WorldWideScience

Sample records for reversed-field pinch fusion

  1. Reversed-field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) configuration is described. The plasma is ohmically ignited by toroidal plasma currents which also inherently provide the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and undergoes a transient, unrefueled burn at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a DT burnup of approx. 50%. The 5-s dwell period between burn pulses for plasma quench and refueling allows steady-state operation of all thermal systems outside the first wall; no auxiliary thermal capacity is required. Tritium breeding occurs in a granular Li 2 O blanket which is packed around an array of radially oriented water/steam coolant tubes. The slightly superheated steam emerging from this blanket directly drives a turbine that produces electrical power at an efficiency of 30%. A borated-water shield is located immediately outside the thermal blanket to protect the superconducting magnet coils. Both the superconducting poloidal and toroidal field coils are energized by homopolar motor/generators. Accounting for all major energy sinks yields a cost-optimized system with a recirculating power fraction of 0.17; the power output is 750 MWe

  2. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors

  3. Prospects for fusion applications of reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) as a source of fusion neutrons for use in developing key fusion nuclear technologies is examined. This Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would emphasize high neutron wall loading, small plasma volume, low fusion and driver powers, and steady-state operation. Both parametric tradeoffs based on present-day physics understanding and a conceptual design based on an approx.1-MW/m 2 (neutron) driven operation are reported. 10 refs

  4. Physics considerations of the Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) configuration is described. The plasma is ohmically ignited by toroidal plasma currents which also inherently provide the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and undergoes a transient, unrefueled burn at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a DT burnup of approx. 50%. Accounting for all major energy sinks yields a cost-optimized system with a recirculating power fraction of 0.17; the power output is 750 MWe

  5. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m 2 and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m 2 ; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings

  6. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP

  7. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Grotz, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H.

    1988-03-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high power density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MWm/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a passive safety assurance design. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Cheng, E.T. (General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)); Grotz, S.P.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. for Plasma and Fusion Research); TITAN Research Group

    1989-04-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a level 2 of passive safety assurance design. (orig.).

  9. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  10. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures

  11. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures

  12. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

  13. The reversed-field-pinch (RFP) fusion neutron source: A conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design of an ohmically heated, reversed-field pinch (RFP) operating at ∼5-MW/m 2 steady-state DT fusion neutron wall loading and ∼124-MW total fusion power is presented. These results are useful in projecting the development of a cost effective, low input power (∼206 MW) source of DT neutrons for large-volume (∼10 m 3 ), high-fluence (3.4 MW yr/m 2 ) fusion nuclear materials and technology testing. 19 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs

  14. The reversed-field pinch: a compact approach to fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. This compact system promises to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that substantiate these promising results have been completed. This 1000 MW(e) (net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion. The RFP presents a robust plasma confinement system capable of providing a range of reactor systems that are compact in both physical size and/or net power output while ensuring acceptable cost and engineering feasibility for a range of assumed physics performance. (author)

  15. Fusion core start-up, ignition, and burn simulations of reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.Y.

    1988-01-01

    A transient reactor simulation model is developed to investigate and simulate the start-up, ignition, and burn of a reversed-field pinch reactor. The simulation is based upon a spatially averaged plasma balance model with field profiles obtained from MHD quasi-equilibrium analysis. Alpha particle heating is estimated from Fokker-Planck calculations. The instantaneous plasma current is derived from a self-consistent circuit analysis for plasma/coil/eddy current interactions. The simulation code is applied to the TITAN RFP reactor design which features a compact, high-power-density reversed-field pinch fusion system. A contour analysis is performed using the steady-state global plasma balance. The results are presented with contours of constant plasma current. A saddle point is identified in the contour plot which determined the minimum value of plasma current required to achieve ignition. In the simulations of the TITAN RFP reactor, the OH-driven super-conducting EF coils are found to deviate from the required equilibrium values as the induced plasma current increases. A set of basic results from the simulation of TITAN RFP reactor yield a picture of RFP plasma operation in a reactor. Investigations of eddy currents are also presented and have very important in reactor design

  16. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): fusion-power-core integration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, C.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schnurr, N.M.

    1985-08-01

    Using detailed two-dimensional neutronics studies based on the results of a previous framework study (LA-10200-MS), the fusion-power-core (FPC) integration, maintenance, and radio-activity/afterheat control are examined for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR). While maintaining as a base case the nominal 20-MW/m 2 neutron first-wall loading design, CRFPR(20), the cost and technology impact of lower-wall-loading designs are also examined. The additional detail developed as part of this follow-on study also allows the cost estimates to be refined. The cost impact of multiplexing lower-wall-loading FPCs into a approx. 1000-MWe(net) plant is also examined. The CRFPR(20) design remains based on a PbLi-cooled FPC with pressurized-water used as a coolant for first-wall, pumped-limiter, and structural-shield systems. Single-piece FPC maintenance of this steady-state power plant is envisaged and evaluated on the basis of a preliminary layout of the reactor building. This follow-on study also develops the groundwork for assessing the feasibility and impact of impurity/ash control by magnetic divertors as an alternative to previously considered pumped-limiter systems. Lastly, directions for future, more-detailed power-plant designs based on the Reversed-Field Pinch are suggested

  17. Tritium systems for the TITAN reversed-field pinch fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Sze, D.K.; Bartlit, J.R.; Gierszewski, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Tritium systems for the TITAN reversed-field pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study have been designed for two blanket concepts. The TITAN-1 design uses a self-cooled liquid-lithium blanket. The TITAN-2 design uses a self-cooled aqueous-solution blanket, with lithium nitrate dissolved in the water for tritium breeding. Tritium inventory, release, and safety margins are within regulatory limits, at acceptable costs. Major issues for TITAN-1 are plasma-driven permeation, the need for a secondary coolant loop, tritium storage requirements, redundancy in the plasma exhaust system, and minimal isotopic distillation of the exhaust. TITAN-1 fuel cleanup, reprocessing, and air detritiation systems are described in detail

  18. A conceptual design study of a reversed field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.; Tanaka, S.; Terai, T.; Hashizume, H.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor with a solid breeder blanket REPUTER-1 has been studied through parametric system studies and detailed design and analysis in order to clarify the technical feasibility of a compact fusion reactor. F-θ pumping is used for driving the plasma current necessary for steady state operation. A maintenance policy of replacing a whole fusion power core including TF coils is proposed to cope with the requirements of high wall loading and high mass power density. For the same reason a normal conductor is selected for most of the coils. The first wall is structurally independent of the blanket. The blanket module is composed of SiC reinforced blocks which form a stable arch so as to keep the stresses in SiC basically compressive. The coolant for the first wall and the limiter is pressurized water, while the coolant for the blanket is helium gas. A number of thin Li 2 O and thick beryllium tiles are packed into the blanket block so as to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio. A pumped limiter is chosen for the plasma exhaust system. The study has shown the technical feasibility of a high power density fusion power reactor (330 kWe/tonne) with solid breeder blanket and many key physics and engineering issues are also clarified. (orig.)

  19. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m 2 ) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately

  20. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  1. Improved zero dimensional model of a reversed field pinch fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model has been developed which accurately predicts conditions observed during several runs of the ZT-40M reversed field pinch fusion device at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model is based on a physical model developed by E.H. Klevans at Penn State University. Improvements made to this model included the use of coronal non-equilibrium equations for predicting impurity effects, the inclusion of an exponentially decaying ion heating term, and the relaxation of the assumption that ion and electron densities are equal in the device. The model has been used to simulate ZT-40M in both flat-top and slowly ramped current modes. Using experimentally measured density and current evolutions, the model accurately predicts observed tau/sub E/, β/sub Θ/, T/sub e/, T/sub i/, Z/sub eff/, and radiated power. The continuing goal of this work is to predict conditions in the ZT-H device, which is under construction. 28 refs., 18 figs

  2. Engineering and physics of high-power-density, compact, reversed-field-pinch fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technical feasibility and key developmental issues of compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field-Pinch (RFP) reactors are the primary results of the TITAN RFP reactor study. Two design approaches emerged, TITAN-I and TITAN-II, both of which are steady-state, DT-burning, circa 1000 MWe power reactors. The TITAN designs are physically compact and have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW m 2 . Detailed analyses indicate that: a) each design is technically feasible; b) attractive features of compact RFP reactors can be realized without sacrificing the safety and environmental potential of fusion; and c) major features of this particular embodiment of the RFP reactor are retained in a design window of neutron wall loading ranging from 10 to 20 MW/m 2 . A major product of the TITAN study is the identification and quantification of major engineering and physics requirements for this class of RFP reactors. These findings are the focus of this paper. (author). 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Toroidal fusion reactor design based on the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.

    1978-07-01

    The toroidal reversed-field pinch (RFP) achieves gross equilibrium and stability with a combination of high shear and wall stabilization, rather than the imposition of tokamak-like q-constraints. Consequently, confinement is provided primarily by poloidal magnetic fields, poloidal betas as large as approximately 0.58 are obtainable, the high ohmic-heating (toroidal) current densities promise a sole means of heating a D-T plasma to ignition, and the plasma aspect ratio is not limited by stability/equilibrium constraints. A reactor-like plasma model has been developed in order to quantify and to assess the general features of a power system based upon RFP confinement. An ''operating point'' has been generated on the basis of this plasma model and a relatively detailed engineering energy balance. These results are used to generate a conceptual engineering model of the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR) which includes a general description of a 750 MWe power plant and the preliminary consideration of vacuum/fueling, first wall, blanket, magnet coils, iron core, and the energy storage/transfer system

  4. Zero-dimensional model of a reversed field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1987-12-01

    A zero-dimensional model for the energy balance for electrons and ions of a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) device has been developed. The model can be used as a tool for parametric studies and has been applied to simulate some ZT-40M experiments. In the model multiplicative coefficients C 1 , C 2 , C 3 and C 4 are introduced to treat anomalous resistivity, electron and ion energy confinement times and to account for the instability driven ion heating that is observed in RFP experiments. Parametric studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of the model to changes in multiplicative coefficients. A set of coefficients which can simulate a number of ZT-40M experiments have been obtained and the sensitivity of T/sub e/ and T/sub i/ to these coefficients was examined. Both flat top and ramp current waveforms were studied. The effects of different levels of impurities were also examined. The results showed that while all the three impurities used, viz., carbon, oxygen and nickel contributed to Z/sub eff/, nickel dominated the impurity radiation power. The results were then applied to study the behavior of the ZT-H device which is being built in the Confinement Physics Research Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. 30 refs., 39 figs., 12 tabs

  5. The reversed-field pinch as a poloidal-field-dominated, compact, high-power-density fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of reversed-field pinch devices as future thermonuclear reactors. Safety, cost, ion temperatures, Lawson numbers, and power densities are reviewed for these types of devices. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Reversed field pinch ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma models are described and used to calculated numerically the transport confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady state operation points for both the reversed field pinch (RFP) and the tokamak. The models are used to examine the CIT tokamak ignition conditions and the RFP experimental and ignition conditions. Physics differences between RFPs and tokamaks and their consequences for a D-T ignition machine are discussed. Compared with a tokamak, the ignition RFP has many physics advantages, including Ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, lower ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits) and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic field, larger aspect ratios and smaller plasma cross-sections, translate to significant cost reductions for both ignition and reactor applications. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. Devices that are under construction should go a long way toward resolving this scaling uncertainty. The 4 MA ZTH is expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data by three orders of magnitude above the results of ZT-40M, and, if the present scaling holds, ZTH is expected to achieve a D-T equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q = 1. A base case RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. (author). 19 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Hagenson, R.L.; Copenhaver, C.; Werley, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The unique confinement properties of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) are exploited to examine physics and technical issues related to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor. This resistive-coil, steady-state, toroidal device would use a dual-media power cycle driven by a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, and coils) with a power density and mass approaching values characteristic of pressurized-water fission rectors. A 1000-MWe(net) base case is selected from a comprehensive trade-off study to examine technological issues related to operating a high-power-density FPC. After describing the main physics and technology issues for this base-case reactor, directions for future study are suggested

  8. Compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Schnurr, N.M.; Copenhaver, C.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The unique confinement properties of the poloidal-field-dominated Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) are exploited to examine physics and technical issues related to a compact high-power-density fusion reactor. This resistive-coil, steady-state, toroidal device would use a dual-media (i.e., two separate coolants) power cycle that would be driven by a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, and coils) having a power density and mass approaching pressurized-water-fission reactor values. A 1000-MWe(net) base case is selected from a comprehensive trade-off study to examine technological issues related to operating a high-power-density FPC. A general rationale outlining the need for improved fusion concepts is given, followed by a description of the RFP principle, a detailed systems and trade-off analysis, and a conceptual FPC design for the ∝ 20-MW/m 2 (neutrons) compact RFP reactor, CRFPR(20). Key FPC components are quantified, and full power-balance, thermal, and mechanical FPC integrations are given. (orig.)

  9. Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Cort, G.E.

    1979-08-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a Reversed-Field Pinch (FRP) configuration is presented. A 50% atomic mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) is ohmically heated to ignition by currents flowing in the toroidal plasma; this plasma current also inherently produces the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having a major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and burns at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a fuel burnup of approx. 50%. Tritium breeding occurs in a granular Li 2 O blanket which is packed around an array of radially oriented coolant tubes carrying a mixture of high-pressure steam and water. The slightly superheated steam emerging from this blanket would be used to drive a turbine directly. Low-pressure helium containing trace amounts of oxygen is circulated through the packed Li 2 O bed to extract the tritium. A 20-mm-thick copper first wall serves as a neutron multiplier, acts as a tritium barrier, and supports image currents to provide plasma stabilization on a 0.1-s timescale; external windings provide stability for longer times

  10. Turbulent transport in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Roberts, K.V.

    1976-01-01

    MHD stability of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) relies on reversal of the toroidal field component in the outer plasma region. Interest in this configuration comes from its potential economic advantages as a thermonuclear reactor, since compared to a Tokamak the RFP supports a higher value of β, the ratio between plasma and total magnetic pressure. Results of computations on the time-evolution of the RFP using a 1D MHD model are reported. (orig./GG) [de

  11. A reversed-field theta-pinch plasma machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasojima, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Sasao, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Noboru; Tanaka, Toshihide

    1984-01-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has constructed a reversed-field theta-pinch machine at its Central Research Laboratory and initiated a series of plasma diagnostics and control studies for development of nuclear-fusion technology. Although the device has a linear configuration, a stable high-temperature, high-density toroidal plasma can be generated. The article describes the overall structure, vacuum system, power-supply system, and diagnostics and control system of the plasma machine. (author)

  12. Confinement dynamics in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    The study of basic transport and confinement dynamics is central to the development of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a confinement concept. Thus, the goal of RFP research is to understand the connection between processes that sustain the RFP configuration and related transport/confinement properties. Recently, new insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation of RFP electron and ion physics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and strongly coupled role in RFP sustainment and confinement dynamics. In this paper, we summarize the results of these studies on the ZT-40M experiment. 8 refs

  13. Reversed-Field Pinch plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Nebel, R.A.; Moses, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is strongly dependent on the plasma profile and the confining sheared magnetic field. Magnetic diffusion and thermal transport produce changing conditions of stability. Despite the limited understanding of RFP transport, modelling is important to predict general trends and to study possible field programming options. To study the ZT-40 experiment and to predict the performance of future RFP reactors, a one-dimensional transport code has been developed. This code includes a linear, ideal MHD stability check based on an energy principle. The transport section integrates plasma profiles forward in time while the stability section periodically checks the stability of the evolving plasma profile

  14. Interchange stability of noncircular reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, D.A.; Prager, S.C.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1987-08-01

    Interchange (Mercier) stability of toroidal reversed-field-pinch plasmas with noncircular cross-section is evaluated numerically. Marginally stable pressure profiles and beta values are produced. Most shapes, such as indented or vertically elongated, reduce stability by making the net magnetic curvature of the poloidal-field-dominated plasmas yet worse than that of the circle. Horizontally elongated plasmas slightly enhance stability beyond that of the circle as a result of increased shear produced by toroidicity. Such shear enhancement by the toroidal shift of magnetic surfaces might be exploited for future, more comprehensive studies

  15. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  16. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show over half of the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport are needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given

  17. Proposal for the ZT-40 reversed-field Z-pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Machalek, M.D.

    1977-08-01

    A next-generation, toroidal, reversed-field Z-pinch experiment to be constructed at LASL is proposed. On the basis of encouraging ZT-I and ZT-S experimental results, a larger device with a 40-cm bore and a 114-cm major radius is proposed, to extend the confinement time by about an order of magnitude. The new experiment will explore the physics of programming reversed-field pinches in a size range unexplored by previous reversed-field pinch experiments. Model reversed-field pinch reactor calculations show that, if stability is assumed, small fusion reactors are possible if the pinch current density is high. A basic aim will be to delineate the plasma and current density ranges in which stable reversed-field pinches can be produced. Improved vacuum techniques will be used to overcome the radiation losses that probably kept electron temperatures low in the earlier, smaller experiments

  18. Reversed field pinch reactor study 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.; Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1977-12-01

    This report, the third of a series on the Reversed Field Pinch Reactor, describes a preliminary concept of the engineering design and layout of this pulsed toroidal reactor, which uses the stable plasma behaviour first observed in ZETA. The basic parameters of the 600 MW(e) reactor are taken from a companion study by Hancox and Spears. The plasma volume is 1.75m minor radius and 16m major radius surrounded by a 1.8m blanket-shield region - with the blanket divided into 14 removable segments for servicing. The magnetic confinement system consists of 28 toroidal field coils situated just outside the blanket and inside the poloidal and vertical field coils and all coils have normal copper conductors. The requirement to incorporate a conducting shell at the front of the blanket to provide a short-time plasma stability has a marked effect on the design. It sets the size of the blanket segment and the scale of the servicing operations, limits the breeding gain and complicates the blanket cooling and its integration with the heat engine. An extensive study will be required to confirm the overall reactor potential of the concept. (author)

  19. Catalyzed deuterium fueled reversed-field pinch reactor assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrott, D.

    1985-01-01

    This study is part of a Department of Energy supported alternate fusion fuels program at Science Applications International Corporation. The purpose of this portion of the study is to perform an assessment of a conceptual compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR) that is fueled by the catalyzed-deuterium (Cat-d) fuel cycle with respect to physics, technology, safety, and cost. The Cat-d CRFPR is compared to a d-t fueled fusion reactor with respect to several issues in this study. The comparison includes cost, reactor performance, and technology requirements for a Cat-d fueled CRFPR and a comparable cost-optimized d-t fueled conceptual design developed by LANL

  20. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment [i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems]. In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development

  1. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale

  2. Overview of quasi single helicity experiments in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Marrelli, L.; Spizzo, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental and theoretical project dedicated to the study of Quasi Single Helicity Reversed Field Pinch plasmas. The project has involved several RFP devices and numerical codes. It appears that QSH spectra are a feature common to all the experiments. (author)

  3. The physics of reversed-field pinch profile sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    A description of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is given. There is experimental evidence that indicates that an RFP dynamo effect sustains field reversal in steady state. Three sustainment mechanisms are reviewed: the MHD model, the tangled discharge model, and the kinetic dynamo model. The relationship of these models to each another is discussed briefly

  4. Plasma engineering design of a compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given

  5. Does shaping bring an advantage for reversed field pinch plasmas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.C.; Xu, X.Y.; Wang, Z.R.; Liu, Y.Q.

    2013-01-01

    The MHD–kinetic hybrid toroidal stability code MARS-K (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503) is applied to study the shaping effects on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stabilities in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas, where both elongation and triangularity are taken into account. The ideal wall β (the ratio of the gaso-kinetic to magnetic pressures) limit set by the ideal kink mode/resistive wall mode in shaped RFP is investigated first, followed by a study of the kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode. Physics understanding of the results is provided by a systematic numerical analysis. Furthermore, the stability boundary of the linear resistive tearing mode in shaped RFP plasmas is computed and compared with that of the circular case. Finally, bootstrap currents are calculated for both circular and shaped RFP plasmas. Overall, the results of these studies indicate that the current circular cross-section is an appropriate choice for RFP devices, in the sense that the plasma shaping does not bring an appreciable advantage to the RFP performance in terms of macroscopic stabilities. In order to reach a steady-state operation, future RFP fusion reactors will probably need a substantial fraction of external current drives, due to the unfavourable scaling for the plasma-generated bootstrap current in the RFP configuration. (paper)

  6. Edge topology and flows in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spizzo, G.; Agostini, M.; Scarin, P.; Vianello, N.; Cappello, S.; Puiatti, M. E.; Valisa, M.; White, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    Edge topology and plasma flow deeply influence transport in the reversed-field pinch as well as in all fusion devices, playing an important role in many practical aspects of plasma performance, such as access to enhanced confinement regimes, the impact on global power balance and operative limits, such as the density limit (Spizzo G. et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 095011). A central role is played by the edge electric field, which is determined by the ambipolar constraint guaranteeing quasi-neutrality in a sheath next to the plasma wall. Its radial component is experimentally determined in RFX over the whole toroidal angle by means of a diagnostic set measuring edge plasma potential and flow with different techniques (Scarin P. et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 073002). The measured radial electric field is used to construct the potential in the form Φ(ψ p , θ, ζ) (ψ p radial coordinate, θ, ζ angles), by means of the Hamiltonian guiding-centre code ORBIT. Simulations show that a proper functional form of the potential can balance the differential radial diffusion of electrons and ions subject to m = 0 magnetic island O- and X-points. Electrons spend more time in the X-points of such islands than in O-points; ions have comparatively larger drifts and their radial motion is more uniform over the toroidal angle. The final spatial distribution of Φ(ψ p , θ, ζ) results in a complex 3D pattern, with convective cells next to the wall. Generally speaking, an edge topology dominating parallel transport with a given symmetry brings about an edge potential with the same symmetry. This fact helps us to build a first step of a unified picture of the effect of magnetic topology on the Greenwald limit, and, more generally, on flows in the edge of RFPs and tokamaks. (paper)

  7. Nonlinear tearing modes in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.

    1989-01-01

    Finite-amplitude islands, which are the saturated states of tearing modes in the reversed field pinch, are calculated. These states are bifurcated noncylindrical equilibrium states. With σ(r) (σequivalentj x B/B 2 ) nonuniform across the plasma, as is consistent with experiment, a variety of m = 1 and m = 0 bifurcated equilibria are possible, instead of just the m = 1 helix calculated for uniform σ(r) by Taylor [in Pulsed High Beta Plasmas, edited by D. Evans (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), p. 59]. Assuming the magnetic field lines in the reversed field pinch are weakly stochastic, the growth time of an unstable tearing mode is on the inertial time scale, as in the Taylor model, in constrast to growth on the resistive time scale predicted from nonlinear tearing mode theory when magnetic surfaces exist. The dependence of the saturated island width on radius of a conducting shell is investigated. Islands in the reversed field pinch often have magnetic wells in the island interior, which may result in improved confinement in the island regions

  8. 3-dimensional simulation of dynamo effect of reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Shinji.

    1990-09-01

    A non-linear numerical simulation of the dynamo effect of a reversed field pinch (RFP) with finite beta is presented. It is shown that the m=-1, n=(9,10,11,....,19) modes cause the dynamo effect and sustain the field reversed configuration. The role of the m=0 modes on the dynamo effect is carefully examined. Our simulation shows that the magnetic field fluctuation level scales as S -0.2 or S -0.3 in the range of 10 3 5 , while Nebel, Caramana and Schnack obtained the fluctuation level is independent of S for a pressureless RFP plasma. (author)

  9. Electron temperature diagnostics in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartiromo, R.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Murari, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Franz, P.; Martin, P.; Zabeo, L.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated approach to the problem of electron temperature diagnostics of the plasma in a reversed field pinch. Three different methods, sampling different portions of the electron distribution function, are adopted, namely Thomson scattering, soft X-ray spectroscopy by pulse-height analysis and filtered soft X-ray intensity ratio. A careful analysis of the different sources of systematic errors is performed and a novel statistical approach is adopted to mutually validate the three independent measurements. A satisfactory agreement is obtained over a large range of experimental conditions, indicating that in the plasma core the energy distribution function is well represented by a maxwellian. (author)

  10. Energy confinement in a high-current reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Z.G.; Lee, G.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1985-07-01

    The ion temperature gradient driven (eta/sub i/) mode is proposed as a candidate for the cause of anomalous transport in high current reversed field pinches. A 'four-field' fluid model is derived to describe the coupled nonlinear evolution of resistive interchange and eta/sub i/ modes. A renormalized theory is discussed, and the saturation level of the fluctuations is analytically estimated. Transport scalings are obtained, and their implications discussed. In particular, these results indicate that pellet injection is a potentially viable mechanism for improving energy confinement in a high temperature RFP

  11. Asymmetric flux generation and its relaxation in reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto, H.; Masamune, S.; Nagata, A.

    1985-02-01

    The toroidally asymmetric flux enhancement [''dynamo effect''] and the axisymmetrization of the enhanced fluxes that follows in the setting up phase of Reversed Field Pinch are investigated on the STP-3[M] device. A rapid increase in the toroidal flux generated by the dynamo effect is first observed near the poloidal and toroidal current feeders. Then, this inhomogeneity of the flux propagates toroidally towards the plasma current. The axisymmetrization of the flux is attained just after the maximum of plasma current. The MHD activities decrease significantly after this axisymmetrization and the quiescent period is obtained. (author)

  12. Behaviour of the peripheral plasma in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Sato, K.I.; Arimoto, H.; Yamada, S.; Nagata, A.; Murata, H.

    1986-01-01

    By using Langmuir probes installed behind limiters, time behaviour of the peripheral plasma in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) are investigated. They are strongly affected by the confined RFP plasma and are divided into three phases (the initial phase before setting up the RFP configuration, the current rising phase, and the quiescent phase), which are just the same as those of the confined RFP plasma. Typical behaviour of the peripheral plasma have relations to the pump out phenomena and of the toroidal flux generation. (author)

  13. Recent studies of Reversed-Field Pinch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The reactor prognoses of a class of confinement scheme that relies primarily on self-fields induced by axial currents flowing within a plasma column are presented. The primary focus has been placed on the toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP). At the limit of very large current densities is the gas-embedded Dense Z-Pinch (DZP), a small-radius, linear device. Past conventional RFP reactor designs are reviewed. The extention of these conventional RFP reactors to DD advanced-fuel operation is described. The implications are summarized of operating higher-density, compact RFPs as reactors, wherein the current density rather than physical dimensions are scaled. Lastly, the application of very high current densities supported in a sub-millimeter linear current channel, as embodied in the DZP reactor, is reviewed

  14. Oscillating field current drive for reversed field pinch discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Gribble, R.F.; Baker, D.A.

    1984-06-01

    Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD), also known as F-THETA pumping, is a steady-state current-drive technique proposed for the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Unlike other current-drive techniques, which employ high-technology, invasive, and power intensive schemes using radio frequency or neutral particle injection, F-THETA pumping entails driving the toroidal and poloidal magnetic field circuits with low-frequency (audio) oscillating voltage sources. Current drive by this technique is a consequence of the strong nonlinear plasma coupling in the RFP. Because of its low frequency and efficient plasma coupling, F-THETA pumping shows excellent promise as a reactor-relevant current-drive technique. A conceptual and computational study of this concept, including its experimental and reactor relevance, is explored in this paper

  15. Advanced-fuel reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-10-01

    The utilization of deuterium-based fuels offers the potential advantages of greater flexibility in blanket design, significantly reduced tritium inventory, potential reduction in radioactivity level, and utilization of an inexhaustible fuel supply. The conventional DT-fueled Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) designs are reviewed, and the recent extension of these devices to advanced-fuel (catalyzed-DD) operation is presented. Attractive and economically competitive DD/RFPR systems are identified having power densities and plasma parameters comparable to the DT systems. Converting an RFP reactor from DT to DD primarily requires increasing the magnetic field levels a factor of two, still requiring only modest magnet coil fields (less than or equal to 4 T). When compared to the mainline tokamak, the unique advantages of the RFP (e.g., high beta, low fields at the coils, high ohmic-heating power densities, unrestricted aspect ratio) are particularly apparent for the utilization of advanced fuels

  16. Divertor design for the TITAN reversed-field-pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, P.I.H.; Bathke, C.G.; Blanchard, J.P.; Creedon, R.L.; Grotz, S.P.; Hasan, M.Z.; Orient, G.; Sharafat, S.; Werley, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The design of the toroidal-field divertor for the TITAN high-power-density reversed-field-pinch reactor is described. The heat flux on the divertor target is limited to acceptable levels (≤ 10 MW/m 2 ) for liquid-lithium cooling by use of an open divertor geometry, strong radiation from the core and edge plasma, and careful shaping of the target surface. The divertor coils are based on the Integrated-Blanket-Coil approach to minimize the loss in breeding-blanket coverage due to the divertor. A tungsten-rhenium armour plate, chosen for reasons of sputtering resistance, and good thermal and mechanical properties, protects the vanadium-alloy coolant tubes

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic effects of current profile control in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovinec, C.R.; Prager, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    Linear and non-linear MHD computations are used to investigate reversed field pinch configurations with magnetic fluctuations reduced through current profile control. Simulations with reduced ohmic drive and moderate auxiliary current drive, represented generically with an electron force term, applied locally in radius near the plasma edge show magnetic fluctuation energies that are orders of magnitude smaller than those in simulations without profile control. The core of the improved configurations has reduced magnetic shear and closed flux surfaces in some cases, and reversal is sustained through the auxiliary current drive. Modes resonant near the edge may become unstable with auxiliary drive, but their saturation levels can be controlled. The space of auxiliary drive parameters is explored, and the ill effects of deviating far from optimal conditions is demonstrated in non-linear simulations. (author)

  18. A vented pump limiter for the reversed field pinch RFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonato, P.

    1998-01-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma performance, as in the Tokamak, is strongly correlated with the edge neutral particle control. The drawbacks of the conventional magnetic divertors and throat limiters on the RFP plasma have slackened the application of an active particle control system in existing devices. An advanced solution, based on the idea of the 'vented pump limiter' experimented on Tore Supra, has been conceived for RFX. This type of pump limiter is very attractive for a RFP. In this paper, the design of a 'vented limiter' prototype for RFX is presented. Up to six modules of this limiter can be installed at the equatorial plane of RFX, allowing a particle exhaust efficiency comparable with a divertor or a throat limiter working in a Tokamak. Finally, the optimization of this concept for the next step RFP device is presented. (orig.)

  19. Turbulent transport in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempel, T.D.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spragins, C.W.; Sprott, J.C.; Stoneking, M.R.; Zita, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    Measurements of edge turbulence and the associated transport are ongoing in the Madison Symmetric Torus (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.52 m) reversed-field pinch using magnetic and electrostatic probes. Magnetic fluctuations are dominated by m = 1 and n ∼ 2R/a tearing modes. Particle losses induced by magnetic field fluctuations have been found to be ambipolar ( parallel B r > = O). Electrostatic fluctuations are broadband and turbulent, with mode widths δm ∼ 3--7 and δn ∼70--150. Particle, parallel current, and energy transport arising from coherent motion with the fluctuating ExB drift has been measured. Particle transport via this channel is comparable to the total particle loss from MST. Energy transport (from phi >/B o ) due to electrostatic fluctuations is relatively small, and parallel current transport (from parallel E chi >/B o ) may be small as well

  20. Physics of reversed-field pinch profile sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A description of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is given, emphasizing the necessity of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or kinetic process to sustain field reversal. Three sustainment mechanisms are reviewed: the MHD dynamo, the tangled discharge model, and nonlocal resistivity. A slab model of steady (ohmic) states is described. A relationship between ohmic state wave numbers and the minimum amplitude of nonsymmetric field components is given. If ohmic states are the sole source of the sustainment process, their wave lengths are probably much longer than the minor diameter of the plasma. Otherwise field asymmetries would exceed those observed in experiments. It is noted that internal field data are still limited, restricting the generality of our comments

  1. Confinement in TPE-RX reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Y.; Bolzonella, T.; Canton, A.

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of the confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP), the TPE-RX (R/a=1.72/0.45 m, R and a are major and minor radii), are presented for the plasma current, I p of 0.2-0.4 MA. TPE-RX has been operational since 1998, and I p =0.5 MA and duration time of up to 0.1 s have been obtained separately. It is found that I p /N (=12x10 -14 Am, N is the line density) is higher than those of other RFPs and poloidal beta, β p , and energy confinement time, τ E , are 5-10% and 0.5-1 ms, respectively, which are comparable with those of other RFPs of comparable sizes (RFX and MST). Pulsed poloidal current drive has recently been tested and the result has shown a twofold improvement of β p and τ E . The improvement is discussed in terms of the dynamic trajectories in the F-Θ plane, where F and Θ are reversal and pinch parameters, respectively. The global confinement properties are compared between the locked and non-locked discharges, which yields a better understanding of the mode-locking phenomena in RFP plasmas. (author)

  2. Alpha effect of Alfven waves and current drive in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.

    1997-10-01

    Circularly polarized Alfven waves give rise to an α-dynamo effect that can be exploited to drive parallel current. In a open-quotes laminarclose quotes magnetic the effect is weak and does not give rise to significant currents for realistic parameters (e.g., in tokamaks). However, in reversed field pinches (RFPs) in which magnetic field in the plasma core is stochastic, a significant enhancement of the α-effect occurs. Estimates of this effect show that it may be a realistic method of current generation in the present-day RFP experiments and possibly also in future RFP-based fusion reactors

  3. Electron Bernstein wave emission from an overdense reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Anderson, J.K.; Biewer, T.M.; Craig, D.; Forest, C.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    Blackbody levels of emission in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies have been observed from an overdense (ω pe ∼3ω ce ) Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed field pinch plasma, a result of electrostatic electron Bernstein waves emitted from the core and mode converted into electromagnetic waves at the extreme plasma edge. Comparison of the measured radiation temperature with profiles measured by Thomson scattering indicates that the mode conversion efficiency can be as high as ∼75%. Emission is preferentially in the X-mode polarization, and is strongly dependent upon the density and magnetic field profiles at the mode conversion point

  4. Pellet injection in the RFP (Reversed Field Pinch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Weber, P. G.; Munson, C. P.; Cayton, T. E.; Bunting, C. A.; Carolan, P. G.

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (xi sub drift approx. 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50 percent were observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D sub alpha light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 microsec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta.

  5. Scaling of sustained ZT-40 M reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, J.; Haberstich, A.; Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Caramana, E.J.; DiMarco, J.N.; Erickson, R.M.; Ingraham, J.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Little, E.M.; Massey, R.S.; Phillips, J.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Schofield, A.E.; Thomas, K.S.; Watt, R.G.; Weber, P.G.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments aimed at evaluating the scaling properties of the ZT-40M Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) facility were conducted in 1983 at Los Alamos. Sustained discharges were produced at nominal toroidal currents ranging from 60 to 240 kA. The standard fill pressure was kept close to the lower limit of the usable pressure range, and the scaling data were acquired at a fixed time in the discharges while the plasma was in a quasi-steady state. Scalings of the diameter-averaged electron density, electron temperature on axis, product of these two parameters, and of various definitions of the electrical resistivity are presented. Trends of the toroidal voltage, energy containment time, and poloidal beta are shown. The impurity contents, particle containment time, and total radiation losses are described, and results obtained with and without poloidal limiters are compared. In addition, the performance of the facility at higher than standard density and at a constant ratio of the toroidal current over the electron line density is examined

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of tearing modes in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Diamond, P.H.; Lynch, V.E.

    1987-05-01

    The results of investigations of nonlinear tearing-mode dynamics in reversed field pinch plasmas are described. The linear instabilities have poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers 10 ≤ n ≤ 20, and the resonant surfaces are therefore in the plasma core. The nonlinear dynamics result in dual cascade processes. The first process is a rapid m = 1 spectral broadening toward high n, with a simultaneous spreading of magnetic turbulence radially outward toward the field-reversal surface. Global m = 0 perturbations, which are driven to large amplitudes by the m = 1 instabilities, in turn trigger the m = 1 spectral broadening by back-coupling to the higher n. The second process is a cascade toward large m and is mediated by m = 2 modes. The m = 2 perturbations have the structure of localized, driven current sheets and nonlinearly stabilize the m = 1 modes by transferring m = 1 energy to small-scale dissipation. The calculated spectrum has many of the qualitative features observed in experiments. 13 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  7. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, J.K.; Borchardt, M.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B.E.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C.B.; Goetz, J.A.; Holly, D.J.; Kim, J.-H.; King, J.; Ko, J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST programme on physics important for the advancement of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as well as for improved understanding of toroidal magnetic confinement more generally is reported. Evidence for the classical confinement of ions in the RFP is provided by analysis of impurity ions and energetic ions created by 1 MW neutral beam injection (NBI). The first appearance of energetic-particle-driven modes by NBI in a RFP plasma is described. MST plasmas robustly access the quasi-single-helicity state that has commonalities to the stellarator and ‘snake’ formation in tokamaks. In MST the dominant mode grows to 8% of the axisymmetric field strength, while the remaining modes are reduced. Predictive capability for tearing mode behaviour has been improved through nonlinear, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamic computation using the measured resistivity profile and Lundquist number, which reproduces the sawtooth cycle dynamics. Experimental evidence and computational analysis indicates two-fluid effects, e.g., Hall physics and gyro-viscosity, are needed to understand the coupling of parallel momentum transport and current profile relaxation. Large Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, plus separately measured kinetic stress, indicate an intricate momentum balance and a possible origin for MST's intrinsic plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic analysis indicates that micro-tearing modes can be unstable at high beta, with a critical gradient for the electron temperature that is larger than for tokamak plasmas by roughly the aspect ratio. (paper)

  8. Plasma behaviour in large reversed-field pinches and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Bodin, H.A.B.; Carolan, P.G.; Johnston, J.W.; Newton, A.A.; Roberts, K.V.; Robinson, D.C.; Watts, M.R.C.; Piotrowicz, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent analytic and numerical results on large reversed-field-pinch (RFP) systems and RFP reactors are presented. Predictions are made of the plasma behaviour in Eta Beta II, HBTXIA (under construction) and RFX (planned). The setting-up phase of an RFP is studied by using turbulence theory in transport equilibrium calculations, and estimates are made of the volt-seconds consumption for four different modes of field control. A prescription is given for a dynamo producing self-reversal which yields finite-β configurations. Residual instabilities of these equilibria may be resistive pressure-driven g-modes, and a new study of these modes that includes parallel viscosity indicates stability for anti β approximately 10%. The sustainment phase of the RFP is examined with tokamak scaling laws assumed for the energy confinement time. Temperatures in excess of 1keV are predicted for currents of 2MA in RFX. An operating cycle for a pulsed RFP reactor including gas puffing to reach ignition is proposed following a study of the energy replacement time for an Ohmically heated plasma. The scaling of the reactor parameters with minor radius is also investigated. (author)

  9. Chaos in reversed-field-pinch plasma simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, C.; Newman, D.E.; Sprott, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear-analysis techniques is used to identify low-dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincare sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents, and short-term predictability. In addition, nonlinear-noise-reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are the DEBS computer code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped-electron-mode model, which models drift-wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low-dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low-dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate that the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system

  10. Confinement properties of the RFP [Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.G.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Ingraham, J.C.; Miller, G.; Munson, C.P.; Pickrell, M.M.; Wurden; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Ritz, Ch.P.

    1990-01-01

    Research in ZT-40M has been focused on elucidating the confinement properties of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Recent improvements in diagnostic capability have permitted measurement of radial profiles, as well as a detailed study of the edge plasma. The emerging confinement picture for ZT-40M has several ingredients: Typically 0.3 of the Ohmic input power to ZT-40M is available to drive fluctuations. Evidence points to this fluctuational power heating the ions. Approximately one quarter of the input power is lost through radiation, with metal impurities playing a key role. Magnetic fluctations in ZT-40M are at the percent level, as measured in the edge plasma. Extrapolating these data to small radii shows stochasticity in the core plasma. Suprathermal electrons are measured in the edge plasma. These electrons originate in the core, and transport to the edge along the fluctuating magnetic field lines. Under typical conditions, these electrons constitute the major electron energy loss channel in ZT-40M. Electrostatic fluctuations dominate the edge electron particle flux, but not the electron thermal flux. The major ion loss process is charge exchange, with smaller contributions from conduction and convection. In examining these observations, and the parametric dependences of confinement, a working model for RFP confinement emerges. An overview of this model, together with implications for the multi-mega-ampere ZTH experiment will be presented

  11. Simulation study of dynamo structure in reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, A.; Sato, K.I.; Ashida, H.; Amano, T.

    1992-10-01

    The dynamo structure in the reversed field pinch (RFP) is studied through the nonlinear dynamics of single-helicity mode. Simulation is concentrated upon the physical structure of nonlinear interactions of the plasma flow and magnetic fluctuation. The result indicates that when the initial equilibrium profile is deformed by resistive diffusion, the radial flow is driven near the core of the plasma. As this flow forms a vortex structure and magnetic fluctuation grows radially, the dynamo electric field is spirally induced just inside the reversal surface and then the toroidal flux is increased. This dynamo electric field correlates to nonlinear evolution of the kinetic energy of m=1 mode, and the increase of the toroidal flux is originated in the growth process of the magnetic energy of this mode. Consequently, the RFP configuration can be sustained by the single-helicity evolution of m=1 mode alone, and the electric field induced by the interactions of the toroidal velocity and the radial magnetic field is the most dominant source on the dynamo action. (author)

  12. Radio frequency wave experiments on the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, C.B.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Nornberg, M.D.; Prager, S.C.; Thomas, M.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Ram, A.K.

