathan and Pope (Physics of Fluids, to be published) who find significant Reynolds number dependence but small effects when varying the source size. The peak centerline ratio of the r.m.s. to the mean of the scalar is also examined and compared with predictions. This work is funded by the US National Science Foundation.

  11. Generalizing the Reynolds number from turbulence to Self Organized Criticality and ecosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, S C; Watkins, N W

    2007-01-01

    In fluid turbulence a single control parameter, the Reynolds number R_E, which is a function of macroscopic system variables is sufficient to quantify the transition from ordered (laminar) to disordered (turbulent) flow. We suggest that a wider class of systems has this property, including Self Organized Criticality (SOC) and ecosystem models for species abundance. These systems can all be driven into a state with defining characteristics: they have many degrees of freedom (d.o.f.); are driven, dissipating and out of equilibrium; are on average in a steady state; and show scaling over a large dynamic range. The Reynolds number expresses the number of d.o.f., or energy carrying modes in the system. For avalanche models exhibiting SOC, d.o.f. refer to avalanche sizes and the Reynolds number R_A that we identify is simply the well known ratio of the driving rate to system dissipation rate. The SOC slowly driven interaction dominated limit is reached by taking R_A to zero; we show this maximizes the number of d.o...

  12. Pulsatility role in cylinder flow dynamics at low Reynolds number

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    We present dynamics of pulsatile flow past a stationary cylinder characterized by three non-dimensional parameters: the Reynolds number (Re), non-dimensional amplitude (A) of the pulsatile flow velocity, and Keulegan-Carpenter number (KC = Uo/Dωc). This work is motivated by the development of total artificial lungs (TAL) device, which is envisioned to provide ambulatory support to patients. Results are presented for 0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.6 and 0.57 ≤ KC ≤ 2 at Re = 5 and 10, which correspond to the operating range of TAL. Two distinct fluid regimes are identified. In both regimes, the size of the separated zone is much greater than the uniform flow case, the onset of separation is function of KC, and the separation vortex collapses rapidly during the last fraction of the pulsatile cycle. The vortex size is independent of KC, but with an exponential dependency on A. In regime I, the separation point remains attached to the cylinder surface. In regime II, the separation point migrates upstream of the cylinder. Two distinct vortex collapse mechanisms are observed. For A < 0.4 and all KC and Re values, collapse occurs on the cylinder surface, whereas for A > 0.4 the separation vortex detaches from the cylinder surface and collapses at a certain distance downstream of the cylinder. The average drag coefficient is found to be independent of A and KC, and depends only on Re. However, for A > 0.4, for a fraction of the pulsatile cycle, the instantaneous drag coefficient is negative indicating a thrust production. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Does the flatness of the velocity derivative blow up at a finite Reynolds number?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Sreenivasan; A Bershadskii

    2005-06-01

    A tentative suggestion is made that the flatness of the velocity derivative could reach an infinite value at finite (though very large) Reynolds number, with possible implications for the singularities of the Navier–Stokes equations. A direct test of this suggestion requires measurements at Reynolds numbers presently outside the experimental capacity, so an alternative suggestion that can be tested at accessible Reynolds numbers is also made.

  14. Irrecoverable pressure loss coefficients for two out-of-plane piping elbows at high Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffield, R.D.; Hammond, R.B.; McKeown, P.T.

    1999-02-08

    Pressure drops of multiple piping elbows were experimentally determined for high Reynolds number flows. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties in the currently used methods for predicting irrecoverable pressure losses and also to provide a qualification database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer codes. The earlier high Reynolds number correlations had been based on extrapolations over several orders of magnitude in Reynolds number from where the original database existed. Recent single elbow test data shows about a factor of two lower elbow pressure loss coefficient (at 40x 106 Reynolds number) than those from current correlations. This single piping elbow data has been extended in this study to a multiple elbow configuration of two elbows that are 90o out-of-plane relative to each other. The effects of separation distance and Reynolds number have been correlated and presented in a form that can be used for design application. Contrary to earlier extrapolations from low Reynolds numbers (Re c 1.0x 106), a strong Reynolds number dependence was found to exist. The combination of the high Reynolds number single elbow data with the multiple elbow interaction effects measured in this study shows that earlier design correlations are conservative by significant margins at high Reynolds numbers. Qualification of CFD predictions with this new high Reynolds number database will help guide the need for additional high Reynolds number testing of other piping configurations. The study also included velocity measurements at several positions downstream of the first and second test elbows using an ultrasonic flowmeter. Reasonable agreement after the first test elbow was found relative to flow fields that are known to exist from low Reynolds number visual tests and also from CFD predictions. This data should help to qualify CFD predictions of the three-dimensional flow stream downstream of the second test elbow.

  15. Aerodynamics of wings at low Reynolds numbers: Boundary layer separation and reattachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, John

    Due to advances in electronics technology, it is now possible to build small scale flying and swimming vehicles. These vehicles will have size and velocity scales similar to small birds and fish, and their characteristic Reynolds number will be between 104 and 105. Currently, these flying and swimming vehicles do not perform well, and very little research has been done to characterize them, or to explain why they perform so poorly. This dissertation documents three basic investigations into the performance of small scale lifting surfaces, with Reynolds numbers near 104. Part I. Low Reynolds number aerodynamics. Three airfoil shapes were studied at Reynolds numbers of 1 and 2x104: a flat plate airfoil, a circular arc cambered airfoil, and the Eppler 387 airfoil. Lift and drag force measurements were made on both 2D and 3D conditions, with the 3D wings having an aspect ratio of 6, and the 2D condition being approximated by placing end plates at the wing tips. Comparisons to the limited number of previous measurements show adequate agreement. Previous studies have been inconclusive on whether lifting line theory can be applied to this range of Re, but this study shows that lifting line theory can be applied when there are no sudden changes in the slope of the force curves. This is highly dependent on the airfoil shape of the wing, and explains why previous studies have been inconclusive. Part II. The laminar separation bubble. The Eppler 387 airfoil was studied at two higher Reynolds numbers: 3 and 6x10 4. Previous studies at a Reynolds number of 6x104 had shown this airfoil experiences a drag increase at moderate lift, and a subsequent drag decrease at high lift. Previous studies suggested that the drag increase is caused by a laminar separation bubble, but the experiments used to show this were conducted at higher Reynolds numbers and extrapolated down. Force measurements were combined with flow field measurements at Reynolds numbers 3 and 6x104 to determine whether

  16. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0277 Experimental Investigation of Turbulence- Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE [U] Experimental investigation of turbulence- chemistry interaction in high-Reynolds-number 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER turbulent...flames. Mixture fraction is an important variable in understanding and modeling turbulent mixing and turbulence- chemistry interaction, two key

  18. Mechanisms of surface pressure distribution within a laminar separation bubble at different Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghwi; Kawai, Soshi; Nonomura, Taku; Anyoji, Masayuki; Aono, Hikaru; Oyama, Akira; Asai, Keisuke; Fujii, Kozo

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms behind the pressure distribution and skin friction within a laminar separation bubble (LSB) are investigated by large-eddy simulations around a 5% thickness blunt flat plate at the chord length based Reynolds number 5.0 × 103, 6.1 × 103, 1.1 × 104, and 2.0 × 104. The characteristics inside the LSB change with the Reynolds number; a steady laminar separation bubble (LSB_S) at the Reynolds number 5.0 × 103 and 6.1 × 103, and a steady-fluctuating laminar separation bubble (LSB_SF) at the Reynolds number 1.1 × 104, and 2.0 × 104. Different characteristics of pressure and skin friction distributions are observed by increasing the Reynolds number, such that a gradual monotonous pressure recovery in the LSB_S and a plateau pressure distribution followed by a rapid pressure recovery region in the LSB_SF. The reasons behind the different characteristics of pressure distributions at different Reynolds numbers are discussed by deriving the Reynolds averaged pressure gradient equation. It is confirmed that the viscous stress distributions near the surface play an important role in determining the formation of different pressure distributions. Depending on the Reynolds numbers, the viscous stress distributions near the surface are affected by the development of a separated laminar shear layer or the Reynolds shear stress. In addition, we show that the same analyses can be applied to the flows around a NACA0012 airfoil.

  19. The stratorotational instability of Taylor-Couette flows of moderate Reynolds numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Rüdiger, G; Schultz, M; Gellert, M; Harlander, U; Egbers, Chr

    2016-01-01

    The instability against nonaxisymmetric perturbations of a Taylor-Couette flow with an axial density stratification is considered. The potential flow (driven by cylinders rotating according to the Rayleigh limit) becomes unstable if the Froude number Fr (= rotation frequency/buoyancy frequency) fulfills ${\\rm Fr}_{\\rm min} 1$ so that measurements for too high Reynolds numbers are excluded for axially bounded containers. The instability pattern migrates azimuthally with $\\dot{\\phi} / \\Omega_{\\rm out} \\simeq 1$ so that the SRI pattern always drifts (slightly) faster than the outer cylinder rotates. The measurements confirm this prediction with high accuracy.

  20. Unsteady behavior of a confined jet in a cavity at moderate Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, G [Laboratoire IUSTI, UMR 7343 CNRS, Aix Marseille Universite, 5 rue Enrico Fermi, 13453 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Climent, E, E-mail: Gilles.Bouchet@univ-amu.fr, E-mail: Gilles.Bouchet@univ-provence.fr, E-mail: climent@imft.fr [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, UMR 5502 Universite de Toulouse-CNRS-INPT-UPS, 1 allee du Professeur Camille Soula, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2012-04-01

    Self-sustained oscillations in the sinuous mode are observed when a jet impinges on a rigid surface. Confined jet instability is experimentally and numerically investigated here at moderate Reynolds numbers. When the Reynolds number is varied, the dynamic response of the jet is unusual in comparison with that of similar configurations (hole-tone, jet edge, etc). Modal transitions are clearly detected when the Reynolds number is varied. However, these transitions result in a reduction of the frequency, which means that the wavelength grows with Reynolds number. Moreover, the instability that sets in at low Reynolds number, as a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, disappears only 25% above the threshold. Then, the flow becomes steady again and symmetric. This atypical behavior is compared with our previous study on a submerged fountain (Bouchet et al 2002 Europhys. Lett. 59 826). (paper)

  1. Laminar-Turbulent Transition: The change of the flow state temperature with the Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2014-01-01

    Using the previously developed model to describe laminar/turbulent states of a viscous fluid flow, which treats the flow as a collection of coherent structures of various size (Chekmarev, Chaos, 2013, 013144), the statistical temperature of the flow state is determined as a function of the Reynolds number. It is shown that at small Reynolds numbers, associated with laminar states, the temperature is positive, while at large Reynolds numbers, associated with turbulent states, it is negative. At intermediate Reynolds numbers, the temperature changes from positive to negative as the size of the coherent structures increases, similar to what was predicted by Onsager for a system of parallel point-vortices in an inviscid fluid. It is also shown that in the range of intermediate Reynolds numbers the temperature exhibits a power-law divergence characteristic of second-order phase transitions.

  2. Unified Strouhal-Reynolds number relationship for laminar vortex streets generated by different-shaped obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ildoo; Wu, X. L.

    2015-10-01

    A structure-based Strouhal-Reynolds number relationship, St =1 /(A +B /Re ) , has been recently proposed based on observations of laminar vortex shedding from circular cylinders in a flowing soap film. Since the new St -Re relation was derived from a general physical consideration, it raises the possibility that it may be applicable to vortex shedding from bodies other than circular ones. The work presented herein provides experimental evidence that this is the case. Our measurements also show that, in the asymptotic limit (Re →∞ ), St∞=1 /A ≃0.21 is constant independent of rod shapes, leaving B the only parameter that is shape dependent.

  3. Large Eddy Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities at high Reynolds number stratified flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dana; Goodman, Lou; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities (KHI) at high Reynolds numbers are performed using the Large Eddy Simulation technique. Reynolds numbers up to 100,000 are achieved using our model. The resulting data set is used to examine the effect of Reynolds number on various statistics, including dissipation flux coefficient, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and Thorpe length scale. It is shown that KHI are qualitatively different at high Re, up to and including the onset of vortex pairing and billow collapse and quantitatively different afterward. The effect of Richardson number is also examined. The results are discussed as they apply to ocean experiments.

  4. Time-dependent measurement of base pressure in a blowdown tunnel with varying unit Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangovi, S.; Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    An operational characteristic of blowdown-type of wind tunnels is the drop in the stagnation temperature with time and the accompanying change in the test-section unit Reynolds number at constant stagnation pressure and Mach number. This apparent disadvantage can be turned to advantage in some cases where a Reynolds number scan is desired in order to study the effect of unit Reynolds number variation on a particular viscous flow phenomenon. This note presents such an instance arising from recent investigations on base pressure at transonic speeds conducted in the NAL 1-ft tunnel.

  5. Lift Production on Flapping and Rotary Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0098 Flapping and Rotary Wing Lift at Low Reynolds Number Anya Jones MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK Final Report 02/26/2016... Lift Production on Flapping and Rotary Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers (YIP) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0251 5c. PROGRAM...The objective of this research was to identify the mechanisms of lift production on models of an entomological flapping wing stroke by evaluating

  6. Tomo-PIV Measurement of High Reynolds Number Dissipation Scale Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Nicholas; Nickels, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the sources of dissipative intermittency in high Reynolds number turbulence is of significant interest, especially given the increasing affordability of LES. Coherent dissipation scale structures have been identified in numerous numerical and experiment investigations, although the latter are typically restricted by the need for accurate resolution of extremely small fast motions. These investigations are therefore often limited to one-dimensional measurements, making the study of these 3D structures and their relationship to the dissipation field difficult. The current investigation employs a very large water mixing tank (2m in diameter), which uses counter-rotating impellors to generate high Reynolds number turbulence (Rλ 1000) that is close to isotropic and homogeneous. The large scale of the tank brings the smallest scales within the resolution of Tomo-PIV, allowing full 3D realization of these structures. This unique experimental setup presents a number of challenges, which include: seeding density limitations imposed by optical attenuation through the tank; demanding light sheet intensity requirements; and the extremely high computational cost of Tomographic reconstruction for the thousands of velocity fields required for statistical analysis. Initial results will be presented along with future plans for measurement refinement.

  7. Modeling the Aerodynamic Lift Produced by Oscillating Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Saif Ullah

    2015-01-01

    For present study, setting Strouhal Number (St) as control parameter, numerical simulations for flow past oscillating NACA-0012 airfoil at 1,000 Reynolds Numbers (Re) are performed. Temporal profiles of unsteady forces; lift and thrust, and their spectral analysis clearly indicate the solution to be a period-1 attractor for low Strouhal numbers. This study reveals that aerodynamic forces produced by plunging airfoil are independent of initial kinematic conditions of airfoil that proves the existence of limit cycle. Frequencies present in the oscillating lift force are composed of fundamental (fs), even and odd harmonics (3fs) at higher Strouhal numbers. Using numerical simulations, shedding frequencies (f_s) were observed to be nearly equal to the excitation frequencies in all the cases. Unsteady lift force generated due to the plunging airfoil is modeled by modified van der Pol oscillator. Using method of multiple scales and spectral analysis of steady-state CFD solutions, frequencies and damping terms in th...

  8. Binary tree models of high-Reynolds-number turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik; Dormy, Emmanuel; Frick, Peter

    1997-08-01

    We consider hierarchical models for turbulence, that are simple generalizations of the standard Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell models (E. B. Gledzer, Dokl, Akad. Nauk SSSR 209, 5 (1973) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 18, 216 (1973)]; M. Yamada and K. Ohkitani, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 4210 (1987)). The density of degrees of freedom is constant in wave-number space. Looking only at this behavior and at the quadratic invariants in the inviscid unforced limit, the models can be thought of as systems living naturally in one spatial dimension, but being qualitatively similar to hydrodynamics in two (2D) and three dimensions. We investigated cascade phenomena and intermittency in the different cases. We observed and studied a forward cascade of enstrophy in the 2D case.

  9. Characteristics of low reynolds number shear-free turbulence at an impermeable base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Mohtar, W H M; ElShafie, A

    2014-01-01

    Shear-free turbulence generated from an oscillating grid in a water tank impinging on an impermeable surface at varying Reynolds number 74 ≤ Re(l) ≤ 570 was studied experimentally, where the Reynolds number is defined based on the root-mean-square (r.m.s) horizontal velocity and the integral length scale. A particular focus was paid to the turbulence characteristics for low Re(l) < 150 to investigate the minimum limit of Re l obeying the profiles of rapid distortion theory. The measurements taken at near base included the r.m.s turbulent velocities, evolution of isotropy, integral length scales, and energy spectra. Statistical analysis of the velocity data showed that the anisotropic turbulence structure follows the theory for flows with Re(l) ≥ 117. At low Re(l) < 117, however, the turbulence profile deviated from the prediction where no amplification of horizontal velocity components was observed and the vertical velocity components were seen to be constant towards the tank base. Both velocity components sharply decreased towards zero at a distance of ≈ 1/3 of the integral length scale above the base due to viscous damping. The lower limit where Re(l) obeys the standard profile was found to be within the range 114 ≤ Re(l) ≤ 116.

  10. Is Ultra-High Reynolds Number Necessary for Comprehensive Log Scaling in a Turbulent Boundary Layer?

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Shivsai Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in an extraordinary turbulent boundary layer called the sink flow, displaying a perfect streamwise invariance, show a wide extent of logarithmic scaling for moments of streamwise velocity up to order 12, even at moderate Reynolds numbers. This is in striking contrast to canonical constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers that show such comprehensive log scaling only at ultra-high Reynolds numbers. This suggests that for comprehensive log scaling, ultra-high-Reynolds-number is not a necessary condition; while specific details of the sink flow are special, the relevance to general turbulent boundary layers is that the sink flow underscores the importance of the streamwise invariance condition that needs to be met in a general flow for obtaining log scaling. Indeed, a simple theory shows that, for log scaling in the inertial sublayer, the invariance of dimensionless mean velocity and higher-order moments along a mean streamline is a necessary and sufficient condition. Ultra-high Reynolds number pri...

  11. Model Experiments with Low Reynolds Number Effects in a Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Filholm, Claus; Topp, Claus;

    The flow in a ventilated room will not always be a fully developed turbulent flow . Reduced air change rates owing to energy considerations and the application of natural ventilation with openings in the outer wall will give room air movements with low turbulence effects. This paper discusses...... the isothermal low Reynolds number flow from a slot inlet in the end wall of the room. The experiments are made on the scale of 1 to 5. Measurements indicate a low Reynolds number effect in the wall jet flow. The virtual origin of the wall jet moves forward in front of the opening at a small Reynolds number......, an effect that is also known from measurements on free jets. The growth rate of the jet, or the length scale, increases and the velocity decay factor decreases at small Reynolds numbers....

  12. High Reynolds Number Studies in the Wake of a Submarine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Juan; Reynolds, Ryan; Smits, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    Results are presented from submarine wake studies conducted in Princeton University's High Reynolds Number Test Facility (HRTF). Compressed air is used as a working fluid enabling Reynolds numbers based on length of up to 10^8, about 1/5 of full scale. Measurements at Reynolds numbers up to 3 x10^6 have been completed, and show that, for the model condition without fins, the wake mean velocity was self-similar at locations 6 and 9 diameters downstream. Also, PIV at Reynolds numbers near 10^4 showed that when the yaw angle was varied the sail-tip and sail-hull junction vortices increased in magnitude emphasizing the importance of fully understanding the flow characteristics of a maneuvering submarine.

  13. Model-based control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Simon J.

    2016-10-01

    Model-based feedback control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers is considered. The feedback signal is provided by velocity measurements in the wake, and actuation is achieved using blowing and suction on the cylinder's surface. Using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations and reduced-order modelling techniques, linear models of the wake are formed at Reynolds numbers between 45 and 110. These models are used to design feedback controllers using {H}_∞ loop-shaping. Complete suppression of shedding is demonstrated up to Re = 110—both for a single-sensor arrangement and for a three-sensor arrangement. The robustness of the feedback controllers is also investigated by applying them over a range of off-design Reynolds numbers, and good robustness properties are seen. It is also observed that it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve acceptable control performance—measured in a suitable way—as Reynolds number increases.

  14. Effects of relative thickness on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at a low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Dongli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characteristics of low Reynolds number flow around airfoil of high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (HAUAVs cruising at low speed. Numerical simulation on the flows around several representative airfoils is carried out to investigate the low Reynolds number flow. The water tunnel model tests further validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the numerical method. Then the effects of the relative thickness of airfoil on aerodynamic performance are explored, using the above numerical method, by simulating flows around airfoils of different relative thicknesses (12%, 14%, 16%, 18%, as well as different locations of the maximum relative thickness (x/c = 22%, 26%, 30%, 34%, at a low Reynolds number of 5 × 105. Results show that performance of airfoils at low Reynolds number is mainly affected by the laminar separation bubble. On the premise of good stall characteristics, the value of maximum relative thickness should be as small as possible, and the location of the maximum relative thickness ought to be closer to the trailing edge to obtain fine airfoil performance. The numerical method is feasible for the simulation of low Reynolds number flow. The study can help to provide a basis for the design of low Reynolds number airfoil.

  15. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project.

  16. Optimized chord and twist angle distributions of wind turbine blade considering Reynolds number effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.; Tang, X. [Univ. of Central Lancashire. Engineering and Physical Sciences, Preston (United Kingdom); Liu, X. [Univ. of Cumbria. Sustainable Engineering, Workington (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a wind turbine depends very much on its blade geometric design, typically based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, which divides the blade into several blade elements. In current blade design practices based on Schmitz rotor design theory, the blade geometric parameters including chord and twist angle distributions are determined based on airfoil aerodynamic data at a specific Reynolds number. However, rotating wind turbine blade elements operate at different Reynolds numbers due to variable wind speed and different blade span locations. Therefore, the blade design through Schmitz rotor theory at a specific Reynolds number does not necessarily provide the best power performance under operational conditions. This paper aims to provide an optimal blade design strategy for horizontal-axis wind turbines operating at different Reynolds numbers. A fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine with S809 airfoil is chosen as a case study and a Matlab program which considers Reynolds number effects is developed to determine the optimized chord and twist angle distributions of the blade. The performance of the optimized blade is compared with that of the preliminary blade which is designed based on Schmitz rotor design theory at a specific Reynolds number. The results demonstrate that the proposed blade design optimization strategy can improve the power performance of the wind turbine. This approach can be further developed for any practice of horizontal axis wind turbine blade design. (Author)

  17. Finite Reynolds number properties of a turbulent channel flow similarity solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, Joseph; Oberlack, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Finite Reynolds number behaviors of the asymptotically logarithmic mean velocity profile in fully developed turbulent channel flow are investigated. This is accomplished by exploiting invariance properties admitted by the appropriately simplified form of the mean momentum equation. These properties underlie the existence of a similarity solution over an interior inertial domain. This similarity solution, which was originally demonstrated by numerically integrating the relevant nonlinear equation, is consistent with the emergence of a logarithmic mean velocity profile as the Reynolds number becomes large. It is now shown that the governing nonlinear equation has an analytical solution that contains both linear and logarithmic terms, but with the coefficient on the linear term decaying to zero with Reynolds number. Existing DNS are used to elucidate Reynolds number dependent properties of this finite Reynolds number form of the similarity solution. Correspondences between these properties and those indicated by finite Reynolds number corrections to the classical overlap layer formulation for the mean velocity profile are described and discussed. Support of the 2014 Mathematics of Turbulence program at the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA, is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  19. Three-dimensional effects on airfoil measurements at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark; Hultmark, Marcus; Hansen, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Blade Element Momentum codes (BEM) are widely used in the wind turbine industry to determine a turbine's operational range and its limits. Empirical two-dimensional airfoil data serve as the primary and fundamental input to the BEM code. Consequently, the results of BEM simulations are strongly dependent on the accuracy of these data. In this presentation, an experimental study is described in which airfoils of different aspect ratios were tested at identical Reynolds numbers. A high-pressure wind tunnel facility is used to achieve large Reynolds numbers of Rec = 3 ×106 , even with small chord lengths. This methodology enables testing of very high aspect ratio airfoils to characterize 3-D effects on the lift and drag data. The tests were performed over a large range of angles of attack, which is especially important for wind turbines. The effect of varying aspect ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil is discussed with emphasis on the outcome of a BEM simulation. The project was partially funded by NSF CBET-1435254 (program manager Dr. Gregory Rorrer).

  20. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier–Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number’. PMID:28167585

  1. Reynolds Number Effects on Turbulent Characteristics of Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonhwi; Fukushima, Naoya; Shimura, Masayasu; Tanahashi, Mamoru; Miyauchi, Toshio

    2012-11-01

    Laminar and turbulent Taylor-Couette flow is of great importance in a wide range of engineering applications, such as viscosity measurement devices, rotating machineries and reactors. In this study, we focus on turbulent Taylor-Couette flow with a fixed outer cylinder and a rotating inner cylinder. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow has been conducted to investigate turbulent characteristics including Reynolds stress budget at Reynolds number from 8000 to 20000. Reynolds number, Re, is defined by gap width and rotating speed of inner cylinder. In this range of Re, turbulent characteristics are expected to change around Re=10000, referring to Wendt's empirical formula. Averaged torque from DNS agrees well with Wendt's empirical formula and torque transition is confirmed around Re=10000. Averaged azimuthal velocity normalized by friction velocity on inner/outer wall increases in logarithmic region with increase in Re. All components of Reynolds stress tensor also increase in all domain. The minute movement of center of Taylor vortices is observed spatially and temporally when Re is over 12000. Finally, Reynolds stress budgets are investigated to figure out Reynolds number effects on turbulent statistics in detail.

  2. Multiscale structures of resistive magnetic reconnection at high magnetic Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Takahiro; Kusano, Kanya

    Magnetic reconnection is the most important process of explosive phenomena in space plasmas. The magnetic Reynolds number for the space plasmas are extremely high in general since those plasmas are thought to be collisionless or semi-collisional. However, magnetic reconnection rate becomes low as magnetic Reynolds number increases within the framework of a stationary resistive MHD model. Thus, modern models of magnetic reconnection often include kinetic effects such as the Hall effect to explain realistic explosive magnetic reconnection. It is thought, on the other hand, that the MHD approximation is valid for the plasmas within a very wide range of scales since the scale gap between the macro-and micro-scale is quite large, e.g., in the solar corona, the ratio of the macro to micro will be more than 107 . Such multiscale structures of MHD with wide range of scales, however, have not been clarified so far. Therefore, in this paper, resistive magnetic reconnection at high magnetic Reynolds numbers are investigated using very high-resolution MHD simulations. Simulation results show that the magnetic energy at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is explosively released, while that at not-so-high magnetic Reynolds numbers is steadily dissipated. In the case of high magnetic Reynolds numbers, multiple small scale plasmoids are intermittently created and ejected via secondary tearing modes in a nonlinearly developed thin current sheet. It is revealed that a secondary plasmoid is not only accelerated up to a local magnetosonic speed toward the down-stream region but also perturbs the up-stream region. Thus, complicated multiscale structures appear around the magnetic field reversal layer. Perspective for the high-resolution simulation of extremely high magnetic Reynolds numbers will be also discussed.

  3. Reynolds Number Versus Roughness Effects in the Princeton “Super-Pipe” Re-examined in the Context of Large Reynolds Number Asymptotics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagib, Hassan; Monkewitz, Peter; Österlund, Jens; Christensen, Kenneth; Adrian, Ronald

    2001-11-01

    Tony Perry, et al. (J. Fluid Mech., v. 439, 2001) have recently contributed to the discussion concerning the reasons for systematic deviations with Re’s (Reynolds numbers) in the Princeton “Super-Pipe” data. Perry et al. demonstrate that the deviation of the constant within the “log-law” is compatible with the “Colebrook formula” for transitionally rough pipes. Since the experiments were completed, Lex Smits and the Princeton Group have argued that the pipe is smooth for at least the majority of the Re range. Here we show that the observed deviations are equally compatible with the finite Re effects obtained from a methodology based on matched asymptotic expansion techniques proposed by us (see abstract at this meeting), in which the infinite-Re limit of the “log-law”, as well as its correction for large but finite Re’s, are derived in a systematic manner. As argued by Perry et al., in these cases one cannot rely on the variation of the centerline velocity with Re to extract the log-law coefficients. The values of the “Karman constant” extracted using either interpretation is significantly lower than the 0.436 value originally proposed and it is closer to the value of 0.38 based on our recent work on boundary layers; see two publications by Österlund et al. (Phys. of Fluids, v. 12 no. 1 and no. 9, 2001). *Supported by NSF, AFOSR & ERCOFTAC.

  4. Control of Low Reynolds Number Flows with Fluid Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-02

    public release; distribution is unlimited. 27 the direct numerical simulations of Andro and Jacquin [37] for a plunging NACA 0012 airfoil at Re...34Bifurcating Flows of Plunging Airfoils at High Strouhal Numbers," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 708, 2012, pp. 349-376. [37] Andro , J.Y

  5. Reynolds number and roughness effects on turbulent stresses in sandpaper roughness boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Squire, D. T.; Klewicki, J. C.; Hutchins, N.; Schultz, M. P.; Marusic, I.

    2017-05-01

    Multicomponent turbulence measurements in rough-wall boundary layers are presented and compared to smooth-wall data over a large friction Reynolds number range (δ+). The rough-wall experiments used the same continuous sandpaper sheet as in the study of Squire et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 795, 210 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.196]. To the authors' knowledge, the present measurements are unique in that they cover nearly an order of magnitude in Reynolds number (δ+≃2800 -17 400 ), while spanning the transitionally to fully rough regimes (equivalent sand-grain-roughness range, ks+≃37 -98 ), and in doing so also maintain very good spatial resolution. Distinct from previous studies, the inner-normalized wall-normal velocity variances, w2¯, exhibit clear dependencies on both ks+ and δ+ well into the wake region of the boundary layer, and only for fully rough flows does the outer portion of the profile agree with that in a comparable δ+ smooth-wall flow. Consistent with the mean dynamical constraints, the inner-normalized Reynolds shear stress profiles in the rough-wall flows are qualitatively similar to their smooth-wall counterparts. Quantitatively, however, at matched Reynolds numbers the peaks in the rough-wall Reynolds shear stress profiles are uniformly located at greater inner-normalized wall-normal positions. The Reynolds stress correlation coefficient, Ru w, is also greater in rough-wall flows at a matched Reynolds number. As in smooth-wall flows, Ru w decreases with Reynolds number, but at different rates depending on the roughness condition. Despite the clear variations in the Ru w profiles with roughness, inertial layer u , w cospectra evidence invariance with ks+ when normalized with the distance from the wall. Comparison of the normalized contributions to the Reynolds stress from the second quadrant (Q2) and fourth quadrant (Q4) exhibit noticeable differences between the smooth- and rough-wall flows. The overall time fraction spent in each quadrant is, however

  6. Mass transfer controlled reactions in packed beds at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedkiw, P.S.

    1978-12-01

    The a priori prediction and correlation of mass-transfer rates in transport limited, packed-bed reactors at low Reynolds numbers is examined. The solutions to the governing equations for a flow-through porous electrode reactor indicate that these devices must operate at a low space velocity to suppress a large ohmic potential drop. Packed-bed data for the mass-transfer rate at such low Reynolds numbers were examined and found to be sparse, especially in liquid systems. Prior models to simulate the solid-void structure in a bed are reviewed. Here the bed was envisioned as an array of sinusoidal periodically constricted tubes (PCT). Use of this model has not appeared in the literature. The velocity field in such a tube should be a good approximation to the converging-diverging character of the velocity field in an actual bed. The creeping flow velocity profiles were calculated. These results were used in the convective-diffusion equation to find mass transfer rates at high Peclet number for both deep and shallow beds, for low Peclet numbers in a deep bed. All calculations assumed that the reactant concentration at the tube surface is zero. Mass-transfer data were experimentally taken in a transport controlled, flow-through porous electrode to test the theoretical calculations and to provide data resently unavailable for deeper beds. It was found that the sinusoidal PCT model could not fit the data of this work or that available in the literature. However, all data could be adequately described by a model which incorporates a channelingeffect. The bed was successfully modeled as an array of dual sized straight tubes.

  7. Drag Reduction of a Turbulent Boundary Layer over an Oscillating Wall and Its Variation with Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Skote

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spanwise oscillation applied on the wall under a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer flow is investigated using direct numerical simulation. The temporal wall forcing produces a considerable drag reduction over the region where oscillation occurs. Downstream development of drag reduction is investigated from Reynolds number dependency perspective. An alternative to the previously suggested power-law relation between Reynolds number and peak drag reduction values, which is valid for channel flow as well, is proposed. Considerable deviation in the variation of drag reduction with Reynolds number between different previous investigations of channel flow is found. The shift in velocity profile, which has been used in the past for explaining the diminishing drag reduction at higher Reynolds number for riblets, is investigated. A new predictive formula is derived, replacing the ones found in the literature. Furthermore, unlike for the case of riblets, the shift is varying downstream in the case of wall oscillations, which is a manifestation of the fact that the boundary layer has not reached a new equilibrium over the limited downstream distance in the simulations. Taking this into account, the predictive model agrees well with DNS data. On the other hand, the growth of the boundary layer does not influence the drag reduction prediction.

  8. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  9. Driving large magnetic Reynolds number flow in highly ionized, unmagnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Peterson, E.; Milhone, J.; Endrizzi, D.; Cooper, C.; Désangles, V.; Khalzov, I.; Siller, R.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    Electrically driven, unmagnetized plasma flows have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment with magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the predicted Rmcrit = 200 threshold for flow-driven MHD instability excitation. The plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive lanthanum hexaboride cathodes which generate a J ×B torque in helium and argon plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies are presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that the edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force, and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to the Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce larger velocity shear and has the correct flow profile for studying the magnetorotational instability.

  10. Transition of effective hydraulic properties from low to high Reynolds number flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesapillai, R.; Steeb, H.; Hartmaier, A.

    2014-07-01

    We numerically analyze fluid flow through porous media up to a limiting Reynolds number of O(103). Due to inertial effects, such processes exhibit a gradual transition from laminar to turbulent flow for increasing magnitudes of Re. On the macroscopic scale, inertial transition implies nonlinearities in the relationship between the effective macroscopic pressure gradient and the filter velocity, typically accounted for in terms of the quadratic Forchheimer equation. However, various inertia-based extensions to the linear Darcy equation have been discussed in the literature; most prominently cubic polynomials in velocity. The numerical results presented in this contribution indicate that inertial transition, as observed in the apparent permeability, hydraulic tortuosity, and interfacial drag, is inherently of sigmoidal shape. Based on this observation, we derive a novel filtration law which is consistent with Darcy's law at small Re, reproduces Forchheimer's law at large Re, and exhibits higher-order leading terms in the weak inertia regime.

  11. The influence of Reynolds numbers on resistance properties of jet pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Q.; Zhou, G.; Li, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Jet pumps are widely used in thermoacoustic Stirling heat engines and pulse tube cryocoolers to eliminate the effect of Gedeon streaming. The resistance properties of jet pumps are principally influenced by their structures and flow regimes which are always characterized by Reynolds numbers. In this paper, the jet pump of which cross section contracts abruptly is selected as our research subject. Based on linear thermoacoustic theory, a CFD model is built and the oscillating flow of the working gas is simulated and analyzed with different Reynolds numbers in the jet pump. According to the calculations, the influence of different structures and Reynolds numbers on the resistance properties of the jet pump are analyzed and presented. The results show that Reynolds numbers have a great influence on the resistance properties of jet pumps and some empirical formulas which are widely used are unsuitable for oscillating flow with small Reynolds numbers. This paper provides a more comprehensive understanding on resistance properties of jet pumps with oscillating flow and is significant for the design of jet pumps in practical thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal/ Fluid Sciences & Engineering Dept.; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.; Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  13. Negative Magnus Effect on a Rotating Sphere at around the Critical Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2011-12-01

    Negative Magnus lift acting on a sphere rotating about the axis perpendicular to an incoming flow is investigated using large-eddy simulation at three Reynolds numbers of 1.0× 104, 2.0 × 105, and 1.14 × 106. The numerical methods adopted are first validated on a non-rotating sphere and the spatial resolution around the sphere is determined so as to reproduce the laminar separation, reattachment, and turbulent transition of the boundary layer observed at around the critical Reynolds number. In the rotating sphere, positive or negative Magnus effect is observed depending on the Reynolds number and the rotating speed imposed. At the Reynolds number in the subcritical or supercritical region, the direction of the lift force follows the Magnus effect to be independent of the rotational speed tested here. In contrast, negative lift is observed at the Reynolds number at the critical region when particular rotating speeds are imposed. The negative Magnus effect is discussed in the context of the suppression or promotion of boundary layer transition around the separation point.

  14. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier-Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted.

  15. Thermocapillary migration of a droplet with a thermal source at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zuo-Bing

    2014-01-01

    The {\\it unsteady} process for thermocapillary droplet migration at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers has been previously reported by identifying a nonconservative integral thermal flux across the surface in the {\\it steady} thermocapillary droplet migration, [Wu and Hu, J. Math. Phys. {\\bf 54} 023102, (2013)]. Here we add a thermal source in the droplet to preserve the integral thermal flux across the surface as conservative, so that thermocapillary droplet migration at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers can reach a {\\it quasi-steady} process. Under assumptions of {\\it quasi-steady} state and non-deformation of the droplet, we make an analytical result for the {\\it steady} thermocapillary migration of droplet with the thermal source at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. The result shows that the thermocapillary droplet migration speed slowly increases with the increase of Marangoni number.

  16. Reynolds number scaling to predict droplet size distribution in dispersed and undispersed subsurface oil releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pu; Weng, Linlu; Niu, Haibo; Robinson, Brian; King, Thomas; Conmy, Robyn; Lee, Kenneth; Liu, Lei

    2016-12-15

    This study was aimed at testing the applicability of modified Weber number scaling with Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil, and developing a Reynolds number scaling approach for oil droplet size prediction for high viscosity oils. Dispersant to oil ratio and empirical coefficients were also quantified. Finally, a two-step Rosin-Rammler scheme was introduced for the determination of droplet size distribution. This new approach appeared more advantageous in avoiding the inconsistency in interfacial tension measurements, and consequently delivered concise droplet size prediction. Calculated and observed data correlated well based on Reynolds number scaling. The relation indicated that chemical dispersant played an important role in reducing the droplet size of ANS under different seasonal conditions. The proposed Reynolds number scaling and two-step Rosin-Rammler approaches provide a concise, reliable way to predict droplet size distribution, supporting decision making in chemical dispersant application during an offshore oil spill.

  17. Reynolds number influence on preferential concentration of heavy particles in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obligado, Martin; Missaoui, Mahrane; Cartellier, Alain; Bourgoin, Mickaeel [Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysiques et Industriels, CNRS/UJF/G-INP UMR5519, BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Monchaux, Romain, E-mail: mickael.bourgoin@hmg.inpg.fr [Unite de mecanique, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Techniques Avancees, ParisTech, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761, Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2011-12-22

    We present a study of the preferential concentration and clustering in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Using Voronoie diagrams, we have formerly quantified preferential concentration as a function of the Stokes number in moderate turbulence conditions up to Reynolds number based on Taylor microscale of the order of R{sub {lambda}} {approx} 120. Using an active grid recently implemented in our windtunnel, we investigate in the present study, the effect of Reynolds number on particles clustering, in the range R{sub {lambda}} {approx} 200 - 400.

  18. PIV measurements of isothermal plane turbulent impinging jets at moderate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayrullina, A.; van Hooff, T.; Blocken, B.; van Heijst, G. J. F.

    2017-04-01

    This paper contains a detailed experimental analysis of an isothermal plane turbulent impinging jet (PTIJ) for two jet widths at moderate Reynolds numbers (7200-13,500) issued on a horizontal plane at fixed relative distances equal to 22.5 and 45 jet widths. The available literature on such flows is scarce. Previous studies on plane turbulent jets mainly focused on free jets, while most studies on impinging jets focused on the heat transfer between the jet and an impingement plane, disregarding jet development. The present study focuses on isothermal PTIJs at moderate Reynolds numbers characteristic of air curtains. Flow visualisations with fluorescent dye and 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been performed. A comparison is made with previous studies of isothermal free turbulent jets at moderate Reynolds numbers. Mean and instantaneous velocity and vorticity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds shear stress are analysed. The jet issued from the nozzle with higher aspect ratio shows more intensive entrainment and a faster decay of the centreline velocity compared to the jet of lower aspect ratio for the same value of jet Reynolds number. The profiles of centreline and cross-jet velocity and turbulence intensity show that the PTIJs behave as a free plane turbulent jet until 70-75% of the total jet height. Alongside the information obtained on the jet dynamics, the data will be useful for the validation of numerical simulations.

  19. Unsteady Numerical Simulation of Flow around 2-D Circular Cylinder for High Reynolds Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui Ai; Dakui Feng; Hengkui Ye; Lin Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,2-D computational analyses were conducted for unsteady high Reynolds number flows around a smooth circular cylinder in the supercritical and upper-transition flow regimes,i.e.8.21×104<Re<l.54×106.The calculations were performed by means of solving the 2-D Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a k-ε turbulence model.The calculated results,produced flow structure drag and lift coefficients,as well as Strouhal numbers.The findings were in good agreement with previous published data,which also supplied us with a good understanding of the flow across cylinders of different high Reynolds numbers.Meanwhile,an effective measure was presented to control the lift force on a cylinder,which points the way to decrease the vortex induced vibration of marine structure in future.

  20. Effect of Reynolds number on flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Ikarashi, Yuya; Yamagata, Takayuki; Taguchi, Syoichi

    2016-11-01

    The flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow was studied experimentally by using the mass transfer measurement by plaster dissolution method, the surface flow visualization by oil film method and stereo PIV measurement. The experiments are carried out in a water tunnel of a circular pipe of 56mm in diameter with a working fluid of water. The Reynolds number was varied from 30000 to 200000. The experimental result indicated the change of the mass transfer coefficient distribution in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds number. This phenomenon is further examined by the surface flow visualization and measurement of secondary flow pattern in the elbow, and the results showed the suggested change of the secondary flow pattern in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds numbers.

  1. Reynolds number effects on the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walchli, B.; Thornber, B.

    2017-01-01

    The Reynolds number effects on the nonlinear growth rates of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are investigated using two-dimensional numerical simulations. A decrease in Reynolds number gives an increased time to reach nonlinear saturation, with Reynolds number effects only significant in the range RePhys. Rev. E 80, 055302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302]. Predicted amplitudes show reasonable agreement with the existing theory of Carles and Popinet [P. Carles and S. Popinet, Phys. Fluids Lett. 13, 1833 (2001), 10.1063/1.1377863; Eur. J. Mech. B 21, 511 (2002), 10.1016/S0997-7546(02)01199-8] and Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 47, 375 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevE.47.375; K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 87, 031003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.031003], with the former being the closest match to the current computations.

  2. Reynolds number invariance of the structure inclination angle in wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusic, Ivan; Heuer, Weston D C

    2007-09-14

    Cross correlations of the fluctuating wall-shear stress and the streamwise velocity in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers are reported over 3 orders of magnitude change in Reynolds number. These results are obtained using hot-film and hot-wire anemometry in a wind tunnel facility, and sonic anemometers and a purpose-built wall-shear stress sensor in the near-neutral atmospheric surface layer on the salt flats of Utah's western desert. The direct measurement of fluctuating wall-shear stress in the atmospheric surface layer has not been available before. Structure inclination angles are inferred from the cross correlation results and are found to be invariant over the large range of Reynolds number. The findings justify the prior use of low Reynolds number experiments for obtaining structure angles for near-wall models in the large-eddy simulation of atmospheric surface layer flows.

  3. On the motion of non-spherical particles at high Reynolds number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a critical review of available methodology for dealing with the motion of non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers in the Eulerian- Lagrangian methodology for dispersed flow. First, an account of the various attempts to classify the various shapes and the efforts...... motion it is necessary to account for the non-coincidence between the center of pressure and center of gravity which is a direct consequence of the inertial pressure forces associated with particles at high Reynolds number flow. Extensions for non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers are far...... in between and usually based on semi-heuristic approaches utilizing concepts from airfoil theory such as profile lift. Even for regular particles there seems to be a long way before a complete theory can be formulated. For irregular particles with small aspect ratio, where the secondary motion...

  4. The shock tube as a device for testing transonic airfoils at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A performance analysis of gas-driven shock tubes shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 100 million can be generated behind the primary shock in a large shock tube. A study of flow over simple airfoils has been carried out at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photos and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those observed for the airfoils in wind tunnels can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with either properly-contoured test section walls or a properly-designed slotted-wall test section. The study indicates that the shock tube is a useful facility for studying two-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic airfoil flows.

  5. Analysis of compressible light dynamic stall flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, R.D. Van; Ekaterinaris, John A.; Chandrasekhara, M.S.;

    1996-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results of steady and light dynamic stall flow over an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil at a freestream Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 0.54 x 10(6) are compared, The experimental observation that dynamic stall is induced from the bursting of a laminar separation...

  6. LIFT FORCE ON ROTATING SPHERE AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS AND HIGH ROTATIONAL SPEEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    The lift force on an isolated rotating sphere in a uniform flow was investigated by means of a three-dimensional numerical simulation for low Reynolds numbers (based on the sphere diameter) (Re < 68.4) and high dimensionless rotational speeds (Γ< 5). The Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian coordinate system were solved using a finite volume formulation based on SIMPLE procedure. The accuracy of the numerical simulation was tested through a comparison with available theoretical, numerical and experimental results at low Reynolds numbers, and it was found that they were in close agreement under the above mentioned ranges of the Reynolds number and rotational speed. From a detailed computation of the flow field around a rotational sphere in extended ranges of the Reynolds number and rotational speed, the results show that, with increasing the rotational speed or decreasing the Reynolds number, the lift coefficient increases. An empirical equation more accurate than those obtained by previous studies was obtained to describe both effects of the rotational speed and Reynolds number on the lift force on a sphere. It was found in calculations that the drag coefficient is not significantly affected by the rotation of the sphere. The ratio of the lift force to the drag force, both of which act on a sphere in a uniform flow at the same time, was investigated. For a small spherical particle such as one of about 100μm in diameter, even if the rotational speed reaches about 106 revolutions per minute, the lift force can be neglected as compared with the drag force.