    1999-04-01

    Experiments, simulations, and theory all indicate that the magnetic fluctuations responsible for the poor confinement in the reversed field pinch (RFP) can be controlled by altering the radial profile of the current density. The magnetic fluctuations in the RFP are due to resistive MHD instabilities caused by current profile peaking; thus confinement in the RFP is ultimately the result of a misalignment between inductively driven current profiles and the stable current profiles characteristic of the Taylor state. If a technique such as rf current drive can be developed to non-inductively sustain a Taylor state (a current profile linearly stable to all tearing modes), the confinement of the RFP and its potential as a reactor concept are likely to increase. Whether there is a self-consistent path from poor confinement to greatly improved confinement through current profile modification is an issue for future experiments to address if and only if near term experiments can demonstrate: (1) coupling to and the propagation of rf waves in RFP plasmas, (2) efficient current drive, and (3) control of the power deposition which will make it possible to control the current profile. In this paper, modeling results and experimental plans are presented for two rf experiments which have the potential of satisfying these three goals: high-n parallel lower hybrid (LH) waves and electron Bernstein waves (EBWs)

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of tearing modes in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Diamond, P.H.; Lynch, V.E.

    1988-01-01

    The results of investigations of nonlinear tearing-mode dynamics in reversed field pinch plasmas are described. The linear instabilities have poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers 10approx. < napprox. <20, and the resonant surfaces are therefore in the plasma core. The nonlinear dynamics result in dual cascade processes. The first process is a rapid m = 1 spectral broadening toward high n, with a simultaneous spreading of magnetic turbulence radially outward toward the field-reversal surface. Global m = 0 perturbations, which are driven to large amplitudes by the m = 1 instabilities, in turn trigger the m = 1 spectral broadening by back coupling to the higher n. The second process is a cascade toward large m and is mediated by m = 2 modes. The m = 2 perturbations have the structure of localized, driven current sheets and nonlinearly stabilize the m = 1 modes by transferring m = 1 energy to small-scale dissipation. The calculated spectrum has many of the qualitative features observed in experiments

  14. Studies of a poloidal divertor reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt has been made to form a reversed field pinch (RFP) in a poloidal divertor configuration which position the plasma far from a conducting wall. In this configuration, the plasma is localized within a magnetic separatrix formed by the combination of toroidal currents in the plasma and four internal aluminum rings. Plasmas were formed with plasma current /approximately/135 kA, toroidal field reversal lasting /approximately/1 msec, line-averaged density /approximately/1--2 /times/ 10 13 cm/sup /minus/3/ and central electron temperature /approximately/55 eV, but a large asymmetry in the magnetic field (δB/B /approximately/40%) onset at about the time the toroidal field reversed at the wall. Symmetric, poloidal divertor RFP equilibria were not formed. This behavior might be expected based on linear MHD stability analysis of a cylindrical plasma bounded by a large vacuum region and distant conducting wall. The symmetric equilibrium before the asymmetry develops and the asymmetry itself are described. 15 refs., 3 figs

  15. Pellet injection in the RFP [Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Bunting, C.A.; Carolan, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (ξ/sub drift/ /approximately/ 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50% have been observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D/sub α/ light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 μsec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta. 10 refs., 6 figs

  16. Murakami density limit in tokamaks and reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.; Hulse, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    A theoretical upper limit for the density in an ohmically heated tokamak discharge follows from the requirement that the ohmic heating power deposited in the central current-carrying channel exceed the impurity radiative cooling in this critical region. A compact summary of our results gives this limit n/sub M/ for the central density as n/sub M/ = [Z/sub e//(Z/sub e/-1]/sup 1/2/n/sub eo/ (B/sub T//1T)(1m/R) where n/sub eo/ depends strongly on the impurity species and is remarkably independent of the central electron temperature T/sub e/(0). For T/sub e/(0) approx. 1 keV, we have n/sub eo/ = 1.5 x 10 14 cm -3 for beryllium, n/sub eo/ = 5 x 10 13 cm -3 for oxygen, n/sub eo/ = 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 for iron, and n/sub eo/ = 0.5 x 10 13 cm -3 for tungsten. The results agree quantitatively with Murakami's original observations. A similar density limit, known as the I/N limit, exists for reversed-field pinch devices and this limit has also been evaluated for a variety of impurity species

  17. Resistive wall modes in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.

    2003-10-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWM) in the reversed field pinch are studied and a detailed comparison of experimental growth rates and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is made. RWM growth rates are experimentally measured in the thin shell device EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1 (2001)]. Linear MHD calculations of RWM growth rates are based on experimental equilibria. Experimental and linear MHD RWM growth rate dependency on the equilibrium profiles is investigated experimentally by varying the pinch parameter Θ=Bθ(a)/ in the range Θ=1.5-1.8. Quantitative agreement between experimental and linear MHD growth rates is seen. The dominating RWMs are the internal on-axis modes (having the same helicity as the central equilibrium field). At high Θ, external nonresonant modes are also observed. For internal modes experimental growth rates decrease with Θ while for external modes, growth rates increase with Θ. The effect of RWMs on the reversed-field pinch plasma performance is discussed.

  18. Self-consistent equilibria in cylindrical reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Surdo, C.; Paccagnella, R.; Guo, S.

    1995-03-01

    The object of this work is to study the self-consistent magnetofluidstatic equilibria of a 2-region (plasma + gas) reversed-field pinch (RFP) in cylindrical approximation (namely, with vanishing inverse aspect ratio). Differently from what happens in a tokamak, in a RFP a significant part of the plasma current is driven by a dynamo electric field (DEF), in its turn mainly due to plasma turbulence. So, it is worked out a reasonable mathematical model of the above self-consistent equilibria under the following main points it has been: a) to the lowest order, and according to a standard ansatz, the turbulent DEF say ε t , is expressed as a homogeneous transform of the magnetic field B of degree 1, ε t =(α) (B), with α≡a given 2-nd rank tensor, homogeneous of degree 0 in B and generally depending on the plasma state; b) ε t does not explicitly appear in the plasma energy balance, as it were produced by a Maxwell demon able of extract the corresponding Joule power from the plasma. In particular, it is showed that, if both α and the resistivity tensor η are isotropic and constant, the magnetic field is force-free with abnormality equal to αη 0 /η, in the limit of vanishing β; that is, the well-known J.B. Taylor'result is recovered, in this particular conditions, starting from ideas quite different from the usual ones (minimization of total magnetic energy under constrained total elicity). Finally, the general problem is solved numerically under circular (besides cylindrical) symmetry, for simplicity neglecting the existence of gas region (i.e., assuming the plasma in direct contact with the external wall)

  19. Statistical theory of field fluctuations in a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.

    1982-01-01

    A statistical description of three-dimensional, incompressible turbulence in an ideal, current-bearing, bounded magnetofluid is given both analytically and numerically. Our results are then compared with existing data taken from reversed-field pinch experiments

  20. Next-Step scientific objectives, targets, and parameters for reversed-field-pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion energy (MFE) systems: Preliminary thoughts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; DiMarco, J.N.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this document is the quantitative definition of objectives, targets, and parameters of the Next-Step device to follow the present RFX experiment; this device is given the name RFXNS. Although developed over five years ago, much of the material distilled into the 1988 RFP tactical plan is useful in establishing the goals and parameters of RFXNS. This earlier plan established tentative parameters of an RFP next step based on: predictions of RFP ignition and commercial-reactor devices; and the assumed successful operation of highly complementary RFP experiments RFX and ZTH/CPRF. Programmatic changes and evolution that have occurred since 1988 strongly impact the role and characteristics of an RFXNS: the Los Alamos ZTH/CPRF project and fusion program was terminated in mid-construction for reasons of MFE cost savings and concept focusing; great progress has been made in launching ITER; and reactor projections for the tokamak have increased in detail and variety, but not in commercial promise and competitiveness. A brief status of and perspective from each of the above three points is necessary before the key issues and their implementation to form the basis of the RFXNS definition are given

  1. A short introduction to the status and motivation for reversed field pinch and compact toroid research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, H.

    1987-09-01

    Potential commercial fusion power systems must be acceptable from a safety and environmental standpoint. They must also promise to be competitive with other sources of energy (i.e., fossil, fission, etc.) when considered from the standpoint of the cost of electricity (COE) and the unit direst cost (UDC) in ($/kWe). These costs are affected by a host of factors including recirculating power, plant availability, construction time, capital cost etc., and are, thus, influenced by technological complexity. In a attempt to meet these requirements, the emphasis of fusion research in the United States has been moving toward smaller, lower-cost systems. There is increased interest in higher beta tokamaks and stellarators, and in compact alternate concepts such as the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) and the Compact Toroids (CTs) which are, in part, the subject of this paper

  2. Microinstabilities and turbulent transport in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Daniel Richard

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with addressing the nature of drift wave microturbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP). Microturbulence is an important phenomenon and contributor to heat and particle transport in tokamaks, where it has been studied for several decades, but its role in the RFP is a rather new topic of study. As such, the nature of RFP drift waves and their relationship to their tokamak counterparts is still developing, and many of the results in this work are focused on addressing this challenge. Fundamental advances in microturbulence research have been made in recent decades through two parallel developments: the theoretical framework encompassed in the gyrokinetic model, and the computational power offered by massively-parallel, high-performance computing systems. Gyrokinetics is a formulation of kinetic theory in such a way that the fast timescale gyromotion of particles around magnetic field lines is averaged out. The implementation and use of RFP equilibrium models in gyrokinetic codes constitutes the bulk of this thesis. A simplified analytic equilibrium, the toroidal Bessel function model (TBFM), is used in the gyrokinetic code GYRO to explore the fundamental scaling properties of drift waves in the RFP geometry. Two drift wave instabilities, the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the microtearing mode (MTM) are found to occur, and the relationship of their critical threshold in driving gradients and plasma beta is explored. The critical values in these parameters are found to be above those of similar tokamak cases by roughly a factor of the flux surface aspect ratio. The MTM is found to be stabilized by increasing the RFP pinch parameter theta, making it unlikely for it to unstable in the high-theta improved confinement pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges. Efforts are also made to address microinstabilities in specific experimental discharges of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). A semi

  3. Experiments on the ZT-S reversed-field pinch, August--December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    During the latter half of 1978 the ZT-S reversed-field pinch was used to explore the utility of pitch-programming techniques in setting up stable diffuse pinch profiles. Several experimental observations relating to this goal are presented

  4. Economically attractive features of steady-state neoclassical reversed field pinch equilibrium with low aspect ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, S.; Yagi, Y.; Sugimoto, H.; Ashida, H.; Hirano, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Taguchi, M.; Nagamine, Y.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.; Watanabe, M.; Aizawa, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dominant plasma self-induced current equilibrium is achieved together with the high β for the steady-state neoclassical reversed field pinch (RFP) equilibrium with low aspect ratio by broadening the plasma pressure profile. The RF-driven current, when the safety factor is smaller than unity, is much less than the self-induced current, which dominates (96%) the toroidal current. This neoclassical RFP equilibrium has strong magnetic shear or a high-stability beta (β t = 63%) due to its hollow current profile. It is shown that the obtained equilibrium is close to the relaxed-equilibrium state with a minimum energy, and is also robust against microinstabilities. These attractive features allow the economical design of compact steady-state fusion power plants with low cost of electricity (COE). (author)

  5. Plasma performance and scaling laws in the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, P.; Alfier, A.; Canton, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2009-01-01

    The large range of plasma currents (I p = 0.2-1.6 MA) and feedback-controlled magnetic boundary conditions of the RFX-mod experiment make it well suited to performing scaling studies. The assessment of such scaling, in particular those on temperature and energy confinement, is crucial both for improving the operating reversed-field pinch (RFP) devices and for validating the RFP configuration as a candidate for the future fusion reactors. For such a purpose scaling laws for magnetic fluctuations, temperature and energy confinement have been evaluated in stationary operation. RFX-mod scaling laws have been compared with those obtained from other RFP devices and numerical simulations. The role of the magnetic boundary has been analysed, comparing discharges performed with different active control schemes of the edge radial magnetic field.

  6. A one-dimensional plasma and impurity transport model for reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1991-11-01

    In this thesis a one-dimensional (1-D) plasma and impurity transport model is developed to address issues related to impurity behavior in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) fusion plasmas. A coronal non-equilibrium model is used for impurities. The impurity model is incorporated into an existing one dimensional plasma transport model creating a multi-species plasma transport model which treats the plasma and impurity evolution self-consistently. Neutral deuterium particles are treated using a one-dimensional (slab) model of neutral transport. The resulting mode, RFPBI, is then applied to existing RFP devices such as ZT-40M and MST, and also to examine steady state behavior of ZTH based on the design parameters. A parallel algorithm for the impurity transport equations is implemented and tested to determine speedup and efficiency

  7. High-β, improved confinement reversed-field pinch plasmas at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyman, M. D.; Chapman, B. E.; Ahn, J. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ennis, D. A.; Fiksel, G.; Gangadhara, S.; Goetz, J. A.; O'Connell, R.; Oliva, S. P.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Brower, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    In Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching n e =4x10 19 m -3 . Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch

  8. MHD turbulence models for the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C.G.; Watkins, M.L.

    1976-01-01

    A kinematic model which describes the effect of isotropic, non-mirror symmetric turbulence on a mean magnetic field is used to examine the temporal behaviour of magnetic field in high beta pinch experiments. Solutions to the model can indicate the formation of a steady-state, force-free configuration that corresponds to the state of lowest magnetic energy and the reversal of the toroidal magnetic field at the plasma boundary in accordance with experimental observations on toroidal pinches such as ZETA and HBTX. This model neglects both the dynamic interaction between fluid and field and the associated anisotropy. These effects are examined in a further model. (author)

  9. Current driven instabilities of the kinetic shear Alfven wave: application to reversed field pinches and spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Perkins, F.W.

    1984-04-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave is studied in a cylindrical force-free plasma with self-consistent magnetic fields. This equilibrium represents a reversed field pinch or a spheromak. The stability of the wave is found to depend on the ratio of the electron drift velocity to the Alfven velocity. This ratio varies inversely with the square root of the plasma line density. The critical line density using the Spitzer-Harm electron distribution function is found for reversed field pinches with deuterium plasmas to be approximately 2 x 10 18 m -1 and is 5 x 10 17 m -1 in spheromaks with hydrogen plasmas. The critical line density is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for reversed field pinches

  10. Energetic electron measurements in the edge of a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, J.C.; Ellis, R.F.; Downing, J.N.; Munson, C.P.; Weber, P.G.; Wurden, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The edge plasma of the ZT-40M [Fusion Technol. 8, 1571 (1985)] reversed-field pinch has been studied using a combination of three different plasma probes: a double-swept Langmuir probe, an electrostatic energy analyzer, and a calorimeter--Langmuir probe. The edge plasma has been measured both with and without a movable graphite tile limiter present nearby in the plasma. Without a limiter a fast nonthermal tail of electrons (T congruent 350 eV) is detected in the edge plasma with nearly unidirectional flow along B and having a density between 2% and 10% of the cold edge plasma (T congruent 20 eV). The toroidal sense of this fast electron flow is against the force of the applied electric field. A large power flux along B is measured flowing in the same direction as the fast electrons and is apparently carried by the fast electrons. With the limiter present the fast electrons are still detected in the plasma, but are strongly attenuated in the shadow of the limiter. The measured scrape-off lengths for both the fast electrons and the cold plasma indicate cross-field transport at the rate of, or less than, Bohm diffusion. Estimates indicate that the fast electrons could carry the reversed-field pinch current density at the edge and, from the measured transverse diffusion rates, could also account for the electron energy loss channel in ZT-40 M. The long mean-free-path kinetic nature of these fast electrons suggests that a kinetic process, rather than a magnetohydrodynamic process that is based upon a local Ohm's law formulation, is responsible for their generation

  11. Global properties of ohmically heated reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.

    The simultaneous requirements of power balance and pressure balance have been considered. The treatment generalizes the Pease-Braginskii pinch current limit by including toroidal magnetic field, anomalous resistivity, nonradiative losses, and time-dependent fields. The rise of the temperature to a state of power balance proves to be amenable to a very simple and unified description. Finally, the practical parameter windows implied by the joint action of power balance and pressure balance are displayed

  12. Compressibility Effects in the Dynamics of the Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2008-01-01

    We study the reversed-field pinch through the numerical solution of the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. Two cases are investigated: In the first case the pressure is derived from an adiabatic condition, and in the second case the pressure equation includes heating terms due to resistivity and viscosity. In the adiabatic case a single helicity state is observed, and the reversed-field pinch configuration is formed for short time intervals and is finally lost. In the nonadiabatic case the system reaches a multiple helicity state, and the reversal parameter remains negative for a longer time. The results show the importance of compressibility in determining the large scale dynamics of the system

  13. Compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR): sensitivity study and design-point determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    If the costing assumptions upon which the positive assessment of conventional large superconducting fusion reactors are based proves overly optimistic, approaches that promise considerably increased system power density and reduced mass utilization will be required. These more compact reactor embodiments generally must operate with reduced shield thickness and resistive magnets. Because of the unique, magnetic topology associated with the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), the compact reactor embodiment for this approach is particularly attractive from the viewpoint of low-field resistive coils operating with Ohmic losses that can be made small relative to the fusion power. A comprehensive system model is developed and described for a steady-state, compact RFP reactor (CRFPR). This model is used to select a unique cost-optimized design point that will be used for a conceptual engineering design. The cost-optimized CRFPR design presented herein would operate with system power densities and mass utilizations that are comparable to fission power plants and are an order of magnitude more favorable than the conventional approaches to magnetic fusion power. The sensitivity of the base-case design point to changes in plasma transport, profiles, beta, blanket thickness, normal vs superconducting coils, and fuel cycle (DT vs DD) is examined. The RFP approach is found to yield a point design for a high-power-density reactor that is surprisingly resilient to changes in key, but relatively unknown, physics and systems parameters

  14. Single-piece maintenance procedures for the TITAN reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, S.P.; Creedon, R.L.; Cooke, P.I.H.; Duggan, W.P.; Krakowski, R.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN reactor is a compact (major radius of 3.9 m and minor plasma radius of 0.6 m), high neutron wall loading (--18MW/m 2 ) fusion energy system based on the reversed-field pinch (RFP) concept. The TITAN-I fusion power core (FPC) is a lithium, self-cooled design with vanadium alloy (V-3Ti-1Si) structural material. The compact design of the TITAN fusion power core (FPC) reduces the system to a few small and relatively low mass components, making toroidal segmentation of the FPC unnecessary. A single-piece maintenance procedure in which the replaceable first wall and blanket is removed as a single unit is, therefore, possible. The TITAN FPC design provides for top access to the reactor with vertical lifts used to remove the components. The number of remote handling procedures is few and the movements are uncomplicated. The annual torus replacement requires that the reusable ohmic-heating coil set and hot-shield assembly be removed and temporarily stored in a hot cell. The used first wall and blanket assembly is drained and disconnected from the coolant supply system, then lifted to a processing room where it is cooled and prepared for Class-C waste burial. The new, pre-tested first wall and blanket assembly is then lowered into position and the removal procedure is reversed to complete the replacement process

  15. Ohmic heating of the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.

    1980-04-01

    Simple analytic expressions are found for the global heating rate and the time needed to achieve global power balance with radiation and other losses, in useful agreement with large RFP transport codes. A simple condition is noted, which insures that the heating can be accomplished before appreciable resistive evolution occurs in the pinch profile. The product of poloidal beta, β/sub theta/, and toroidal current, I, that characterizes a condition of global power balance is derived subject to the above-mentioned condition without making key assumptions used by earlier investigators. First, a perfectly steady state (with local power balance) is not assumed, nor is it appropriate to do so. Secondly, the cross-field resistivity is not required to be classical. Since the value of (β/sub theta/ I) plays a fundamental role in determining the kind of device one requires, the foundations of this value are important

  16. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Kaellne, E.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and Z eff together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented. (author)

  17. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-09-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated.

  18. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  19. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-01-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated. (author)

  20. Edge fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Nilles, E.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, J.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. At low frequency ( e > p e /p e where φ and p e are the fluctuating potential and pressure, respectively). From measurements of the fluctuating density, temperature, and potential we infer that the electrostatic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy can be substantial. 13 refs., 11 figs

  1. Plasma behaviors in the open field region of reversed-field theta-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Yoshiyuki; Hirano, Keiichi.

    1983-03-01

    A characteristic behavior of the plasma in an open field region of reversed field theta pinch has been studied with the guide field (GF) which extends the field line along the axial direction. The experimental result suggests that the rotaional instability may be induced in FRC after the plasma touches the wall at the ends of the open field. (author)

  2. Edge plasmas and plasma/wall interactions in an ignition-class reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A range of limiter, armor, and divertor options are examined as a means to minimize plasma/wall interactions for a high-power-density, ignition-class reversed field pinch. An open, toroidal-field divertor can operate at maximum powers, while isolating the core plasma from impurities and protecting the wall. 16 refs

  3. Magnetic fluctuation driven cross-field particle transport in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.; Liu, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations generally cause cross-field particle transport in confined plasmas. Thus core localized turbulence must be kept at low levels for sufficient energy confinement in magnetic fusion plasmas. Reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibria can, theoretically, be completely stable to ideal and resistive (tearing) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes at zero beta. Unstable resistive interchange modes are, however, always present at experimentally relevant values of the poloidal beta β θ . An analytical quasilinear, ambipolar diffusion model is here used to model associated particle transport. The results indicate that core density fluctuations should not exceed a level of about 1% for plasmas of fusion interest. Parameters of experimentally relevant stationary states of the RFP were adjusted to minimize growth rates, using a fully resistive linearized MHD stability code. Density gradient effects are included through employing a parabolic density profile. The scaling of particle diffusion [D(r)∝λ 2 n 0.5 T/aB, where λ is the mode width] is such that the effects of particle transport are milder in present day RFP experiments than in future reactor-relevant plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. The safety designs for the TITAN reversed-field pinch reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Hoot, C.G.; Schultz, K.R.; Grotz, S.P.; Blanchard, J.; Sharafat, S.; Najmabadi, F.

    1989-01-01

    TITAN is a study to investigate the potential of the reversed-field pinch concept as a compact, high-power density energy system. Two reactor concepts were developed, a self-cooled lithium design with vanadium structure and an aqueous solution loop-in-pool design, both operating at 18 MW/m 2 . The key safety features of the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium blanket design are in material selection, fusion power core configuration selection, lithium piping connections, and passive lithium drain tank system. Based on these safety features and results from accident evaluation, TITAN-I can at least be rated at a level 3 of safety assurance. For the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design, the key passive feature is the complete submersion of the fusion power core and the corresponding primary coolant loop system into a pool of low temperature water. Based on this key safety design feature, the TITAN-II design can be rated at a level 2 of safety assurance. (orig.)

  5. Maintenance procedures for the TITAN-I and TITAN-II reversed field pinch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, S.P.; Duggan, W.; Krakowski, R.; Najmabadi, F.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The TITAN reactor is a compact, high-power-density (neutron wall loading 18 MW/m 2 ) machine, based on the reversed-field-pinch (RFP) confinement concept. Two designs for the fusion power core have been examined: TITAN-I is based on a self-cooled lithium loop with a vanadium-alloy structure for the first wall, blanket and shield; and TITAN-II is based on an aqueous loop-in-pool design with a LiNO 3 solution as the coolant and breeder. The compact design of the TITAN fusion power core, (FPC) reduces the system to a few small and relatively low mass components, making toroidal segmentation of the FPC unnecessary. A single-piece maintenance procedure is possible. The potential advantages of single-piece maintenance procedures are: (1) Short period of down time; (2) improved reliability; (3) no adverse effects resulting from unequal levels of irradiation; and (4) ability to continually modify the FPC design. Increased availability can be expected from a fully pre-tested, single-piece FPC. Pre-testing of the FPC throughout the assembly process and prior to installation into the reactor vault is discussed. (orig.)

  6. The safety designs for the TITAN reversed-field pinch reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Hoot, C.G.; Schultz, K.R.; Grotz, S.P.; Blanchard, J.P.; Sharafat, S.; Najmabadi, F.

    1988-01-01

    TITAN is a study to investigate the potential of the reversed-field pinch concept as a compact, high-power density energy system. Two reactor concepts were developed, a self-cooled lithium design with vanadium structure and an aqueous solution loop-in-pool design, both operating at 18 MW/m 2 . The key safety features of the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium blanket design are in material selection, fusion power core configuration selection, lithium piping connections and passive lithium drain tank system. Based on these safety features and results from accident evaluation, TITAN-I can at least be rated as level 3 of safety assurance. For the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design, the key passive feature is the complete submersion of the fusion power core and the corresponding primary coolant loop system into a pool of low temperature water. Based on this key safety design feature, the TITAN-II design can be rated as level 2 of safety assurance. 7 refs., 2 figs

  7. Comparison of zero-dimensional and one-dimensional thermonuclear burn computations for the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebel, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Moses, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor designs of the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) have been based on profile-averaged zero-dimensional (point) plasma models. The plasma response/performance that has been predicted by the point plasma model is re-examined by a comprehensive one-dimensional (radial) burn code that has been developed and parametrically evaluated for the RFPR. Agreement is good between the zero-dimensional and one-dimensional models, giving more confidence in the RFPR design point reported previously from the zero-dimensional analysis

  8. Current, temperature and confinement time scaling in toroidal reversed-field pinch experiments ZT-I and ZT-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Di Marco, J.N.; Haberstich, A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Howell, R.B.; Karr, H.J.; Schofield, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    The scaling properties of a toroidal reversed-field Z pinch have been investigated over a limited range by comparing two experiments having conducting walls and discharge-tube minor diameters which differ by a factor of approximately 1.5. Both the confinement time of the plasma column and the electron temperature were found to increase about a factor of two with the increased minor diameter. Both the poloidal field diffusion and the decay of the toroidal reversed field were significantly reduced with the larger tube diameter. These results support the hypothesis that the loss of stability later in the discharge is caused by diffusion-induced deterioration of initially favourable plasma-field profiles to MHD unstable ones. This conclusion has been verified by stability analysis of the magnetic field profiles. Fusion reactor calculations show that small reactors are conceptually possible assuming good containment can be achieved for current densities approximately >20MAm -2 . (author)

  9. Spontaneous quasi single helicity regimes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, good progress toward a better understanding and control of the plasma performance in reversed-field pinch devices has been made. These improvements consist both of the discovery of spontaneous plasma regimes, termed the quasi single helicity (QSH) regime, in which part of the plasma core is no longer stochastic, and of the development of techniques for active control of plasma instabilities. In this paper, a systematic study of spontaneous QSH in the EXTRAP T2R device [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] is presented. In this device, QSH states can occur spontaneously and it is associated with magnetic and thermal structures. A statistical analysis to determine the most favorable experimental conditions to have a transition to the QSH regime will be presented. The results described here are useful to understand the underlying properties of QSH regimes in view of future applications of the QSH active control in EXTRAP T2R; they are also important to have a comparison with the QSH studied in other devices.

  10. A review of the experimental and theoretical status of the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) approach to the development of a compact nuclear fusion reactor. Two RFP papers in this conference are complementary; the first paper contains the historical origins and basic concepts concerning MHD instabilities, relaxation and RFP confinement properties as well as a discussion of future prospects of the RFP. This paper gives an overview of the status of plasma parameters of the present main RFP experiments and of the status of theory and experiment of the interesting RFP plasma phenomena of relaxation, self reversal and flux generation (these effects are often referred to as the dynamo effect). The low frequency oscillating-field current drive concept which exploits these effects is discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the theoretical results obtained from plasma simulation codes used in these active areas of study. Selected topics of recent research on the Los Alamos ZT-40M experiments are reported. The paper concludes with descriptions of the next generation Los Alamos RFP experiment ZTH, to be located in the new Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) presently under construction, and the characteristics of an RFP compact reactor. 68 refs

  11. Stable Alfven-wave dynamo action in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Previous theoretical work has suggested that Alfven waves may be related to the anomalous toroidal magnetic flux generation and extended (over classical expectations) discharge times observed in the reversed-field pinch. This thesis examines the dynamo action of stable Alfven waves as a means of generating toroidal flux. Recent advances in linear resistive MHD stability analysis are used to calculate the quasi-linear dynamo mean electromotive force of Alfven waves. This emf is incorporated into a one-dimensional transport and mean-field evolution code. The changing equilibrium is then fed back to the stability code to complete a computational framework that self-consistently evaluates a dynamic plasma dynamo. This technique is readily extendable to other plasmas in which dynamic stable model action is of interest. Such plasmas include Alfven wave current-drive and plasma heating for fusion devices, as well as astrophysical and geophysical dynamo systems. This study also contains extensive studies of resistive Alfven wave properties. This includes behavior versus spectral location, magnetic Reynolds number and wave number

  12. High-flux first-wall design for a small reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, G.E.; Graham, A.L.; Christensen, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    To achieve the goal of a commercially economical fusion power reactor, small physical size and high power density should be combined with simplicity (minimized use of high-technology systems). The Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is a magnetic confinement device that promises to meet these requirements with power densities comparable to those in existing fission power plants. To establish feasibility of such an RFP reactor, a practical design for a first wall capable of withstanding high levels of cyclic neutron wall loadings is needed. Associated with the neutron flux in the proposed RFP reactor is a time-averaged heat flux of 4.5 MW/m 2 with a conservatively estimated transient peak approximately twice the average value. We present the design for a modular first wall made from a high-strength copper alloy that will meet these requirements of cyclic thermal loading. The heat removal from the wall is by subcooled water flowing in straight tubes at high linear velocities. We combined a thermal analysis with a structural fatigue analysis to design the heat transfer module to last 10 6 cycles or one year at 80% duty for a 26-s power cycle. This fatigue life is compatible with a radiation damage life of 14 MW/yr/m 2

  13. Point design for deuterium-deuterium compact reversed-field pinch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Dobrott, D.R.; Gurol, H.; Schnack, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    A deuterium-deuterium (D-D) reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactor may be made comparable in size and cost to a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor at the expense of high-thermal heat load to the first wall. This heat load is the result of the larger percentage of fusion power in charged particles in the D-D reaction as compared to the D-T reaction. The heat load may be reduced by increasing the reactor size and hence the cost. In addition to this ''degraded'' design, the size may be kept small by means of a higher heat load wall, or by means of a toroidal divertor, in which case most of the heat load seen by the wall is in the form of radiation. Point designs are developed for these approaches and cost studies are performed and compared with a D-T reactor. The results indicate that the cost of electricity of a D-D RFP reactor is about20% higher than a D-T RFP reactor. This increased cost could be offset by the inherent safety features of the D-D fuel cycle

  14. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Johnson, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, Auburn University 206 Allison Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q{sub 0} by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  15. Reversed-field pinch configuration with minimum energy and finite beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng

    1989-01-01

    The reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration has been studied for the case of finite beta. Suydam's condition and the sufficient criterion have been used to examine this configuration. Results of numerical calculations show that the critical value of the pinch parameter Θ for the appearance of the reverse toroidal field increases as the β-value increases. The critical value of Θ for the helical state increases with β as well. Suydam's and Robinson's stability regions increase and shift towards higher values of Θ with increasing β. Theoretical results for finite β coincide with recent RFP experimental results

  16. Enhanced confinement with plasma biasing in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, J.K.

    1997-06-01

    We report an increase in particle confinement with plasma biasing in a reversed field pinch. Miniature plasma sources are used as electrodes to negatively bias the plasma at the edge (r/a ∼ 0.9). Particle content increases and H α radiation decreases upon application of bias and global particle confinement roughly doubles as a result. Measurements of plasma potential, impurity flow, and floating potential fluctuations indicate that strong flows are produced and that electrostatic fluctuations are reduced

  17. Method and apparatus for producing average magnetic well in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic well reversed field plasma pinch method and apparatus produces hot magnetically confined pinch plasma in a toroidal chamber having a major toroidal axis and a minor toroidal axis and a small aspect ratio, e.g. < 6. A pinch current channel within the plasma and at least one hyperbolic magnetic axis outside substantially all of the plasma form a region of average magnetic well in a region surrounding the plasma current channel. The apparatus is operated so that reversal of the safety factor q and of the toroidal magnetic field takes place within the plasma. The well-producing plasma cross section shape is produced by a conductive shell surrounding the shaped envelope and by coils. A shell is of copper or aluminium with non-conductive breaks, and is bonded to a thin aluminium envelope by silicone rubber. (author)

  18. Resistive Wall Mode Stability and Control in the Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadikin, Dmitriy

    2006-03-01

    Control of MHD instabilities using a conducting wall together with external magnetic fields is an important route to improved performance and reliability in fusion devices. Active control of MHD modes is of interest for both the Advanced Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) configurations. A wide range of unstable, current driven MHD modes is present in the RFP. An ideally conducting wall facing the plasma can in principle provide stabilization to these modes. However, a real, resistive wall characterized by a wall field diffusion time, cannot stabilize the ideal MHD modes unless they rotate with Alfvenic velocity, which is usually not the case. With a resistive wall, the ideal modes are converted into resistive wall modes (RWM) with growth rates comparable to the inverse wall time. Resistive wall modes have been studied in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell RFP device. Growth rates have been measured and found in agreement with linear MHD stability calculations. An advanced system for active control has been developed and installed on the EXTRAP T2R device. The system includes an array of 128 active saddle coils, fully covering the torus surface. Experiments on EXTRAP T2R have for the first time demonstrated simultaneous active suppression of multiple independent RWMs. In experiments with a partial array, coupling of different modes due to the limited number of feedback coils has been observed, in agreement with theory. Different feedback strategies, such as the intelligent shell, the rotating shell, and mode control have been studied. Further, feedback operation with different types of magnetic field sensors, measuring either the radial or the toroidal field components have been compared

  19. Experimental studies of confinement in the EXTRAP T2 and T2R reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecconello, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The confinement properties of fusion plasmas are affected by magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations. The determination of the plasma confinement properties requires the measurement of several global and local quantities such as the ion and electron temperatures, the electron and neutral density profiles, the radiation emissivity profiles, the ohmic input power and the particle and heat diffusivities. The focus of this thesis is the study of the plasma confinement properties based on measurements of these quantities under different experimental conditions. The studies have been carried out on the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP T2 and T2R at the Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. Studies carried out in EXTRAP T2 were focused on dynamo activity and on the effect of phase alignment and locking to the wall of magnetic instabilities. These were observed with a dedicated imaging system. The experimental studies in EXTRAP T2R were focused on the measurement of the confinement properties of different configurations. To this aim, a set of diagnostics were used some of which were upgraded, such as the interferometer, while others were newly installed, such as a neutral particle energy analyser and a bolometer array. The dynamo, which is responsible for the plasma sustainment, involves resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities that enhance stochastic transport. Furthermore, the plasma confinement properties are in general improved in the presence of mode rotation. The possibility of reducing the stochastic transport and thereby further improving the confinement has been demonstrated in a current profile control experiment. These results indicate that long pulse operations with a resistive shell and current profile control are indeed feasible

  20. Dynamics of a reconnection-driven runaway ion tail in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. K., E-mail: jkanders@wisc.edu; Kim, J.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Sears, S. H. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    While reconnection-driven ion heating is common in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, the underlying mechanisms for converting magnetic to kinetic energy remain not fully understood. Reversed field pinch discharges are often characterized by rapid ion heating during impulsive reconnection, generating an ion distribution with an enhanced bulk temperature, mainly perpendicular to magnetic field. In the Madison Symmetric Torus, a subset of discharges with the strongest reconnection events develop a very anisotropic, high energy tail parallel to magnetic field in addition to bulk perpendicular heating, which produces a fusion neutron flux orders of magnitude higher than that expected from a Maxwellian distribution. Here, we demonstrate that two factors in addition to a perpendicular bulk heating mechanism must be considered to explain this distribution. First, ion runaway can occur in the strong parallel-to-B electric field induced by a rapid equilibrium change triggered by reconnection-based relaxation; this effect is particularly strong on perpendicularly heated ions which experience a reduced frictional drag relative to bulk ions. Second, the confinement of ions varies dramatically as a function of velocity. Whereas thermal ions are governed by stochastic diffusion along tearing-altered field lines (and radial diffusion increases with parallel speed), sufficiently energetic ions are well confined, only weakly affected by a stochastic magnetic field. High energy ions traveling mainly in the direction of toroidal plasma current are nearly classically confined, while counter-propagating ions experience an intermediate confinement, greater than that of thermal ions but significantly less than classical expectations. The details of ion confinement tend to reinforce the asymmetric drive of the parallel electric field, resulting in a very asymmetric, anisotropic distribution.

  1. Fluctuation reduction and enhanced confinement in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    Plasmas with a factor of ≥3 improvement in energy confinement have been achieved in the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP). These plasmas occur spontaneously, following sawtooth crashes, subject to constraints on, eg, toroidal magnetic field reversal and wall conditioning. Possible contributors to the improved confinement include a reduction of core-resonant, global magnetic fluctuations and a reduction of electrostatic fluctuations over the entire plasma edge. One feature of these plasmas is a region of strong ExB flow shear in the edge. Never before observed in conjunction with enhanced confinement in the RFP, such shear is common in enhanced confinement discharges in tokamaks and stellarators. Another feature of these plasmas is a new type of discrete dynamo event. Like sawtooth crashes, a common form of discrete dynamo, these events correspond to bursts of edge parallel current. The reduction of electrostatic fluctuations in these plasmas occurs within and beyond the region of strong ExB flow shear, similar to what is observed in tokamaks and stellarators. However, the reductions in the MST include fluctuations whose correlation lengths are larger than the width of the shear region. The reduction of the global magnetic fluctuations is most likely due to flattening of the μ=μ 0 rvec J· rvec B/B 2 profile. Flattening can occur, eg, due to the new type of discrete dynamo event and reduced edge resistivity. Enhanced confinement plasmas are also achieved in the MST when auxiliary current is applied to flatten the μ profile and reduce magnetic fluctuations. Unexpectedly, these plasmas also exhibit a region (broader than in the case above) of strong ExB flow shear in the edge, an edge-wide reduction of electrostatic fluctuations, and the new type of discrete dynamo event. Auxiliary current drive has historically been viewed as the principal route to fusion reactor viability for the RFP

  2. Plasma-wall interaction and locked modes in the toroidal pinch experiment TPE-RX reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasqualini, D.; Martin, P.; Koguchi, H.; Yagi, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.; Spizzo, G.

    2006-01-01

    The MHD instabilities that sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration tend to phase-lock together and also to wall-lock, forming a bulging of the plasma column, called 'locked mode'. This phenomenon is of particular interest, since the locked mode causes a larger plasma resistivity, plasma cooling, and, in some cases, anomalous discharge termination. Up to now, studies of the locked mode have been focused on m=1 modes (being m the poloidal mode number). In this Letter we show that m=0 modes also play a role, based on the cross-check between magnetic spectra and toroidally resolved D α array measurements. (author)

  3. Initial reversed-field pinch experiments on ZT-40 and recent advances in RFP theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The ZT-40 reversed-field pinch (RFP) has been operated in several modes: (1) without reversed toroidal field, (2) with self reversal, and (3) with aided reversal. An analytic ohmic heating and ignition model both confirm and provide guidance for transport codes. Nondissipative formation schemes have been analyzed and ideal MHD stable evolution and burn scenarios have been found. Particle and fluid simulations have produced qualitative agreement with respect to the nonlinear behavior of m = 0 resistive g-modes. Helical ohmic reversed field states are produced by a 2-D dynamical simulation, and nonlinear analytic work describes the final state. A fast resistive MHD code for linear stability has clarified the relations between several kinds of resistive instabilities. Ballooning modes and g-modes in systems with arbitrary magnetic shear including resistivity and viscosity, have been studied in a unified treatment with growth rate vs wavenumber showing the existence of important cutoffs

  4. Effects of compressibility and heating in magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2009-01-01

    The reversed field pinch is studied using numerical simulations of the compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. Contrary to what has been done in previous works, the hypotheses of constant density and vanishing pressure are not used. Two cases are investigated. In the first case the pressure is derived from an adiabatic condition and in the second case the pressure equation includes heating terms due to resistivity and viscosity. The evolution of the reversal parameter and the production of single helicity or multiple helicity states are different in the two cases. The simulations show that the results are affected by compressibility and are very sensitive to hypotheses on heat production.

  5. Numerical modeling of formation of helical structures in reversed-field-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, N.; Ichiguchi, K.; Todo, Y.; Sanpei, A.; Oki, K.; Masamune, S.; Himura, H.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) simulations have been executed for the low-aspect-ratio reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasma to reveal the physical mechanism of the formation processes of helical structures. The simulation results show a clear formation of n=4 structure as a result of dominant growth of resistive modes, where n represents the toroidal mode number. The resultant relaxed helical state consists of a unique bean-shaped and hollow pressure profile in the poloidal cross section for both cases of resonant and non-resonant triggering instability modes. The results are partially comparable to the experimental observations. The physical mechanisms of those processes are examined. (author)

  6. Reynolds and Maxwell stress measurements in the reversed field pinch experiment Extrap-T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    The complete Reynolds stress (RS) has been measured in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. The RS exhibits a strong gradient in the region where a high E × B shear takes place. Experimental results show this gradient to be almost entirely due to the electrostatic contribution. This has been interpreted as experimental evidence of flow generation via turbulence mechanism. The scales involved in flow generation are deduced from the frequency decomposition of RS tensor. They are found related to magnetohydrodynamic activity but are different with respect to the scales responsible for turbulent transport.

  7. Reynolds and Maxwell stress measurements in the reversed field pinch experiment Extrap-T2R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsaaker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    The complete Reynolds stress (RS) has been measured in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. The RS exhibits a strong gradient in the region where a high E x B shear takes place. Experimental results show this gradient to be almost entirely due to the electrostatic contribution. This has been interpreted as experimental evidence of flow generation via turbulence mechanism. The scales involved in flow generation are deduced from the frequency decomposition of RS tensor. They are found related to magnetohydrodynamic activity but are different with respect to the scales responsible for turbulent transport

  8. Characteristics of a large reversed field pinch machine, TPE-RX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Hirano, Y.; Sekine, S.; Sakakita, H.; Koguchi, H.; Kiyama, S.; Maejima, Y.; Hirota, I.; Hayase, K.; Sato, Y.; Sugisaki, K.; Oyabu, I.; Hasegawa, M.; Yamane, M.; Sato, F.; Kuno, K.; Minato, T.; Kiryu, A.; Takagi, S.; Sako, K.; Kudough, F.; Urata, K.; Orita, J.; Kaguchi, H.; Sago, H.; Ue, K.

    1998-01-01

    Construction of a new, large reversed field pinch (RFP) machine called TPE-RX was complete at the end of 1997 as a successor of the previous TPE-1RM20 machine at the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL). RFP configuration has been successfully obtained in March 1998. The optimization of the operating condition and discharge cleaning of the wall are presently undergoing with the first physics experiments. This paper is the first report of TPE-RX especially on the goals, overall machine characteristics and the present status. Other papers accompanying with this one will present specific topics on the magnetic coil system and the vacuum vessel system. (author)

  9. Characteristics of a large reversed field pinch machine, TPE-RX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Hirano, Y.; Sekine, S.; Sakakita, H.; Koguchi, H.; Kiyama, S.; Maejima, Y.; Hirota, I.; Hayase, K.; Sato, Y.; Sugisaki, K. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Oyabu, I.; Hasegawa, M.; Yamane, M.; Sato, F.; Kuno, K.; Minato, T.; Kiryu, A.; Takagi, S.; Sako, K. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp. (Japan); Kudough, F.; Urata, K.; Orita, J.; Kaguchi, H.; Sago, H.; Ue, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Construction of a new, large reversed field pinch (RFP) machine called TPE-RX was complete at the end of 1997 as a successor of the previous TPE-1RM20 machine at the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL). RFP configuration has been successfully obtained in March 1998. The optimization of the operating condition and discharge cleaning of the wall are presently undergoing with the first physics experiments. This paper is the first report of TPE-RX especially on the goals, overall machine characteristics and the present status. Other papers accompanying with this one will present specific topics on the magnetic coil system and the vacuum vessel system. (author)

  10. Magnetic divertor design for the compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A recently completed design of a pumped-limiter-based Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor is used to estimate for the first time the impact of magnetic divertors. A range of divertor options for the low-toroidal-field RFP is examined, and a design selection is made constrained by consideration of field ripple (magnetic island), blanket displacement, recirculating power, cost, heat flux, and access. Design choices based on diversion of minority (toroidal) field lead to a preference for (poloidally) symmetric or bundle divertor geometries

  11. Data-acquisition system of the reversed field pinch device REPUTE-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, N.; Aoki, H.; Shinohara, H.; Toyama, H.; Morikawa, J.

    1988-01-01

    The new, compact data-acquisition system of the reversed field pinch device, REPUTE-1, is reported. Its distinctive feature is high flexibility and easy handling. The interface between the computer and measurement devices is CAMAC. The computer and the CAMAC devices are connected to a CAMAC byte serial highway that transmits setup parameters and acquisition data. The computer carries out setup of CAMAC devices and data acquisition automatically by use of CAMAC parameters and the acquisition data base. The maintenance tools for the data base are also provided. The computer system, which consists of a ''TOSBAC DS-600,'' has been in operation for REPUTE-1 since 1985

  12. Ion heating and MHD dynamo fluctuations in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, E.; Hokin, S.; Watts, C.; Mattor, N.

    1992-01-01

    Ion temperature measurements, time resolved to 10 μs, have been made in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch with a five channel charge exchange analyzer. The ion temperature, T i ∼ 200 eV for I = 350 kA, increases by as much as 100% during discrete dynamo bursts in MST discharges. Magnetic field fluctuations in the range 0.5--5 MHz were also measured. Structure in the fluctuation frequency spectrum at the ion cyclotron frequency appears as the bursts terminate, suggesting that the mechanism of ion heating involves the dissipation of dynamo fluctuations at ion gyro-orbit scales

  13. MHD computation of feedback of resistive-shell instabilities in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zita, E.J.; Prager, S.C.

    1992-05-01

    MHD computation demonstrates that feedback can sustain reversal and reduce loop voltage in resistive-shell reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. Edge feedback on ∼2R/a tearing modes resonant near axis is found to restore plasma parameters to nearly their levels with a close-fitting conducting shell. When original dynamo modes are stabilized, neighboring tearing modes grow to maintain the RFP dynamo more efficiently. This suggests that experimentally observed limits on RFP pulselengths to the order of the shell time can be overcome by applying feedback to a few helical modes

  14. Numerical studies of active current profile control in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, J-E; Scheffel, J; Anderson, J K

    2007-01-01

    Quenching of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) dynamo is observed in numerical simulations using current profile control. A novel algorithm employing active feedback of the dynamo field has been utilized. The quasi-steady state achieved represents an important improvement as compared with earlier numerical work and may indicate a direction for the design of future experiments. Both earlier and the novel schemes of feedback control result in quasi-single helicity states. The energy confinement time and poloidal beta are observed to be substantially increased, as compared with the conventional RFP, in both the cases. Different techniques for experimental implementation are discussed

  15. Activation and waste disposal of the TITAN RFP [reversed-field-pinch] reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Conn, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The TITAN-I lithium self-cooled and TITAN-II aqueous lithium nitrate solution-cooled fusion reactors are based on the reversed-field-pinch (RFP) toroidal confinement concept and operate at high power density with an 18.1 MW/m 2 neutron wall loading. These designs were analyzed to study the activation and waste disposal aspects of such high-power density reactors. It was found that because of the use of V-3Ti-1Si (TITAN-I) and reduced activation ferritic steel (TITAN-II) as structural alloys for the first wall, blanket, reflector, and shield components, all the TITAN components except the divertor collector plates can be classified as shallow-land burial (10CFR61 Class C or better) nuclear waste for disposal, provided that the impurity elements, niobium and molybdenum, can be controlled below about 1 and 0.3 appm levels, respectively. The average annual disposal masses were estimated to be 150 and 96 tonnes, respectively, for the 1,000 MW TITAN-I and TITAN-II reactors. This corresponds to about 11% of the total mass in the fusion power core of both reactors. The divertor collector plates are fabricated with tungsten because of its low particle sputtering properties. These divertor collector plates in the TITAN-I reactor will be qualified as Class C waste after 18.1 MW-y/m 2 operation. The waste disposal rating of the divertor collector plates in the TITAN-II reactor, however, is estimated to be a factor of 4 higher than allowed for Class C disposal, because of the soft neutron spectrum in the beryllium environment. The annual disposal mass of this non-Class C waste is 0.35 tons, about 0.04% of the average annual discharge mass for the TITAN-II reactor. An additional 74 m 3 annual discharge of Class C waste containing 14 C may be needed for the TITAN-II reactor because of the use of nitrate salt in the aqueous coolant as the tritium breeder. 13 refs., 6 tabs

  16. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity in characterising low-aspect-ratio reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onchi, T; Fujisawa, A; Sanpei, A; Himura, H; Masamune, S

    2017-01-01

    Permutation entropy and statistical complexity are measures for complex time series. The Bandt–Pompe methodology evaluates probability distribution using permutation. The method is robust and effective to quantify information of time series data. Statistical complexity is the product of Jensen–Shannon divergence and permutation entropy. These physical parameters are introduced to analyse time series of emission and magnetic fluctuations in low-aspect-ratio reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma. The observed time-series data aggregates in a region of the plane, the so-called C – H plane, determined by entropy versus complexity. The C – H plane is a representation space used for distinguishing periodic, chaos, stochastic and noisy processes of time series data. The characteristics of the emissions and magnetic fluctuation change under different RFP-plasma conditions. The statistical complexities of soft x-ray emissions and magnetic fluctuations depend on the relationships between reversal and pinch parameters. (paper)

  17. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-09-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4×1010cm-3 for a central electron density of 1×1013cm-3. Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20m2 s-1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ˜2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge.

  18. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-01-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4x10 10 cm -3 for a central electron density of 1x10 13 cm -3 . Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20 m 2 s -1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ∼2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge

  19. Characteristics of the TPE reversed-field pinch plasmas in conventional and improved confinement regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakita, H.; Asai, T.; Fiksel, G.; Yagi, Y.; Frassinetti, L.; Hayase, K.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Innocente, P.; Spizzo, G.; Terranova, D.; Sato, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the characteristics and experimental scaling laws of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas, which are obtained from the recently established toroidal pinch experiment (TPE) database. The database contains information for approximately 1500 discharges consistently selected from four TPE RFP devices, and covers two decades of RFP experiments under conventional operating conditions at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. We present the physics of the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges in the TPE-RX RFP device, and a comparison of the improved energy confinement time in PPCD, τ E P PCD , with τ E s caling as the reference scaling law (τ E s caling ∼ a 1.63 (I P 0.78 (I P /N) 0.33 Θ 2.97 ) in the TPE database, is attempted. The result shows that τ E P PCD agrees well with τ E s caling because of the strong pinch parameter dependence on the TPE scaling law. A potential improved confinement mode in the quasi-single-helicity (QSH) state is also investigated in TPE-RX, with respect to the operation conditions under which the QSH spontaneously appears in the core region, where a typical island structure is observed by means of soft Xray tomography. (author)

  20. Current-driven instabilities of the kinetic shear Alfven wave: Application to reversed field pinches and spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Perkins, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave is studied in a cylindrical force-free plasma with self-consistent magnetic fields. This equilibrium represents a reversed field pinch or a spheromak. The stability of the wave is found to depend on the ratio of the electron drift velocity to the Alfven velocity. This ratio varies inversely with the square root of the plasma line density. The critical line density using the Spitzer--Harm electron distribution function is found for reversed field pinches with deuterium plasmas to be approximately 2 x 10 18 and is 5 x 10 17 m -1 in spheromaks with hydrogen plasmas. The critical line density is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for reversed field pinches

  1. Comparison study of toroidal-field divertors for a compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two divertor configurations for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) based on diverting the minority (toroidal) field have been reported. A critical factor in evaluating the performance of both poloidally symmetric and bundle divertor configurations is the accurate determination of the divertor connection length and the monitoring of magnetic islands introduced by the divertors, the latter being a three-dimensional effect. To this end the poloidal-field, toroidal-field, and divertor coils and the plasma currents are simulated in three dimensions for field-line tracings in both the divertor channel and the plasma-edge regions. The results of this analysis indicate a clear preference for the poloidally symmetric toroidal-field divertor. Design modifications to the limiter-based CRFPR design that accommodate this divertor are presented

  2. Effects of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of a Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2010-01-01

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  3. Temperature evolution in a magnetohydrodynamics simulation of a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2010-01-01

    The temperature evolution in a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of a reversed-field pinch (RFP) is investigated including thermal conductivity. For numerical reasons, an isotropic thermal conductivity is used, even though in a RFP plasma the parallel conductivity is much larger than the perpendicular one so that magnetic field lines tend to become isothermal. The system shows alternating multiple helicity states and quasi-single helicity states. Single-helical-axis states are formed when the amplitude of the dominant mode is above a determined threshold, as observed in experiments. The relation between heat transport and magnetic field topology that is observed in RFP experiments cannot be found in the simulation, since thermal conductivity is independent of the magnetic field. This difficulty should be taken into account in the numerical investigation of the RFP dynamics. In this paper, the first description of the temperature evolution in a compressible MHD simulation of a RFP is given.

  4. Role of anisotropic thermal conductivity in the reversed-field pinch dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2011-01-01

    Two compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the reversed-field pinch are performed, with isotropic and anisotropic thermal conductivity. We describe in detail the numerical method we use to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity, which makes magnetic field lines almost isothermal. We compare the results of the two simulations, showing that the anisotropic thermal conductivity causes the formation of a hot island when closed magnetic surfaces exist, while temperature becomes almost uniform when the magnetic field is chaotic. After a transient single-helicity state that is formed in the initial phase, a stationary state is reached where the RFP configuration exists in a multiple helicity state, even though the Hartmann number is below the threshold found in previous simulations for the formation of multiple helicity states.

  5. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities. (author)

  6. Reversed-field pinch experiments in EXTRAP T2R with a resistive shell boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Cecconello, M.; Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch has a resistive shell with a magnetic penetration time of 6 ms. This time is intermediate between the dynamo/relaxation cycle time scale (<2ms) and the pulse length (∼20ms). The resonant tearing modes do not wall-lock. They rotate with angular phase velocities in the range of 20 to 600 krad/s. As a result of the rotation the radial component of the perturbations at the shell from the resonant modes is suppressed. Non-resonant (resistive-wall) kink modes are unstable and their linear growth rates have been measured. The measured growth rates follow the trend expected from theoretical estimates for a range of equilibrium parameters. Furthermore, when the resonant modes are rotating, the loop voltage and confinement parameters have values comparable to those of a conducting shell RFP. The poloidal beta is around 10% for a range of current and density. (author)

  7. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-05-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities.

  8. Electrical design of a high current density air-core reversed-field pinch ''ZTP''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Cribble, R.F.; Melton, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the electrical design of a small, high current density (10 MA/m 2 ) toroidal reversed-field Z-Pinch (RFP) presently being constructed at Los Alamos. Special purpose magnetic field programs were used to calculate self and mutual inductances for the poloidal field windings. The network analysis program MINI-SCEPTRE was then used to predict plasma current, including the interaction between toroidal and poloidal field circuits, as described by the Bessel function model for RFP's. Using these programs, coil geometry was obtained for minimal field errors and the pulse power systems were optimized to minimize equilibrium control power. Results of computer modeling and implementation of the electrical circuits are presented

  9. Soft x-ray measurement of internal tearing mode structure in a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartas, G.; Hokin, S.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of internally resonant tearing modes has been studied in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch with a soft x-ray detector system consisting of an imaging array at one toroidal location and several detectors at different toroidal locations. The toroidal mode numbers of m = 1 structures are in the range n = -5, -6, -7. The modes propagate with phase velocity v = 1--6 x 10 6 cm/s, larger than the diamagnetic drift velocity v d ∼ 5 x 10 5 cm/s. Phase locking between modes with different n in manifested as a beating of soft x-ray signals which is found to be strongest near the resonant surfaces of the modes (r/a = 0.1 -- 0.5). 15 refs., 5 figs

  10. Confinement dynamics and boundary condition studies in the Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Ingraham, J.C.; Moses, R.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The study of confinement dynamics, including investigation of the boundary conditions required for plasma sustainment, are central to the development of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) concept. Recently, several insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation RFP electron and ion dynamics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and coupled role in RFP stability, sustainment, and confinement. In this paper, we summarize the results of confinement studies on the ZT-40M experiment, and boundary condition studies on the Wisconsin non-circular RFP experiment. A brief description of the newly commissioned Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) is also presented. 28 refs., 3 figs

  11. High beta plasma confinement and neoclassical effects in a small aspect ratio reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayase, K.; Sugimoto, H.; Ashida, H.

    2003-01-01

    The high β equilibrium and stability of a reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration with a small aspect ratio are theoretically studied. The equilibrium profile, high beta limit and the bootstrap current effect on those are calculated. The Mercier stable critical β decreases with 1/A, but β∼0.2 is permissible at A=2 with help of edge current profile modification. The effect of bootstrap current is evaluated for various pressure and current profiles and cross-sectional shapes of plasma by a self-consistent neoclassical PRSM equilibrium formulation. The high bootstrap current fraction (F bs ) increases the shear stabilization effect in the core region, which enhances significantly the stability β limit compared with that for the classical equilibrium. These features of small aspect ratio RFP, high β and high F bs , and a possibly easier access to the quasi-single helicity state beside the intrinsic compact structure are attractive for the feasible economical RFP reactor concept. (author)

  12. Magnetic islands at the field reversal surface in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsker, R.I.; Reiman, A.H.

    1985-09-01

    In the reversed field pinch (RFP), magnetic field perturbations having zero poloidal mode number and any toroidal mode number are resonant at the field reversal surface. Such perturbations are a particular threat to the RFP because of their weak radial dependence at low toroidal mode number, and because the toroidal field ripple is essentially of this type. The widths of the resulting islands are calculated in this paper. The self-consistent plasma response is included through the assumption that the plasma relaxes to a Taylor force-free state. The connection with linear tearing mode theory is established for those limits where arbitrarily large islands result from infinitesimal perturbations. Toroidal effects are considered, and application of the theory to RFP experiments is discussed

  13. Ohm close-quote s law for plasmas in reversed field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martines, E.; Vallone, F.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical relationship between current density and applied electric field in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas has been derived in the framework of the kinetic dynamo theory, that is assuming a radial field-aligned momentum transport caused by the magnetic field stochasticity. This Ohm close-quote s law yields current density profiles with a poloidal current density at the edge which can sustain the magnetic field configuration against resistive diffusion. The dependence of the loop voltage on plasma current and other plasma parameters for RFP experiments has been obtained. The results of the theoretical work have been compared with experimental data from the RFX experiment, and a good agreement has been found. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Electrical design of a high current density air-core reversed-field pinch ZTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Melton, J.G.; Gribble, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the electrical design of a small, high current density (10 MA/m 2 ) toroidal reversed-field Z-Pinch (RFP) presently being constructed at Los Alamos. Special purpose magnetic field programs were used to calculate self and mutual inductances for the poloidal field windings. The network analysis program MINI-SCEPTRE was then used to predict plasma current, including the interaction between toroidal and poloidal field circuits, as described by the Bessel function model for RFP's. Using these programs, coil geometry was obtained for minimal field errors and the pulse power systems were optimized to minimize equilibrium control power. Results of computer modeling and implementation of the electrical circuits are presented

  15. Edge-plasmas and wall protection in RFPs [Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Reverse-Field Pinch (RFP) has the ability to operate as a compact, moderate-to-high beta, high-power-density system. A compact system requires careful control of the particle and heat fluxes impinging on plasma-facing components. A strongly recycling, toroidal-field open divertor combined with a highly radiating (>90% of plasma heating power) core plasma is required. An open divertor configuration locates the plate near the field null to take advantage of the flux expansion and minimum poloidal asymmetries to minimize peak heat fluxes. The physics and engineering requirements are quantitatively discussed for an evolutionary sequence of impurity/ash-control schemes for AT-40M (0.4 MA) → ZT-P (0.08 MA) → ZTH (2-4 MA) → FTF/RFP (10 MA) → TITAN (18 MA). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Simulations of the lower-hybrid antenna in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Smithe, David; Kaufman, Michael; Goetz, John; Thomas, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Due to constraints inherent to a reversed-field pinch plasma configuration, an unusual launch structure—the interdigital line—was used for lower-hybrid current-drive experiments in the Madison Symmetric Torus. The antenna design and performance were analyzed using an array of codes (including RANT3D/AORSA1D-H, Microwave Studio and VORPAL). It was found that the voltage phasing was not the intended one. As a result, the parallel-wavenumber spectrum of the launched wave peaks at a value lower than desired, making the accessibility marginal. Further simulations demonstrated that the error can largely be corrected by either lowering the antenna operating frequency or shortening the length of the resonators. (paper)

  17. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-01-01

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the nτ vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with β = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 x 10 19 m -3 ) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size

  18. Thermal instabilities in the edge region of reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, J.; Mondt, J.P.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal stability of the edge region of reversed-field pinch configurations is analyzed within the context of a two-fluid model. Two major sources of instability are identified in combination with a parallel electric field: either an electron temperature gradient and/or a density gradient that leads to rapid growth (of several to many ohmic heating rates) over a region of several millimeters around the mode-rational surfaces in the edge region. The basic signature of both instabilities is electrostatic. In the case of the density gradient mode, the signature relies on the effects of electron compressibility, whereas the temperature gradient mode can be identified as the current-convective instability by taking the limit of zero diamagnetic drift, density gradient, thermal force, drift heat flux, and electron compressibility

  19. Measurement of core velocity fluctuations and the dynamo in a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Chapman, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma flow velocity fluctuations have been directly measured in the high temperature magnetically confined plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP). These measurements show that the flow velocity fluctuations are correlated with magnetic field fluctuations. This initial measurement is subject to limitations of spatial localization and other uncertainties, but is evidence for sustainment of the RFP magnetic field configuration by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. Both the flow velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are the result of global resistive MHD modes of helicity m = 1, n = 5--10 in the core of MST. Chord-averaged flow velocity fluctuations are measured in the core of MST by recording the Doppler shift of impurity line emission with a specialized high resolution and throughput grating spectrometer. Magnetic field fluctuations are recorded with a large array of small edge pickup coils, which allows spectral decomposition into discrete modes and subsequent correlation with the velocity fluctuation data

  20. A comprehensive theory of the equilibria in a tokamak and a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiyoda, Katsuji

    1996-01-01

    The equilibrium configuration of a tokamak is analysed by the equilibrium equations derived for analysing a reversed field pinch (RFP). The expressions of the magnetic field and the toroidal shift in the internal plasma region and the external vacuum region are obtained. The expressions in the vacuum region become the Shafranov's expressions, when the plasma-center coordinates is used. Discontinuities of the equilibrium quantities are considered. It is concluded that the equilibrium equations are applicable also to the tokamak plasma and that the difference of the equilibria between the tokamak and the RFP stems from the choices of the pressure and the toroidal current function. A feature of our theory is that any ordering to the safety factor is not imposed. (author)

  1. Role of magnetic reconnection phenomena in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The reversed-field pinch (RFP), an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement experiment, has physics rich in the area commonly called field line reconnection or merging. This paper reviews the topics where reconnection plays a vital role: (a) RFP formation and the phenomenon of self-reversal, (b) RFP sustainment in which the RFP configuration has been shown to be capable of maintaining itself for times much longer than earlier predictions from classical resistive MHD theory, (c) steady state current drive in which dynamo action and associated reconnection processes give rise to the possibility of sustaining the configuration indefinitely by means of low frequency ac modulation of the toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, (d) the effects of reconnection on the formation and evolution of the magnetic surfaces which are intimately related to the plasma containment properties. It appears that all phases of the RFP operation are intimately related to the reconnection and field regeneration processes similar to those encountered in space and astrophysics

  2. Importance of radial profiles in spectroscopic diagnostics applied to the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch

    OpenAIRE

    Gravestijn, Bob

    2003-01-01

    The determination of the plasma confinement propertiesdemand data as the electron temperature, the ionic and electrondensity profiles and the radiative emissivity profiles. Thefocus of this thesis is the importance of radial profiles inspectroscopic diagnostics applied to the EXTRAP-T2Rreversed-field pinch. EXTRAP-T2R is a resistive shell reversed-field pinch with amagnetic field shell penetration time much longer than therelaxation cycle time scale. Significant improvements inconfinement pro...

  3. Confinement characteristics of the TPE reversed field pinch plasmas and effects of the boundary configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Y.; Maejima, Y.; Zollino, G.

    2001-01-01

    Confinement characteristics of the TPE series reversed field pinch (RFP) machines, TPE-1RM15, TPE-1RM20 and TPE-1RM20mod, at Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL) are summarized. Especially data are synthesized in respect to the effects of the different boundary structures of the machines, where shell proximity and overlapped poloidal shell gaps by the multi-layered shell structure are featured. Comparison of the experimental results is shown in terms of the characteristics of magnetic fluctuations, global confinement properties in general, operation capability of the improved confinement in high pinch parameter (Q) discharges and locked mode events. Linear growth rate of the unstable modes as a function of the shell distance is numerically simulated. Understandings of RFP plasma physics have also made progress by the most recent intensive experiments on correlation studies between fast electrons and dynamo activities and measurement of the plasma and mode rotation. TPE-1RM20mod was shutdown in December 1996 and new RFP experiment has started in TPE-RX from March 1998. The new machine also succeeds the concept of the shell configuration of the TPE-1RM20. (author)

  4. A study of reversed field pinch experiments using a new programming mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Y.

    1979-08-01

    A new mode of external-field programming for setting up a reversed-field pinch (RFP) is tested in STP-1. It involves creating an initial plasma with a screw pinch followed by external-field reversal. The program is done carefully so as to satisfy the equilibrium relation with respect to the minor radius throughout the setting-up phase. Increase of the trapped flux in the plasma by a factor of two is consequently attained, as compared with previous usual programming mode. Actually, at a plasma current of 58 kA, a stable operation time of 13 μsec is achieved with a density of 3.5 x 10 15 cm -3 and a temperature of 20 eV. After 13 μsec stable operation time, the plasma is suddenly crashed down by a violent MHD instability. One dimensional stability analysis based on ideal MHD model is applied to the experimental results. It is found that the instability is m = 1 resistive tearing mode under the influence of viscosity. Using the new programming high current operation at 110 kA is done and results in higher plasma temperature and density of 40 eV and 4.5 x 10 15 cm -3 , respectively. The duration of stable discharge, however, is limited to about 10 μsec, in spite of the expected longer confinement time at the higher temperature. (author)

  5. Effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in reversed field pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.C.; Chu, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas are studied. Most RFP machines are equipped with one or more metal shells outside of the vacuum vessel. These shells have finite resistivities. The eddy currents induced in each of the shells contribute to the braking electromagnetic (EM) torque which slows down the plasma rotation. In this work we study the electromagnetic torque acting on the plasma (tearing) modes produced by a system of resistive shells. These shells may consist of several nested thin shells or several thin shells enclosed within a thick shell. The dynamics of the plasma mode is investigated by balancing the EM torque from the resistive shells with the plasma viscous torque. Both the steady state theory and the time-dependent theory are developed. The steady state theory is shown to provide an accurate account of the resultant EM torque if (dω/dt)ω -2 <<1 and the time scale of interest is much longer than the response (L/R) time of the shell. Otherwise, the transient theory should be adopted. As applications, the steady state theory is used to evaluate the changes of the EM torque response from the resistive shells in two variants of two RFP machines: (1) modification from Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) [Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)] to the modified RFX: both of them are equipped with one thin shell plus one thick shell; (2) modification from Extrap T2 to Extrap T2R [Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]: both of them are equipped with two thin shells. The transient theory has been applied numerically to study the time evolution of the EM torque during the unlocking of a locked tearing mode in the modified RFX

  6. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  7. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPIELMAN, RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999

  8. Transport simulations of the oscillating field current drive experiment in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardovelli, R.A.; Nebel, R.A.; Werley, K.A.; Miley, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD) is based on the premise that in order to sustain a relaxing Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) plasma, one needs only to supply magnetic helicity at the same rate it is consumed. The purpose of this work is to try to better understand the possible mechanisms underlying these relaxations within the context of different kinds of resistive MHD instabilities

  9. Simulation study of self-sustainment mechanism in reversed-field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Kanya; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1989-09-01

    3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are carried out in order to reveal the fundamental mechanism of the self-sustainment process in the reversed-field pinch plasma. It is confirmed that the RFP configuration is sustained in a cyclic process, where the MHD relaxation phase and the resistive diffusion phase appear cyclically and alternatively. In the MHD relaxation process, the RFP plasma approaches a Taylor's minimum energy state, but it departs from there in the diffusion process. In other words, since MHD relaxation processes periodically release excess magnetic energy accumulated in the resistive diffusion phase, RFP plasma can stay in the neighborhood of the minimum energy state. The mechanism of this cyclic process is disclosed. Namely, when at least two ideal kink (m = 1) modes becomes unstable, MHD relaxation can take place. This is because the MHD relaxation progresses through nonlinear reconnection of the m = 0 mode, which is driven by nonlinear coupling between the unstable kink modes. Therefore, self-sustainment processes can be achieved by the nonlinear effects of essentially the m = 0 and 1 modes. The quantitative dependence of the relaxation-diffusion cycle on the aspect ratio of the device is considered along with its dependence on the magnetic Reynolds, number. These results are consistent with recent experiments and indicate that a coherent oscillation, which is often observed in experiments, is necessary for self-sustainment. The influence of self-sustainment processes on particle confinement is briefly discussed. (author)

  10. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  11. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J. R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-11-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size.

  12. Scaling of confinement and profiles in the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch the diagnostic techniques for the measurement of electron density and temperature include; Thomson scattering which gives values at three radial positions in the core (r/a=0, 0.28, 0.56), Langmuir probes which give values at the edge (r/a>0.9) and interferometry which gives a line-averaged density. The empirical scaling of electron density and temperature including profile information with global plasma parameters has been studied. The density profile is subject to large variations, with an average parabolic shape when the density is low and flatter shapes when the density is increased. The change in the profile shape can be attributed to a shift in the penetration length of neutrals from the vicinity of the wall. The temperature scales roughly as I/n 1/2 where I is the plasma current and n is the density. The temperature profile is always quite flat with lower variations and there is a tendency for a flatter profile at higher temperatures. (author)

  13. Scaling of confinement and profiles in the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch the diagnostic techniques for the measurement of electron density and temperature include; Thomson scattering which gives values at three radial positions in the core (r/a = 0, 0.28, 0.56), Langmuir probes which give values at the edge (r/a > 0.9) and interferometry which gives a line-averaged density. The empirical scaling of electron density and temperature including profile information with global plasma parameters has been studied. The density profile is subject to large variations, with an average parabolic shape when the density is low and flatter shapes when the density is increased. The change in the profile shape can be attributed to a shift in the penetration length of neutrals from the vicinity of the wall. The temperature scales roughly as I/n1/2 where I is the plasma current and n is the density. The temperature profile is always quite flat with lower variations and there is a tendency for a flatter profile at higher temperatures.

  14. Self-Organisation and Intermittent Coherent Oscillations in the EXTRAP T2 Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Sallander, E.; Drake, J. R.

    Many reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments exhibit a coherent oscillatory behaviour that is characteristic of discrete dynamo events and is associated with intermittent current profile self-organisation phenomena. However, in the vast majority of the discharges in the resistive shell RFP experiment EXTRAP T2, the dynamo activity does not show global, coherent oscillatory behaviour. The internally resonant tearing modes are phase-aligned and wall-locked resulting in a large localised magnetic perturbation. Equilibrium and plasma parameters have a level of high frequency fluctuations but the average values are quasi-steady. For some discharges, however, the equilibrium parameters exhibit the oscillatory behaviour characteristic of the discrete dynamo events. For these discharges, the trend observed in the tearing mode spectra, associated with the onset of the discrete relaxation event behaviour, is a relative higher amplitude of m = 0 mode activity and relative lower amplitude of the m = 1 mode activity compared with their average values. Global plasma parameters and model profile calculations for sample discharges representing the two types of relaxation dynamics are presented.

  15. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, A.; Bergsaaker, H.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred MWm -2 . To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a LaB 6 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local Hα measurements and radial dependences, are presented. (author)

  16. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.; Bergsåker, H.

    1998-02-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred 0741-3335/40/2/011/img1. To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a 0741-3335/40/2/011/img2 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local 0741-3335/40/2/011/img3 measurements and radial dependences, are presented.

  17. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J.R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-01-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size

  18. Reversed-field pinch experiments in EXTRAP T2R with a resistive shell boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is operated with a resistive shell with a magnetic penetration time of 6 ms. This time is intermediate between the dynamo/relaxation cycle time scale (<1 ms) and the pulse length (= 20 ms). The internally-resonant tearing modes do not wall lock and exhibit natural rotation with velocities in the range of 20 to 600 krad/s. Under these conditions the radial component of the tearing mode perturbation at the shell is suppressed. Therefore the linear growth rates of the unstable, non-resonant, ideal (resistive-wall) kink modes can be observed even at very low amplitudes (0.01% of the equilibrium field). Both internally-non-resonant and externally non-resonant RW mode types are observed. The growth rates have been measured for a range of equilibrium current profile parameters and are compared with theoretical estimates. Previous observations and simulations for the resistive-shell RFP have shown an increased loop voltage associated with altered dynamo dynamics. When the tearing modes are rotating, the loop voltage and confinement parameters have values comparable to those of a conducting-shell RFP. (author)

  19. Cost-constrained design point for the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    A broad spectrum of Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) operating modes are compared on an economics basis. An RFPR with superconducting coils and an air-core poloidal field transformer optimizes to give a minimum cost system when compared to normal-conducting coils and the iron-core transformer used in earlier designs. An interim design is described that exhibits a thermally stable, unrefueled, 21 s burn (burnup 50 percent) with an energy containment time equal to 200 times the Bohm time, which is consistent with present-day tokamak experiments. This design operates near the minimum energy state (THETA = B/sub THETA/(r/sub w/)/[B/sub z/] = 2.0 and F = B/sub z/(r/sub w/)/[B/sub z/] = 1.0 from the High Beta Model) of the RFP configuration. This cost-optimized design produces a reactor of 1.5-m minor radius and 12.8-m major radius, that generates 1000 MWe (net) with a recirculating power fraction of 0.15 at a direct capital cost of 970 $/kWe

  20. Ion heating and MHD dynamo fluctuations in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, E.E.

    1992-05-01

    Ion temperature measurements, time resolved to 10 μs, have been made in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) with a five channel charge exchange analyzer. The characteristic anomalously high ion temperature of RFP discharges has been observed in the MST. The evolution of the ion and electron temperature, as well as density and charge exchange power loss, were measured for a series of reproducible discharges. The ion heating expected from collisional processes with the electrons is calculated and shown too small to explain the measured ion temperatures. The charge exchange determined ion temperature is also compared to measurements of the thermally broadened CV 227.1 nm line. The ion temperature, T i ∼ 250 eV for I = 360 kA, increases by more than 100% during discrete dynamo bursts in MST discharges. Magnetic field fluctuations in the range 0.5 endash 5 MHz were also measured during the dynamo bursts. Structure in the fluctuation frequency spectrum at the ion cyclotron frequency appears as the bursts terminate, suggesting that the mechanism of ion heating involves the dissipation of dynamo fluctuations at ion cyclotron frequencies. Theoretical models for ion heating are reviewed and discussed in light of the experimental results. Similar electron heating mechanisms may be responsible for the discrepancy between measured and expected loop voltages in the RFP. The electrons, as well as the ions, may be heated by turbulent mechanisms, and a RFP energy budget including such phenomena is described

  1. Toroidal magnetic field system for a 2-MA reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, J.G.; Linton, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering design of the toroidal magnetic field (TF) system for a 2-MA Reversed-Field Pinch experiment (ZT-H) is described. ZT-H is designed with major radius 2.15 meters, minor radius 0.40 meters, and a peak toroidal magnetic field of 0.85 Tesla. The requirement for highly uniform fields, with spatial ripple <0.2% leads to a design with 72 equally spaced circular TF coils, located at minor radius 0.6 meters, carrying a maximum current of 9.0 MA. The coils are driven by a 12-MJ capacitor bank which is allowed to ring in order to aid the reversal of magnetic field. A stress analysis is presented, based upon calculated hoop tension, centering force, and overturning moment, treating these as a combination of static loads and considering that the periodic nature of the loading causes little amplification. The load transfer of forces and moments is considered as a stress distribution resisted by the coils, support structures, wedges, and the structural shell

  2. Control of nonlinear systems using periodic parametric perturbations with application to a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirus, K.A.

    1998-06-01

    In this thesis, the possibility of controlling low- and high-dimensional chaotic systems by periodically driving an accessible system parameter is examined. This method has been carried out on several numerical systems and the MST Reversed Field Pinch. The numerical systems investigated include the logistic equation, the Lorenz equations, the Roessler equations, a coupled lattice of logistic equations, a coupled lattice of Lorenz equations, the Yoshida equations, which model tearing mode fluctuations in a plasma, and a neural net model for magnetic fluctuations on MST. This method was tested on the MST by sinusoidally driving a magnetic flux through the toroidal gap of the device. Numerically, periodic drives were found to be most effective at producing limit cycle behavior or significantly reducing the dimension of the system when the perturbation frequency was near natural frequencies of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the attractor of the unperturbed system. Several different unstable periodic orbits have been stabilized in this way for the low-dimensional numerical systems, sometimes with perturbation amplitudes that were less than 5% of the nominal value of the parameter being perturbed. In high-dimensional systems, limit cycle behavior and significant decreases in the system dimension were also achieved using perturbations with frequencies near the natural unstable periodic orbit frequencies. Results for the MST were not this encouraging, most likely because of an insufficient drive amplitude, the extremely high dimension of the plasma behavior, large amounts of noise, and a lack of stationarity in the transient plasma pulses

  3. Control of nonlinear systems using periodic parametric perturbations with application to a reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirus, Kevin A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibility of controlling low- and high-dimensional chaotic systems by periodically driving an accessible system parameter is examined. This method has been carried out on several numerical systems and the MST Reversed Field Pinch. The numerical systems investigated include the logistic equation, the Lorenz equations, the Roessler equations, a coupled lattice of logistic equations, a coupled lattice of Lorenz equations, the Yoshida equations, which model tearing mode fluctuations in a plasma, and a neural net model for magnetic fluctuations on MST. This method was tested on the MST by sinusoidally driving a magnetic flux through the toroidal gap of the device. Numerically, periodic drives were found to be most effective at producing limit cycle behavior or significantly reducing the dimension of the system when the perturbation frequency was near natural frequencies of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the attractor of the unperturbed system. Several different unstable periodic orbits have been stabilized in this way for the low-dimensional numerical systems, sometimes with perturbation amplitudes that were less than 5% of the nominal value of the parameter being perturbed. In high-dimensional systems, limit cycle behavior and significant decreases in the system dimension were also achieved using perturbations with frequencies near the natural unstable periodic orbit frequencies. Results for the MST were not this encouraging, most likely because of an insufficient drive amplitude, the extremely high dimension of the plasma behavior, large amounts of noise, and a lack of stationarity in the transient plasma pulses.

  4. Observation of trapped-electron-mode microturbulence in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, J. R.; Williams, Z. R.; Brower, D. L.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Pueschel, M. J.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.

    2018-01-01

    Density fluctuations in the large-density-gradient region of improved confinement Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas exhibit multiple features that are characteristic of the trapped-electron mode (TEM). Core transport in conventional RFP plasmas is governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from multiple long-wavelength tearing modes. Using inductive current profile control, these tearing modes are reduced, and global confinement is increased to that expected for comparable tokamak plasmas. Under these conditions, new short-wavelength fluctuations distinct from global tearing modes appear in the spectrum at a frequency of f ˜ 50 kHz, which have normalized perpendicular wavenumbers k⊥ρs≲ 0.2 and propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. They exhibit a critical-gradient threshold, and the fluctuation amplitude increases with the local electron density gradient. These characteristics are consistent with predictions from gyrokinetic analysis using the Gene code, including increased TEM turbulence and transport from the interaction of remnant tearing magnetic fluctuations and zonal flow.

  5. Turbulence, transport, and zonal flows in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Z. R.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Hauff, T.

    2017-12-01

    The robustness and the effect of zonal flows in trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) are investigated from numerical solutions of the gyrokinetic equations with and without magnetic external perturbations introduced to model tearing modes. For simulations without external magnetic field perturbations, zonal flows produce a much larger reduction of transport for the density-gradient-driven TEM turbulence than they do for the ITG turbulence. Zonal flows are studied in detail to understand the nature of their strong excitation in the RFP and to gain insight into the key differences between the TEM- and ITG-driven regimes. The zonal flow residuals are significantly larger in the RFP than in tokamak geometry due to the low safety factor. Collisionality is seen to play a significant role in the TEM zonal flow regulation through the different responses of the linear growth rate and the size of the Dimits shift to collisionality, while affecting the ITG only minimally. A secondary instability analysis reveals that the TEM turbulence drives zonal flows at a rate that is twice that of the ITG turbulence. In addition to interfering with zonal flows, the magnetic perturbations are found to obviate an energy scaling relation for fast particles.

  6. Design and development of a lower-hybrid antenna for the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Cekic, M.; Lovell, T.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies strongly motivated the development of a radio-frequency current drive scheme for current density gradient reduction in the outer region of a reversed field pinch. The preliminary experiments using inductive current drive indicate that such current density profile modification reduces the magnetic fluctuation amplitude and related energy and particle losses. To test the theoretical predictions and to further improve confinement in the MST, the authors are planning a series of lower-hybrid wave experiments. The initial phase is the design and optimization of a low-power antenna to study slow wave propagation in a frequency range 2--3 f LH (200--300 MHz) with parallel index of refraction n parallel ∼10. Ray-tracing calculations, for typical MST plasma parameters, indicate that such a wave will spiral radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The antenna consists of an array of tunable loops arranged in the poloidal direction. The design is compatible with the existing box-port openings in the MST conductive shell to prevent additional magnetic field errors associated with large portholes. Antenna vacuum characteristics are studied on a test-stand designed to approximate the geometry of the MST shell. For the initial measurements of plasma response and antenna loading, the authors designed a reduced, easily insertable, vacuum antenna structure. The results of plasma impedance measurements will be compared with the numerical modeling results and incorporated in the optimized design of the antenna for wave propagation experiments

  7. Analysis of resistive tearing-mode in the reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Hiroshi; Masamune, Sadao; Hamuro, Eitaro; Tamaki, Reiji.