  7. A comparative study of near-wall turbulence in high and low Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M. M.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2001-03-01

    The present study explores the effects of Reynolds number, over three orders of magnitude, in the viscous wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. Complementary experiments were conducted both in the boundary layer wind tunnel at the University of Utah and in the atmospheric surface layer which flows over the salt flats of the Great Salt Lake Desert in western Utah. The Reynolds numbers, based on momentum deficit thickness, of the two flows were Rθ=2×103 and Rθ≈5×106, respectively. High-resolution velocity measurements were obtained from a five-element vertical rake of hot-wires spanning the buffer region. In both the low and high Rθ flows, the length of the hot-wires measured less than 6 viscous units. To facilitate reliable comparisons, both the laboratory and field experiments employed the same instrumentation and procedures. Data indicate that, even in the immediate vicinity of the surface, strong influences from low-frequency motions at high Rθ produce noticeable Reynolds number differences in the streamwise velocity and velocity gradient statistics. In particular, the peak value in the root mean square streamwise velocity profile, when normalized by viscous scales, was found to exhibit a logarithmic dependence on Reynolds number. The mean streamwise velocity profile, on the other hand, appears to be essentially independent of Reynolds number. Spectra and spatial correlation data suggest that low-frequency motions at high Reynolds number engender intensified local convection velocities which affect the structure of both the velocity and velocity gradient fields. Implications for turbulent production mechanisms and coherent motions in the buffer layer are discussed.

  8. Dynamic unified RANS-LES simulations of high Reynolds number separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan; Stoellinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The development of hybrid RANS-LES methods is seen to be a very promising approach to enable efficient simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows involving flow separation. To contribute to further advances, we present a new, theoretically well based, dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method, referred to as DLUM. It is applied to a high Reynolds number flow involving both attached and separated flow regimes: a periodic hill flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 37 000. Its performance is compared to pure LES, pure RANS, other hybrid RANS-LES (given by DLUM modifications), and experimental observations. It is shown that the use of this computational method offers huge cost reductions (which scale with Re/200, Re refers to the Reynolds number) of very high Reynolds number flow simulations compared to LES, it is much more accurate than RANS, and more accurate than LES, which is not fully resolved. In particular, this conclusion does also apply to the comparison of DLUM and pure LES simulations on rather coarse grids, which are often simply required to deal with simulations of very high Reynolds number flows: the DLUM provides mean velocity fields which are hardly affected by the grid, whereas LES velocity fields reveal significant shortcomings. We identified the reason for the superior performance of our new dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method compared to LES: it is the model's ability to respond to a changing resolution with adequate turbulent viscosity changes by ensuring simultaneously a physically correct turbulence length scale specification under the presence of interacting RANS and LES modes.

  9. Simplified physical models of the flow around flexible insect wings at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harenberg, Steve; Reis, Johnny; Miller, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Some of the smallest insects fly at Reynolds numbers in the range of 5-100. We built a dynamically scaled physical model of a flexible insect wing and measured the resulting wing deformations and flow fields. The wing models were submerged in diluted corn syrup and rotated about the root of the wing for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1-100. Spatially resolved flow fields were obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Deformations of the wing were tracked using DLTdv software to determine the motion and induced curvature of the wing.

  10. The effects of nozzle geometry on waterjet breakup at high Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Pourdeyhimi, B. [Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center, North Carolina State University, NC 27695-8301, Raleigh (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Waterjet breakup is traditionally considered to follow the Ohnesorge classification. In this classification, high Reynolds number waterjets are considered to atomize quickly after discharge. By generating a constricted waterjet where the water flow stays detached all the way through the nozzle, we have observed the first wind-induced breakup mode at high Reynolds numbers. Such a peculiar behavior, however, was not observed in non-constricted waterjets. Our results indicate that, constricted jets do not follow the Ohnesorge classification, in contrast to the non-constricted waterjets. We discuss the impact of nozzle geometry on the characteristics of waterjets and support our discussion by numerical simulations. (orig.)

  11. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  12. Performance losses of drag-reducing spanwise forcing at moderate values of the Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Davide; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental problem in the field of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction is to determine the performance of the available control techniques at high values of the Reynolds number Re. We consider active, predetermined strategies based on spanwise forcing (oscillating wall and streamwise-traveling waves applied to a plane channel flow), and explore via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) up to Reτ = 2100 the rate at which their performance deteriorates as Re is increased. To be able to carry out a comprehensive parameter study, we limit the computational cost of the simulations by adjusting the size of the computational domain in the homogeneous directions, compromising between faster computations and the increased need of time-averaging the fluctuating space-mean wall shear-stress. Our results, corroborated by a few full-scale DNS, suggest a scenario where drag reduction degrades with Re at a rate that varies according to the parameters of the wall forcing. In agreement with already available information, keeping them at their low-Re optimal value produces a relatively quick decrease of drag reduction. However, at higher Re the optimal parameters shift towards other regions of the parameter space, and these regions turn out to be much less sensitive to Re. Once this shift is accounted for, drag reduction decreases with Re at a markedly slower rate. If the slightly favorable trend of the energy required to create the forcing is considered, a chance emerges for positive net energy savings also at large values of the Reynolds number.

  13. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  14. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  15. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  16. Numerical simulation of 3D backward facing step flows at various Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louda Petr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work deals with the numerical simulation of 3D turbulent flow over backward facing step in a narrow channel. The mathematical model is based on the RANS equations with an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM. The numerical method uses implicit finite volume upwind discretization. While the eddy viscosity models fail in predicting complex 3D flows, the EARSM model is shown to provide results which agree well with experimental PIV data. The reference experimental data provide the 3D flow field. The simulations are compared with experiment for 3 values of Reynolds number.

  17. Estimation of the Reynolds number in a Poiseuille flow using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, M.; Gónzalez, J. A.; Que, U.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the estimation of Reynolds number in a 2-dimensional Poiseuille flow is explored employing artificial neural networks (ANNs). The velocity fields of the fluids were generated evaluating the Hage-Poiseuille equation for different Reynolds (Re) from 20 to 2000. The velocity profile obtained for each case is used as input data for the ANNs, which is then trained to predict the Re. The results show an accuracy of at least of 99.5% in all prediction cases. This analysis is the first step towards the construction of a Machine Learning algorithm capable of computing physical parameters in more general scenarios.

  18. Large velocity fluctuations in small-Reynolds-number pipe flow of polymer solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, D.; Ingremeau, F.; Amarouchene, Y.; Kellay, H.

    2011-01-01

    The flow of polymer solutions is examined in a flow geometry where a jet is used to inject the viscoelastic solution into a cylindrical tube. We show that this geometry allows for the generation of a "turbulentlike" flow at very low Reynolds numbers with a fluctuation level which can be as high as 3

  19. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  20. Self-similar decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoof, R.A.; Huisman, S.G.; Veen, van der R.C.A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds-number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e., the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder (Re i =2×10 6 , the outer cylinder is at rest) is stopped within 12 s, thus fully removing the energy input to the syst

  1. Mechanisms Of Pressure Distributions Within Laminar Separation Bubble At Different Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghwi; Kawai, Soshi; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Fujii, Kozo

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation around 5 % thickness flat plate at Re = 5 , 000 , 6 , 100 , 11 , 000 and 20 , 000 are performed and the physical mechanisms of the pressure distributions (Cp) in laminar separation bubbles are analyzed. Depending on the Reynolds number, a gradual pressure recovery and plateau pressure distribution are observed as experiments by Anyoji et al. [AIAA paper 2011-0852]. The causes of the pressure distributions are quantitatively shown by deriving the pressure gradient (momentum budget) equation from the steady momentum equation. From the results, we identify that the viscous diffusion term near the surface has a major contribution to the pressure gradients, and a different growth of the separated shear layer relying on the Reynolds numbers affects the viscous stress near the surface. The gradual pressure recovery at the lower Reynolds numbers is caused by the progressive development of separated shear layer due to the viscous stress which makes a non-negligible viscous stress. On the other hand, a thin laminar separated shear layer is created at the higher Reynolds numbers because of the relatively small viscous diffusion effects, which results in a negligible shear stress distribution. It makes dp / dx ~ 0 and the plateau pressure distribution is generated. Asahi Glass Scholarship.

  2. Flow field behavior with Reynolds number variance around a spiked body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Shashank; Suzuki, Kojiro; Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2016-10-01

    An experimental visualization study was performed to investigate the dependence of the pressure hill height and the influence zone expanse, for flow past a spiked body with different nose configurations, over a Reynolds number range from 2278 to 4405 to establish the vortex shedding process, and applicability in low speed flow regime for effective pressure reduction. It is found that the spike reduces the radius of curvature of the approaching streamline, leading to the deflection of the streamlines towards the shoulder of the basic body, resulting in a narrow zone of the positive pressure hill at the body nose. It is also observed that the pressure hill length and the influence zone expanse decrease with the introduction of spike over the present range of Reynolds numbers. For Reynolds numbers less than 2700, spike with conical nose is found to be more efficient than the spikes with other nose shapes of the present study in reducing the positive pressure at the nose of the blunt body. For higher Reynolds numbers, greater than 2700, the size of the vortex at the junction of the spike and basic body is the largest for the spike with hemispherical nose, and emerges as a potential candidate for application in possible wind-design resistant structures.

  3. Two-dimensional energy spectra in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Dileep; Baidya, Rio; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The current study measures the two-dimensional (2D) spectra of streamwise velocity component (u) in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer for the first time. A 2D spectra shows the contribution of streamwise (λx) and spanwise (λy) length scales to the streamwise variance at a given wall height (z). 2D spectra could be a better tool to analyse spectral scaling laws as it is devoid of energy aliasing errors that could be present in one-dimensional spectra. A novel method is used to calculate the 2D spectra from the 2D correlation of u which is obtained by measuring velocity time series at various spanwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. At low Reynolds number, the shape of the 2D spectra at a constant energy level shows λy √{ zλx } behaviour at larger scales which is in agreement with the literature. However, at high Reynolds number, it is observed that the square-root relationship gradually transforms into a linear relationship (λy λx) which could be caused by the large packets of eddies whose length grows proportionately to the growth of its width. Additionally, we will show that this linear relationship observed at high Reynolds number is consistent with attached eddy predictions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Australian Research Council.

  4. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  5. Experiments on low Reynolds number turbulent flow through a square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Bayode; Poole, Robert; Dennis, David

    2015-11-01

    Previous experimental studies on square duct turbulent flow have focused mainly on high Reynolds numbers for which a turbulence induced eight-vortex secondary flow pattern exists in the cross sectional plane. More recently, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have revealed that the flow field at Reynolds numbers close to transition can be very different; the flow in this marginally turbulent regime alternating between two states characterised by four vortices. In this study, we experimentally investigate the onset criteria for transition to turbulence in square ducts. We also present experimental data on the mean flow properties and turbulence statistics in both marginally and fully turbulent flow at relatively low Reynolds numbers using laser Doppler velocimetry. Results for both flow categories show good agreement with DNS. The switching of the flow field between two flow states at marginally turbulent Reynolds numbers is confirmed by bimodal probability density functions of streamwise velocity at certain distances from the wall as well as joint probability density functions of streamwise and wall normal velocities which feature two peaks.

  6. Status and future prospects of using numerical methods to study complex flows at High Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The calculation of flow fields past aircraft configuration at flight Reynolds numbers is considered. Progress in devising accurate and efficient numerical methods, in understanding and modeling the physics of turbulence, and in developing reliable and powerful computer hardware is discussed. Emphasis is placed on efficient solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. High and Low Reynolds number Measurements in a Room with an Impinging Isothermal Jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Hyldgaard, C. E.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The present paper, which is within the work of the lEA - annex 20, presents a series of full-scale velocity measurements in a room with isothermal mixing ventilation. The measurements are in the Reynolds number range 1000 - 7000 based on inlet dimensions. This means that a transition from laminar...

  8. Negative Magnus lift on a rotating sphere at around the critical Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Negative Magnus lift acting on a sphere rotating about the axis perpendicular to an incoming flow was investigated using large-eddy simulation at three Reynolds numbers of 1.0 × 104, 2.0 × 105, and 1.14 × 106. The numerical methods used were first validated on a non-rotating sphere, and the spatial resolution around the sphere was determined so as to reproduce the laminar separation, reattachment, and turbulent transition of the boundary layer observed in the vicinity of the critical Reynolds number. The rotating sphere exhibited a positive or negative Magnus effect depending on the Reynolds number and the imposed rotating speed. At Reynolds numbers in the subcritical or supercritical regimes, the direction of the Magnus lift force was independent of the rotational speed. In contrast, the lift force was negative in the critical regime when particular rotating speeds were imposed. This negative Magnus effect was investigated in the context of suppression or promotion of boundary layer transition around the separation point.

  9. Stokesian swimming of a sphere at low Reynolds number by helical surface distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof, B. U.; Jones, R. B.

    2016-07-01

    Explicit expressions are derived for the matrices determining the mean translational and rotational swimming velocities and the mean rate of dissipation for Stokesian swimming at low Reynolds number of a distorting sphere in a viscous incompressible fluid. As an application, an efficient helical propeller-type stroke is found and its properties are calculated.

  10. Design and installation of a high Reynolds number recirculating water tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Libin

    The High-Reynolds Number Fluid Mechanics Laboratory has recently been established at Oklahoma State University (OSU). The three primary components of the laboratory are 1) a recirculating water tunnel, 2) a multiphase pipe flow facility, and 3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. This thesis focuses on the design and fabrication of the water tunnel, which will be used for high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer research. Two main design criteria for the water tunnel were to achieve a momentum thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104 and to have high optical access to the flow surfaces in the test section. This is being achieved with a 1 m. long test section and a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105). The water tunnel is powered by a 150 hp motor and a 4500 gpm capacity centrifugal pump. The water tunnel is designed for a maximum operating pressure of 40 psi. This will make the facility a low cost option to perform high-Reynolds number aerodynamic and hydrodynamic tests. Improved flow imaging capability is a major advantage to liquid based fluid facilities because of the increased density for seeding and reduced field-of-view for equivalent Reynolds number. The laboratory's state-of-the-art flow visualization system can be used for time-resolved and phase averaged stereo- particle-image-velocimetry (sPIV), laser-induced-fluorescence, and high-speed imaging. Design provisions are also made to allow a multi-phase loop to share the pump and motor configuration of this water tunnel facility. The major design decisions that went into the design of the water tunnel facility are discussed. The design considerations that were taken into account for the test section, flow conditioning sections and the entire flow loop are discussed in greater detail. The final configuration and the technical drawings of the water

  11. Comparison of turbulent channel and pipe flows with varying Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, H.C.H.; Monty, J.P.; Hutchins, N.; Chong, M.S.; Marusic, I. [University of Melbourne, Department Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Single normal hot-wire measurements of the streamwise component of velocity were taken in fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows for matched friction Reynolds numbers ranging from 1,000 {<=} Re{sub {tau}}{<=} 3,000. A total of 27 velocity profile measurements were taken with a systematic variation in the inner-scaled hot-wire sensor length l {sup +} and the hot-wire length-to-diameter ratio (l/d). It was observed that for constant l {sup +} = 22 and l/d >or similar 200, the near-wall peak in turbulence intensity rises with Reynolds number in both channels and pipes. This is in contrast to Hultmark et al. in J Fluid Mech 649:103-113, (2010), who report no growth in the near-wall peak turbulence intensity for pipe flow with l {sup +} = 20. Further, it was found that channel and pipe flows have very similar streamwise velocity statistics and energy spectra over this range of Reynolds numbers, with the only difference observed in the outer region of the mean velocity profile. Measurements where l {sup +} and l/d were systematically varied reveal that l {sup +} effects are akin to spatial filtering and that increasing sensor size will lead to attenuation of an increasingly large range of small scales. In contrast, when l/d was insufficient, the measured energy is attenuated over a very broad range of scales. These findings are in agreement with similar studies in boundary layer flows and highlight the need to carefully consider sensor and anemometry parameters when comparing flows across different geometries and when drawing conclusions regarding the Reynolds number dependency of measured turbulence statistics. With an emphasis on accuracy, measurement resolution and wall proximity, these measurements are taken at comparable Reynolds numbers to currently available DNS data sets of turbulent channel/pipe flows and are intended to serve as a database for comparison between physical and numerical experiments. (orig.)

  12. Regularized characteristic boundary conditions for the Lattice-Boltzmann methods at high Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissocq, Gauthier; Gourdain, Nicolas; Malaspinas, Orestis; Eyssartier, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the investigations done to adapt the Characteristic Boundary Conditions (CBC) to the Lattice-Boltzmann formalism for high Reynolds number applications. Three CBC formalisms are implemented and tested in an open source LBM code: the baseline local one-dimension inviscid (BL-LODI) approach, its extension including the effects of the transverse terms (CBC-2D) and a local streamline approach in which the problem is reformulated in the incident wave framework (LS-LODI). Then all implementations of the CBC methods are tested for a variety of test cases, ranging from canonical problems (such as 2D plane and spherical waves and 2D vortices) to a 2D NACA profile at high Reynolds number (Re =105), representative of aeronautic applications. The LS-LODI approach provides the best results for pure acoustics waves (plane and spherical waves). However, it is not well suited to the outflow of a convected vortex for which the CBC-2D associated with a relaxation on density and transverse waves provides the best results. As regards numerical stability, a regularized adaptation is necessary to simulate high Reynolds number flows. The so-called regularized FD (Finite Difference) adaptation, a modified regularized approach where the off-equilibrium part of the stress tensor is computed thanks to a finite difference scheme, is the only tested adaptation that can handle the high Reynolds computation.

  13. Introducing a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is commonly used for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly because of its continuous signal and high bandwidth. However, measuring two components of velocity in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has proven to be quite challenging with conventional crossed hot-wires, especially close to the wall, due to insufficient resolution and obstruction from the probe. The Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) is a miniature hot-wire that drastically increased the spatial and temporal resolutions for single-component measurements by using a nano-scale platinum wire. Applying a novel combining method and reconfiguration of the NSTAP design, we created a sensor (x-NSTAP) that is capable of two-component velocity measurements with a sensing volume of approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, providing spatial and temporal resolutions similar to the single component NSTAP. The x-NSTAP is deployed in the Superpipe facility for accurate measurements of the Reynolds stresses at very high Reynolds numbers. Supported under NSF Grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  14. DNS/LES Simulations of Separated Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) simulations of flow through a periodic channel with a constriction are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model at two Reynolds numbers of 2800 and 10595. The LES equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. DNS are performed for the lower Reynolds number case using a fine grid and the data are used to validate the LES results obtained with a coarse and a medium size grid. LES simulations are also performed for the higher Reynolds number case using a coarse and a medium size grid. The results are compared with an existing reference data set. The DNS and LES results agreed well with the reference data. Reynolds stresses, sub-grid eddy viscosity, and the budgets for the turbulent kinetic energy are also presented. It is found that the turbulent fluctuations in the normal and spanwise directions have the same magnitude. The turbulent kinetic energy budget shows that the production peaks near the separation point region and the production to dissipation ratio is very high on the order of five in this region. It is also observed that the production is balanced by the advection, diffusion, and dissipation in the shear layer region. The dominant term is the turbulent diffusion that is about two times the molecular dissipation.

  15. Effects of Low Reynolds Number on Wake-Generated Unsteady Flow of an Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsunuma Takayuki

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flow field downstream of axial-flow turbine rotors at low Reynolds numbers was investigated experimentally using hot-wire probes. Reynolds number, based on rotor exit velocity and rotor chord length Re out,RT , was varied from 3.2× 10 4 to 12.8× 10 4 at intervals of 1.0× 10 4 by changing the flow velocity of the wind tunnel. The time-averaged and time-dependent distributions of velocity and turbulence intensity were analyzed to determine the effect of Reynolds number. The reduction of Reynolds number had a marked influence on the turbine flow field. The regions of high turbulence intensity due to the wake and the secondary vortices were increased dramatically with the decreasing Reynolds number. The periodic fluctuation of the flow due to rotor-stator interaction also increased with the decreasing Reynolds number. The energy-dissipation thickness of the rotor midspan wake at the low Reynolds number Re out,RT =3.2× 10 4 was 1.5 times larger than that at the high Reynolds number Re out,RT =12.8× 10 4 . The curve of the −0.2 power of the Reynolds number agreed with the measured energy-dissipation thickness at higher Reynolds numbers. However, the curve of the −0.4 power law fitted more closely than the curve of the −0.2 power law at lower Reynolds numbers below 6.4× 10 4 .

  16. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  17. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  18. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Skála, J; Büchner, J; Rampp, M

    2014-01-01

    The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal, large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas motivates the implementation of almost conservative MHD computer codes. They should efficiently calculate, use highly parallelized schemes scaling well with large numbers of CPU cores, allows to obtain a high grid resolution over large simulation domains and which can easily be adapted to new computer architectures as well as to new initial and boundary conditions, allow modular extensions. The new massively parallel simulation code GOEMHD3 enables efficient and fast simulations of almost ideal, large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasma flows, well resolved and on huge grids covering large domains. Its abilities are validated by major tests of ideal and weakly dissipative plasma phenomena. The high resolution ($2048^3$ grid points) simulation of a large part of the solar corona above an observed active region proved the excellent parallel scalability of the code using more than 30.000 processor cores...

  19. Failure of energy stability in Oldroyd-B fluids at arbitrarily low Reynolds numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, C; Schumacher, J

    2004-01-01

    Energy theory for incompressible Newtonian fluids is, in many cases, capable of producing strong absolute stability criteria for steady flows. In those fluids the kinetic energy naturally defines a norm in which perturbations decay monotonically in time at sufficiently low (but non-zero) Reynolds numbers. There are, however, at least two obstructions to the generalization of such methods to Oldroyd-B fluids. One previously recognized problem is the fact that the natural energy does not correspond to a proper functional norm on perturbations. Another problem, original to this work, is the fact that fluctuations in Oldroyd-B fluids may be subject to non-normal amplification at arbitrarily low Reynolds numbers (albeit at sufficiently large Weissenberg numbers). Such transient growth, occuring even when the base flow is linearly stable, precludes the uniform monotonic decay of any reasonable measure of the disturbance's amplitude.

  20. Laboratory astrophysics using differential rotation of unmagnetized plasma at large magnetic Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, David

    2016-10-01

    Differentially rotating plasma flow has been measured in the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX). Spherical cusp-confined plasmas have been stirred both from the plasma boundary using electrostatic stirring in the magnetized edge and in the plasma core using weak global fields and cross-field currents to impose a body-force torque. Laminar velocity profiles conducive to shear-driven MHD instabilities like the dynamo and the MRI are now being generated and controlled with magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm method for plasma heating, but limits on input heating power have been observed (believed to be caused by the formation of double-layers at anodes). These confinement studies have culminated in large (R = 1.4 m), warm (Te 1), steady-state plasmas. Results of the ambipolar transport model are good fits to measurements of pressure gradients and fluid drifts in the cusp, and offer a predictive tool for future cusp-confined devices. Hydrodynamic modeling is shown to be a good description for measured plasma flows, where ion viscosity proves to be an efficient mechanism for transporting momentum from the magnetized edge into the unmagnetized core. In addition, the body-force stirring technique produces velocity profiles conducive to MRI experiments where dΩ / dr research of flow-driven astrophysical MHD instabilities.

  1. Extending the restricted nonlinear model for wall-turbulence to high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretheim, Joel; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice

    2016-11-01

    The restricted nonlinear (RNL) model for wall-turbulence is motivated by the long-observed streamwise-coherent structures that play an important role in these flows. The RNL equations, derived by restricting the convective term in the Navier-Stokes equations, provide a computationally efficient approach due to fewer degrees of freedom in the underlying dynamics. Recent simulations of the RNL system have been conducted for turbulent channel flows at low Reynolds numbers (Re), yielding insights into the dynamical mechanisms and statistics of wall-turbulence. Despite the computational advantages of the RNL system, simulations at high Re remain out-of-reach. We present a new Large Eddy Simulation (LES) framework for the RNL system, enabling its use in engineering applications at high Re such as turbulent flows through wind farms. Initial results demonstrate that, as observed at moderate Re, restricting the range of streamwise varying structures present in the simulation (i.e., limiting the band of x Fourier components or kx modes) significantly affects the accuracy of the statistics. Our results show that only a few well-chosen kx modes lead to RNL turbulence with accurate statistics, including the mean profile and the well-known inner and outer peaks in energy spectra. This work is supported by NSF (WindInspire OISE-1243482).

  2. Long-range lPIV to resolve the small scales in a jet at high Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Westerweel, J.; Elsinga, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of flows at high Reynolds number is of great interest for the theory of turbulence, in that the large and the small scales of turbulence show a clear separation. But, as the Reynolds number of the flow increases, the size of the Kolmogorov length scale ( η ) drops almost proportion

  3. Experiment on smooth, circular cylinders in cross-flow in the critical Reynolds number regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miau, J.J.; Tsai, H.W.; Lin, Y.J.; Tu, J.K.; Fang, C.H.; Chen, M.C. [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tainan (China)

    2011-10-15

    Experiments were conducted for 2D circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers in the range of 1.73 x 10{sup 5}-5.86 x 10{sup 5}. In the experiment, two circular cylinder models made of acrylic and stainless steel, respectively, were employed, which have similar dimensions but different surface roughness. Particular attention was paid to the unsteady flow behaviors inferred by the signals obtained from the pressure taps on the cylinder models and by a hot-wire probe in the near-wake region. At Reynolds numbers pertaining to the initial transition from the subcritical to the critical regimes, pronounced pressure fluctuations were measured on the surfaces of both cylinder models, which were attributed to the excursion of unsteady flow separation over a large circumferential region. At the Reynolds numbers almost reaching the one-bubble state, it was noted that the development of separation bubble might switch from one side to the other with time. Wavelet analysis of the pressure signals measured simultaneously at {theta} = {+-}90 further revealed that when no separation bubble was developed, the instantaneous vortex-shedding frequencies could be clearly resolved, about 0.2, in terms of the Strouhal number. The results of oil-film flow visualization on the stainless steel cylinder of the one-bubble and two-bubble states showed that the flow reattachment region downstream of a separation bubble appeared not uniform along the span of the model. Thus, the three dimensionality was quite evident. (orig.)

  4. Reynolds number effects on the fluctuating velocity distribution in wall-bounded shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Roggenkamp, Dorothee; Jessen, Wilhelm; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuations of zero pressure gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layers are investigated for seven Reynolds numbers based on the momentum thickness in the range of 1009  ⩽  Re θ   ⩽  4070 by particle-image velocimetry (PIV) and micro-particle tracking velocimetry (µ-PTV) at a spatial resolution up to 0.06-0.23 wall units such that the viscous sublayer is well resolved. The statistics evidence good agreement with direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experimental results from the literature. The experimental results show the streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuation to grow at increasing Reynolds numbers.

  5. Influence of Reynolds number and forcing type in a turbulent von K\\'arm\\'an flow

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Michel, Brice; Marié, Louis; Ravelet, Florent; Daviaud, François

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed study of of a global bifurcation occuring in a turbulent von K\\'arm\\'an swirling flow. In this system, the statistically steady states progressively display hysteretic behaviour when the Reynolds number is increased above the transition to turbulence. We examine in detail this hysteresis using asymmetric forcing conditions --- rotating the impellers at different speeds. For very high Reynolds numbers, we study the sensitivity of the hysteresis cycle --- using complementary Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and global mechanical measurements --- to the forcing nature, imposing either the torque or the speed of the impellers. New mean states, displaying multiple quasi-steady states and negative differential responses, are experimentally observed in torque control. A simple analogy with electrical circuits is performed to understand the link between multi-stability and negative responses. The system is compared to other, similar "bulk" systems, to understand some relevant ingredients of nega...

  6. Characteristics of a hyperboloid-flare configuration at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvegintsev, V. I.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chirkashenko, V. F.; Chibisov, S. V.; Fletcher, D.; Paris, S.

    2006-12-01

    Results on a hyperboloid-flare model tested in a new hypersonic wind tunnel with adiabatic compression AT-303 based at ITAM SB RAS at M∞ = 10 and 15 and in a wide range of Reynolds numbers are presented. Pressure and heat-flux distributions along the model are compared with data obtained previously in various European hypersonic wind tunnels (Longshot — Belgium, HEG — Germany) and with results of numerical computations. Pressure and heat-flux coefficients measured in the attached flow region are demonstrated to be in good qualitative agreement. Reasons for the differences in results measured in regions of flow separation and reattachment are discussed. Significant viscous effects on characteristics of the flow around the model are demonstrated; a particularly strong effect is exerted on the heat-flux distribution. This fact confirms that it is important to model real Reynolds numbers in wind-tunnel testing of aerospace plane models.

  7. Small-scale anisotropic intermittency in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at low magnetic Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Naoya; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Small-scale anisotropic intermittency is examined in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence subjected to a uniformly imposed magnetic field. Orthonormal wavelet analyses are applied to direct numerical simulation data at moderate Reynolds number and for different interaction parameters. The magnetic Reynolds number is sufficiently low such that the quasistatic approximation can be applied. Scale-dependent statistical measures are introduced to quantify anisotropy in terms of the flow components, either parallel or perpendicular to the imposed magnetic field, and in terms of the different directions. Moreover, the flow intermittency is shown to increase with increasing values of the interaction parameter, which is reflected in strongly growing flatness values when the scale decreases. The scale-dependent anisotropy of energy is found to be independent of scale for all considered values of the interaction parameter. The strength of the imposed magnetic field does amplify the anisotropy of the flow.

  8. The Simulation of High Reynolds Number Cavity Flow Based on Fractional Volumetric Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Shan-ling; ZHU Ping; LIN Zhong-qin

    2005-01-01

    The fractional volumetric lattice Boltzmann method with much better stability was used to simulate two dimensional cavity flows. Because the effective viscosity was reduced by the fraction factor, it is very effective forsimulating high Reynolds number flows. Simulations were carried out on a uniform grids system. The stream lines and the velocity profiles obtained from the simulations agree well with the standard lattice Boltzmann method simulations. Comparisons of detailed flow patterns with other studies via location of vortex centers are also satisfactory.

  9. Reynolds number trend of hierarchies and scale interactions in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, W. J.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers are often coupled with the larger-scale motions. Studying the nature and extent of this scale interaction allows for a statistically representative description of the small scales over a time scale of the larger, coherent scales. In this study, we consider temporal data from hot-wire anemometry at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ≈2800 to 22 800, in order to reveal how the scale interaction varies with Reynolds number. Large-scale conditional views of the representative amplitude and frequency of the small-scale turbulence, relative to the large-scale features, complement the existing consensus on large-scale modulation of the small-scale dynamics in the near-wall region. Modulation is a type of scale interaction, where the amplitude of the small-scale fluctuations is continuously proportional to the near-wall footprint of the large-scale velocity fluctuations. Aside from this amplitude modulation phenomenon, we reveal the influence of the large-scale motions on the characteristic frequency of the small scales, known as frequency modulation. From the wall-normal trends in the conditional averages of the small-scale properties, it is revealed how the near-wall modulation transitions to an intermittent-type scale arrangement in the log-region. On average, the amplitude of the small-scale velocity fluctuations only deviates from its mean value in a confined temporal domain, the duration of which is fixed in terms of the local Taylor time scale. These concentrated temporal regions are centred on the internal shear layers of the large-scale uniform momentum zones, which exhibit regions of positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations. With an increasing scale separation at high Reynolds numbers, this interaction pattern encompasses the features found in studies on internal shear layers and concentrated vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number wall turbulence.

  10. High-Reynolds Number Viscous Flow Simulations on Embedded-Boundary CartesianGrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    term goal of this research is to develop algorithms to simulate high Reynolds number turbulent flow in complicated geometries using embedded boundary...Spalding’s formula of matching the pro- files actually computed in the flow field by the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. In particular the profiles ...turbu- lent viscosity to be computed, see e.g. the profiles in the bottom row of Fig. 4. The streamwise velocity and especially the turbulent viscosity

  11. Axisymmetric instability of the Poiseuille-Couette flow between concentric cylinders at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenkov, I. V.

    2015-02-01

    For the pressure-driven flow in an annular channel with a wall moving in the axial direction, its linear instability with respect to axisymmetric perturbations at high Reynolds numbers is investigated within the framework of the triple-deck theory. When the gap between the cylinders is sufficiently small (as compared to the radii of the cylinders), it is shown that the perturbations can split into two wave packets, the first of which grows faster and moves at a higher velocity.

  12. Wake flow pattern modified by small control cylinders at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.-H.; Chiou, L.-C.; Chen, C.-C.

    2007-08-01

    Passive wake control behind a circular cylinder in uniform flow is studied by numerical simulation for ReD ranging from 80 to 300. Two small control cylinders, with diameter d/D=1/8, are placed at x/D=0.5 and y/D=±0.6. Unlike the 1990 results of Strykowski and Sreenivasan, in the present study, the vortex street behind the main cylinder still exists but the fluctuating lift and the form drag on the main cylinder reduces significantly and monotonously as the Reynolds number increases from 80 to 300. Obstruction of the control cylinders to the incoming flow deflects part of the fluid to pass through the gap between the main and control cylinders, forming two symmetric streams. These streams not only eliminate the flow separation along the rear surface of the main cylinder, they also merge toward the wake centerline to create an advancing momentum in the immediate near-wake region. These two effects significantly reduce the wake width behind the main cylinder and lead to monotonous decrease of the form drag as the Reynolds number increases. As the Reynolds number gets higher, a large amount of the downstream advancing momentum significantly delays the vortex formation farther downstream, leading to a more symmetric flow structure in the near-wake region of the main cylinder. As the Reynolds number increases from 80 to 300, both increasing symmetry of the flow structure in the near-wake and significant delay of the vortex formation are the main reasons for the fluctuating lift to decrease monotonously.

  13. Space experimental device on Marangoni drop migrations of large Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璞; 胡良; 刘方; 姚永龙; 解京昌; 林海; 胡文瑞

    2001-01-01

    The space experimental device for testing the Marangoni drop migrations has been discussed in the present paper. The experiment is one of the spaceship projects of China. In comparison with similar devices, it has the ability of completing all the scientific experiments by both auto controlling and telescience methods. It not only can perform drop migration experiments of large Reynolds numbers but also has an equi-thick interferential system.

  14. Subsurface Signature of the Internal Wave Field Radiated by Submerged High Reynolds Number Stratified Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-26

    parametric subharmonic instability. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stratified turbulent wakes, high Reynolds numbers, internal waves, nonlinear effects, harmonics, mean...beam and the potential for parametric subharmonic instability. In all these efforts, a uniform linear stratification was considered. A subset of our...found for all simulated waves. c) For sufficiently high-amplitude beams, a parametric subharmonic instability is observed after a long enough time

  15. The hydrodynamics of swimming at intermediate Reynolds numbers in the water boatman (Corixidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Victoria; McHenry, Matthew James

    2014-08-01

    The fluid forces that govern propulsion determine the speed and energetic cost of swimming. These hydrodynamics are scale dependent and it is unclear what forces matter to the tremendous diversity of aquatic animals that are between a millimeter and a centimeter in length. Animals at this scale generally operate within the regime of intermediate Reynolds numbers, where both viscous and inertial fluid forces have the potential to play a role in propulsion. The present study aimed to resolve which forces create thrust and drag in the paddling of the water boatman (Corixidae), an animal that spans much of the intermediate regime (10acceleration reaction force. Based on these findings, we developed a forward-dynamic model of propulsion in free swimming that accurately predicted changes in the body's center of mass over time. For both tethered and free swimming, we used non-linear optimization algorithms to determine the force coefficients that best matched our measurements. With this approach, the drag coefficients on the body and paddle were found to be up to three times greater than on static structures in fully developed flow at the same Reynolds numbers. This is likely a partial consequence of unsteady interactions between the paddles or between the paddles and the body. In addition, the maximum values for these coefficients were inversely related to the Reynolds number, which suggests that viscous forces additionally play an important role in the hydrodynamics of small water boatmen. This understanding for the major forces that operate at intermediate Reynolds numbers offers a basis for interpreting the mechanics, energetics and functional morphology of swimming in many small aquatic animals.

  16. Turbulent boundary layer separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number 2000000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin; Huang Yong; Wang Xunnian; Wang Wanbo; Tang Kun; Li Huaxing

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of symmetrical plasma actuators on turbulent boundary layer separation control at high Reynolds number. Com-pared with the traditional control method of plasma actuator, the whole test model was made of aluminum and acted as a covered electrode of the symmetrical plasma actuator. The experimental study of plasma actuators’ effect on surrounding air, a canonical zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary, was carried out using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) in the 0.75 m ? 0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the symmetrical plasma actuator characterization in an external flow. A half model of wing-body configuration was experimentally investigated in the £ 3.2 m low speed wind tunnel with a six-component strain gauge balance and PIV. The results show that the turbulent boundary layer separation of wing can be obviously sup-pressed and the maximum lift coefficient is improved at high Reynolds number with the symmetri-cal plasma actuator. It turns out that the maximum lift coefficient increased by approximately 8.98% and the stall angle of attack was delayed by approximately 2? at Reynolds number 2 ? 106. The effective mechanism for the turbulent separation control by the symmetrical plasma actuators is to induce the vortex near the wing surface which could create the relatively large-scale disturbance and promote momentum mixing between low speed flow and main flow regions.

  17. Control of wing-tip vortex using winglets at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seunghyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Winglets are considered as one of the effective devices for reducing induced drag, and thus many studies have been conducted, but mainly at high Reynolds numbers (Re ~106 ~107) for commercial airplanes. However, small-size unmanned air vehicles (UAV), operating at low Reynolds numbers (Re aerodynamic performance of an UAV by varying the cant angle. The WASP UAV model is used and the Reynolds numbers considered are 110,000 ~ 140,000 based on the free stream velocity and mean chord length of the WASP wing. The lift and drag forces on UAV are measured, and PIV measurements are conducted at several cross-flow planes for a few different angles of attack (α) . At high angles of attack (7° ~13°) , the winglets with the cant angle of 70° increase the aerodynamic performance, whereas at low angles of attack (2° ~6°) , the wing-tip extension (cant angle of 0°) shows better performances. The velocity fields measured from PIV indicate that, with the winglet, the wing-tip vortex moves away from the wing surface at α =12° , and the downwash motion in the wake behind the trailing edge is decreased, reducing the magnitude of the induced drag. A concept of changing the cant angle during flight is also suggested at this talk. Supported by 2011-0028032.

  18. Simulation of three-dimensional nonideal MHD flow at low magnetic Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU HaoYu; LEE ChunHian

    2009-01-01

    A numerical procedure based on a five-wave model associated with non-ideal,low magnetic Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic(MHD)flows was developed.It is composed of an entropy conditioned scheme for solving the non-homogeneous Navier-Stokes equations,in conjunction with an SOR method for solving the elliptic equation governing the electrical potential of flow field.To validate the developed procedure,two different test cases were used which included MHD Rayleigh problem and MHD Hartmann problem.The simulations were performed under the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number.The simulated results were found to be in good agreement with the closed form analytical solutions deduced in the present study,showing that the present algorithm could simulate engineering MHD flow at low magnetic Reynolds number effectively.In the end,a flow field between a pair of segmented electrodes in a three dimensional MHD channel was simulated using the present algorithm with and without including Hall effects.Without the introduction of Hall effects,no distortion was observed in the current and potential lines.By taking the Hall effects into account,the potential lines distorted and clustered at the upstream and downstream edges of the cathode and anode,respectively.

  19. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  20. Localisation of flow separation and transition over a pitching NACA0012 airfoil at transitional Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Daniel

    Previous research at RMC has cataloged the occurrence of limit cycle oscillations at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers for an elastically mounted aeroelastic airfoil. These oscillations were attributed to boundary layer separation and the formation of a laminar separation bubble. For this thesis, an instrumented and motor-driven oscillating airfoil rig was designed and fabricated for the purpose of investigating the boundary layer of a NACA-0012 airfoil. The oscillating airfoil was driven by a servo motor to mimic the observed aeroelastic pitching with a sinusoid of matched amplitude and frequency. Hot-wire anemometry was used to investigate the near wake of the new motor-driven airfoil and compare it with the aeroelastic experiment. A chord-wise array of hot-film sensors captured the boundary layer state during the airfoil pitching oscillation. A novel analysis technique is introduced; A sliding window (in time) cross-correlation of adjacent sensors was used to detect dynamic laminar separation. Wind tunnel tests were performed at static angles-of-attack, for quasi-static very low frequency sweeps to verify the technique, and for selected cases of oscillations obtained with the aeroelastic rig. The new detection method was verified against the existing static techniques of phase reversal signature detection and signal cross-correlation by comparing quasi-static and static results. A map of the laminar separation bubble was produced for fixed angles of attack as well as for the pitching airfoil. The presence of a laminar separation was linked to the occurrence and characteristics of the limit cycle oscillations. Keywords: laminar separation, NACA0012, hot-film, hot-wire, anemometry, transitional flow, aeroelasticity.

  1. Reynolds number trend of hierarchies and scale interactions in turbulent boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, W J; Hutchins, N; Marusic, I

    2017-03-13

    Small-scale velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers are often coupled with the larger-scale motions. Studying the nature and extent of this scale interaction allows for a statistically representative description of the small scales over a time scale of the larger, coherent scales. In this study, we consider temporal data from hot-wire anemometry at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ≈2800 to 22 800, in order to reveal how the scale interaction varies with Reynolds number. Large-scale conditional views of the representative amplitude and frequency of the small-scale turbulence, relative to the large-scale features, complement the existing consensus on large-scale modulation of the small-scale dynamics in the near-wall region. Modulation is a type of scale interaction, where the amplitude of the small-scale fluctuations is continuously proportional to the near-wall footprint of the large-scale velocity fluctuations. Aside from this amplitude modulation phenomenon, we reveal the influence of the large-scale motions on the characteristic frequency of the small scales, known as frequency modulation. From the wall-normal trends in the conditional averages of the small-scale properties, it is revealed how the near-wall modulation transitions to an intermittent-type scale arrangement in the log-region. On average, the amplitude of the small-scale velocity fluctuations only deviates from its mean value in a confined temporal domain, the duration of which is fixed in terms of the local Taylor time scale. These concentrated temporal regions are centred on the internal shear layers of the large-scale uniform momentum zones, which exhibit regions of positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations. With an increasing scale separation at high Reynolds numbers, this interaction pattern encompasses the features found in studies on internal shear layers and concentrated vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number wall turbulence.This article is part of the

  2. Opposing Shear-Induced Forces Dominate Inertial Focusing in Curved Channels and High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Keinan, Eliezer; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    Inertial focusing is the migration of particles in fluid toward equilibrium, where current theory predicts that shear-induced and wall-induced lift forces are balanced. First reported in 1961, this Segre-Silberberg effect is particularly useful for microfluidic isolation of cells and particles. Interestingly, recent work demonstrated particle focusing at high Reynolds numbers that cannot be explained by current theory. In this work, we show that non-monotonous velocity profiles, such as those developed in curved channels, create peripheral velocity maxima around which opposing shear-induced forces dominate over wall effects. Similarly, entry effects amplified in high Reynolds flow produce an equivalent trapping mechanism in short, straight channels. This new focusing mechanism in the developing flow regime enables a 10-fold miniaturization of inertial focusing devices, while our model corrects long-standing misconceptions about the nature of mechanical forces governing inertial focusing in curved channels.

  3. Computation of Turbulent Heat Transfer on the Walls of a 180 Degree Turn Channel With a Low Reynolds Number Reynolds Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A. A.; Rigby, D. L.; Steinthorsson, E.; Gaugler, Raymond (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Low Reynolds number version of the Stress-omega model and the two equation k-omega model of Wilcox were used for the calculation of turbulent heat transfer in a 180 degree turn simulating an internal coolant passage. The Stress-omega model was chosen for its robustness. The turbulent thermal fluxes were calculated by modifying and using the Generalized Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis. The results showed that using this Reynolds Stress model allowed better prediction of heat transfer compared to the k-omega two equation model. This improvement however required a finer grid and commensurately more CPU time.

  4. High Reynolds number flows about bodies of revolution with application to submarines and torpedoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Juan M.

    The work presented here is an investigation of the wake flow field over a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model at a large range of Reynolds numbers based on model length, 1.1x106 ≤ ReL ≤ 25 x 106, on the centerline of the wake for locations 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 diameters downstream from the tail. The model is an axisymmetric body without appendages (fins) supported by a streamlined support. The support models the flow of a semi-infinite sail. The wake experimental results, obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and crossed hot-wires, provide qualitative and quantitative insight into the flow field created by a submarine. In addition, the pressure was measured at 45 different locations along the submarine model for three different Reynolds numbers, ReL = 1.1 x 10 6, 12 x 106, and 25 x 106. Also, PIV measurements were conducted in the wake of the sail attached to a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model at ReL = 93.6 x 10 3. Four different yaw angles, 6 ≤ alpha ≤ 17, were investigated yielding insights into the behavior of the junction/hull and sail tip vortices. For all Reynolds numbers studied, the mean velocity distribution attains self-similarity at distances between 3 and 6 diameters downstream for the side where the support is not located, and follows an exponential function as expected from similarity arguments. In contrast, the mean velocity distribution for the support side does not attain self similarity, and displays significant effects of the support wake and support/body junction flows. In addition, none of the Reynolds stress distributions of the flow attain self similarity. For the higher Reynolds numbers studied the presence of the support introduces an asymmetry into the wake which results in the overall decrease of radial and axial turbulence intensities for the support side. Also, the coefficient of pressure, CP, distribution along the top meridian line of the model, r/D > 0, is generally lower for ReL = 1.1 x 106 than that for ReL = 12 x 10 6 and 25

  5. Convective heat transfer characteristics of low Reynolds number nanofluid flow around a circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Khelili

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical investigation of heat transfer phenomena of low Reynolds number nano-fluid flow over an isothermal cylinder is presented in this paper. Steady state governing equations (continuity, N–S and energy equations have been solved using finite volume method. Stationary heat transfer, and flow characteristics over the cylinder have been studied for water based copper nanofluid with different solid fraction values. The effect of volume fraction of nano- particles on the fluid flow and heat transfer were investigated numerically. It was found that at a given Nusselt number, drag coefficient, re-circulation length, and pressure coefficient increase by increasing the volume fraction of nano-particles.

  6. Numerical Investigation of the Influence of Reynolds Number on Probe Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The influence of Reynolds number (Re) on probe measurements was investigated numerically, including the effects of the pressure holes and their geometry to obtain accurate hole-pressures. The results indicate that Re influences the probe measurements and cannot be neglected for Re larger than 105 and that the influence increases with Mach number (Ma). The calculations show that the pressures in the downwind holes are influenced more by Re than those of the upwind and central holes when the probe is at an angle. Thus, 7-hole probes may be more suitable for measurements at different Re than 5-hole probes.

  7. Entropy Analyses of Droplet Combustion in Convective Environment with Small Reynolds Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaobin; ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the entropy generation rate of simple pure droplet combustion in a temperature-elevated air convective environment based on the solutions of flow,and heat and mass transfer between the two phases.The flow-field calculations are carried out by solving the respective conservation equations for each phase,accounting for the droplet deformation with the axisymmetric model.The effects of the temperature,velocity and oxygen fraction of the free stream air on the total entropy generation rate in the process of the droplet combustion are investigated.Special attention is given to analyze the quantitative effects of droplet deformation.The results reveal that the entropy generation rate due to chemical reaction occupies a large fraction of the total entropy generated,as a result of the large areas covered by the flame.Although,the magnitude of the entropy generation rate per volume due to heat transfer and combined mass and heat transfer has a magnitude of one order greater than that due to chemical reaction,they cover a very limited area,leading to a small fraction of the total entropy generated.The entropy generation rate due to mass transfer is negligible.High temperature and high velocity of the free stream are advantageous to increase the exergy efficiency in the range of small Reynolds number (<1) from the viewpoint of the second-law analysis over the droplet lifetime.The effect of droplet deformation on the total entropy generation is the modest.