    1985-01-01

    As one of the methods of confining high temperature plasma by magnetic stress, attention has been paid to reversed field pinch (RFP). This RFP is the method of maintaining plasma pressure by combining the poloidal field generated by plasma current and the toroidal field having nearly same intensity, thus forming the toroidal shape, closed magnetic surface. As the typical RFP equipment, there have been TPE-1R(M), HBTX-1A, ZT-40M and OHTE, but in order to anticipate the further development, one of the problems is the resistive instability. In this study, the critical beta value determined by the tearing mode in RFP configuration was examined by analytical and numerical calculation methods. The position of a wall required for the stability was determined by solving a second order differential equation for a radial perturbed magnetic field. The propriety of the computer code for determining the position was examined. The magnetic field configuration having a finite beta value was determined, and its stability against a tearing mode was investigated. For this judgement of the stability, the developed computer code was used. The tearing mode in a Bessel function model, the tearing mode of a finite beta value and others are described. (Kako, I.)

  8. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of t d ≅10τ w is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system

  9. Tokamak-like confinement at high beta and low field in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J S; Anderson, J K; Biewer, T M; Brower, D L; Chapman, B E; Chattopadhyay, P K; Craig, D; Deng, B; Hartog, D J Den; Ding, W X; Fiksel, G; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; O'Connell, R; Prager, S C; Thomas, M A

    2003-01-01

    For several reasons, improved-confinement achieved in the reversed field pinch (RFP) during the last few years can be characterized as 'tokamak-like'. Historically, RFP plasmas have had relatively poor confinement due to tearing instability which causes magnetic stochasticity and enhanced transport. Tearing reduction is achieved through modification of the inductive current drive, which dramatically improves confinement. The electron temperature increases to >1 keV and the electron heat diffusivity decreases to approx. 5 m 2 s -1 , comparable with the transport level expected in a tokamak plasma of the same size and current. This corresponds to a 10-fold increase in global energy confinement. Runaway electrons are confined, and Fokker-Planck modelling of the electron distribution reveals that the diffusion at high energy is independent of the parallel velocity, uncharacteristic of stochastic transport. Improved-confinement occurs simultaneously with increased beta approx. 15%, while maintaining a magnetic field strength ten times weaker than a comparable tokamak. Measurements of the current, magnetic, and electric field profiles show that a simple Ohm's Law applies to this RFP sustained without dynamo relaxation

  10. Core fluctuations and current profile dynamics in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, D.L.; Ding, W.X.; Lei, J.

    2003-01-01

    First measurements of the current density profile, magnetic field fluctuations and electrostatic (e.s.) particle flux in the core of a high-temperature reversed-field pinch (RFP) are presented. We report three new results: (1) The current density peaks during the slow ramp phase of the sawtooth cycle and flattens promptly at the crash. Profile flattening can be linked to magnetic relaxation and the dynamo which is predicted to drive anti-parallel current in the core. Measured core magnetic fluctuations are observed to increases four-fold at the crash. Between sawtooth crashes, measurements indicate the particle flux driven by e.s. fluctuations is too small to account for the total radial particle flux. (2) Core magnetic fluctuations are observed to decrease at least twofold in plasmas where energy confinement time improves ten-fold. In this case, the radial particle flux is also reduced, suggesting core e.s. fluctuation-induced transport may play role in confinement. (3) The parallel current density increases in the outer region of the plasma during high confinement, as expected, due to the applied edge parallel electric field. However, the core current density also increases due to dynamo reduction and the emergence of runaway electrons. (author)

  11. Control of nonlinear systems using periodic parametric perturbations with application to a reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Kevin Andrew

    In this thesis, the possibility of controlling low- and high-dimensional chaotic systems by periodically driving an accessible system parameter is examined. This method has been carried out on several numerical systems and the MST Reversed Field Pinch. The numerical systems investigated include the logistic equation, the Lorenz equations, the Rossler equations, a coupled lattice of logistic equations, a coupled lattice of Lorenz equations, the Yoshida equations, which model tearing mode fluctuations in a plasma, and a neural net model for magnetic fluctuations on MST. This method was tested on the MST by sinusoidally driving a magnetic flux through the toroidal gap of the device. Numerically, periodic drives were found to be most effective at producing limit cycle behavior or significantly reducing the dimension of the system when the perturbation frequency was near natural frequencies of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the attractor of the unperturbed system. Several different unstable periodic orbits have been stabilized in this way for the low-dimensional numerical systems, sometimes with perturbation amplitudes that were less than 5% of the nominal value of the parameter being perturbed. In high- dimensional systems, limit cycle behavior and significant decreases in the system dimension were also achieved using perturbations with frequencies near the natural unstable periodic orbit frequencies. Results for the MST were not this encouraging, most likely because of an insufficient drive amplitude, the extremely high dimension of the plasma behavior, large amounts of noise, and a lack of stationarity in the transient plasma pulses.

  12. Self-organisation and intermittent coherent oscillations in the EXTRAP T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.A.; Sallander, E.; Drake, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Many reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments exhibit a coherent oscillatory behaviour that is characteristic of discrete dynamo events and is associated with intermittent current profile self-organisation phenomena. However, in the vast majority of the discharges in the resistive shell RFP experiment EXTRAP T2, the dynamo activity does not show global, coherent oscillatory behaviour. The internally resonant tearing modes are phase-aligned and wall-locked resulting in a large localised magnetic perturbation. Equilibrium and plasma parameters have a level of high frequency fluctuations but the average values are quasi-steady. For some discharges, however, the equilibrium parameters exhibit the oscillatory behaviour characteristic of the discrete dynamo events. For these discharges, the trend observed in the tearing mode spectra, associated with the onset of the discrete relaxation event behaviour, is a relative higher amplitude of m = 0 mode activity and relative lower amplitude of the m = 1 mode activity compared with their average values. Global plasma parameters and model profile calculations for sample discharges representing the two types of relaxation dynamics are presented

  13. ZT-P: an advanced air core reversed field pinch prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ZT-P experiment, with a major radius of 0.45 m and a minor radius of 0.07 m, was designed to prototype the next generation of reversed field pinch (RFP) machines at Los Alamos. ZT-P utilizes an air-core poloidal field system, with precisely wound and positioned rigid copper coils, to drive the plasma current and provide plasma equilibrium with intrinsically low magnetic field errors. ZT-P's compact configuration is adaptable to test various first wall and limiter designs at reactor-relevant current densities in the range of 5 to 20 MA/m 2 . In addition, the load assembly design allows for the installation of toroidal field divertors. Design of ZT-P began in October 1983, and assembly was completed in October 1984. This report describes the magnetic, electrical, mechanical, vacuum, diagnostic, data acquisition, and control aspects of the machine design. In addition, preliminary data from initial ZT-P operation are presented. Because of ZT-P's prototypical function, many of its design aspects and experimental results are directly applicable to the design of a next generation RFP. 17 refs., 47 figs

  14. Plasma-column instabilities in a reversed-field pinch without a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma column instabilities in a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) without a shell were investigated in the Colorado Reversatron RFP. The Reversatron RFP (aspect ration R/a = 50 cm/8cm) is a toroidal plasma containment device consisting of a vacuum chamber, a thick conducting shell, modular shells, magnetic field producing coils and diagnostics to characterize the plasma. RFP discharges were set up in the Reversatron in three different experimental configurations: with a thick conducting shell, with a modular shell and with no shell. In two of the configurations, a shell enclosed the plasma column to provide some plasma stability. A vertical magnetic field provided equilibrium in experiments without a shell. Data from discharges without a shell indicated that the plasma duration was greatly reduced and the plasma resistance increased compared to the discharges with a thick shell. Plasma position probes indicated large plasma centriod displacements corresponding to a n = 1 and a n = 3 kink coincident with the peak of the plasma current and the start of a discharge termination phase. The modular shell lengthened the discharge duration and lowered the plasma resistance to values intermediate between the plasma with a thick shell and the plasma with no shell. The modular shell suppressed the large plasma column displacements observed in the RFP plasma without a shell.

  15. Equilibrium poloidal-field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison between the approximate analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation for reversed-field-pinch (RFP) configurations is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal-field distribution at the conducting shell that surrounds the plasma is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the centre shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the gross equilibrium behaviour of an axisymmetric RFP discharge, as well as an effective tool for designing the poloidal-field systems of RFP experiments. (author)

  16. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given

  17. Plasma-column instabilities in a reversed-field pinch without a shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma column instabilities in a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) without a shell were investigated in the Colorado Reversatron RFP. The Reversatron RFP (aspect ration R/a = 50 cm/8cm) is a toroidal plasma containment device consisting of a vacuum chamber, a thick conducting shell, modular shells, magnetic field producing coils and diagnostics to characterize the plasma. RFP discharges were set up in the Reversatron in three different experimental configurations: with a thick conducting shell, with a modular shell and with no shell. In two of the configurations, a shell enclosed the plasma column to provide some plasma stability. A vertical magnetic field provided equilibrium in experiments without a shell. Data from discharges without a shell indicated that the plasma duration was greatly reduced and the plasma resistance increased compared to the discharges with a thick shell. Plasma position probes indicated large plasma centriod displacements corresponding to a n = 1 and a n = 3 kink coincident with the peak of the plasma current and the start of a discharge termination phase. The modular shell lengthened the discharge duration and lowered the plasma resistance to values intermediate between the plasma with a thick shell and the plasma with no shell. The modular shell suppressed the large plasma column displacements observed in the RFP plasma without a shell

  18. Electron transport in the stochastic fields of the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.-H.; Punjabi, A.

    1996-01-01

    We employ the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of anomalous transport developed by Punjabi and Boozer to calculate the particle diffusion coefficient for electrons in the stochastic magnetic fields of the reversed-field pinch (RFP). In the Monte Carlo calculations represented here, the transport mechanism is the loss of magnetic surfaces due to resistive perturbations. The equilibrium magnetic fields are represented by the Bessel function model for the RFP. The diffusion coefficient D is calculated as a function of a, the amplitude of the perturbation. We see three regimes as the amplitude of the tearing modes is increased: the Rechester-Rosenbluth regime where D scales as a 2 ; the anomalous regime where D scales more rapidly than a 2 ; and the Mynick-Krommes regime where D scales more slowly than a 2 . Inclusion of the effects of loop voltage on the particle drift orbits in the RFP does not affect the intervals in the amplitude a where these regimes operate. (Author)

  19. Blanket activation and afterheat for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.W.; Battat, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed assessment has been made of the activation and afterheat for a Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) blanket using a two-dimensional model that included the limiter, the vacuum ducts, and the manifolds and headers for cooling the limiter and the first and second walls. Region-averaged, multigroup fluxes and prompt gamma-ray/neutron heating rates were calculated using the two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates code TRISM. Activation and depletion calculations were performed with the code FORIG using one-group cross sections generated with the TRISM region-averaged fluxes. Afterheat calculations were performed for regions near the plasma, i.e., the limiter, first wall, etc. assuming a 10-day irradiation. Decay heats were computed for decay periods up to 100 minutes. For the activation calculations, the irradiation period was taken to be one year and blanket activity inventories were computed for decay times to 4 x 10 5 years. These activities were also calculated as the toxicity-weighted biological hazard potential (BHP). 15 refs

  20. Far-infrared laser interferometry measurements on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio.

    1993-09-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 μm was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of ∼10% for both chords during the current rising phase and ∼5% and ∼15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a ∼30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m=0 magnetic fluctuations, and a ∼90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M). (author)

  1. Generation and confinement of hot ions and electrons in a reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B E; Almagri, A F; Anderson, J K; Caspary, K J; Clayton, D J; Den Hartog, D J; Ennis, D A; Fiksel, G; Gangadhara, S; Kumar, S; Magee, R M; O'Connell, R; Parke, E; Prager, S C; Reusch, J A; Sarff, J S; Stephens, H D; Brower, D L; Ding, W X; Craig, D

    2010-01-01

    By manipulating magnetic reconnection in Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) discharges, we have generated and confined for the first time a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma with an ion temperature >1 keV and an electron temperature of 2 keV. This is achieved at a toroidal plasma current of about 0.5 MA, approaching MST's present maximum. The manipulation begins with intensification of discrete magnetic reconnection events, causing the ion temperature to increase to several kiloelectronvolts. The reconnection is then quickly suppressed with inductive current profile control, leading to capture of a portion of the added ion heat with improved ion energy confinement. Electron energy confinement is simultaneously improved, leading to a rapid ohmically driven increase in the electron temperature. A steep electron temperature gradient emerges in the outer region of the plasma, with a local thermal diffusivity of about 2 m 2 s -1 . The global energy confinement time reaches 12 ms, the largest value yet achieved in the RFP and which is roughly comparable to the H-mode scaling prediction for a tokamak with the same plasma current, density, heating power, size and shape.

  2. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  3. ExB flow shear and enhanced confinement in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B.E.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, J.K.; Chiang, C.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Stoneking, M.R.; Terry, P.W.

    1998-01-01

    Strong ExB flow shear occurs in the edge of three types of enhanced confinement discharge in the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field pinch. Measurements in standard (low confinement) discharges indicate that global magnetic fluctuations drive particle and energy transport in the plasma core, while electrostatic fluctuations drive particle transport in the plasma edge. This paper explores possible contributions of ExB flow shear to the reduction of both the magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations and, thus, the improved confinement. In one case, shear in the ExB flow occurs when the edge plasma is biased. Biased discharges exhibit changes in the edge electrostatic fluctuations and improved particle confinement. In two other cases, the flow shear emerges (1) when auxiliary current is driven in the edge and (2) spontaneously, following sawtooth crashes. Both edge electrostatic and global magnetic fluctuations are reduced in these discharges, and both particle and energy confinement improve. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  4. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on three dimensional equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munaretto, S., E-mail: smunaretto@wisc.edu; Chapman, B. E.; Nornberg, M. D.; Boguski, J.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The orientation of 3D equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field pinch can now be controlled with a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). Absent the RMP, the orientation of the stationary 3D equilibrium varies from shot to shot in a semi-random manner, making its diagnosis difficult. Produced with a poloidal array of saddle coils at the vertical insulated cut in MST's thick conducting shell, an m = 1 RMP with an amplitude b{sub r}/B ∼ 10% forces the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. This control has led to improved diagnosis, revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. With sufficient amplitude, the RMP also inhibits the generation of high-energy (>20 keV) electrons, which otherwise emerge due to a reduction in magnetic stochasticity in the core. Field line tracing reveals that the RMP reintroduces stochasticity to the core. A m = 3 RMP of similar amplitude has little effect on the magnetic topology or the high-energy electrons.

  5. Impact of helical boundary conditions on nonlinear 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veranda, M; Bonfiglio, D; Cappello, S; Chacón, L; Escande, D F

    2013-01-01

    Helical self-organized reversed-field pinch (RFP) regimes emerge both numerically—in 3D visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations—and experimentally, as in the RFX-mod device at high current (I P above 1 MA). These states, called quasi-single helicity (QSH) states, are characterized by the action of a MHD mode that impresses a quasi-helical symmetry to the system, thus allowing a high degree of magnetic chaos healing. This is in contrast with the multiple helicity (MH) states, where magnetic fluctuations create a chaotic magnetic field degrading the confinement properties of the RFP. This paper reports an extensive numerical study performed in the frame of 3D visco-resistive MHD which considers the effect of helical magnetic boundary conditions, i.e. of a finite value of the radial magnetic field at the edge (magnetic perturbation, MP). We show that the system can be driven to a selected QSH state starting from both spontaneous QSH and MH regimes. In particular, a high enough MP can force a QSH helical self-organization with a helicity different from the spontaneous one. Moreover, MH states can be turned into QSH states with a selected helicity. A threshold in the amplitude of MP is observed above which is able to influence the system. Analysis of the magnetic topology of these simulations indicates that the dominant helical mode is able to temporarily sustain conserved magnetic structures in the core of the plasma. The region occupied by conserved magnetic surfaces increases reducing secondary modes' amplitude to experimental-like values. (paper)

  6. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q fi ) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes

  7. Demonstration of Electron Bernstein Wave Heating in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Andrew H.

    The Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) presents an alternative to conventional electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in overdense plasmas, where electromagnetic waves are inaccessible. The first observation of rf heating in a reversed field pinch (RFP) using the EBW has been demonstrated on Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). The EBW propagates radially inward through a magnetic field that is either stochastic or has broken flux surfaces, before absorption on a substantially Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance (? = n*?_ce - k_parallel*v_parallel), where n is the harmonic number. Deposition depth is controllable with plasma current on a broad range (n=1-7) of harmonics. Novel techniques were required to measure the suprathermal electron tail generated by EBW heating in the presence of intense Ohmic heating. In the thick-shelled MST RFP, the radial accessibility of the EBW is limited to r/a > 0.8 ( 10 cm), where a=52cm is the minor radius, by magnetic field error induced by the porthole necessary for the antenna; accessibility in a thin-shelled device with actively controlled saddle coils (without the burden of substantial porthole field error) is likely to be r/a> 0.5 in agreement with ray tracing studies. Measured electron loss rates with falloff time constants in the 10s of micros imply a large, non-collisional radial diffusivity; collisional times with background particles are on the order of one millisecond. EBW-heated test electrons are used as a probe of edge (r/a > 0.9) radial transport, showing a modest transition from 'standard' to reduced-tearing RFP operation.

  8. Quantitative plasma spectroscopy in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedqvist, Anders

    1999-10-01

    The subject addressed in this thesis is quantitative plasma spectroscopy. Measurements of electron temperature and impurity ion density, performed at EXTRAP-T2, are aimed to investigate the effects of operating a reversed- field pinch with a resistive shell and a graphite wall. The spectroscopic measurements are analyzed with a collisional-radiative model and a consistency check is performed for the measurements and the model itself. The resistive shell results in wall-locked modes, enhanced plasma-wall interaction and degraded confinement. Measurements of vacuum ultraviolet resonant transitions of carbon and oxygen show that the local heating of the wall, at the position of the locking, leads to influxes of hydrogen and impurities, resulting in a cold and resistive plasma. Effects on the local scale are also observed. Spatially-resolved measurements of line emission originating from charge exchange collisions are used to investigate the change in neutral hydrogen profile. Temporal correlations between soft x-ray emission and poloidal loop voltage at the position of the wall-locked modes are observed and in connection, a decrease in central electron temperature, indicating there is a direct energy loss channel between the center and the edge. The hydrogen recycling properties of the graphite wall are investigated in an isotope exchange experiment. The density of the hydrogen isotopes are measured from spectral line emission and compared with recycling models. In charge exchange collisions between fully stripped chlorine and thermal deuterium, observed in JET plasmas, only a single n-level is populated. This is different from most ions and may be used to test models for calculating charge exchange collision cross-sections

  9. Reversed field pinch magnetic equilibrium and profile dynamics in Extrap T1-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, P.; Mazur, S.; Drake, J.R.

    1992-05-01

    An eight station insertable magnetic probe has been installed on the Extrap T1-U machine. The structure of the reversed field pinch magnetic equilibrium and the time evolution of the profiles has been studied. The probe was inserted into sustained high current density RFP plasma, typically 12-16 MA/m 2 on axis. When the probe was inserted there was a somewhat shorter pulse duration and a slightly decaying current. The magnetic field profiles are shift corrected and expressed in a cylindrically symmetric form. All quantities are then derived from cylindrically symmetric equations. In the beginning of the sustainment phase, where the best reproducibility is achieved, we have been able to obtain estimates of the pressure profile consistent with independent measurements of the central pressure. Values of βθ approx = 0.19 and approx = 0.09 are found leading to an estimation of the energy confinement time, with the probe inserted, of τε approx = 5 μs. Profiles of the effective parallel conductivity clearly indicates the presence of a 'dynamo mechanism' sustaining the field configuration. Higher Θ discharges usually exhibit large oscillations in the F-Θ plane. We find that these oscillations represents macroscopic redistribution of the current in the plasma. A cyclic process is found where the parallel current density (μ-profile) tends to peak in the center and then relax towards a flatter and broader configuration. Towards the end of the discharge there is an increasing fluctuation level along with an increasing V loop /I p - Here we find a relative increase in the current density in the edge region resulting in a hollow μ-profile. (au) (15 refs., 31 figs.)

  10. A global analysis of the behaviour of the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, J.A.; Baker, D.A.; Gribble, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data from the reversed field experiment, ZT-40M, have been re-examined in an attempt to determine the scaling behaviour of the physical plasma quantities and their fluctuations. A subset of the data is defined, allowing a reduced number of independent variables to described the behaviour. For flat-top ZT-40M discharges the independent variables are chosen as being the toroidal current, I φ , and the dimensionless pinch parameter, Θ, which is proportional to the ratio of the toroidal current to the toroidal magnetic flux. The amplitudes of the dependent variables, including the electron temperature, plasma resistance, toroidal flux, the ratio of I φ to the mean electron density and their fluctuation amplitudes, exhibit minima as functions of Θ for constant Iφ. These minima move towards lower Θ values with increasing I φ . Over the range of conditions for acceptable operation, the scaling of variables with I φ is not unique but depends on the variation of Θ as I φ increases. The Θ variation is governed by the specific conditions (such as constant poloidal beta, β p ) chosen to set the desired RFP operational constraints. Contour plots of the dependent variables versus the two independent variables, I φ and Θ, allow the determination of the Iφ-Θ trajectory that corresponds to discharges that meet the chosen condition. The analysis shows that the amplitude of the low frequency fluctuations correlates with the mean β p and energy confinement time of ZT-40M. By modifying the external circuits on ZT-40M, low frequency fluctuations were reduced. Comparing the designs of different RFP experiments and their operating behaviour, these modifications suggest design changes for present and future RFP experiments that will benefit their performance. (author). 90 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Momentum transport during reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritsyn, Alexey

    2008-11-01

    During reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch momentum parallel to the magnetic field is observed to be suddenly transported from the core to the edge. This occurs simultaneous with a surge in multiple resistive tearing instabilities. From measurements of the plasma flow and the forces arising from tearing instability (Maxwell and Reynolds stresses) we have established that tearing instabilities induce strong momentum transport. Comparison with nonlinear MHD computation of tearing fluctuations supports this conclusion, although it also indicates that effects beyond single-fluid MHD are likely to be important. The radial profile of the parallel velocity is reconstructed from a combination of diagnostics: Rutherford scattering of injected neutral atoms (for majority ions), charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (for minority ions), and Mach probes (for edge majority ion flow). Maxwell stress has been measured previously in the core by laser Faraday rotation, and both stresses are measured in the edge with probes. A surprising observation is that both the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are each ten times larger than needed to account for the observed momentum transport (i.e., larger than the inertial and viscous terms in the momentum balance equation). However, they are oppositely directed such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The large magnitude of the individual stresses is not predicted by MHD theory; the Maxwell stress also produces a Hall dynamo effect, implying that a two-fluid theory might be necessary for a complete description of momentum transport. To test further the relation between momentum transport and tearing fluctuations, momentum transport was measured perturbatively, by altering plasma rotation with inserted biased electrodes. Biasing is applied in plasmas with large tearing activity and improved confinement plasmas in which tearing activity is reduced by inductive current profile

  12. Movable limiter experiment on TPE-1RM15 reversed field pinch machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Toshio; Hirota, Isao; Maejima, Yoshiki; Hirano, Yoichi; Ogawa, Kiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Two movable limiters with a graphite head (35 mm Φ x 40 mm high) were installed in TPE-1RM15 reversed field pinch (RFP) machine. Measurement of the heat flux input to the movable limiters and the effect of the insertion of the limiter on plasma properties, as well as surface analyses of the graphite head after the exposure, were conducted. The heat flux input into the electron drift side of the limiter exceeded that from the ion drift side by factor of 4-6 at the maximum insertion of the limiters (10 mm inward from the shadow of the fixed limiters). This factor increased as the movable limiter protruded into the plasma, and this profile is attributed to the change of the pitch profile of the magnetic field line at the plasma periphery. At the maximum insertion of the two movable limiters, the energy input into a graphite head was about 10% of the joule input energy during the current sustainment phase. The one turn loop voltage and plasma resistance increased when the movable limiters were inserted beyond the shadow of the fixed limiters, and the increment of the joule input power roughly correlates with the increment of the loss power into the protruded movable limiters. Unbalanced position scanning showed that the relative distance of a movable limiter from the plasma column was not affected by another movable limiter installed 180 0 toroidally away from the former limiter. Fundamental surface analyses of the graphite head showed that deposition of metal impurities (Fe and Cr) was higher at the corner of the ion drift side than that of the electron shift side, and that the corner of the electron drift side was more roughened than the ion drift side. (orig.)

  13. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, James Tharp [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8-20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.

  14. Quantitative plasma spectroscopy in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedqvist, Anders

    1999-10-01

    The subject addressed in this thesis is quantitative plasma spectroscopy. Measurements of electron temperature and impurity ion density, performed at EXTRAP-T2, are aimed to investigate the effects of operating a reversed- field pinch with a resistive shell and a graphite wall. The spectroscopic measurements are analyzed with a collisional-radiative model and a consistency check is performed for the measurements and the model itself. The resistive shell results in wall-locked modes, enhanced plasma-wall interaction and degraded confinement. Measurements of vacuum ultraviolet resonant transitions of carbon and oxygen show that the local heating of the wall, at the position of the locking, leads to influxes of hydrogen and impurities, resulting in a cold and resistive plasma. Effects on the local scale are also observed. Spatially-resolved measurements of line emission originating from charge exchange collisions are used to investigate the change in neutral hydrogen profile. Temporal correlations between soft x-ray emission and poloidal loop voltage at the position of the wall-locked modes are observed and in connection, a decrease in central electron temperature, indicating there is a direct energy loss channel between the center and the edge. The hydrogen recycling properties of the graphite wall are investigated in an isotope exchange experiment. The density of the hydrogen isotopes are measured from spectral line emission and compared with recycling models. In charge exchange collisions between fully stripped chlorine and thermal deuterium, observed in JET plasmas, only a single n-level is populated. This is different from most ions and may be used to test models for calculating charge exchange collision cross-sections.

  15. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8--20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation

  16. Linear studies of resistive interchange modes in a cylindrical reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.; O'Neill, N.J.; Killeen, J.; Bonugli, R.J.; Ellis, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Resistive interchange modes in a cylindrical reversed field pinch are studied using a one-dimensional, linear, compressible initial value code. Separate equations for the electron and ion temperature perturbations are solved. Hall terms and the thermal force vector are included in Ohm's law. Anisotropic thermal conductivity and viscosity are included in the code model. Calculations are carried out for various values of poloidal and toroidal mode number, Lundquist number, Suydam parameter, Hall parameter, thermal conductivity, viscosity, etc., with respect to uniform density equilibria known to be stable to tearing modes. It is shown that in the cold ion limit sufficiently large Hall terms cause all modes that are tested to become stable. However for T/sub i/ = T/sub e/ and ignoring the effects of viscosity and thermal conductivity, there is a critical value of the ratio of Alfven to ion cyclotron frequency above which the ''even'' mode not only dominates the ''odd'' mode but is likely to have a growth rate significantly larger than that of the odd mode in the absence of Hall terms. Inclusion of a classical tensor thermal conductivity, while having little effect on the odd mode in the absence of Hall terms, does stabilize the even mode for sufficiently large Hall parameter. Inclusion of a classical tensor viscosity reduces the growth rate of (but does not necessarily stabilize) the odd mode. Inclusion of Hall and thermal force terms, tensor thermal conductivity and tensor viscosity causes all modes that are tested to stabilize. Results are compared to other contemporary studies

  17. Refueling and density control in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Watt, R.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Buechl, K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of pellet injection and gas puff refueling have been studied in the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch. Multiple deuterium pellets (≤ 6 x 10 19 D atoms/pellet) with velocities ranging from 300 to 700 m/sec have been injected into plasmas with n-bar/sub e/ ∼1 to 5 X 10 19 m -3 , I/sub phi/ ∼100 to 250 kA, T/sub e/(0) ∼150 to 300 eV and discharge durations of ≤ 20 msec. Photographs and an array D/sub α/ detectors show substantial deflection of the pellet trajectory in both the poloidal and toroidal planes, due to asymmetric ablation of the pellet by electrons streaming along field lines. To compensate for the poloidal deflection, the injector was moved up +14 cm off-axis, allowing the pellets to curve down to the midplane. In this fashion, central peaking of the pellet density deposition profile can be obtained. Both electron and ion temperatures fall in response to the density rise, such that β/sub θ/(β/sub θ/ identical to n-bar/sub e/(T/sub e/(0) + T/sub i/)/(B/sub θ/(a)) 2 ) remains roughly constant. Energy confinement is momentarily degraded, and typically a decrease in F (F identical to B/sub phi/(a)/(B/sub phi/)) is seen as magnetic energy is converted to plasma energy when the pellet ablates. As a result of pellet injection at I/sub phi/ = 150 kA we observe T/sub e/(0) α n-bar/sub e//sup -.9 +- .1/, while the helicity based resistivity eta/sub k/ transiently varies as n-bar/sub e//sup .7 +- .1/. While the achievement of center-peaked density profiles is possible with pellet injection, gas puffing at rates strong enough to show a 50% increase in n-bar/sub e/ over a period of 10 msec (∼150 torr-litres/sec) leads to hollow density profiles. The refueling requirements for parameters expected in the next generation RFPs (ZTH, RFX) can be extrapolated from these data using modified tokamak pellet ablation codes

  18. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann

    2003-06-01

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium in magnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequently susceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven by the free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressure gradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect the particle, momentum and heat confinement properties of the configuration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the most important modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies are carried out on plasmas in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. One phenomenon commonly observed in RFPs is mode wall locking. The localized nature of these phase- and wall locked structures results in localized power loads on the wall which are detrimental for confinement. A detailed study of the wall locked mode phenomenon is performed based on magnetic measurements from three RFP devices. The two possible mechanisms for wall locking are investigated. Locking as a result of tearing modes interacting with a static field error and locking due to the presence of a non-ideal boundary. The characteristics of the wall locked mode are qualitatively similar in a device with a conducting shell system (TPE-RX) compared to a device with a resistive shell (Extrap T2). A theoretical model is used for evaluating the threshold values for wall locking due to eddy currents in the vacuum vessel in these devices. A good correlation with experiment is observed for the conducting shell device. The possibility of successfully sustaining discharges in a resistive shell RFP is introduced in the recently rebuilt device Extrap T2R. Fast spontaneous mode rotation is observed, resulting in low magnetic fluctuations, low loop voltage and improved confinement. Wall locking is rarely observed. The low tearing mode amplitudes allow for the theoretically predicted internal non-resonant on-axis resistive wall modes to be observed. These modes have not previously been distinguished due to the formation of wall

  19. Properties of the edge plasma in the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, N; Spolaore, M; Serianni, G; Bergsaker, H; Antoni, V; Drake, J R

    2002-01-01

    The edge region of the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment has been investigated using Langmuir probes. Radial profiles of main plasma parameters are obtained and compared with those of the previous device Extrap-T2. The spontaneous setting up of a double shear layer of ExB toroidal velocity is confirmed. The particle flux induced by electrostatic fluctuations is calculated and the resulting effective diffusion coefficient is consistent with the Bohm estimate. A close relationship between electrostatic fluctuations at the edge and non-linear coupling of MHD modes in the core is found

  20. Properties of the edge plasma in the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Bergsåker, H.; Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    The edge region of the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment has been investigated using Langmuir probes. Radial profiles of main plasma parameters are obtained and compared with those of the previous device Extrap-T2. The spontaneous setting up of a double shear layer of E×B toroidal velocity is confirmed. The particle flux induced by electrostatic fluctuations is calculated and the resulting effective diffusion coefficient is consistent with the Bohm estimate. A close relationship between electrostatic fluctuations at the edge and non-linear coupling of MHD modes in the core is found.

  1. Behavior of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakita, Hajime; Craig, Darren; Anderson, Jay K.; Chapman, Brett E.; Den-Hartog, Daniel J.; Prager, Stewart C.; Biewer, Ted M.; Terry, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on passive measurements of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. During PPCD, the electron temperature increased and a sudden reduction of magnetic fluctuations was observed. For this change, we have studied whether plasma velocity is affected. Plasma rotation is observed to decrease during PPCD. From measurements of line intensities for several impurities at 10 poloidal chords, it is found that the impurity line emission shifts outward. The ion temperature of impurities is reasonably connected to that measured by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy from core to edge. (author)

  2. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  3. Fusion with Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.

    1998-06-01

    In the past thirty-six months, great progress has been made in x-ray production using high-current z-pinches. Today, the x-ray energy and power output of the Z accelerator (formerly PBFA-II) is the largest available in the laboratory. These z-pinch x-ray sources have the potential to drive high-yield ICF reactions at affordable cost if several challenging technical problems can be overcome. In this paper, the recent technical progress with Z-pinches will be described, and a technical strategy for achieving high-yield ICF with z-pinches will be presented

  4. Analytical study of a reversed-field pinch with rectangular cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng

    1990-01-01

    An analyic solution of the force-free equation for a toroidal configuration of rectangular cross section is presented. It is shown that the critical value of contraction ratio for the appearance of a reversed field as well as of the ohmic current increases as the elongation of the cross section increases

  5. Ultra-low q and reversed field pinch experiments in Extrap T1 with a resistive shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Drake, J.R.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.

    1991-02-01

    The Extrap T1 device is a high aspect ratio toroidal pinch with the dimensions R/a = 0.5 m/0.057 m. In the experiments described here, the stainless steel bellows vacuum vessels was surrounded by a resistive shell with a perpendicular field penetration time of 75 μs. The ULQ discharges, with toroidal currents in the range 20-50 kA and pulse lengths up to 2 ms, showed the typical step-wise decay of the plasma current. The current steps corresponded to transitions of the edge q-value across rational values 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, and 1. During a step through a rational q value, there was an increase in the fluctuation activity and a corresponding increase in the plasma resistance. As part of the ULQ studies, discharges with four poloidal field nulls were produced by applying an octupole magnetic field, thus demonstrating that it is possible to sustain ULQ equilibria with poloidal field x-points and a magnetic separatix. In another study, the transition from ULQ discharges to relaxed state discharges was investigated. When the initial bias toroidal field was reduced so that q was less than about 1/6, which corresponded to a pinch parameter of about 0.6, a change in the discharge character was observed. The loop voltage required to sustain a given current increased and stochastic fluctuations were seen. Toroidal flux was generated and relaxed state equilibira developed. For higher pinch parameter, in the range of 1.5 to 2.0, a reversed field pinch could be set up if the toroidal field power supply provided a reversed current in the coils. The plasma resistivity was again lower and the pulse lengths in the RFP mode were up to 1 ms, corresponding to over 10 shell penetration times. (au)

  6. Collisional-radiative models for hydrogen-like and helium-like carbon and oxygen ions and applications to experimental data from the TS Tokamak and the reversed field pinch RFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraro, L.; Sattin, F.; Puiatty, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Mattioli, M.; Demichelis, C.; Mandl, W. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Collisional radiative models (CRM) are needed to simulate experimental line brightnesses and emissivities from fusion devices. CRM are built for H-like and He-like carbon and oxygen ions. The impurity ion radial distribution is obtained using a transport code with two radius dependent transport parameters: a diffusion coefficient D and an inward convection velocity V. Examples are given of the quantitative interpretation of experimental spectroscopic data from two fusion devices: the Tore Supra Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch RFX. (K.A.). 60 refs.

  7. Collisional-radiative models for hydrogen-like and helium-like carbon and oxygen ions and applications to experimental data from the TS Tokamak and the reversed field pinch RFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraro, L.; Sattin, F.; Puiatty, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Mattioli, M.; Demichelis, C.; Mandl, W.

    1996-07-01

    Collisional radiative models (CRM) are needed to simulate experimental line brightnesses and emissivities from fusion devices. CRM are built for H-like and He-like carbon and oxygen ions. The impurity ion radial distribution is obtained using a transport code with two radius dependent transport parameters: a diffusion coefficient D and an inward convection velocity V. Examples are given of the quantitative interpretation of experimental spectroscopic data from two fusion devices: the Tore Supra Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch RFX. (K.A.)

  8. Start-up assist by magnetized plasma flow injection in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)]. E-mail: asai@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji (Japan); Koguchi, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Sakakita, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Yambe, K. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Kiyama, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A reversed-field pinch (RFP) start-up assisted by a magnetized plasma flow injection was demonstrated for the first time on a TPE-RX machine. This sequence of experiments aimed to establish a new method of ionization, gas-fill and helicity injection in the start-up phase of an RFP. In this start-up method, magnetized and well-ionized plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and injected into the torus chamber as an initial pre-ionized plasma for RFP formation. In the initial experiments, attenuated density pump-out and comparatively slow decay of the toroidal flux and plasma current were observed as evidence of its being an effective start-up method.

  9. Comparison of confinement in resistive-shell reversed-field pinch devices with two different magnetic shell penetration times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravestijn, R M; Drake, J R; Hedqvist, A; Rachlew, E

    2004-01-01

    A loop voltage is required to sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibrium. The configuration is characterized by redistribution of magnetic helicity but with the condition that the total helicity is maintained constant. The magnetic field shell penetration time, τ s , has a critical role in the stability and performance of the RFP. Confinement in the EXTRAP device has been studied with two values of τ s , first (EXTRAP-T2) with tau s of the order of the typical relaxation cycle timescale and then (EXTRAP-T2R) with τ s much longer than the relaxation cycle timescale, but still much shorter than the pulse length. Plasma parameters show significant improvements in confinement in EXTRAP-T2R. The typical loop voltage required to sustain comparable electron poloidal beta values is a factor of 3 lower in the EXTRAP-T2R device. The improvement is attributed to reduced magnetic turbulence

  10. Effect of double-shell structure on reduction of field errors in the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.; Masamune, S.; Nagata, A.; Arimoto, H.; Oshiyama, H.; Sato, K.I.

    1988-08-01

    Reversed-field pinch (RFP) operation on STP-3 (M) proved that the adition of a quasistational vertical field B sub(perpendicular) together with large reduction of irregular magnetic field at the shell gap could remarkably improve properties of the plasma confinement. Here, the gaps of a thick shell is wholely covered with the single primary coil having a shell shape. The measured field error at the gap is as small as 7.5 % of the poloidal field. The application of B sub(perpendicular) sets the plasma at a more perfect equilibrium. In this operation, the plasma resistivety much decreased by a factor 2 and the electron temperature rose up to 0.8 keV. (author)

  11. Compact and lightweight support platform with electromagnetic disturbance elimination for interferometer on reversed field pinch Keda Torus eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhe; Yuan, Peng; Zheng, Jian; Ding, Weixing; Li, Hong; Lan, Tao; Liu, Adi; Liu, Wandong; Xie, Jinlin

    2016-11-01

    A compact and lightweight support platform has been used as a holder for the interferometer system on the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX), which is a reversed field pinch device. The vibration caused by the interaction between the time-varying magnetic field and the induced current driven in the metal optical components has been measured and, following comparison with the mechanical vibration of the KTX device and the refraction effect of the ambient turbulent air flow, has been identified as the primary vibration source in this case. To eliminate this electromagnetic disturbance, nonmetallic epoxy resin has been selected as the material for the support platform and the commercially available metal optical mounts are replaced. Following these optimization steps and mechanical reinforcements, the stability of the interferometer platform has improved significantly. The phase shift caused by the vibration has been reduced to the level of background noise.

  12. END effects on the n = 2 rotational instability in the reversed field theta-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Y.; Wu, Ch.; Himeno, S.; Hirano, K.

    1981-07-01

    It is observed that n = 2 rotational mode which appears in the field reversed configuration created by a theta-pinch can be stabilized if the ejected plasmas from the ends are guided out to the far ends of the apparatus by long axial solenoidal fields. This is understood from the fact that endshorting becomes no longer possible before the ejecting plasma tips reach to the ends. Measurement of plasma rotations just outside the separatrix suggests that both preferential diffusion loss and endshorting play a very important role for the n = 2 mode. (author)

  13. ZTI: Preliminary characterization of an ignition class reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary cost-optimized conceptual design of an intermediate-step, ignition-class RFP device (ZTI) for the study of alpha-particle physics in a DT plasma is reported. The ZTI design reflects potentially significant cost savings relative to similar ignition-class tokamaks for device parameters that reside on the path to a viable commercial RFP reactor. Reductions in both device costs and number of steps to commercialization portend a significantly reduced development cost for fusion. The methodology and result and coupling realistic physics, engineering, and cost models through a multi-dimensional optimizer are reported for ZTI, which is a device that would follow the 2--4 MA ZTH on a approx-gt 1996--98 timescale. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Error field assessment from driven rotation of stable external kinks at EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2013-04-01

    A new non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch. Stable and marginally stable external kink modes of toroidal mode number n = 10 and n = 8, respectively, were generated, and their rotation sustained, by means of rotating magnetic perturbations of the same n. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the kink modes were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude. This behaviour was used to precisely infer the amplitude and approximately estimate the toroidal phase of the EF. A subsequent scan permitted to optimize the toroidal phase. The technique was tested against deliberately applied as well as intrinsic EFs of n = 8 and 10. Corrections equal and opposite to the estimated error fields were applied. The efficacy of the error compensation was indicated by the increased discharge duration and more uniform mode rotation in response to a uniformly rotating perturbation. The results are in good agreement with theory, and the extension to lower n, to tearing modes and to tokamaks, including ITER, is discussed.

  15. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  16. An energy confinement study of the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch using a Thomson scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.

    1989-11-01

    Thomson scattering measurements of the central electron temperature and density during the plasma current peak have been performed on the MST Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). This Thomson scattering diagnostic was calibrated for absolute electron density measurements. These measurements of T e and n e , when combined with profile assumptions, were used to calculate estimates of energy confinement time (τ E ) and poloidal beta (β θ ). A standard discharge with I p ∼ 400 kA, F ∼ -0.1, and θ ∼ 1.6 typically exhibited T e ∼ 275 eV, n e ∼ 2.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , τ E ≤ 1 ms, and β θ ≤ 8%. The results of a limited plasma current scaling study did not indicate a strong scaling of T e or τ E with I p . The Thomson scattering diagnostic was used in conjunction with a bolometer, VUV radiation monitor, and edge magnetic coils to study the loss of energy from the plasma. Results indicate that thermal transport from stochastic magnetic fields, particle loss, and radiation are important energy loss processes. The experiments done for this study included an F-scan, a paddle limiter insertion series, and an argon doping series. The plasma maintained a constant βτ during these perturbation experiments, suggesting that increases in one energy loss channel are compensated by drops in other channels and increases in input power to the plasma

  17. Two-fluid and nonlinear effects of tearing and pressure-driven resistive modes in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirnov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale tearing instabilities have long been considered to underlie transport and dynamo processes in the reversed field pinch (RFP). The vast majority of theoretical and computational RFP work has focused on pressureless, single-fluid MHD in cylindrical plasmas driven solely by a toroidal electric field. We report results of five investigations covering two-fluid dynamos, toroidal nonlinear MHD computation, nonlinear computation of Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD), the effect of shear flow on tearing instability, and the effect of pressure on resistive instability. The key findings are: (1) two-fluid dynamo arising from the Hall term is much larger than the standard MHD dynamo present in a single-fluid treatment, (2) geometric coupling from toroidicity precludes the occurrence of laminar single helicity states, except for nonreversed plasmas, (3) OFCD, a form of AC helicity injection, can sustain the RFP plasma current, although magnetic fluctuations are enhanced, (4) edge shear flow can destabilize the edge resonant m=0 modes, which occur as spikes in experiment, and (5) pressure driven modes are resistive at low beta, only becoming ideal at extremely high beta. (author)

  18. Physical understanding of the instability spectrum and the feedback control of resistive wall modes in reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.R.; Guo, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    The cylindrical MHD model integrated with a feedback system is applied to the study of resistive wall mode (RWM) in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The model takes into account the compressibility, longitudinal flow, viscosity and resistive wall with a finite thickness. The study, via both analytical and numerical analyses, provides a physical understanding on the following subjects: firstly, on the nature of the instability spectrum of the RWM observed in RFP plasmas; specifically, the growth rates of the two groups of the RWMs (internally non-resonant and externally non-resonant) have opposite dependence on the variation of the field reversal. Secondly, on the response of the unstable plasmas to the feedback control in RFPs, the mode behaviour in plasmas under the feedback is clarified and discussed in detail. Finally, the linear solutions of time evolution of RWM instability in various feedback scenarios are given. The effects of the wall proximity, the sensor location and the system response time are discussed, respectively.

  19. Reversed field pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberston, S.

    1991-05-01

    The Reversatron RFP is usually operated with toroidal field windings which are a continuous helix of 144 turns. These windings produce a poloidal current which is uniform around the torus. The distribution of current is fixed by the geometry so that the applied field has only an m = 0, n = 0 component. The windings cannot act to stabilize an m = 0 mode with |n| > 0 or any m = 1 mode because these modes will excite no current in the windings. It has recently been suggested that parallel connected field coils might act as a shell by forcing the flux within each winding to be the same. Coils connected in parallel must have the same voltage at their terminals and thus must enclose the same volt-seconds or flux. Data from ZT-40 show that the discharges are more quiescent when parallel or series-parallel connected windings are used

  20. Z-pinch driven fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Olson, Craig L.; Rochau, Gary E.; Dezon, Mark S.; Peterson, P.F.; Degroot, J.S.; Jensen, N.; Miller, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the most powerful multi-module synchronized pulsed-power accelerator in the world. Rapid development of z-pinch loads on Z has led to outstanding progress in the last few years, resulting in radiative powers of up to 280 TW in 4 ns and a total radiated x-ray energy of 1.8 MJ. The present goal is to demonstrate single-shot, high-yield fusion capsules. Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology, which should be well suited for Inertial Fusion Energy, but a rep-rated capability is needed. Recent developments have led to a viable conceptual approach for a rep-rated z-pinch power plant for IFE. This concept exploits the advantages of going to high yield (a few GJ) at low rep-rate (approximately 0.1 Hz), and using a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to provide the necessary standoff between the fusion target and the power plant chamber. In this approach, a portion of the transmission line near the capsule is replaced after each shot. The RTL should be constructed of materials that can easily be separated from the liquid coolant stream and refabricated for a subsequent shots. One possibility is that most of the RTL is formed by casting FLiBe, a salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium, which is an attractive choice for the reactor coolant, with chemically compatible lead or tin on the surface to provide conductivity. The authors estimate that fusion yields greater than 1 GJ will be required for efficient generation of electricity. Calculations indicate that the first wall will have an acceptable lifetime with these high yields if blast mitigation techniques are used. Furthermore, yields above 5 GJ may allow the use of a compact blanket direct conversion scheme

  1. High-density fusion and the Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Munger, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of a Z-pinch in dense gas is investigated using numerical modeling in one and two dimensions. Hot, dense Z-pinches are calculated with n approximately 2 x 10 21 cm 3 and T = 10 keV. Relaxation by sausage instability of an unstable pinch profile to a marginally stable one is calculated along with end losses in 2 dimensions to show that, if plasma is confined for N = 50 to 200 sound transits across the radius a, pinches with length L = Na are of interest for fusion power. A conceptual, ''no-wall'' fusion reactor is discussed. (author)

  2. Effects of the resistivity profile on the formation of a reversed configuration and single helicity states in compressible simulations of the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.

    2013-01-01

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) are presented. Previous simulations of the RFP, including density and pressure evolution, showed that a stationary state with a reversed toroidal magnetic field could not be obtained, contrary to the results produced with numerical codes neglecting density and pressure dynamics. The simulations described in the present paper show that including density and pressure evolution, a stationary RFP configuration can be obtained if the resistivity has a radial profile steeply increasing close to the wall. Such resistivity profile is more realistic than a uniform resistivity, since the temperature at the wall is lower than in the plasma core

  3. Improved particle confinement in transition from multiple-helicity to quasi-single-helicity regimes of a reversed-field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L; Predebon, I; Koguchi, H; Yagi, Y; Hirano, Y; Sakakita, H; Spizzo, G; White, R B

    2006-10-27

    The quasi-single-helicity (QSH) state of a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma is a regime in which the RFP configuration can be sustained by a dynamo produced mainly by a single tearing mode and in which a helical structure with well-defined magnetic flux surfaces arises. In this Letter, we show that spontaneous transitions to the QSH regime enhance the particle confinement. This improvement is originated by the simultaneous and cooperative action of the increase of the magnetic island and the reduction of the magnetic stochasticity.

  4. Predictor-based multivariable closed-loop system identification of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch external plasma response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsson, K Erik J; Brunsell, Per R; Drake, James R [Fusion Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH Stockholm), Sweden (Association EURATOM-VR) (Sweden); Rojas, Cristian R; Hjalmarsson, Haakan, E-mail: erik.olofsson@ee.kth.se [Automatic Control, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    The usage of computationally feasible overparametrized and nonregularized system identification signal processing methods is assessed for automated determination of the full reversed-field pinch external plasma response spectrum for the experiment EXTRAP T2R. No assumptions on the geometry of eigenmodes are imposed. The attempted approach consists of high-order autoregressive exogenous estimation followed by Markov block coefficient construction and Hankel matrix singular value decomposition. It is seen that the obtained 'black-box' state-space models indeed can be compared with the commonplace ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) resistive thin-shell model in cylindrical geometry. It is possible to directly map the most unstable autodetected empirical system pole to the corresponding theoretical resistive shell MHD eigenmode.

  5. Synthesis and operation of an FFT-decoupled fixed-order reversed-field pinch plasma control system based on identification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsson, K Erik J; Brunsell, Per R; Drake, James R [School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Witrant, Emmanuel, E-mail: erik.olofsson@ee.kth.s [Control Systems Department, UJF/GIPSA-lab, INPG/UJF Grenoble University (France)

    2010-10-15

    Recent developments and applications of system identification methods for the reversed-field pinch (RFP) machine EXTRAP T2R have yielded plasma response parameters for decoupled dynamics. These data sets are fundamental for a real-time implementable fast Fourier transform (FFT) decoupled discrete-time fixed-order strongly stabilizing synthesis as described in this work. Robustness is assessed over the data set by bootstrap calculation of the sensitivity transfer function worst-case H{sub {infinity}}-gain distribution. Output tracking and magnetohydrodynamic mode m = 1 tracking are considered in the same framework simply as two distinct weighted traces of a performance channel output-covariance matrix as derived from the closed-loop discrete-time Lyapunov equation. The behaviour of the resulting multivariable controller is investigated with dedicated T2R experiments.

  6. Predictor-based multivariable closed-loop system identification of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch external plasma response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J.; Brunsell, Per R.; Rojas, Cristian R.; Drake, James R.; Hjalmarsson, Håkan

    2011-08-01

    The usage of computationally feasible overparametrized and nonregularized system identification signal processing methods is assessed for automated determination of the full reversed-field pinch external plasma response spectrum for the experiment EXTRAP T2R. No assumptions on the geometry of eigenmodes are imposed. The attempted approach consists of high-order autoregressive exogenous estimation followed by Markov block coefficient construction and Hankel matrix singular value decomposition. It is seen that the obtained 'black-box' state-space models indeed can be compared with the commonplace ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) resistive thin-shell model in cylindrical geometry. It is possible to directly map the most unstable autodetected empirical system pole to the corresponding theoretical resistive shell MHD eigenmode.

  7. A spectroscopic system for time- and space-resolved studies of impurities on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1998-06-01

    The radial distribution of impurity line emission in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP) is studied with a five viewing chord, absolutely calibrated, spectrometer system. The light is analyzed with a single 0.5 m grating spectrometer. Different parts of the entrance slit are used for different channels. This arrangement makes it possible to use the system over a wide wavelength range, from 2500 to 6500 Å, without having to recalibrate the relative sensitivity for the different channels. The rather short plasma pulses of 10-15 ms require a high time resolution. The use of photomultiplier tubes provides a time resolution of 10 μs which is limited by the transient recorders used. The result is a robust, low-cost system that produces reliable measurements of the radial dependence of emission from a wide range of impurity ions.

  8. Reconstruction of the eddy current distribution on the vacuum vessel in a reversed field pinch device based on the external magnetic sensor signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Sanpei, Akio; Masamune, Sadao; Watanabe, Kiyomasa

    2014-01-01

    For the MHD equilibrium reconstruction of a reverse field pinch device, it is a big issue to identify accurately the strong eddy current flow on the shell. In the present work, boundary integrals of the eddy current along the shell are added to the conventional Cauchy-condition surface method formulation. The eddy current profile is unknown in advance but straightforwardly identified using only the signals from magnetic sensors located outside the plasma. Two ideas are introduced to overcome the numerical difficulties encountered in the problem. One is an accurate boundary integral scheme to damp out the near singularity occurring at the sensor position very close to the shell. The other is the modified truncated singular value decomposition technique to solve an ill-conditioned matrix equation when a large number of nodal points exist on the shell. The capability of the new method is demonstrated for a test problem modeling the RELAX device. (author)

  9. Progress on z-pinch inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.; Rochau, G.; Matzen, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented. (author)

  10. Polarized radial magnetic fields and outward plasma fluxes during shallow-reversal discharges in the ZT-40M reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.; Rusbridge, M.G.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of edge-region electromagnetic disturbances and of pulsed radial fluxes of plasma to the liner as well as the detailed interrelationship among these processes have been studied on the ZT-40M reversed-field pinch in its normal, shallow-reversal operating regime. The dominant magnetic disturbances are spiky (pulsewidth approx.5--10 μs) low-amplitude (Vertical BarB/sub r//B/sub theta/Vertical Bar -2 )= poloidally symmetric radial-field structures intersecting the vacuum wall and precessing toroidally in the anti-I/sub phi/ sense. The effect of even slight toroidal-field reversal (Vertical BarB/sub phi/(a)Vertical Barroughly-equalB/sub theta/(a)/10) is to polarize these radial-field spikes preferentially positive (i.e., B/sub r/>0) and to increase the speed of the minority (B/sub r/ 0) spikes. Synchronous with the polarized B/sub r/ spikes are intense radially outward fluxes of plasma (instantaneously > or approx. =10 22 m -2 s -1 ) leading to recurrent, large amplitude (Vertical BarΔn/n> or approx. =25%) depletion of the density in the outer quarter of minor radius. The resulting time-averaged global loss-rate per particle is significant (approx.10 3 s -1 )

  11. Measurements of neutral hydrogen profiles on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch from time-resolved ? line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Källne, E.

    1998-09-01

    The investigations of the radial distributions of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission from the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma show that the emission profile varies a lot, even during one plasma discharge. At central electron temperatures of about 150 eV it was expected that the 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission should emerge from the plasma centre. In comparison, 0953-4075/31/17/015/img4 is always observed to radiate from the centre. Our measurements of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission have, however, shown that this is not always the case, the emission often comes from the plasma edge. The analysis of the measurements has led us to conclude that the edge emission comes from charge-exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen near the carbon first wall. These observations provide a way to estimate the change in neutral hydrogen density during local plasma-wall interaction.

  12. Intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch with partial coverage of the toroidal surface by a discrete active coil array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    An active feedback system is required for long pulse operation of the reversed field pinch (RFP) device to suppress resistive wall modes (RWMs). A general feature of a feedback system using a discrete active coil array is a coupling effect which arises when a set of side band modes determined by the number of active coils is produced. Recent results obtained on the EXTRAP T2R RFP demonstrated the suppression of independent m = 1 RWMs using an active feedback system with a two-dimensional array of discrete active coils in the poloidal and toroidal directions. One of the feedback algorithms used is the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Active feedback systems having different number of active coils in the poloidal (Mc) and toroidal (Nc) directions (Mc × Nc = 2 × 32 and Mc × Nc = 4 × 16) are studied. Different side band effects are seen for these configurations. A significant prolongation of the plasma discharge is achieved for the intelligent shell feedback scheme using the 2 × 32 active coil configuration. This is attributed to the side band sets including only one of the dominant unstable RWMs and avoiding coupling to resonant modes. Analog proportional-integral-derivative controllers are used in the feedback system. Regimes with different values of the proportional gain are studied. The requirement of the proportional-integral control for low proportional gain and proportional-derivative control for high proportional gain is seen in the experiments.

  13. Error Field Assessment from Driven Mode Rotation: Results from Extrap-T2R Reversed-Field-Pinch and Perspectives for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2012-10-01

    A new ITER-relevant non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) were generated and their rotation sustained by rotating magnetic perturbations. In particular, stable modes of toroidal mode number n=8 and 10 and unstable modes of n=1 were used in this experiment. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the RWMs were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude (in the case of unstable modes, the observed oscillation was superimposed to the mode growth). This behavior was used to infer the amplitude and toroidal phase of n=1, 8 and 10 EFs. The method was first tested against known, deliberately applied EFs, and then against actual intrinsic EFs. Applying equal and opposite corrections resulted in longer discharges and more uniform mode rotation, indicating good EF compensation. The results agree with a simple theoretical model. Extensions to tearing modes, to the non-uniform plasma response to rotating perturbations, and to tokamaks, including ITER, will be discussed.

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.R.; Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y.Q.

    2005-01-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real or complex values (targeted-harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be suppressed by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of saddle coils in the array is half the number of sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. As a result, each control harmonic has to control simultaneously two mode harmonics. Real gains can stabilize non-rotating RWMs, while complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs. In addition open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic. (author)

  15. Three dimensional equilibrium solutions for a current-carrying reversed-field pinch plasma with a close-fitting conducting shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koliner, J. J.; Boguski, J., E-mail: boguski@wisc.edu; Anderson, J. K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J. R.; Goetz, J. A.; McGarry, M.; Morton, L. A.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cianciosa, M. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hanson, J. D. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    In order to characterize the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas that bifurcate to a helical equilibrium, the V3FIT equilibrium reconstruction code was modified to include a conducting boundary. RFP plasmas become helical at a high plasma current, which induces large eddy currents in MST's thick aluminum shell. The V3FIT conducting boundary accounts for the contribution from these eddy currents to external magnetic diagnostic coil signals. This implementation of V3FIT was benchmarked against MSTFit, a 2D Grad-Shafranov solver, for axisymmetric plasmas. The two codes both fit B{sub θ} measurement loops around the plasma minor diameter with qualitative agreement between each other and the measured field. Fits in the 3D case converge well, with q-profile and plasma shape agreement between two distinct toroidal locking phases. Greater than 60% of the measured n = 5 component of B{sub θ} at r = a is due to eddy currents in the shell, as calculated by the conducting boundary model.

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.R.; Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.

    2005-01-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic

  18. D-D fusion experiments using fast z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1994-01-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides us with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I 2 and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast ( 2 fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia's Saturn facility generating up to 3 x 10 12 D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, we intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices

  19. D-D fusion experiments using fast Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1998-03-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides the authors with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I 2 and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast ( 2 fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia's Saturn facility generating up to 3 x 10 12 D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, the authors intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices

  20. X-ray sources by Z-pinch for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Hidenori; Katsuki, Sunao; Lisitsyn, Igor

    1999-01-01

    Inertial confinement nuclear fusion driven by X-ray from Z-pinch plasmas has been developed. Recently, extremely high X-ray power (290 TW) and energy (1.8 MJ) were produced in fast Z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories). Wire arrays are used to produce the initial plasma. The X-ray from Z-pinch plasmas produced by pulsed power has great potential as a driver of inertial confinement nuclear fusion. (author)

  1. Pinch me - I'm fusing. Fusion Power - what is it? What is a z pinch? And why are z-pinches a promising fusion power technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DERZON, MARK S.

    2000-01-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article the author points out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and how it may one day generate electrical power for mankind

  2. Developing models for simulation of pinched-beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Mark, J.W.K.; Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    For heavy-ion fusion energy applications, Mark and Yu have derived hydrodynamic models for numerical simulation of energetic pinched-beams including self-pinches and external-current pinches. These pinched-beams are applicable to beam propagation in fusion chambers and to the US High Temperature Experiment. The closure of the Mark-Yu model is obtained with adiabatic assumptions mathematically analogous to those of Chew, Goldberger, and Low for MHD. Features of this hydrodynamic beam model are compared with a kinetic treatment

  3. Overview of the Fusion Z-Pinch Experiment FuZE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. R.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; McLean, H. S.; Tummel, K. K.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A. E.; UW/LLNL Team

    2016-10-01

    Previously, the ZaP device, at the University of Washington, demonstrated sheared flow stabilized (SFS) Z-pinch plasmas. Instabilities that have historically plagued Z-pinch plasma confinement were mitigated using sheared flows generated from a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type. Based on these results, a new SFS Z-pinch experiment, the Fusion Z-pinch Experiment (FuZE), has been constructed. FuZE is designed to investigate the scaling of SFS Z-pinch plasmas towards fusion conditions. The experiment will be supported by high fidelity physics modeling using kinetic and fluid simulations. Initial plans are in place for a pulsed fusion reactor following the results of FuZE. Notably, the design relies on proven commercial technologies, including a modest discharge current (1.5 MA) and voltage (40 kV), and liquid metal electrodes. Supported by DoE FES, NNSA, and ARPA-E ALPHA.

  4. The quest for a z-pinch based fusion energy source—a historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethian, John

    1997-05-01

    Ever since 1958, when Oscar Anderson observed copious neutrons emanating from a "magnetically self-constricted column of deuterium plasma," scientists have attempted to develop the simple linear pinch into a fusion power source. After all, simple calculations show that if one can pass a current of slightly less than 2 million amperes through a stable D-T plasma, then one could achieve not just thermonuclear break-even, but thermonuclear gain. Moreover, several reactor studies have shown that a simple linear pinch could be the basis for a very attractive fusion system. The problem is, of course, that the seemingly simple act of passing 2 MA through a stable pinch has proven to be quite difficult to accomplish. The pinch tends to disrupt due to instabilities, either by the m=0 (sausage) or m=1 (kink) modes. Curtailing the growth of these instabilities has been the primary thrust of z-pinch fusion research, and over the years a wide variety of formation techniques have been tried. The early pinches were driven by relatively slow capacitive discharges and were formed by imploding a plasma column. The advent of fast pulsed power technology brought on a whole new repertoire of formation techniques, including: fast implosions, laser or field-enhanced breakdown in a uniform volume of gas, a discharge inside a small capillary, a frozen deuterium fiber isolated by vacuum, and staged concepts in which one pinch implodes upon another. And although none of these have yet to be successful, some have come tantalizingly close. This paper will review the history of this four-decade long quest for fusion power.

  5. A conceptual fusion reactor based on the high-plasma-density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.; Hoffman, M.; Werner, R.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual DT and DD fusion reactors are discussed based on magnetic confinement with the high-plasma-density Z-pinch. The reactor concepts have no ''first wall'', the fusion neutrons and plasma energy being absorbed directly into a surrounding lithium vortex blanket. Efficient systems with low re-circulated power are projected, based on a flow-through pinch cycle for which overall Q values can approach 10. The conceptual reactors are characterized by simplicity, small minimum size (100MW(e)) and by the potential for minimal radioactivity hazards. (author)

  6. Collapse of Z-pinch necks for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan'kov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The ignition is possible under the condition of collapring z-pinch neck up to the diameter 10 -4 cm. The current pulse with duration 10 -7 s and 10 7 A must be applied to a cylinder of condensed D-T mixture in order to obtain the parameter ρr≥0.4 g/cm 2 . 22 refs

  7. Electrical insulators for the theta-pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The five major applications for electrical insulators in the Reference Theta Pinch Reactor are as follows: (1) first-wall insulator, (2) blanket intersegment insulator, (3) graphite encapsulating insulator, (4) implosion coil insulator, and (5) compression coil insulator. Insulator design proposals and some preliminary test results are given for each application

  8. Development and characterization of a Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion target concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuneo, Michael E.; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L. Jr.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Fehl, David L.; Gilliland, Terrance L.; Hanson, David L.; McGurn, John S.; Reynolds, Paul G.; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Seamen, Hans; Spielman, Rick B.; Struve, Ken W.; Stygar, William A.; Simpson, Walter W.; Torres, Jose A.; Wenger, David F.; Hammer, James H.; Rambo, Peter W.; Peterson, Darrell L.

    2001-01-01

    Initial experiments to study the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concept of Hammer, Tabak, and Porter [Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)] are described. The relationship between measured pinch power, hohlraum temperature, and secondary hohlraum coupling ('hohlraum energetics') is well understood from zero-dimensional semianalytic, and two-dimensional view factor and radiation magnetohydrodynamics models. These experiments have shown the highest x-ray powers coupled to any Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum (26±5 TW), indicating the concept could scale to fusion yields of >200 MJ. A novel, single-sided power feed, double-pinch driven secondary that meets the pinch simultaneity requirements for polar radiation symmetry has also been developed. This source will permit investigation of the pinch power balance and hohlraum geometry requirements for ICF relevant secondary radiation symmetry, leading to a capsule implosion capability on the Z accelerator [Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)

  9. Target design for high fusion yield with the double Z-pinch-driven hohlraum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Lemke, R. W.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Cuneo, M. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Campbell, R. B.; Christenson, P. J.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.; Slutz, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    A key demonstration on the path to inertial fusion energy is the achievement of high fusion yield (hundreds of MJ) and high target gain. Toward this goal, an indirect-drive high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target involving two Z-pinch x-ray sources heating a central secondary hohlraum is described by Hammer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)]. In subsequent research at Sandia National Laboratories, theoretical/computational models have been developed and an extensive series of validation experiments have been performed to study hohlraum energetics, capsule coupling, and capsule implosion symmetry for this system. These models have been used to design a high-yield Z-pinch-driven ICF target that incorporates the latest experience in capsule design, hohlraum symmetry control, and x-ray production by Z pinches. An x-ray energy output of 9 MJ per pinch, suitably pulse-shaped, is sufficient for this concept to drive 0.3-0.5 GJ capsules. For the first time, integrated two-dimensional (2D) hohlraum/capsule radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have demonstrated adequate hohlraum coupling, time-dependent radiation symmetry control, and the successful implosion, ignition, and burn of a high-yield capsule in the double Z-pinch hohlraum. An important new feature of this target design is mode-selective symmetry control: the use of burn-through shields offset from the capsule that selectively tune certain low-order asymmetry modes (P 2 ,P 4 ) without significantly perturbing higher-order modes and without a significant energy penalty. This paper will describe the capsule and hohlraum design that have produced 0.4-0.5 GJ yields in 2D simulations, provide a preliminary estimate of the Z-pinch load and accelerator requirements necessary to drive the system, and suggest future directions for target design work

  10. X-Pinch Plasma Generation Testing for Neutron Source Development and Nuclear Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A.Gabbar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion is a sought-out technology in which two light elements are fused together to create a heavier element and releases energy. Two primary nuclear fusion technologies are being researched today: magnetic and inertial confinement. However, a new type of nuclear fusion technology is currently being research: multi-pinch plasma beams. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, there is research on multi-pinch plasma beam technology as an alternative to nuclear fusion. The objective is to intersect two plasma arcs at the center of the chamber. This is a precursor of nuclear fusion using multi-pinch. The innovation portion of the students’ work is the miniaturization of this concept using high energy electrical DC pulses. The experiment achieved the temperature of 2300 K at the intersection. In comparison to the simulation data, the temperature from the simulation is 7000 K at the intersection. Additionally, energy harvesting devices, both photovoltaics and a thermoelectric generator, were placed in the chamber to observe the viable energy extraction.

  11. Surface interactions in a reverse field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, G.M.; Firth, L.; Goodall, D.H.J.; King, R.E.; Lavender, K.E.; Newton, A.A.; Thompson, V.K. (Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (UK). Culham Lab.); Edwards, B.C.; Titchmarsh, J. (UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Metallurgy Div.)

    The principle findings of the investigations were: (1) mechanical deformation occurring at the end of the bellows section adjacent to the weld. (2) Very localised erosion on at least three deformed sections, leading in one case to the puncturing of the liner wall. These eroded spots were all at a region of the liner underneath a gap in the shell. The mechanism whereby the energy is deposited locally is not understood. (3) Deposition of stainless steel as molten droplets was observed over a much larger area adjacent to the shell gap. There is no obvious link between this deposition and the puncture. (4) Arcing is observed over a large proportion of the liner surface: the highest local density of arcs is found on the outer part of the torus, especially near the ports. (5) The inside of the vessel has large coloured areas which were identified as oxide layers probably formed as the result of liner heating by the plasma in the presence of leaks during the last weeks of operation.

  12. Electrical circuit modeling of reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprott, J.C.

    1988-02-01

    Equations are proposed to describe the radial variation of the magnetic field and current density in a circular, cylindrical RFP. These equations are used to derive the electrical circuit parameters (inductance, resistance, and coupling coefficient) for an RFP discharge. The circuit parameters are used to evaluate the flux and energy consumption for various startup modes and for steady-state operation using oscillating field current drive. The results are applied to the MST device. 32 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  13. Flow-through Z-pinch study for radiation generation and fusion energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Moir, R.; Shumlak, U.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss a high-density fusion reactor which utilizes a flow-through Z pinch magnetic confinement configuration. Assessment of this reactor system is motivated by simplicity and small unit size (few hundred MWe) and immunity to plasma contamination made possible at high density. The type reactor discussed here would employ a liquid Li vortex as the first wall/blanket to capture fusion neutrons with minimum induced radioactivity and to achieve high wall loading and a power density of 200 w/cm 3

  14. Refrigeration requirements for fusion reactors based upon the theta-pinch concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, K.D. Jr.; King, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    Two refrigeration systems applicable to the theta-pinch fusion concept are described. The first is a 1100 W, 4.5 K refrigerator which will be used for testing superconducting NbTi Magnetic Energy Transfer and Storage (METS) coil systems. This unit is currently being installed and is to be operational by April 1977. The second unit is applicable to the Syllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) and has been conceptually designed. This liquefier-refrigerator is about 22 times larger than those in existence at present and will require 12-MW input electrical power. It will provide 3045 kg/h of liquid helium at 4.5 K

  15. Engineering design of a fusion test reactor (FTR) and fusion engineering research facility (FERF) based on a toroidal theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Burke, R.J.; Dauzvardis, P.V.; Foss, M.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Maroni, V.A.; Pierce, A.W.; Turner, A.F.; Krakowski, R.A.; Linford, R.K.; Oliphant, T.A.; Ribe, F.L.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes two advanced toroidal theta-pinch devices which are being proposed for future construction. The Fusion Test Reactor (FTR) is being designed to produce thermonuclear energy (at 20 MeV/neutron) equal to the maximum plasma energy (Q=1) and to demonstrate α-particle heating. The Fusion Engineering and Research Facility (FERF) is being designed to test materials in a fusion environment where the average 14-MeV neutron flux from the plasma is greater than or of the order of 5.10 13 n/cm 2 .s over large surface areas. These devices employ the staged theta-pinch principle where the heating is accomplished by rapid (about 0.1 μs) implosion and expansion followed by a slow compression of the plasma. The rapid implosion injects as much heat as possible at as large a plasma radious as possible so that the plasma remains stable even after further compression. The final compression to ignition requires the transfer of a large amount of magnetic energy which implies a long transfer time (about 1 ms) for realistic voltages in the driving circuit. Throughout the heating and burn cycle the plasma must remain in equilibrium and stable to the dominant MHD-modes. A sufficiently large plasma radius guarantees stability against the m = 1 modes. These equilibrium and stability conditions and the requirements on thermonuclear burn determine the design parameters for either machine. The design parameters must also be consistent with economic limitations and technological feasibility of components. In addition to these requirements, the FERF must provide a steady and reliable source of fusion neutrons. (author)

  16. The belt-screw-pinch reactor and other high-beta systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustraan, M.; Klippel, H.Th.; Veringa, H.J.; Verschuur, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a screw-pinch reactor the expenditure for plasma implosion and compression can be reduced and the reacting volume and burn time can be enlarged. This is possible by pinch ignition of only a few percent of the fuel. Fusion energy then ignites injected fuel pellets and expands the plasma. The magnitude of the pulsed magnetic fields is such as to make the application of superconducting coils feasible. An economical reactor model is described. A comparison is made with tokamak and reversed field pinch reactor designs. (author)

  17. The role of Z-pinch fusion transmutation of waste in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, James Dean; Drennen, Thomas E.; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Martin, William Joseph; Kamery, William; Phruksarojanakun, Phiphat; Grady, Ryan; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Guild-Bingham, Avery; Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich

    2007-01-01

    The resurgence of interest in reprocessing in the United States with the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership has led to a renewed look at technologies for transmuting nuclear waste. Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating the use of a Z-Pinch fusion driver to burn actinide waste in a sub-critical reactor. The baseline design has been modified to solve some of the engineering issues that were identified in the first year of work, including neutron damage and fuel heating. An on-line control feature was added to the reactor to maintain a constant neutron multiplication with time. The transmutation modeling effort has been optimized to produce more accurate results. In addition, more attention was focused on the integration of this burner option within the fuel cycle including an investigation of overall costs. This report presents the updated reactor design, which is able to burn 1320 kg of actinides per year while producing 3,000 MWth

  18. The role of Z-pinches and related configurations in magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of a magnetic field within a fusion target is now known as Magnetized Target Fusion in the US and as MAGO (Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) in Russia. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (e.g., ICF), MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm, magnetized, wall-confined plasma of intermediate density within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression and heating of the plasma by imploding the confining wall, or pusher. In many ways, MTF can be considered a marriage between the more mature MFE and ICF approaches, and this marriage potentially eliminates some of the hurdles encountered in the other approaches. When compared to ICF, MTF requires lower implosion velocity, lower initial density, significantly lower radial convergence, and larger targets, all of which lead to substantially reduced driver intensity, power, and symmetry requirements. When compared to MFE, MTF does not require a vacuum separating the plasma from the wall, and, in fact, complete magnetic confinement, even if possible, may not be desirable. The higher density of MTF and much shorter confinement times should make magnetized plasma formation a much less difficult step than in MFE. The substantially lower driver requirements and implosion velocity of MTF make z-pinch magnetically driven liners, magnetically imploded by existing modern pulsed power electrical current sources, a leading candidate for the target pusher of an MTF system

  19. Physics of the dense Z-pinch in theory and in experiment with application to fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, M.G. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK). Blackett Lab.)

    1982-01-01

    A new generation of Z-pinches employing high voltage, high current pulsed lines as power sources produce dense hot plasmas with enhanced stability properties. Three methods of Z-pinch formation are currently in use: (1) cylindrical collapse and compression of a pre-ionised gas; (2) laser initiation and Joule heating of a gas embedded pinch, and (3) hollow gas puff and subsequent collapse to the axis. The first two experimental conditions are relevant for fusion. A calculation of energy balance for satisfying Lawson conditions with axial and radial energy losses and radiation loss shows that a current of approximately 10/sup 6/ A and a line density of 6 x 10/sup 18/ m/sup -1/ are required. This leads to two coincidences of physical quantities that are very favourable for controlled fusion. The first is that at this line density and under pressure balance the ratio of the ion Larmor radius to pinch is of order 1 so that a marked stabilisation of the configuration is expected. The second coincidence is that the current is only just below the Pease-Braginskii limit; this will permit the possibility or radiative collapse to attain the high density (approximately 4 x 10/sup 27/ m/sup -3/) and small radius (approximately 20 ..mu..m) required for a compact (0.1 m long) discharge.

  20. Prospects for alternative Fusion Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glancy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The author has worked on three different magnetic confinement concepts for alternate fusion fueled reactors: tokamaks; tanden mirrors, and reversed field pinches. The focus of this article is on prospects for alternate fusion fuels as the author sees them relative to the other choices: increased numbers of coal plants, fission reactors, renewables, and D-T fusion. Discussion is limited on the consideration of alternate fusion fuels to the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fuel cycle. Reasons for seeking an alternate energy source are cost, a more secure fuel supply, environmental impact and safety. The technical risks associated with development of fusion are examined briefly

  1. The high-density Z-pinch as a pulsed fusion neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Sethian, J.D.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch (DZP) is one of the earliest and simplest plasma heating and confinement schemes. Recent experimental advances based on plasma initiation from hair-like (10s μm in radius) solid hydrogen filaments have so far not encountered the usually devastating MHD instabilities that plagued early DZP experiments. These encouraging results along with debt of a number of proof-of principle, high-current (1--2 MA in 10--100 ns) experiments have prompted consideration of the DZP as a pulsed source of DT fusion neutrons of sufficient strength (/dot S//sub N/ ≥ 10 19 n/s) to provide uncollided neutron fluxes in excess of I/sub ω/ = 5--10 MW/m 2 over test volumes of 10--30 litre or greater. While this neutron source would be pulsed (100s ns pulse widths, 10--100 Hz pulse rate), giving flux time compressions in the range 10 5 --10 6 , its simplicity, near-time feasibility, low cost, high-Q operation, and relevance to fusion systems that may provide a pulsed commercial end-product (e.g., inertial confinement or the DZP itself) together create the impetus for preliminary considerations as a neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testings. The results of a preliminary parametric systems study (focusing primarily on physics issues), conceptual design, and cost versus performance analyses are presented. The DZP promises an expensive and efficient means to provide pulsed DT neutrons at an average rate in excess of 10 19 n/s, with neutron currents I/sub ω/ /approx lt/ 10 MW/m 2 over volumes V/sub exp/ ≥ 30 litre using single-pulse technologies that differ little from those being used in present-day experiments. 34 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Alternative fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostagni, G.

    1981-01-01

    The paper reports the discussions and statements made by the participants on the actual state and future of five different approaches on the fusion concept; they are the following: bumpy torus, reversed-field pinch, open-ended configurations, compact toroids and stellarators. Tables show for each concept parameters that represent the achieved results; data expected for future devices and extrapolations on reactor requirements are included

  3. Demonstration of radiation pulse shaping with nested-tungsten-wire-array pinches for high-yield inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Sinars, D B; Chittenden, J P; Waisman, E M; Lemke, R W; Lebedev, S V; Bliss, D E; Stygar, W A; Porter, J L; Schroen, D G; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Mehlhorn, T A

    2005-10-28

    Nested wire-array pinches are shown to generate soft x-ray radiation pulse shapes required for three-shock isentropic compression and hot-spot ignition of high-yield inertial confinement fusion capsules. We demonstrate a reproducible and tunable foot pulse (first shock) produced by interaction of the outer and inner arrays. A first-step pulse (second shock) is produced by inner array collision with a central CH2 foam target. Stagnation of the inner array at the axis produces the third shock. Capsules optimized for several of these shapes produce 290-900 MJ fusion yields in 1D simulations.

  4. Radiation symmetry control for inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions in double Z-pinch hohlraums on Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, Roger A.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Porter, John L. Jr.; Adams, Richard G.; Aragon, Rafael A.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Simpson, Walter W.; Smith, Ian C.; Bennett, Guy R.

    2003-01-01

    The double Z-pinch hohlraum high-yield concept [Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)] utilizes two 63-MA Z pinches to heat separate primary hohlraums at either end of a secondary hohlraum containing the cryogenic fusion capsule. Recent experiments on the Z accelerator [Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)] at Sandia National Laboratories have developed an advanced single-sided power feed, double Z-pinch load to study radiation symmetry and pinch power balance using implosion capsules [Cuneo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 215004 (2002)]. Point-projection x-ray imaging with the Z-Beamlet Laser mapped the trajectory and distortion of 2-mm diameter plastic ablator capsules. Using the backlit capsule distortion as a symmetry diagnostic, the ability to predictably tune symmetry at the 2 Legendre mode asymmetry coefficient over a range of ±6% (±2% considering points nearest the optimum) was achieved by varying the length of the cylindrical secondary hohlraum containing the capsule, in agreement with viewfactor and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations

  5. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  6. Helical-D pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The open-quotes helical-Dclose quotes geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a open-quotes dynamoclose quotes process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1

  7. Reversed-field multiple mirror concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Grossmann, W.; Seyler, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    The reversed-field multiple mirror (RFMM), is a promising technique for end-stoppering linear magnetic fusion plasmas. By this means the physics and engineering advantages of a linear plasma are gained while circumventing the endloss problem, allowing the projection of very short (less than or equal to 100 m) conceptual reactors. RFMM end-stoppering is accomplished by a string of closed field-line cells on the plasma column axis; these cells strongly retard the axial flow of particles and energy. We describe the reactor implications of the RFMM

  8. Dense Z-pinch (DZP) as a fusion power reactor: preliminary scaling calculations and sysems energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.; Moses, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual DT fusion reactor concept is described that is based upon the dense Z-pinch (DZP). This study emphasizes plasma modeling and the parametric assessment of the reactor energy balance. To this end simple analytic and numerical models have been developed and evaluated. The resulting optimal reactor operating point promises a high-Q, low-yield system of a scale that may allow the use of conventional high-voltage Marx/water-line technology to drive a potentially very small reactor system

  9. Dense Z-pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlachter, J.S.; Hammel, J.E.; Scudder, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Early researchers recogniZed the desirable features of the linear Z-pinch configuration as a magnetic fusion scheme. In particular, a Z-pinch reactor might not require auxiliary heating or external field coils, and could constitute an uncomplicated, high plasma β geometry. The simple Z pinch, however, exhibited gross MHD instabilities that disrupted the plasma, and the linear Z pinch was abandoned in favor of more stable configurations. Recent advances in pulsed-power technology and an appreciation of the dynamic behavior of an ohmically heated Z pinch have led to a reexamination of the Z pinch as a workable fusion concept

  10. Compression of an Applied Bz field by a z-pinch onto a Tamped DT Fiber for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Simulations of a z-pinch compressing an applied 100 kG Bz field onto an on-axis DT fiber tamped with beryllium show the field reaching over 100 MG in the tamp, sufficient to confine DT alpha particles and to form a thermal barrier. The barrier allows the DT plasma to burn at a rho*r value as low as 0.045 g/cm^2, and at temperatures over 50 keV for a 63 MA drive current. Driving currents between 21 and 63 MA are considered with cryogenic DT fiber diameters between 600 μm and 1.6 mm. Pinch implosion times are 120 ns with a peak implosion velocity of 35 cm/μs. 1D simulations are of a foil pinch, but for improved stability we propose a nested wire-array. Simulated fusion yields with this system scale as the sixth power of the current, with burn fractions scaling as the fourth power of the current. At 63 MA the simulated yield is 521 MJ from 4.2 mg/cm of DT with a 37% burn fraction at a rho*r of only 0.18 g/cm^2.

  11. The Role of Strong Coupling in Z-Pinch-Driven Approaches to High Yield Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MEHLHORN, THOMAS A.; DESJARLAIS, MICHAEL P.; HAILL, THOMAS A.; LASH, JOEL S.; ROSENTHAL, STEPHEN E.; SLUTZ, STEPHEN A.; STOLTZ, PETER H.; VESEY, ROGER A.; OLIVER, B.