  8. A comparison of three approaches to compute the effective Reynolds number of the implicit large-eddy simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thornber, Ben [The Univ. of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-04-12

    Here, the implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) has been utilized as an effective approach for calculating many complex flows at high Reynolds number flows. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) induced flow can be viewed as a homogeneous decaying turbulence (HDT) after the passage of the shock. In this article, a critical evaluation of three methods for estimating the effective Reynolds number and the effective kinematic viscosity is undertaken utilizing high-resolution ILES data. Effective Reynolds numbers based on the vorticity and dissipation rate, or the integral and inner-viscous length scales, are found to be the most self-consistent when compared to the expected phenomenology and wind tunnel experiments.

  9. Turbulent boundary layer separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number 2000000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of symmetrical plasma actuators on turbulent boundary layer separation control at high Reynolds number. Compared with the traditional control method of plasma actuator, the whole test model was made of aluminum and acted as a covered electrode of the symmetrical plasma actuator. The experimental study of plasma actuators’ effect on surrounding air, a canonical zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary, was carried out using particle image velocimetry (PIV and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV in the 0.75 m × 0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the symmetrical plasma actuator characterization in an external flow. A half model of wing-body configuration was experimentally investigated in the ∅ 3.2 m low speed wind tunnel with a six-component strain gauge balance and PIV. The results show that the turbulent boundary layer separation of wing can be obviously suppressed and the maximum lift coefficient is improved at high Reynolds number with the symmetrical plasma actuator. It turns out that the maximum lift coefficient increased by approximately 8.98% and the stall angle of attack was delayed by approximately 2° at Reynolds number 2 × 106. The effective mechanism for the turbulent separation control by the symmetrical plasma actuators is to induce the vortex near the wing surface which could create the relatively large-scale disturbance and promote momentum mixing between low speed flow and main flow regions.

  10. Parameter study of simplified dragonfly airfoil geometry at Reynolds number of 6000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-10-21

    Aerodynamic study of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil in gliding flight at Reynolds numbers below 10,000 is motivated by both pure scientific interest and technological applications. At these Reynolds numbers, the natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development of Micro UAV's and more. Insect wings are typically characterized by corrugated airfoils. The present study follows a fundamental flow physics study (Levy and Seifert, 2009), that revealed the importance of flow separation from the first corrugation, the roll-up of the separated shear layer to discrete vortices and their role in promoting flow reattachment to the aft arc, as the leading mechanism enabling high-lift, low drag performance of the Dragonfly gliding flight. This paper describes the effect of systematic airfoil geometry variations on the aerodynamic properties of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil at Reynolds number of 6000. The parameter study includes a detailed analysis of small variations of the nominal geometry, such as corrugation placement or height, rear arc and trailing edge shape. Numerical simulations using the 2D laminar Navier-Stokes equations revealed that the flow accelerating over the first corrugation slope is followed by an unsteady pressure recovery, combined with vortex shedding. The latter allows the reattachment of the flow over the rear arc. Also, the drag values are directly linked to the vortices' magnitude. This parametric study shows that geometric variations which reduce the vortices' amplitude, as reduction of the rear cavity depth or the reduction of the rear arc and trailing edge curvature, will reduce the drag values. Other changes will extend the flow reattachment over the rear arc for a larger mean lift coefficients range; such as the negative deflection of the forward flat plate. These changes consequently reduce the drag values at higher mean lift coefficients. The detailed geometry study enabled the definition of a corrugated airfoil

  11. Stratlets: Low Reynolds Number Point-Force Solutions in a Stratified Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardekani, A. M.; Stocker, R.

    2010-08-01

    We present fundamental solutions of low Reynolds number flows in a stratified fluid, including the case of a point force (Stokeslet) and a doublet. Stratification dramatically alters the flow by creating toroidal eddies, and velocity decays much faster than in a homogeneous fluid. The fundamental length scale is set by the competition of buoyancy, diffusion and viscosity, and is O(100μm-1mm) in aquatic environments. Stratification can therefore affect the swimming of small organisms and the sinking of marine snow particles, and diminish the effectiveness of mechanosensing in the ocean.

  12. Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    of Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014014. Fig. 4 Turbulent transport as a fraction of total transport plotted versus Re for each of four...Diffusion in Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014062. [9] George, E., Glimm, J., Grove, J. W., Li, X.-L., Liu, Y.-J., Xu, Z.-L., and Zhao, N., 2003...ABSTRACT Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context Report Title Mix is a critical input to hydro

  13. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016), 10.1007/s10494-016-9723-8] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Reτ=360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Reτ=550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  14. Experimental Investigation of a Hypersonic Glider Configuration at a Mach Number of 6 and at Full-Scale Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiff, Alvin; Wilkins, Max E.

    1961-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic glider configuration, consisting of a slender ogive cylinder with three highly swept wings, spaced 120 apart, with the wing chord equal to the body length, were investigated experimentally at a Mach number of 6 and at Reynolds numbers from 6 to 16 million. The objectives were to evaluate the theoretical procedures which had been used to estimate the performance of the glider, and also to evaluate the characteristics of the glider itself. A principal question concerned the viscous drag at full-scale Reynolds number, there being a large difference between the total drags for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. It was found that the procedures which had been applied for estimating minimum drag, drag due to lift, lift curve slope, and center of pressure were generally accurate within 10 percent. An important exception was the non-linear contribution to the lift coefficient which had been represented by a Newtonian term. Experimentally, the lift curve was nearly linear within the angle-of-attack range up to 10 deg. This error affected the estimated lift-drag ratio. The minimum drag measurements indicated that substantial amounts of turbulent boundary layer were present on all models tested, over a range of surface roughness from 5 microinches maximum to 200 microinches maximum. In fact, the minimum drag coefficients were nearly independent of the surface smoothness and fell between the estimated values for turbulent and laminar boundary layers, but closer to the turbulent value. At the highest test Reynolds numbers and at large angles of attack, there was some indication that the skin friction of the rough models was being increased by the surface roughness. At full-scale Reynolds number, the maximum lift-drag ratio with a leading edge of practical diameter (from the standpoint of leading-edge heating) was 4.0. The configuration was statically and dynamically stable in pitch and yaw, and the center of pressure was less

  15. Gap-flow patterns behind twin-cylinders at low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Shun Chang; Liu, Chien Ting [National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung (China)

    2011-11-15

    The flow structures, drag coefficients (C{sub d}) and vortex shedding characteristics around a single square cylinder and twin side-by-side square cylinders were experimentally investigated with various Reynolds numbers (Re) and gap ratios (g{sup *}) in a vertical water tunnel. The Reynolds number (Re) and gap ratio (g{sup *}) were 178 < Re < 892 and 0 {<=} g{sup *} {<=} 2.5, respectively. The flow patterns and vortex shedding frequency were determined using the particle tracking flow visualization (PTFV). The flow structures, velocity properties, and drag coefficients were calculated using the particle image velocimetry (PIV). The topological flow patterns of vortex evolution processes were plotted and analyzed based on critical point theory. Furthermore, the flow structures behind twin side-by-side square cylinders were classified into three modes - single vortex-street mode, gap-flow mode and couple vortex-streets mode. The maximum C{sub d} occurred in the single vortex-street mode, and the minimum C{sub d} occurred in the gap-flow mode. The highest Strouhal number (St) occurred in the single vortex-street mode, and the lowest St occurred in the gap-flow mode.

  16. Phenomenology of a flow around a circular cylinder at sub-critical and critical Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Di Felice, Fabio; Miozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the flow around a circular cylinder is investigated at Reynolds numbers ranging from 79 000 up to 238 000 by means of a combined acquisition system based on Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) and particle velocimetry. The proposed setup allows simultaneous and time-resolved measurement of absolute temperature and relative skin friction fields onto the cylinder surface and near-wake velocity field. Combination of time-resolved surface measurements and planar near-field velocity data allows the investigation of the profound modifications undergone by the wall shear stress topology and its connections to the near-field structure as the flow regime travels from the sub-critical to the critical regime. Laminar boundary-layer separation, transition, and re-attachment are analyzed in the light of temperature, relative skin friction maps, and Reynolds stress fields bringing about a new perspective on the relationship between boundary layer development and shear layer evolution. The fast-responding TSP employed allows high acquisition frequency and calculation of power spectral density from surface data. Correlation maps of surface and near-wake data provide insight into the relationship between boundary-layer evolution and vortex shedding. We find that as the Reynolds number approaches the critical state, the separation line oscillations feature an increasingly weaker spectrum peak compared to the near-wake velocity spectrum. In the critical regime, separation line oscillations are strongly reduced and the correlation to the local vorticity undergoes an overall decrease giving evidence of modifications in the vortex shedding mechanism.

  17. Experiments on a low aspect ratio wing at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Daniel R.

    At the start of the 21st century much of the focus of aircraft design has been turned to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) which generally operate at much lower speeds in higher risk areas than manned aircraft. One subset of UAVs are Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which usually are no larger than 20cm and rely on non-traditional shapes to generate lift at very low velocities. This purpose of this work is to describe, in detail with experimental methods, the flow field around a low aspect ratio wing operating at low Reynolds numbers and at high angles of attack. Quantitative measurements are obtained by Three Component Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (3C TR PIV) which describe the mean and turbulent flow field. This research focuses on the leading edge separation zone and the vortex shedding process which occurs at the leading edge. Streamwise wing tip vortices which dominate the lift characteristics are described with flow visualization and 3C TR PIV measurements. Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is described at the leading edge over several angles of attack. Turbulent Reynolds stresses in all three directions are described over the wing span and several Reynolds numbers. Two primary cyclic processes are observed within the flow field; one low frequency oscillation in the separated region and one high frequency event associated with leading edge vortex formation and convection. Two length scales are proposed and are shown to match well with each other, one based on leading edge vortex shedding frequency and convective velocity and the other based on mean vortex separation distance. A new method of rendering velocity frequency content over large data sets is proposed and used to illustrate the different frequencies observed at the leading edge.

  18. Experimental Study of High Moisture Content Gas Flow Across a Cylinder at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. M. Christopher; GUO Liang(郭亮)

    2003-01-01

    The Nusselt number for cross flow of a mixture of air and vapor over a cylinder was measured at moderate Reynolds numbers (3000-7000) for temperatures from 300℃ to 700℃ and for vapor mass fractions of 0.18-0.35. Results are also presented for a set of three cylinders aligned perpendicular to the flow for the same range of conditions. The effect of the vapor concentration and temperature on the convection coefficients was investigated to develop a modified Zhukauskas correlation. The results show that the Nusselt number increases as the moisture content increases and that the increase is more than could be accounted for by typical models for the property variations of mixtures. The exponent of the vapor concentration term in the modified correlation is 0.145 for the entire data set indicating the importance of the property variation due to the moisture content.

  19. Vortex shedding and heat transfer dependence on effective Reynolds number for mixed convection around a cylinder in cross flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Singh, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    vorticity on the wake formation is addressed in the present study. The variation of Strouhal number and Nusselt number with the 'effective Reynolds number', is analyzed for different values of cylinder to free stream temperature ratio. Both Strouhal number and the rate of heat transfer increases...... the effective Reynolds number and the computed data for Strouhal number and Nusselt number do not collapse for the range of temperature ratio considered here. The flow field is found to be asymmetric and the cylinder experiences a negative lift. The drag coefficient increases steadily with the rise of surface...... temperature. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Modeling droplet vaporization and combustion with the volume of fluid method at a small Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bin ZHANG; Wei ZHANG; Xue-jun ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) formulation is applied to model the combustion process of a single droplet in a hightemperature convective air free stream environment.The calculations solve the flow field for both phases,and consider the droplet deformation based on an axisymmetrical model.The chemical reaction is modeled with one-step finite-rate mechanism and the thcrmo-physica1 properties for the gas mixture are species and temperature dependence.A mass transfer model applicable to the VOF calculations due to vaporization of the liquid phases is developed in consideration with the fluctuation of the liquid surface.The model is validated by examining the burning rate constants at different convective air temperatures,which accord well with experimental data of previous studies.Other phenomena from the simulations,such as the transient history of droplet deformation and flame structure,are also qualitatively accordant with the descriptions of other numerical results.However,a different droplet deformation mechanism for the low Reynolds number is explained compared with that for the high Reynolds number.The calculations verified the feasibility of the VOF computational fluid dynamics (CFD) formulation as well as the mass transfer model due to vaporization.

  1. The high Reynolds number flow through an axial-flow pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierke, W. C.; Straka, W. A.; Taylor, P. D.

    1993-11-01

    The high Reynolds number pump (HIREP) facility at ARL Penn State has been used to perform a low-speed, large-scale experiment of the incompressible flow of water through a two-blade-row turbomachine. HIREP can involve blade chord Reynolds numbers as high as 6,000,000 and can accommodate a variety of instrumentation in both a stationary and a rotating frame of reference. The objectives of this experiment were as follows: to provide a database for comparison with three-dimensional, viscous (turbulent) flow computations; to evaluate the engineering models; and to improve our physical understanding of many of the phenomena involved in this complex flow field. The experimental results include a large quantity of data acquired throughout HIREP. A five-hole probe survey of the inlet flow 37.0 percent chord upstream of the inlet guide vane (IGV) leading edge is sufficient to give information for the inflow boundary conditions, while some static-pressure information is available to help establish an outflow boundary condition.

  2. Sectional lift coefficient of a rotating wing at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun [Hyundai Motor Company, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hae Cheon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    We study the characteristics of the sectional lift coefficient (C{sub L,S}) of low-aspect-ratio wings in rotating motion at low Reynolds number (Re = 136), by conducting three-dimensional numerical simulations. Three different shapes of thin-plate wings (fruit-fly, rectangular, and triangular wings) are considered but keeping their aspect ratio (wing span/wing chord) the same at 3.74. Each wing rotates at a constant angular velocity and the angle of attack (α) is fixed during rotation. During rotation, the wing is exposed to the downward flows generated from the previous rotation, and thus C{sub L,S} is overall reduced due to the decrease in the effective angle of attack. At low α's, C{sub L,S} becomes almost constant on the whole span. At high α's, C{sub L,S} on the wing mid-section is inversely proportional to the radial position. The radial distribution of the sectional lift coefficient is less affected by the wing planform, while the lift coefficient significantly depends on the wing planforms. Finally, we show that the effect of the Reynolds number on the sectional lift coefficient is insignificant at low angle of attack but becomes important at high angle of attack.

  3. Curling dynamics of naturally curved ribbons from high to low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran Arriagada, Octavio; Massiera, Gladys; Abkarian, Manouk

    2012-11-01

    Curling deformation of thin elastic sheets appears in numerous structures in nature, such as membranes of red blood cells, epithelial tissues or green algae colonies to cite just a few examples. However, despite its ubiquity, the dynamics of curling propagation in a naturally curved material remains still poorly investigated. Here, we present a coupled experimental and theoretical study of the dynamical curling deformation of naturally curved ribbons. Using thermoplastic and metallic ribbons molded on cylinders of different radii, we tune separately the natural curvature and the geometry to study curling dynamics in air, water and in viscous oils, thus spanning a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Our theoretical and experimental approaches separate the role of elasticity, gravity and hydrodynamic dissipation from inertia and emphasize the fundamental differences between the curling of a naturally curved ribbon and a rod described by the classical Elastica. Our work shows evidence for the propagation of a single instability front, selected by a local buckling condition. We show that depending on gravity, and both the Reynolds and the Cauchy numbers, the curling speed and shape are modified by the large scale drag and the local lubrication forces. This work was supported by the French Ministry of Research, the CNRS Physics-Chemistry-Biology Interdisciplinary Pro- gram, the University Montpellier 2 Interdisciplinary Program and the Region Languedoc-Roussillon.

  4. Low Reynolds number turbulence modeling of blood flow in arterial stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalichi, F; Deng, X; De Champlain, A; Douville, Y; King, M; Guidoin, R

    1998-01-01

    Moderate and severe arterial stenoses can produce highly disturbed flow regions with transitional and or turbulent flow characteristics. Neither laminar flow modeling nor standard two-equation models such as the kappa-epsilon turbulence ones are suitable for this kind of blood flow. In order to analyze the transitional or turbulent flow distal to an arterial stenosis, authors of this study have used the Wilcox low-Re turbulence model. Flow simulations were carried out on stenoses with 50, 75 and 86% reductions in cross-sectional area over a range of physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers. The results obtained with this low-Re turbulence model were compared with experimental measurements and with the results obtained by the standard kappa-epsilon model in terms of velocity profile, vortex length, wall shear stress, wall static pressure, and turbulence intensity. The comparisons show that results predicted by the low-Re model are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This model accurately predicts the critical Reynolds number at which blood flow becomes transitional or turbulent distal an arterial stenosis. Most interestingly, over the Re range of laminar flow, the vortex length calculated with the low-Re model also closely matches the vortex length predicted by laminar flow modeling. In conclusion, the study strongly suggests that the proposed model is suitable for blood flow studies in certain areas of the arterial tree where both laminar and transitional/turbulent flows coexist.

  5. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  6. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary la...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible.......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary....... The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas...

  7. The effects of Reynolds number, tip speed ratio, and solidity in VAWTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Colin; Schult, Allen; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2015-11-01

    The wakes of several scale models of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are investigated in a wind tunnel using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). The tip speed ratio, Reynolds number, and solidity (chord to diameter ratio) is varied to see effect each parameter. The solidity is changed by varying the chord length of a three blade turbine of constant diameter. The range of parameters (Reynolds number and tip-speed ratio) investigated, closely matches those of full size turbines. Time averaging behind the turbines shows the asymmetry in wake. A more complete picture of the wake is seen using phase averaging by syncing the imaging to the position of the turbine. These results show a cycle of structures developing on the blades and then being shed into the wake. Imaging is done at the midplane of the turbine from upstream of the turbine back into the wake. Additionally a vertical plane behind the center of the turbine is used to measure the horizontal components in the wake.

  8. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  9. Effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwoo; Balachandar, S.; Lee, Hyungoo

    2013-11-01

    For studies on particle-laden flows involving particle transport and dispersion, the prediction capability of hydrodynamic forces on the particle in a non-uniform flow is one of the central issues. However, existing analytical expressions and empirical correlations are mainly made based on the homogeneous flow conditions such as uniform or uniform shear flows. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers. To do so, we perform direct numerical simulations of flow over a sphere in an inhomogeneous flow. In this study, we consider three different kinds of the inhomogeneous flows: cosine, hyperbolic cosine and hyperbolic secant profiles. The Reynolds number of the sphere based on the freestream velocity and sphere diameter is 100. The present simulations show that the quasi-steady drag forces in inhomogeneous flows are reasonably estimated by standard drag law based on the relative velocity if the fluid velocity seen by the particle is evaluated by surface average. The results support Loth and Dorgan (2009)'s proposed formula. In the final presentation, the effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces would be presented in more detail.

  10. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary la...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible........ The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary...

  11. Transport coefficients for the shear dynamo problem at small Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nishant K; Sridhar, S

    2011-05-01

    We build on the formulation developed in S. Sridhar and N. K. Singh [J. Fluid Mech. 664, 265 (2010)] and present a theory of the shear dynamo problem for small magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers, but for arbitrary values of the shear parameter. Specializing to the case of a mean magnetic field that is slowly varying in time, explicit expressions for the transport coefficients α(il) and η(il) are derived. We prove that when the velocity field is nonhelical, the transport coefficient α(il) vanishes. We then consider forced, stochastic dynamics for the incompressible velocity field at low Reynolds number. An exact, explicit solution for the velocity field is derived, and the velocity spectrum tensor is calculated in terms of the Galilean-invariant forcing statistics. We consider forcing statistics that are nonhelical, isotropic, and delta correlated in time, and specialize to the case when the mean field is a function only of the spatial coordinate X(3) and time τ; this reduction is necessary for comparison with the numerical experiments of A. Brandenburg, K. H. Rädler, M. Rheinhardt, and P. J. Käpylä [Astrophys. J. 676, 740 (2008)]. Explicit expressions are derived for all four components of the magnetic diffusivity tensor η(il)(τ). These are used to prove that the shear-current effect cannot be responsible for dynamo action at small Re and Rm, but for all values of the shear parameter.

  12. Spectrum of a passive scalar in stretched grid turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. K.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately homogeneous isotropic turbulence is obtained by stretching a wind-tunnel grid flow with a 1.36:1 contraction. The flow is mildly heated so that temperature serves as a passive scalar. For three different grids, the dissipation rates and spectra of velocity and temperature fluctuations are obtained from simultaneous hot-wire and cold-wire measurements. The dissipation rates follow a power-law decay. Comparison with an unstretched grid flow shows that the contraction improves the isotropy and reduces the effect of grid shape on the decay exponents. At low Reynolds numbers, there is a significant scaling range for the temperature spectrum but not for the velocity spectrum. With stretching, the temperature spectrum shows a wider scaling range, and that the scaling range exponent is closer to 5/3. The scaling exponent for the temperature spectrum (mθ) is represented by a power-law function of Reynolds number, and it approaches 5/3 faster than that for the velocity spectrum (mu). Results show that the ratio between the velocity and temperature scaling range exponents, (5/3+mu)/mθ, is about 1.98.

  13. A passive planar micromixer with obstructions for mixing at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Peterson, Erik T. K.; Papautsky, Ian

    2007-05-01

    Passive mixers rely on the channel geometry to mix fluids. However, many previously reported designs either work efficiently only at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (Re), or require a complex 3D channel geometry that is often difficult to fabricate. In this paper, we report design, simulation, fabrication and characterization of a planar passive microfluidic mixer capable of mixing at low Reynolds numbers. The design incorporates diamond-shaped obstructions within the microchannel to break-up and recombine the flow. Simulation and experimental results of the developed micromixer show excellent mixing performance over a wide range of flow conditions (numerically: 0.01 < Re < 100, experimentally: 0.02 < Re < 10). The micromixer is also characterized by low pressure drop, an important characteristic for integration into complex, cascading microfluidic systems. Due to the simple planar structure of the micromixer, it can be easily realized and integrated with on-chip microfluidic systems, such as micro total analysis systems (μTAS) or lab on a chip (LOC).

  14. Time resolved, near wall PIV measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willert, C.; Soria, J.; Stanislas, M.; Amili, O.; Bellani, G.; Cuvier, C.; Eisfelder, M.; Fiorini, T.; Graf, N.; Klinner, J.

    2016-11-01

    We report on near wall measurements of a turbulent pipe flow at shear Reynolds numbers up to Reτ = 40000 acquired in the CICLoPE facility near Bologna, Italy. With 900 mm diameter and 110 m length the facility offers a well-established turbulent flow with viscous length scales ranging from y+ = 85 μ m at Reτ = 5000 to y+ = 11 μ m at Reτ = 40000 . These length scales can be resolved with a high-speed PIV camera at image magnification near unity. For the measurement the light of a high-speed, double-pulse laser is focused into a 300 μ m thin light sheet that is introduced radially into the pipe. The light scattered by 1 μ m water-glycerol droplet seeding is observed from the side by the camera via a thin high-aspect ratio mirror with a field of view covering 20mm in wall-normal and 5mm in stream-wise direction. Statistically converged velocity profiles could be achieved using 70000 samples per sequence acquired at low laser repetition rates (100Hz). Higher sampling rates of 10 kHz provide temporally coherent data from which frequency spectra can be derived. Preliminary analysis of the data shows a well resolved inner peak that grows with increasing Reynolds number. (Project funding through EuHIT - www.euhit.org)

  15. Numerical simulation of flow around square cylinder using different low-Reynolds number turbulence models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; ZHOU Jun-li; CHEN Xiao-chun; LAN Li; ZHANG Nan

    2008-01-01

    ABE-KONDOH-NAGANO, ABID, YANG-SHIH and LAUNDER-SHARMA low-Reynolds number turbulence models were applied to simulating unsteady turbulence flow around a square cylinder in different phases flow field and time-averaged unsteady flow field. Meanwhile, drag and lift coefficients of the four different low-Reynolds number turbulence models were analyzed. The simulated results of YANG-SHIH model are close to the large eddy simulation results and experimental results, and they are significantly better than those of ABE-KONDOH-NAGANO, ABID and LAUNDER-SHARMR models. The modification of the generation of turbulence kinetic energy is the key factor to a successful simulation for YANG-SHIH model, while the correction of the turbulence near the wall has minor influence on the simulation results. For ABE-KONDOH-NAGANO, ABID and LAUNDER-SHARMA models satisfactory simulation results cannot be obtained due to lack of the modification of the generation of turbulence kinetic energy. With the joint force of wall function and the turbulence models with the adoption of corrected swirl stream,flow around a square cylinder can be fully simulated with less grids by the near-wall.

  16. Effects of Reynolds and Womersley Numbers on the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Womersley numbers on the hemodynamics of two simplified intracranial aneurysms (IAs), that is, sidewall and bifurcation IAs, and a patient-specific IA are investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For this purpose, we carried out three numerical experiments for each IA with various Reynolds (Re = 145.45 to 378.79) and Womersley (Wo = 7.4 to 9.96) numbers. Although the dominant flow feature, which is the vortex ring formation, is similar for all test cases here, the propagation of the vortex ring is controlled by both Re and Wo in both simplified IAs (bifurcation and sidewall) and the patient-specific IA. The location of the vortex ring in all tested IAs is shown to be proportional to Re/Wo2 which is in agreement with empirical formulations for the location of a vortex ring in a tank. In sidewall IAs, the oscillatory shear index is shown to increase with Wo and 1/Re because the vortex reached the distal wall later in the cycle (higher resident time). However, this trend was not observed in the bifurcation IA because the stresses were dominated by particle trapping structures, which were absent at low Re = 151.51 in contrast to higher Re = 378.79. PMID:27847544

  17. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  18. Inclined gravity currents filling basins: The influence of Reynolds number on entrainment into gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Charlie A. R.; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    In many important natural and industrial systems, gravity currents of dense fluid feed basins. Examples include lakes fed by dense rivers and auditoria supplied with cooled air by ventilation systems. As we will show, the entrainment into such buoyancy driven currents can be influenced by viscous forces. Little work, however, has examined this viscous influence and how entrainment varies with the Reynolds number, Re. Using the idea of an entrainment coefficient, E, we derive a mathematical expression for the rise of the front at the top of the dense fluid ponding in a basin, where the horizontal cross-sectional area of the basin varies linearly with depth. We compare this expression to experiments on gravity currents with source Reynolds numbers, Res, covering the broad range 100 < Res < 1500. The form of the observed frontal rises was well approximated by our theory. By fitting the observed frontal rises to the theoretical form with E as the free parameter, we find a linear trend for E(Res) over the range 350 < Res < 1100, which is in the transition to turbulent flow. In the experiments, the entrainment coefficient, E, varied from 4 × 10-5 to 7 × 10-2. These observations show that viscous damping can be a dominant influence on gravity current entrainment in the laboratory and in geophysical flows in this transitional regime.

  19. Large eddy simulation of the FDA benchmark nozzle for a Reynolds number of 6500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiga, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates the flow in a benchmark nozzle model of an idealized medical device proposed by the FDA using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It was in particular shown that a proper modeling of the transitional flow features is particularly challenging, leading to large discrepancies and inaccurate predictions from the different research groups using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling. In spite of the relatively simple, axisymmetric computational geometry, the resulting turbulent flow is fairly complex and non-axisymmetric, in particular due to the sudden expansion. The resulting flow cannot be well predicted with simple modeling approaches. Due to the varying diameters and flow velocities encountered in the nozzle, different typical flow regions and regimes can be distinguished, from laminar to transitional and to weakly turbulent. The purpose of the present work is to re-examine the FDA-CFD benchmark nozzle model at a Reynolds number of 6500 using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES results are compared with published experimental data obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an excellent agreement can be observed considering the temporally averaged flow velocities. Different flow regimes are characterized by computing the temporal energy spectra at different locations along the main axis.

  20. Structure Functions in Wall-bounded Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Marusic, Ivan; Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the structure function Dij = (where i = 1,2,3 and r is the two-point displacement, ui is the velocity fluctuation in the xi direction), is studied in wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number within the framework of the Townsend attached eddy model. While the scaling of Dij has been the subject of several studies, previous work focused on the scaling of D11 for r = (Δx ,0,0) (for streamwise velocity component and displacements only in the streamwise direction). Using the Hierarchical-Random-Additive formalism, a recently developed attached-eddy formalism, we propose closed-form formulae for the structure functionDij with two-point displacements in arbitrary directions, focusing on the log region . The work highlights new scalings that have received little attention, e.g. the scaling of Dij for r =(0, Δy, Δz) and for i ≠ j . As the knowledge on Dij leads directly to that of the Reynolds stress, statistics of the filtered flow field, etc., an analytical formula of Dij for arbitrary r can be quite useful for developing physics-based models for wall-bounded flows and validating existing LES and reduced order models.

  1. The effect of tip speed ratio on a vertical axis wind turbine at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-05-01

    This work visualizes the flow surrounding a scaled model vertical axis wind turbine at realistic operating conditions. The model closely matches geometric and dynamic properties—tip speed ratio and Reynolds number—of a full-size turbine. The flow is visualized using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) in the midplane upstream, around, and after (up to 4 turbine diameters downstream) the turbine, as well as a vertical plane behind the turbine. Time-averaged results show an asymmetric wake behind the turbine, regardless of tip speed ratio, with a larger velocity deficit for a higher tip speed ratio. For the higher tip speed ratio, an area of averaged flow reversal is present with a maximum reverse flow of -0.04U_∞. Phase-averaged vorticity fields—achieved by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine—show distinct structures form from each turbine blade. There were distinct differences in results by tip speed ratios of 0.9, 1.3, and 2.2 of when in the cycle structures are shed into the wake—switching from two pairs to a single pair of vortices being shed—and how they convect into the wake—the middle tip speed ratio vortices convect downstream inside the wake, while the high tip speed ratio pair is shed into the shear layer of the wake. Finally, results show that the wake structure is much more sensitive to changes in tip speed ratio than to changes in Reynolds number.

  2. Magnetic field amplification by small-scale dynamo action: dependence on turbulence models and Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-02-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus it is expected to depend crucially on the nature of the turbulence. In this paper, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(ℓ)proportional ℓ([symbol see text])V}, where ℓ and v(ℓ) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_{crit}, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is Rm(crit) (K) ≈ 110 and for Burgers turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/2) Rm(crit)(B) ≈ 2700. Furthermore, we derive that the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field for a general type of turbulence is Γ proportional Re((1-[symbol see text])/(1+[symbol see text])) in the limit of infinite magnetic Prandtl number. For decreasing magnetic Prandtl number (down to Pm >/~ 10), the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo decreases. The details of this drop depend on the WKB approximation, which becomes invalid for a magnetic Prandtl number of about unity.

  3. Low Reynolds number flow in rectangular cooling channels provided with low aspect ratio pin fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armellini, Alessandro; Casarsa, Luca [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, 33100 Udine (Italy); Giannattasio, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.giannattasio@uniud.i [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The flow structures around single heat transfer promoters of different shapes (square, circular, triangular and rhomboidal) have been investigated experimentally by means of a 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. The geometrical configuration and flow conditions considered are typical of real liquid cooling channels. They include low aspect ratio pin fins confined at both ends by the walls of a rectangular channel, water flow at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 800, 1800, 2800), high core flow turbulence and undeveloped boundary layers at the position of the obstacle. In front of the pin fins the high turbulence level is found to promote a strong instability of the horseshoe vortex system that forms at the wall/obstacle junction. In particular, frequent events of break-away of the primary vortices and inrush of core fluid, which are known to enhance the wall heat transfer, are observed in the cases of square and circular pins already from Re = 1800. The near wake downstream of the obstacles appears to be influenced by streamwise oriented vortical structures produced at the wall/obstacle junction. They give rise to spanwise velocity components (up-wash flow) that lead to a three-dimensional mass recirculation behind the pins. The combination of up-wash flows, low Reynolds number and high core flow turbulence gives rise to a competition between the classical alternate vortex shedding and an irregular shedding mode characterized by the decoupling of the shear layers and the absence of well organized primary structures. At Re = 800, the irregular shedding prevails and the mean wake topology is almost insensitive to the obstacle shape. As the Reynolds number is increased, the junction flow structures reduce in size and strength, their effect on the wake flow weakens and the recirculation structures behind the obstacles differentiate significantly according to the pin shape. Besides investigating complex flow structures in geometrical and flow configurations of

  4. Numerical and analytical approaches to an advection-diffusion problem at small Reynolds number and large P\\'eclet number

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Nathaniel J

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a detailed understanding of the physical interactions between a cell and its environment often requires information about the flow of fluid surrounding the cell. Cells must be able to effectively absorb and discard material in order to survive. Strategies for nutrient acquisition and toxin disposal, which have been evolutionarily selected for their efficacy, should reflect knowledge of the physics underlying this mass transport problem. Motivated by these considerations, in this paper we consider a two-dimensional advection-diffusion problem at small Reynolds number and large P\\'eclet number. We discuss the problem of mass transport for a circular cell in a uniform far-field flow. We approach the problem numerically, and also analytically through a rescaling of the concentration boundary layer. A biophysically motivated first-passage problem for the absorption of material by the cell demonstrates quantitative agreement between the numerical and analytical approaches.

  5. Aeroacoustic Properties of Moderate Reynolds Number Elliptic and Rectangular Supersonic Jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin Wayne

    1995-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic, rectangular, and circular jets are experimentally investigated. All three jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25,000 to 50,000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high velocity and low density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process. Experiments in the present work focus on comparisons between the cold and simulated heated jet conditions and on the beneficial aeroacoustic properties of non-circular jets. Comparisons are also made between the elliptic and rectangular jets. When helium is added to the jets, the instability wave phase velocity is found to approach or exceed the ambient sound speed. The radiated noise is also louder and directed at a higher angle from the jet axis. In addition, near field hot-wire spectra are found to match the far-field acoustic spectra only for the helium/air mixture case. These results demonstrate that there are significant differences between unheated and heated asymmetric jets in the Mach 1.5 speed range, many of which have been found previously for circular jets. The asymmetric jets were also found to radiate less noise than the round jet at comparable operating conditions. Strong similarities were also found between the aerodynamic and acoustic properties of the elliptic and rectangular jets.

  6. Study on lattice Boltzmann method/large eddy simulation and its application at high Reynolds number flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Boltzmann method combined with large eddy simulation is developed in the article to simulate fluid flow at high Reynolds numbers. A subgrid model is used as a large eddy simulation model in the numerical simulation for high Reynolds flow. The idea of subgrid model is based on an assumption to include the physical effects that the unresolved motion has on the resolved fluid motion. It takes a simple form of eddy viscosity models for the Reynolds stress. Lift and drag evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation takes momentum-exchange method for curved body surface. First of all, the present numerical method is validated at low Reynolds numbers. Second, the developed lattice Boltzmann method/large eddy simulation method is performed to solve flow problems at high Reynolds numbers. Some detailed quantitative comparisons are implemented to show the effectiveness of the present method. It is demonstrated that lattice Boltzmann method combined with large eddy simulation model can efficiently simulate high Reynolds numbers’ flows.

  7. Vortex-induced vibrations of circular cylinder in cross flow at supercritical Reynolds numbers; Chorinkai Reynolds su ryoiki ni okeru enchu no uzu reiki shindo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, T.; Nakao, T.; Takahashi, M.; Hayashi, M.; Goto, N. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-25

    Vortex-induced vibrations were measured for a circular cylinder subjected to a water cross flow at supercritical Reynolds numbers for a wide range of reduced velocities. Turbulence intensities were changed from 1% to 13% in order to investigate the effect of the Strouhal number on the region of synchronization by symmetrical and Karman vortex shedding. The reduced damping of the test cylinder was about 0.1 in water. The surface roughness of the cylinder was a mirror-polished surface. Strouhal number decreased from about 0.48 to 0.29 with increasing turbulence intensity. Synchronized vibrations were observed even at supercritical Reynolds numbers where fluctuating fluid force was small. Reduced velocities at which drag and lift direction lock-in by Karman vortex shedding were initiated decreased with increasing Strouhal number. When Strouhal number was about 0.29, the self-excited vibration in drag direction by symmetrical vortex shedding began at which the frequency ratio of Karman vortex shedding frequency to the natural frequency of cylinder was 0.32. (author)

  8. On the design of squeeze film dampers operating within the limits of the Reynolds theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu MORARU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Squeeze film dampers (SFD are used to control the shaft dynamics in rotating machinery; SFD are essentially thin oil films installed around the ball bearing housing (or even ball bearings outer races to lower the stiffness and to provide damping for a better control of the lateral vibrations of the shaft. Significant efforts have been dedicated to SFSs, however, these dampers are still subject to open research. This paper will discuss some design aspects as well as modeling aspects of the SFD that operate within the limits of the classical Reynolds theory.

  9. Control of mean and fluctuating forces on a circular cylinder at high Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanping Shao; Jianming Wang

    2007-01-01

    A narrow strip is used to control mean and fluctuating forces on a circular cylinder at Reynolds numbers from 2.0 x 104 to 1.0 x 105. The axes of the strip and cylinder are parallel. The control parameters are strip width ratio and strip position characterized by angle of attack and distance from the cylinder. Wind tunnel tests show that the vortex shedding from both sides of the cylinder can be suppressed, and mean drag and fluctuating lift on the cylinder can be reduced if the strip is installed in an effective zone downstream of the cylinder. A phenomenon of mono-side vortex shedding is found. The strip-induced local changes of velocity profiles in the near wake of the cylinder are measured, and the relation between base suction and peak value in the power spectrum of fluctuating lift is studied. The control mechanism is then discussed from different points of view.

  10. Velocity fluctuations and population distribution in clusters of settling particles at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Boschan, A; Annichini, M; Gauthier, G

    2016-01-01

    A study on the spatial organization and velocity fluctuations of non Brownian spherical particles settling at low Reynolds number in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell is reported. The particle volume fraction ranged from 0.005 to 0.05, while the distance between cell plates ranged from 5 to 15 times the particle radius. Particle tracking revealed that particles were not uniformly distributed in space but assembled in transient settling clusters. The population distribution of these clusters followed an exponential law. The measured velocity fluctuations are in agreement with that predicted theoretically for spherical clusters, from the balance between the apparent weight and the drag force. This result suggests that particle clustering, more than a spatial distribution of particles derived from random and independent events, is at the origin of the velocity fluctuations.

  11. Estimating the effective Reynolds number in implicit large-eddy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J; Haines, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    In implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES), energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter out unresolved scales and to implicitly model subgrid scale effects. From an applied perspective, it is highly desirable to estimate a characteristic Reynolds number (Re)-and therefore a relevant effective viscosity-so that the impact of resolution on predicted flow quantities and their macroscopic convergence can usefully be characterized. We argue in favor of obtaining robust Re estimates away from the smallest scales of the simulated flow-where numerically controlled dissipation takes place and propose a theoretical basis and framework to determine such measures. ILES examples include forced turbulence as a steady flow case, the Taylor-Green vortex to address transition and decaying turbulence, and simulations of a laser-driven reshock experiment illustrating a fairly complex turbulence problem of current practical interest.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF BUBBLE-BUBBLE INTERACTION DEPENDED ON REYNOLDS NUMBER USING STEREOSCOPIC BUBBLE-TRACKING TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Jian-wu; MURAI Yuichi; YAMAMOTO Fujio

    2005-01-01

    Bubble-bubble interaction in free rising bubbly flows is experimentally investigated in the present study.The velocity vectors of the bubbles are measured by a stereoscopic bubble-tracking technique and then the relative velocity vectors of two nearest-neighbor bubbles are calculated with high statistical reliability.With the measurement data at Reynolds number ranging from 5 to 75, the vertical attraction and the horizontal repulsion are confirmed for Re<10 as known by the past study based on Navier-Stokes simulation.The new finding of the present measurement is that the bubbles of Re>30 have repulsive velocity bothin the horizontal and the vertical directions as those rise closely.Moreover, the three-dimensional structure of the bubble-bubble interaction is discussed with the data analysis of the interaction vector fields.

  13. Numerical simulation of low-Reynolds number flows past two tandem cylinders of different diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-tao WANG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow past two tandem circular cylinders of different diameters was simulated using the ?nite volume method. The diameter of the downstream main cylinder (D was kept constant, and the diameter of the upstream control cylinder (d varied from 0.1D to D. The studied Reynolds numbers based on the diameter of the downstream main cylinder were 100 and 150. The gap between the control cylinder and the main cylinder (G ranged from 0.1D to 4D. It is concluded that the gap-to-diameter ratio (G/D and the diameter ratio between the two cylinders (d/D have important effects on the drag and lift coef?cients, pressure distributions around the cylinders, vortex shedding frequencies from the two cylinders, and ?ow characteristics.

  14. Numerical analysis of jet impingement heat transfer at high jet Reynolds number and large temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    was investigated at a jet Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 and a temperature difference between jet inlet and wall of 1600 K. The focus was on the convective heat transfer contribution as thermal radiation was not included in the investigation. A considerable influence of the turbulence intensity at the jet inlet......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall was investigated numerically for a ratio of 2 between the jet inlet to wall distance and the jet inlet diameter. The influence of turbulence intensity at the jet inlet and choice of turbulence model on the wall heat transfer...... was observed in the stagnation region, where the wall heat flux increased by a factor of almost 3 when increasing the turbulence intensity from 1.5% to 10%. The choice of turbulence model also influenced the heat transfer predictions significantly, especially in the stagnation region, where differences of up...

  15. Efficient swimming of an assembly of rigid spheres at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2015-01-01

    The swimming of an assembly of rigid spheres immersed in a viscous fluid of infinite extent is studied in low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The instantaneous swimming velocity and rate of dissipation are expressed in terms of the time-dependent displacements of sphere centers about their collective motion. For small amplitude swimming with periodically oscillating displacements, optimization of the mean swimming speed at given mean power leads to an eigenvalue problem involving a velocity matrix and a power matrix. The corresponding optimal stroke permits generalization to large amplitude motion in a model of spheres with harmonic interactions and corresponding actuating forces. The method allows straightforward calculation of the swimming performance of structures modeled as assemblies of interacting rigid spheres. A model of three collinear spheres with motion along the common axis is studied as an example.

  16. PIV and LIF study of slot continuous jet at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broučková Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with a continuous jet issuing from a small narrow slot with a width of 0.36 mm. The experimental arrangement is based on the piezoelectric synthetic jet actuator studied previously for easy comparisons. The working fluid is water at room temperature. The experiments were performed using methods of particle image velocimetry (PIV and flow visualization (laser induced fluorescence, LIF. The time-mean volume flux through the exit nozzle was quantified using precise scales. The mean velocity and the Reynolds number were evaluated as Um = 0.12 m/s and Re = 90, respectively. The results of LIF and PIV techniques revealed the three-dimensional character of the flow field, namely the saddle-shape velocity profiles. This behavior is typical for steady jets from a rectangular nozzle. The obtained results were compared with previous measurements of the synthetic jet issuing from the same cavity and the slot nozzle.

  17. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in high Reynolds-number magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, J; Schäfer, T; Grauer, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scaling behavior of longitudinal and transverse structure functions in homogeneous and isotropic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence by means of an exact hierarchy of structure function equations as well as by direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional MHD turbulence. In particular, rescaling relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are derived and utilized in order to compare different scaling behavior in the inertial range. It is found that there are no substantial differences between longitudinal and transverse structure functions in MHD turbulence. This finding stands in contrast to the case of hydrodynamic turbulence which shows persistent differences even at high Reynolds numbers. We propose a physical picture that is based on an effective reduction of pressure contributions due to local regions of same magnitude and alignment of velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. Finally, our findings underline the importance of the pressure term for ...

  18. Influence of Turbulence Model for Wind Turbine Simulation in Low Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In designing a wind turbine, the validation of the mathematical model’s result is normally carried out by comparison with wind tunnel experiment data. However, the Reynolds number of the wind tunnel experiment is low, and the flow does not match fully developed turbulence on the leading edge of a wind turbine blade. Therefore, the transition area from laminar to turbulent flow becomes wide under these conditions, and the separation point is difficult to predict using turbulence models. The prediction precision decreases dramatically when working with tip speed ratios less than the maximum power point. This study carries out a steadiness calculation with turbulence model and an unsteadiness calculation with laminar model for a three-blade horizontal axis wind turbine. The validation of the calculations is performed by comparing with experimental results. The power coefficients calculated without turbulence models are in agreement with the experimental data for a tip speed ratio greater than 5.

  19. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  20. Relaminarization of wall turbulence by high-pressure ramps at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Kwonyul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transition from the turbulent towards the laminar flow regime was investigated experimentally by progressively increasing the pressure up to 400 MPa in a fully developed pipe flow operated with silicone oil as the working fluid. Using hot-wire anemometry, it is shown indirectly that at low Reynolds numbers a rapid increase in pressure modifies the turbulence dynamics owing to the processes which induce the effects caused by fluid compressibility in the region very close to the wall. The experimental results confirm that under such circumstances, the traditional mechanism responsible for self-maintenance of turbulence in wall-bounded flows is altered in such a way as to lead towards a state in which turbulence cannot persist any longer.

  1. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  2. Angular velocity of a sphere in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Meibohm, J; Rosén, T; Einarsson, J; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the angular dynamics of a small neutrally buoyant sphere in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the sphere rotates at half the fluid vorticity. We compute how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity, and find $\\omega_3/s \\sim -{1}/{2} +0.0540\\, {\\rm Re}_{\\rm s}^{3/2}$ where $s$ is the shear rate and ${\\rm Re}_{\\rm s}$ is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 44 (1970) 1] who obtained a coefficient roughly three times larger. Our result is in good agreement with those of direct numerical simulations at small but not too small values of ${\\rm Re}_{\\rm }s$.

  3. Steady imperfect bifurcation with generic 3D bluff bodies at large Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadot, Olivier; Pastur, Luc; Evrard, Antoine; Soyer, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    The turbulent wake of parallelepiped bodies exhibits a strong bi-modal behavior. The wake randomly undergoes symmetry breaking reversals, between two mirror asymmetric steady modes (RSB modes). The characteristic time for reversals is about 2 or three orders of magnitudes larger than the natural time for vortex shedding. Such a dynamics has been recently observed on real car which points out its importance about industrial applications. Both the viscosity and the proximity of a wall in the vicinity of the parallelepiped body (similarly to the road with a car model), stabilize the RSB modes on a single symmetric mode. It is shown that these stabilizations occur through imperfect fork bifurcations at large Reynolds numbers. The extra drag due to the presence of the RSB modes is evidenced.