    1999-01-01

    Peak x-ray powers as high as 280 ± 40 TW have been generated from the implosion of tungsten wire arrays on the Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. The high x-ray powers radiated by these z-pinches provide an attractive new driver option for high yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The high x-ray powers appear to be a result of using a large number of wires in the array which decreases the perturbation seed to the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability and diminishes other 3-D effects. Simulations to confirm this hypothesis require a 3-D MHD code capability, and associated databases, to follow the evolution of the wires from cold solid through melt, vaporization, ionization, and finally to dense imploded plasma. Strong coupling plays a role in this process, the importance of which depends on the wire material and the current time history of the pulsed power driver. Strong coupling regimes are involved in the plasmas in the convolute and transmission line of the powerflow system. Strong coupling can also play a role in the physics of the z-pinch-driven high yield ICF target. Finally, strong coupling can occur in certain z-pinch-driven application experiments

  12. Advanced fusion concepts program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    While the prospects for the eventual development of a tokamak-based fusion reactor appear promising at the present time, the Department of Energy maintains a vigorous program in alternate magnetic fusion concepts. Several of the concepts presently supported include the toroidal reversed field pinch, Tormac, Elmo Bumpy Torus, and various linear options. Recent technical accomplishments and program evaluations indicate that the possibility now exists for undertaking the next development stage, a proof-of-principle experiment, for a few of the most promising alternate concepts

  13. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac

  14. On the economics of fusion breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for improving the economics of tandem mirror fusion breeders by assisting them with tritium produced in the control of the client light water reactors and/or by operating them with polarized plasma is assessed. Also assessed is the promise of a Starfire tokamak and a compact reversed field pinch fusion driver for fusion breeder applications. All three approaches are found to promise a significant reduction in the cost of fusion breeder produced fissile fuel, potentially making the FB-LWR system economically competitive with conventional nuclear energy systems. (orig.) [de

  15. Measurements of fusion-protons anisotropy around the pinch axis within high-current PF-1000 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, M.J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies - IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)] [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion - IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Malinowska, A.; Malinowski, K.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zebrowski, J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies - IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; Stepniewski, W. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion - IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The paper describes measurements of fast protons produced by D-D fusion reactions during high-current discharges within the PF-1000 facility operated with the deuterium filling at 27 kV, 480 kJ. The measurements were performed by means of a set of pinhole-cameras equipped with PM-355 track detectors shielded by 80-{mu}m-thick Al-filters, which eliminated fast primary deuterons and protons of lower energy (< 3 MeV). Those cameras were placed at different angles around the pinch axis. The obtained proton images showed a distinct angular anisotropy, which was explained by an influence of local magnetic fields connected with a filamentary structure of the plasma column during the fast proton (and neutron) emission. The paper shows that in addition to measurements of a fusion neutron anisotropy it is reasonable to study also an anisotropy of fusion protons (originated from the second branch of the D-D reactions), as well as other charged fusion products. This document is composed of a paper followed by a poster

  16. Magnetic turbulent electron transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.; Moses, R.

    1990-01-01

    A model of magnetic turbulent electron transport is presented. The model, based on the thermal conduction theory of Rechester and Rosenbluth, entails a Boltzmann description of electron dynamics in the long mean-free-path limit and quantitatively describes the salient features of superthermal electron measurements in the RFP edge plasma. Included are predictions of the mean superthermal electron energy, current density, and power flux asymmetry. A discussion of the transport model, the assumptions implicit in the model, and the relevance of this work to more general issue of magnetic turbulent transport in toroidal systems is presented. 32 refs., 3 figs

  17. Mode dynamics and confinement in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.R.; Bergsaker, H.; Brzozowski, J.H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Scheffel, J.; Schnack, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Tearing mode dynamics and toroidal plasma flow in the RFP has been experimentally studied in the Extrap T2 device. A toroidally localised, stationary magnetic field perturbation, the 'slinky mode' is formed in nearly all discharges. There is a tendency of increased phase alignment of different toroidal Fourier modes, resulting in higher localised mode amplitudes, with higher magnetic fluctuation level. The fluctuation level increases slightly with increasing plasma current and plasma density. The toroidal plasma flow velocity and the ion temperature has been measured with Doppler spectroscopy. Both the toroidal plasma velocity and the ion temperature clearly increase with I/N. Initial, preliminary experimental results obtained very recently after a complete change of the Extrap T2 front-end system (first wall, shell, TF coil), show that an operational window with mode rotation most likely exists in the rebuilt device, in contrast to the earlier case discussed above. A numerical code DEBSP has been developed to simulate the behaviour of RFP confinement in realistic geometry, including essential transport physics. Resulting scaling laws are presented and compared with results from Extrap T2 and other RFP experiments. (author)

  18. ''Compact'' reversed-field pinch (CRFP) reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Nebel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    These results indicate that a CRFP operating in the range of 100 MWe should be feasible. While the large aspect ratio leads to a 6.4-m major radius, the design still retains many attributes of conventional compact tori, such as simplicity and ease of access. The relatively low Q/sub p/ with batch burns might be satifactory for a demonstration unit. However, to obtain power-plant ''grade'' Q/sub p/, either refueling (possibly by pellets) or larger size plasmas appear necessary

  19. Statistical magnetohydrodynamics and reversed-field-pinch quiescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.

    1982-01-01

    A statistical model of a bounded, incompressible, cylindrical magnetofluid is presented. This model predicts the presence of magnetic fluctuations about a cylindrically-symmetric, Bessel-function-model, mean magnetic field, which satisfies del x = μ . As theta → 1.56, the model predicts that the significant region of the fluctuation spectrum narrows down to a single (coherent) m = 1 mode. An analogy between the Debye length of an electrostatic plasma and μ -1 suggests the physical validity o the model's prediction of when /r - r'/ greater than or equal to μ -1

  20. Stable Alfven wave dynamo action in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in linear resistive MHD stability analysis are used to calculate the quasi-linear dynamo mean electromotive force of Alfven waves. This emf is incorporated into a one-dimensional transport and mean-field evolution code. The changing equilibrium is then fed back to the stability code to complete a computational framework that self-consistently evaluates a dynamic plasma dynamo. Static quasi-linear Alfven wave calculations have shown that dynamo emfs on the order of eta vector J are possible. This suggested a possible explanation of RFP behavior and a new (externally driven) mechanism for extending operation and controlling field profiles (possibly reducing plasma transport). This thesis demonstrates that the dynamo emf can quickly induce plasma currents whose emf cancels the dynamo effect. This thesis also contains extensive studies of resistive Alfven wave properties. This includes behavior versus spectral location, magnetic Reynolds number and wave number

  1. Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion target physics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Alberts, T.E.; Asay, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Three hohlraum concepts are being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to investigate the possibility of using pulsed power driven magnetic implosions (z-pinches) to drive high gain targets capable of yields in the range of 200-1000 MJ. This research is being conducted on SNL's Z facility that is capable of driving peak currents of 20 MA in z-pinch loads producing implosion velocities as high as 7.5x10 7 cm/s, x-ray energies approaching 2 MJ, and x-ray powers exceeding 200 TW. This paper will discuss each of these hohlraum concepts and will overview the experiments that have been conducted on these systems to date. (author)

  2. Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan'kov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Although pinches, unlike tokamaks, have not occupied a central position in fusion research, their structural simplicity and the wealth of physical processes associated with plasma foci have maintained a steady interest. The development of Z-pinches, including plasma foci, micropinches, and dense Z-pinches, is reviewed. Attention is focused on theoretical as opposed to experimental questions, and on recent work rather than the basic results now found in textbooks. Finally, Soviet work is discussed more fully than work done abroad, and applications to controlled fusion are emphasized

  3. Chamber and Wall Response to Target Implosion in Inertial and Z-Pinch Fusion and Lithography Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    The chamber walls, both solid and liquid, in inertial fusion energy (IFE) and Z-pinch reactors and Lithography devices are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion or pinching of plasma. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to target implosion. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, neutrons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The hydrodynamic response of chamber walls in bare or in gas-filled cavities and the photon transport of the deposited energy has been calculated by means of new and advanced numerical techniques for accurate shock treatment and propagation. These models include detail media hydrodynamics, non-LTE multi-group for both continuum and line radiation transport, and dynamics of eroded debris resulting from the intense energy deposition. The focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in various proposed protection methods for IFE systems. Key requirements are that: (i) the chamber wall accommodates the cyclic energy deposition while providing the required lifetime due to various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls, and (ii) after each shot the chamber is cleared and returned to a quiescent state in preparation for the target injection and the firing of the driver for the subsequent shot. This paper investigates in details these two important issues and found that the required operating frequency of the IFE reactors for power production may be severely limited due to these two requirements. (author)

  4. Compact-Toroid Fusion Reactor (CTOR) based on the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Scoping studies of a translating Compact Torus Reactor (CTOR) have been made on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach. This CTOR embodiment uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plamoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radition shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  5. Compact-Toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CTOR) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  6. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  7. Dense sheet Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetsu, Miyamoto

    1999-01-01

    The steady state and quasi-steady processes of infinite- and finite-width sheet z-pinches are studied. The relations corresponding to the Bennett relation and Pease-Braginskii current of cylindrical fiber z-pinches depend on a geometrical factor in the sheet z-pinches. The finite-width sheet z-pinch is approximated by a segment of infinite-width sheet z-pinch, if it is wide enough, and corresponds to a number of (width/thickness) times fiber z-pinch plasmas of the diameter that equals the sheet thickness. If the sheet current equals this number times the fiber current, the plasma created in the sheet z-pinches is as dense as in the fiber z-pinches. The total energy of plasma and magnetic field per unit mass is approximately equal in both pinches. Quasi-static transient processes are different in several aspects from the fiber z-pinch. No radiation collapse occurs in the sheet z-pinch. The stability is improved in the sheet z-pinches. The fusion criterions and the experimental arrangements to produce the sheet z-pinches are also discussed. (author)

  8. Dynamic identification of plasma magnetic contour in fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettini, P.; Trevisan, F.; Cavinato, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a method to identify the plasma magnetic contour in fusion machines, when eddy currents are present in the conducting structures surrounding the plasma. The approach presented is based on the integration of an electromagnetic model of the plasma with a lumped parameters model of the conducting structures around the plasma. This approach has been validated against experimental data from RFX, a reversed field pinch machine. (author)

  9. Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan'kov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The development of Z-pinches, including plasma foci, micropinches and dense Z-pinches are reviewed. A special attention is paid to the physics of sausage instability development. Theoretical questions are discussed in more detail that the experimental ones, recent works - to a fuller extent than the fundamental pioneer ones which are included in the textbooks. The Soviet works are given a greater coverage as compared to the foreign ones. An emphasis is made on the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion

  10. Driven reconnection in magnetic fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1995-11-01

    Error fields (i.e. small non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field due to coil misalignments, etc.) are a fact of life in magnetic fusion experiments. What effects do error fields have on plasma confinement? How can any detrimental effects be alleviated? These, and other, questions are explored in detail in this lecture using simple resistive magnetohydrodynamic (resistance MHD) arguments. Although the lecture concentrates on one particular type of magnetic fusion device, namely, the tokamak, the analysis is fairly general and could also be used to examine the effects of error fields on other types of device (e.g. Reversed Field Pinches, Stellerators, etc.)

  11. Energy storage, compression, and switching in a theta-pinch fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1976-01-01

    A new 488 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage and transfer system is being proposed for a Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor. The 1280 module system uses vacuum interrupters to switch 26 kA storage currents in 0.7 ms through a capacitive transfer circuit at 60 kV to the compression coils in the machine. Many of the components of the system have been built and tested and a prototype section of the machine is planned. Prototype coils with 381 kJ at 26 kA currents will be built by industry using advanced superconducting wire. The wire uses a Cu and Cu--Ni matrix around filaments of Nb--Ti to minimize eddy current losses. These wires are presently used in a 10 kA braided conductor for 300 kJ pre-prototype coils, and can withstand field changes of approximately 10 7 gauss/sec without inducing normal transitions. Three such 300 kJ coils are being constructed in industry for the LASL program

  12. Overview of the RFX-mod contribution to the international Fusion Science Program

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Puiatti, M.E.; Dal Bello, S.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barbisan, M.; Barbui, T.; Baruzzo, M.; Battistella, M.; Belli, F.; Bettini, P.; Bigi, M.; Bilel, R.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cester, D.; Chacon, L.; Chapman, B.E.; Chitarin, G.; Ciaccio, G.; Cooper, W.A.; Dalla Palma, M.; Deambrosis, S.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Dong, J.Q.; Escande, D.F.; Esposito, B.; Fassina, A.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Finotti, C.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Gaio, E.; Ghezzi, F.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Gonzales, W.A.; Grando, L.; Guo, S.C.; Hanson, J.D.; Hirshman, S.P.; Innocente, P.; Jackson, J.L.; Kiyama, S.; Komm, Michael; Laguardia, L.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.Q.; Lorenzini, R.; Luce, T.C.; Luchetta, A.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marchiori, G.; Marconato, N.; Marocco, D.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martines, E.; Martini, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Mazzitelli, G.; Miorin, E.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, E.; Paccagnella, R.; Patel, N.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pigatto, L.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Predebon, I.; Rea, C.; Recchia, M.; Rigato, V.; Rizzolo, A.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rostagni, G.; Ruset, C.; Ruzzon, A.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J.S.; Sartori, E.; Sattin, F.; Scaghanm, A.; Scarin, P.; Schmitz, O.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D.A.; Spizzo, G.; Stevanato, L.; Takechi, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Trevisan, G.L.; Urso, G.; Valente, M.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Viesti, G.; Villone, F.; Vincenzi, P.; Visona, N.; Wang, Z.R.; White, R.B.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Xu, X.Y.; Yanovskiy, V.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zuin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2015), s. 104012-104012 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference 2014 (FEC) /25./. St Petersburg, 13.10.2014-18.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * reversed field pinch * single helicity * 3D boundary Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/10/104001

  13. Fusion - the programme in the UK - and other thoughts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R

    1978-01-01

    The Fusion Programme in the Euratom--UKAEA Fusion Association is mainly one of plasma confinement studies in four major experimental areas. Conceptual studies of fusion reactors have been based upon the tokamak and the reversed field pinch. Particular attention has been given to the potential operating problems of toroidal fusion reactors in order to establish design principles which take note of the high availability essential in a power plant. Future plans for fusion power programmes are discussed and it is suggested that they are not obviously the quickest or most cost effective ways to establishing the credibility of fusion. It is proposed that a more aggressive programme which involved taking calculated risks could be quicker and cheaper. An additional, important advantage would be to attract into the fusion programme good engineers who feel the need to be motivated by action on a time scale less than the 30 to 50 years of much present planning

  14. Advanced concepts in the United States fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the magnetic fusion program is to establish the scientific and technological base for fusion energy. Development of a variety of magnetic confinement systems is essential to achieving that goal. The role of the advanced concepts program is to conduct experimental investigations of confinement concepts other than the tokamaks and tandem mirror concepts. The present advanced concepts program consists of the reversed-field-pinch (RFP), the spheromak and the field-reversed configuration (FRC). Significant new experiments in the RFP and FRC concepts have been approved and are described

  15. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  16. Demountable toroidal fusion core facility for physics optimization and fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Krall, N.A.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Weggel, C.F.; Lund, K.O.; Sedehi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Following a successful compact ignition tokamak (CIT) experiment, a fusion facility will be required for physics optimization (POF) and fusion engineering research (FERF). The POF will address issues such as high-beta operation, current drive, impurity control, and will test geometric and configurational variations such as the spherical torus or the reversed-field pinch (RFP). The FERF will be designed to accumulate rapidly a large neutron dose in prototypical fusion subsystems exposed to radiation. Both facilities will require low-cost replacement cores and rapid replacement times. The Demountable Toroidal Fusion Core (DTFC) facility is designed to fulfill these requirements. It would be a cost-effective stepping stone between the CIT and a demonstration fusion reactor

  17. Fusion power in the E.E.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    1976-01-01

    The work outlines firstly the aims of a fusion reactor development programme, as well as the role regarding plasma physics in this and then deals with the present situation of system studies on a series of various types of fusion apparatus. 15 test systems are listed and discussed. After working out the differences between the terms 'fusion technology' and 'fusion reactor technology', factors based on the organization of technology research and development, and the future technology research and development of the E.E.C. are dealt with. Problems concerning time-tables, resources, and the priorities to be set are touched upon. Suggestions are made regarding the carring-out of a European fusion reactor development programme. Problems concerning fusion reactor technology and some dealing with the tokamak and reversed field pinch are listed and discussed in two appendixes. (GG) [de

  18. The need and prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Miller, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10-15 yr have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points toward smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. The results of a number of recent conceptual designs of reversed-field pinch, spheromak, and tokamak fusion reactors are summarized as examples of more compact approaches. While a focus has been placed on increasing the fusion-power-core mass power density beyond the minimum economic threshold of 100-200 kWe/tonne, other means by which the overall attractiveness of fusion as a long-term energy source are also addressed

  19. Identification of future engineering-development needs of alternative concepts for magnetic-fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    A qualitative identification of future engineering needs of alternative fusion concepts (AFCs) is presented. These needs are assessed relative to the similar needs of the tokamak in order to emphasize differences in required technology with respect to the well documented mainline approach. Although nearly thirty AFCs can be identified as being associated with some level of reactor projection, redirection, refocusing, and general similarities can be used to generate a reduced AFC list that includes only the bumpy tori, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and compact toroids. Furthermore, each AFC has the potential of operating as a conventional (low power density, superconducting magnets) or a compact, high-power-density (HPD) system. Hence, in order to make tractable an otherwise difficult task, the future engineering needs for the AFCs are addressed here for conventional versus compact approaches, with the latter being treated as a generic class and the former being composed of bumpy tori, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and compact toroids

  20. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  1. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Soto, Leopoldo; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Pavez, Cristian; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Moreno, José; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile))" >Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José; Veloso, Felipe; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; Vergara, Julio; Clausse, Alejandro; Bruzzone, Horacio; Castillo, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10 4 (W/cm 2 )s 1/2 can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules

  2. Computational methods for reversed-field equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Auerbach, S.P.; Willmann, P.A.; Berk, H.L.; McNamara, B.

    1980-01-01

    Investigating the temporal evolution of reversed-field equilibrium caused by transport processes requires the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation and computation of field-line-averaged quantities. The technique for field-line averaging and the computation of the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented. Application of Green's function to specify the Grad-Shafranov equation boundary condition is discussed. Hill's vortex formulas used to verify certain computations are detailed. Use of computer software to implement computational methods is described

  3. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  4. Compact-toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch: reactor scaling and optimization for CTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CT) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conduction shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  5. Overview of the RFX-mod fusion science activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zuin, M.; Dal Bello, S.; Marrelli, L.; Puiatti, M.E.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barbisan, M.; Barbui, T.; Baruzzo, M.; Belli, F.; Bettini, P.; Bigi, M.; Bilel, R.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Bustreo, C.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cester, D.; Chacon, L.; Chitarin, G.; Cooper, W.A.; Cordaro, L.; Dalla Palma, M.; Deambrosis, S.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Dong, J.Q.; Escande, D.F.; Fassina, A.; Felici, F.; Ferro, A.; Finotti, C.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Gaio, E.; Ghezzi, F.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Gonzalez, W.A.; Grando, L.; Guo, S.C.; Hanson, J.D.; Hirshman, S.P.; Innocente, P.; Jackson, J.L.; Kiyama, S.; Komm, Michael; Kudlacek, O.; Laguardia, L.; Li, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, S.F.; Liu, Y.Q.; López- Bruna, D.; Lorenzini, R.; Luce, T.C.; Luchetta, A.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marchiori, G.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martin, P.; Martines, E.; Martini, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; McCormack, O.; Miorin, E.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Narushima, Y.; Okabayashi, M.; Paccagnella, R.; Patel, N.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pigatto, L.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Predebon, I.; Pucella, G.; Rea, C.; Recchia, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Rostagni, G.; Ruset, C.; Sajò- Bohus, L.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J.S.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Schmitz, O.; Schneider, W.; Siragusa, M.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D.A.; Spizzo, G.; Stevanato, L.; Suzuki, Y.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Tudisco, O.; Urso, G.; Valente, M.; Valisa, M.; Vallar, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; Vincenzi, P.; Visona, N.; White, R.B.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Xu, X.Y.; Yanovskiy, V.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zilli, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 102012. ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/26./. Kyoto, 17.10.2016-22.10.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : reversed field pinch * tokamak * single helicity * 3D boundary * runaway electrons * MHD * PWI Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa61cc

  6. Open-ended magnetic confinement systems for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetic confinement systems that use externally generated magnetic fields can be divided topologically into two classes: ''closed'' and 'open''. The tokamak, the stellarator, and the reversed-field-pinch approaches are representatives of the first category, while mirror-based systems and their variants are of the second category. While the recent thrust of magnetic fusion research, with its emphasis on the tokamak, has been concentrated on closed geometry, there are significant reasons for the continued pursuit of research into open-ended systems. The paper discusses these reasons, reviews the history and the present status of open-ended systems, and suggests some future directions for the research

  7. Dynamics of a Z-pinch x-ray source for heating inertial-confinement-fusion relevant hohlraums to 120--160 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Olson, R. E.; Mock, R. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Nash, T. J.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Struve, K. W.; Peterson, D. L. (and others)

    2000-11-01

    A Z-pinch radiation source has been developed that generates 60{+-}20 kJ of x rays with a peak power of 13{+-}4 TW through a 4-mm-diam axial aperture on the Z facility. The source has heated National Ignition Facility-scale (6-mm-diam by 7-mm-high) hohlraums to 122{+-}6 eV and reduced-scale (4-mm-diam by 4-mm-high) hohlraums to 155{+-}8 eV -- providing environments suitable for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion studies. Eulerian-RMHC (radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code) simulations that take into account the development of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in the r--z plane provide integrated calculations of the implosion, x-ray generation, and hohlraum heating, as well as estimates of wall motion and plasma fill within the hohlraums. Lagrangian-RMHC simulations suggest that the addition of a 6 mg/cm3 CH{sub 2} fill in the reduced-scale hohlraum decreases hohlraum inner-wall velocity by {approx}40% with only a 3%--5% decrease in peak temperature, in agreement with measurements.

  8. Dynamics of a Z-pinch x-ray source for heating inertial-confinement-fusion relevant hohlraums to 120--160 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Olson, R. E.; Mock, R. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Nash, T. J.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Struve, K. W.; Peterson, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    A Z-pinch radiation source has been developed that generates 60±20 kJ of x rays with a peak power of 13±4 TW through a 4-mm-diam axial aperture on the Z facility. The source has heated National Ignition Facility-scale (6-mm-diam by 7-mm-high) hohlraums to 122±6 eV and reduced-scale (4-mm-diam by 4-mm-high) hohlraums to 155±8 eV -- providing environments suitable for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion studies. Eulerian-RMHC (radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code) simulations that take into account the development of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in the r--z plane provide integrated calculations of the implosion, x-ray generation, and hohlraum heating, as well as estimates of wall motion and plasma fill within the hohlraums. Lagrangian-RMHC simulations suggest that the addition of a 6 mg/cm3 CH 2 fill in the reduced-scale hohlraum decreases hohlraum inner-wall velocity by ∼40% with only a 3%--5% decrease in peak temperature, in agreement with measurements

  9. Dynamics of a Z-pinch x-ray source for heating inertial-confinement-fusion relevant hohlraums to 120-160 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Olson, R. E.; Mock, R. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Nash, T. J.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Struve, K. W.; Peterson, D. L.; Bowers, R. L.; Matuska, W.

    2000-11-01

    A Z-pinch radiation source has been developed that generates 60±20 kJ of x rays with a peak power of 13±4 TW through a 4-mm-diam axial aperture on the Z facility. The source has heated National Ignition Facility-scale (6-mm-diam by 7-mm-high) hohlraums to 122±6 eV and reduced-scale (4-mm-diam by 4-mm-high) hohlraums to 155±8 eV—providing environments suitable for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion studies. Eulerian-RMHC (radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code) simulations that take into account the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane provide integrated calculations of the implosion, x-ray generation, and hohlraum heating, as well as estimates of wall motion and plasma fill within the hohlraums. Lagrangian-RMHC simulations suggest that the addition of a 6 mg/cm3 CH2 fill in the reduced-scale hohlraum decreases hohlraum inner-wall velocity by ˜40% with only a 3%-5% decrease in peak temperature, in agreement with measurements.

  10. Simulations of fusion chamber dynamics and first wall response in a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, J.M., E-mail: qjm06@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz_es@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Chu, Y.Y., E-mail: chuyanyun@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Li, Z.H., E-mail: lee_march@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Z-FFR utilizes DT neutrons to drive a sub-critical fission blanket to produce energy. • A metal shell and Ar gas are employed in the fusion chamber for shock mitigation. • Massive materials can effectively mitigate the thermal heats on the chamber wall. • The W-coated Zr-alloy first wall exhibits good viability as a long-lived component. - Abstract: In a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR), the fusion target will produce enormous energy of ∼1.5 GJ per pulse at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Almost 20% of the fusion energy yield, approximately 300 MJ, is released in forms of pulsed X-rays. To prevent the first wall from fatal damages by the intense X-rays, a thin spherical metal shell and rare Ar buffer gas are introduced to mitigate the transient X-ray bursts. Radiation hydrodynamics in the fusion chamber were investigated by MULTI-1D simulations, and the corresponding thermal and mechanical loads on the first wall were also obtained. The simulations indicated that by optimizing the design parameters of the metal shell and Ar buffer gas, peak power flux of the thermal heats on the first wall could be mitigated to less than 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} within a time scale of several milliseconds, while peak overpressures of the mechanical loads varying from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa. In addition, the thermomechanical response in a W–coated Zr-alloy first wall was performed by FWDR1D calculations using the derived thermal and mechanical loads as inputs. The temperature and stress fields were analyzed, and the corresponding elastic strains were conducted for primary lifetime estimations by using the Coffin–Manson relationships of both W and Zr-alloy. It was shown that the maximum temperature rises and stresses in the first wall were less than 50 K and 130 MPa respectively, and lifetime of the first wall would be in excess of 10{sup 9} cycles. The chamber exhibits good viability as a long-lived component to sustain the Z-FFR conceptual

  11. Recent developments in the design of conceptual fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribe, F.L.

    1977-01-01

    Since the first round of conceptual fusion reactor designs in 1973 - 1974, there has been considerable progress in design improvement. Two recent tokamak designs of the Wisconsin and Culham groups, with increased plasma beta and wall loading (power density), lead to more compact reactors with easier maintenance. The Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor has undergone considerable upgrading in the design of the first wall insulator and blanket. In addition, a conceptual homopolar energy storage and transfer system has been designed. In the case of the mirror reactor, there are design changes toward improved modular construction and ease of handling, as well as improved direct converters. Conceptual designs of toroidal-multiple-mirror, liner-compression, and reverse-field pinch reactors are also discussed. A design is presented of a toroidal multiple-mirror reactor that combines the advantages of steady-state operation and high-aspect ratio. The liner-compression reactor eliminates a major problem of radiation damage by using a liquid-metal first wall that also serves as a neutron-thermalizing blanket. The reverse-field pinch reactor operates at higher beta, larger current density and larger aspect ratio than a tokamak reactor. These properties allow the possibility of ignition by ohmic heating alone and greater ease of maintenance

  12. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S.; Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F.; Schumer, Joseph Wade; Welch, Dale Robert; Kim, Alexander; Kulcinski, Gerald L.; Kammer, Daniel C.; Rose, David Vincent; Nedoseev, Sergei L.; Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G.; Bruner, Nichelle

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO 2 production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  13. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle " Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  14. Advanced fusion concepts project summaries, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This report summarizes all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Applied Plasma Physics Division of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. Each project summary was written by the respective principal investigator using the format: title, principal investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. This report is organized into three sections: Section one contains five summaries describing work in the reversed-field pinch program being performed by a diversified group of contractors, these include a national laboratory, a private company, and several universities. Section two contains eight summaries of work from the compact toroid area which encompasses field-reversed configurations, spheromaks, and heating and formation experiments. Section three contains summaries from two other programs, a density Z-pinch experiment and high-beta Q machine experiment. The intent of this collection of project summaries is to help the contractors of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch understand their relationship with the rest of the branch's activities. It is also meant to provide background to those outside the program by showing the range of activities of interest of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch

  15. The benefits of ITER for the portfolio of fusion configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent plasma science challenges are 1) what limits the pressure in plasmas? (macroscopic stability), 2) how do hot particles and plasma waves interact in the non-linear regime? (wave-particle interactions), 3) what causes plasma transport? (microscopic turbulence and transport) and 4) how can high-temperature plasma and material surface co-exist? (plasma-material interactions). This fusion plasma science is addressed using a 'Portfolio' of configurations, like Stellarator, Tokamak, Spherical Torus, Reversed Field Pinch, Spheromak, and Field Reversed Configuration. Namely, the scientific results from one configuration benefit progress in others. Recent example of this effort can be found in NCSX, NSTX and RFP. ITER will provide very significant benefits to the development of the full fusion portfolio; macroscopic stability, wave-particle interactions, microturbulence and transport, plasma-material interactions, and technical demonstration of an integrated fusion system. (author)

  16. The benefits of ITER for the portfolio of fusion configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Recent plasma science challenges are 1) what limits the pressure in plasmas? (macroscopic stability), 2) how do hot particles and plasma waves interact in the non-linear regime? (wave-particle interactions), 3) what causes plasma transport? (microscopic turbulence and transport) and 4) how can high-temperature plasma and material surface co-exist? (plasma-material interactions). This fusion plasma science is addressed using a 'Portfolio' of configurations, like Stellarator, Tokamak, Spherical Torus, Reversed Field Pinch, Spheromak, and Field Reversed Configuration. Namely, the scientific results from one configuration benefit progress in others. Recent example of this effort can be found in NCSX, NSTX and RFP. ITER will provide very significant benefits to the development of the full fusion portfolio; macroscopic stability, wave-particle interactions, microturbulence and transport, plasma-material interactions, and technical demonstration of an integrated fusion system. (author)

  17. On the Heating of Ions in Noncylindrical Z-Pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    The method proposed here for analyzing processes in a hot plasma of noncylindrical Z-pinches is based on separation of the group of high-energy ions into a special fraction. Such ions constitute an insignificant fraction ( 10%) of the total volume of the Z-pinch plasma, but these ions contribute the most to the formation of conditions in which the pinch becomes a source of nuclear fusion products and X-ray radiation. The method allows a quite correct approach to obtaining quantitative estimates of the plasma parameters, the nuclear fusion energy yield, and the features of neutron fluxes in experiments with Z-pinches.

  18. Scylla IV-P theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, A.G.; Chandler, G.I.; Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Lillberg, J.W.; Machalek, M.D.; Seibel, F.T.

    1976-01-01

    Scylla IV-P is a flexible, linear theta pinch designed to investigate high-density linear concepts, end-stoppering, alternate heating methods, and plasma injection techniques relevant to a pure fusion reactor and/or a fusion-fission hybrid system. The construction and experimental arrangement of the device are briefly described

  19. History of the Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovberg, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The plasma Z-Pinch occupies a unique position in the history of controlled fusion research as the first confinement and heating scheme to be tried experimentally. In contrast to the sophistication of programs being conducted today, in which extensive theoretical and experimental forces are in close collaboration, early pinch experiments were designed on quite elementary theoretical grounds. Indeed, these systems and the results from them provided the focus for much of the rapid development of theoretical plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics during the 1950's. In comparison to present programs, these early experiments had the considerable advantage of small size and minimal managerial encumbrance. After nearly three decades of abandonment because of difficulties with MHD instabilities, the Z-pinch is arising once again in a new incarnation characterized by microscopic size and time scales, and very high density. Uniquely in the history of the pinch, the new experimental surprises seem encouraging, rather than discouraging, to the goal of thermonuclear fusion

  20. Conceptual design for an air core 2 meg-amp reversed field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos CTR Division is involved in the conceptual design of a next phase Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The paper will discuss, in general, some of the physics questions that the experiment will address. Also in more detail it will discuss the engineering parameters and the possible hardware design solutions. The experiment is designed to produce a plasma current of about 2 MA which can be sustained for about 200 ms. The electrical energy for the system is provided by a large motor generator set. An inductive energy store is used to drive the magnetizing and poloidal field windings. A capacitor bank provides the energy for the toroidal field windings. The current in both circuits is maintained by using SCR controlled transformer rectifiers

  1. Conceptual design for an AIR CORE 2 MEG-AMP Reversed field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos CTR Division is involved in the conceptual design of a next phase Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The paper will discuss, in general, some of the physics questions that the experiment will address. Also in more detail it will discuss the engineering parameters and the possible hardware design solutions. The experiment is designed to produce a plasma current of about 2 MA which can be sustained for about 200 ms. The electrical energy for the system is provided by a large motor generator set. An inductive energy store is used to drive the magnetizing and poloidal field windings. A capacitor bank provides the energy for the toroidal field windings. The current in both circuits is maintained by using SCR controlled transformer rectifiers

  2. Thomson scattering in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, A.

    1996-11-01

    A Thomson scattering system has been installed on the EXTRAP-T2 RFP experiment. The system measures the electron density and temperature in three radial points using three spectral channels. A description of the system, the calibration techniques and examples of data obtained are given. The error bars for the electron temperature measurements are estimated to be < 10% for typical T2-plasmas. 4 refs

  3. Confinement and fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprott, J.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.A.; Chartas, G.; Dexter, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Holly, D.J.; Prager, S.C.; Rempel, T.D.; Sarff, J.S.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.W.; Watts, C.

    1990-09-01

    MST is a large (R 0 /a = 1.5/0.52 m) RFP which to date has obtained 80 ms discharges at a peak plasma current of 0.6 MA. Low loop voltages (15 volts) and modest temperatures (T e /T i ∼ 350/250 eV) are routinely obtained giving estimated unoptimized energy confinement times of about 1 ms. Loop voltage and ion temperature are anomalous. Magnetic fluctuations are typically 0.5% with most of the power at frequencies below 30 kHz and mode numbers in agreement with MHD prediction for tearing modes. Electrostatic fluctuations are typically 10 to 20% with a spectrum that decreases with frequency. 5 refs., 2 figs

  4. MHD control experiments in the Extrap T2R Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, L.; Bolzonella, T.; Brunsell, P.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.; Franz, P.; Gregoratto, D.; Manduchi, G.; Martin, P.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Piovesan, P.; Spizzo, G.; Yadikin, D.; Zanca, P.

    2004-11-01

    We report here on MHD active control experiments performed in the Extrap T2R device, which has been recently equipped with a set of 32 feedback controlled saddle coils couples. Experiments aiming at selectively exciting a resonant resistive instability in order to actively induce Quasi Single Helicity states will be presented. Open loop experiments have in fact shown that a spectrum with one dominant mode can be excited in a high aspect ratio device like T2R. In addition, evidences of controlled braking of tearing modes, which spontaneously rotate in T2R, have been gathered, allowing the determination of a threshold for mode wall locking. Different feedback control schemes have been implemented. In particular, mode suppression schemes proved successful in delaying resistive wall modes growth and in increasing the discharge duration: this suggests a hybrid mode control scenario, in which RWM are suppressed and QSH is induced. Radiation imaging and internal magnetic field reconstructions performed with the ORBIT code will be presented.

  5. Radiated Power and Impurity Concentrations in the EXTRAP-T2R Reversed-Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Y.; Rachlew, E.; Cecconello, M.; Gravestijn, R. M.; Hedqvist, A.; Pégourié, B.; Schunke, B.; Stancalie, V.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of the impurity concentration and radiation in the EXTRAP-T2R device is reported. The experimental setup consists of an 8-chord bolometer system providing the plasma radiated power and a vacuum-ultraviolet spectrometer providing information on the plasma impurity content. The plasma emissivity profile as measured by the bolometric system is peaked in the plasma centre. A one dimensional Onion Skin Collisional-Radiative model (OSCR) has been developed to compute the density and radiation distributions of the main impurities. The observed centrally peaked emissivity profile can be reproduced by OSCR simulations only if finite particle confinement time and charge-exchange processes between plasma impurities and neutral hydrogen are taken into account. The neutral hydrogen density profile is computed with a recycling code. Simulations show that recycling on metal first wall such as in EXTRAP-T2R (stainless steel vacuum vessel and molybdenum limiters) is compatible with a rather high neutral hydrogen density in the plasma centre. Assuming an impurity concentration of 10% for oxygen and 3% for carbon compared with the electron density, the OSCR calculation including lines and continuum emission reproduces about 60% of the total radiated power with a similarly centrally peaked emissivity profile. The centrally peaked emissivity profile is due to low ionisation stages and strongly radiating species in the plasma core, mainly O4+ (Be-like) and C3+ Li-like.

  6. Radiated Power and Impurity Concentrations in the EXTRAP-T2R Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corre, Y.; Rachlew, E.; Gravestijn, R.M.; Hedqvist, A.; Stancalie, V.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of the impurity concentration and radiation in the EXTRAP-T2R device is reported. The experimental setup consists of an 8-chord bolometer system providing the plasma radiated power and a vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer providing information on the plasma impurity content. The plasma emissivity profile as measured by the bolometric system is peaked in the plasma centre. A one dimensional Onion Skin Collisional-Radiative model (OSCR) has been developed to compute the density and radiation distributions of the main impurities. The observed centrally peaked emissivity profile can be reproduced by OSCR simulations only if finite particle confinement time and charge-exchange processes between plasma impurities and neutral hydrogen are taken into account. The neutral hydrogen density profile is computed with a recycling code. Simulations show that recycling on metal first wall such as in EXTRAP-T2R (stainless steel vacuum vessel and molybdenum limiters) is compatible with a rather high neutral hydrogen density in the plasma centre. Assuming an impurity concentration of 10% for oxygen and 3% for carbon compared with the electron density, the OSCR calculation including lines and continuum emission reproduces about 60% of the total radiated power with a similarly centrally peaked emissivity profile. The centrally peaked emissivity profile is due to low ionisation stages and strongly radiating species in the plasma core, mainly O 4+ (Be-like) and C 3+ (Li-like)

  7. Theoretical reversed field pinch studies: Progress report, August 31, 1987 to June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the progress made in Grant DE-FG02-85ER53212 since the end of the last year, August 31, 1987 to the present (June, 1988). Substantial results have emerged in two areas of high importance to the RFP program - nonlinear evolution with nonideal boundaries and self-consistent equilibrium in the presence of field errors. Both of these topics are critical for a basic understanding of RFP physics, for interpretation of current experiments, and for design of future devices and reactors. 3 refs

  8. Electron Bernstein wave experiments in a over-dense reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, C. B.; Anderson, J.K.; Cengher, M.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Carter, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical work show that it is possible to couple power to the EBW in an RFP, and that these waves may be suitable for driving current. The main results of our work thus far are: (1) A coupling theory for a phased array of waveguides is developed and compared to experiment. Both O and X mode polarizations can be used; in general coupling for both is optimized for obliquely launched waves. (2) The surface impedance and reflection coefficients have been measured for EBWs launched by waveguide antennas on the edge of MST. Emission and coupling measurements are both consistent with theoretical models and the measured density gradients at the plasma edge. In particular, the coupling showed a strong asymmetry in N Φ for X-mode launch. (3) Black-body levels of emission have been observed in the ECRF from over-dense MST plasmas, which by reciprocity indicate that coupling to the EBW is possible with external antennas. Emission is preferentially polarized in the X-mode and is affected by density fluctuations at the plasma edge. Mode conversion efficiencies as high as 75% have been observed. (4) Ray tracing of EBW waves, coupled to Fokker Planck calculations show that localized, efficient current drive is possible. Current drive is possible by choosing the poloidal angle of the launching antenna to control the N of the wave. (authors)

  9. Experiments of spheromak and reversed field configuration in 2m theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogi, Y.; Shimamura, S.; Ogura, H.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.; Shiina, S.; Yoshimura, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the z-current produces the paramagnetic field near the electrodes, the spheromak formation is more difficult in the straight bias field. In order to help the reconnection at the coil ends, the cusp bias coils are added to both ends of the straight coil. Then the spheromak configuration is formed and the plasma is confined for 5 to 10 μs. On the other hand, the RFC continues for about 30 μs in case of the straight bias field. The confinement time is limited by the rotational instability. Although the start time of the instability is not clear, the elongation of the plasma is detected in 15 to 20 μs after the RFC is formed. The period of the rotation is slightly different every shot. Detailed study of the instability is being pursued

  10. Poloidal field system design for the ZT-H reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Gribble, R.F.; Linton, T.W.; Reass, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses each of the following areas: (1) equilibrium specification, (2) the equilibrium winding, (3) the magnetizing winding, (4) numerical poloidal field system analysis, (5) coil cross section, turns, minimum field error, (6) coil stresses and cooling, (7) the upper structure, (8) the loads, (9) boundary conditions and method of analysis, and (10) design description

  11. Proceedings of the international workshop on engineering design of next step reversed field pinch devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, D.B.

    1987-11-01

    These Proceedings contain the formal contributed papers, the workshop papers and workshop summaries presented at the International Workshop on Engineering Design of Next Step RFP Devices held at Los Alamos, July 13-17, 1987. Contributed papers were presented at formal sessions on the topics: (1) physics overview (3 papers); (2) general overview (3 papers); (3) front-end (9 papers); (4) computer control and data acquisition (1 paper); (5) magnetics (5 papers); and (6) electrical design (9 papers). Informal topical workshop sessions were held on the topics: (1) RFP physics (9 papers); (2) front-end (7 papers); (3) magnetics (3 papers); and (4) electrical design (1 paper). This volume contains the summaries written by the Chairmen of each of the informal topical workshop sessions. The papers in these Proceedings represent a significant review of the status of the technical base for the engineering design of the next step RFP devices being developed in the US, Europe, and Japan, as of this date

  12. Magnetic fluctuation induced transport and edge dynamo measurements in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.