  4. Three-dimensional flow past rotating wing at low Reynolds number: a computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruifeng, Hu, E-mail: rfhu@xidian.edu.cn [School of Mechano-Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we performed a computational study on the three-dimensional (3D) flow past a rotating wing at a low Reynolds number (Re = 200). The 3D vortical structures and aerodynamic performances of the rotating wing with different aspect ratios and rotating speeds are computed and analyzed. A quasi-steady model is adopted for prediction of aerodynamic performances of the wing, and its applicability is evaluated by the computation. It is found that there exists a periodic vortex shedding pattern at a low rotating speed, while vortices may cluster near the wing when rotating speed is high enough. The wake vortex topology is also affected by the aspect ratio. The current quasi-steady aerodynamic model could only be used for rotating wing aerodynamics at a low rotating speed when regularly periodic vortex shedding exists. (paper)

  5. Flow analysis of the low-Reynolds number swimmer C. elegans

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Arratia, Paulo E; Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Swimming cells and microorganisms are a critical component of many biological processes. In order to better interpret experimental studies of low Reynolds number swimming, we combine experimental and numerical methods to perform an analysis of the flow-field around the swimming nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We first use image processing and particle tracking velocimetry to extract the body shape, kinematics, and flow-fields around the nematode. We then construct a three-dimensional model using the experimental swimming kinematics and use a boundary element method to simulate flow-fields, obtaining very good quantitative agreement with experiment. We next apply a simple local-drag theory in order to generate a theoretical correction factor, which allows the approximation of three-dimensional shear rates from two-dimensional flow measurements. This correction is verified against 3D numerical simulations, and then applied to experimental data. Our results show how fundamental fluid mechanics considerations ma...

  6. Swimming at small Reynolds number of a collinear assembly of spheres in an incompressible viscous fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    Swimming at small Reynolds number of a linear assembly of identical spheres immersed in a viscous fluid is studied on the basis of a set of equations of motion for the individual spheres. The motion of the spheres is caused by actuating forces and forces derived from a direct interaction potential, as well as hydrodynamic forces exerted by the fluid as frictional and added mass hydrodynamic interactions. The swimming velocity is deduced from the momentum balance equation for the assembly of spheres, and the mean power required during a period is calculated from an instantaneous power equation. Expressions are derived for the mean swimming velocity and the mean power, valid to second order in the amplitude of displacements from the relative equilibrium positions. Hence these quantities can be evaluated in terms of prescribed periodic displacements. Explicit calculations are performed for a linear chain of three identical spheres.

  7. Estimation of Reynolds number for flows around cylinders with lattice Boltzmann methods and artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Mauricio; Que, Ulices; González, José A.

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to estimate the Reynolds (Re) number for flows around a cylinder. The data required to train the ANN was generated with our own implementation of a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) code performing simulations of a two-dimensional flow around a cylinder. As results of the simulations, we obtain the velocity field (v ⃗) and the vorticity (∇ ⃗×v ⃗ ) of the fluid for 120 different values of Re measured at different distances from the obstacle and use them to teach the ANN to predict the Re. The results predicted by the networks show good accuracy with errors of less than 4 % in all the studied cases. One of the possible applications of this method is the development of an efficient tool to characterize a blocked flowing pipe.

  8. Exploration of plasma-based control for low-Reynolds number airfoil/gust interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetta, Donald P.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the use of plasma-based actuation for the control of a vortical gust interacting with a wing section at a low Reynolds number. Flow about the SD7003 airfoil section at 4° angle of attack and a chord-based Reynolds number of 60,000 is considered in the simulation, which typifies micro air vehicle (MAV) applications. Solutions are obtained to the Navier-Stokes equations that were augmented by source terms used to represent body forces imparted by the plasma actuator on the fluid. A simple phenomenological model provided these body forces resulting from the electric field generated by the plasma. The numerical method is based upon a high-fidelity time-implicit scheme and an implicit LES approach which are used to obtain solutions on a locally refined overset mesh system. A Taylor-like vortex model is employed to represent a gust impinging upon the wing surface, which causes a substantial disruption to the undisturbed flow. It is shown that the fundamental impact of the gust on unsteady aerodynamic forces is due to an inviscid process, corresponding to variation in the effective angle of attack, which is not easily overcome. Plasma control is utilised to mitigate adverse effects of the interaction and improve aerodynamic performance. Physical characteristics of the interaction are described, and several aspects of the control strategy are explored. Among these are uniform and non-uniform spanwise variations of the control configuration, co-flow and counter-flow orientations of the directed force, pulsed and continuous operations of the actuator and strength of the plasma field. Results of the control situations are compared with regard to their effect upon aerodynamic forces. It was found that disturbances to the moment coefficient produced by the gust can be greatly reduced, which may be significant for stability and handling of MAV operations.

  9. Mathematical Relationship Between Particle Reynolds Number and Ripple Factor using Tapi River Data, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yadav

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The computation of bed load allows for the fact that only part of the shear stress is used for transport of sediments and some of the shear stress is wasted in overcoming the resistance due to bed forms therefore the total shear stress developed in the open channel requires correction in the form of correction factor called ripple factor. Different methods have been followed for correcting the actual shear stress in order to compute the sediment load. Correction factors are based on particular characteristics grain size of particle. In the present paper the ripple factor has been obtained for non uniform bed material considering the various variables like discharge, hydraulic mean depth, flow velocity, bed slope, average diameter of particle etc. by collecting the field data of Tapi river for 15 years for a particular gauging station. The ripple factor is obtained using Meyer Peter and Muller formula, Einstein Formula, Kalinske’s formula, Du Boy’s formula, Shield’s formula, Bagnold’s formula, average of six formulae and multiple regression analysis. The variation of ripple factor with particle Reynolds Number is studied. The ripple factor obtained by different approaches are further analyzed using Origin software and carrying out multiple regression on the 15 years of data with more than 10 parameters, ripple factor by multiple regression has been obtained. These values are further analysed and giving statistical mean to the parameters a relationship of power form has been developed. The ripple factor increases with the increase in the value of Particle Reynolds number. The large deviation is observed in case of Kalinske’s approach when compare with other approaches

  10. A Reynolds Number Study of Wing Leading-Edge Effects on a Supersonic Transport Model at Mach 0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. Susan; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Chu, Julio

    1999-01-01

    A representative supersonic transport design was tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in its original configuration with small-radius leading-edge flaps and also with modified large-radius inboard leading-edge flaps. Aerodynamic data were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers at a Mach number of 0.3 and angles of attack up to 16 deg. Increasing the radius of the inboard leading-edge flap delayed nose-up pitching moment to a higher lift coefficient. Deflecting the large-radius leading-edge flap produced an overall decrease in lift coefficient and delayed nose-up pitching moment to even higher angles of attack as compared with the undeflected large- radius leading-edge flap. At angles of attack corresponding to the maximum untrimmed lift-to-drag ratio, lift and drag coefficients decreased while lift-to-drag ratio increased with increasing Reynolds number. At an angle of attack of 13.5 deg., the pitching-moment coefficient was nearly constant with increasing Reynolds number for both the small-radius leading-edge flap and the deflected large-radius leading-edge flap. However, the pitching moment coefficient increased with increasing Reynolds number for the undeflected large-radius leading-edge flap above a chord Reynolds number of about 35 x 10 (exp 6).

  11. Experimental Study of Thin and Thick Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Garcia, Elifalet; Johari, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    A recent surge in applications of unmanned air vehicles in various fields has led to increased interest in understanding the characteristics of airfoils at Reynolds number regime ~104. At these low Re numbers, aerodynamics of an airfoil is influenced by laminar separation and its possible reattachment, which is in contrast to airfoil behavior at high Re numbers. This study focused on comparing the load characteristics of symmetric, thin (NACA-0009) and thick (NACA-0021) airfoils at low Re numbers ~2 - 4 × 104, and angles of attack between 2° to 12°, along with simultaneous flow visualization. The experiments were performed in a low speed flow visualization water tunnel facility, and two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to quantify the inflow conditions and turbulence intensity. A high precision force/torque transducer was used for the load measurements, while hydrogen bubble technique was used for flow visualization on the suction side of the airfoils. The presentation will discuss the correlation between observed flow structures and instantaneous load on the airfoils, as well as the aerodynamic load characteristics of thin and thick airfoils at low Re numbers.

  12. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T.; Einarsson, J.; Nordmark, A.; Aidun, C. K.; Lundell, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Rea. As Rea→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Rea for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λc≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ -Rea plane that reaches λ ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Rea=1 ) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results.

  13. MASS TRANSFER CONTROL OF A BACKWARD-FACING STEP FLOW BY LOCAL FORCING- EFFECT OF REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhaier MEHREZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of fluid mechanics and mass transfer in separated and reattaching flow over a backward-facing step by a local forcing, is studied using Large Eddy Simulation (LES.To control the flow, the local forcing is realized by a sinusoidal oscillating jet at the step edge. The Reynolds number is varied in the range 10000 ≤ Re≤ 50000 and the Schmidt number is fixed at 1.The found results show that the flow structure is modified and the local mass transfer is enhanced by the applied forcing. The observed changes depend on the Reynolds number and vary with the frequency and amplitude of the local forcing. For the all Reynolds numbers, the largest recirculation zone size reduction is obtained at the optimum forcing frequency St = 0.25. At this frequency the local mass transfer enhancement attains the maximum.

  14. High Reynolds number test of a NACA 651-213, a equals 0.5 airfoil at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdges, K. P.; Blackwell, J. A., Jr.; Pounds, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-Tunnel tests were conducted in the Lockheed-Georgia Company's compressible flow facility to determine the transonic two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA 65 sub 1-213 a = 0.50 airfoil. The results are correlated with data obtained in the NASA-Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel and the NAE high Reynolds number 15x60-inch two-dimensional test facility. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.60 to 0.80 and an angle of attack range from -1 deg to 8 deg. Reynolds numbers, based on the airfoil chord, were varied.

  15. The dependence of Nusselt number on Reynolds number for a hot-wire sensor in supercritical CO2 flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukoslavcevic, Petar; Wallace, James

    2005-11-01

    An analysis of the heat transfer mechanism around a hot-wire sensor in superctitical CO2 flow has been performed, and the dependence of the Nusselt number (Nu) on the Reynolds number (Re) has been determined. A special, closed flow loop, capable of inducing variable speed flow at different pressures and temperatures in the ranges of 0.15-2 m/s, 15-70^oC and 1-100 bar, has been used to create a supercritical CO2 flow around a hot-wire sensor operated in the constant temperature mode. The Nu and Re numbers were determined based on the known heat convected from the sensor, the flow speed and the sensor temperature and dimensions. The experiment was performed along a line of constant 80 bar pressure in the temperature range of 25-65^oC. It was found that, at a given pressure and temperature, the relation Nu=F(Re) has the classical form Nu=M+NRe^n, with the parameters M and N being functions of pressure and temperature. The dependence of these parameters on temperature was analyzed, and the most convenient reference temperature was chosen. In contrast to the operation of hot-wires in air and water, the dependence of the parameters M and N on the Prandtl number can result in nonunique solutions.

  16. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  17. Motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in low-Reynolds-number Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staben, Michelle E.; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2003-06-01

    A new boundary-integral algorithm for the motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in Poiseuille flow at low Reynolds number was developed to study the translational and rotational velocities for a broad range of particle sizes and depths in the channel. Instead of the free-space Green's function more commonly employed in boundary-integral equations, we used the Green's function for the domain between two infinite plane walls [Liron and Mochon, J. Eng. Math. 10, 287 (1976)]. This formulation allows us to directly incorporate the effects of the wall interactions into the stress tensor, without discretizing the bounding walls, and use well-established iterative methods. Our results are in good agreement with previous computations [Ganatos et al., J. Fluid Mech. 99, 755 (1980)] and limiting cases, over their range of application, with additional results obtained for very small particle-wall separations of less than 1% of the particle radius. In addition to the boundary-integral solution in the mobility formulation, we used the resistance formulation to derive the near-field asymptotic forms for the translational and rotational velocities, extending the results to even smaller particle-wall separations. The decrease in translational velocity from the unperturbed fluid velocity increases with particle size and proximity of the particle to one or both of the walls. The rotational velocity exhibits a maximum magnitude between the centerline and either wall, due to the competing influences of wall retardation and the greater fluid velocity gradient near the walls. The average particle velocity for a uniform distribution of particles was generally found to exceed the average fluid velocity, due in large part to exclusion of the particle centers from the region of slowest fluid near the walls. The maximum average particle velocity is 18% greater than the average fluid velocity and occurs for particle diameters that are 42% of the channel height; particles with

  18. WAKE PATTERNS OF FLOW PAST A PAIR OF CIRCULAR CYLINDERS IN SIDE-BY-SIDE ARRANGEMENTS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A flow past two side-by-side identical circular cylinders was numerically investigated with the unstructured spectral element method. From the computational results at various non-dimensional distances between cylinder centers T/D and the Reynolds number Re, a total of nine kinds of wake patterns were observed: four steady wake patterns, including single bluff-body steady pattern, separated double-body steady pattern and transition steady pattern for sub-critical Reynolds numbers and biased steady pattern for super-critical Reynolds numbers, and five unsteady wake patterns, including single bluff-body periodic pattern, biased quasi-steady pattern, quasi-periodic (flip-flopping) pattern, in-phase-synchronized pattern and anti-phase-synchronized pattern. Time evolution of lift and drag coefficients corresponding to each unsteady wake pattern was given.

  19. 3 TUNNELS IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB - IN CELL CE-26 VARIABLE REYNOLDS NUMBER SUPERSONIC NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-01-01

    3 TUNNELS IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB - IN CELL CE-26 VARIABLE REYNOLDS NUMBER SUPERSONIC NOZZLE - CELL CE-4 6X6 INCH MACH NUMBER 2.96 SUPERSONIC AIRPLANE - CELL 1-NW 1X1 FOOT MACH 3.12 SUPERSONIC TUNNEL

  20. Assessment of an Euler-Interacting Boundary Layer Method Using High Reynolds Number Transonic Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Maddalon, Dal V.

    1998-01-01

    Flight-measured high Reynolds number turbulent-flow pressure distributions on a transport wing in transonic flow are compared to unstructured-grid calculations to assess the predictive ability of a three-dimensional Euler code (USM3D) coupled to an interacting boundary layer module. The two experimental pressure distributions selected for comparative analysis with the calculations are complex and turbulent but typical of an advanced technology laminar flow wing. An advancing front method (VGRID) was used to generate several tetrahedral grids for each test case. Initial calculations left considerable room for improvement in accuracy. Studies were then made of experimental errors, transition location, viscous effects, nacelle flow modeling, number and placement of spanwise boundary layer stations, and grid resolution. The most significant improvements in the accuracy of the calculations were gained by improvement of the nacelle flow model and by refinement of the computational grid. Final calculations yield results in close agreement with the experiment. Indications are that further grid refinement would produce additional improvement but would require more computer memory than is available. The appendix data compare the experimental attachment line location with calculations for different grid sizes. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and calculated attachment line locations.

  1. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  2. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan–Carpenter (KC) number. PMID:21580803

  3. Experiments on a Steady Low Reynolds Number Airfoil in a Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, David; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    The aerodynamics of steady airfoils in uniform flow have received considerably more attention than that of an airfoil operating in a non-uniform flow. Inviscid theory by Tsien (1943) shows that an airfoil experiences a decrease in the zero lift angle of attack for a shear flow with uniform clockwise vorticity. The current work utilizes a shaped honeycomb technique to create a velocity profile with a large region of uniform shear in a water tunnel. Direct force measurements are implemented and validated using experiments on a circular cylinder and NACA 0012 in a uniform cross-flow. Results for a NACA 0012 airfoil with a chord Reynolds number of 1.2 ×104 in a non-uniform approach flow are compared to concurrent CFD calculations (presented in a companion talk) showing an increase in the zero lift angle of attack; in contradiction with inviscid theory. The effect of shear on the mean lift coefficient over a wide range of angles of attack is also explored. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  4. Lift on a Steady Airfoil in Low Reynolds Number Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patrick; Visbal, Miguel; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    Current understanding of airfoil aerodynamics is primarily based on a uniform freestream velocity approaching the airfoil, without consideration for possible presence of shear in the approach flow. Inviscid theory by Tsien (1943) shows that a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack experiences positive lift, i.e. a shift in the zero-lift angle of attack, in the presence of positive mean shear in the approach flow. In the current work, 2D computations are conducted on a steady NACA 0012 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of Re = 12,000, at zero angle of attack. A uniform shear profile (i.e. a linear velocity variation) is used for the approach flow by modifying the FDL3DI Navier-Stokes solver (Visbal and Gaitonde, 1999). Interestingly, opposite to the inviscid prediction of Tsien (1943), the results for the airfoil at zero angle of attack show that the average lift is negative in the shear flow. The magnitude of this lift grows as the shear rate increases. Additional results are presented regarding the physics underlying the shear effect on lift. A companion experimental study is also given in a separate presentation. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  5. Secondary vortex street in the wake of two tandem circular cylinders at low Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-ying; Tian, Fang-bao; Jia, Lai-bing; Lu, Xi-yun; Yin, Xie-zhen

    2010-03-01

    The experiments on two tandem circular cylinders were conducted in a horizontal soap film tunnel for the Reynolds number Re=60 , 80, and 100 and the nondimensional center-to-center spacing Gamma ranging in 1 approximately 12. The flow patterns were recorded by a high-speed camera and the vortex shedding frequency was obtained by a spatiotemporal evolution method. The secondary vortex formation (SVF) mode characterized by the formation of a secondary vortex street in the wake of the downstream cylinder was found at large gamma. Moreover, some typical modes predicted by previous investigations, including the single bluff-body, shear layer reattachment, and synchronization of vortex shedding modes, were also revisited in our experiments. Further, numerical simulations were carried out using a space-time finite-element method and the results confirmed the existence of the SVF mode. The mechanism of SVF mode was analyzed in terms of the numerical results. The dependence of the Strouhal number Sr on Gamma was given and the flow characteristics relevant to the critical spacing values and the hysteretic mode transitions were investigated.

  6. Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun; Goldstraw, Erin E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ for stationary and nonstationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the presence of external forces. By combining with previous studies for freely decaying MHD turbulence, we obtain here both the most general model equation for Cɛ applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence and a comprehensive numerical study of the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless total energy dissipation rate at unity magnetic Prandtl number. We carry out a series of medium to high resolution direct numerical simulations of mechanically forced stationary MHD turbulence in order to verify the predictions of the model equation for the stationary case. Furthermore, questions of nonuniversality are discussed in terms of the effect of external forces as well as the level of cross- and magnetic helicity. The measured values of the asymptote Cɛ ,∞ lie between 0.193 ≤Cɛ ,∞≤0.268 for free decay, where the value depends on the initial level of cross- and magnetic helicities. In the stationary case we measure Cɛ ,∞=0.223 .

  7. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  8. Reynolds number scaling of influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Edlund, E M

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of quasi-Keplerian flows in a Taylor-Couette device that identify the boundary conditions required to generate near-ideal flows that exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. These experiments are contrasted with alternate boundary configurations that result in flows that progressively deviate from ideal Couette rotation as the Reynolds number is increased. These behaviors are quantitatively explained in terms of the tendency to generate global Ekman circulation and the balance of angular momentum fluxes through the axial and radial boundary layers.

  9. Flow structure and heat transfer characteristics of an unconfined impinging air jet at high jet Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Y.; Baydar, E. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of an unconfined air jet that is impinged normally onto a heated flat plate have been experimentally investigated for high Reynolds numbers ranging from 30,000 to 70,000 and a nozzle-to-plate spacing range of 1-10. The mean and turbulence velocities by using hot-wire anemometry and impingement surface pressures with pressure transducer are measured. Surface temperature measurements are made by means of an infrared thermal imaging technique. The effects of Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing on the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics are described and compared with similar experiments. It was seen that the locations of the second peaks in Nusselt number distributions slightly vary with Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing. The peaks in distributions of Nusselt numbers and radial turbulence intensity are compatible for spacings up to 3. The stagnation Nusselt number was correlated for the jet Reynolds number and the nozzle-to-plate spacing as Nu{sub st}{proportional_to}Re {sup 0.69}(H/D){sup 0.019}. (orig.)

  10. Effects of Reynolds Number and Stokes Number on Particle-pair Relative Velocity in Isotropic Turbulence: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Bragg, Andrew; Hammond, Adam; Liang, Zach; Collins, Lance; Meng, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Effects of Reynolds number (Rλ) and Stokes number (St) on particle-pair relative velocity (RV) were studied using four-frame particle tracking in an enclosed turbulence chamber. Two tests were performed: varying Rλ between 246 and 357 at six St values, and varying St between 0.02 and 4.63 at five Rλ values. By comparing experimental and DNS results of mean inward particle-pair RV, , we observed excellent agreement for all test conditions across a large range of particle separation distance (r) ; however at r values were higher than simulation. At fixed St , was found to be independent of Rλ in the observable St , r, and Rλ ranges. At fixed Rλ, increased with St at small r and decreased with St at large r. We further compared and variance of RV, , between experiments, DNS and theoretical predictions by Pan and Padoan (2010). At 0 theory-predicted and matched with DNS and experiment in the range of r = 1 - 60 η . As St increased, theoretical predictions were lower than experiment and DNS results. The potential causes of these trends are explored. Additionally, we discuss the observed electrostatic charge effect on particle relative motion in isotropic turbulence and our plans of studying this effect using an integrated experimental, numerical and theoretical approach. This work was supported by NSF CBET-0967407 and CBET-0967349.

  11. Mesh Generation and Adaption for High Reynolds Number RANS Computations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal offers to provide NASA with an automatic mesh generator for the simulation of aerodynamic flows using Reynolds-Averages Navier-Stokes (RANS) models....

  12. Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation of transonic airfoil buffet at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuma; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we conduct the wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (LES) of transonic buffet phenomena over the OAT15A supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number. The transonic airfoil buffet involves shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions and shock vibration associated with the flow separation downstream of the shock wave. The wall-modeled LES developed by Kawai and Larsson PoF (2012) is tuned on the K supercomputer for high-fidelity simulation. We first show the capability of the present wall-modeled LES on the transonic airfoil buffet phenomena and then investigate the detailed flow physics of unsteadiness of shock waves and separated boundary layer interaction phenomena. We also focus on the sustaining mechanism of the buffet phenomena, including the source of the pressure waves propagated from the trailing edge and the interactions between the shock wave and the generated sound waves. This work was supported in part by MEXT as a social and scientific priority issue to be tackled by using post-K computer. Computer resources of the K computer was provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Project ID: hp150254).

  13. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments to Design Sweeping Jets for High Reynolds Number Cruise Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Fell, Jared S.; Webb, Sandy R.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The application of a sweeping jet actuator to a circulation control system was initiated by a risk reduction series of experiments to optimize the authority of a single sweeping jet actuator. The sweeping jet design was integrated into the existing Fundamental Aerodynamic Subsonic Transonic- Modular Active Control (FAST-MAC) model by replacing the steady blowing system with an array of thirty-nine sweeping jet cartridges. A constant slot height to wing chord ratio was similar to the steady blowing configuration resulting in each actuator having a unique in size for the sweeping jet configuration. While this paper will describe the scaling and optimization of the actuators for future high Reynolds number applications, the major focus of this effort was to target the transonic flight regime by increasing the amplitude authority of the actuator. This was accomplished by modifying the diffuser of the sweeping jet actuator, and this paper highlights twelve different diffuser designs. The experimental portion of this work was completed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility.

  14. Reconciling the Reynolds number dependence of scalar roughness length and laminar resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Rigden, Angela; Salvucci, Guido; Liu, Heping

    2017-04-01

    The scalar roughness length and laminar resistance are necessary for computing scalar fluxes in numerical simulations and experimental studies. Their dependence on flow properties such as the Reynolds number remains controversial. In particular, two important power laws ("1/4" and "1/2"), both having strong theoretical foundations, have been widely used in various parameterizations and models. Building on a previously proposed phenomenological model for interactions between the viscous sublayer and the turbulent flow, it is shown here that the two scaling laws can be reconciled. The 1/4 power law corresponds to the situation where the vertical diffusion is balanced by the temporal change or advection due to a constant velocity in the viscous sublayer, while the 1/2 scaling corresponds to the situation where the vertical diffusion is balanced by the advection due to a linear velocity profile in the viscous sublayer. In addition, the recently proposed "1" power law scaling is also recovered, which corresponds to the situation where molecular diffusion dominates the scalar budget in the viscous sublayer. The formulation proposed here provides a unified framework for understanding the onset of these different scaling laws and offers a new perspective on how to evaluate them experimentally.

  15. Aerodynamic performance of an airfoil with a prescribed wall protuberance at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Mejia, Cristian; Camacho, Diego; Lockerby, Duncan

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations of flow around a modified NACA0012 airfoil, featuring a small surface perturbation on the upper wall, were performed at two low Reynolds numbers. The aerodynamic performance was examined under conditions of incompressible steady state flow. Simulations at different angles of attack (AOA) were performed: 0, 6, 9.25 and 12 degrees for Re =5000, and 6, 9.25 and 12 for Re =50000. The effect of the wall-perturbation was assessed in terms of changes of drag and lift coefficients, and alterations of the upper wall turbulent boundary layer. Examination of mean velocity profiles reveals that the wall perturbation promotes boundary-layer separation near the leading edge and increase of the skin friction drag. An arguably improvement of the effectiveness, i.e. ratio of lift to drag, was observed for the modified profile for Re = 5000, especially at AOA of 6 degrees. This effect seems to be caused by a double effect: boundary layer separation approaching the leading edge and an increase of the lift coefficient caused by the larger pressure drop on the upper surface. The effect of the perturbation was always negative for the airfoil operating at Re =50000, independently of AOA.

  16. Triple-deck analysis of transonic high Reynolds number flow through slender channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwick, A; Kornfeld, M

    2014-07-28

    In this work, laminar transonic weakly three-dimensional flows at high Reynolds numbers in slender channels, as found in microsupersonic nozzles and turbomachines of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are considered. The channel height is taken so small that the viscous wall layers forming at the channel walls start to interact strongly rather than weakly with the inviscid core flow and, therefore, the classical boundary layer approach fails. The resulting viscous-inviscid interaction problem is formulated using matched asymptotic expansions and found to be governed by a triple-deck structure. As a consequence, the properties of the predominantly inviscid core region and the viscous wall layers have to be calculated simultaneously in the interaction region. Weakly three-dimensional effects caused by surface roughness, upstream propagating flow perturbations, boundary layer separation as well as bifurcating solutions are discussed. Representative results for subsonic as well as supersonic conditions are presented, and the importance of these flow phenomena in technical applications as, for example, a means to reduce shock losses through the use of deformed geometry is addressed.

  17. Influences of initial velocity, diameter and Reynolds number on a circular turbulent air/air jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Jian-Chun; Du Cheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses the suitability of the inflow Reynolds number defined by Reo ≡ UoD/v (here Uo and D are respectively the initial jet velocity and diameter while v is kinematic viscosity) for a round air/air jet.Specifically an experimental investigation is performed for the influences of U(o),D and Re(o) on the mean-velocity decay and spread coefficients (Ku,Kr) in the far field of a circular air jet into air from a smoothly contracting nozzle.Present measurements agree well with those previously obtained under similar inflow conditions.The relations Ku (oc) U(o) and Kr (oc) 1/U(o) for U(o) < 5 m/s appear to work,while each coefficient approaches asymptotically to a constant for U(o) > 6 m/s,regardless of the magnitudes of Reo and D.It is revealed that Reo may not be an appropriate dimensionless parameter to characterize the entire flow of a free air/air jet.This paper is the first paper that has challenged the suitability of Re(o) for turbulent free jets.

  18. Material properties of of Caenorhabditis elegans swimming at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Sznitman, Josue; Krajacic, Predrag; Lamitina, Todd; Arratia, Paulo E

    2009-01-01

    Undulatory locomotion, as seen in the nematode \\emph{Caenorhabditis elegans}, is a common swimming gait of organisms in the low Reynolds number regime, where viscous forces are dominant. While the nematode's motility is expected to be a strong function of its material properties, measurements remain scarce. Here, the swimming behavior of \\emph{C.} \\emph{elegans} are investigated in experiments and in a simple model. Experiments reveal that nematodes swim in a periodic fashion and generate traveling waves which decay from head to tail. The model is able to capture the experiments' main features and is used to estimate the nematode's Young's modulus $E$ and tissue viscosity $\\eta$. For wild-type \\emph{C. elegans}, we find $E\\approx 3.77$ kPa and $\\eta \\approx-860$ Pa$\\cdot$s; values of $\\eta$ for live \\emph{C. elegans} are negative because the tissue is generating rather than dissipating energy. Results show that material properties are sensitive to changes in muscle functional properties, and are useful quanti...

  19. Effect of low Reynolds number flow on the quorum sensing behavior of sessile bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingremeau, Francois; Minyoung, Kevin Kim; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard; Mechanical; Aerospace Engineering, Complex fluids Group Team; Molecular Biology Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    Sessile and planktonic bacteria can be sensitive to the bacteria cell density around them through a chemical mediated communication called quorum sensing. When the quorum sensing molecules reach a certain value, the metabolism of the bacteria changes. Quorum sensing is usually studied in static conditions or in well mixed environments. However, bacteria biofilms can form in porous media or in the circulatory system of an infected body: quorum sensing in such flowing environment at low Reynolds number is not well studied. Using microfluidic devices, we observe how the flow of a pure media affects quorum sensing of bacteria attached to the wall. The biofilm formation is quantified by measuring the optical density in brightfield microscopy and the quorum sensing gene expression is observed through the fluorescence of a green fluorescent protein, which is a reporter for one of the quorum sensing genes. We measured without flow the amount of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm when the quorum sensing gene expression starts. In contrast, when the media is flowing in the microchannel, the quorum sensing expression is delayed. This effect can be understood and modelled by considering the diffusion of the quorum sensing molecules in the biofilm and their convection by the flowing media.

  20. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  1. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intesaaf Ashraf; Amit Agrawal; Majid Hassan Khan; Sooraj P; Atul Srivastava; Atul Sharma

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) based investigation of wake structure of a pitching airfoil. PIV measurements have been carried out for NACA0015 airfoil at Re = 2900 with reduced frequency range of 1.82–10.92 and pitching angle of 5°. Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán shedding and deflected vortex shedding) are observed over this parameter range. The vorticity decreases substantially over a distance of two chord-lengths. The velocity profile indicates a jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil. It is shown that the jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil is however not a sufficient condition for the generation of thrust. The vortex strength is found to be invariant of the pitching frequency. Certain differences from the reported results are noted, which may be because of difference in the airfoil shape. These results can help improve understanding of the flow behavior as the low Reynolds number range is not well studied.

  2. Characterization of an acoustic actuation mechanism for robotic propulsion in low Reynolds number environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Christopher; Armstrong, Jenelle; Burkhardt, John; Firebaugh, Samara

    2014-06-01

    With the end goal of medical applications such as non-invasive surgery and targeted drug delivery, an acoustically driven resonant structure is proposed for microrobotic propulsion. At the proposed scale, the low Reynolds number environment requires non-reciprocal motion from the robotic structure for propulsion; thus, a "flapper" with multiple, flexible joints, has been designed to produce excitation modes that involve the necessary flagella-like bending for non-reciprocal motion. The key design aspect of the flapper structure involves a very thin joint that allows bending in one (vertical) direction, but not the opposing direction. This allows for the second mass and joint to bend in a manner similar to a dolphin's "kick" at the bottom of their stroke, resulting in forward thrust. A 130 mm x 50 mm x 0.2 mm prototype of a swimming robot that utilizes the flapper was fabricated out of acrylic using a laser cutter. The robot was tested in water and in a water-glycerine solution designed to mimic microscale fluid conditions. The robot exhibited forward propulsion when excited by an underwater speaker at its resonance mode, with velocities up to 2.5 mm/s. The robot also displayed frequency selectivity, leading to the possibility of exploring a steering mechanism with alternatively tuned flappers. Additional tests were conducted with a robot at a reduced size scale.

  3. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  4. Simulations of three-dimensional viscoelastic flows past a circular cylinder at moderate Reynolds numbers

    KAUST Repository

    RICHTER, DAVID

    2010-03-29

    The results from a numerical investigation of inertial viscoelastic flow past a circular cylinder are presented which illustrate the significant effect that dilute concentrations of polymer additives have on complex flows. In particular, effects of polymer extensibility are studied as well as the role of viscoelasticity during three-dimensional cylinder wake transition. Simulations at two distinct Reynolds numbers (Re = 100 and Re = 300) revealed dramatic differences based on the choice of the polymer extensibility (L2 in the FENE-P model), as well as a stabilizing tendency of viscoelasticity. For the Re = 100 case, attention was focused on the effects of increasing polymer extensibility, which included a lengthening of the recirculation region immediately behind the cylinder and a sharp increase in average drag when compared to both the low extensibility and Newtonian cases. For Re = 300, a suppression of the three-dimensional Newtonian mode B instability was observed. This effect is more pronounced for higher polymer extensibilities where all three-dimensional structure is eliminated, and mechanisms for this stabilization are described in the context of roll-up instability inhibition in a viscoelastic shear layer. © 2010 Cambridge University Press.

  5. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Low Reynolds Number Particle-Laden Gas Jet by Vortex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Tomomi; Yagami, Hisanori

    An air jet, which remains laminar and axisymmetric in the single-phase flow condition, is simulated numerically in the particle-laden condition. The vortex method for particle-laden gas jet proposed by the authors is employed for the simulation. An air issues with velocity U0 from a round nozzle into the air co-flowing with velocity Ua. The Reynolds number based on U0 and the nozzle diameter is 1333, the velocity ratio Ua/U0 is 0.4. Spherical glass particles with diameter 65μm are loaded at the mass loading ratio 0.025. The particle velocity at the nozzle exit is 0.68U0. The particles impose disturbances on the air and induce the three-dimensional flow, resulting in the transition from the axisymmetric flow to the non-axisymmetric one. As the particles make the air velocity fluctuation increase, the air momentum diffuses more in the radial direction, and accordingly the spread of the jet becomes larger. The abovementioned results agree well with the trend of the existing experiments. The proposed vortex method can successfully capture the flow transition caused by the particles laden on an axisymmetric air jet.

  7. COHERENT NONHELICAL SHEAR DYNAMOS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A., E-mail: jsquire@caltech.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Nonhelical shear dynamos are studied with a particular focus on the possibility of coherent dynamo action. The primary results—serving as a follow up to the results of Squire and Bhattacharjee—pertain to the “magnetic shear-current effect” as a viable mechanism to drive large-scale magnetic field generation. This effect raises the interesting possibility that the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo could drive large-scale dynamo action, and is likely to be important in the unstratified regions of accretion disk turbulence. In this paper, the effect is studied at low Reynolds numbers, removing the complications of small-scale dynamo excitation and aiding analysis by enabling the use of quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. In addition to the magnetically driven dynamo, new results on the kinematic nonhelical shear dynamo are presented. These illustrate the relationship between coherent and incoherent driving in such dynamos, demonstrating the importance of rotation in determining the relative dominance of each mechanism.

  8. Flow past a rotating cylinder at high Reynolds number using PANS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, high-Reynolds number flow past a rotating cylinder has been simulated using Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method. The simulations are performed at Re = 140000. The spin ratio of the cylinder, which is defined by the ratio of the circumferential speed of the cylinder to the free-stream speed, varies from a = 0 to a = 4. The resolved and the modeled physical scales have been compared with the corresponding LES data for better understanding of the efficacy of the PANS method. The comparison of PANS results with the LES results showed good agreement. It has been recognized that the PANS simulation is able to produce fairly acceptable results using even a coarse-mesh. It is recognized that the time-averaged flow statistics obtained using PANS and URANS simulations are approximately same. However the vortex structure is much better captured by the PANS method. With the increase in the spin ratio, decrease in the time-averaged drag and increase in the time-averaged lift force acting on the cylinder have been observed. The vortices in far wake region are displaced and deformed but those in the vicinity of the cylinder are stretched at the bottom and accumulated over the top of the cylinder.

  9. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION OF FLOW AROUND CYLINDER ARRAYS AT A SUBCRITICAL REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Lin; LIN Yu-feng; LAM Kit

    2008-01-01

    The complex three-dimensional turbulent flows around a cylinder array with four cylinders in an in-line square configuration at a subcritical Reynolds number of 1.5 ×104 with the spacing ratio at and 3.5 were investigated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The full field vorticity and velocity distributions as well as turbulent quantities were calculated in detail and the near wake structures were presented. The results show that the bi-stable flow nature was observed at and distinct vortex shedding of the upstream cylinders occurred at at . The techniques of Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) are also employed to validate the present LES method. The results show that the numerical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Therefore, the full field instantaneous and mean quantities of the flow field, velocity field and vorticity field can be extracted from the LES results for further study of the complex flow characteristics.

  10. The hydrodynamics of locomotion at intermediate Reynolds numbers: undulatory swimming in ascidian larvae (Botrylloides sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Matthew J; Azizi, Emanuel; Strother, James A

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how the shape and motion of an aquatic animal affects the performance of swimming requires knowledge of the fluid forces that generate thrust and drag. These forces are poorly understood for the large diversity of animals that swim at Reynolds numbers (Re) between 10(0) and 10(2). We experimentally tested quasi-steady and unsteady blade-element models of the hydrodynamics of undulatory swimming in the larvae of the ascidian Botrylloides sp. by comparing the forces predicted by these models with measured forces generated by tethered larvae and by comparing the swimming speeds predicted with measurements of the speed of freely swimming larvae. Although both models predicted mean forces that were statistically indistinguishable from measurements, the quasi-steady model predicted the timing of force production and mean swimming speed more accurately than the unsteady model. This suggests that unsteady force (i.e. the acceleration reaction) does not play a role in the dynamics of steady undulatory swimming at Re approximately 10(2). We explored the relative contribution of viscous and inertial force to the generation of thrust and drag at 10(0)10(2)) and low (<10(0)) Re, the fluid forces that generate thrust cannot be assumed to be the same as those that generate drag at intermediate Re.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Low Reynolds Number Fluid-Structure Interaction with Immersed Boundary Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Pingjian; Zhang Wenping

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a numerical scheme on the basis of semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations (SIMPLE) algorithm to simulate incompressible unsteady flows with fluid-structure interaction. The Navier-Stokes equation is discretized spatially with collocated finite volume method and Eulerian implicit method in time domain. The hybrid method that combines immersed boundary method (IBM) and volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to deal with rigid body motion in fluid domain. The details of movement of immersed boundary (IB) and calculation of VOF are also described. This method can be easily applied to any existing finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver without complex operation, with which fluid flow interaction of arbitrarily complex geometry can be realized on a fixed mesh. The method is verified by low Reynolds number flows passing both stationary and oscillating cylinders. The drag and lift coefficients acquired by the study well accord with other published results, which indicate the reasonability of the proposed method.

  12. Swimming at low Reynolds number: a beginners guide to undulatory locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Netta; Boyle, Jordan H.

    2010-03-01

    Undulatory locomotion is a means of self-propulsion that relies on the generation and propagation of waves along a body. As a mode of locomotion it is primitive and relatively simple, yet can be remarkably robust. No wonder then, that it is so prevalent across a range of biological scales from motile bacteria to gigantic prehistoric snakes. Key to understanding undulatory locomotion is the body's interplay with the physical environment, which the swimmer or crawler will exploit to generate propulsion, and in some cases, even to generate the underlying undulations. This review focuses by and large on undulators in the low Reynolds number regime, where the physics of the environment can be much more tractable. We review some key concepts and theoretical advances, as well as simulation tools and results applied to selected examples of biological swimmers. In particular, we extend the discussion to some simple cases of locomotion in non-Newtonian media as well as to small animals, in which the nervous system, motor control, body properties and the environment must all be considered to understand how undulations are generated and modulated. To conclude, we review recent progress in microrobotic undulators that may one day become commonplace in applications ranging from toxic waste disposal to minimally invasive surgery.

  13. Reynolds number dependence of the drag coefficient for laminar flow through fine-scale photoetched screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, T. J.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1993-06-01

    The laminar steady flow downstream of fine-mesh screens is studied. Instead of woven-wire screens, high-uniformity screens are fabricated by photoetching holes into 50.8-micron-thick Inconel sheets. The resulting screens have minimum wire widths of 50.8 microns and inter-wire separations of 254 and 318 microns for the two screens examined. A flow facility has been constructed for experiments with these screens. Air is passed through the screens at upstream velocities yielding wire width Reynolds numbers from 2 to 35. To determine the drag coefficient, pressure drops across the screens are measured using pressure transducers and manometers. Three-dimensional flow simulations are also performed. The computational drag coefficients consistently overpredict the experimental values. However, the computational results exhibit sensitivity to the assumed wire cross section, indicating that detailed knowledge of the wire cross section is essential for unambiguous interpretation of experiments using photoetched screens. Standard semiempirical drag correlations for woven-wire screens do not predict the present experimental results with consistent accuracy.

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF FLOW BEHAVIOR IN DRIVEN CAVITY AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudhail Bin Abdul Munir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, due to rapidly increasing computational power, computational methods have become the essential tools to conduct researches in various engineering fields.  In parallel to the development of ultra high speed digital computers, computational fluid dynamics (CFD has become the new third approach apart from theory and experiment in the philosophical study and development of fluid dynamics.  Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is an alternative method to conventional CFD.  LBM is relatively new approach that uses simple microscopic models to simulate complicated microscopic behavior of transport phenomena.  In this paper, fluid flow behaviors of steady incompressible flow inside lid driven square cavity are studied.  Numerical calculations are conducted for different Reynolds numbers by using Lattice Boltzmann scheme.  The objective of the paper is to demonstrate the capability of this lattice Boltzmann scheme for engineering applications particularly in fluid transport phenomena. Keywords-component; lattice Boltzmann method, lid driven cavity, computational fluid dynamics.

  15. Learning from jellyfish: Fluid transport in muscular pumps at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Janna; Dabiri, John

    2010-11-01

    Biologically inspired hydrodynamic propulsion and maneuvering strategies promise the advancement of medical implants and minimally invasive clinical tools. We have chosen juvenile jellyfish as a model system for investigating fluid dynamics and morphological properties underlying fluid transport by a muscular pump at intermediate Reynolds numbers. Recently we have described how natural variations in viscous forces are balanced by changes in jellyfish body shape (phenotypic plasticity), to the effect of facilitating efficient body-fluid interaction. Complementing these studies in our live model organisms, we are also engaged in engineering an artificial jellyfish, that is, a jellyfish-inspired construct of a flexible plastic sheet actuated by a monolayer of rat cardiomyocytes. The main challenges here are (1) to derive a body shape and deformation suitable for effective fluid transport under physiological conditions, (2) to understand the mechanical properties of the muscular film and derive a design capable of the desired deformation, (3) to master the proper alignment and timely contraction of the muscle component needed to achieve the desired deformation, and (4) to evaluate the performance of the design.

  16. Hydrodynamic interaction on large-Reynolds-number aligned bubbles: Drag effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Munoz, J., E-mail: jrm@correo.azc.uam.mx [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Polimeros, Marcos Achar Lobaton No. 2, Tepexpan, 55885 Acolman, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Soria, A. [Departamento de IPH, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gama-Goicochea, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Polimeros, Marcos Achar Lobaton No. 2, Tepexpan, 55885 Acolman, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > The hydrodynamic interaction of a pair aligned equal-sized bubbles is analyzed. > The leading bubble wake decreases the drag on the trailing bubble. > A new semi-analytical model for the trailing bubble's drag is presented. > The equilibrium distance between bubbles is predicted. - Abstract: The hydrodynamic interaction of two equal-sized spherical gas bubbles rising along a vertical line with a Reynolds number (Re) between 50 and 200 is analyzed. An approach to estimate the trailing bubble drag based on the search of a proper reference fluid velocity is proposed. Our main result is a new, simple semi-analytical model for the trailing bubble drag. Additionally, the equilibrium separation distance between bubbles is predicted. The proposed models agree quantitatively up to small distances between bubbles, with reported data for 50 {<=} Re {<=} 200. The relative average error for the trailing bubble drag, Er, is found to be in the range 1.1 {<=} Er {<=} 1.7, i.e., it is of the same order of the analytical predictions in the literature.

  17. Turbulent Flow Physics and Noise in High Reynolds Number Compressible Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    In this talk I will present a snapshot of our ongoing research in high Reynolds number turbulent compressible jets. The high speed axisymmetric jet work (Mach 0.6 - 1.1) has been jointly performed with Spectral Energies LLC through AFRL support and involves 10 kHz and large window PIV data extracted from the near field jet plume, simultaneously sampled with near field pressure and far field noise. We have learned from the simultaneously sampled 10 kHz PIV near field plume and far field noise data, using POD/OID and Wavelet filtering, that there are certain "loud" velocity modes that have low averaged turbulent kinetic energy content but strongly correlate with the far field noise. From the large window PIV data obtained at Mach 1.0 and 1.1, specific POD modes were found to contain important physics of the problem. For example, the large-scale structure of the jet, shock-related fluctuations, and turbulent mixing regions of the flow were isolated through POD. By computing cross correlations, particular POD modes were found to be related to particular noise spectra. I will conclude with a description of our complex nozzle work which uses the multi-stream supersonic single expansion rectangular nozzle (SERN) recently installed in our large anechoic chamber at SU. This work is funded from both AFOSR (joint with OSU with a primary focus on flow physics) and Spectral Energies LLC (via AFRL funds with a focus on noise). Particular emphasis will be on insight gained into this complex 3D flow field (and its relationship to the far field noise) from applications of POD, Wavelet filtering and DMD to various numerical (LES) and experimental (PIV, high speed schlieren, near and far field pressure) data sets, at a core nozzle Mach number of 1.6 and a second stream Mach number of 1.0.

  18. Long-range μPIV in the turbulent region of a jet, at high Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Elsinga, G.E.; Westerweel, J.

    The present work involves the investigation of the fine scale motions in the turbulent region of a high Reynolds number air jet. In the fully developed region of the jets, the small scales of turbulence are assumed to be isotropic, and expected to contain elongated vortices (worms), whose diameter s

  19. Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics of pipe flows measured with 3D-PTV at moderate and high Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, J.L.G.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) measurements have provided accurate Eulerian and Lagrangian high-order statistics of velocity and acceleration fluctuations and correlations at Reynolds number 10,300, based on the bulk velocity and the pipe diameter. Spatial resolution requir

  20. Summary of the Blind Test Campaign to predict the High Reynolds number performance of DU00-W-210 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Özlem Ceyhan; Pires, Oscar; Munduate, Xabier;

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a blind test campaign organized in the AVATAR project to predict the high Reynolds number performance of a wind turbine airfoil for wind turbine applications. The DU00-W-210 airfoil was tested in the DNW-HDG pressurized wind tunnel in order to investigate the ...

  1. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-01

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to `simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.

  2. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, T; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-01-01

    We numerically analyse the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number, ${\\rm Re}_a$. As ${\\rm Re}_a \\to 0$ and as the box size of the system tends to infinity we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in ${\\rm Re}_a$ for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are corrections to the analytical result of order ${\\rm Re}_a^{3/2}$. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice-Boltzmann simulations to analyse the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio $\\lambda_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.137$ below which tumbling ...