    1994-09-01

    Probe measurements in MST indicate that RFP particle and energy loss is governed by magnetic fluctuations inside r/a = 0.8, with energy carried out convectively by superthermal electrons. The radial loss rate is lower than the Rechester-Rosenbluth level, presumably due to the establishment of a restraining ambipolar potential. Several aspects of these measurements contradict the Kinetic Dynamo Theory, while the MHD dynamo EMF is measured to be large enough to drive the edge current carried by these superthermal electrons

  13. Analysis techniques for diagnosing runaway ion distributions in the reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J., E-mail: jkim536@wisc.edu; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Sears, S. H. [University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA) on the Madison Symmetric Torus measures deuterium ions of energy ranges 8-45 keV with an energy resolution of 2-4 keV and time resolution of 10 μs. Three different experimental configurations measure distinct portions of the naturally occurring fast ion distributions: fast ions moving parallel, anti-parallel, or perpendicular to the plasma current. On a radial-facing port, fast ions moving perpendicular to the current have the necessary pitch to be measured by the ANPA. With the diagnostic positioned on a tangent line through the plasma core, a chord integration over fast ion density, background neutral density, and local appropriate pitch defines the measured sample. The plasma current can be reversed to measure anti-parallel fast ions in the same configuration. Comparisons of energy distributions for the three configurations show an anisotropic fast ion distribution favoring high pitch ions.

  14. Pitch programming of the ZT-S reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Baker, D.A.; Howell, R.B.; Schofield, A.E.; Sgro, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Pitch programming is only realizable in the non-ideal case and as such is tried on ZT-S. Once the resistivity profile in the plasma is determined along with the appropriate thermal conductivity, then q(t) at the wall possesses a fairly simple mapping to a q(r) for a given time as shown in the experimental results. Thus the resulting q(r) profiles are qualitatively similar to ones desirable from the point of MHD stability theory. The results of this initial investigation indicate that pitch programming should be pursued further as a possible means of setting up desirable equilibrium profiles in an RFP

  15. Magnetic and electrostatic fluctuation measurements on the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.; Ingraham, J.C.; Munson, C.P.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Weber, P.G.; Tsui, H.Y.; Ritz, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    It is presently unknown whether anomalous transport in toroidal, magnetically confined plasma systems, if fluctuation induced, is dominated by electrostatic or magnetic turbulence. We are participating in a joint study of the edge plasmas of tokamak, stellarator, and RFP in an attempt to elucidate this issue. We measure magnetic and electrostatic fields using probes inserted into the edge of the ZT-40M RFP. Using the present technique, with stationary probes, these measurements can be done without damaging the probes only for low current discharges (60 kA). In this initial study, we find that both turbulent magnetic and electrostatic transport are of importance. (author) 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Reversed-field-pinch and ultra-low-q discharges in REPUTE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Yoshida, Z.; Kamada, Y.; Saito, M.; Miyamoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    Ultra-low q (ULQ) and very-low q (VLQ) discharge experiments have been done using the REPUTE-1 RFP. It was found that in these q regime, the plasma density and beta are fairly high, and the confinement property is less sensitive to the error field compared to the RFP. However, since the temperature of the REPUTE-1 discharge is limited in low value because of the small plasma current due to the small toroidal field, its magnetic Reynolds number is too small to simulate the reactor plasma behavior. The radiation barrier has not been overcome yet, and consequently the energy confinement time is very short. In order to improve these aspects of the REPUTE-1 experiment, the REPUTE-2 is designed to produce higher toroidal field of 2T. The toroidal field increases slowly to the final value as in the case of the ramp-up mode of the RFP operation. The first stage of the REPUTE-2 project will be devoted to study the confinement physics of RFP, ULQ, and VLQ. In the second stage, innovation of these configurations, such as resistive shell RFP, neutral beam current drive, and higher current density, is planned. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Global modelling of plasma-wall interaction in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagatin, M.; Costa, S.; Ortolani, S.

    1989-01-01

    The impurity production and deuterium recycling mechanisms in ETA-BETA II and RFX are firstly discussed by means of a simple model applicable to a stationary plasma interacting with the wall. This gives the time constant and the saturation values of the impurity concentration as a function of the boundary temperature and density. If the latter is sufficiently high, the impurity buildup in the main plasma becomes to some extent stabilized by the shielding effect of the edge. A self-consistent global model of the time evolution of an RFP plasma interacting with the wall is then described. The bulk and edge parameters are derived by solving the energy and particle balance equations incorporating some of the basic plasma-surface processes, such as sputtering, backscattering and desorption. The application of the model to ETA-BETA II confirms the impurity concentrations of the light and metal impurities as well as the time evolution of the average electron density found experimentally under different conditions. The model is then applied to RFX, a larger RFP experiment under construction, whose wall will be protected by a full graphite armour. The time evolution of the discharge shows that carbon sputtering could increase Z eff to ≅ 4, but without affecting significantly the plasma performance. (orig.)

  18. PF magnetic design for the 4MA reversed field pinch experiment CPRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribble, R.F.; Rogers, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    ZTH is to reach 2 MA by inductive energy transfer in 0.05 s followed by power supply ramping to 4 MA in 0.4 s. Major and minor radii are 2.4 and 0.4 m. Copper for the poloidal field coils weighs 48 metric tonnes, the one-turn equivalent ohmic heating (OH) coil inductance is 1.90 μH, and the OH coil rating is 15.4 MAT, 225 MJ, and 29.3 Vs at 60 kA. The normal operating OH current is 50 kA. Design of the coil for 60 kA provides a margin for uncertainties. OH coils are connected in series and the combination is connected in parallel with four equilibrium field (EF) coils. With optimized location of all coils, this connection provides decoupling between the OH and EH coil sets so that the changing OH current does not affect EF winding current. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Global modelling of plasma-wall interaction in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, M.; Costa, S.; Ortolani, S.

    1989-04-01

    The impurity production and deuterium recycling mechanisms in ETA—BETA II and RFX are firstly discussed by means of a simple model applicable to a stationary plasma interacting with the wall. This gives the time constant and the saturation values of the impurity concentration as a function of the boundary temperature and density. If the latter is sufficiently high, the impurity buildup in the main plasma becomes to some extent stabilized by the shielding effect of the edge. A self-consistent global model of the time evolution of an RFP plasma interacting with the wall is then described. The bulk and edge parameters are derived by solving the energy and particle balance equations incorporating some of the basic plasma-surface processes, such as sputtering, backscattering and desorption. The application of the model to ETA-BETA II confirms the impurity concentrations of the light and metal impurities as well as the time evolution of the average electron density found experimentally under different conditions. The model is then applied to RFX, a larger RFP experiment under construction, whose wall will be protected by a full graphite armour. The time evolution of the discharge shows that carbon sputtering could increase Zeff to ~ 4, but without affecting significantly the plasma performance.

  20. B4C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B 4 C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ''superthermal'' (not ''runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod

  1. Transport and confinement studies in the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, P.; Alfier, A.; Carraro, L.; Lorenzini, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Terranova, D.

    2007-01-01

    In the modified RFX experiment (RFX-mod) external magnetic field coils and a close fitting thin conductive shell control radial magnetic fields. In the so-called virtual shell (VS) operation, radial field zeroing at the thin shell radius is stationary provided by the feedback-controlled coils. First experiments on RFX-mod proved the capability of the active scheme to steadily reduce the radial magnetic field. Furthermore it has been found that such edge magnetic field control extends its beneficial effects to the whole plasma. With respect to the old RFX, where magnetohydrodynamic modes amplitude was controlled by the use of a passive thick conductive shell, a stationary 2- to 3-fold reduction of the B r field amplitude in the core is obtained. The reduction of field fluctuations positively reflects on confinement. In fact, a strong reduction of the loop voltage is observed and correspondingly a 3-fold increase in pulse length is achieved by using the same poloidal flux swing. Temperature and particle measurements confirm the improved confinement properties of the VS operation. With a lower ohmic input power, higher electron temperature and lower particle influx are measured. Particle and heat transport have been studied by means of a 1D code. Local power balance was used to compute the heat conductivity profile: for the VS discharges a lower conductivity over a significant region of the plasma is found. The improved properties of RFX-mod VS operation provide a better confinement scaling in terms of plasma current. The results show that compared with the thick shell configuration, a significant confinement improvement can be obtained under stationary conditions by actively controlling the plasma magnetic boundary

  2. Scrape-off model and pumped-limiter design for reversed-field pinches (RFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to develop a better understanding of the plasma/first-wall interaction in an RFP configuration, the models being developed to describe edgeplasma and scrapeoff regions for the tokamak have been adopted. Specifically, a scrapeoff model similar to the one developed and used for the tokamak FED design is used to model the parameter range where pumped limiters may be applied to the compact RFP. The one-dimensional, steady-state heat and particle equations are solved in the scrapeoff layer for an RFP geometry, assuming equal electron and ion temperature and density, convective transport along field lines, and Bohm-like diffusion. All charge-exchange and radiation effects are assumed to take place in the region between plasma and scrapeoff layer, and only a specific fraction of the total plasma energy will enter the scrapeoff layer in the form of conduction and convection. A simplified recycling model based on an effective recycling coefficient is used. For a given particle and energy flux entering the scrapeoff and for specified relationships between the particle flux and the energy flux near the first wall, the temperature and density profiles in the scrapeoff layer region are determined. The shape of the limiter surface is determined iteratively for a specified number of poloidal limiters by specifying a constant (design) heat flux for the limiter surfaces

  3. Self-consistent equilibrium in a cylindrical, dissipative reverse field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.C.; Paccagnella, R.

    1994-01-01

    One of the authors (C.L.S.) recently proposed a dissipative model to self-consistently solve the equilibrium problem in a free-boundary plasma column under cylindrical symmetry. In the present paper, on one hand the problem is strongly specialized to circular symmetry and to Ohm's and Fourier's laws without off-diagonal contributions; on the other hand, it is generalized by adding a dynamo effective electric field E d in Ohm's law, based on the standard turbulent model. This seems appropriate enough to study RFP equilibria, since it is well known that a stationary and cylindrically symmetric RFP is incompatible with a classical Ohm's law. Reasonably, only numerical solutions are expected to be accessible in general; but the further simplified problem with scalar and constant electric resistivity and constant dynamo coefficient α (E d =αB) can be solved analytically by elementary means. (author) 4 refs., 2 figs

  4. Proceedings of the international workshop on engineering design of next step reversed field pinch devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, D.B. (comp.)

    1987-11-01

    These Proceedings contain the formal contributed papers, the workshop papers and workshop summaries presented at the International Workshop on Engineering Design of Next Step RFP Devices held at Los Alamos, July 13-17, 1987. Contributed papers were presented at formal sessions on the topics: (1) physics overview (3 papers); (2) general overview (3 papers); (3) front-end (9 papers); (4) computer control and data acquisition (1 paper); (5) magnetics (5 papers); and (6) electrical design (9 papers). Informal topical workshop sessions were held on the topics: (1) RFP physics (9 papers); (2) front-end (7 papers); (3) magnetics (3 papers); and (4) electrical design (1 paper). This volume contains the summaries written by the Chairmen of each of the informal topical workshop sessions. The papers in these Proceedings represent a significant review of the status of the technical base for the engineering design of the next step RFP devices being developed in the US, Europe, and Japan, as of this date.

  5. Magnetic fusion 1985: what next

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1985-03-01

    Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion

  6. Culham: fusion and commerce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of present day work at the UKAEA research establishment at Culham. This consists not only of research into the practical and theoretical problems of nuclear fusion but also contract work for commercial companies and government agencies. This latter type of work includes studies on the effect of lightening striking aircraft, work on electrostatic hazards in oil tankers and potential uses of lasers in industrial processes such as cutting, drilling and welding. The six toroidal confinement devices at present at Culham are described. Reference is made to the superconducting levitron which is of the toroidal multipole type, two stellarators TORSO and CLEO, the reversed field pinch configuration Zeta experiment and the two tokamaks TOSCA and DITE. Work on such complex machines needs substantial support in engineering and computational skills, and these are also provided by groups at Culham. Research is already under way into overcoming the difficulties of an actual reactor system such as extracting energy from the neutrons coming out of the plasma, and the long term effects of neutron irradiation on cell modules for fusion reactor blankets. (U.K.)

  7. Symposium: new trends in unconventional approaches to magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    An extensive review of the meeting is given. The concepts discussed included reverse-field pinches, compact tori, advanced stellarators, multipoles, surface magnetic confinement systems, the bumpy torus, and a collection of mirror-based approaches

  8. Eddy current analysis in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1988-06-01

    In magnetic fusion devices, particularly tokamaks and reversed field pinch (RFP) experiments, time-varying magnetic fields are in intimate contact with electrically conducting components of the device. Induced currents, fields, forces, and torques result. This note reviews the analysis of eddy current effects in the following systems: Interaction of a tokamak plasma with the eddy currents in the first wall, blanket, and shield (FWBS) systems; Eddy currents in a complex but two-dimensional vacuum vessel, as in TFTR, JET, and JT-60; Eddy currents in the FWBS system of a tokamak reactor, such as NET, FER, or ITER; and Eddy currents in a RFP shell. The cited studies are chosen to be illustrative, rather than exhaustive. 42 refs

  9. Review of compact, alternate concepts for magnetic confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, S.B.; Shmayda, W.T.; Dinner, P.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1984-06-01

    This report documents a study of compact alternate magnetic confinement fusion experiments and conceptual reactor designs. The purpose of this study is to identify those devices with a potential to burn tritium in the near future. The bulk of the report is made up of a review of the following compact alternates: compact toroids, high power density tokamaks, linear magnetic systems, compact mirrors, reversed field pinches and some miscellaneous concepts. Bumpy toruses and stellarators were initially reviewed but were not pursued since no compact variations were found. Several of the concepts show promise of either burning tritium or evolving into tritium burning devices by the early 1990's: RIGGATRON, Ignitor, OHTE, Frascati Tokamak upgrade, several driven (low or negative net power) mirror experiments and several Reversed Field Pinch experiments that may begin operation around 1990. Of the above only the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade has had funds allocated. Also identified in this report are groups who may have tritium burning experiments in the mid to late 1990's. There is a discussion of the differences between the reviewed devices and the mainline tokamak experiments. This discussion forms the basis of recommendations for R and D aimed at the compact alternates and the applicability of the present CFFTP program to the needs of the compact alternates. These recommendations will be presented in a subsequent report

  10. Self-stabilized pinch (SSP) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugisaki, Kiwamu; Hirano, Keiichi.

    1985-01-01

    Self-Stabilized pinch (SSP) consept is revealed. SSP providcs many attractive features for application to a fusion reactor. Design studies for high temperature plasma production are carried out. Use of adiabatic compression leads to a remarkable reduction of required power source. (author)

  11. The Physics of Fast Z Pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RYUTOV,D.D.; DERZON,MARK S.; MATZEN,M. KEITH

    1999-10-25

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizing the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 36 figures and more than 300 references.

  12. The physics of fast Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D.D.; Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references

  13. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-08-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  14. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  15. Metal Wire-array Load for Z-pinch Used as X-ray Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    <正> The inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has evident minatory applications becasuse ICF ignites the fusion fuel with high energy media. As a method of ICF, Z-pinch has obtained evidently increased X-ray power PX-ray and energy EX-ray. The scientists have noticed this promising achievement. The Z-accelerator which is an operating Z-pinch device in Sandia national laboratory (SNL) in USA achieved 290 TW Px-ray in 1997 and the energy and defense departments of USA will finance SNL for a larger Z-pinch device. The early Z-pinch aimed to obtain high tempera

  16. A comparison of mainline and alternate approaches to fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayman, P.W.; Roth, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The tokamak and tandem mirror concepts are compared with alternate confinement concepts using the criteria established in DOE/ET-0047, ''An Evaluation of Alternate Magnetic Fusion Concepts 1977.'' The concepts are evaluated and rated in each of three broad categories: confidence in physics and technology, and reactor desirability. The STARFIRE and MARS reactors are used as a basis for comparing the mainline tokamak and tandem mirror concepts with the alternate concepts evaluated in DOE/ET-0047. Two recent alternate concepts, the ohmically heated toroidal experiment (OHTE) and the compact reversed field pinch reactor (CRFPR), are also evaluated. Results indicate that the physics of the mainline tokamaks and tandem mirrors is better understood than that of most alternate concepts. Both mainline concepts rank near the middle for technology requirements, and both rank near or at the bottom when compared with the reactor desirability of alternate concepts

  17. Cost assessment of a generic magnetic fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Delene, J.G.; Parsly, L.F.; Ashby, D.E.T.F.; Reiersen, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of generating electricity by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components that are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium-burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reversed-field pinches (RFPs), and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak; rather, it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion rectors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent, it is not as good an approximation to systems such as the RFP in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure, and coils. The model shows that a 1200-MW(e) power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Studies of the sensitivity of the model to variations in the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that a fusion reactor of this scale may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities

  18. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  19. Effect of liner non-uniformity on plasma instabilities in an inverse Z-pinch magnetized target fusion system: liner-on-plasma simulations and comparison with linear stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, P V; Madhavan, S; Chaturvedi, S

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) liner-on-plasma computations have been performed to study the growth of instabilities in a magnetized target fusion system involving the cylindrical compression of an inverse Z-pinch target plasma by a metallic liner. The growth of modes in the plasma can be divided into two phases. During the first phase, the plasma continues to be Kadomtsev stable. The dominant mode in the liner instability is imposed upon the plasma in the form of a growing perturbation. This mode further transfers part of its energy to its harmonics. During the second phase, however, non-uniform implosion of the liner leads to axial variations in plasma quantities near the liner-plasma interface, such that certain regions of the plasma locally violate the Kadomtsev criteria. Further growth ofthe plasma modes is then due to plasma instability. The above numerical study has been complemented with a linear stability analysis for the plasma, the boundary conditions for this analysis being obtained from the liner-on-plasma simulation. The stability of axisymmetric modes in the first phase is found to satisfy the Kadomtsev condition Q 0 1 modes, using equilibrium profiles from the 2D MHD study, shows that their growth rates can exceed those for m=0 by as much as an order of magnitude

  20. Introduction to Pinch Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    ? How to put energy efficiency and other targets like reducing emissions, increasing plant capacities, improve product qualities etc, into a one coherent strategic plan for the overall site? All these questions and more can be answered with a full understanding of Pinch Technology and an awareness...... of the available tools for applying it in a practical way. The aim here is to provide the basic knowledge of pinch technology concept and how it can be applied across a wide range of process industries. The pinch technology was proposed firstly for optimization of heat exchangers and therefore it is introduced...

  1. A Reactor Development Scenario for the FuZE Sheared-Flow Stabilized Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Harry S.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A.; Tummel, K. K.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Golingo, R. P.; Stepanov, A. D.; Weber, T. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-10-01

    We present a conceptual design, scaling calculations, and development path for a pulsed fusion reactor based on a flow-stabilized Z-pinch. Experiments performed on the ZaP and ZaP-HD devices have largely demonstrated the basic physics of sheared-flow stabilization at pinch currents up to 100 kA. Initial experiments on the FuZE device, a high-power upgrade of ZaP, have achieved 20 usec of stability at pinch current 100-200 kA and pinch diameter few mm for a pinch length of 50 cm. Scaling calculations based on a quasi-steady-state power balance show that extending stable duration to 100 usec at a pinch current of 1.5 MA and pinch length of 50 cm, results in a reactor plant Q 5. Future performance milestones are proposed for pinch currents of: 300 kA, where Te and Ti are calculated to exceed 1-2 keV; 700 kA, where DT fusion power would be expected to exceed pinch input power; and 1 MA, where fusion energy per pulse exceeds input energy per pulse. This work funded by USDOE ARPA-E and performed under the auspices of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734770.

  2. Radiation hydrodynamics of z-pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    Over the years there has been a sustained interest in and fascination with Z-pinch plasmas. Whether the interest is in radiation source development, fusion plasmas, or basic research there exits an extensive bibliography of literature promulgating and perpetuating a variety of claims regarding the performance of Z-pinch plasmas. In this paper an attempt will be made to present a coherent picture of the documented and commonly held views for a class of Z-pinch plasmas concerned primarily with soft x-ray radiation source development. Many of the issues and findings are common to Z-pinch plasmas in general but the attention here will be focused on gas puffs and multiple wire arrays. The role and importance of radiation on the dynamics and the interplay between the radiation and the dynamics will also be presented and discussed. A number of comparisons with experimental results will be made with 0-, 1-, and 2-D numerical simulations for several pulsed power drivers ranging in current from several mega-amps to 10's of mega-amps for a variety of risetimes and load materials

  3. The belt-shaped screw-pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustraan, M.; Klippel, H.Th.; Veringa, H.J.; Verschuur, K.A.; Lievense, K.

    1981-12-01

    The belt-shaped screw pinch is a pulsed toroidal plasma with an elongated cross-section. Force-free currents in an outer plasma envelope of low density allow beta to rise to high values in the order of 50%. This is a potential possibility to develop an economically attractive reactor. The physical requirements of its realization are described: formation, heating and ignition of a very small amount of the fuel to be burnt in one pulse by the fields generated by normal or superconducting coils. Then follows injection of the greater part of the fuel by D-T pellets and consequent plasma heating and expansion by nuclear reactions without undue disturbing of the plasma current configuration. Technical requirements include an insulating first wall and fast rising magnetic fields produced by superconducting coils. This reactor system is compared with the tokamak and the reversed-field pinch system

  4. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this lecture note is to present the theories and experiments of plasma physics for recent activities of controlled fusion research for graduate and senior undergraduate students. Chapters 1-6 describe the basic knowledge of plasma and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). MHD instabilities limit the beta ratio (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure) of confined plasma. Chapters 7-9 provide the kinetic theory of hot plasma and discuss the wave heating and non-inductive current drive. The dispersion relation derived by the kinetic theory are used to discuss plasma waves and perturbed modes. Landau damping is the essential mechanism of plasma heating and the stabilization of perturbation. Landau inverse damping brings the amplification of waves and the destabilization of perturbed modes. Chapter 10 explains the plasma transport due to turbulence, which is the most important and challenging subject for plasma confinement. Theories and simulations including subject of zonal flow are introduced. Chapters 11, 12 and 13 describe the recent activities of tokamak including ITER as well as spherical tokamak, reversed field pinch (RFP) and stellarator including quasi-symmetric configurations. Emphasis has been given to tokamak research since it made the most remarkable progress and the construction phase of 'International Tokamak Experimental Reactor' called ITER has already started. (author)

  5. Pinch Me - I'm Fusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derzon, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, ,is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Honestly - this is true. There does seem to be something going on here; I just don't know what. Apparently some experimenters get energy out of a process many call cold fission but no one seems to know what it is, or how to do it reliably. It is not getting much attention from the mainline physics community. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article 1 will point out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and may one day generate electrical power for mankind

  6. Steady state theta pinch concept for slow formation of FRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1987-05-01

    A steady state high beta plasma flow through a channel along the magnetic field increasing downstream can be regarded as a ''steady state theta pinch'', because if we see the plasma riding on the flow we should observe very similar process taking place in a theta pinch. Anticipating to produce an FRC without using very high voltage technics such as the ones required in a conventional theta pinch, we have studied after the analogy a ''steady state reversed field theta pinch'' which is brought about by steady head-on collision of counter plasma streams along the channel as ejected from two identical co-axial plasma sources mounted at the both ends of the apparatus. The ideal Poisson and shock adiabatic flow models are employed for the analysis of the steady colliding process. It is demonstrated that an FRC involving large numbers of particles is produced only by the weak shock mode which is achieved in case energetic plasma flow is decelerated almost to be stagnated through Poisson adiabatic process before the streams are collided. (author)

  7. Time-resolved observation of discrete and continuous MHD dynamo in the reversed-field pinch edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, H.; Almagri, A.F.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    We report the first experimental verification of the MHD dynamo in the RFP. A burst of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo electric field is observed during the sawtooth crash, followed by an increase in the local parallel current in the MST RFP edge. By measuring each term, the parallel MHD mean-field Ohm's law is observed to hold within experimental error bars both between and during sawtooth crashes

  8. Fast pyrobolometers for measurements of plasma heat fluxes and radiation losses in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Frank, J.; Holly, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of fast bolometers are described for the plasma energy transport study in the Madison Symmetric Torus plasma confinement device. Both types use pyrocrystals of LiTaO 3 or LiNbO 3 as the sensors. One type is used for measurements of the radiated heat losses and is situated at the vacuum shell inner surface. Another type is insertable in the plasma and measures the plasma particle heat flux. The frequency response of the bolometers is measured to be in the 150--200 kHz range. The range of the measured power fluxes is 0.1 W/cm 2 10 kW/cm 2 and can be adjusted by changing the size of the entrance aperture. The lower limit is determined by the amplifier noise and the frequency bandwidth, the higher limit by destruction of the bolometer sensor

  9. Localized plasma-density disturbance propagating along B in the interior of the ZT-40M reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalesso, G.; Jacobson, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Using a ten-chord interferometer, we have measured a field-aligned (k/sub parallel/roughly-equal2 m -1 ; k/sub perpendicular/> or approx. =25 m -1 ) plasma-density disturbance propagating along B with a speed in the ion acoustic range. The propagation is purely in the electron drift direction and is observed only when the drift parameter (electron drift speed/electron thermal speed)> or approx. =0.1. A novel spatial-filter technique resolves this localized mode, which otherwise would be hidden by more robust global disturbances present along the lines of sight

  10. Approach to high stability beta limit and its control by fast wave current drive in reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, K.; Kondoh, Y.; Gesso, H.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.N.; Ukai, R.; Nanba, T.; Nagamine, Y.; Shiina, S.

    2001-01-01

    Before the generation of steady state, dynamo-free RFP configuration by rf current driving scheme, it is necessary to find an optimum configuration into high stability beta limit against m=1 resonant resistive MHD modes and reducing nonlinearly turbulent level with less rf power. As first step to the optimization study, we are interested in partially relaxed state model (PRSM) RFP configuration, which is considered to be closer to a relaxed state at finite beta since it has force-free fields for poloidal direction with a relatively shorter characteristic length of relaxation and a relatively higher stability beta limit to m=1 resonant ideal MHD modes. The stability beta limit to m=1 resonant resistive MHD modes can be predicted to be relatively high among other RFP models and to be enhanced by the current density profile control using fast magnetosonic waves (FMW), which are accessible to high density region with strong absorption rate. (author)

  11. Kinetic simulation of neutron production in a deuterium z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostrom, C.; Stygar, William A.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R.E.; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Rose, David V.

    2010-01-01

    We have found computationally that, at sufficiently high currents, half of the neutrons produced by a deuterium z pinch are thermonuclear in origin. Early experiments below 1-MA current found that essentially all of the neutrons produced by a deuterium pinch are not thermonuclear, but are initiated by an instability that creates beam-target neutrons. Many subsequent authors have supported this result while others have claimed that pinch neutrons are thermonuclear. To resolve this issue, we have conducted fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium pinch. We find that at 1-MA pinch currents, most of the neutrons are, indeed, beam-target in origin. At much higher current, half of the neutrons are thermonuclear and half are beam-target driven by instabilities that produce a power law fall off in the ion energy distribution function at large energy. The implications for fusion energy production with such pinches are discussed.

  12. The static pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmire, Conrad L [University of California, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1958-07-01

    In a pinch, the outward diffusion of plasma due to collisions can be balanced by the inward drift resulting from ExB, where E is the applied electric field and B the magnetic field. From the equation expressing the balance of these two effects, together with the pressure balance equation, one obtains the perpendicular conductivity, which is about one-half of the classical parallel conductivity. This result has been applied to the problem of a static pinch under the assumptions: 1) there is an applied longitudinal (B{sub z}) magnetic field; 2) the plasma is isothermal; 3) the solution depends only on the radial coordinate.

  13. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  14. First-order finite-Larmor-radius fluid modeling of tearing and relaxation in a plasma pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Sovinec, C. R. [Department of Engineering-Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Mirnov, V. V. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Drift and Hall effects on magnetic tearing, island evolution, and relaxation in pinch configurations are investigated using a non-reduced first-order finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) fluid model with the nonideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with rotation, open discussion (NIMROD) code [C.R. Sovinec and J. R. King, J. Comput. Phys. 229, 5803 (2010)]. An unexpected result with a uniform pressure profile is a drift effect that reduces the growth rate when the ion sound gyroradius ({rho}{sub s}) is smaller than the tearing-layer width. This drift is present only with warm-ion FLR modeling, and analytics show that it arises from {nabla}B and poloidal curvature represented in the Braginskii gyroviscous stress. Nonlinear single-helicity computations with experimentally relevant {rho}{sub s} values show that the warm-ion gyroviscous effects reduce saturated-island widths. Computations with multiple nonlinearly interacting tearing fluctuations find that m = 1 core-resonant-fluctuation amplitudes are reduced by a factor of two relative to single-fluid modeling by the warm-ion effects. These reduced core-resonant-fluctuation amplitudes compare favorably to edge coil measurements in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. The computations demonstrate that fluctuations induce both MHD- and Hall-dynamo emfs during relaxation events. The presence of a Hall-dynamo emf implies a fluctuation-induced Maxwell stress, and the simulation results show net transport of parallel momentum. The computed magnitude of force densities from the Maxwell and competing Reynolds stresses, and changes in the parallel flow profile, are qualitatively and semi-quantitatively similar to measurements during relaxation in MST.

  15. Stage theta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Downing, J.N.; Gribble, R.F.; Jacobson, A.R.; Platts, D.A.; Thomas, K.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Staged Theta Pinch program is designed to study the technological and physics problems associated with producing fat plasmas and separating the implosion heating from the adiabatic compression. Several methods of implosion heating are discussed. Circuit diagrams and theoretical magnetic field behavior are described for the STP and resonant heating experiments. (MOW)

  16. Collisional tearing in a field-reversed sheet pinch assuming nonparallel propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quest, K.B.; Coroniti, F.V.

    1985-01-01

    We examine the linear stability properties of the collisional tearing mode in a reversed-field sheet pinch assuming that the wave vector is not parallel to B, where B is the equilibrium magnetic field. We show that pressure balance in the direction of the equilibrium current requires a nonzero perturbed current component deltaJ/sub z/ that is driven toward tyhe center of the pinch. At the center of the pinch, deltaJ/sub z/ goes to zero, and momentum is balanced by coupling to the ion-acoustic mode. In order to achieve current closure, a large perturbed field-aligned current is generated that is strongly localized about the dissipative tearing layer. The relation of this work to the collisionless case is discussed

  17. Review of mirror fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Three magnetic confinement concepts, based on the mirror principle, are described. These mirror concepts are summarized as follows: (1) fusion-fission hybrid reactor, (2) tandem mirror reactor, and (3) reversed field mirror reactor

  18. Explosive instabilities of reaction-diffusion equations including pinch effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Particular solutions of reaction-diffusion equations for temperature are obtained for explosively unstable situations. As a result of the interplay between inertial, diffusion, pinch and source processes certain 'bell-shaped' distributions may grow explosively in time with preserved shape of the spatial distribution. The effect of the pinch, which requires a density inhomogeneity, is found to diminish the effect of diffusion, or inversely to support the inertial and source processes in creating the explosion. The results may be described in terms of elliptic integrals or. more simply, by means of expansions in the spatial coordinate. An application is the temperature evolution of a burning fusion plasma. (au) (18 refs.)

  19. A Reactor Development Scenario for the FUZE Shear-flow Stabilized Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, H. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A.; Tummel, K. K.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Golingo, R. P.; Weber, T. R.

    2016-10-01

    We present a conceptual design, scaling calculations, and a development path for a pulsed fusion reactor based on the shear-flow-stabilized Z-pinch device. Experiments performed on the ZaP device have demonstrated stable operation for 40 us at 150 kA total discharge current (with 100 kA in the pinch) for pinches that are 1cm in diameter and 100 cm long. Scaling calculations show that achieving stabilization for a pulse of 100 usec, for discharge current 1.5 MA, in a shortened pinch 50 cm, results in a pinch diameter of 200 um and a reactor plant Q 5 for reasonable assumptions of the various system efficiencies. We propose several key intermediate performance levels in order to justify further development. These include achieving operation at pinch currents of 300 kA, where Te and Ti are calculated to exceed 1 keV, 700 kA where fusion power exceeds pinch input power, and 1 MA where fusion energy per pulse exceeds input energy per pulse. This work funded by USDOE ARPAe ALPHA Program and performed under the auspices of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-697801.

  20. Staged theta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Downing, J.N.; Gribble, R.F.; Jacobson, A.R.; Platts, D.A.; Thomas, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    Two implosion heating circuits are being experimentally tested. The principal experiment in the program is the 4.5-m-long Staged Theta Pinch (STP). It uses two relatively low energy (50kJ and 100 kJ), high voltage (125 kV) capacitor banks to produce the theta pinch plasma inside the 20 cm i.d. quartz discharge tube. A lower voltage (50 kV), higher energy (750 kJ) capacitor bank is used to contain the plasma and provide a variable amount of adiabatic compression. Because the experiment produces a higher ratio of implosion heating to compressional heating than conventional theta pinches, it should be capable of producing high temperature plasmas with a much larger ratio of plasma radius to discharge tube radius than has been possible in the past. The Resonant Heating Experiment (RHX) in its initial configuration is the same as a 0.9-m-long section of the high voltage part of the STP experiment and all the plasma results here were obtained with the experiment in that configuration. Part of the implosion bank will be removed and a low inductance crowbar added to convert it to the resonant heating configuration. (U.K.)

  1. Sheet pinch devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.A.; Baker, W.R.; Ise, J. Jr.; Kunkel, W.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Stone, J.M.

    1958-01-01

    Three types of sheet-like discharges are being studied at Berkeley. The first of these, which has been given the name 'Triax', consists of a cylindrical plasma sleeve contained between two coaxial conducting cylinders A theoretical analysis of the stability of the cylindrical sheet plasma predicts the existence of a 'sausage-mode' instability which is, however, expected to grow more slowly than in the case of the unstabilized linear pinch (by the ratio of the radial dimensions). The second pinch device employs a disk shaped discharge with radial current guided between flat metal plates, this configuration being identical to that of the flat hydromagnetic capacitor without external magnetic field. A significant feature of these configurations is the absence of a plasma edge, i.e., there are no regions of sharply curved magnetic field lines anywhere in these discharges. The importance of this fact for stability is not yet fully investigated theoretically. As a third configuration a rectangular, flat pinch tube has been constructed, and the behaviour of a flat plasma sheet with edges is being studied experimentally

  2. Z-pinch driven hohlraums design for the 100 nanoseconds current time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, F.

    2003-12-01

    This work estimates Z-pinch driven hohlraums capabilities to obtain high temperatures (>200 eV). Simple models are proposed to calculate the performances offered by currents of 5 to 100 MA in 100 ns. The one dimensional physics of the Z-pinch at the length scale of its thickness and the hydrodynamics instabilities are studied. Then the enhancement of hohlraums performances with double nested Z-pinches or the use of an axial magnetic field is analysed. Z-pinch direct drive approach for inertial confinement fusion is finally considered. All the presented results are based on theoretical and 2D numerical approach and on the analysis of experimental results which were obtained on the american 'Z' generator. Annexes recall radiation MHD equations and check their validity for Z-pinch implosion. (author)

  3. Plasma dynamics in a staged pinch device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, N.A.D.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, A.M.; Murtaza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma parameters in fiber initiated fast and dense theta-pinch plasma driven by an annular finite-thickness gas-puff Z-pinch are studied. The imploding gas-puff Z-pinch plasma traps an axial magnetic field B/sub z/, compressing it to large values (of the order of several megagauss) in an extremely short time. The rapidly changing magnetic flux of this field induces an azimuthal current on the surface of the coaxially placed fiber, with a rise time an order of magnitude shorter than the applied Z-pinch current. The shorter rise time of the current stabilizes the pinch against sausage mode of MHD instabilities. Our numerical results demonstrate that for a relatively thick gas-puff layer, the compression occurs before the current saturates. At the peak compression the fuel densities of the order of 10/sup 25/ cm/sup -3/ and temperature above 10 keV can be achieved on a time scale of 0.1 nanoseconds, yielding the Lawson Criterion parameters n tau is approximately equal to 10/sup 14/ sec cm/sup -3/ for D-T fuel. The snow-plow effect incorporated in our model exercise a strong influence on the onset and growth rate of sausage and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) modes of instabilities. Imposing a rotational velocity on the outer thin gas-puff plasma can control the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical results indicate that the choice of the spin velocity is critical. Large values of the spin velocity, though provide stabilization against the R-T instability at the final stage of compression, however, it adversely reduce the plasma parameters so essential to achieve controlled fusion. Our analysis, therefore, suggests that a judicious choice of the spin velocity is necessary to obtain the desired temperature and density, especially when we seed D-T fiber plasma with a small fraction of high-Z Kr impurity to initiate the radiative collapse. (author)

  4. Development of an effective pinch bar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ottermann, RW

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available . ....................................10 Figure 3-3: Layout of lightweight pinch bar extruded fibreglass tube. ..................................11 Figure 3-4: XDM lightweight pinch bar with manufactured glass fibre bar. ..........................12 Figure 3-5: XDM lightweight pinch... bar with extruded glass fibre tube. ................................12 Figure 3-6: Stiffness of a 2.8m lightweight pinch bar with an extruded glass fibre tube and a 25mm steel pinch bar...

  5. Scaling the Shear-flow Stabilized Z-pinch to Reactor Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Cleveau, E.

    2015-11-01

    We present a conceptual design along with scaling calculations for a pulsed fusion reactor based on the shear-flow-stabilized Z-pinch device. Experiments performed on the ZaP device, at the University of Washington, have demonstrated stable operation for durations of 20 usec at ~100kA discharge current for pinches that are ~1 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The inverse of the pinch diameter and plasma energy density scale strongly with pinch current and calculations show that maintaining stabilization durations of ~7 usec for increased discharge current (~15x) in a shortened pinch (10 cm) results in a pinch diameter of ~200 um and plasma conditions that approach those needed to support significant fusion burn and energy gain (Ti ~ 30keV, density ~ 3e26/m3, ntau ~1.4e20 sec/m3). Compelling features of the concept include operation at modest discharge current (1.5 MA) and voltage (40kV) along with direct adoption of liquid metals for at least one electrode--technological capabilities that have been proven in existing, commercial, pulse power devices such as large ignitrons. LLNL-ABS-674920. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy ARPAe ALPHA Program by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Linear Transformer Drivers for Z-pinch Based Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert; Seidler, William; Giddens, Patrick; Fabisinski, Leo; Cassibry, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The MSFC/UAH team has been developing of a novel power management and distribution system called a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD). LTD's hold the promise of dramatically reducing the required mass to drive a z-pinch by replacing the capacitor banks which constitute half the mass of the entire system. The MSFC?UAH tea, is developing this technology in hope of integrating it with the Pulsed Fission Fusion (PuFF) propulsion concept. High-Voltage pulsed power systems used for Z-Pinch experimentation have in the past largely been based on Marx Generators. Marx generators deliver the voltage and current required for the Z-Pinch, but suffer from two significant drawbacks when applied to a flight system: they are very massive, consisting of high-voltage capacitor banks insulated in oil-filled tanks and they do not lend themselves to rapid pulsing. The overall goal of Phase 2 is to demonstrate the construction of a higher voltage stack from a number of cavities each of the design proven in Phase 1 and to characterize and understand the techniques for designing the stack. The overall goal of Phase 3 is to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a higher energy cavity from a number of smaller LTD stacks, to characterize and understand the way in which the constituent stacks combine, and to extend this demonstration LTD to serve as the basis for a 64 kJ pulse generator for Z-Pinch experiments.

  7. Progress in symmetric ICF capsule implosions and wire-array z-pinch source physics for double z-pinch driven hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, David Emery; Vesey, Roger Alan; Rambo, Patrick K.; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Hanson, David L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Afeyan, Bedros B.; Smith, Ian Craig; Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Bennett, Guy R.; Campbell, Robert B.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan

    2005-01-01

    Over the last several years, rapid progress has been made evaluating the double-z-pinch indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) high-yield target concept (Hammer et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2129). We have demonstrated efficient coupling of radiation from two wire-array-driven primary hohlraums to a secondary hohlraum that is large enough to drive a high yield ICF capsule. The secondary hohlraum is irradiated from two sides by z-pinches to produce low odd-mode radiation asymmetry. This double-pinch source is driven from a single electrical power feed (Cuneo et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 215004) on the 20 MA Z accelerator. The double z-pinch has imploded ICF capsules with even-mode radiation symmetry of 3.1 ± 1.4% and to high capsule radial convergence ratios of 14-21 (Bennett et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 245002; Bennett et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 3717; Vesey et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 1854). Advances in wire-array physics at 20 MA are improving our understanding of z-pinch power scaling with increasing drive current. Techniques for shaping the z-pinch radiation pulse necessary for low adiabat capsule compression have also been demonstrated.