  3. Production of microbubbles from axisymmetric flow focusing in the jetting regime for moderate Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, E J; Acero, A J; Montanero, J M; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2014-06-01

    We analyze both experimentally and numerically the formation of microbubbles in the jetting regime reached when a moderately viscous liquid stream focuses a gaseous meniscus inside a converging micronozzle. If the total (stagnation) pressure of the injected gas current is fixed upstream, then there are certain conditions on which a quasisteady gas meniscus forms. The meniscus tip is sharpened by the liquid stream down to the gas molecular scale. On the other side, monodisperse collections of microbubbles can be steadily produced in the jetting regime if the feeding capillary is appropriately located inside the nozzle. In this case, the microbubble size depends on the feeding capillary position. The numerical simulations for an imposed gas flow rate show that a recirculation cell appears in the gaseous meniscus for low enough values of that parameter. The experiments allow one to conclude that the bubble pinch-off comprises two phases: (i) a stretching motion of the precursor jet where the neck radius versus the time before the pinch essentially follows a potential law, and (ii) a final stage where a very thin and slender gaseous thread forms and eventually breaks apart into a number of micron-sized bubbles. Because of the difference between the free surface and core velocities, the gaseous jet breakage differs substantially from that of liquid capillary jets and gives rise to bubbles with diameters much larger than those expected from the Rayleigh-type capillary instability. The dependency of the bubble diameter upon the flow-rate ratio agrees with the scaling law derived by A. M. Gañán-Calvo [Phys. Rev. E 69, 027301 (2004)], although a slight influence of the Reynolds number can be observed in our experiments.

  4. Experiments on the Flow Field and Acoustic Properties of a Mach number 0·75 Turbulent Air Jet at a Low Reynolds Number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, H.J.; Moore, P.; Delfos, R.; Boersma, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results of a detailed investigation of the flow and acoustic properties of a turbulent jet with Mach number 0·75 and Reynolds number 3·5 103. We describe the methods and experimental procedures followed during the measurements, and subsequently present the f

  5. The effect of Reynolds number on inertial particle dynamics in isotropic turbulence. Part II: Simulations with gravitational effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Peter J; Collins, Lance R

    2015-01-01

    In Part I of this study, we analyzed the motion of inertial particles in isotropic turbulence in the absence of gravity using direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, in Part II, we introduce gravity and study its effect over a wide range of flow Reynolds numbers, Froude numbers, and particle Stokes numbers. We see that gravity causes particles to sample the flow more uniformly and reduces the time particles can spend interacting with the underlying turbulence. We also find that gravity tends to increase inertial particle accelerations, and we introduce a model to explain that effect. We then analyze the particle relative velocities and radial distribution functions (RDFs), which are generally seen to be independent of Reynolds number for low and moderate Kolmogorov-scale Stokes numbers $St$. We see that gravity causes particle relative velocities to decrease, and that the relative velocities have higher scaling exponents with gravity. We observe that gravity has a non-trivial effect on clustering, acting to ...

  6. Experimental investigation of influence of Reynolds number on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; He, GuoSheng; Kulkarni, Varun; Wang, JinJun

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was employed to study the effect of Reynolds number ( Re sj) on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall. Four Reynolds numbers ranging from 166 to 664 were investigated for comparison while other parameters were kept constant. It is found that the Reynolds number has a significant impact on the spatial evolution of near-wall vortical structures of the impinging synthetic jet. Velocity triple decomposition reveals that periodic Reynolds shear stresses produced by both impinging and secondary vortex rings agree well with a four-quadrant-type distribution rule, and the random velocity fluctuations are strengthened as Re sj increases. For radial wall jet, radial velocity profiles exhibit a self-similar behavior for all Re sj, and this self-similar profile gradually deviates from the laminar solution as Re sj is increased. In particular, the self-similar profile for low Re sj (166) coincides with the laminar solution indicating that periodic velocity fluctuations produced by vortex rings have little effect on the velocity profile of the laminar wall jet. This also provides evidence that the impinging synthetic jet is more effective in mixing than the continuous jet for the laminar flow. For the high Re sj, the mean skin friction coefficient has a slower decay rate after reaching peak, and the radial momentum flux has a higher value at locations far away from the impingement region, both of these can be attributed to the enhanced random fluctuations.

  7. Numerical simulations of flame dynamics in the near-field of high-Reynolds number jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Rishikesh

    Recent experiments in diesel jet flames show that flame lift-off has a significant influence on pollutant formation. Lift-off occurs in the near-field of the jet, which is characterized by complex interactions between turbulence and chemistry. Commonly employed modeling approaches based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are limited in their capability to predict transient and steady lift-off phenomena, as they ignore effects due to unsteadiness and curvature that are inherent in the near-field. In the present work, we perform numerical investigations of localized flame dynamics in the near-field (x/d diesel engine applications. The primary focus is on the exploration of unsteady extinction/reignition phenomena. A dual approach involving large-eddy simulation (LES) of a 70,000-Re variable-density isothermal gaseous fuel jet, and studies of flame-vortex interactions and unsteady flamelets, under diesel engine conditions, is employed in this work. Results from flame-vortex interaction studies show that in the near-field (x/d 1.0) in the jet near-field,temporary flame weakening/recovery events are likely to occur. Steady flamelet models provide reasonable estimates of the mean temperature, and mean mass fractions of the major species and unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs), but are inadequate for the prediction of mean NO mass fractions. Extrapolation of the analysis to jets with higher global strain rates shows that unsteady effects on the localized flame dynamics are important for the prediction of transient and steady lift-off behavior.

  8. Log law of the wall revisited in Taylor-Couette flows at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Suazo, Claudio Alberto Torres; Liné, Alain

    2016-11-01

    We provide Reynolds averaged azimuthal velocity profiles, measured in a Taylor-Couette system in turbulent flow, at medium Reynolds (7800 image velocimetry technique. We find that in the wall regions, close to the inner and outer cylinders, the azimuthal velocity profile reveals a significant deviation from classical logarithmic law. In order to propose a new law of the wall, the profile of turbulent mixing length was estimated from data processing; it was shown to behave nonlinearly with the radial wall distance. Based on this turbulent mixing length expression, a law of the wall was proposed for the Reynolds averaged azimuthal velocity, derived from momentum balance and validated by comparison to different data. In addition, the profile of viscous dissipation rate was investigated and compared to the global power needed to maintain the inner cylinder in rotation.

  9. Exact two-dimensionalization of low-magnetic-Reynolds-number flows subject to a strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of flows, including turbulent flows, driven by a horizontal body-force and subject to a vertical magnetic field, with the following question in mind: for very strong applied magnetic field, is the flow mostly two-dimensional, with remaining weak three-dimensional fluctuations, or does it become exactly 2D, with no dependence along the vertical? We first focus on the quasi-static approximation, i.e. the asymptotic limit of vanishing magnetic Reynolds number Rm << 1: we prove that the flow becomes exactly 2D asymptotically in time, regardless of the initial condition and provided the interaction parameter N is larger than a threshold value. We call this property "absolute two-dimensionalization": the attractor of the system is necessarily a (possibly turbulent) 2D flow. We then consider the full-magnetohydrodynamic equations and we prove that, for low enough Rm and large enough N, the flow becomes exactly two-dimensional in the long-time limit provided the initial vertically-de...

  10. Influence of Turbulence Parameters, Reynolds Number, and Body Shape on Stagnation-Region Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfossen, G. James; Simoneau, Robert J.; Ching, Chan Y.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was threefold: (1) to determine if a free-stream turbulence length scale existed that would cause the greatest augmentation in stagnation-region heat transfer over laminar levels; (2) to investigate the effect of velocity gradient on stagnation-region heat transfer augmentation by free-stream turbulence; and (3) to develop a prediction tool for stagnation heat transfer in the presence of free-stream turbulence. Heat transfer was measured in the stagnation region of four models with elliptical leading edges that had ratios of major to minor axes of 1:1, 1.5:1, 2.25:1, and 3:1. Five turbulence-generating grids were fabricated; four were square mesh, biplane grids made from square bars. The fifth grid was an array of fine parallel wires that were perpendicular to the model spanwise direction. Heat transfer data were taken at Reynolds numbers ranging from 37 000 to 228 000. Turbulence intensities were in the range of 1.1 to 15.9% while the ratio of integral length scale to leading-edge diameter ranged from 0.05 to 0.30. Stagnation-point velocity gradient was varied by nearly 50%. Stagnation-region heat transfer augmentation was found to increase with decreasing length scale but no optimum length scale was found. Heat transfer augmentation due to turbulence was found to be unaffected by the velocity gradient near the leading edge. A correlation was developed that fit heat transfer data for the square-bar grids to within +/- 4%.

  11. Rotation induced flow suppression around two tandem circular cylinders at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Dipankar; Gupta, Krishan; Kumar, Virendra; Varghese, Sachin Abraham

    2017-08-01

    The rotation to a bluff object is known to have a stabilizing effect on the fluid dynamic transport around the body. An unsteady periodic flow can be degenerated into a steady flow pattern depending on the rate of rotation imparted to the body. On the other hand, multiple bodies placed in tandem arrangement with respect to an incoming flow can cause destabilization to the flow as a result of the complicated wake interaction between the bodies. Accordingly, the spacing between the bodies and the rate of rotation have significant impact on the overall fluid dynamic transport around them. The present work aims to understand how these two competing factors are actually influencing the fluidic transport across a pair of identical rotating circular cylinders kept in tandem arrangement in an unconfined medium. The cylinders are subjected to a uniform free stream flow and the gaps between the cylinders are varied as 0.2, 0.7, 1.5 and 3.0. Both the cylinders are made to rotate in the clockwise sense. The Reynolds number based on the free stream flow is taken as 100. A two-dimensional finite volume based transient computation is performed for a range of dimensionless rotational speeds of the cylinders (0 ≤ Ω ≤ 2.75). The results show that the shedding phenomena can be observed up to a critical rate of rotation (Ωcr) depending on the gap spacing. Beyond Ωcr, the flow becomes stabilized and finally completely steady as Ω increases further. Increasing the gap initially causes a slight decrease in the critical rotational speed, however, it increases at a rapid rate for larger gap spacing.

  12. LARGE AERODYNAMIC FORCES ON A SWEEPING WING AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Mao; WU Jianghao

    2004-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces and flow structure of a model insect wing is studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations numerically. After an initial start from rest, the wing is made to execute an azimuthal rotation (sweeping) at a large angle of attack and constant angular velocity. The Reynolds number (Re) considered in the present note is 480 (Re is based on the mean chord length of the wing and the speed at 60% wing length from the wing root). During the constant-speed sweeping motion, the stall is absent and large and approximately constant lift and drag coefficients can be maintained. The mechanism for the absence of the stall or the maintenance of large aerodynamic force coefficients is as follows. Soon after the initial start, a vortex ring, which consists of the leading-edge vortex (LEV), the starting vortex, and the two wing-tip vortices, is formed in the wake of the wing. During the subsequent motion of the wing, a base-to-tip spanwise flow converts the vorticity in the LEV to the wing tip and the LEV keeps an approximately constant strength. This prevents the LEV from shedding. As a result,the size of the vortex ring increases approximately linearly with time, resulting in an approximately constant time rate of the first moment of vorticity, or approximately constant lift and drag coefficients.The variation of the relative velocity along the wing span causes a pressure gradient along the wingspan. The base-to-tip spanwise flow is mainly maintained by the pressure-gradient force.

  13. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes investigation of high-lift low-pressure turbine blade aerodynamics at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, Bryan M.

    Design trends for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) section of modern gas turbine engines include increasing the loading per airfoil, which promises a decreased airfoil count resulting in reduced manufacturing and operating costs. Accurate Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes predictions of separated boundary layers and transition to turbulence are needed, as the lack of an economical and reliable computational model has contributed to this high-lift concept not reaching its full potential. Presented here for what is believed to be the first time applied to low-Re computations of high-lift linear cascade simulations is the Abe-Kondoh-Nagano (AKN) linear low-Re two-equation turbulence model which utilizes the Kolmogorov velocity scale for improved predictions of separated boundary layers. A second turbulence model investigated is the Kato-Launder modified version of the AKN, denoted MPAKN, which damps turbulent production in highly strained regions of flow. Fully Laminar solutions have also been calculated in an effort to elucidate the transitional quality of the turbulence model solutions. Time accurate simulations of three modern high-lift blades at a Reynolds number of 25,000 are compared to experimental data and higher-order computations in order to judge the accuracy of the results, where it is shown that the RANS simulations with highly refined grids can produce both quantitatively and qualitatively similar separation behavior as found in experiments. In particular, the MPAKN model is shown to predict the correct boundary layer behavior for all three blades, and evidence of transition is found through inspection of the components of the Reynolds Stress Tensor, spectral analysis, and the turbulence production parameter. Unfortunately, definitively stating that transition is occurring becomes an uncertain task, as similar evidence of the transition process is found in the Laminar predictions. This reveals that boundary layer reattachment may be a result of laminar

  14. Reynolds Number Trends in Computational Solutions of Two-Dimensional Airfoils with Taguchi Techniques and Grid Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    have been the angle of attack, the turbulence model, the airfoil, the Reynolds number, and the grid spacing. The Taguchi method also allows the...important to remember that Taguchi Methods do not provide "hard engineering" numbers - only the statistical significance of a particular experimental factor...34good", "bad", or "acceptable". To use a Taguchi Method to aid in evaluating a CFD code would require sound engineering judgement since so very many

  15. Self-sustained oscillations between two tandem cylinders at Reynolds number 1,000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, C.H.; Chein, S.M.; Hsieh, H.J. [National Chung Hsing University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Taichung (China)

    2008-04-15

    This study focuses on the self-sustained oscillatory flow characteristics between two tandem circular cylinders of equal diameter placed in a uniform inflow. The Reynolds number (Re{sub D}), based on the cylinder diameter, was around 1,000 and all experiments were performed in a recirculating water channel. The streamwise distance between two tandem cylinders ranged within 1.5 {<=} X{sub c}/D {<=} 7.0. Here X{sub c} denotes the center-to-center distance between two tandem cylinders. For all experiments studied herein, quantitative velocity measurements were performed using hot-film anemometer and the LDV system. The laser sheet technique was employed for qualitative flow visualization. The wavelet transform was applied to elucidate the temporal variation and phase difference between two spectral components of the velocity signals detected in the flow field. The remarkable finding was that when two tandem circular cylinders were spaced at a distance within 4.5 {<=} X{sub c}/D {<=} 5.5, two symmetrical unstable shear layers with a certain wavelength were observed to impinge onto the downstream cylinder. The responding frequency (f{sub u}), measured between these two cylinders, was much higher than the natural shedding frequency behind a single isolated cylinder at the same Re{sub D}. This responding frequency decreased as the distance X{sub c}/D increased. Not until X{sub c}/D {>=} 6.0, did it recover to the natural shedding frequency behind a single isolated cylinder. Between two tandem cylinders, the Strouhal numbers (St{sub c} = f{sub u} X{sub c}/U{sub c}) maintained a nearly constant value of 3, indicating the self-sustained oscillating flow characteristics with a wavelength X{sub c}/3. Here U{sub c} is the convection speed of the unstable shear layers between two tandem cylinders. At Re{sub D} = 1,000, the self-sustained oscillating characteristics between two tandem circular cylinders were proven to exhibit a sustained flow pattern, not just a sporadic

  16. Study of parameters and entrainment of a jet in cross-flow arrangement with transition at two low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Camilo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany); Convenio Andres Bello, Instituto Internacional de Investigaciones Educativas para la Integracion, La Paz (Bolivia); Denev, Jordan A.; Bockhorn, Henning [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engler-Bunte-Institute, Combustion Division, Karlsruhe (Germany); Suntz, Rainer [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of the mixing process is one of the main issues in chemical engineering and combustion and the configuration of a jet into a cross-flow (JCF) is often employed for this purpose. Experimental data are gained for the symmetry plane in a JCF-arrangement of an air flow using a combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The experimental data with thoroughly measured boundary conditions are complemented with direct numerical simulations, which are based on idealized boundary conditions. Two similar cases are studied with a fixed jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio of 3.5 and variable cross-flow Reynolds numbers equal to 4,120 and 8,240; in both cases the jet issues from the pipe at laminar conditions. This leads to a laminar-to-turbulent transition, which depends on the Reynolds number and occurs quicker for the case with higher Reynolds number in both experiments and simulations as well. It was found that the Reynolds number only slightly affects the jet trajectory, which in the case with the higher Reynolds number is slightly deeper. It is attributed to the changed boundary layer shape of the cross-flow. Leeward streamlines bend toward the jet and are responsible for the strong entrainment of cross-flow fluid into the jet. Velocity components are compared for the two Reynolds numbers at the leeward side at positions where strongest entrainment is present and a pressure minimum near the jet trajectory is found. The numerical simulations showed that entrainment is higher for the case with the higher Reynolds number. The latter is attributed to the earlier transition in this case. Fluid entrainment of the jet in cross-flow is more than twice stronger than for a similar flow of a jet issuing into a co-flowing stream. This comparison is made along the trajectory of the two jets at a distance of 5.5 jet diameters downstream and is based on the results from the direct numerical simulations and recently published

  17. Stabilized MLPG-VF-based method with CBS scheme for laminar flow at high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjilela, Vali; Salimi, Davood; Tavasoli, Ali; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin vorticity-stream function (MLPG-VF) method is extended to solve two-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer equations for high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. The characteristic-based split (CBS) scheme which uses unity test function is employed for discretization, and the moving least square (MLS) method is used for interpolation of the field variables. Four test cases are considered to evaluate the present algorithm, namely lid-driven cavity flow with Reynolds numbers up to and including 104, flow over a backward-facing step at Reynolds number of 800, natural convection in a square cavity for Rayleigh numbers up to and including 108, and natural convection in a concentric square outer cylinder and circular inner cylinder annulus for Rayleigh numbers up to and including 107. In each case, the result obtained using the proposed algorithm is either compared with the results from the literatures or with those obtained using conventional numerical techniques. The present algorithm shows stable results at lower or equal computational cost compared to the other upwinding schemes usually employed in the MLPG method. Close agreements between the compared results as well as higher accuracy of the proposed method show the ability of this stabilized algorithm.

  18. Bounds on the attractor dimension for magnetohydrodynamic channel flow with parallel magnetic field at low magnetic Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R; Pothérat, A

    2015-05-01

    We investigate aspects of low-magnetic-Reynolds-number flow between two parallel, perfectly insulating walls in the presence of an imposed magnetic field parallel to the bounding walls. We find a functional basis to describe the flow, well adapted to the problem of finding the attractor dimension and which is also used in subsequent direct numerical simulation of these flows. For given Reynolds and Hartmann numbers, we obtain an upper bound for the dimension of the attractor by means of known bounds on the nonlinear inertial term and this functional basis for the flow. Three distinct flow regimes emerge: a quasi-isotropic three-dimensional (3D) flow, a nonisotropic 3D flow, and a 2D flow. We find the transition curves between these regimes in the space parametrized by Hartmann number Ha and attractor dimension d(att). We find how the attractor dimension scales as a function of Reynolds and Hartmann numbers (Re and Ha) in each regime. We also investigate the thickness of the boundary layer along the bounding wall and find that in all regimes this scales as 1/Re, independently of the value of Ha, unlike Hartmann boundary layers found when the field is normal to the channel. The structure of the set of least dissipative modes is indeed quite different between these two cases but the properties of turbulence far from the walls (smallest scales and number of degrees of freedom) are found to be very similar.

  19. Flight Reynolds Number Testing of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    A 6%-scale unpowered model of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) ALAS-11-rev3c configuration was tested in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility to obtain static aerodynamic data at flight Reynolds numbers. Subsonic and transonic data were obtained for Mach numbers between 0.3 and 0.95 for angles of attack from -4 to +22 degrees and angles of sideslip from -10 to +10 degrees. Data were also obtained at various intermediate Reynolds numbers between 2.5 million and 45 million depending on Mach number in order to examine the effects of Reynolds number on the vehicle. Force and moment data were obtained using a 6-component strain gauge balance that operated both at warm temperatures (+120 . F) and cryogenic temperatures (-250 . F). Surface pressure data were obtained with electronically scanned pressure units housed in heated enclosures designed to survive cryogenic temperatures. Data obtained during the 3-week test entry were used to support development of the LAV aerodynamic database and to support computational fluid dynamics code validation. Furthermore, one of the outcomes of the test was the reduction of database uncertainty on axial force coefficient for the static unpowered LAV. This was accomplished as a result of good data repeatability throughout the test and because of decreased uncertainty on scaling wind tunnel data to flight.

  20. INVESTIGATION OF DOMINANT FREQUENCIES IN TRANSITION REYNOLDS NUMBER RANGE OF FLOW AROUND A CIRCULAR CYLINDER PART Ⅱ: THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VORTEX SHED DING AND TRANSITION FREQUENCIES AT DIFFERENT REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AHMED N A

    2006-01-01

    An attempt has been made to explore whether the power relation can be obtained from theoretical considerations. The classical laminar and turbulent boundary layer concepts have been employed to determine appropriate values of the scaling lengths associated with vortex shedding and shear layer frequencies to predict the power law relationship with Reynolds number. The predicted results are in good agreement with experimental results. The findings will provide a greater insight into the overall phenomenon involved.

  1. An experimental investigation on Lagrangian correlations of small-scale turbulence at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Michele; Liberzon, Alexander; Tsinober, Arkady; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    Lagrangian auto- and cross-correlation functions of the rate of strain s(2) , enstrophy omega (2) , their respective production terms -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki} and omega_{i}omega_{j}s_{ij}, and material derivatives, Ds s(2/Ds) t and Dsomega(2/Ds) t are estimated using experimental results obtained through three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (three-dimensional-PTV) in homogeneous turbulence at Re_{lambda} {=} 50. The autocorrelation functions are used to estimate the Lagrangian time scales of different quantities, while the cross-correlation functions are used to clarify some aspects of the interaction mechanisms between vorticity omega and the rate of strain tensor s_{ij}, that are responsible for the statistically stationary, in the Eulerian sense, levels of enstrophy and rate of strain in homogeneous turbulent flow. Results show that at the Reynolds number of the experiment these quantities exhibit different time scales, varying from the relatively long time scale of omega(2) to the relatively shorter time scales of s(2) , omega_{i}omega_{j}s_{ij} and -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki}. Cross-correlation functions suggest that the dynamics of enstrophy and strain, in this flow, is driven by a set of different-time-scale processes that depend on the local magnitudes of s(2) and omega(2) . In particular, there are indications that, in a statistical sense, (i) strain production anticipates enstrophy production in low-strain low-enstrophy regions (ii) strain production and enstrophy production display high correlation in high-strain high-enstrophy regions, (iii) vorticity dampening in high-enstrophy regions is associated with weak correlations between -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki} and s(2) and between -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki} and Ds s(2) /Ds t, in addition to a marked anti-correlation between omega_{i}omega_{j}s_{ij} and Ds s(2) /Ds t. Vorticity dampening in high-enstrophy regions is thus related to the decay of s(2) and its production term, -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki}.

  2. Active Flow Separation Control of a Laminar Airfoil at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Nathan Owen

    Detailed investigation of the NACA 643-618 is obtained at a Reynolds number of 6.4x104 and angle of attack sweep of -5° locked investigation, by way of particle image velocimetry, at ten degrees angle of attack illuminates physical mechanisms responsible for separation control of pulsed actuation at a low frequency and duty cycle. Temporal resolution of large structure formation and wake shedding is obtained, revealing a key mechanism for separation control. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is identified as responsible for the formation of smaller structures in the separation region which produce favorable momentum transfer, assisting in further thinning the separation region and then fully attaching the boundary layer. Closed-loop separation control of an oscillating NACA 643-618 airfoil at Re = 6.4x104 is investigated in an effort to autonomously minimize control effort while maximizing aerodynamic performance. High response sensing of unsteady flow with on-surface hot-film sensors placed at zero, twenty, and forty percent chord monitors the airfoil performance and determines the necessity of active flow control. Open-loop characterization identified the use of the forty percent sensor as the actuation trigger. Further, the sensor at twenty percent chord is used to distinguish between pre- and post- leading edge stall; this demarcation enables the utilization of optimal blowing parameters for each circumstance. The range of effectiveness of the employed control algorithm is explored, charting the practicality of the closed-loop control algorithm. To further understand the physical mechanisms inherent in the control process, the transients of the aerodynamic response to flow control are investigated. The on-surface hot-film sensor placed at the leading edge is monitored to understand the time delays and response times associated with the initialization of pulsed normal blowing. The effects of angle of attack and pitch rate on these models are investigated. Black

  3. Characteristics of the Velocity Power Spectrum as a Function of Taylor Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Alejandro J.

    An understanding of the wide range of scales present in a turbulent flow as well as the turbulence kinetic energy associated with those scales can provide significant insight into the modeling of such flows. Since turbulence is a stochastic process, statistical quantities such as mean, root mean square, correlations and spectra are used to identify and understand the evolution of turbulent flows. Time-resolved velocity measurements presented herein are obtained using hot-wire anemometry in nearly homogeneous, isotropic and moderately high Taylor Reynolds number, Rlambda , flow downstream of an active grid. Velocity power spectra presented herein are show that the slope, n, of the inertial subrange, where the inertial subrange is defined as the wavenumber range where the power spectrum scales as kappa--n, varies with R lambda as n = 1.69 -- 5.86 Rlambda--0.645. This variation in the slope of the inertial subrange is consistent with measurements presented by Mydlarski and Warhaft (1996) in an active grid flow and Saddoughi and Veeravalli (1994) in a turbulent boundary layer. The effectiveness of velocity power spectrum normalizations proposed by Kolmogorov (1963), Von Karman and Howarth (1938), and George (1992) are compared qualitatively and quantitatively. The effectiveness of these normalizations suggests how the turbulent scales make specific portions of the velocity spectrum self-similar. It is found that the relation between the large and small scales is also shown by the normalized dissipation rate, which is defined as the dissipation rate normalized by the ratio of the turbulence kinetic energy to the time scale of the large scale structure is shown to be a constant with respect to R lambda for Rlambda ≥ 450. A modified model of the one-dimensional velocity power spectrum is proposed that is based on a model proposed by Pope (2000), which has been demonstrated to model power spectra at high value of Rlambda where the slope of the inertial subrange is very

  4. Coupled dynamics of vortex-induced vibration and stationary wall at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-09-01

    The flow past an elastically mounted circular cylinder placed in proximity to a plane wall is numerically studied in both two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). This paper aims to explain the mechanism of the cylinder bottom shear layer roll-up suppression in the context of laminar vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a cylinder placed in the vicinity of a plane stationary wall. In 2D simulations, VIV of a near-wall cylinder with structure-to-displaced fluid mass ratios of m* = 2 and 10 is investigated at the Reynolds number of Re = 100 at a representative gap ratio of e/D = 0.90, where e denotes the gap distance between the cylinder surface and the plane wall. First, the cylinder is placed at five different upstream distances, LU, to study the effects of the normalized wall boundary layer thickness, δ /D , on the hydrodynamic quantities involved in the VIV of a near-wall cylinder. It is found that the lock-in range shifts towards the direction of the higher reduced velocity Ur as δ /D increases and that the lock-in range widens as m* reduces. Second, via visualization of the vortex shedding patterns, four different modes are classified and the regime maps are provided for both m* = 2 and 10. Third, the proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is employed to assess the cylinder bottom shear layer roll-up suppression mechanism. For 3D simulations at Re = 200, the circular cylinder of a mass ratio of m* = 10 with a spanwise length of 4D is placed at a gap ratio of e/D = 0.90 and an upstream distance of LU = 10D. The 3D vortex patterns are investigated to re-affirm the vortex shedding suppression mechanism. The pressure distributions around the cylinder are identified within one oscillation cycle of VIV. The pressure and the shear stress distributions on the bottom wall are examined to demonstrate the effects of near-wall VIV on the force distributions along the plane wall. It is found that both the suction pressure and the shear stress right below the cylinder

  5. TR-PIV measurement of the wake behind a grooved cylinder at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying Zheng; Shi, Liu Liu; Yu, Jun

    2011-04-01

    A comparative study of the wakes behind cylinders with grooved and smooth surfaces was performed with a view to understand the wake characteristics associated with the adult Saguaro cacti. A low-speed recirculation water channel was established for the experiment; the Reynolds number, based on the free-stream velocity and cylinder diameter (D), was kept at ReD=1500. State-of-the-art time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) was employed to measure a total of 20 480 realizations of the wake field at a frame rate of 250 Hz, enabling a comprehensive view of the time- and phase-averaged wake pattern. In comparison to the wake behind the smooth cylinder, the length of the recirculation zone behind the grooved cylinder was extended by nearly 18.2%, yet the longitudinal velocity fluctuation intensity was considerably weakened. A global view of the peaked spectrum of the longitudinal velocity component revealed that the intermediate region for the grooved cylinder, which approximately corresponds to the transition region where the shear layer vortices interact, merge and shed before the formation of the Karman-like vortex street, was much wider than that for the smooth one. The unsteady events near St=0.3-0.4 were detected in the intermediate region behind the grooved cylinder, but no such events were found in the smooth cylinder system. Although the formation of the Karman-like vortex street was delayed by about 0.6D downstream for the grooved cylinder, no prominent difference in the vortex street region was found in the far wake for both cylinders. The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) method was used extensively to decompose the vector and swirling strength fields, which gave a close-up view of the vortices in the near wake. The first two POD modes of the swirling strength clarified the spatio-temporal characteristics of the shear layer vortices behind the grooved cylinder. The small-scale vortices superimposed on the shear layers behind the grooved cylinder

  6. Low Reynolds number kappa-epsilon and empirical transition models for oscillatory pipe flow and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christopher

    1993-11-01

    Stirling engine heat exchangers are shell-and-tube type with oscillatory flow (zero-mean velocity) for the inner fluid. This heat transfer process involves laminar-transition turbulent flow motions under oscillatory flow conditions. A low Reynolds number kappa-epsilon model, (Lam-Bremhorst form), was utilized in the present study to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a circular tube. An empirical transition model was used to activate the low Reynolds number k-e model at the appropriate time within the cycle for a given axial location within the tube. The computational results were compared with experimental flow and heat transfer data for: (1) velocity profiles, (2) kinetic energy of turbulence, (3) skin friction factor, (4) temperature profiles, and (5) wall heat flux. The experimental data were obtained for flow in a tube (38 mm diameter and 60 diameter long), with the maximum Reynolds number based on velocity being Re(sub max) = 11840, a dimensionless frequency (Valensi number) of Va = 80.2, at three axial locations X/D = 16, 30 and 44. The agreement between the computations and the experiment is excellent in the laminar portion of the cycle and good in the turbulent portion. Moreover, the location of transition was predicted accurately. The Low Reynolds Number kappa-epsilon model, together with an empirical transition model, is proposed herein to generate the wall heat flux values at different operating parameters than the experimental conditions. Those computational data can be used for testing the much simpler and less accurate one dimensional models utilized in 1-D Stirling Engine design codes.

  7. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number using the von Karman length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Longfei

    2016-12-01

    The von Karman length scale is able to reflect the size of the local turbulence structure. However, it is not suitable for the near wall region of wall-bounded flows, for its value is almost infinite there. In the present study, a simple and novel length scale combining the wall distance and the von Karman length scale is proposed by introducing a structural function. The new length scale becomes the von Karman length scale once local unsteady structures are detected. The proposed method is adopted in a series of turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that the proposed length scale with the structural function can precisely simulate turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, even with a coarse grid resolution.

  8. Numerical study on flow separation in 90° pipe bend under high Reynolds number by k-ε modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun Dutta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper makes an effort to find the flow separation characteristics under high Reynolds number in pipe bends. Single phase turbulent flow through pipe bends is investigated using k-ε turbulence model. After the validation of present model against existing experimental results, a detailed study has been performed to study the influence of Reynolds number on flow separation and reattachment. The separation region and the velocity field of the primary and the secondary flows in different sections have been illustrated. Numerical results show that flow separation can be clearly visualized for bend with low curvature ratio. Distributions of the velocity vector show the secondary motion clearly induced by the movement of fluid from inner to outer wall of the bend leading to flow separation. This paper provides numerical results to understand the flow characteristics of fluid flow in 90° bend pipe.

  9. A numerical study on effect of corner radius and Reynolds number on fluid flow over a square cylinder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRASENJIT DEY; AJOY K R DAS

    2017-07-01

    The behaviour of the fluid flowing over a square cylinder with rounded edges subjected to an upstream steady laminar flow was investigated numerically. Here, the commercial CFD software Fluent was used. A two-dimensional steady laminar flow has been investigated numerically at low Reynolds number 5<=Re<=45, different corner radii (r = 0.50, 0.51, 0.54, 0.59, 0.64 and 0.71) and blockage 0.05. The effects of the parameters such as Reynolds number and corner radius on the drag and laminar boundary layer have been studied for the first time. The results are shown in the form of drag coefficient, boundary layer and pressure coefficient on the cylinder surface. It is found that the boundary layer thickness and the displacement thickness decrease with decreasing of the corner radius for a particular Re and also the boundary layer profile shifted downwards on decreasing Re.

  10. Instability of the interface in two-layer flows with large viscosity contrast at small Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiebin Liu; Jifu Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The Kelvin–Helmholtz instability is believed to be the dominant instability mechanism for free shear flows at large Reynolds numbers. At small Reynolds numbers, a new instability mode is identified when the temporal instability of parallel viscous two fluid mixing layers is extended to current-fluid mud systems by considering a composite error function velocity profile. The new mode is caused by the large viscosity difference between the two fluids. This interfacial mode exists when the fluid mud boundary layer is sufficiently thin. Its performance is different from that of the Kelvin–Helmholtz mode. This mode has not yet been reported for interface instability problems with large viscosity contrasts. These results are essential for further stability analysis of flows relevant to the breaking up of this type of interface.

  11. Model-based scaling and prediction of the streamwise energy intensity in high-Reynolds number turbulent channels

    CERN Document Server

    Moarref, Rashad; Tropp, Joel A; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01

    We study the Reynolds number scaling of a gain-based, low-rank approximation to turbulent channel flows, determined by the resolvent formulation of McKeon & Sharma (2010), in order to obtain a description of the streamwise turbulence intensity from direct consideration of the Navier-Stokes equations. Under this formulation, the velocity field is decomposed into propagating waves (with single streamwise and spanwise wavelengths and wave speed) whose wall-normal shapes are determined from the principal singular function of the corresponding resolvent operator. We establish that the resolvent formulation admits three classes of wave parameters that induce universal behavior with Reynolds number on the low-rank model, and which are consistent with scalings proposed throughout the wall turbulence literature. For the rank-1 model subject to broadband forcing, the integrated streamwise energy density takes a universal form which is consistent with the dominant near-wall turbulent motions. When the shape of the f...

  12. Effects of non-uniform interfacial tension in small Reynolds number flow past a spherical liquid drop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Mason; G M Moremedi

    2011-09-01

    A singular perturbation solution is given for small Reynolds number flow past a spherical liquid drop. The interfacial tension required to maintain the drop in a spherical shape is calculated. When the interfacial tension gradient exceeds a critical value, a region of reversed flow occurs on the interface at the rear and the interior flow splits into two parts with reversed circulation at the rear. The magnitude of the interior fluid velocity is small, of order the Reynolds number. A thin transition layer attached to the drop at the rear occurs in the exterior flow. The effects could model the stagnant cap which forms as surfactant is added but the results apply however the variability in the interfacial tension might have been induced.

  13. Deformation of an elastic body in low Reynolds number transport: Relevance to biofilm deformation and streamer formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Nikhil; Das, Siddhartha; Mitra, Sushanta K.; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain analytical results for shear stress distributions inside an elastic body placed in a low Reynolds number transport. The problem definition is inspired by a recent experimental study (Valiei et al., Lab Chip, 2012, 12, 5133-5137) that reports the flow-triggered deformation of bacterial biofilms, formed on cylindrical rigid microposts, into long filamentous structures known as streamers. In our analysis, we consider an elastic body of finite thickness (forming a rim) pl...

  14. Numerical study of cavitation inception in the near field of an axisymmetric jet at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Stefano; Knio, Omar M.; Katz, Joseph

    2000-10-01

    Cavitation inception in the near field of high Reynolds number axisymmetric jets is analyzed using a simplified computational model. The model combines a vorticity-stream-function finite-difference scheme for the simulation of the unsteady flow field with a simplified representation for microscopic bubbles that are injected at the jet inlet. The motion of the bubbles is tracked in a Lagrangian reference frame by integrating a semiempirical dynamical equation which accounts for pressure, drag, and lift forces. The likelihood of cavitation inception is estimated based on the distributions of pressure and microscopic bubbles. The computations are used to examine the role of jet slenderness ratio, Reynolds number, bubble size, and bubble injection location on the cavitation inception indices. The results indicate that, for all bubble sizes considered, the cavitation inception index increases as the jet slenderness ratio decreases. Larger bubbles entrain more rapidly into the cores of concentrated vortices than smaller bubbles, and the corresponding inception indices are generally higher than those of smaller bubbles. The inception indices for larger bubbles are insensitive to the injection location, while the inception indices of smaller bubbles tend to increase when they are injected inside the shear layer near the nozzle lip. Although it affects the bubble distributions, variation of the Reynolds number leads to insignificant changes in pressure minima and in the inception indices of larger bubbles, having noticeable effect only on the inception indices of smaller bubbles. Computed results are consistent with, and provide plausible explanations for, several trends observed in recent jet cavitation experiments.

  15. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Non-Stationary Parameters on Effective Phenomena of a Pitching Airfoil at Low Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Naderi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various applications of ornithopter have led to research interest in oscillation airfoils which affect on low Reynolds number flight, like; pitching oscillation, heaving oscillation and flapping of a wing. The purpose of this study is investigation of aerodynamic characteristics of NACA0012 airfoil with a simple harmonic pitching oscillation at zero and 10 degrees of mean angle of attack. Therefore the effects of unstable parameters, including oscillation amplitude up to 10 degrees, reduced frequency up to 1.0, center of oscillation up to 6/8 chord length, and Reynolds number up to 5000 have been studied numerically. A pressure based algorithm using a finite volume element method has been used to solve Navier-Stokes equations. According to results, variation of each studied parameters at mean angle of attack of 0 degree do not cause significant changes in flow phenomena on airfoil but at mean angle of attack of 10 degrees, changing in reduced frequency and specially Reynolds number cause variations in flow phenomena. These variations are because of “wake capturing” and/or “added mass” phenomena.

  17. Study of the near-wall-turbulent region of the high-Reynolds-number boundary layer using an atmospheric flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Gary J.; Marusic, Ivan

    2006-02-01

    Data from the near-wall-turbulent region of the high-Reynolds-number atmospheric surface layer are used to analyse the attached-eddy model of wall turbulence. All data were acquired during near-neutral conditions at the Surface Layer Turbulence and Environmental Science Test (SLTEST) facility located in the western Utah Great Salt Lake Desert. Instantaneous streamwise and wall-normal components of velocity were collected with a wall-normal array of two-component hot wires within the first 2 m above the surface of the salt flats. Streamwise and wall-normal turbulence intensities and spectra are directly compared to corresponding laboratory data and similarity formulations hypothesized from the attached-eddy model of wall turbulence. This affords the opportunity to compare results with Reynolds numbers varying over three orders of magnitude. The wall-normal turbulence-intensity similarity formulation is extended. The results show good support for the similarity arguments forwarded by the attached-eddy model as well as Townsend's (1956) Reynolds-number similarity hypothesis and lack of the ‘inactive’ motion influence on the wall-normal velocity component. The effects of wall roughness and the spread in the convection velocity due to this roughness are also discussed.

  18. Chaotic sedimentation of particle pairs in a vertical channel at low Reynolds number: Multiple states and routes to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjus, Romuald; Guillou, Sylvain; Ezersky, Alexander; Angilella, Jean-Régis

    2016-12-01

    The sedimentation of a pair of rigid circular particles in a two-dimensional vertical channel containing a Newtonian fluid is investigated numerically, for terminal particle Reynolds numbers (ReT) ranging from 1 to 10, and for a confinement ratio equal to 4. While it is widely admitted that sufficiently inertial pairs should sediment by performing a regular DKT oscillation (Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling), the present analysis shows in contrast that a chaotic regime can also exist for such particles, leading to a much slower sedimentation velocity. It consists of a nearly horizontal pair, corresponding to a maximum effective blockage ratio, and performing a quasiperiodic transition to chaos while increasing the particle weight. For less inertial regimes, the classical oblique doublet structure and its complex behavior (multiple stable states and hysteresis, period-doubling cascade and chaotic attractor) are recovered, in agreement with previous work [Aidun, C. K. and Ding, E.-J., "Dynamics of particle sedimentation in a vertical channel: Period-doubling bifurcation and chaotic state," Phys. Fluids 15, 1612 (2003)]. As a consequence of these various behaviors, the link between the terminal Reynolds number and the non-dimensional driving force is complex: it contains several branches displaying hysteresis as well as various bifurcations. For the range of Reynolds number considered here, a global bifurcation diagram is given.

  19. Numerical investigation of the high Reynolds number 3D flow field generated by a self-propelling manta ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzani, Jean-Noel; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    An embedded-boundary (or cut-cell) method for complex geometry with moving boundaries is used to solve the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equation around a self-propelling manta swimming at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The motion of the ray is prescribed using a kinematic model fitted to actual biological data. The dependence of thrust production mechanism on Strouhal and Reynolds numbers is investigated. The vortex core structures are accurately plotted and a correlation between wake structures and propulsive performance is established. This insight is critical in understanding the key flow features that a bio-inspired autonomous vehicle should reproduce in order to swim efficiently. The solution method is implemented, on a block-structured Cartesian grid using a cut-cell approach enabling the code to correctly evaluate the wall shear-stress, a key feature necessary at higher Reynolds. To enhance computational efficiency, a parallel adaptive mesh refinement technique is used. The present method is validated against published experimental results. Supported by ONR MURI.

  20. Experimental studies on the effect of Reynolds and Weber numbers on the impact forces of low-speed droplets colliding with a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Jingyin; Guo, Penghua; Lv, Qian

    2017-09-01

    The impact force of low-speed droplets colliding with a solid surface was recorded with an experimental setup involving a highly sensitive piezoelectric force transducer and a high-speed camera recording the droplet shape. Water, ethanol, pure glycerin and aqueous glycerin solutions were used. Experimental results showed that dimensionless force is independent of the Weber number in the experimental range of 68-858 but varies with the Reynolds number. The impact is categorized into three types of processes according to the data on dimensionless peak force against the Reynolds number. The first type is a viscosity-dominated one, in which the Reynolds number ranges between 2.9 and 20. In the second type, transition process, the Reynolds number is in the range of 20-230. In the inertia-dominated type, the Reynolds number is larger than 230. In the viscosity-dominated impact, dimensionless peak force decreases rapidly with increasing Reynolds number, and the effect of viscosity could not be ignored. In the inertia-dominated impact, dimensionless peak force remains constant with varying the Reynolds number, that is, impact force is directly proportional to the product of liquid density, velocity squared and diameter squared but is unaffected by the changes in viscosity and surface tension. Furthermore, the deformation of droplet shape due to oscillation affects the impact force; a small horizontal-to-vertical ratio results in small impact force and vice versa.

  1. SYMMETRIC MODE INSTABILITY OF THE SLIPFLOW MODEL FOR FLOWS IN A MICROCHANNEL WITH A VANISHING REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘才俊; 吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The slipflow model is usually used to study microflows when the Knudsen number lies between 0.01 and 0.1. The instability due to microscale effect seems to have never been studied before.In this paper we present preliminary results for the instability (not physical instability) of this model when applied to microchannel flow with a vanishing Reynolds number. The present paper is restricted to symmetrical mode. Both first-order and second-order slip boundary conditions will be considered.

  2. Mixing behavior of the rhombic micromixers over a wide Reynolds number range using Taguchi method and 3D numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C K; Shih, T R; Chen, T C; Wu, B H

    2008-10-01

    A planar micromixer with rhombic microchannels and a converging-diverging element has been systematically investigated by the Taguchi method, CFD-ACE simulations and experiments. To reduce the footprint and extend the operation range of Reynolds number, Taguchi method was used to numerically study the performance of the micromixer in a L(9) orthogonal array. Mixing efficiency is prominently influenced by geometrical parameters and Reynolds number (Re). The four factors in a L(9) orthogonal array are number of rhombi, turning angle, width of the rhombic channel and width of the throat. The degree of sensitivity by Taguchi method can be ranked as: Number of rhombi > Width of the rhombic channel > Width of the throat > Turning angle of the rhombic channel. Increasing the number of rhombi, reducing the width of the rhombic channel and throat and lowering the turning angle resulted in better fluid mixing efficiency. The optimal design of the micromixer in simulations indicates over 90% mixing efficiency at both Re > or = 80 and Re < or = 0.1. Experimental results in the optimal simulations are consistent with the simulated one. This planar rhombic micromixer has simplified the complex fabrication process of the multi-layer or three-dimensional micromixers and improved the performance of a previous rhombic micromixer at a reduced footprint and lower Re.

  3. Experimental and multiphase analysis of nanofluids on the conjugate performance of micro-channel at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Rajesh; Venkatasubbaiah, K.

    2017-06-01

    The present study investigates the laminar forced convection flow of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), gold (Au), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), silver (Ag) and hybrid (Al2O3 + Ag) nanofluids (HyNF) in a wide rectangular micro-channel at low Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer characteristics of de-ionized (DI) water and SWCNT nanofluid with different nanoparticle volume concentrations have been experimental studied. Furthermore, numerical study has also been carried out to investigate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of DI water, SWCNT, Au, Al2O3, Ag and HyNF at different Reynolds numbers with different nanoparticle volume concentrations and particle diameters. The numerical study consider the effects of both inertial and viscous forces by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations at low Reynolds numbers. A two dimensional conjugate heat transfer multiphase mixture model has been developed and used for numerical study. A significant enhancement in the average Nusselt number is observed both experimentally and numerically for nanofluids. The study presents four optimized combinations of nanofluids (1 vol% SWCNT and 1 vol% Au with d_p = 50 nm), (2 vol% SWCNT and 3 vol% Au with d_p = 70 nm), (3 vol% Al2O3 and 2 vol% Au with d_p = 70 nm) as well as (3 vol% HyNF (2.4% Al2O3 + 0.6% Ag) and 3 vol% Au with d_p = 50 nm) that provides a better switching option in choosing efficient working fluid with minimum cost based on cooling requirement. The conduction phenomenon of the solid region at bottom of the micro-channel is considered in the present investigation. This phenomenon shows that the interface temperature between solid and fluid region increases along the length of the channel. The present results has been validated with the experimental and numerical results available in the literature.

  4. Experimental and multiphase analysis of nanofluids on the conjugate performance of micro-channel at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Rajesh; Venkatasubbaiah, K.

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the laminar forced convection flow of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), gold (Au), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), silver (Ag) and hybrid (Al2O3 + Ag) nanofluids (HyNF) in a wide rectangular micro-channel at low Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer characteristics of de-ionized (DI) water and SWCNT nanofluid with different nanoparticle volume concentrations have been experimental studied. Furthermore, numerical study has also been carried out to investigate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of DI water, SWCNT, Au, Al2O3, Ag and HyNF at different Reynolds numbers with different nanoparticle volume concentrations and particle diameters. The numerical study consider the effects of both inertial and viscous forces by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations at low Reynolds numbers. A two dimensional conjugate heat transfer multiphase mixture model has been developed and used for numerical study. A significant enhancement in the average Nusselt number is observed both experimentally and numerically for nanofluids. The study presents four optimized combinations of nanofluids (1 vol% SWCNT and 1 vol% Au with d_p = 50 nm), (2 vol% SWCNT and 3 vol% Au with d_p = 70 nm), (3 vol% Al2O3 and 2 vol% Au with d_p = 70 nm) as well as (3 vol% HyNF (2.4% Al2O3 + 0.6% Ag) and 3 vol% Au with d_p = 50 nm) that provides a better switching option in choosing efficient working fluid with minimum cost based on cooling requirement. The conduction phenomenon of the solid region at bottom of the micro-channel is considered in the present investigation. This phenomenon shows that the interface temperature between solid and fluid region increases along the length of the channel. The present results has been validated with the experimental and numerical results available in the literature.

  5. A Thermal Equilibrium Analysis of Line Contact Hydrodynamic Lubrication Considering the Influences of Reynolds Number, Load and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoli; Sun, Zheng; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal effects such as conduction, convection and viscous dissipation are important to lubrication performance, and they vary with the friction conditions. These variations have caused some inconsistencies in the conclusions of different researchers regarding the relative contributions of these thermal effects. To reveal the relationship between the contributions of the thermal effects and the friction conditions, a steady-state THD analysis model was presented. The results indicate that the contribution of each thermal effect sharply varies with the Reynolds number and temperature. Convective effect could be dominant under certain conditions. Additionally, the accuracy of some simplified methods of thermo-hydrodynamic analysis is further discussed.

  6. The effect of temperature and gas Reynolds number on evaporation of a sessile liquid drop in mini-channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlik Evgeniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental setup has been designed and manufactured to study the evaporation processes of liquid drop under blowing gas in mini-channel. The height of channel can be varied from 3 to 20 mm. Substrates are removable and its surface temperature is kept to constant value. The shadow method is main measurement technique. Series of experiments with 100 μl water drop on polished stainless still substrate are carried out in channel with 9 mm height. Dependences of evaporating rate for different range of temperatures and gas Reynolds numbers are obtained.

  7. Heat transfer of a staggered fining flat-oval tube banks in cross flow at the small Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Максим Михайлович Вознюк

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations of heat transfer of staggered bundles of flat-oval tubes with incomplete transversal finning in the range of Reynolds numbers 500 < <20000 are performed. New calculation correlations for determining of heat transfer coefficients for 1<3000 are suggested, the impact of basic geometric and regime parameters on intensity of external heat transfer are determined. The received calculation depending is possible to use in developing of heat transfer surfaces for “dry” cooling towers and air cooling apparatuses

  8. Magnetorotational Turbulence Transports Angular Momentum in Stratified Disks with Low Magnetic Prandtl Number but Magnetic Reynolds Number above a Critical Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.

    2012-02-14

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm-dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  9. Wall-resolved LES of high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition for wall modeling in LES: LESFOIL revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kengo; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    Wall-resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) of an airfoil flow involving a turbulent transition and separations near stall condition at a high Reynolds number 2.1 x 106 (based on the freestream velocity and the airfoil chord length) is conducted by using K computer. This study aims to provide the wall-resolved LES database including detailed turbulence statistics for near-wall modeling in LES and also to investigate the flow physics of the high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition. The LES well predicts the laminar separation bubble, turbulent reattachment and turbulent separation. The LES also clarified unsteady flow features associated with shear-layer instabilities: high frequency unsteadiness at St = 130 at the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and low frequency unsteadiness at St = 1.5 at the separated turbulent shear-layer near the trailing edge. Regarding the near-wall modeling in LES, the database indicates that the pressure term in the mean streamwise-momentum equation is not negligible at the laminar and turbulent separated regions. This fact suggests that widely used equilibrium wall model is not sufficient and the inclusion of the pressure term is necessary for wall modeling in LES of such flow. This research used computational resources of the K computer provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project (Project ID: hp140028). This work was supported by KAKENHI (Grant Number: 16K18309).

  10. Magnetic Field Amplification by Small-Scale Dynamo Action: Dependence on Turbulence Models, Reynolds and Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2011-01-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus is expected to depend crucially on the nature of turbulence. In this work, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(l) ~ l^theta, where l and v(l) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB-approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_crit, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence (theta=1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is approximately 110 and for Burger...

  11. The effects of an algal biofilm on the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen; Steppe, Cecily; Reidenbach, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms are an important fouling community on ship hulls, with severe economic consequences due to increased drag. As with other types of roughness on aquatic surfaces, biofilms increase skin friction and thus induce severe drag penalties. In fact, slime layers appear to induce greater drag than would be predicted by the roughness height alone. Our work indicates that this is likely due to two characteristics of algal biofilms: i) flexible streamers that protrude into the flow, and ii) the compliant nature of a biofilm layer. High resolution PIV was used to measure the turbulent boundary layer flow over diatomaceous biofilm grown under dynamic conditions. Local mean streamwise velocity profiles were used to estimate the local wall shear stresses and to determine the similarity between the inner and outer layers of the boundary layer and those of a smooth wall. Spatially explicit turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Reynolds shear stress (RSS), swirling strength and quadrant analyses over the biofilm were compared to those over a smooth wall and a rigid mesh roughness. We found that the combination of canopy flow due to streamers coupled with compliant wall-flow interactions result in large wall shear stresses and higher turbulence. Funding provided by the ONR NURP program and the NSF GRIP program.

  12. Computation of Far-Field Noise from Vortex Shedding Behind a Circular Cylinder at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H.; You, D.; Choi, M.-R.; Kang, S.-H.

    1996-11-01

    Laminar vortex sheddings behind a circular cylinder with and without splitter plates attached to the cylinder at low Reynolds numbers are simulated by solving the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The Strouhal number, lift and drag rapidly change with the length of the splitter plate. Far-field noise from the vortex shedding behind the cylinder is computed using the Curle's formulation of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. The acoustic source functions are obtained from the computed near-field velocity and pressure. Numerical results show that the volume quadrupole noise is small at a low Mach number, compared to the surface dipole noise from the cylinder. Variations of the far-field noise characteristics with respect to the splitter plate are being investigated and will be shown in the final presentation. ^* Supported by KOSEF under Contract No. 961-1009-075-2

  13. Numerical study to invistigate the effect of inlet gas velocity and Reynolds number on bubble formation in a viscous liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Tariqul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble formation dynamics has great value in mineral recovery and the oil industry. In this paper, a single bubble formation process through an orifice in a rectangle domain is modelled to study the bubble formation characteristics using the volume of fluid (VOF with the continuum surface force (CSF method. The effect of gas inlet velocities, Ug ~ 0.1 - 0.3 m/s on bubble formation stages (i.e., expansion, elongation and pinch off, bubble contact angle, dynamics and static pressure, bubble departure diameter etc. was investigated through an orifice diameter of 1 mm. The method was also used to study the effect of Reynolds number, Reμ ~ 1.32 - 120 on bubble formation when all other parameters were kept constant. It is found that a high inlet gas velocity accelerated the reducing of the bubble contact angle from an obtuse angle to an acute angle and the faster development of hemispherical shape of the bubble. It is also found that an increasing of Reynolds number caused speeding up of the bubble pinch-off and formed a smaller bubble neck height due to stronger vortex ring around the bubble neck.

  14. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  15. Measuring air core characteristics of a pressure-swirl atomizer via a transparent acrylic nozzle at various Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun J.; Oh, Sang Youp; Kim, Ho Y.; Yoon, Sam S. [Dept. of Mechanical, Korea University Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbukgu, 136-713 Seoul (Korea); James, Scott C. [Thermal/Fluid Science and Engineering, Sandia National Labs, PO Box 969, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Because of thermal fluid-property dependence, atomization stability (or flow regime) can change even at fixed operating conditions when subject to temperature change. Particularly at low temperatures, fuel's high viscosity can prevent a pressure-swirl (or simplex) atomizer from sustaining a centrifugal-driven air core within the fuel injector. During disruption of the air core inside an injector, spray characteristics outside the nozzle reflect a highly unstable, nonlinear mode where air core length, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), cone angle, and discharge coefficient variability. To better understand injector performance, these characteristics of the pressure-swirl atomizer were experimentally investigated and data were correlated to Reynolds numbers (Re). Using a transparent acrylic nozzle, the air core length, SMD, cone angle, and discharge coefficient are observed as a function of Re. The critical Reynolds numbers that distinguish the transition from unstable mode to transitional mode and eventually to a stable mode are reported. The working fluids are diesel and a kerosene-based fuel, referred to as bunker-A. (author)

  16. A rapid three-dimensional vortex micromixer utilizing self-rotation effects under low Reynolds number conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Che Hsin, Lin; Lung Ming, Fu; 10.1088/0960-1317/15/5/006

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel three-dimensional (3D) vortex micromixer for micro-total-analysis-systems ( mu TAS) applications which utilizes self-rotation effects to mix fluids in a circular chamber at low Reynolds numbers (Re). The microfluidic mixer is fabricated in a three-layer glass structure for delivering fluid samples in parallel. The fluids are driven into the circular mixing chamber by means of hydrodynamic pumps from two fluid inlet ports. The two inlet channels divide into eight individual channels tangent to a 3D circular chamber for the purpose of mixing. Numerical simulation of the microfluidic dynamics is employed to predict the self-rotation phenomenon and to estimate the mixing performance under various Reynolds number conditions. Experimental flow visualization by mixing dye samples is performed in order to verify the numerical simulation results. A good agreement is found to exist between the two sets of results. The numerical results indicate that the mixing performance can be as high as 9...

  17. Low Reynolds Number Flow Dynamics of a Thin Airfoil with an Actuated Leading Edge using Direct Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Kevin; Apte, Sourabh

    2010-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effect of a movable leading edge on the unsteady flow at high angles of attack over a flat, thin airfoil at Reynolds number of 14700 based on the chord length. The leading edge of the airfoil is hinged at one-third chord length allowing dynamic variations in the effective angle of attack through specified oscillations (or flapping). A fictitious-domain based finite volume approach [(Apte et al. (JCP 2009)] is used to compute the flow over an airfoil with a flapping leading edge on a fixed background mesh. Cases were run at 20 degrees angle of attack to study the drag and lift characteristics with sinusoidal flapping of the leading edge about the hinge over a range of reduced frequencies (k=πf c/U∞ = 0.57- 5.7). It is shown that high-frequency low amplitude actuation of the leading edge significantly alters the leading edge boundary-layer and vortex shedding and increases the mean lift- to-drag ratio. The concept of an actuated leading-edge flap has potential for development of control techniques to stabilize and maneuver low-Reynolds number micro-air vehicles in response to unsteady perturbations.

  18. The effect of the Reynolds number on mass transfer at a free surface in a fully developed turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi

    2005-11-01

    This study deals with mass transfer mechanism into a turbulent liquid at a free surface in an open channel. Both mass flux and subsurface hydrodynamics measured in laboratory measurements and found that the normalized mass transfer coefficient is proportional to the Reynolds number Rem which is defined by water depth and the bulk mean velocity [S. Komori, R. Nagaosa and Y. Murakami, AIChE J. 36, 957, 1991]. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of mass transport at the free surface in a fully developed turbulence have been carried out in this study to discuss suitability of the results of the previous laboratory experiments. The results of this study show that the predicted mass transfer velocities by the DNS technique agree well with our previous laboratory measurements. The mass transfer velocities predicted in the present DNS are, however, proportional to 3/4 power of Rem, rather than 1 as found in the laboratory experiments. The difference of the exponent could be a reason of underestimation of mass flux in the numerical predictions in a larger Reynolds number turbulence of about Rem>10,000.

  19. A numerical investigation into the effects of Reynolds number on the flow mechanism induced by a tubercled leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamzadeh, Nikan; Kelso, Richard M.; Dally, Bassam

    2016-05-01

    Leading-edge modifications based on designs inspired by the protrusions on the pectoral flippers of the humpback whale (tubercles) have been the subject of research for the past decade primarily due to their flow control potential in ameliorating stall characteristics. Previous studies have demonstrated that, in the transitional flow regime, full-span wings with tubercled leading edges outperform unmodified wings at high attack angles. The flow mechanism associated with such enhanced loading traits is, however, still being investigated. Also, the performance of full-span tubercled wings in the turbulent regime is largely unexplored. The present study aims to investigate Reynolds number effects on the flow mechanism induced by a full-span tubercled wing with the NACA-0021 cross-sectional profile in the transitional and near-turbulent regimes using computational fluid dynamics. The analysis of the flow field suggests that, with the exception of a few different flow features, the same underlying flow mechanism, involving the presence of transverse and streamwise vorticity, is at play in both cases. With regard to lift-generation characteristics, the numerical simulation results indicate that in contrast to the transitional flow regime, where the unmodified NACA-0021 undergoes a sudden loss of lift, in the turbulent regime, the baseline foil experiences gradual stall and produces more lift than the tubercled foil. This observation highlights the importance of considerations regarding the Reynolds number effects and the stall characteristics of the baseline foil, in the industrial applications of tubercled lifting bodies.

  20. A numerical investigation into the effects of Reynolds number on the flow mechanism induced by a tubercled leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamzadeh, Nikan; Kelso, Richard M.; Dally, Bassam

    2017-02-01

    Leading-edge modifications based on designs inspired by the protrusions on the pectoral flippers of the humpback whale (tubercles) have been the subject of research for the past decade primarily due to their flow control potential in ameliorating stall characteristics. Previous studies have demonstrated that, in the transitional flow regime, full-span wings with tubercled leading edges outperform unmodified wings at high attack angles. The flow mechanism associated with such enhanced loading traits is, however, still being investigated. Also, the performance of full-span tubercled wings in the turbulent regime is largely unexplored. The present study aims to investigate Reynolds number effects on the flow mechanism induced by a full-span tubercled wing with the NACA-0021 cross-sectional profile in the transitional and near-turbulent regimes using computational fluid dynamics. The analysis of the flow field suggests that, with the exception of a few different flow features, the same underlying flow mechanism, involving the presence of transverse and streamwise vorticity, is at play in both cases. With regard to lift-generation characteristics, the numerical simulation results indicate that in contrast to the transitional flow regime, where the unmodified NACA-0021 undergoes a sudden loss of lift, in the turbulent regime, the baseline foil experiences gradual stall and produces more lift than the tubercled foil. This observation highlights the importance of considerations regarding the Reynolds number effects and the stall characteristics of the baseline foil, in the industrial applications of tubercled lifting bodies.

  1. Deformation of an elastic body in low Reynolds number transport: Relevance to biofilm deformation and streamer formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Nikhil; Mitra, Sushanta K; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain analytical results for shear stress distributions inside an elastic body placed in a low Reynolds number transport. The problem definition is inspired by a recent experimental study (Valiei et al., Lab Chip, 2012, 12, 5133-5137) that reports the flow-triggered deformation of bacterial biofilms, formed on cylindrical rigid microposts, into long filamentous structures known as streamers. In our analysis, we consider an elastic body of finite thickness (forming a rim) placed over a rigid cylinder, i.e., we mimic the biofilm structure in the experiment. We consider Oseen flow solution to describe the low Reynolds transport past this cylindrical elastic structure. The stress and strain distributions inside the elastic structure are found to be functions of position, Poisson ratio, initial thickness of the elastic rim and the ratio of the flow-driven shear stress to the shear modulus of the elastic body. More importantly, these analyses, which can be deemed as one of the first formal analys...

  2. Large-scale flow and Reynolds numbers in the presence of boiling in locally heated turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefnagels, Paul B. J.; Wei, Ping; Narezo Guzman, Daniela; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Guenter

    2017-07-01

    We report on an experimental study of the large-scale flow (LSF) and Reynolds numbers in turbulent convection in a cylindrical sample with height equal to its diameter and heated locally around the center of its bottom plate (locally heated convection). The sample size and shape are the same as those of Narezo Guzman et al. [D. Narezo Guzman et al., J. Fluid Mech. 787, 331 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.701; D. Narezo Guzman et al., J. Fluid Mech. 795, 60 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.178]. Measurements are made at a nearly constant Rayleigh number as a function of the mean temperature, both in the presence of controlled boiling (two-phase flow) and for the superheated fluid (one-phase flow). Superheat values Tb-To n up to about 11 K (Tb is the bottom-plate temperature and To n is the lowest Tb at which boiling is observed) are used. The LSF is less organized than it is in (uniformly heated) Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), where it takes the form of a single convection roll. Large-scale-flow-induced sinusoidal azimuthal temperature variations (like those found for RBC) could be detected only in the lower portion of the sample, indicating a less organized flow in the upper portions. Reynolds numbers are determined using the elliptic model (EM) of He and Zhang [G.-W. He and J.-B. Zhang, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055303(R) (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.055303]. We found that for our system the EM is applicable over a wide range of space and time displacements, as long as these displacements are within the inertial range of the temporal and spatial spectrum. At three locations in the sample the results show that the vertical mean-flow velocity component is reduced while the fluctuation velocity is enhanced by the bubbles of the two-phase flow. Enhancements of velocity fluctuations up to about 60% are found at the largest superheat values. Local temperature measurements within the sample reveal temperature oscillations that also used to determine a Reynolds number. These results are

  3. Numerical simulations of flows through fixed networks of monodispersed and bi-dispersed spheres, for moderate Reynolds numbers; Simulations numeriques d'ecoulements a travers des reseaux fixes de spheres monodisperses et bidisperses, pour des nombres de Reynolds moderes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massol, A.

    2004-02-15

    The application of statistically averaged two-fluid models for the simulation of complex indus- trial two-phase flows requires the development of adequate models for the drag force exerted on the inclusions and the interfacial heat exchange. This task becomes problematic at high volume fractions of the dispersed phase. The quality of the simulation strongly depends upon the inter- facial exchange terms, starting with the steady drag force. For example, an accurate modelling of the drag force is therefore a crucial point to simulate the expansion of dense fluidized beds. Most models used to study the exchange terms between particles and fluids are based on the interaction between an isolated particle and a surrounding gas. Those models are clearly not adequate in cases where the volume fraction of particles increases and particle-particle interactions become important. Studying such cases is a complex task because of the multiple possible configurations. While the interaction between an isolated sphere and a gas depends only on the particle size and the slip velocity between gas and particles, the interaction between a cloud of particles and a gas depends on many more parameters: size and velocity distribution of particles, relative position of particles. Even if the particles keep relative fixed positions, there is an infinite number of combinations to construct such an array. The objective of the present work is to perform steady and unsteady simulations of the flow in regular arrays of fixed particles in order to analyze the influence of the size and distributions of spheres on drag force and heat transfer (the array of spheres can be either monodispersed, either bi-dispersed). Several authors have studied the drag exerted on the spheres, but only for low Reynolds numbers and/or solid volume fractions close to the packed limit. Moreover some discrepancies are observed between the different studies. On top of that, all existing studies are limited to steady flows

  4. An experimental analysis of bed load transport in gravel-bed braided rivers with high grain Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vincenzo, Annamaria; Brancati, Francesco; Pannone, Marilena

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed with nearly uniform fluvial gravel (D50=9 mm, D10=5 mm and D90=13 mm) to analyse the relationship between stream power and bed load transport rate in gravel-bed braided rivers at high grain Reynolds numbers. The values of the unit-width dimensionless bed-load rate qb* and unit-width dimensionless stream power ω* were evaluated in equilibrium conditions based on ten different experimental runs. Then, they were plotted along with values obtained during particularly representative field studies documented in the literature, and a regression law was derived. For comparison, a regression analysis was performed using the data obtained from laboratory experiments characterized by smaller grain sizes and, therefore, referring to relatively low grain Reynolds numbers. A numerical integration of Exner's equation was performed to reconstruct the local and time-dependent functional dependence of qb* and ω*. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) At equilibrium, the reach-averaged bed load transport rate is related to the reach-averaged stream power by different regression laws at high and low grain Reynolds numbers. Additionally, the transition from bed to suspended load transport is accelerated by low Re*, with the corresponding bed load discharge increasing with stream power at a lower, linear rate. 2) When tested against the gravel laboratory measurements, the high Re* power law derived in the present study performs considerably better than do previous formulas. 3) The longitudinal variability of the section-averaged equilibrium stream power is much more pronounced than that characterizing the bed load rate, at least for high Re*. Thus, the stream power and its local-scale heterogeneity seem to be directly responsible for transverse sediment re-distribution and, ultimately, for the determination of the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the gravel bedforms. 4) Finally, the stochastic interpretation of the wetted

  5. Experimental study of the vortex-induced vibration of drilling risers under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the different Reynolds numbers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liangjie

    Full Text Available A considerable number of studies for VIV under the uniform flow have been performed. However, research on VIV under shear flow is scarce. An experiment for VIV under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the two different Reynolds numbers was conducted in a deep-water offshore basin. Various measurements were obtained by the fiber bragg grating strain sensors. Experimental data were analyzed by modal analysis method. Results show several valuable features. First, the corresponding maximum order mode of the natural frequency for shedding frequency is the maximum dominant vibration mode and multi-modal phenomenon is appeared in VIV under the shear flow, and multi-modal phenomenon is more apparent at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow effect. Secondly, the riser vibrates at the natural frequency and the dominant vibration frequency increases for the effect of the real-time tension amplitude under the shear flow and the IL vibration frequency is the similar with the CF vibration frequency at the Reynolds number of 1105 in our experimental condition and the IL dominant frequency is twice the CF dominant frequency with an increasing Reynolds number. In addition, the displacement trajectories at the different locations of the riser appear the same shape and the shape is changed at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow. The diagonal displacement trajectories are observed at the low Reynolds number and the crescent-shaped displacement trajectories appear with an increasing Reynolds number under shear flow in the experiment.

  6. Drop Characteristics of non-Newtonian Impinging Jets at High Generalized Bird-Carreau Jet Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Paul E.; Rodrigues, Neil S.

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the drop characteristics of three Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sprays produced by the impingement of two liquid jets. The three water-based solutions used in this work (0.5 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, and 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF) exhibited strong shear-thinning, non-Newtonian behavior - characterized by the Bird-Carreau rheological model. A generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number was used as the primary parameter to characterize the drop size and the drop velocity, which were measured using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). PDA optical configuration enabled a drop size measurement range of approximately 2.3 to 116.2 μm. 50,000 drops were measured at each test condition to ensure statistical significance. The arithmetic mean diameter (D10) , Sauter mean diameter (D32) , and mass median diameter (MMD) were used as representative diameters to characterize drop size. The mean axial drop velocity Uz -mean along with its root-mean square Uz -rms were used to characterize drop velocity. Incredibly, measurements for all three CMC liquids and reference DI water sprays seemed to follow a single curve for D32 and MMD drop diameters in the high generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number range considered in this work (9.21E +03 Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  7. Vortex shedding in high Reynolds number axisymmetric bluff-body wakes: Local linear instability and global bleed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, A.; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2004-09-01

    In the present work we study the large-scale helical vortex shedding regime in the wake of an axisymmetric body with a blunt trailing edge at high Reynolds numbers, both experimentally and by means of local, linear, and spatiotemporal stability analysis. In the instability analysis we take into account the detailed downstream evolution of the basic flow behind the body base. The study confirms the existence of a finite region of absolute instability for the first azimuthal number in the near field of the wake. Such instability is believed to trigger the large-scale helical vortex shedding downstream of the recirculating zone. Inhibition of vortex shedding is examined by blowing a given flow rate of fluid through the base of the slender body. The extent of the locally absolute region of the flow is calculated as a function of the bleed coefficient, Cb=qb/(πR2u∞), where qb is the bleed flow rate, R is the radius of the base, and u∞ is the incident free-stream velocity. It is shown that the basic flow becomes convectively unstable everywhere for a critical value of the bleed coefficient of Cb*˜0.13, such that no self-excited regime is expected for Cb>Cb*. In addition, we report experimental results of flow visualizations and hot-wire measurements for increasing values of the bleed coefficient. When a sufficient amount of base bleed is applied, flow visualizations indicate that vortex shedding is suppressed and that the mean flow becomes axisymmetric. The critical bleed coefficient predicted by linear instability analysis is shown to fall within the experimental values in the range of Reynolds numbers analyzed here.

  8. Lift-optimal aspect ratio of a revolving wing at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Thierry; Colonius, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Lentink & Dickinson (2009) showed that rotational acceleration stabilized the leading-edge vortex on revolving, low-aspect-ratio wings, and hypothesized that a Rossby number of around 3, which is achieved during each half-stroke for a variety of hovering insects, seeds, and birds, represents a convergent high-lift solution across a range of scales in nature. Subsequent work has verified that, in particular, the Coriolis acceleration is responsible for LEV stabilization. Implicit in these results is that there exists an optimal aspect ratio for wings revolving about their root, because it is otherwise unclear why, apart from possible physiological reasons, the convergent solution would not occur for an even lower Rossby number. We perform direct numerical simulations of the flow past revolving wings where we vary the aspect ratio and Rossby numbers independently by displacing the wing root from the axis of rotation. We show that the optimal lift coefficient represents a compromise between competing trends where the coefficient of lift increases monotonically with aspect ratio, holding Rossby number constant, but decreases monotonically with Rossby number, when holding aspect ratio constant. For wings revolving about their root, this favors wings of aspect ratio between 3 and 4. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from Fondation ISAE-Supaero.

  9. Chaotic sedimentation of particle pairs in a vertical channel at low Reynolds number: multiple states and routes to chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Verjus, Romuald; Ezersky, Alexander; Angilella, Jean-Régis

    2016-01-01

    The sedimentation of a pair of rigid circular particles in a two-dimensional vertical channel containing a Newtonian fluid is investigated numerically, for terminal particle Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 to 10, and for a confinement ratio equal to 4. While it is widely admitted that sufficiently inertial pairs should sediment by performing a regular DKT oscillation (Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling), the present analysis shows in contrast that a chaotic regime can also exist for such particles, leading to a much slower sedimentation velocity. It consists of a nearly horizontal pair, corresponding to a maximum effective blockage ratio, and performing a quasiperiodic transition to chaos under increasing the particle weight. For less inertial regimes, the classical oblique doublet structure and its complex behavior (multiple stable states and hysteresis, period-doubling cascade and chaotic attractor) are recovered, in agreement with previous work [Aidun & Ding, Physics of Fluids 15(6), 2003]. As a consequence of ...

  10. A theoretical model of a wake of a body towed in a stratified fluid at large Reynolds and Froude numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Troitskaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to develop a theoretical model describing the evolution of a turbulent wake behind a towed sphere in a stably stratified fluid at large Froude and Reynolds numbers. The wake flow is considered as a quasi two-dimensional (2-D turbulent jet flow whose dynamics is governed by the momentum transfer from the mean flow to a quasi-2-D sinuous mode growing due to hydrodynamic instability. The model employs a quasi-linear approximation to describe this momentum transfer. The model scaling coefficients are defined with the use of available experimental data, and the performance of the model is verified by comparison with the results of a direct numerical simulation of a 2-D turbulent jet flow. The model prediction for the temporal development of the wake axis mean velocity is found to be in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Spedding (1997.

  11. On the flow and thermal characteristics of high Reynolds numbers (2800-17000) dye cell: simulation and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, G K; Prakash, O; Biswal, R; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational and experimental studies on wavelength/frequency fluctuation characteristics of high pulse repetition rate (PRR: 18 kHz) dye laser pumped by frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The temperature gradient in the dye solution is found to be responsible for wavelength fluctuations of the dye laser at low flow rates (2800Reynolds number (ReT) and the range of eddy sizes present in the turbulent flow are found to be responsible for the fluctuations at high flow rates (8400

  12. Application of SALSSA Framework to the Validation of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Low Reynolds Number Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Chase, Jared M.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2009-06-15

    The Support Architecture for Large-Scale Subsurface Analysis (SALSSA) provides an extensible framework, sophisticated graphical user interface (GUI), and underlying data management system that simplifies the process of running subsurface models, tracking provenance information, and analyzing the model results. The SALSSA software framework is currently being applied to validating the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. SPH is a three-dimensional model of flow and transport in porous media at the pore scale. Fluid flow in porous media at velocities common in natural porous media occur at low Reynolds numbers and therefore it is important to verify that the SPH model is producing accurate flow solutions in this regime. Validating SPH requires performing a series of simulations and comparing these simulation flow solutions to analytical results or numerical results using other methods. This validation study is being facilitated by the SALLSA framework, which provides capabilities to setup, execute, analyze, and administer these SPH simulations.

  13. A self-sustaining process model of inertial layer dynamics in high Reynolds number turbulent wall flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, G. P.; Montemuro, B.; White, C. M.; Klewicki, J.

    2017-03-01

    Field observations and laboratory experiments suggest that at high Reynolds numbers Re the outer region of turbulent boundary layers self-organizes into quasi-uniform momentum zones (UMZs) separated by internal shear layers termed `vortical fissures' (VFs). Motivated by this emergent structure, a conceptual model is proposed with dynamical components that collectively have the potential to generate a self-sustaining interaction between a single VF and adjacent UMZs. A large-Re asymptotic analysis of the governing incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is performed to derive reduced equation sets for the streamwise-averaged and streamwise-fluctuating flow within the VF and UMZs. The simplified equations reveal the dominant physics within-and isolate possible coupling mechanisms among-these different regions of the flow.

  14. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  15. Swimming at small Reynolds number of a planar assembly of spheres in an incompressible viscous fluid with inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    Translational and rotational swimming at small Reynolds number of a planar assembly of identical spheres immersed in an incompressible viscous fluid is studied on the basis of a set of equations of motion for the individual spheres. The motion of the spheres is caused by actuating forces and forces derived from a direct interaction potential, as well as hydrodynamic forces exerted by the fluid as frictional and added mass hydrodynamic interactions. The translational and rotational swimming velocities of the assembly are deduced from momentum and angular momentum balance equations. The mean power required during a period is calculated from an instantaneous power equation. Expressions are derived for the mean swimming velocities and the power, valid to second order in the amplitude of displacements from the relative equilibrium positions. Hence these quantities can be evaluated for prescribed periodic displacements. Explicit calculations are performed for three spheres interacting such that they form an equilat...

  16. Reynolds Number Effects in the Flow of a Vočadlo Electrorheological Fluid in a Curved Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.; Falicki, J.

    2017-08-01

    Many electrorheological fluids (ERFs) as fluids with micro-structure demonstrate a non-Newtonian behaviour. Rheometric measurements indicate that some flows of these fluids may by modelled as the flows of a Vočadlo ER fluid. In this paper, the flow of a Vočadlo fluid - with a fractional index of non-linearity - in a narrow gap between two fixed surfaces of revolution with a common axis of symmetry is considered. The flow is externally pressurized and it is considered with inertia effect. In order to solve this problem the boundary layer equations are used. The Reynolds number effects (the effects of inertia forces) on the pressure distribution are examined by using the method of averaged inertia terms of the momentum equation. Numerical examples of externally pressurized flows in the gap between parallel disks and concentric spherical surfaces are presented.

  17. On the effect of rotation on magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high magnetic Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Benjamin F N; Cambon, Claude; 10.1080/03091929.2010.544655

    2011-01-01

    This article is focused on the dynamics of a rotating electrically conducting fluid in a turbulent state. As inside the Earth's core or in various industrial processes, a flow is altered by the presence of both background rotation and a large scale magnetic field. In this context, we present a set of 3D direct numerical simulations of incompressible decaying turbulence. We focus on parameters similar to the ones encountered in geophysical and astrophysical flows, so that the Rossby number is small, the interaction parameter is large, but the Elsasser number, defining the ratio between Coriolis and Lorentz forces, is about unity. These simulations allow to quantify the effect of rotation and thus inertial waves on the growth of magnetic fluctuations due to Alfv\\'en waves. Rotation prevents the occurrence of equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energies, with a reduction of magnetic energy at decreasing Elsasser number {\\Lambda}. It also causes a decrease of energy transfer mediated by cubic correlations....

  18. Global surface pressure measurements of static and dynamic stall on a wind turbine airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Gregory, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Recognizing the need for global surface measurement techniques to characterize the time-varying, three-dimensional loading encountered on rotating wind turbine blades, fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been evaluated for resolving unsteady aerodynamic effects in incompressible flow. Results of a study aimed at demonstrating the laser-based, single-shot PSP technique on a low Reynolds number wind turbine airfoil in static and dynamic stall are reported. PSP was applied to the suction side of a Delft DU97-W-300 airfoil (maximum thickness-to-chord ratio of 30 %) at a chord Reynolds number of 225,000 in the University of Wyoming open-return wind tunnel. Static and dynamic stall behaviors are presented using instantaneous and phase-averaged global pressure maps. In particular, a three-dimensional pressure topology driven by a stall cell pattern is detected near the maximum lift condition on the steady airfoil. Trends in the PSP-measured pressure topology on the steady airfoil were confirmed using surface oil visualization. The dynamic stall case was characterized by a sinusoidal pitching motion with mean angle of 15.7°, amplitude of 11.2°, and reduced frequency of 0.106 based on semichord. PSP images were acquired at selected phase positions, capturing the breakdown of nominally two-dimensional flow near lift stall, development of post-stall suction near the trailing edge, and a highly three-dimensional topology as the flow reattaches. Structural patterns in the surface pressure topologies are considered from the analysis of the individual PSP snapshots, enabled by a laser-based excitation system that achieves sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the single-shot images. The PSP results are found to be in general agreement with observations about the steady and unsteady stall characteristics expected for the airfoil.

  19. Extended self-similarity in moment-generating-functions in wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Meneveau, C.; Marusic, I.; Biferale, L.

    2016-08-01

    In wall-bounded turbulence, the moment generating functions (MGFs) of the streamwise velocity fluctuations develop power-law scaling as a function of the wall normal distance z /δ . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units (averaged friction velocity), z is the distance from the wall, q is an independent variable, and δ is the boundary layer thickness. Previous work has shown that this power-law scaling exists in the log-region 3 Reτ0.5≲z+,z ≲0.15 δ where Reτ is the friction velocity-based Reynolds number. Here we present empirical evidence that this self-similar scaling can be extended, including bulk and viscosity-affected regions 30 reference value, qo. ESS also improves the scaling properties, leading to more precise measurements of the scaling exponents. The analysis is based on hot-wire measurements from boundary layers at Reτ ranging from 2700 to 13 000 from the Melbourne High-Reynolds-Number-Turbulent-Boundary-Layer-Wind-Tunnel. Furthermore, we investigate the scalings of the filtered, large-scale velocity fluctuations uzL and of the remaining small-scale component, uzS=uz-uzL . The scaling of uzL falls within the conventionally defined log region and depends on a scale that is proportional to l+˜Reτ1/2 ; the scaling of uzS extends over a much wider range from z+≈30 to z ≈0.5 δ . Last, we present a theoretical construction of two multiplicative processes for uzL and uzS that reproduce the empirical findings concerning the scalings properties as functions of z+ and in the ESS sense.

  20. Motion and deformation of immiscible droplet in plane Poiseuille flow at low Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘定一; 林雨青; 张凌新; 邵雪明

    2016-01-01

    Droplet migration in plane Poiseuille flow is numerically investigated with a dissipative particle dynamics method. The single droplet deformation in the channel flow is first studied to verify the current method and the physical model. The effect of the viscosity ratio between the droplet and the solvent and the effect of the confinement are systematically investigated. The droplet is in an off-centerline equilibrium position with a specific selection of the parameters. A large viscosity ratio makes the droplet locate in a near-wall equilibrium position, and a large capillary number makes the droplet migrate to the near-centerline region of the channel. For the droplet migration at the same Capillary number, there is a critical width of the channel, which is less than twice of the droplet diameter, and the droplet will only migrate to the channel centerline if the width is less than this critical value.

  1. Sensitivity of inertial particle response on turbulent duct flows to mass loading ratio and Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafane, Laura; Banko, Andrew; Elkins, Chris; Eaton, John

    2016-11-01

    The momentum coupled dynamics of particles and turbulence are experimentally investigated in a vertical fully developed turbulent square duct flow of air laden with Nickel particles. Significant preferential concentration is present for the Stokes numbers investigated, which vary from 3 to 30 based on the Kolmogorov time scale. Higher order measures of preferential concentration, such as the sizes and shapes of clusters and voids, are analyzed for increasing mass loading ratios. The mass loadings chosen span the one-way and two-way coupled regimes, while the volume loading is kept low. The effect of Stokes number and mass loading is also evaluated for particle velocity statistics and compared to the unladen gas statistics. Planar laser scattering is used to record instantaneous particle images in the center of the duct. Preferential concentration statistics are computed from box counting and Voronoi tessellation algorithms. PIV and PTV techniques are used to calculate particle velocity statistics. The analysis is extended to the near wall region in the logarithmic layer for the case of low mass loading. These results are compared to those from the duct center to assess the effects of strong carrier phase inhomogeneity on the particle distributions. This Material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0002373-1.

  2. Optimization design study of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils for the high-efficiency propeller of low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil makes a great impact on designing a high-efficiency propeller for low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere. At high altitude,low-Reynolds-number airfoils are supposed to have high lift-drag ratio or high endurance factor at cruising attack angle along with good stall characteristics. To design such a high-performance low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil,the paper established a hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform by combing direct search optimization algorithm EXTREM and airfoil flow field solver XFOIL to automatically and quickly calculate aerodynamic performance function of airfoil by computer. It provides an effective solution to multi-point design problem of low-speed low-Reynolds-number airfoil. It can be seen from the results of three typical optimization examples,the new airfoil E387_OPT2,FX63-137_OPT2 and S1223_OPT2 based on hot low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils (Eppler 387 airfoil,Wortmann FX63-137 airfoil and S1223 airfoil) can meet the optimization design requirements and have very good aerodynamic characteristics in both design state and non-design state. Thus,the applicability and effectiveness of hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform are verified.

  3. Experimental investigation of flow characteristics around four square-cylinder arrays at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Deep Draft Semi-Submersible (DDS concepts are known for their favourable vertical motion performance. However, the DDS may experience critical Vortex-Induced Motion (VIM stemming from the fluctuating forces on the columns. In order to investigate the current-induced excitation forces of VIM, an experimental study of flow characteristics around four square-section cylinders in a square configuration is presented. A number of column spacing ratios and array attack angles were considered to investigate the parametric influences. The results comprise flow patterns, drag and lift forces, as well as Strouhal numbers. It is shown that both the drag and lift forces acting on the cylinders are slightly different between the various L/D values, and the fluctuating forces peak at L/D = 4.14. The lift force of downstream cylinders reaches its maximum at around α = 15°. Furthermore, the flow around circular- section-cylinder arrays is also discussed in comparison with that of square cylinders.

  4. Experimental investigation of flow characteristics around four square-cylinder arrays at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Mingyue

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Deep Draft Semi-Submersible (DDS concepts are known for their favourable vertical motion performance. However, the DDS may experience critical Vortex-Induced Motion (VIM stemming from the fluctuating forces on the columns. In order to investigate the current-induced excitation forces of VIM, an experimental study of flow characteristics around four square-section cylinders in a square configuration is presented. A number of column spacing ratios and array attack angles were considered to investigate the parametric influences. The results comprise flow patterns, drag and lift forces, as well as Strouhal numbers. It is shown that both the drag and lift forces acting on the cylinders are slightly different between the various L/D values, and the fluctuating forces peak at L/D = 4.14. The lift force of downstream cylinders reaches its maximum at around α = 15°. Furthermore, the flow around circular-section-cylinder arrays is also discussed in comparison with that of square cylinders.

  5. Effect of steady rotation on low Reynolds number vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Paluri; Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper control of oblique vortex shedding in the wake behind a straight circular cylinder is explored experimentally and computationally. Towards this, steady rotation of the cylinder about its axis is used as a control device. Some limited studies are also performed with a stepped circular cylinder, where at the step the flow is inevitably three-dimensional irrespective of the rotation rate. When there is no rotation, the vortex shedding pattern is three dimensional as described in many previous studies. With a non-zero rotation rate, it is demonstrated experimentally as well as numerically that the shedding pattern becomes more and more two-dimensional. At sufficiently high rotation rates, the vortex shedding is completely suppressed.

  6. Control of low Reynolds number flows by means of fluid-structure interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursul, I.; Cleaver, D. J.; Wang, Z.

    2014-01-01

    There is great interest in small aircraft known as Micro Air Vehicles and mini Unmanned Air Vehicles due to the wide range of possible applications. This article reviews recent work that aims to exploit the flexibility of the wing structure in order to increase lift and thrust, and delay stall. Wing flexibility has often been considered to be unwanted for large conventional aircraft and measures are taken to limit the deformation. In contrast, very small aircraft flying at low speeds are not necessarily subject to the same limitation. This approach is only applicable to small aircraft because the frequencies of the wing structure and fluid flow instabilities are close to each other. Consequently, small amplitude and high-frequency motions will be considered. We first start with rigid airfoils and wings in forced plunging motion, which mimics the bending oscillations. The main advantage of this approach is the freedom to vary the frequency within a wide range. Two mechanisms of high-lift production on the oscillating rigid airfoils are discussed. In the first one, leading-edge vortex dynamics and different modes of vortex topology play an important role on the time-averaged lift and thrust at post-stall angles of attack. Existence of optimal frequencies and amplitudes are demonstrated, and their relation to other phenomena is discussed. In the second mechanism of high-lift, trailing-edge vortex dynamics leads to bifurcated/asymmetric flows at pre-stall angles of attack. Deflected wakes can lead to time-averaged lift coefficients higher than those for the first mechanism. Some aspects of lift enhancement can be sensitive to the airfoil shape. For three-dimensional finite wings, lift enhancement due to the leading-edge vortices and existence of optimal frequencies are similar to the two-dimensional case. Vortex dynamics of the leading-edge vortex and tip vortex is discussed in detail. Leading-edge sweep is shown to be beneficial in the reattachment of the separated

  7. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  8. Numerical simulation of flow past twin near-wall circular cylinders in tandem arrangement at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-qiang Tang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow past twin circular cylinders in a tandem arrangement placed near a plane wall was investigated by means of numerical simulations. The two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a three-step finite element method at a relatively low Reynolds number of Re = 200 for various dimensionless ratios of and , where D is the cylinder diameter, L is the center-to-center distance between the two cylinders, and G is the gap between the lowest surface of the twin cylinders and the plane wall. The influences of and on the hydrodynamic force coefficients, Strouhal numbers, and vortex shedding modes were examined. Three different vortex shedding modes of the near wake were identified according to the numerical results. It was found that the hydrodynamic force coefficients and vortex shedding modes are quite different with respect to various combinations of and . For very small values of , the vortex shedding is completely suppressed, resulting in the root mean square (RMS values of drag and lift coefficients of both cylinders and the Strouhal number for the downstream cylinder being almost zero. The mean drag coefficient of the upstream cylinder is larger than that of the downstream cylinder for the same combination of and . It is also observed that change in the vortex shedding modes leads to a significant increase in the RMS values of drag and lift coefficients.

  9. An investigation of turbulence structure in a low Reynolds number incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strataridakis, Constantine John

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using two X-probes simultaneously. The experiment was performed in the large Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Wind Tunnel at the University of California, Davis. The 7.32 meter long flat plate installed within the wind tunnel generated approximately 20 cm thick boundary layer, R (sub theta) approximately 4,000. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity data very close to the wall (y(+) is greater than or = to 1) were measured with a single hot wire to improve the measurement resolution. Space-time correlations of mu' and upsilon' velocities and of their instantaneous product were obtained with a pair of X-wires. The mean convection velocities, the extent in space, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the mu', upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') large-scale structures are presented. (The (mu')(upsilon') results are presented for the first time.) The mu' structure is inclined at a small angle (19 deg) to the wall, while the upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') structures propagate almost at wall-normal directions. Each of the mu' and upsilon' structures appears elongated in the direction of the corresponding velocity fluctuation and is limited to delta-extent in the other two directions. The similarity between the upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') suggests that the (mu')(upsilon') might mainly be a consequence of the motion of the upsilon' structure. Finally, a possible explanation for the differences between the (mu')(upsilon'), upsilon' and the mu' structures is the existence of different coherent scales, one dominating mu' and the other dominating upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon').

  10. Numerical analyses of high Reynolds number flow of high pressure fuel gas through rough pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadorin, Margherita; Morini, Mirko; Pinelli, Michele [ENDIF - Engineering Department in Ferrara, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1 - 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, a CFD commercial code is used to evaluate the pressure drop through pipes in a stream of high pressure gas. Both hexahedral and tetrahedral grids are considered. Preliminarily, a grid sensitivity analysis is carried out by comparing CFD results with analytical results. Each grid is characterized by a different number and thickness of layers in order to investigate the behavior of the grid with respect to the boundary layer. Then, the model is validated by using a literature test case, in which high pressure gas flow through a rough pipe is experimentally studied. Moreover, various equations of state (i.e., constant properties, Ideal Gas and Redlich-Kwong equations) and boundary conditions (e.g., pressure, mass flow, etc.) are taken into consideration and compared. Finally, the model is used to extrapolate the behavior of gaseous fuels (i.e., natural gas, biogas and hydrogen-methane mixture) flowing at high pressure through pipes of different roughness. The analyses show that the radial depth of the prism layers on pipe wall has to be controlled to allow the correct resolution of the boundary layer. Moreover, the results highlight that the first element height of the prism layer should be high enough to avoid inconsistencies in the rough model application. At the same time, the grid used for calculations does not strongly influence the numerical results and hence tune of the first element height to perfectly fit the roughness is not always justified. The final analysis on the different gaseous fuels put into evidence the capability of the CFD analysis to determine the energy performance of fuel transportation in gas pipeline. (author)

  11. INVESTIGATION OF DOMINANT FREQUENCIES IN TRANSITION REYNOLDS NUMBER RANGE OF FLOW AROUND A CIRCULAR CYLINDER Ⅰ: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN VORTEX SHEDDING AND TRANSITION FREQUENCIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AHMED N A

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive hot wire investigation of the flow around a circular cylinder is carried out in an 18" × 18" wind tunnel to look into the dominant frequencies at the stagnation, separation and separated shear layers in the transition Reynolds number range. The majority of the experiments are carried out at Reynolds number of 4.5 × 104, with additional transition frequency tests at Reynolds numbers of 2.9 × 104, 3.3 × 104 and 9.7 × 104 respectively. The results are analysed in terms of power spectral density. While the frequency associated with stagnation is found to be essentially due to vortex shedding, frequency doubling of vortex shedding is also evident in the separated shear layers.Two peaks associated with transition frequencies are detected and their possible implications are presented.

  12. Boundary layer and separation control on wings at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanling

    Results on boundary layer and separation control through acoustic excitation at low Re numbers are reported. The Eppler 387 profile is specifically chosen because of its pre-stall hysteresis and bi-stable state behavior in the transitional Re regime, which is a result of flow separation and reattachment. External acoustic forcing on the wing yields large improvements (more than 70%) in lift-to-drag ratio and flow reattachment at forcing frequencies that correlate with the measured anti-resonances in the wind tunnel. The optimum St/Re1/2 range for Re = 60,000 matches the proposed optimum range in the literature, but there is less agreement for Re = 40,000, which suggests that correct St scaling has not been determined. The correlation of aerodynamic improvements to wind tunnel resonances implies that external acoustic forcing is facility-dependent, which inhibits practical application. Therefore, internal acoustic excitation for the same wing profile is also pursued. Internal acoustic forcing is designed to be accomplished by embedding small speakers inside a custom-designed wing that contains many internal cavities and small holes in the suction surface. However, initial testing of this semi-porous wing model shows that the presence of the small holes in the suction surface completely transforms the aerodynamic performance by changing the mean chordwise separation location and causing an originally separated, low-lift state flow to reattach into a high-lift state. The aerodynamic improvements are not caused by the geometry of the small holes themselves, but rather by Helmholtz resonance that occurs in the cavities, which generate tones that closely match the intrinsic flow instabilities. Essentially, opening and closing holes in the suction surface of a wing, perhaps by digital control, can be used as a means of passive separation control. Given the similarity of wing-embedded pressure tap systems to Helmholtz resonators, particular attention must be given to the

  13. A model for roll stall and the inherent stability modes of low aspect ratio wings at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Matt

    The development of Micro Aerial Vehicles has been hindered by the poor understanding of the aerodynamic loading and stability and control properties of the low Reynolds number regime in which the inherent low aspect ratio (LAR) wings operate. This thesis experimentally evaluates the static and damping aerodynamic stability derivatives to provide a complete aerodynamic model for canonical flat plate wings of aspect ratios near unity at Reynolds numbers under 1 x 105. This permits the complete functionality of the aerodynamic forces and moments to be expressed and the equations of motion to solved, thereby identifying the inherent stability properties of the wing. This provides a basis for characterizing the stability of full vehicles. The influence of the tip vortices during sideslip perturbations is found to induce a loading condition referred to as roll stall, a significant roll moment created by the spanwise induced velocity asymmetry related to the displacement of the vortex cores relative to the wing. Roll stall is manifested by a linearly increasing roll moment with low to moderate angles of attack and a subsequent stall event similar to a lift polar; this behavior is not experienced by conventional (high aspect ratio) wings. The resulting large magnitude of the roll stability derivative, Cl,beta and lack of roll damping, Cl ,rho, create significant modal responses of the lateral state variables; a linear model used to evaluate these modes is shown to accurately reflect the solution obtained by numerically integrating the nonlinear equations. An unstable Dutch roll mode dominates the behavior of the wing for small perturbations from equilibrium, and in the presence of angle of attack oscillations a previously unconsidered coupled mode, referred to as roll resonance, is seen develop and drive the bank angle? away from equilibrium. Roll resonance requires a linear time variant (LTV) model to capture the behavior of the bank angle, which is attributed to the

  14. Quantitative analysis of the angular dynamics of a single spheroid in simple shear flow at moderate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Tomas; Nordmark, Arne; Aidun, Cyrus K.; Do-Quang, Minh; Lundell, Fredrik

    2016-08-01

    A spheroidal particle in simple shear flow shows surprisingly complicated angular dynamics; caused by effects of fluid inertia (characterized by the particle Reynolds number Rep) and particle inertia (characterized by the Stokes number St). Understanding this behavior can provide important fundamental knowledge of suspension flows with spheroidal particles. Up to now only qualitative analysis has been available at moderate Rep. Rigorous analytical methods apply only to very small Rep and numerical results lack accuracy due to the difficulty in treating the moving boundary of the particle. Here we show that the dynamics of the rotational motion of a prolate spheroidal particle in a linear shear flow can be quantitatively analyzed through the eigenvalues of the log-rolling particle (particle aligned with vorticity). This analysis provides an accurate description of stable rotational states in terms of Rep,St, and particle aspect ratio (rp). Furthermore we find that the effect on the orientational dynamics from fluid inertia can be modeled with a Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator. This opens up the possibility of developing a reduced-order model that takes into account effects from both fluid and particle inertia.

  15. Choice of boundary condition for lattice-Boltzmann simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow in complex domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Rupert W; Carver, Hywel B; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Hetherington, James; Groen, Derek; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V

    2014-02-01

    Modeling blood flow in larger vessels using lattice-Boltzmann methods comes with a challenging set of constraints: a complex geometry with walls and inlets and outlets at arbitrary orientations with respect to the lattice, intermediate Reynolds (Re) number, and unsteady flow. Simple bounce-back is one of the most commonly used, simplest, and most computationally efficient boundary conditions, but many others have been proposed. We implement three other methods applicable to complex geometries [Guo, Zheng, and Shi, Phys. Fluids 14, 2007 (2002); Bouzidi, Firdaouss, and Lallemand, Phys. Fluids 13, 3452 (2001); Junk and Yang, Phys. Rev. E 72, 066701 (2005)] in our open-source application hemelb. We use these to simulate Poiseuille and Womersley flows in a cylindrical pipe with an arbitrary orientation at physiologically relevant Re number (1-300) and Womersley (4-12) numbers and steady flow in a curved pipe at relevant Dean number (100-200) and compare the accuracy to analytical solutions. We find that both the Bouzidi-Firdaouss-Lallemand (BFL) and Guo-Zheng-Shi (GZS) methods give second-order convergence in space while simple bounce-back degrades to first order. The BFL method appears to perform better than GZS in unsteady flows and is significantly less computationally expensive. The Junk-Yang method shows poor stability at larger Re number and so cannot be recommended here. The choice of collision operator (lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook vs multiple relaxation time) and velocity set (D3Q15 vs D3Q19 vs D3Q27) does not significantly affect the accuracy in the problems studied.

  16. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-07

    developed a new Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP), with a sensing wire over an order of magnitude smaller than current commercial hot - wires ...concern is the accuracy of our hot wire measurements. In this respect, the primary issues are the temporal and spatial response of the probes. The...is the local mean velocity and/is the frequency in Hz. In each case, the range of wavenumbers corresponding to the hot wire length lw is shown as

  17. The effects of fluid viscosity on the kinematics and material properties of C. elegans swimming at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Sznitman, Josue; Purohit, Prashant K; Arratia, Paulo E

    2009-01-01

    The effects of fluid viscosity on the kinematics of a small swimmer at low Reynolds number are investigated in both experiments and in a simple model. The swimmer is the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is an undulating roundworm approximately 1 mm long. Experiments show that the nematode maintains a highly periodic swimming behavior as the fluid viscosity is varied from 1.0 mPa-s to 12 mPa-s. Surprisingly, the nematode's swimming speed (~0.35 mm/s) is nearly insensitive to the range of fluid viscosities investigated here. However, the nematode's beating frequency decreases to an asymptotic value (~1.7 Hz) with increasing fluid viscosity. A simple model is used to estimate the nematode's Young's modulus and tissue viscosity. Both material properties increase with increasing fluid viscosity. It is proposed that the increase in Young's modulus may be associated with muscle contraction in response to larger mechanical loading while the increase in effective tissue viscosity may be associated with the energ...

  18. CFD Study of Pectoral Fins of Larval Zebrafish: Effect of Reynolds Number and Fin Bending in Fluid Structures and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Toukir; Curet, Oscar M.

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish exhibits significant changes in fin morphology as well as fin actuation during its physical development. In larval stage (Re ~ 10), they beat pectoral fins asymmetrically during slow swimming and prey tracking and a hypothesis suggests pectoral fin motion enhances fluid mixing to assist respiration. We performed a series of computational simulations to study effect of Reynolds number (Re) and pectoral fin kinematics in the fluid dynamics and mixing around a larval zebrafish. The CFD algorithm is based on a constraint formulation where the kinematics of the zebrafish are specified. We simulated experimental zebrafish kinematics at different Re (17 to 300) and considered variations on the fin kinematics to evaluate role of fin deformation in the fluid structures generated by the pectoral fins. Using Lagrangian Coherent Structures and Lagrangian fluid tracers, we identified distinctly dynamic fluid regions and found that mixing around the pectoral fin significantly increases with Re and fin bending enhance fluid mixing at low Re. However, as zebrafish matures and its Re increases, the need to beat the pectoral fins to enhance mixing is reduced.

  19. A comparison of vortex and pseudo-spectral methods for the simulation of periodic vortical flows at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Leonard, Anthony; Pullin, D. I.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-04-01

    We present a validation study for the hybrid particle-mesh vortex method against a pseudo-spectral method for the Taylor-Green vortex at ReΓ = 1600 as well as in the collision of two antiparallel vortex tubes at ReΓ = 10,000. In this study we present diagnostics such as energy spectra and enstrophy as computed by both methods as well as point-wise comparisons of the vorticity field. Using a fourth order accurate kernel for interpolation between the particles and the mesh, the results of the hybrid vortex method and of the pseudo-spectral method agree well in both flow cases. For the Taylor-Green vortex, the vorticity contours computed by both methods around the time of the energy dissipation peak overlap. The energy spectrum shows that only the smallest length scales in the flow are not captured by the vortex method. In the second flow case, where we compute the collision of two anti-parallel vortex tubes at Reynolds number 10,000, the vortex method results and the pseudo-spectral method results are in very good agreement up to and including the first reconnection of the tubes. The maximum error in the effective viscosity is about 2.5% for the vortex method and about 1% for the pseudo-spectral method. At later times the flows computed with the different methods show the same qualitative features, but the quantitative agreement on vortical structures is lost.

  20. The hydrodynamic and ultrasound-induced forces on microbubbles under high Reynolds number flow representative of the human systemic circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are micron-sized bubbles that are used in conjunction with ultrasound (US) in medical applications such as thrombolysis and targeted intravenous drug delivery. Previous work has shown that the Bjerknes force, due to the phase difference between the incoming US pressure wave and the bubble volume oscillations, can be used to manipulate the trajectories of microbubbles. Our work explores the behavior of microbubbles in medium sized blood vessels under both uniform and pulsatile flows at a range of physiologically relevant Reynolds and Womersley numbers. High speed images were taken of the microbubbles in an in-vitro flow loop that replicates physiological flow conditions. During the imaging, the microbubbles were insonified at different diagnostic ultrasound settings (varying center frequency, PRF, etc.). An in-house Lagrangian particle tracking code was then used to determine the trajectories of the microbubbles and, thus, a dynamic model for the microbubbles including the Bjerknes forces acting on them, as well as drag, lift, and added mass. Preliminary work has also explored the behavior of the microbubbles in a patient-specific model of a carotid artery bifurcation to demonstrate the feasibility of preferential steering of microbubbles towards the intracranial circulation with US.

  1. Extended self-similarity in moment-generating-functions in wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiang I A; Marusic, Ivan; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In wall-bounded turbulence, the moment generating functions (MGFs) of the streamwise velocity fluctuations $\\left$ develop power-law scaling as a function of the wall normal distance $z/\\delta$. Here $u$ is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, $+$ indicates normalization in wall units (averaged friction velocity), $z$ is the distance from the wall, $q$ is an independent variable and $\\delta$ is the boundary layer thickness. Previous work has shown that this power-law scaling exists in the log-region {\\small $3Re_\\tau^{0.5}\\lesssim z^+$, $z\\lesssim 0.15\\delta$}, where $Re_\\tau$ is the friction velocity-based Reynolds numbers. Here we present empirical evidence that this self-similar scaling can be extended, including bulk and viscosity-affected regions $30

  2. Computation of drag and lift coefficients for simple two-dimensional objects with Reynolds number Re = 420 000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matas Richard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with comparison of drag and lift coefficients for simple two-dimensional objects, which are often discussed in fluid mechanics fundamentals books. The commercial CFD software ANSYS/FLUENT 13 was used for computation of flow fields around the objects and determination of the drag and lift coefficients. The flow fields of the two-dimensional objects were computed for velocity up to 160 km per hour and Reynolds number Re = 420 000. Main purpose was to verify the suggested computational domain and model settings for further more complex objects geometries. The more complex profiles are used to stabilize asymmetrical ('z'-shaped pantographs of high-speed trains. The trains are used in two-way traffic where the pantographs have to operate with the same characteristics in both directions. Results of the CFD computations show oscillation of the drag and lift coefficients over time. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental data and discussed. Some examples are presented in the paper.

  3. Arrangement of scale-interaction and large-scale modulation in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between small- and large-scale motions are inherent in the near-wall dynamics of wall-bounded flows. We here examine the scale-interaction embedded within the streamwise velocity component. Data were acquired using hot-wire anemometry in ZPG turbulent boundary layers, for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ≡ δUτ / ν ~ 2800 to 22800. After first decomposing velocity signals into contributions from small- and large-scales, we then represent the time-varying small-scale energy with time series of its instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency, via a wavelet-based method. Features of the scale-interaction are inferred from isocorrelation maps, formed by correlating the large-scale velocity with its concurrent small-scale amplitude and frequency. Below the onset of the log-region, the physics constitutes aspects of amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Time shifts, associated with the correlation extrema--representing the lead/lag of the small-scale signatures relative to the large-scales--are shown to be governed by inner-scaling. Wall-normal trends of time shifts are explained by considering the arrangement of scales in the log- and intermittent-regions, and how they relate to stochastic top-down and bottom-up processes.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of the turbulent MHD channel flow at low magnetic Reynolds number for electric correlation characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent channel flow has been performed under the low magnetic Reynolds number assumption.The velocity-electric field and electric-electric field correlations were studied in the present work for different magnetic field orientations.The Kenjeres-Hanjalic (K-H) model was validated with the DNS data in a term by term manner.The numerical results showed that the K-H model makes good predictions for most components of the velocity-electric field correlations.The mechanisms of turbulence suppression were also analyzed for different magnetic field orientations utilizing the DNS data and the K-H model.The results revealed that the dissipative MHD source term is responsible for the turbulence suppression for the case of streamwise and spanwise magnetic orientation,while the Lorentz force which speeds up the near-wall fluid and decreases the production term is responsible for the turbulence suppression for the case of the wall normal magnetic orientation.

  5. The drag-adjoint field of a circular cylinder wake at Reynolds numbers 20, 100 and 500

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiqi

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the adjoint solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. We focus on flow across a circular cylinder at three Reynolds numbers, ReD = 20, 100 and 500. The objective function in the adjoint formulation is the drag on the cylinder. We use classical fluid mechanics approaches to analyze the adjoint solution, which is a vector field similar to a flow field. Production and dissipation of kinetic energy of the adjoint field is discussed. We also derive the evolution of circulation of the adjoint field along a closed material contour. These analytical results are used to explain three numerical solutions of the adjoint equations presented in this paper: The adjoint solution at ReD = 20, a viscous steady state flow, exhibits a downstream suction and an upstream jet, opposite of expected behavior of a flow field. The adjoint solution at ReD = 100, a periodic 2D unsteady flow, exhibits periodic, bean shaped circulation the near wake region. The adjoint solution at ReD = 500, a turbulent 3D unsteady flow,...

  6. Influence of flexible fins on vortex-induced load over a circular cylinder at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Gurugubelli, Pardha S.

    2016-11-01

    Rigid fins/fairings are known to reduce the vortex induced periodic forces exerting on a cylinder by extending the shear layers interaction further downstream to avoid alternate oppositely-signed shed vortices in the afterbody region. In this work, we present a numerical analysis on the effect of flexible fins with their leading edges fixed tangentially to the cylinder and the trailing edges are free to flap in the wake of two-dimensional (2D) cylinder. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out with varying non-dimensional flexural rigidity, KB ∈ [0.01, 1] at a fixed a non-dimensional mass ratio, m* = 0 . 1 and Reynolds number, Re = 100, defined based on the cylinder diameter. We investigate the role of flexibility in altering the wake flow and load generation over the cylinder body. As the KB is reduced, there exists a critical KB below which the flexible fins lose their stability to perform flapping and the drag acting on combined cylinder flexible fins begins to increase. However surprisingly, we observe that due to the flexible fin flapping the periodic lift forces acting on the cylinder drops significantly. We show that we can achieve an approx. 62.5% decrease in the nett periodic lift forces when compared to the bare cylinder.

  7. Spreading of an inkjet droplet on a solid surface with a controlled contact angle at low Weber and Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yangsoo; Kim, Chongyoup; Yang, Doo Ho; Ahn, Dong June

    2008-03-18

    Even though the inkjet technology has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies for electronic and bio industries, the full understanding of the dynamics of an inkjet droplet at its operating conditions is still lacking. In this study, the normal impact of water droplets on solid substrates was investigated experimentally. The size of water droplets studied here was 46 microm and was much smaller than the most of the previous studies on drop impact. The Weber number (We) and Reynolds number (Re) were 0.05-2 and 10-100, respectively, and the Ohnesorge number was fixed at 0.017. The wettability of the solid substrate was varied by adsorbing a self-assembled monolayer of octadecyltrichlorosilane followed by the exposure to UV-ozone plasma. The impact scenarios for low We impacts were found to be qualitatively different from the high to moderate We impacts. Neither the development of a thin film and lamella under the traveling sphere nor the entrapment of small bubbles was observed. The dynamics of droplet impact at the conditions studied here is found to proceed under the combined influences of inertia, surface tension, and viscosity without being dominated by one specific mechanism. The maximum spreading factor (beta), the ratio of the diameter of the wetted surface and the drop diameter before impact, was correlated well with the relationship ln beta=0.090 ln We/(fs-cos theta)+0.151 for three decades of We/(fs-cos theta), where theta is the equilibrium contact angle, and fs is the ratio between the surface areas contacting the air and the solid substrate. The result implies that the final shape of the droplet is determined by the surface phenomenon rather than fluid mechanical effects.

  8. Error-landscape-based multi-objective calibration of the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity using high-Reynolds-number decaying turbulence data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Geurts, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    A suite of large-eddy simulation(LESs) of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is performed and compared to wind-tunnel experiments in the tradition of Comte-Bellot and Corrsin. The error-landscape approach is used for the evaluation of the Smagorinsky model, and the re

  9. Effects of Reynolds Number on the Energy Conversion and Near-Wake Dynamics of a High Solidity Vertical-Axis Cross-Flow Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bachant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed with a large laboratory-scale high solidity cross-flow turbine to investigate Reynolds number effects on performance and wake characteristics and to establish scale thresholds for physical and numerical modeling of individual devices and arrays. It was demonstrated that the performance of the cross-flow turbine becomes essentially R e -independent at a Reynolds number based on the rotor diameter R e D ≈ 10 6 or an approximate average Reynolds number based on the blade chord length R e c ≈ 2 × 10 5 . A simple model that calculates the peak torque coefficient from static foil data and cross-flow turbine kinematics was shown to be a reasonable predictor for Reynolds number dependence of an actual cross-flow turbine operating under dynamic conditions. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements in the near-wake showed subtle differences over the range of R e investigated. However, when transport terms for the streamwise momentum and mean kinetic energy were calculated, a similar R e threshold was revealed. These results imply that physical model studies of cross-flow turbines should achieve R e D ∼ 10 6 to properly approximate both the performance and wake dynamics of full-scale devices and arrays.

  10. A methodology for highly accurate results of direct numerical simulations: Drag force in dense gas–solid flows at intermediate Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Y.; Kriebitzsch, S.H.L.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Peters, E.A.J.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations with an iterative immersed boundary method (IBM) are performed to predict the drag force for gas–solid flows at intermediate Reynolds number (Re). A methodology is developed to obtain highly accurate IBM results at relatively low computational cost. First of all, “resolution-free” gas–so

  11. CFD Analysis on the Air-Side Thermal-Hydraulic Performance of Multi-Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Saleem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The air-side thermal-hydraulic performance of multi-louvered aluminium fin heat exchangers is investigated. A systematic numerical study has been performed to analyze the air-sde thermal hydraulic characteristics over a wide range of Reynolds number i.e., from 30 to 500. Air-side heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop were calculated and validated over the mentioned band of Reynolds numbers. The critical Reynolds number was determined numerically; and also the variation of flow pattern along with the air-side heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a multi-louvered heat exchanger associated with R e c r i has been reported. Moreover, a parametric study of the multi-louvered aluminium fin heat exchangers was also performed for 36 heat exchanger configurations with the louver angles (19–31°; fin pitches (1.0, 1.2, 1.4 mm and flow depths (16, 20, 24 mm; and the geometric configuration exhibiting the highest air-side heat transfer coefficient was reported. The air-side heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop results for different geometrical configurations were presented in terms of Colburn j factor and Fanning friction factor f; as a function of Reynolds number based on louver pitch.

  12. Flight and wind-tunnel measurements showing base drag reduction provided by a trailing disk for high Reynolds number turbulent flow for subsonic and transonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of a trailing disk, or trapped vortex concept, in reducing the base drag of a large body of revolution was studied from measurements made both in flight and in a wind tunnel. Pressure data obtained for the flight experiment, and both pressure and force balance data were obtained for the wind tunnel experiment. The flight test also included data obtained from a hemispherical base. The experiment demonstrated the significant base drag reduction capability of the trailing disk to Mach 0.93 and to Reynolds numbers up to 80 times greater than for earlier studies. For the trailing disk data from the flight experiment, the maximum decrease in base drag ranged form 0.08 to 0.07 as Mach number increased from 0.70 to 0.93. Aircraft angles of attack ranged from 3.9 to 6.6 deg for the flight data. For the trailing disk data from the wind tunnel experiment, the maximum decrease in base and total drag ranged from 0.08 to 0.05 for the approximately 0 deg angle of attack data as Mach number increased from 0.30 to 0.82.

  13. Effects of the Reynolds number on two-dimensional dielectrophoretic motions of a pair of particles under a uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang Mo; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Maniyeri, Ranjith Maniyeri [National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Mangalore (India)

    2016-07-15

    This paper presents two-dimensional direct numerical simulations to explore the effect of the Reynolds number on the Dielectrophoretic (DEP) motion of a pair of freely suspended particles in an unbounded viscous fluid under an external uniform electric field. Accordingly, the electric potential is obtained by solving the Maxwell'00s equation with a great sudden change in the electric conductivity at the particle-fluid interface and then the Maxwell stress tensor is integrated to determine the DEP force exerted on each particle. The fluid flow and particle movement, on the other hand, are predicted by solving the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations together with the kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are carried out using a finite volume approach, composed of a sharp interface method for the electric potential and a direct-forcing immersed-boundary method for the fluid flow. Through the simulations, it is found that both particles with the same sign of the conductivity revolve and eventually align themselves in a line with the electric field. With different signs, to the contrary, they revolve in the reverse way and eventually become lined up at a right angle with the electric field. The DEP motion also depends significantly on the Reynolds number defined based on the external electric field for all the combinations of the conductivity signs. When the Reynolds number is approximately below Re{sub cr} ≈ 0.1, the DEP motion becomes independent of the Reynolds number and thus can be exactly predicted by the no-inertia solver that neglects all the inertial and convective effects. With increasing Reynolds number above the critical number, on the other hand, the particles trace larger trajectories and thus take longer time during their revolution to the eventual in-line alignment.

  14. Water Tank Experiments on Stratified Flow over Double Mountain-Shaped Obstacles at High-Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stiperski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an overview of the HyIV-CNRS-SecORo (Hydralab IV-CNRS-Secondary Orography and Rotors Experiments laboratory experiments carried out in the CNRM (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques large stratified water flume. The experiments were designed to systematically study the influence of double obstacles on stably stratified flow. The experimental set-up consists of a two-layer flow in the water tank, with a lower neutral and an upper stable layer separated by a sharp density discontinuity. This type of layering over terrain is known to be conducive to a variety of possible responses in the atmosphere, from hydraulic jumps to lee waves and highly turbulent rotors. In each experiment, obstacles were towed through the tank at a constant speed. The towing speed and the size of the tank allowed high Reynolds-number flow similar to the atmosphere. Here, we present the experimental design, together with an overview of laboratory experiments conducted and their results. We develop a regime diagram for flow over single and double obstacles and examine the parameter space where the secondary obstacle has the largest influence on the flow. Trapped lee waves, rotors, hydraulic jumps, lee-wave interference and flushing of the valley atmosphere are successfully reproduced in the stratified water tank. Obstacle height and ridge separation distance are shown to control lee-wave interference. Results, however, differ partially from previous findings on the flow over double ridges reported in the literature due to the presence of nonlinearities and possible differences in the boundary layer structure. The secondary obstacle also influences the transition between different flow regimes and makes trapped lee waves possible for higher Froude numbers than expected for an isolated obstacle.

  15. Classical to quantum in large number limit

    CERN Document Server

    Modi, Kavan; Pascazio, Saverio; Vedral, Vlatko; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    We construct a quantumness witness following the work of Alicki and van Ryn (AvR) in "A simple test of quantumness for a single system" [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor., 41, 062001 (2008)]. The AvR test is designed to detect quantumness. We reformulate the AvR test by defining it for quantum states rather than for observables. This allows us to identify the necessary quantities and resources to detect quantumness for any given system. The first quantity turns out to be the purity of the system. When applying the witness to a system with even moderate mixedness the protocol is unable to reveal any quantumness. We then show that having many copies of the system leads the witness to reveal quantumness. This seems contrary to the Bohr correspondence, which asserts that in the large number limit quantum systems become classical, while the witness shows quantumness when several non-quantum systems, as determined by the witness, are considered together. However, the resources required to detect the quantumness increase dra...

  16. A STUDY ON THE MECHANISM OF HIGH-LIFT GENERATION BY AN AIRFOIL IN UNSTEADY MOTION AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂; Hossein Hamdani

    2001-01-01

    The aerodynamic force and flow structure of NACA 0012 airfoil performing an unsteady motion at low Reynolds number (Re = 100) are calculated by solving Navier-Stokes equations. The motion consists of three parts: the first translation, rotation and the second translation in the direction opposite to the first.The rotation and the second translation in this motion are expected to represent the rotation and translation of the wing-section of a hovering insect. The flow structure is used in combination with the theory of vorticity dynamics to explain the generation of unsteady aerodynamic force in the motion. During the rotation, due to the creation of strong vortices in short time, large aerodynamic force is produced and the force is almost normal to the airfoil chord. During the second translation, large lift coefficient can be maintained for certain time period and CL1, the lift coefficient averaged over four chord lengths of travel, is larger than 2 (the corresponding steady-state lift coefficient is only 0.9). The large lift coefficient is due to two effects. The first is the delayed shedding of the stall vortex. The second is that the vortices created during the airfoil rotation and in the near wake left by previous translation form a short "vortex street" in front of the airfoil and the "vortex street" induces a "wind";against this "wind" the airfoil translates, increasing its relative speed. The above results provide insights to the understanding of the mechanism of high-lift generation by a hovering insect.

  17. An experimental investigation of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    A very low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient is studied. The aim is to obtain highly accurate mean-flow and turbulence measurements under conditions that can be closely related to the numerical simulations of Philippe Spalart for the purposes of CFD validation. Much of the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel was completely rebuilt with a new wider contraction and working section which will improve compatibility with the simulations. A unique sophisticated high-speed computer controlled 3-D probe traversing mechanism was integrated into the test section. Construction of the tunnel and traverse is discussed in some detail. The hardware is now complete, and measurements are in progress. The mean-flow data indicate that a suitably two-dimensional base flow was established. Automation of the probe positioning and data acquistion have led to a decreased running time for total pressure measurements. However, the most significant benefits are expected to occur when using hot-wire probes. Calibrations can be performed automatically and there is no need to handle fragile probes when moving between measuring stations. Techniques are being developed which require sampling of the signals from moving hot-wire probes on the basis of their position in the flow. Measurements can be made in high intensity turbulence by flying probes upstream at high speed so that the relative magnitude of the turbulent velocity fluctuations are reduced. In regions, where the turbulence intensity is not too large, the probe can also be repetitively scanned across very dense spatial grids in other directions. With this technique, a complete profile can be measured in about 1/3 the time and with a spatial density about 50 times that obtainable using a stationary probe.

  18. Effect of trailing edge shape on the separated flow characteristics around an airfoil at low Reynolds number: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomareis, Nikitas; Papadakis, George

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow field around a NACA 0012 airfoil at Reynolds number 50 000 and angle of attack 5° with 3 different trailing edge shapes (straight, blunt, and serrated) have been performed. Both time-averaged flow characteristics and the most dominant flow structures and their frequencies are investigated using the dynamic mode decomposition method. It is shown that for the straight trailing edge airfoil, this method can capture the fundamental as well as the subharmonic of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that develops naturally in the separating shear layer. The fundamental frequency matches well with relevant data in the literature. The blunt trailing edge results in periodic vortex shedding, with frequency close to the subharmonic of the natural shear layer frequency. The shedding, resulting from a global instability, has an upstream effect and forces the separating shear layer. Due to forcing, the shear layer frequency locks onto the shedding frequency while the natural frequency (and its subharmonic) is suppressed. The presence of serrations in the trailing edge creates a spanwise pressure gradient, which is responsible for the development of a secondary flow pattern in the spanwise direction. This pattern affects the mean flow in the near wake. It can explain an unexpected observation, namely, that the velocity deficit downstream of a trough is smaller than the deficit after a protrusion. Furthermore, the insertion of serrations attenuates the energy of vortex shedding by de-correlating the spanwise coherence of the vortices. This results in weaker forcing of the separating shear layer, and both the subharmonics of the natural frequency and the shedding frequency appear in the spectra.

  19. Collision Dynamics of a Rough Deformable Sphere and its Subsequent Trajectory in Air at High Reynolds Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Matthew Joseph

    We begin by modeling the collision between two macroscopic bodies, where one of the bodies, a sphere, is treated as a damped, linear spring. Predictions of the sphere's resultant speed, spin rate, and angle above the horizontal are made, and are compared to the results of experiments we performed on golf balls. In the general case, the ball first slides, then rolls upward along the striking surface. Toward the end of the impact, the ball may even slip on the hitting surface, similar to the action of tires on a rapidly accelerating car. Inertial forces which arise in a rotating coordinate system play a major role in this analysis. After the collision, the final values of the spin rate, speed, and angle above the horizontal are used to provide initial conditions for the trajectory of the ball in air. In order to precisely calculate the trajectory, the effects of drag due to air resistance and lift due to spin (the "Magnus Effect") must be taken into account. The trajectory also depends upon the drag and lift coefficients of the ball, which are, in general, functions of the velocity, spin, Reynolds number, and roughness of the ball. For the case in which the coefficients are considered constant, the numerical results for the trajectories compare favorably to an analytic method we developed that ignores terms of second order in the ratio of horizontal to vertical velocity components. For the non-constant coefficient case, the decay of the ball's spin rate is incorporated for the first time. It is assumed to be proportional to the product of the spin and the speed of the ball. A physical model that explains this correspondence is discussed, and evidence supporting the model is provided by experimental data.

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF FLOW AROUND A BIO-INSPIRED AIRFOIL AT REYNOLDS NUMBER 2.0×103

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Sheng-xian; LIU Ying-zheng; CHEN Jian-min

    2012-01-01

    The fluid flow around a bio-iuspired airfoil with corrugated surfaces and its smooth counterpart at chord Reynolds number Re =2.0× 103 and different Angle-Of-Attack (AOA =0°,4°,8° and 12°) were measured by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).The global characteristics of the fluid flow around two airfoils were analyzed by ensemble-averaged velocity field,distribution of reverse flow intennittency,and time-series flow visualizations.At AOA =0°,no significant variation of the global flow patterns was recognized for both configurations.The statistical results of reverse flow intermittency results demonstrated that the protruding peaks of the corrugated airfoil delay flow separation occur at AOA =4°.At large AOAs (8° and 12°),however,the flow is massively separated in both configurations,the combination of large separation bubble above the corrugated airfoil and small reeirculation zones in the upstream upper valley results in earlier separation of the flow.At AOA=g°,the wake region behind the corrugated airfoil is considerably shortened in comparison to the smooth one,indicating a remarkable reduction of the time-mean lift and drag forces,however,at AOA =12°,the wake region behind the corrugated one is slightly larger than that behind the smooth one.For the case of AOA - 8° and 12°,the time-series flow visualizations demonstrate the intensified vortex shedding process of the corrugated airfoil,which would give rise to enhanced dynamic loading.Due to the fact that dragonfly wing is practically flexible,it is speculated that the wing structure of a gliding dragonfly might be sophisticatedly deformed in response to the periodic loading to reduce the drag.

  1. Effects of Input Voltage on Flow Separation Control for Low-Pressure Turbine at Low Reynolds Number by Plasma Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Matsunuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Active flow control using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma actuators was investigated to reattach the simulated boundary layer separation on the suction surface of a turbine blade at low Reynolds number, Re = 1.7 × 104. The flow separation is induced on a curved plate installed in the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel. Particle image velocimetry (PIV was used to obtain instantaneous and time-averaged two-dimensional velocity measurements. The amplitude of input voltage for the plasma actuator was varied from ±2.0 kV to ±2.8 kV. The separated flow reattached on the curved wall when the input voltage was ±2.4 kV and above. The displacement thickness of the boundary layer near the trailing edge decreased by 20% at ±2.0 kV. The displacement thickness was suddenly reduced as much as 56% at ±2.2 kV, and it was reduced gradually from ±2.4 kV to ±2.8 kV (77% reduction. The total pressure loss coefficient, estimated from the boundary layer displacement thickness and momentum thickness, was 0.172 at the baseline (actuator off condition. The total pressure loss was reduced to 0.107 (38% reduction at ±2.2 kV and 0.078 (55% reduction at ±2.8 kV.

  2. Analytical and computational investigations of airfoils undergoing high-frequency sinusoidal pitch and plunge motions at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Gregory Z.

    Current interests in Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technologies call for the development of aerodynamic-design tools that will aid in the design of more efficient platforms that will also have adequate stability and control for flight in gusty environments. Influenced largely by nature MAVs tend to be very small, have low flight speeds, and utilize flapping motions for propulsion. For these reasons the focus is, specifically, on high-frequency motions at low Reynolds numbers. Toward the goal of developing design tools, it is of interest to explore the use of elementary flow solutions for simple motions such as pitch and plunge oscillations to predict aerodynamic performance for more complex motions. In the early part of this research, a validation effort was undertaken. Computations from the current effort were compared with experiments conducted in a parallel, collaborative effort at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). A set of pure-pitch and pure-plunge sinusoidal oscillations of the SD7003 airfoil were examined. Phase-averaged measurements using particle image velocimetry in a water tunnel were compared with computations using two flow solvers: (i) an incompressible Navier-Stokes Immersed Boundary Method and (ii) an unsteady compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver. The motions were at a reduced frequency of k = 3.93, and pitch-angle amplitudes were chosen such that a kinematic equivalence in amplitudes of effective angle of attack (from plunge) was obtained. Plunge cases showed good qualitative agreement between computation and experiment, but in the pitch cases, the wake vorticity in the experiment was substantially different from that predicted by both computations. Further, equivalence between the pure-pitch and pure-plunge motions was not attained through matching effective angle of attack. With the failure of pitch/plunge equivalence using equivalent amplitudes of effective angle of attack, the effort shifted to include pitch-rate and

  3. Investigation on subsonic to supersonic flow around a sphere at low Reynolds number of between 50 and 300 by direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, T.; Nonomura, T.; Takahashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Fukuda, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, analysis of flow properties around a sphere and its aerodynamic coefficients in the high-Mach-and-low-Reynolds-numbers conditions is carried out by direct numerical simulations solving the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The calculation is performed on a boundary-fitted coordinate system with a high-order scheme of sufficient accuracy. The analysis is conducted by assuming a rigid sphere with a Reynolds number of between 50 and 300, based on the diameter of the sphere and the freestream velocity and a freestream Mach number of between 0.3 and 2.0, together with the adiabatic wall boundary condition. The calculation shows the following yields: (1) unsteady fluctuation of hydrodynamic forces become smaller as the Mach number increases under the same Reynolds number condition, (2) the drag coefficient increases with the Mach number due to an increase in the pressure drag by the shock wave, and (3) an accurate prediction of the drag coefficient in the supersonic regime using traditional models might be difficult.

  4. A Study of Low-Reynolds Number Effects in Backward-Facing Step Flow Using Large Eddy Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Lars; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The flow in ventilated rooms is often not fully turbulent, but in some regions the flow can be laminar. Problems have been encountered when simulating this type of flow using RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) methods. Restivo carried out experiment on the flow after a backward-facing step......, with a large step....

  5. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Pei-Xue, E-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of CO_2 Utilization and Reduction Technology/Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bo, Han-Liang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  6. THE EFFECT OF THE REYNOLDS NUMBER OF AIR FLOW TO THE PARTICLE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF A FIBROUS FILTER MEDIUM WITH CYLINDRICAL SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Kouropoulos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At this study an attempt for the theoretical approach of the Re ynolds number effect of air flow to the particle collection efficiency of a fibrous fil ter with cylindrical section will be made. Initially, a report of the air filtration models to fibrous filter media will be presented along with an explanation of both the parameters and the physical quantities which govern the air filtration process. Furthermore, the resul ting equation from the mathematical model will be applied to a real filter medium and the characteristic curves of filter efficiency will be drawn. The change of a filter medi um efficiency with regard to the Reynolds number of air flow that passes through the filt er, derived from the curves, will be studied. The general conclusion that we have is that as the Reynolds number of filtered air increases, the collection efficiency of the filter decreases.

  7. Low Reynolds number kappa-epsilon and empirical transition models for oscillatory pipe flow and heat transfer. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Stirling engine heat exchangers are shell-and-tube type with oscillatory flow (zero-mean velocity) for the inner fluid. This heat transfer process involves laminar-transition turbulent flow motions under oscillatory flow conditions. A low Reynolds number kappa-epsilon model, (Lam-Bremhorst form), was utilized in the present study to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a circular tube. An empirical transition model was used to activate the low Reynolds number k-e model at the appropriate time within the cycle for a given axial location within the tube. The computational results were compared with experimental flow and heat transfer data for: (1) velocity profiles, (2) kinetic energy of turbulence, (3) skin friction factor, (4) temperature profiles, and (5) wall heat flux. The experimental data were obtained for flow in a tube (38 mm diameter and 60 diameter long), with the maximum Reynolds number based on velocity being Re(sub max) = 11840, a dimensionless frequency (Valensi number) of Va = 80.2, at three axial locations X/D = 16, 30 and 44. The agreement between the computations and the experiment is excellent in the laminar portion of the cycle and good in the turbulent portion. Moreover, the location of transition was predicted accurately. The Low Reynolds Number kappa-epsilon model, together with an empirical transition model, is proposed herein to generate the wall heat flux values at different operating parameters than the experimental conditions. Those computational data can be used for testing the much simpler and less accurate one dimensional models utilized in 1-D Stirling Engine design codes.

  8. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  9. Osmotic dehydration of some agro-food tissue pre-treated by pulsed electric field: Impact of impeller’s Reynolds number on mass transfer and color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissues of apple, carrot and banana were pre-treated by pulsed electric field (PEF and subsequently osmotically dehydrated in an agitated flask at ambient temperature using a 65% sucrose solution as osmotic medium. The effect of stirring intensity was investigated through water loss (WL and solid gain (SG. Changes in product color were also considered to analyze the impact of the treatment. The impeller’s Reynolds number was used to quantify the agitation. The Reynolds number remained inferior to 300 thus displaying laminar flow regime. Water loss (WL and solid gain (SG increase with the increase of Reynolds number. Mass transfer in osmotic dehydration of all three test particles has been studied on the basis of a two-exponential kinetic model. Then, mass transfer coefficients were related to the agitation intensity. This paper shows that the proposed empirical model is able to describe mass transfer phenomena in osmotic dehydration of these tissues. It is also shown that a higher agitation intensity improves both the kinetics of water loss and solid gain.

  10. Protein folding: understanding the role of water and the low Reynolds number environment as the peptide chain emerges from the ribosome and folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Voorheis, H Paul

    2014-12-21

    The mechanism of protein folding during early stages of the process has three determinants. First, moving water molecules obey the rules of low Reynolds number physics without an inertial component. Molecular movement is instantaneous and size insensitive. Proteins emerging from the ribosome move and rotate without an external force if they change shape, forming and propagating helical structures that increases translocational efficiency. Forward motion ceases when the shape change or propelling force ceases. Second, application of quantum field theory to water structure predicts the spontaneous formation of low density coherent units of fixed size that expel dissolved atmospheric gases. Structured water layers with both coherent and non-coherent domains, form a sheath around the new protein. The surface of exposed hydrophobic amino acids is protected from water contact by small nanobubbles of dissolved atmospheric gases, 5 or 6 molecules on average, that vibrate, attracting even widely separated resonating nanobubbles. This force results from quantum effects, appearing only when the system is within and interacts with an oscillating electromagnetic field. The newly recognized quantum force sharply bends the peptide and is part of a dynamic field determining the pathway of protein folding. Third, the force initiating the tertiary folding of proteins arises from twists at the position of each hydrophobic amino acid, that minimizes surface exposure of the hydrophobic amino acids and propagates along the protein. When the total bend reaches 360°, the leading segment of water sheath intersects the trailing segment. This steric self-intersection expels water from overlapping segments of the sheath and by Newton׳s second law moves the polypeptide chain in an opposite direction. Consequently, with very few exceptions that we enumerate and discuss, tertiary structures are absent from proteins without hydrophobic amino acids, which control the early stages of protein

  11. Heat transfer measurements on an incidence-tolerant low pressure turbine blade in a high speed linear cascade at low to moderate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualeu, Leolein Patrick Gouemeni

    Runway-independent aircraft are expected to be the future for short-haul flights by improving air transportation and reducing area congestion encountered in airports. The Vehicle Systems Program of NASA identified a Large Civil Tilt-Rotor, equipped with variable-speed power-turbine engines, as the best concept. At cruise altitude, the engine rotor-speed will be reduced by as much as the 50% of take-off speed. The large incidence variation in the low pressure turbine associated with the change in speed can be detrimental to the engine performance. Low pressure turbine blades in cruise altitude are more predisposed to develop regions of boundary layer separation. Typical phenomenon such as impinging wakes on downstream blades and mainstream turbulences enhance the complexity of the flow in low pressure turbines. It is therefore important to be able to understand the flow behavior to accurately predict the losses. Research facilities are seldom able to experimentally reproduce low Reynolds numbers at relevant engine Mach number. Having large incidence swing as an additional parameter in the investigation of the boundary layer development, on a low pressure turbine blade, makes this topic unique and as a consequence requires a unique facility to conduct the experimental research. The compressible flow wind tunnel facility at the University of North Dakota had been updated to perform steady state experiments on a modular-cascade, designed to replicate a large variation of the incidence angles. The high speed and low Reynolds number facility maintained a sealed and closed loop configuration for each incidence angle. The updated facility is capable to produce experimental Reynolds numbers as low as 45,000 and as high as 570,000 at an exit Mach number of 0.72. Pressure and surface temperature measurements were performed at these low pressure turbine conditions. The present thesis investigates the boundary layer development on the surface of an Incidence-tolerant blade. The

  12. NUMERICAL STUDY OF PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION IN THE WAKE OF GAS-PARTICLE TWO-PHASE FLOWS PAST A CIRCULAR CYLINDER AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yuan-dong; ZHANG Hong-wu; WU Wen-quan

    2005-01-01

    Particle-laden gas flows past a circular cylinder at the Reynolds number of 2×105 were numerically investigated. The Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) was employed to evaluate the unsteady gas flow fields and a Lagrangian approach was applied for tracking individual solid particles. The vortex patterns and the distributions of particles with different Stokes numbers were obtained. Numerical results show that: (1) at small Stokes number (St=0.01) the particles move with the fluid and could be found evenly throughout the flow, (2) the regions around the vortex cores, where few particles exist, become wider as the stokes number of particles increases from 0.01 to 1.0, (3) at middle Stokes number (St=1.0, 10) centrifugal forces throw the particles out of the wake vortices, (4) at high Stokes number (St=100, 1000) the particles are not affected by the vortices,and their motion is determined by their inertia effects.

  13. Aerodynamic Effects of Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie Brynn; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The high turbulence study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 to 51.0. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12105 to 2.12106 and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 0.25 - 0.4 for the low Tu tests and 8- 15 for the high Tu study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitchyaw probe located in a survey plane 7 axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At the extreme positive and negative incidence angles, the data show substantial differences in the exit flow field. These differences are attributable to both the higher inlet Tu directly and to the thinner inlet endwall

  14. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, J.; Ertunç, Ö.; Ostwald, Ch; Lienhart, H.; Delgado, A.

    2011-12-01

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  15. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, J; Ertunc, Oe; Ostwald, Ch; Lienhart, H; Delgado, A, E-mail: jens.krauss@lstm.uni-erlangen.de [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2011-12-22

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  16. Where we observe that helical turbulence prevails over inertial waves in forced rotating flows at high Reynolds and low Rossby numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Baerenzung, J; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of spectral laws for helical turbulence in the presence of solid body rotation up to Reynolds numbers Re~1*10^5 and down to Rossby numbers Ro~3*10^-3. The forcing function is a fully helical flow that can also be viewed as mimicking the effect of atmospheric convective motions. We test in the helical case variants of a model developed previously (Baerenzung et al. 2008a) against direct numerical simulations (DNS), using data from a run on a grid of 15363 points; we also contrast its efficiency against a spectral Large Eddy Simulation (LES) (Chollet and Lesieur 1981) as well as an under-resolved DNS. The model including the contribution of helicity to the spectral eddy dissipation and eddy noise behaves best, allowing to recover statistical features of the flow. An exploration of parameter space is then performed beyond what is feasible today using DNS. At fixed Reynolds number, lowering the Rossby number leads to a regime of wave-mediated inertial helicity cascade to small scales. However, ...

  17. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  18. Influence of geometrical factors and pressing mould wear on thermal-hydraulic characteristics for steel offset strip fins at low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lihua; Qin, Feng; Chen, Jiangping; Chen, Zhijiu [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhou, Yimin [Zhejiang Yinlun Machinery Co. Ltd., Zhejiang Province 317200 (China)

    2007-12-15

    Aiming at achieving a more comprehensive understanding of influence factors on thermal-hydraulic characteristics for high-pressure-direction type steel offset strip fins, this paper constructed a single fin core assembly test rig with lubricant oil as work media at low Reynolds number. Six fin schemes were experimentally investigated only varying in fin height and fin wavelength due to mould restrictions. Twenty fin schemes changing in fin width, fin angle, fin thickness and staggered fin wavelength were simulated for supplement, and the geometrical influences in fin performance were put forward. Both Taguchi method and uniform design were introduced to study the contribution of each geometrical factor to fin global thermal-hydraulic performance, verifying that fin wavelength and fin height have the most significant contributions. Based on signal to noise ratio distributions, fin geometries were optimized for 16% elevation of global performance at Reynolds number of 430, then the 'cost-based fin performance' was put forward and compared quantitatively, proving that above optimum fin scheme is also economical. Finally, mould wear influence in fin performance was tested in different wear periods of a vacuum heat-treated Cr12MoV mould pair, then three stages of initial wear, stable wear, and overdrive wear were defined based on pressing times. The influences were analyzed and regulations were deduced relating to mould pressing times and oil Reynolds number. The suggested lifetime for this type of mould pair is 1050 thousand pressing times. The paper intends for fin performance evaluation, optimization, and pressing mould improvement. (author)

  19. Cascaded lattice Boltzmann method with improved forcing scheme for large-density-ratio multiphase flow at high Reynolds and Weber numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycett-Brown, Daniel; Luo, Kai H

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed forcing scheme has allowed the pseudopotential multiphase lattice Boltzmann method to correctly reproduce coexistence curves, while expanding its range to lower surface tensions and arbitrarily high density ratios [Lycett-Brown and Luo, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023305 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.023305]. Here, a third-order Chapman-Enskog analysis is used to extend this result from the single-relaxation-time collision operator, to a multiple-relaxation-time cascaded collision operator, whose additional relaxation rates allow a significant increase in stability. Numerical results confirm that the proposed scheme enables almost independent control of density ratio, surface tension, interface width, viscosity, and the additional relaxation rates of the cascaded collision operator. This allows simulation of large density ratio flows at simultaneously high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which is demonstrated through binary collisions of water droplets in air (with density ratio up to 1000, Reynolds number 6200 and Weber number 440). This model represents a significant improvement in multiphase flow simulation by the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann method in which real-world parameters are finally achievable.

  20. Cascaded lattice Boltzmann method with improved forcing scheme for large-density-ratio multiphase flow at high Reynolds and Weber numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycett-Brown, Daniel; Luo, Kai H.

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed forcing scheme has allowed the pseudopotential multiphase lattice Boltzmann method to correctly reproduce coexistence curves, while expanding its range to lower surface tensions and arbitrarily high density ratios [Lycett-Brown and Luo, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023305 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.023305]. Here, a third-order Chapman-Enskog analysis is used to extend this result from the single-relaxation-time collision operator, to a multiple-relaxation-time cascaded collision operator, whose additional relaxation rates allow a significant increase in stability. Numerical results confirm that the proposed scheme enables almost independent control of density ratio, surface tension, interface width, viscosity, and the additional relaxation rates of the cascaded collision operator. This allows simulation of large density ratio flows at simultaneously high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which is demonstrated through binary collisions of water droplets in air (with density ratio up to 1000, Reynolds number 6200 and Weber number 440). This model represents a significant improvement in multiphase flow simulation by the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann method in which real-world parameters are finally achievable.

  1. The Influence of Advection Schemes and Turbulence Closure Models on Drag Coefficient Calculation Around a Circular Cylinder at High Reynolds Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhenhua; ZHAO Dongliang; SONG Jinbao

    2011-01-01

    Different advection schemes and two-equation turbulence closure models based on eddy viscosity concept are used to compute the drag coefficient around a circular cylinder at high Reynolds number (106).The numerical results from these simulations are compared with each other and with experimental data in order to evaluate the performance of different combinations of advection scheme and two-equation turbulence model.The separate contributions from form drag and friction drag are also analyzed.The computational results show that the widely used standard k-ε turbulence closure is not suitable for such kind of study,while the other two-equation turbulence closure models produce acceptable results.The influence of the different advection schemes on the final results are small compared to that produced by the choice of turbulence closure method.The present study serves as a reference for the choice of advection schemes and turbulence closure models for more complex numerical simulation of the flow around a circular cylinder at high Reynolds number.

  2. Effects of drop acceleration and deceleration on particle capture in a cross-flow gravity tower at intermediate drop Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Gupta, S K; Kale, S R

    2007-04-01

    Cross-flow gravity towers are particle scrubbing devices in which water is sprayed from the top into particle-laden flow moving horizontally. Models for predicting particle capture assume drops traveling at terminal velocity and potential flow (ReD > 1000) around it, however, Reynolds numbers in the intermediate range of 1 to 1000 are common in gravity towers. Drops are usually injected at velocities greater than their terminal velocities (as in nozzles) or from near rest (perforated tray) and they accelerate/decelerate to their terminal velocity in the tower. Also, the effects of intermediate drop Reynolds number on capture efficiency have been simulated for (a) drops at their terminal velocity and (b) drops accelerating/decelerating to their terminal velocity. Tower efficiency based on potential flow about the drop is 40%-50% greater than for 200 mm drops traveling at their terminal velocity. The corresponding values for 500 mm drops are about 10%-20%. The drop injection velocity is important operating parameter. Increase in tower efficiency by about 40% for particles smaller than 5 mm is observed for increase in injection velocity from 0 to 20 m/s for 200 and 500mm drops.

  3. RANS / LES coupling applied to high Reynolds number turbulent flows of the nuclear industry; Application du couplage RANS / LES aux ecoulements turbulents a haut nombre de Reynolds de l'industrie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarafa, Y

    2005-12-15

    The main issue to perform a computational study of high Reynolds numbered turbulent flows consists on predicting their unsteadiness without implying a tremendous computational cost. First, the main drawbacks of large-eddy simulation with standard wall model on a coarse mesh for a plane channel flow are highlighted. To correct these drawbacks two coupling RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The first one relies on a sophisticated wall model (TBLE) which consists on solving Thin Boundary Layer Equations with a RANS type turbulent closure in the near wall region. The second one consists on a RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The second one consists on a RANS/LES coupling method using a forcing term approach. These various approaches have been implemented in the TRIO-U code developed at CEA (French Atomic Center) at Grenoble, France. The studied flow configurations are the fully developed plane channel flow and a flow around a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow unsteady simulations for a low computational cost. (author)

  4. Effect of Reynolds and Grashof numbers on mixed convection inside a lid-driven square cavity filled with water-Al2O3 nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaman, Md. Shah; Islam, Showmic; Saha, Sumon; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Islam, Md. Quamrul

    2016-07-01

    A numerical analysis is carried out to study the performance of steady laminar mixed convection flow inside a square lid-driven cavity filled with water-Al2O3 nanofluid. The top wall of the cavity is moving at a constant velocity and is heated by an isothermal heat source. Two-dimensional Navier-stokes equations along with the energy equations are solved using Galerkin finite element method. Results are obtained for a range of Reynolds and Grashof numbers by considering with and without the presence of nanoparticles. The parametric studies for a wide range of governing parameters in case of pure mixed convective flow show significant features of the present problem in terms of streamline and isotherm contours, average Nusselt number and average temperature profiles. The computational results indicate that the heat transfer coeffcient is strongly influenced by the above governing parameters at the pure mixed convection regime.

  5. Numerical modeling of separated flows at moderate Reynolds numbers appropriate for turbine blades and unmanned aero vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Giacomo

    Flows over airfoils and blades in rotating machinery, for unmanned and micro-aerial vehicles, wind turbines, and propellers consist of a laminar boundary layer near the leading edge that is often followed by a laminar separation bubble and transition to turbulence further downstream. Typical Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models are inadequate for such flows. Direct numerical simulation is the most reliable, but is also the most computationally expensive alternative. This work assesses the capability of immersed boundary methods and large eddy simulations to reduce the computational requirements for such flows and still provide high quality results. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of a laminar separation bubble on a NACA-0012 airfoil at Rec = 5x104 and at 5° of incidence have been performed with an immersed boundary code and a commercial code using body fitted grids. Several sub-grid scale models have been implemented in both codes and their performance evaluated. For the two-dimensional simulations with the immersed boundary method the results show good agreement with the direct numerical simulation benchmark data for the pressure coefficient Cp and the friction coefficient Cf, but only when using dissipative numerical schemes. There is evidence that this behavior can be attributed to the ability of dissipative schemes to damp numerical noise coming from the immersed boundary. For the three-dimensional simulations the results show a good prediction of the separation point, but an inaccurate prediction of the reattachment point unless full direct numerical simulation resolution is used. The commercial code shows good agreement with the direct numerical simulation benchmark data in both two and three-dimensional simulations, but the presence of significant, unquantified numerical dissipation prevents a conclusive assessment of the actual prediction capabilities of very coarse large eddy simulations with low order schemes in general

  6. Combined Effects of Pipe Diameter, Reynolds Number and Wall Heat Flux and on Flow, Heat Transfer and Second-Law Characteristics of Laminar-Transitional Micro-Pipe Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alper Ozalp

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow, heat transfer and entropy generation characteristics of micro-pipes are investigated computationally by considering the simultaneous effects of pipe diameter, wall heat flux and Reynolds number in detail. Variable fluid property continuity, Navier-Stokes and energy equations are numerically handled for wide ranges of pipe diameter (d = 0.50–1.00 mm, wall heat flux (q''= 1000–2000 W/m2 and Reynolds number (Re = 1 – 2000, where the relative roughness is kept constant at e/d = 0.001 in the complete set of the scenarios considered. Computations indicated slight shifts in velocity profiles from the laminar character at Re = 500 with the corresponding shape factor (H and intermittency values (γ of H = 3.293→3.275 and γ = 0.041→0.051 (d = 1.00→0.50 mm. Moreover, the onset of transition was determined to move down to Retra = 1,656, 1,607, 1,491, 1,341 and 1,272 at d = 1.00, 0.90, 0.75, 0.60 and 0.50 mm, respectively. The impacts of pipe diameter on friction mechanism and heat transfer rates are evaluated to become more significant at high Reynolds numbers, resulting in the rise of energy loss data at the identical conditions as well. In cases with low pipe diameter and high Reynolds number, wall heat flux is determined to promote the magnitude of local thermal entropy generation rates. Local Bejan numbers are inspected to rise with wall heat flux at high Reynolds numbers, indicating that the elevating role of wall heat flux on local thermal entropy generation is dominant to the suppressing function of Reynolds number on local thermal entropy generation. Cross-sectional total entropy generation is computed to be most influenced by pipe diameter at high wall heat flux and low Reynolds numbers.

  7. Simulating high Reynolds number flow in two-dimensional lid-driven cavity by multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chai Zhen-Hua; Shi Bao-Chang; Zheng Lin

    2006-01-01

    By coupling the non-equilibrium extrapolation scheme for boundary condition with the multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method, this paper finds that the stability of the multi-relaxation-time model can be improved greatly, especially on simulating high Reynolds number (Re) flow. As a discovery, the super-stability analysed by Lallemand and Luo is verified and the complex structure of the cavity flow is also exhibited in our numerical simulation when Re is high enough. To the best knowledge of the authors, the maximum of Re which has been investigated by direct numerical simulation is only around 50 000 in the literature; however, this paper can readily extend the maximum to 1000 000 with the above combination.

  8. 雷诺数对藻类垂向分布特性的影响%Effects of reynolds number on the vertical distributions of algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安强; 龙天渝; 刘春静; 雷雨; 李哲

    2012-01-01

    Through a self-designed experimental device according to hydrodynamic conditions of backwater area of branch of Three Gorges Reservoir, the experiment was carried out to study the effects of reynolds number and turbulent flow on the vertical distributions of algae and its suspension and gathered behavior in different water depths. In the condition that water temperature is 20X1 , illumination is 5000 lx and there are enough nutrient concentrations in water, the experiment results showed that Cyanophyta cells are mainly in the depth ranging from 0. 2 m to 0. 8 m when average flow velocity is within 0 ?.005 m/s and reynolds number is within 0 - 1750 while Bacillariophyta cells are mainly in the depth ranging from 0. 2 m to 0. 8 m when average flow velocity is within 0. 1 ?0. 5 m/s and reynolds number is within 35000 ?175000. Compared to Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta, a considerable part of Chlorophyta cells could suspend in the depth ranging from 0. 2 m to 0. 8 m when flow velocity is within 0 -0. 05 m/s and reynolds number is within 0 - 17500.%为研究紊流水体中藻类的垂向分布特性,依据三峡水库次级河流回水段的水动力状况,自行设计了水流实验装置,选取次级河流回水区水华高发时段的气候状况和营养盐水平为实验条件,研究了雷诺数对蓝藻、绿藻和硅藻垂向分布的影响以及雷诺数对不同水深处藻类的悬浮和聚集行为的作用.研究结果表明:在水温为20℃、光照强度为5000 lx的富营养水体中,当断面平均流速在0~0.005 m/s、雷诺数在0~1750时,蓝藻主要悬浮聚集在0.2~0.8m的表层水体中;而当断面平均流速在0.1 ~0.5 m/s、雷诺数在35000 ~ 175000时,硅藻主要悬浮聚集在0.2~0.8 m的表层水体中;与蓝藻和硅藻相比,绿藻适宜的雷诺数范围更宽,当断面平均流速在0 ~0.05 m/s、雷诺数在0~ 17500时,绝大部分的绿藻都能悬浮聚集在0.2~0.8m的表层水体中.

  9. Dynamics and ‘normal stress’ evaluation of dilute suspensions of periodically forced prolate spheroids in a quiescent Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Madhukar; P V Kumar; T R Ramamohan; I S Shivakumara

    2010-12-01

    The problem of determining the force acting on a particle in a fluid where the motion of the fluid and the particle is given has been considered in some detail in the literature. In this work, we propose an example of a new class of problems where, the fluid is quiescent and the effect of an external periodic force on the motion of the particle is determined at low non-zero Reynolds numbers. We present an analysis of the dynamics of dilute suspensions of periodically forced prolate spheroids in a quiescent Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds numbers including the effects of both convective and unsteady inertia. The inclusion of both forms of inertia leads to a nonlinear integro – differential equation which is solved numerically for the velocity and displacement of the individual particle. We show that a ‘normal stress’ like parameter can be evaluated using standard techniques of Batchelor. Hence this system allows for an experimentally accessible measurable macroscopic parameter, analogous to the ‘normal stress’, which can be related to the dynamics of individual particles. We note that this ‘normal stress’ arises from the internal fluctuations induced by the periodic force. In addition, a preliminary analysis leading to a possible application of separating particles by shape is presented. We feel that our results show possibilities of being technologically important since the ‘normal stress’ depends strongly on the controllable parameters and our results may lead to insights in the development of active dampeners and smart fluids. Since we see complex behaviour even in this simple system, it is expected that the macroscopic behaviour of such suspensions may be much more complex in more complex flows.

  10. Aeroacoustics of compressible subsonic jets: Direct Numerical Simulation of a low Reynolds number subsonic jet and the associated sound field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Jet noise is an extensively studied phenomenon since the deployment of the first civil jet aircraft more than 50 years ago. Jet noise makes up a considerable portion of the total noise of jet aircraft, and the expansion of the numbers of airplanes and airports has only been possible by keeping the

  11. A computational study of heat transfer in a laminar oscillating confined slot jet impinging on an isothermal surface at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny ISSA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer in a laminar confined oscillating slot jet is numerically investigated. A uniform inlet velocity profile oscillating with an angle φ, having the following sinusoidal shape: φ= φmax*sin(2πft. φ is in radians, φmax is the maximum jet angle, and f is the oscillation frequency. The height-to-jet-width ratio (H/w was fixed to 5 and the fluid’s Prandtl number which is one of the dimensionless governing groups is 0.74. The other dimensionless groups characterizing this problem, which are, Strouhal’s number, St, and Reynolds number, Re, where varied. Re was in the range 100numbers are based on the jet hydraulic diameter (2w. Defining φmax is explained later in this paper. For Re=250 and St=0.5, a dim heat transfer enhancement was noticed in the stagnation region, when compared to the steady case. A similar enhancement was observed for Re=400 at St=0.75. At Re=100 no improvements were observed, where the flow showed a high vulnerability to severe oscillations, that drastically reduced heat removal ability. Jet flapping could be triggered at Re=400. But the flapping mode was most stable for St=0.75, in which case, heat transfer enhancement was detected.

  12. The flow over a thin airfoil subjected to elevated levels of freestream turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sridhar; Watkins, Simon; Watmuff, Jon; Massey, Kevin; Petersen, Phred; Marino, Matthew; Ravi, Anuradha

    2012-09-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) can be difficult to control in the outdoor environment as they fly at relatively low speeds and are of low mass, yet exposed to high levels of freestream turbulence present within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. In order to examine transient flow phenomena, two turbulence conditions of nominally the same longitudinal integral length scale (Lxx/c = 1) but with significantly different intensities (Ti = 7.2 % and 12.3 %) were generated within a wind tunnel; time-varying surface pressure measurements, smoke flow visualization, and wake velocity measurements were made on a thin flat plate airfoil. Rapid changes in oncoming flow pitch angle resulted in the shear layer to separate from the leading edge of the airfoil even at lower geometric angles of attack. At higher geometric angles of attack, massive flow separation occurred at the leading edge followed by enhanced roll up of the shear layer. This lead to the formation of large Leading Edge Vortices (LEVs) that advected at a rate much lower than the mean flow speed while imparting high pressure fluctuations over the airfoil. The rate of LEV formation was dependent on the angle of attack until 10° and it was independent of the turbulence properties tested. The fluctuations in surface pressures and consequently aerodynamic loads were considerably limited on the airfoil bottom surface due to the favorable pressure gradient.

  13. Low Reynolds number flow across an array of cylindrical microposts in a microchannel and figure-of-merit analysis of micropost-filled microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, J.; Agonafer, D. D.; Han, J.-H.; Shannon, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    Micropost-filled reactors are commonly found in many micro-total analysis system applications because of their large surface area for the surrounding volume. Design rules for micropost-filled reactors are presented here to optimize the performance of a micro-preconcentrator, which is a component of a micro-gas chromatography system. A key figure of merit for the performance of the micropost-filled preconcentrator is to minimize the pressure drop while maximizing the surface-area-to-volume ratio for a given overall channel geometry. Several independent models from the literature are used to predict the flow resistance across the micropost-filled channels for low Reynolds number flows. The pressure drop can be expressed solely as a function of a couple of design parameters: β = a/s, the ratio of the radius of each post to the half-spacing between two adjacent posts, and N, the number of microposts in a row. Pressure drop measurements are performed to experimentally corroborate the flow resistance models and the optimization scheme using the figure of merit. As the number of microposts for a given β increases in a given channel size, a greater surface-area-to-volume ratio will result for a fixed pressure drop. Therefore, increasing the arrays of posts with smaller diameters and spacing will optimize the microreactor for larger surface area for a given flow resistance, at least until Knudsen flow begins to dominate.

  14. Research on the test technique of Reynolds number variety in a hypersonic wind tunnel%高超声速风洞变雷诺数试验技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢飞; 郭雷涛; 朱涛; 邹琼芬

    2016-01-01

    Research on the test technique of Reynolds number variety is conducted in theΦ1 m Hypersonic Wind Tunnel in CARDC to fulfill the needs of Reynolds numbers effect simulations for hypersonic vehicles.Because the run-mode of theΦ1 m Hypersonic Wind Tunnel is high-pressure and vacuum-pumping,it owns a wide range of operational condition,the test Reynolds number can be changed by the way of stagnation pressure changing.The test technique of Reynolds number change consists of two types:single-point Reynolds number change method and continuous Reynolds number change method.The single-point Reynolds number change method keeps the stagnation pressures a fixed value to obtain aerodynamic coefficients with different attitude angles.The continuous Reynolds number change method keeps test model with a fixed attitude and continuously change stagnation pressure from high to low to obtain aerodynamic coefficients with different Reynolds number.The run-modes of wind tunnel,test measurement and data process method are presented in detail,and the validation tests of a lifting-body aircraft and a missile models have been presented. Combining continuous Reynolds number change method with single-point Reynolds number change method,we can completely and accurately obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of hypersonic vehicle with Reynolds number changing. The test results show the application prospect of this test technique.%为满足高超声速飞行器气动力雷诺数效应研究需求,在CARDC的Φ1米高超声速风洞中开展了变雷诺数试验技术研究.该项试验技术是利用Φ1米高超声速风洞采用高压下吹-真空抽吸驱动运行方式、风洞运行参数范围宽的特点,通过宽范围内调节风洞运行总压而大幅改变模拟雷诺数.研究采用了单点变雷诺数试验技术和连续变雷诺数试验技术两种手段来开展高超声速飞行器气动力雷诺数效应模拟.单点变雷诺数试验是通过一系列不同雷诺数条

  15. Enhancements to the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model and Recent High-Reynolds Number Testing in the National Transonic Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milholen, William E., II; Jones, Gregory S.; Chan, David T.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Anders, Scott G.; Melton, Latunia P.; Carter, Melissa B.; Allan, Brian G.; Capone, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    A second wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control model was recently completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was equipped with four onboard flow control valves allowing independent control of the circulation control plenums, which were directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged flap. The model was configured for low-speed high-lift testing with flap deflections of 30 and 60 degrees, along with the transonic cruise configuration with zero degree flap deflection. Testing was again conducted over a wide range of Mach numbers up to 0.88, and Reynolds numbers up to 30 million based on the mean chord. The first wind tunnel test had poor transonic force and moment data repeatability at mild cryogenic conditions due to inadequate thermal conditioning of the balance. The second test demonstrated that an improvement to the balance heating system significantly improved the transonic data repeatability, but also indicated further improvements are still needed. The low-speed highlift performance of the model was improved by testing various blowing slot heights, and the circulation control was again demonstrated to be effective in re-attaching the flow over the wing at off-design transonic conditions. A new tailored spanwise blowing technique was also demonstrated to be effective at transonic conditions with the benefit of reduced mass flow requirements.

  16. Kronecker limit formula for real quadratic number fields(III)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For a kind of L-function of the real quadratic number fields, we prove a Kronecker limit formula which generalized a result of Hecke. And taking an example we give an interesting identity on a fundamental unit of such a field.

  17. One- and two-point velocity distribution functions and velocity autocorrelation functions for various Reynolds numbers in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    A decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is treated on the combined bases of the Kolmogorov hypothesis and the cross-independence hypothesis (for a closure of the Monin-Lundgren (ML) hierarchy of many-point velocity distributions) in turbulence. Similarity solutions for one- and two-point velocity distributions are obtained in the viscous, inertial and large-scale ranges of separation distance, from which we can give a reasonable picture of longitudinal and transverse velocity autocorrelation functions for any Reynolds number, even though they are distant from exact solutions of the infinite ML hierarchy. Possibility of non-similarity solutions with other reasonable and more realistic features is unveiled within the same theoretical framework. The cross-independence hypothesis is proved to be inconsistent with the Kolmogorov [1941b. Dissipation of energy in locally isotropic turbulence. Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 32, 16-18.] theory in the inertial range. This is the main factor by which our special strategy (described in Introduction) is taken for solving this problem.

  18. On the need for a nonlinear subscale turbulence term in POD models as exemplified for a high Reynolds number flow over an Ahmed body

    CERN Document Server

    Östh, Jan; Krajnović, Siniša

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a hierarchy of eddy-viscosity terms in POD Galerkin models to account for a large fraction of unresolved fluctuation energy. These Galerkin methods are applied to Large Eddy Simulation data for a flow around the vehicle-like bluff body call Ahmed body. This flow has three challenges for any reduced-order model: a high Reynolds number, coherent structures with broadband frequency dynamics, and meta-stable asymmetric base flow states. The Galerkin models are found to be most accurate with modal eddy viscosities as proposed by Rempfer & Fasel (1994). Robustness of the model solution with respect to initial conditions, eddy viscosity values and model order is only achieved for state-dependent eddy viscosities as proposed by Noack, Morzynski & Tadmor (2011). Only the POD system with state-dependent modal eddy viscosities can address all challenges of the flow characteristics. All parameters are analytically derived from the Navier-Stokes based balance equations with the available data. We ar...

  19. An Experimental Parametric Study of Geometric, Reynolds Number, and Ratio of Specific Heats Effects in Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott D.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    1993-01-01

    Since mission profiles for airbreathing hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane include single-stage-to-orbit requirements, real gas effects may become important with respect to engine performance. The effects of the decrease in the ratio of specific heats have been investigated in generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweep angles of 30 and 70 degrees. The effects of a decrease in ratio of specific heats were seen by comparing data from two facilities in two test gases: in the Langley Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel in tetrafluoromethane (where gamma=1.22) and in the Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel in perfect gas air (where gamma=1.4). In addition to the simulated real gas effects, the parametric effects of cowl position, contraction ratio, leading-edge sweep, and Reynolds number were investigated in the 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The models were instrumented with a total of 45 static pressure orifices distributed on the sidewalls and baseplate. Surface streamline patterns were examined via oil flow, and schlieren videos were made of the external flow field. The results of these tests have significant implications to ground based testing of inlets in facilities which do not operate at flight enthalpies.

  20. Gamete evolution and sperm numbers: sperm competition versus sperm limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Geoff A; Lehtonen, Jussi

    2014-09-22

    Both gamete competition and gamete limitation can generate anisogamy from ancestral isogamy, and both sperm competition (SC) and sperm limitation (SL) can increase sperm numbers. Here, we compare the marginal benefits due to these two components at any given population level of sperm production using the risk and intensity models in sperm economics. We show quite generally for the intensity model (where N males compete for each set of eggs) that however severe the degree of SL, if there is at least one competitor for fertilization (N - 1 ≥ 1), the marginal gains through SC exceed those for SL, provided that the relationship between the probability of fertilization (F) and increasing sperm numbers (x) is a concave function. In the risk model, as fertility F increases from 0 to 1.0, the threshold SC risk (the probability q that two males compete for fertilization) for SC to be the dominant force drops from 1.0 to 0. The gamete competition and gamete limitation theories for the evolution of anisogamy rely on very similar considerations: our results imply that gamete limitation could dominate only if ancestral reproduction took place in highly isolated, small spawning groups. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. On the number of limit cycles for perturbed pendulum equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasull, A.; Geyer, A.; Mañosas, F.

    2016-08-01

    We consider perturbed pendulum-like equations on the cylinder of the form x ¨ + sin ⁡ (x) = ε∑s=0mQn,s (x)x˙s where Qn,s are trigonometric polynomials of degree n, and study the number of limit cycles that bifurcate from the periodic orbits of the unperturbed case ε = 0 in terms of m and n. Our first result gives upper bounds on the number of zeros of its associated first order Melnikov function, in both the oscillatory and the rotary regions. These upper bounds are obtained expressing the corresponding Abelian integrals in terms of polynomials and the complete elliptic functions of first and second kind. Some further results give sharp bounds on the number of zeros of these integrals by identifying subfamilies which are shown to be Chebyshev systems.

  2. From Fibonacci Numbers to Central Limit Type Theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    A beautiful theorem of Zeckendorf states that every integer can be written uniquely as a sum of non-consecutive Fibonacci numbers $\\{F_n\\}_{n=1}^{\\infty}$. Lekkerkerker proved that the average number of summands for integers in $[F_n, F_{n+1})$ is $n/(\\varphi^2 + 1)$, with $\\varphi$ the golden mean. We prove the following massive generalization: given nonnegative integers $c_1,c_2,\\dots,c_L$ with $c_1,c_L>0$ and recursive sequence $\\{H_n\\}_{n=1}^{\\infty}$ with $H_1=1$, $H_{n+1} =c_1H_n+c_2H_{n-1}+\\cdots +c_nH_1+1$ $(1\\le n< L)$ and $H_{n+1}=c_1H_n+c_2H_{n-1}+\\cdots +c_LH_{n+1-L}$ $(n\\geq L)$, every positive integer can be written uniquely as $\\sum a_iH_i$ under natural constraints on the $a_i$'s, the mean and the variance of the numbers of summands for integers in $[H_{n}, H_{n+1})$ are of size $n$, and the distribution of the numbers of summands converges to a Gaussian as $n$ goes to the infinity. Previous approaches were number theoretic, involving continued fractions, and were limited to results on exis...

  3. Analysis of the Reynolds number influence on hydrodynamic coefficients in numerical simulation of submarine maneuverability%潜艇操纵性数值模拟中雷诺数的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙铭泽; 王永生; 杨琼方

    2012-01-01

    潜艇拘束模型试验中模型与实艇雷诺数的2个量级差异是导致水动力系数出现偏差的主要原因.为了研究模型试验中雷诺数对水动力系数的影响,采用虚流体粘度和基于网格变形的动网格技术方法计算了不同量级雷诺数下潜艇的水动力系数,分析了潜艇操纵性水动力计算中雷诺数的影响.研究结果表明,高雷诺数下的惯性类系数计算精度较高,误差最小为1.17%,而粘性类系数计算误差稍大,均在10%以上;整体来看潜艇水动力系数预报值与试验结果吻合良好,证明了该方法对于消除雷诺数在操纵性计算中影响的有效性.%Difference of two orders of magnitude in Reynolds numbers between an actual submarine and its model was discovered to be the main cause of the errors of hydrodynamic coefficients in the submarine captive model test. In order to research the influence of Reynolds number on the hydrodynamic coefficient in model test, a virtual fluid viscosity was introduced and the mesh motion technology based on mesh deformation was then used to calculate the hydrodynamic coefficient of a submarine in different orders of Reynolds numbers. In addition, the research examined the influence of Reynolds numbers in submarine maneuvering hydrodynamic calculation. The results as well indicate the precision of inertia hydrodynamic coefficient is higher than viscous hydrodynamic coefficients when the Reynolds number is high, in which the prior minimum error is 1. 17% , and the error of the latter is over 10%. As a whole, the computational fluid dynamic ( CFD) results of hydrodynamic coefficients are in good agreement with data from the model test, thus, proving that this method can effectively eliminate the influence of Reynolds numbers in maneuvering hydrodynamic computation.

  4. Parallel machine covering with limited number of preemptions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yi-wei; HU Jue-liang; WENG Ze-wei; ZHU Yu-qing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the i-preemptive scheduling on parallel machines to maximize the minimum machine completion time, i.e., machine covering problem with limited number of preemptions. It is aimed to obtain the worst case ratio of the objective value of the optimal schedule with unlimited preemptions and that of the schedule allowed to be preempted at most i times. For the m identical machines case, we show the worst case ratio is 2m-i-1m , and we present a polynomial time algorithm which can guarantee the ratio for any 0≤ i≤ m-1. For the i-preemptive scheduling on two uniform machines case, we only need to consider the cases of i=0 and i=1. For both cases, we present two linear time algorithms and obtain the worst case ratios with respect to s, i.e., the ratio of the speeds of two machines.

  5. Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Flow Around an Cylinder at High Reynolds Number%高雷诺数下圆柱绕流数值模拟与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武频; 高升

    2014-01-01

    In this paper ,large-eddy simulation combined with multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann (MRT-LBM ) method is proposed for solving the poor stability problem in high Reynolds number flow simulation with LBM .The implementation is discussed in the context of 9-velocity (D2Q9 ) MRT-LBM model in conjunction with the Smargorinsky subgrid closure model .This model is used for doing the two-dimensional numerical simulation of flow around a cylinder with a high Reynolds number .According to the experimental results ,a systematic analysis of the form of shed vortex of flow around cylinder is made , and the variation of the Strouhal number and the drag coefficient with the change of Reynolds number .The experimental results show that the method can well increase numerical stability in the simulation with LBM in a high Reynolds number .%将大涡模拟(Large Eddy Simulation ,LES)和多弛豫时间格子玻尔兹曼(Multiple Relaxation Time(MRT) LBM )方法相结合,用于解决LBM方法在高雷诺数流动模拟产生的数值不稳定的问题。结合D2Q9-M RT 模型与Smargorinsky涡粘模型,对高雷诺数下二维圆柱绕流进行数值模拟。并根据实验结果,系统分析了圆柱绕流涡的脱落形态,以及Strouhal数和其阻力升力系数随雷诺数的变化情况。实验结果表明该方法可以很好增加LBM在高雷诺数模拟中数值稳定性。

  6. Message passing with a limited number of DMA byte counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael (Rochester, MN); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kumar, Sameer (White Plains, NY); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-10-04

    A method for passing messages in a parallel computer system constructed as a plurality of compute nodes interconnected as a network where each compute node includes a DMA engine but includes only a limited number of byte counters for tracking a number of bytes that are sent or received by the DMA engine, where the byte counters may be used in shared counter or exclusive counter modes of operation. The method includes using rendezvous protocol, a source compute node deterministically sending a request to send (RTS) message with a single RTS descriptor using an exclusive injection counter to track both the RTS message and message data to be sent in association with the RTS message, to a destination compute node such that the RTS descriptor indicates to the destination compute node that the message data will be adaptively routed to the destination node. Using one DMA FIFO at the source compute node, the RTS descriptors are maintained for rendezvous messages destined for the destination compute node to ensure proper message data ordering thereat. Using a reception counter at a DMA engine, the destination compute node tracks reception of the RTS and associated message data and sends a clear to send (CTS) message to the source node in a rendezvous protocol form of a remote get to accept the RTS message and message data and processing the remote get (CTS) by the source compute node DMA engine to provide the message data to be sent.

  7. 低雷诺数流动问题的SPH数值模拟及与FPM方法的比较%SPH simulation of low reynolds number flow and comparison with FPM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周浩; 徐志宏; 唐玲艳; 冉宪文; 汤文辉

    2015-01-01

    The low Reynolds number flow is simulated with SPH method, the influent of initial smooth length and kernel function on the simulation result is researched. The simulation of classic Poiseuille flow and Couette flow show that SPH was an ideal method to model low Reynolds number flow, furthermore, the precision and efficiency of the computation of SPH and FPM are compared.%采用SPH方法对低雷诺数流动问题进行了数值模拟,讨论了初始光滑长度以及核函数影响域大小对结果的影响。典型Poiseuille流和Couette流的模拟结果表明, SPH方法能够很好地模拟低雷诺数流动。并比较了SPH方法和FPM方法的精度和计算效率。

  8. Space Shuttle Orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study. Volume 7: Effects of configuration modifications on the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of the 1140 A/B orbbiter at high Reynolds numbers. [Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    Subsonic longitudinal andd laternal directional characteristics were obtained for several modified configurations of the 140 A/B orbiter (0.010 scale). These modifications, designed to extend longitudinal trim capability forward of the 65 percent fuselage length station, consisted of modified wing planform fillet and a canard. Tests were performed in the Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at Reynolds numbers from about 4.2 million to 14.3 million based on the fuselage reference length.

  9. 低雷诺数涡轮叶片边界层转捩及分离特性测量%Measurement of the Transition and Separation for Turbine Blade Boundary Layer with Low-Reynolds Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔渭阳; 赵磊; 罗华玲; 伊进宝; 张军胜

    2012-01-01

    低雷诺数工作条件下涡轮流场特征及其控制设计,是航空发动机低压涡轮部件设计的难点和重点。针对低雷诺数涡轮叶栅流场开展了实验研究工作,利用油流显示、表面静压、边界层压力探针等测量手段研究了涡轮叶片边界层的分离和转捩。结果表明雷诺数降低导致了流动损失的增大,且存在一个临界雷诺数。当雷诺数小于临界雷诺数时,发生在吸力面的流动分离是开式的层流分离泡,不会再附与叶片;当雷诺数大于临界雷诺数时,分离流会在尾缘前重新附着于叶片吸力面,形成闭式分离泡。随着雷诺数的减小,出口尾迹变宽,出口流动损失、出口速度亏损和出口气流角偏离增大,尾迹中心向吸力面方向移动。%The flow field characteristics and its control under Low-Reynolds numbers work condition are essential for the Aero-Engine Low Pressure Turbine design. An experimental investigation was conducted on the turbine cascade flow field with the low - Reynolds numbers. The separation and transition of the boundary layer on the suction side of turbine blade were in- vestigated with the special oil flow display, surface static pressure holes, and boundary layer pressure probe. The detailed measurement results for the turbine cascade outflow field and blade surface boundary layer were presented. The results show that the flow losses increase with the decrease of Reynolds number, and a critical Reynolds number is in existence. When the Reynolds number is less than this critical value, the flow separation occurs on the suction surface with an open laminar separa- tion bubble, and flow can not reattach. When the Reynolds number is larger than the critical value, the separated flow reat- taches before the blade trailing and a closed separation bubble is formed. As the Reynolds number decreases, the exit wake is broadened, while exit flow loss and exit velocity deficit, as well

  10. A law of large numbers for limit order books

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We define a stochastic model of a two-sided limit order book in terms of its key quantities \\textit{best bid [ask] price} and the \\textit{standing buy [sell] volume density}. For a simple scaling of the discreteness parameters, that keeps the expected volume rate over the considered price interval invariant, we prove a limit theorem. The limit theorem states that, given regularity conditions on the random order flow, the key quantities converge in probability to a tractable continuous limitin...

  11. Numerical analysis natural convection of thermo-electrically conducting fluids in a square cavity under a uniform magnetic field. 4th Report. Stable numerical scheme for low magnetic Reynolds numbers: scheme verification; GSMAC yugen yosoho ni yoru naibu hatsunetsu wo tomonau denji netsu ryutai no seihokei cavity nai shizen tairyu kaiseki. 4. Teijiki Reynolds su de anteina kaiho: scheme no kensho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Y.; Tanahashi, T. [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1995-07-25

    In the present paper, the natural convections of thermo-electrically conducting fluids in a square cavity under a uniform magnetic field are calculated using GSMAC-FEM in conjunction with the so-called B method. This scheme efficiently satisfies conservation laws of both mass and magnetic flux. In order to establish a stable numerical scheme at low magnetic Reynolds number problems, we introduce both the generalized trapezoidal method and the 3-level fully implicit method into the conventional numerical residual method. The numerical results obtained are in good agreement with the past numerical and experimental results. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. On the number of limit cycles in double homoclinic bifurcations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩茂安; 陈健

    2000-01-01

    Let L be a double homoclinic loop of a Hamiltonian system on the plane. We obtain a condition under which L generates at most two large limit cycles by perturbations. We also give conditions for the existence of at most five or six limit cycles which appear near L under perturbations.

  13. Maximum Likelihood Position Location with a Limited Number of References

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Munoz-Rodriguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A Position Location (PL scheme for mobile users on the outskirts of coverage areas is presented. The proposedmethodology makes it possible to obtain location information with only two land-fixed references. We introduce ageneral formulation and show that maximum-likelihood estimation can provide adequate PL information in thisscenario. The Root Mean Square (RMS error and error-distribution characterization are obtained for differentpropagation scenarios. In addition, simulation results and comparisons to another method are provided showing theaccuracy and the robustness of the method proposed. We study accuracy limits of the proposed methodology fordifferent propagation environments and show that even in the case of mismatch in the error variances, good PLestimation is feasible.

  14. Turbulence detection in a stenosed artery bifurcation by numerical simulation of pulsatile blood flow using the low-Reynolds number turbulence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalichi, Farzan; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2003-01-01

    The pulsatile blood flow in a partially blocked artery is significantly altered as the flow regime changes through the cardiac cycle. This paper reports on the application of a low-Reynolds turbulence model for computation of physiological pulsatile flow in a healthy and stenosed carotid artery bifurcation. The human carotid artery was chosen since it has received much attention because atherosclerotic lesions are frequently observed. The Wilcox low-Re k-omega turbulence model was used for the simulation since it has proven to be more accurate in describing transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Using the FIDAP finite element code a validation showed very good agreement between experimental and numerical results for a steady laminar to turbulent flow transition as reported in a previous publication by the same authors. Since no experimental or numerical results were available in the literature for a pulsatile and turbulent flow regime, a comparison between laminar and low-Re turbulent calculations was made to further validate the turbulence model. The results of this study showed a very good agreement for velocity profiles and wall shear stress values for this imposed pulsatile laminar flow regime. To explore further the medical aspect, the calculations showed that even in a healthy or non-stenosed artery, small instabilities could be found at least for a portion of the pulse cycle and in different sections. The 40% and 55% diameter reduction stenoses did not significantly change the turbulence characteristics. Further results showed that the presence of 75% stenoses changed the flow properties from laminar to turbulent flow for a good portion of the cardiac pulse. A full 3D simulation with this low-Re-turbulence model, coupled with Doppler ultrasound, can play a significant role in assessing the degree of stenosis for cardiac patients with mild conditions.

  15. Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Conversion Research at UNH: From Fundamental Studies of Hydrofoil Sections, to Moderate Reynolds Number Turbine Tests in a Tow Tank, to Open Water Deployments at Tidal Energy Test Sites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.; Nedyalkov, I.; Rowell, M.; Dufresne, N.; Lyon, V.

    2013-12-01

    We report on research related to MHK turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy (CORE) at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). The research projects span varies scales, levels of complexity and environments - from fundamental studies of hydrofoil sections in a high speed water tunnel, to moderate Reynolds number turbine tests with inflow and wake studies in a large cross-section tow tank, to deployments of highly instrumented process models at tidal energy test sites in New England. A concerted effort over the past few years has brought significant new research infrastructure for marine hydrokinetic energy conversion online at UNH-CORE. It includes: a high-speed cavitation tunnel with independent control of velocity and pressure; a highly accurate tow mechanism, turbine test bed and wake traversing system for the 3.7m x 2.4m cross-section UNH tow tank; a 10.7m x 3.0m tidal energy test platform which can accommodate turbines up to 1.5m in diameter, for deployments at the UNH-CORE Tidal Energy Test Site in Great Bay Estuary, NH, a sheltered 'nursery site' suitable for intermediate scale tidal energy conversion device testing with peak currents typically above 2 m/s during each tidal cycle. Further, a large boundary layer wind tunnel, the new UNH Flow Physics Facility (W6.0m x H2.7m xL72m) is being used for detailed turbine wake studies, producing data and insight also applicable to MHK turbines in low Froude number deployments. Bi-directional hydrofoils, which perform equally well in either flow direction and could avoid the use of complex and maintenance-intensive yaw or blade pitch mechanisms, are being investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. For selected candidate shapes lift, drag, wake, and cavitation inception/desinence are measured. When combined with a cavitation inception model for MHK turbines, this information can be used to prescribe turbine design/operational parameters. Experiments were performed with a 1m diameter and 1m

  16. 过渡流态下槽道流动间歇性结构PIV实验研究%PIV Study on Intermittent Flow Structure in Poiseuille Channel Flow at Transitional Reynolds Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴轩; 鹫尾望; 会田紘史; 塚原隆裕; 川口靖夫; 宇波

    2013-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field quantitatively at the transitional Reynolds number to investigate the large scale structure in channel flow at transitional state. The intermittent instantaneous velocity field was captured, and the large-scale structure in stripe shape was extracted from the flow field reconstructed on the basis of the Taylor's hypothesis. The results show that there is an angle of about 25°30° between the borderline of the high velocity stripe and the low velocity stripe and the flow direction. The absolute values of the skewness factor and the flatness factor decrease with the decrease in Reynolds number, indicating that the turbulent events become fewer and the flow state tends to be laminar. In addition, the flow state changes dramatically at Reynolds number from 1 300 to 1 600 according to the flow field and the high-order statistics.%为了研究槽道湍流与层流过渡流态下流场中的大尺度流动结构,采用粒子图像测速仪对过渡雷诺数下平板槽道内的流场进行了定量测量,捕捉到了高速区域与低速区域相间的瞬时流场,并基于Taylor假设对所测流场进行了重构,从多个瞬时流场中提取出大尺度条纹状结构.结果表明:这种条纹结构与流动方向之间存在一定的夹角,大约为25°~30°;倾斜因子和平坦因子的绝对值随雷诺数的减小而减小,即湍流猝发事件减少,间歇性减弱,流动趋于有序,逐渐向层流转化.从流场及统计量的变化还可以看出:当1 300≤Rem≤1 600时,流场的变化最显著.

  17. Physics-informed machine learning approach for reconstructing Reynolds stress modeling discrepancies based on DNS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Large discrepancies in the RANS-modeled Reynolds stresses are the main source that limits the predictive accuracy of RANS models. Identifying these discrepancies is of significance to possibly improve the RANS modeling. In this work, we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for reconstructing discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are trained by existing direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases and then used to predict Reynolds stress discrepancies in different flows where data are not available. The proposed method is evaluated by two classes of flows: (1) fully developed turbulent flows in a square duct at various Reynolds numbers and (2) flows with massive separations. In separated flows, two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties are considered: (1) the flow in the same periodic hills geometry yet at a lower Reynolds number and (2) the flow in a different hill geometry with a similar recirculation zone. Excellent predictive performances were observed in both scenarios, demonstrating the merits of the proposed method.

  18. Algorithm-Eigenvalue Estimation of Hyperspectral Wishart Covariance Matrices from a Limited Number of Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    ALGORITHM—EIGENVALUE ESTIMATION OF HYPERSPECTRAL WISHART COVARIANCE MATRICES FROM A LIMITED NUMBER OF SAMPLES ECBC-TN-067 Avishai Ben-David...Estimation of Hyperspectral Wishart Covariance Matrices from a Limited Number of Samples 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...covariance matrices and to recompute a revised covariance matrix from the eigenvalues. The MATLAB function is an implementation of the procedure developed

  19. Cilia walls influence on peristaltically induced motion of magneto-fluid through a porous medium at moderate Reynolds number: Numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E. Abo-Elkhair

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses, effects of a magneto-fluid through a Darcy flow model with oscillatory wavy walled whose inner surface is ciliated. The equations that governing the flow are modeled without using any approximations. Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM is used to evaluate the solution of our system of nonlinear partial differential equations. Stream function, velocity and pressure gradient components are obtained by using the vorticity formula. The effects for our arbitrary physical parameters on flow characteristics are analyzed by plotting diagrams and discussed in details. With the help of stream lines the trapping mechanism has also been discussed. The major outcomes for the ciliated channel walls are: The axial velocity is higher without a ciliated walls than that for a ciliated walls and an opposite behaviour is shown near the ciliated channel walls. The pressure gradients in both directions are higher for a ciliated channel walls. More numbers of the trapped bolus in the absent of the eccentricity of the cilia elliptic path.

  20. 3-D numerical study of the effect of Reynolds number and baffle angle on heat transfer and pressure drop of turbulent flow of air through rectangular duct of very small height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Present article illustrates a computational study of three-dimensional steady state heat transfer and high turbulent flow characteristics through a rectangular duct with constant heat fluxed upper wall and single rectangular cross-sectioned baffle insertion at different angles. RNG k–ɛ model along with standard wall function based computations has been accomplished applying the finite volume method, and SIMPLE algorithm has been executed for solving the governing equations. For a Reynolds number, Re of 10,000 to 50,000, Prandtl Number, Pr of 0.707 and baffle angle, α of 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°, computational studies are executed, centred onto the hydraulic diameter, Dh, test section and hydrodynamic entry length of the duct. Flow field has been solved using Ansys Fluent 14.0 software. Study exposes that baffled rectangular duct has a higher average Nusselt number, Nu and Darcy friction factor, f compared to a smooth rectangular duct. Nu as well as f are found to be maximum at 90° baffle angle. Results illustrate that both α and Re play a significant role in heat transfer as well as flow characteristics and also effects TEF. The correctness of the results attained in this study is corroborated by comparing the results with those existing in the literature for smooth rectangular duct within a precision of ±2% for f and ±4% for Nu.