  8. Power balance in an Ohmically heated fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Roberts, K.V.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified power-balance equation (zero-dimensional model) is used to study the performance of an Ohmically heated fusion reactor with emphasis on a pulsed reversed-field pinch concept (RFP). The energy confinement time tausub(E) is treated as an adjustable function, and empirical tokamak scaling laws are employed in the numerical estimates, which are supplemented by 1-D ATHENE code calculations. The known heating rates and energy losses are represented by the net energy replacement time tausub(W), which is exhibited as a surface in density (n) and temperature (T) space with a saddle point (nsub(*), Tsub(*)), the optimum ignition point. It is concluded that i) ignition by Ohmic heating is more practicable for the RFP reactor than for a tokamak reactor with the same tausub(E), (ii) if at fixed current the minor radius can be reduced or at fixed minor radius the current can be increased, then it is found that Ohmic ignition becomes more likely when present tokamak scaling laws are used. More definitive estimates require, however, a knowledge of tausub(E), which can only be obtained by establishing a reliable set of experimental RFP scaling laws and, in particular, by extending RFP experiments closer to the reactor regime. (author)

  9. Japanese fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, T.

    1987-01-01

    The Japan experience during thirty years in nuclear fusion research is reported, after attending the 1st Geneva Conference in 1955, Osaka University, immedeately began linear pinch study using capacitor bank discharge. Subsequently to his trial several groups were organized to ward fusion R and D at universities in Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto, Sendai and son on. Based upon the recommendation of Japan Science Council, Institut of Plasma Physics (IPP) was established at Nagoya University in 1961 When the 1st International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research was held in Saltzburg. The gloomy Bohm barrier had stood in front of many of experiments at that time. (author) [pt

  10. Engineering and physics considerations for a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor (LTPHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor based on pulsed, high-β, linear theta-pinch magnetic confinement is considered. A preliminary design which incorporates key physics, engineering and economic considerations is presented. An extensive presentation of the system energy balance is made, and this energy balance is evaluated parametrically. The feasibility of end-loss reduction is addressed

  11. Future with fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, F.

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews several current approaches to the development of nuclear fusion power sources by the year 2000. First mentioned is the only project to develop a nonpolluting, radiation-free source by using only natural and nonradioactive isotopes (nuclei of deuterium, helium 3 and boron) as ''advanced'' fuels. This system will also be capable of direct conversion of the released energy into electricity. Next described is the PACER concept, in which thermonuclear burning of deuterium occurs in fusion explosion taking place underground (e.g., in a salt dome). The released energy is absorbed in high-pressure steam which is then piped to a surface heat exchanger to provide steam for a turbogenerator. After filtration, the steam is returned. The PACER system also produces fissionable fuel. The balance of the article reviews three ''magnetic fusion'' approaches. Tokamak, mirror and theta pinch systems utilize magnetic fields to confine a plasma for either pulsed or steady-state operation. The tokamak and theta pinch are toroidal in shape, while the mirror can be thought of as a magnetic field configuration of roughly tubular shape that confines the plasma by means of higher fields at the ends than at its center. The tokamak approach accounts for about 65 percent of the magnetic fusion research and development, while theta pinches and mirrors represent about 15 percent each. Refs

  12. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive survey is presented of the present state of knowledge in nuclear fusion research. In the first part, potential thermonuclear reactions, basic energy balances of the plasma (Lawson criterion), and the main criteria to be observed in the selection of appropriate thermonuclear reactions are dealt with. This is followed by a discussion of the problems encountered in plasma physics (plasma confinement and heating, transport processes, plasma impurities, plasma instabilities and plasma diagnostics) and by a consideration of the materials problems involved, such as material of the first wall, fuel inlet and outlet, magnetic field generation, as well as repair work and in-service inspections. Two main methods have been developed to tackle these problems: reactor concepts using the magnetic pinch (stellarator, Tokamak, High-Beta reactors, mirror machines) on the one hand, and the other concept using the inertial confinement (laser fusion reactor). These two approaches and their specific problems as well as past, present and future fusion experiments are treated in detail. The last part of the work is devoted to safety and environmental aspects of the potential thermonuclear aspects of the potential thermonuclear reactor, discussing such problems as fusion-specific hazards, normal operation and potential hazards, reactor incidents, environmental pollution by thermal effluents, radiological pollution, radioactive wastes and their disposal, and siting problems. (orig./GG) [de

  13. Review of effects of dielectric coatings on electrical exploding wires and Z pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Li, Mo; Li, Yang; Qiu, Aici

    2017-10-01

    As the most powerful x-ray source in the laboratories, the wire array Z pinches have been of great relevance to inertial confinement fusions, laboratory astrophysics, and other high-energy density applications. In order to produce x-ray with greater power and higher efficiency, the dynamics of wire array has been investigated extensively, and various methods have been proposed to improve the implosion quality of the wire array. This review focuses on the experimental and theoretical investigations regarding the effects of the dielectric coatings on electrical exploding wires and Z pinches. Since the early 2000, the electrical wire explosion related to the first stage of the wire array Z pinches has been studied extensively, and the results indicated that the dielectric coatings can significantly increase the joule energy deposition into a wire in the initial stage, and even the corona free explosion of tungsten wires can be achieved. Recently, there is an increasing interest in the dynamics of insulated wire array Z pinches. By applying dielectric coatings, the ablation process is suppressed, the x-ray start time is delayed, and the possibility of multi-peak radiation is decreased. This review is organized by the evolution dynamics of wire array Z pinches, and a broad introduction to relevant scientific concepts and various other applications are presented. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further developments of Z pinch loads using dielectric coatings are proposed to further promote the researches and their applications.

  14. Review of effects of dielectric coatings on electrical exploding wires and Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Mo; Li, Yang; Li, Xingwen; Qiu, Aici

    2017-01-01

    As the most powerful x-ray source in the laboratories, the wire array Z pinches have been of great relevance to inertial confinement fusions, laboratory astrophysics, and other high-energy density applications. In order to produce x-ray with greater power and higher efficiency, the dynamics of wire array has been investigated extensively, and various methods have been proposed to improve the implosion quality of the wire array. This review focuses on the experimental and theoretical investigations regarding the effects of the dielectric coatings on electrical exploding wires and Z pinches. Since the early 2000, the electrical wire explosion related to the first stage of the wire array Z pinches has been studied extensively, and the results indicated that the dielectric coatings can significantly increase the joule energy deposition into a wire in the initial stage, and even the corona free explosion of tungsten wires can be achieved. Recently, there is an increasing interest in the dynamics of insulated wire array Z pinches. By applying dielectric coatings, the ablation process is suppressed, the x-ray start time is delayed, and the possibility of multi-peak radiation is decreased. This review is organized by the evolution dynamics of wire array Z pinches, and a broad introduction to relevant scientific concepts and various other applications are presented. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further developments of Z pinch loads using dielectric coatings are proposed to further promote the researches and their applications. (topical review)

  15. Computational modeling of z-pinch-driven hohlraum experiments on Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R.A.; Porter, J.L. Jr.; Cuneo, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The high-yield inertial confinement fusion concept based on a double-ended z-pinch driven hohlraum tolerates the degree of spatial inhomogeneity present in z-pinch plasma radiation sources by utilizing a relatively large hohlraum wall surface to provide spatial smoothing of the radiation delivered to the fusion capsule. The z-pinch radiation sources are separated from the capsule by radial spoke arrays. Key physics issues for this concept are the behavior of the spoke array (effect on the z-pinch performance, x-ray transmission) and the uniformity of the radiation flux incident on the surface of the capsule. Experiments are underway on the Z accelerator at Sandia National laboratories to gain understanding of these issues in a single-sided drive geometry. These experiments seek to measure the radiation coupling among the z-pinch, source hohlraum, and secondary hohlraum, as well as the uniformity of the radiation flux striking a foam witness ball diagnostic positioned in the secondary hohlraum. This paper will present the results of computational modeling of various aspects of these experiments

  16. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  17. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintenz, J P; Adams, R G; Bailey, J E [Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs.

  18. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs

  19. Towards fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, G.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt has been made to present general but broad review of the recent developments in the field of plasma physics and its application to fusion power. The first chapter describes the fusion reactions and fusion power systems. The second chapter deals in detail with production and behaviour of plasma, screening, oscillations, instability, energy losses, temperature effects, etc. Magnetic confinements, including pinch systems, toroidal systems such as Tokamac and stellarator, minor machine, etc. are discussed in detail in chapter III. Laser produced plasma, laser implosion and problems associated with it and future prospects are explained in chapter IV. Chapter V is devoted entirely to the various aspects of hybrid systems. The last chapter throws light on problems of fusion technology, such as plasma heating, vacuum requirements, radiation damage, choice of materials, blanket problems, hazards of fusion reactions, etc. (K.B.)

  20. Design of the PST: A Diagnostic for 1-D Imaging of Fast Z-Pinch Power Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, Gregory A.; Derzon, Mark S.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Lazier, Steven Earl

    2000-01-01

    Fast Z-pinch technology developed on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories can produce up to 230 TW of thermal x-ray power for applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and weapons physics experiments. During implosion, these Z-pinches develop Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities which are very difficult to diagnose and which functionally diminish the overall pinch quality. The Power-Space-Time (PST) instrument is a newly configured diagnostic for measuring the pinch power as a function of both space and time in a Z-pinch. Placing the diagnostic at 90 degrees from the Z-pinch axis, the PST provides a new capability in collecting experimental data on R-T characteristics for making meaningful comparisons to magneto-hydrodynamic computer models. This paper is a summary of the PST diagnostic design. By slit-imaging the Z-pinch x-ray emissions onto a linear scintillator/fiber-optic array coupled to a streak camera system, the PST can achieve ∼100 microm spatial resolution and ∼1.3 ns time resolution. Calculations indicate that a 20 microm thick scintillating detection element filtered by 1,000 angstrom of Al is theoretically linear in response to Plankian x-ray distributions corresponding to plasma temperatures from 40 eV to 150 eV, By calibrating this detection element to x-ray energies up to 5,000 eV, the PST can provide pinch power as a function of height and time in a Z-pinch for temperatures ranging from ∼40 eV to ∼400 eV. With these system pm-meters, the PST can provide data for an experimental determination of the R-T mode number, amplitude, and growth rate during the late-time pinch implosion

  1. Two-dimensional integrated Z-pinch ICF design simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lash, J.S.

    1999-07-01

    The dynamic hohlraum ICF concept for a Z-pinch driver utilizes the imploding wire array collision with a target to produce a radiation history suitable for driving an embedded inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule. This target may consist of various shaped layers of low-density foams or solid-density materials. The use of detailed radiation magneto-hydrodynamic (RMHD) modeling is required for understanding and designing these complex systems. Critical to producing credible simulations and designs is inclusion of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable wire-array dynamics; the bubble and spike structure of the collapsing sheath may yield regions of low-opacity enhancing radiation loss as well as introduce non-uniformities in the capsule's radiation drive. Recent improvements in LASNEX have allowed significant progress to be made in the modeling of unstable z-pinch implosions. Combining this with the proven ICF capsule design capabilities of LASNEX, the authors now have the modeling tools to produce credible, fully-integrated ICF dynamic hohlraum simulations. They present detailed two-dimensional RMHD simulations of recent ICF dynamic hohlraum experiments on the Sandia Z-machine as well as design simulations for the next-generation Z-pinch facility and future high-yield facility.

  2. Two-dimensional integrated Z-pinch ICF design simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic hohlraum ICF concept for a Z-pinch driver utilizes the imploding wire array collision with a target to produce a radiation history suitable for driving an embedded inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule. This target may consist of various shaped layers of low-density foams or solid-density materials. The use of detailed radiation magneto-hydrodynamic (RMHD) modeling is required for understanding and designing these complex systems. Critical to producing credible simulations and designs is inclusion of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable wire-array dynamics; the bubble and spike structure of the collapsing sheath may yield regions of low-opacity enhancing radiation loss as well as introduce non-uniformities in the capsule's radiation drive. Recent improvements in LASNEX have allowed significant progress to be made in the modeling of unstable z-pinch implosions. Combining this with the proven ICF capsule design capabilities of LASNEX, the authors now have the modeling tools to produce credible, fully-integrated ICF dynamic hohlraum simulations. They present detailed two-dimensional RMHD simulations of recent ICF dynamic hohlraum experiments on the Sandia Z-machine as well as design simulations for the next-generation Z-pinch facility and future high-yield facility

  3. Pinch Related Research At Institute For Plasma Research, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, Anurag

    2006-01-01

    Several pinch related experiment, their drivers and related diagnostics are being developed in our laboratory. The first set of experiments is to investigate various aspects of magnetized target fusion (MTF/MAGO). To drive the liner, in Z or theta pinch configuration, a 1.2 MJ, 3.6 MA capacitor bank is developed. For liner diagnostics flash radiography, VISAR and pyrometery are being developed. To produce magnetized (target) plasma a 120 kJ, 3 MA and several other banks are developed. Hot magnetized Plasma will be diagnosed by optical schlieren, interferometery and X-Ray spectrometry. A terra-watt system consisting of a Marx bank and water line delivering 800 kA at 1.6 MV will be commissioned, soon. The device will be used to study different pinch (wire array) configurations for production of electro-magnetic radiations. Smaller pulsed power systems, consisting of 1MV/500 kV Marx bank/tesla transformer and than water or solid state (cables) pulse forming network (coax) are also being developed for capillary discharge and other experiments. Two plasma foci experiments are also being conducted. The effort is produce a repetitively operating compact plasma focus

  4. Putting the pinch on reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavic, P.; Kravanja, Z.; Homsak, M.

    1990-01-01

    Pinch technology has proven to be a powerful tool for designing new processes and retrofitting old ones. But, until recently, it was thought to pertain only to heat exchanger networks, separators and power devices (such as heat engines and heat pumps). Regarded as process background, reactors have been left out of heat integrations. Their structure, however, can be changed and, within limits, their parameters modified to better exploit energy. In a pinch-designed plant, heat is transferred between the hot and cold process streams so efficiently that the plant's utility requirements (heat sources and sinks) are minimal. The design procedure is discussed. It involves two steps: finding a nearly optimal process structure by means of an analysis of process-temperature-vs.- enthalpy diagrams, and then optimizing the structure by means of grid diagrams or a computerized procedure

  5. Eigenvalue pinching on spinc manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Saskia

    2017-02-01

    We derive various pinching results for small Dirac eigenvalues using the classification of spinc and spin manifolds admitting nontrivial Killing spinors. For this, we introduce a notion of convergence for spinc manifolds which involves a general study on convergence of Riemannian manifolds with a principal S1-bundle. We also analyze the relation between the regularity of the Riemannian metric and the regularity of the curvature of the associated principal S1-bundle on spinc manifolds with Killing spinors.

  6. Producing High-Performance, Stable, Sheared-Flow Z-Pinches in the FuZE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.,; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Stepanov, A. D.; Weber, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Tummel, K. K.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A. E.; University of Washington (UW) Collaboration; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The Fusion Z-Pinch Experiment (FuZE) has made significant strides towards generating high-performance, stable Z-pinch plasmas with goals of ne = 1018 cm-3 and T =1 keV. The Z-pinch plasmas are stabilized with a sheared axial flow that is driven by a coaxial accelerator. The new FuZE device has been constructed and reproduces the major scientific achievements the ZaP project at the University of Washington; ne = 1016 cm-3,T = 100 eV, r20 μs. These parameters are measured with an array of magnetic field probes, spectroscopy, and fast framing cameras. The plasma parameters are achieved using a small fraction of the maximum energy storage and gas injection capability of the FuZE device. Higher density, ne = 5×1017 cm-3, and temperature, T = 500 eV, Z-pinch plasmas are formed by increasing the pinch current. At the higher voltages and currents, the ionization rates in the accelerator increase. By modifying the neutral gas profile in the accelerator, the plasma flow from the accelerator is maintained, driving the flow shear. Formation and sustainment of the sheared-flow Z-pinch plasma will be discussed. Experimental data demonstrating high performance plasmas in a stable Z-pinches will be shown. This work is supported by an award from US ARPA-E.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  8. Invited paper: measurements and model of the coupled particle loss and fluid acceleration in the boundary layer of the zt-40m reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.; Burkhardt, C.; Rusbridge, G.

    1983-01-01

    Coordinated measurements of density fluctuations, using a 10-chord forward scattering array, and of poloidal voltage fluctuations (for frequencies lower than the liner's skin frequency) have led to a consistent account of fluid acceleration associated with pulsed particle loss. The fluctuations involved in this mechanism are present from the beginning of the discharge, and are not obviously related to termination percursor phenomena observed in ZT-40M and discussed elsewhere. The dominant density fluctuation in ZT-40M is an impulsive (risetime about 5 μs) poloidally symmetric cavitation occurring in an annulus (Δr approx. = 0.02-0.04 m) near the liner (r = a = 0.2 m). The pulsed disturbance is primarily due to radial loss of plasma to the liner rather than to toroidal convection. The peak ion flux to the liner is GAMMA /sub i/ greater than or equal to 10 22 m -2 s -1 during an impulse. The cavitations leave an imprint in the density profile that propagates toroidally (against I /sub PHI/ ) with a speed about (1-2) x 10 4 m/s. Another important fluctuating quantity, the poloidal voltage at the plasma boundary, is dominated by impulsive spikes whose full-width is similar to the density-cavitations risetime. The spikes propagate toroidally (against I /sub PHI/ ) with a speed about 3 x 10 4 m/s and survive for a pathlength less than or equal to 1 m. The voltage spikes and density cavitations are highly correlated

  9. Design of a high-temperature first wall/blanket for a d-d compact Reversed-Field-Pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Glancy, J.E.

    1983-05-01

    A high-temperature first wall/blanket which would take full advantage of the absence of tritium breeding in a d-d reactor was designed. This design which produces steam at p = 7 MPa and T = 538 0 C at the blanket exit eliminates the requirement for a separate steam generator. A steam cycle with steam-to-steam reheat yielding about 37.5 percent efficiency is compatible with this design

  10. Scaling laws for spherical pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.P.; Palleschi, V.; Vaselli, M.

    1991-01-01

    In spherical pinch (SP) experiments, the plasma heated at the center of a cell to reach ignition temperature is confined by imploding shock waves for a time long enough to satisfy the Lawson criterion for plasma fusion. In earlier theoretical studies, the expansion of the central plasma either is neglected or is assumed to be radially uniform. The energy is considered to be deposited instantaneously at the center of the cell and the nonlinear heat conduction equation is solved to study the temporal evolution of the central plasma. Incorporating the ignition condition for the average temperature of the expanding fireball, and its confinement by imploding convergent shock waves, which may be fired from the periphery of the cell with some time delay, the scaling laws for satisfying the Lawson criterion are investigated in detail. The relevant calculations indicate that the cumulative effects of the convergent shock waves in the vicinity of the center of the cell play an important role in these scaling laws. (author)

  11. Development of fast pulsed power driver for radiography and Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Aici; Sun Fengju

    2008-01-01

    Z-pinch and flash X-ray radiography have an important application in inertial confine fusion (ICF) and nuclear radiation effects simulation and high performance hydrodynamic test, etc. Z-pinch ICF and multi-pulse multi-axis high energy X-ray radiography put forward a huge challenge for pulsed power driver, so the direct-driven-load fast pulsed power driver are developed actively in home and abroard. The paper summarized the recent advances and developing trends of the fast pulsed power driver based on fast Marx(FMG) and fast linear transformer driver (LTD), and analysized the advantages and disadvantages and restricting factors about FMG and FLTD and their key technologies, then introduced the state-of-arts on the investigation in Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology. In the end, the paper presented some advices and views about studying fast pulsed power driver applied to Z-pinch and flash X-ray radiography in home. (authors)

  12. Z-pinch driven hohlraums design for the 100 nanoseconds current time scale; Conception de cavites radiatives chauffees par plasma de striction magnetique en regime 100ns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, F

    2003-12-15

    This work estimates Z-pinch driven hohlraums capabilities to obtain high temperatures (>200 eV). Simple models are proposed to calculate the performances offered by currents of 5 to 100 MA in 100 ns. The one dimensional physics of the Z-pinch at the length scale of its thickness and the hydrodynamics instabilities are studied. Then the enhancement of hohlraums performances with double nested Z-pinches or the use of an axial magnetic field is analysed. Z-pinch direct drive approach for inertial confinement fusion is finally considered. All the presented results are based on theoretical and 2D numerical approach and on the analysis of experimental results which were obtained on the american 'Z' generator. Annexes recall radiation MHD equations and check their validity for Z-pinch implosion. (author)

  13. Fiber Z-pinch experiments and calculations in the finite Larmor radius regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.; Dangor, A.E.; Coppins, M.

    1996-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch project at Imperial College is aimed at achieving radiative collapse to high density in a hydrogen plasma, and also to study plasmas close to controlled fusion conditions. To this end, the MAGPIE generator (2.4 MV, 1.25 Ω, and 200 ns) has been built and tested, and is now giving preliminary experimental data at 60% of full voltage for carbon and CD 2 fibers. These discharges are characterized by an initial radial expansion followed by the occurrence of m = 0 structures with transient X-ray emission from bright spots. Late in the discharge a disruption can occur, accompanied by hard X-ray emission from the anode due to an energetic electron beam and, in the case of CD 2 fibers, a neutron burst. Concomitant theoretical studies have solved the linear stability problem for a Z-pinch with large ion Larmor radii, showing that a reduction in growth rate of m = 0 and m = 1 modes to about 20% of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) value can occur for a parabolic density profile when the Larmor radius is optimally 20% of the pinch radius. Two-dimensional MHD simulations of Z-pinches in two extremes of focussed short-pulse laser-plasma interactions and of galactic jets reveal a nonlinear stabilizing effect in the presence of sheared flow. One-dimensional simulations show that at low line density the lower hybrid drift instability can lead to coronal radial expansion of a Z-pinch plasma. (Author)

  14. Fusion reaction yield in focused discharges with variable energy and plasma fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, A.; Brzosko, J.S.; Chiara, P. De; Kilic, H.; Mezzetti, F.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.; Wang, J.

    1992-01-01

    The same linear correlation between the distribution parameters (ΔT and Max ΔV) of the radial current density J between electrodes and the fusion reaction yield per pulse, Y, in the plasma focus (PF) pinch was quantitatively determined from different PF machines. Contact prints of current-sheath fragments (CSF) ejected from the pinch are obtained from 2.5-MeV-D + ions. CSF's show the same submillimetric fine structure of the pinch. (author) 3 refs., 2 tabs

  15. 1/4-pinched contact sphere theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Jian; Huang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Given a closed contact 3-manifold with a compatible Riemannian metric, we show that if the sectional curvature is 1/4-pinched, then the contact structure is universally tight. This result improves the Contact Sphere Theorem in [EKM12], where a 4/9-pinching constant was imposed. Some tightness...

  16. PIXIE3D: An efficient, fully implicit, parallel, 3D extended MHD code for fusion plasma modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, L.

    2007-01-01

    PIXIE3D is a modern, parallel, state-of-the-art extended MHD code that employs fully implicit methods for efficiency and accuracy. It features a general geometry formulation, and is therefore suitable for the study of many magnetic fusion configurations of interest. PIXIE3D advances the state of the art in extended MHD modeling in two fundamental ways. Firstly, it employs a novel conservative finite volume scheme which is remarkably robust and stable, and demands very small physical and/or numerical dissipation. This is a fundamental requirement when one wants to study fusion plasmas with realistic conductivities. Secondly, PIXIE3D features fully-implicit time stepping, employing Newton-Krylov methods for inverting the associated nonlinear systems. These methods have been shown to be scalable and efficient when preconditioned properly. Novel preconditioned ideas (so-called physics based), which were prototypes in the context of reduced MHD, have been adapted for 3D primitive-variable resistive MHD in PIXIE3D, and are currently being extended to Hall MHD. PIXIE3D is fully parallel, employing PETSc for parallelism. PIXIE3D has been thoroughly benchmarked against linear theory and against other available extended MHD codes on nonlinear test problems (such as the GEM reconnection challenge). We are currently in the process of extending such comparisons to fusion-relevant problems in realistic geometries. In this talk, we will describe both the spatial discretization approach and the preconditioning strategy employed for extended MHD in PIXIE3D. We will report on recent benchmarking studies between PIXIE3D and other 3D extended MHD codes, and will demonstrate its usefulness in a variety of fusion-relevant configurations such as Tokamaks and Reversed Field Pinches. (Author)

  17. Numerical simulation of a Z-pinch compressed by imploding liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, L.; Linhart, J.G.; Verri, G.; Bernal, L.

    2001-01-01

    The spark created in a neck of a dense Z-pinch can ignite a fusion detonation in the adjacent D-T plasma channel. Using an appropriate transition between the ignited D-T plasma and an inertially confined cylinder of highly compressed advanced fuel plasma it is possible to amplify the spark energy to a level adequate for the ignition of a detonation wave in the advanced fuel. An m=0 instability of a Z-pinch carrying a current of the order of 10 MA, with a rise time inferior to 10 ns can generate a spark capable of igniting a fusion detonation in the adjacent D-T plasma channel. Such μZ-pinch may be produced by a fast implosion of a cylindrical liner, while a conical channel properly chosen can amplify the spark energy. In order to derive some general rules for the parameters of the spark, the transition, the cylinder of advanced fuel and the liner different numerical models were used. We present here a review of these results and an outline of a possible experimental arrangement for obtaining such a Z-pinch compression

  18. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for

  19. Lower pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-01-01

    In an Extrap pinch there is a superimposed magnetic octupole field which forms a magnetic separatrix with the field generated by the pinch current. Earlier experiments have shown that the octupole field has a stabilizing influence on the plasma. Regardless of the details of this stabilizing mechanism, it is expected that the influence of the octupole field should become negligible for a sufficiently small ratio between the characteristic pinch and separatrix radii. In other words, there should exist a lower limit of this ratio below which the system approaches the state of an ordinary unstabilized Z-pinch. The present paper presents an extended version of an earlier theoretical model of this lower limit, and its relation to the corresponding critical ratio between the external conductor and pinch currents. This ratio is found to vary substantially with the plasma parameters. (authors)

  20. Plasma sheath dynamics in pinch discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, A.A.Abd-Fattah

    1995-01-01

    The main interest of the study was to understand the dynamic and to determine the plasma parameters in the 3.5 meter θ-pinch discharge. The 3.5 meter thetatron plasma device has been reconstructed and developed which consist of four capacitor banks: a) Main pinch capacitor bank, (θ-pinch bank) consists of 40 capacitors connected in parallel each of 1.5 μ F., with maximum energy equal to 48 k Joule. b) Preionization capacitor bank (z-pinch) consists of capacitors connected in series each of 1.5μ F., with maximum energy to 0.94 k Joule. c) Bias field bank consists of 4 capacitors connected in parallel each of 38μ F., with maximum energy equal to 4.46 k Joule. d) Screw pinch capacitor bank consists of 5 capacitors connected in parallel each of 1.5μ F., with maximum energy equal to 6 k Joule

  1. Solid fiber Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations have been performed to study the behavior of solid deuterium fiber Z-pinch experiments performed at Los Alamos and the Naval Research Laboratory. The computations use a tabulated atomic data base and ''cold-start'' initial conditions. The computations predict that the solid fiber persists longer in existing experiments than previously expected and that the discharge actually consists of a relatively low-density, hot plasma which has been ablated from the fiber. The computations exhibit m = 0 behavior in the hot, exterior plasma prior to complete ablation of the solid fiber. The m = 0 behavior enhances the fiber ablation rate. 10 refs., 5 figs

  2. Energy by nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buende, R.; Daenner, W.; Herold, H.; Raeder, J.

    1976-12-01

    This report reviews the state of knowledge in a number of fields of fusion research up to autumn 1976. Section 1 gives a very brief presentation of the elementary fusion reactions, the energies delivered by them and the most basic energy balances leading to Lawson-type diagrams. Section 2 outlines the reserves and cost of lithium and deuterium, gives estimates of the total energy available from DT fusion and comments on production technology, availlability and handling of the fuels. In section 3 a survey is given of the different concepts of magnetic confinement (stellarators, tokamaks, toroidal pinches, mirror machines, two-component plasmas), of confinement by walls, gas blankets and imploding liners and, finally, of the concepts of interial confinement (laser fusion, beam fusion). The reactors designed or outlined on the basis of the tokamak, high-β, mirror, and laser fusion concepts are presented in section 4, which is followed in section 5 by a discussion of the key problems of fusion power plants. The present-day knowledge of the cost structure of fusion power plants and the sensitivity of this structure with respect to the physical and technical assumptions made is analysed in section 6. Section 7 and 8 treat the aspects of safety and environment. The problems discussed include the hazard potentials of different designs (radiological, toxicological, and with respect to stored energies), release of radioactivity, possible kinds of malfunctioning, and the environmental impact of waste heat, radiation and radioactive waste (orig.) [de

  3. Comparison between the boundary layer and global resistivity methods for tearing modes in reversed field configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, M.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the problem of growth rate calculations for tearing modes in field reversed Θ-pinches is presented. Its shown that in the several experimental data, the methods used for analysing the plasma with a global finite resistivity has a better quantitative agreement than the boundary layer analysis. A comparative study taking into account the m = 1 resistive kindmode and the m = 2 mode, which is more dangerous for the survey of rotational instabilities of the plasma column is done. It can see that the imaginary component of the eigenfrequency, which determinates the growth rate, has a good agreement with the experimental data and the real component is different from the rotational frequency as it has been measured in some experiments. (author) [pt

  4. Upper pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-12-01

    A simple static equilibrium model of the Z-pinch is considered where a hot plasma core is surrounded by a cold-mantle (gas blanket). The pinch radius, defined as the radial extension of the fully ionized plasma core, is uniquely determined by the plasma particle. momentum and heat balance equations. In Extrap configurations an octupole field is introduced which imposes a magnetic separatrix on Z-pinch geometry. This makes the conditions for Extrap equilibrium 'overdetermined' when the characteristic pinch radium given by the plasma parameters tends to exceed the characteristic radius of the magnetic separatrix. In this case no conventional pinch equilibrium can exist, and part of the current which is forced into the plasma discharge by external sources must be channelled outside of the separatrix, i.e. into the surrounding support structure of the Extrap conductors and the vessel walls. A possibly existing bootstrap current in the plasma boundary layer is further expected to be 'scraped off' in this case. The present paper gives some illustrations of the marginal case of this upper pinch radius limit, in a state where the pinch current is antiparallel to the external rod currents which generate the octupole field. (authors)

  5. Fusion research at Imperial College

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The historical roots of fusion research at Imperial College can be traced back to 1946 with the pioneering work of G.P. Thomson. At present research in fusion is carried out in several research groups with interdisciplinary work managed by the Centre for Fusion Studies. The principal research activity will be centred on a newly funded 5 TW pulsed power facility allowing an experimental and theoretical study of radiation collapse and fusion conditions in the dense Z-pinch. Laser-plasma studies relevant to inertial confinement are carried out using the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory's Central Laser Facility and the new ultra-short pulse (300 fs) laser facility at Imperial College. There is a significant collaboration on the Joint European Torus and the Next European Torus together with a continuation of a long association with Culham Laboratory. Several European collaborations funded by the Comission of the European Communities and other world-wide collaborations form an integral part of this university programme, which is by far the largest in the UK. After a sketch of the historical development of fusion activities, the current and future programme of fusion research at Imperial College is presented in each of the three broad areas: the Z-pinch, laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and tokamak and other conventional magnetic confinement schemes. A summary of the funding and collaborations is outlined. (author)

  6. Physics and applications of micro and fast z-pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masugata, Katsumi

    2003-07-01

    This is the proceedings of symposium on 'Physics and Application of Micro and Fast z-Pinch Plasma' held at National Institute for Fusion Science. Recent progress of experimental and theoretical works on high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power is presented. Separate abstracts were presented for 4 of the papers in this report. The remaining 14 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  7. Neutron emission generated during wire array Z-pinch implosion onto deuterated fiber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Ananev, S.S.; Bakshaev, Yu. L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Kazakov, E.D.; Korolev, V. D.; Meshcherov, B.R.; Ustroev, G. I.; Juha, Libor; Krása, Josef; Velyhan, Andriy

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2008), 32701/1-32701/13 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : fusion plasmas * d-d reaction * neutron yield * Z pinch * high-current discharges Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.427, year: 2008

  8. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Chopp, Treasa; Qi Shengmei; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2005-01-01

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion

  9. The stability of the High-Density Z-Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.; Nebel, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiber-initiated High Density Z-Pinches at Los Alamos, NRL, and Karlsruhe have shown anomalously good stability. Kink modes are never seen, and sausage modes are at least delayed until late in the discharge. The success of these devices in reaching fusion conditions may depend on maintaining and understanding this anomalous stability. We have developed two numerical methods to study the stability in the regime where fluid theory is valid. While our methods are applicable to all modes, we will describe them only for the m = 0 sausage mode. The appearance of sausage modes late in the discharge and the total absence of kink modes suggest that an understanding of sausage modes is more urgent, and it is also simpler. 14 refs., 8 figs

  10. The stability of the high-density z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.; Nebel, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiber-initiated High Density Z-Pinches at Los Alamos, NRL, and Karlsruhe have shown anomalously good stability. Kink modes are never seen, and sausage modes are at least delayed until late in the discharge. The success of these devices in reaching fusion conditions may depend on maintaining and understanding this anomalous stability. We have developed two numerical methods to study the stability in the regime where fluid theory is valid. While our methods are applicable to all modes, we will describe them only for the m=0 sausage mode. The appearance of sausage modes late in the discharge and the total absence of kink modes suggest that an understanding of sausage modes is more urgent, and it is also simpler

  11. Cost estimation for a theta-pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coultas, T.A.; Cook, J.M.; Crnkovich, P.; Dauzvardis, P.

    1976-02-01

    A simulation of a theta-pinch fusion power plant has been completed to the point where economic feasibility can be examined. A PL/I cost subprogram is presented for interfacing with the computer code TPFPP. This code is then used to obtain a first approximation of the costs for the reactor. Independent geometrical and plant design parameters are varied over a wide range, with simultaneous variation of magnetic field, minor first wall radius, and plasma maximum compression. The study indicates that the plant energy balance must be favorable, availability must be high, and major component costs must be low to achieve economical results. Although costing uncertainties remain, it is clear that development of easy and rapid replacement methods for reactor components is essential and that new staging concepts to reduce the implosion energy requirement must be pursued

  12. The physics of the high density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.; Hammel, J.E.; Lewis, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-initiated High-Density Z-Pinch (HDZP) is a novel concept in which fusion plasma could be produced by applying 2 MV along a thin filament of frozen deuterium, 20-30 μm in diameter, 5-10 cm long. The megamp-range currents that result would ohmically heat the fiber to fusion temperatures in 100 ns while maintaining nearly constant radius. The plasma pressure would be held stably by the self-magnetic field for many radial sound transit times during the current-rise phase while, in the case of D-T, a significant fraction of the fiber undergoes thermonuclear fusion. This paper presents results of Los Alamos HDZP studies. Existing and new experiments are described. A succession of theoretical studies, including 1D self-similar and numerical studies of the hot plasma phase, 1D and 2D numerical studies of the cold startup phase, and 3D numerical studies of stability in the hot regime, are then presented. 9 refs., 4 figs

  13. Charger 1: A New Facility for Z-Pinch Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Brian; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Doughty, Glen; Adams, Robert; DeCicco, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Charger 1 is a multipurpose pulsed power laboratory located on Redstone Arsenal, with a focus on fusion propulsion relevant experiments involving testing z-pinch diodes, pulsed magnetic nozzle and other related physics experiments. UAH and its team of pulsed power researchers are investigating ways to increase and optimize fusion production from Charger 1. Currently the team has reached high-power testing. Due to the unique safety issues related to high power operations the UAH/MSFC team has slowed repair efforts to develop safety and operations protocols. The facility is expected to be operational by the time DZP 2017 convenes. Charger 1 began life as the Decade Module 2, an experimental prototype built to prove the Decade Quad pinch configuration. The system was donated to UAH by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DRTA) in 2012. For the past 5 years a UAH/MSFC/Boeing team has worked to refurbish, assemble and test the system. With completion of high power testing in summer 2017 Charger 1 will become operational for experimentation. Charger 1 utilizes a Marx Bank of 72 100-kV capacitors that are charged in parallel and discharged in series. The Marx output is compressed to a pulse width of approximately 200 ns via a pulse forming network of 32 coaxial stainless steel tubes using water as a dielectric. After pulse compression a set of SF6 switches are triggered, allowing the wave front to propagate through the output line to the load. Charger 1 is capable of storing 572-kJ of energy and time compressing discharge to less than 250 ns discharge time producing a discharge of about 1 TW of discharge with 1 MV and 1 MA peak voltage and current, respectively. This capability will be used to study energy yield scaling and physics from solid density target as applied to advanced propulsion research.

  14. Plasma channel and Z-pinch dynamics for heavy ion transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce-Marquez, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A self stabilized, free standing, z-pinch plasma channel has been proposed to deliver the high intensity heavy ion beam from the end of a driver to the fuel target in a heavy ion inertial fusion power plant. The z-pinch relaxes emittance and energy spread requirements requiring a lower cost driver. A z-pinch transport would reduce the number of beam entry port holes to the target chamber from over a hundred to four as compared to neutralized ballistic focusing thus reducing the driver hardware exposure to neutron flux. Experiments where a double pulse discharge technique is used, z-pinch plasma channels with enhanced stability are achieved. Typical parameters are 7 kV pre-pulse discharge and 30 kV main bank discharge with 50 kA of channel current in a 7 torr background gas atmosphere. This work is an experimental study of these plasma channels examining the relevant physics necessary to understand and model such plasmas. Laser diagnostics measured the dynamical properties of neutrals and plasma. Schlieren and phase contrast techniques probe the pre-pulse gas dynamics and infrared interferometry and faraday effect polarimetry are used on the z-pinch to study its electron density and current distribution. Stability and repeatability of the z-pinch depend on the initial conditions set by the pre-pulse. Results show that the z-pinch channel is wall stabilized by an on-axis gas density depression created by the pre-pulse through hydrodynamic expansion where the ratio of the initial gas density to the final gas density is > 10/1. The low on-axis density favors avalanching along the desired path for the main bank discharge. Pinch time is around 2 s from the main bank discharge initiation with a FWHM of ~ 2 cm. Results also show that typical main bank discharge plasma densities reach 1017 cm-3 peak on axis for a 30 kV, 7 torr gas nitrogen discharge. Current rise time is limited by the circuit-channel inductance with the highest contribution to the

  15. Status of fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Ashok

    1978-01-01

    The current status of fusion technology is surveyed. Limited reserves of fossil fuel and dangers of proliferation from nuclear reactors have brought into focus the need to develop an optional energy source. Fusion is being looked upon as an optional energy source which is free from environmental hazards unlike fossil fuels and nuclear reactors. Investments in R and D of fusion energy have increased rapidly in USA, Japan, USSR and European countries. Out of the various fusion fuels known, a mixture of D and T is widely chosen. The main problem in fusion technology is the confinement of plasma for a time sufficient to start the fusion reaction. This can be done magnetically or inertially. The three approaches to magnetic confinement are : (1) tokamak, (2) mirror and (3) pinch. Inertial confinement makes use of lasers or electron beams or ion beams. Both the methods of confinement i.e. magnetic and inertial have problems which are identified and their nature is discussed. (M.G.B.)

  16. Generation of a subgigagauss magnetic field by pinching the plasma channel of exploded-wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubsky, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    An interest in the dense pinches produced in the explosion of thin wires in the diodes of high current-nanosecond-REB-generators is provided by an opportunity to obtain high temperature-dense plasma configurations as an object of fusion studies and that in the spectroscopy of multi-charged ions. One needs to have a micrometer size of the Z-pinch neck to ignite the fusion reaction. The plasma channel pinching of the wires exploded by a megaampere current to a micrometer size of its neck can provide gigagauss magnetic fields. An important aspect of a given study is verification of an opportunity to obtain the radiation collapse of the plasma channel due to an exploded wire along its whole length up to the kA because of a line radiation cut-off due to the Braginsky-Pease current reduction to 150-200 from the plasma with left-angle Z right-angle much-gt 1. This paper presents experimental studies in this field, with the currents 0.2 MA, 0.5 MA, 1.2 MA

  17. Plasma and current structures in dynamical pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butov, I.Ya.; Matveev, Yu.V.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamics of plasma layers and current structure in aZ-pinch device has been experimentally investigated. It is found that shaping of a main current envelope is ended with its explosion-like expansion, the pinch decaying after compression to separated current filaments. It is also shown that filling of a region outside the pinch with plasma and currents alternating in directions occurs owing to interaction of current loops (inductions) formed in a magnetic piston during its compression with reflected shock wave. Current circulating in the loops sometimes exceeds 1.5-2 times the current of discharge circuit. The phenomena noted appear during development of superheat instability and can be realized, for example, in theta-pinches, plasma focuses, tokamaks. The experiments were carried out at the Dynamic Zeta-pinch device at an energy reserse of up to 15 kJ (V 0 =24 kV) in a capacitor bank. Half-period of the discharge current is 9 μs; Isub(max)=3.5x10sup(5) A. Back current guide surrounding a china chamber of 28 cm diameter and 50 cm length is made in the form of a hollow cylinder. Initial chamber vacuum is 10 -6 torr [ru

  18. High density linear systems for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.R.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The physics and technological limitations and uncertainties associated with the linear theta pinch are discussed in terms of a generalized energy balance, which has as its basis the ratio (Q/sub E/) of total electrical energy generated to net electrical energy consumed. Included in this total is the virtual energy of bred fissile fuel, if a hybrid blanket is used, as well as the actual of real energy deposited in the blanket by the fusion neutron. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed operation demanded by the linear theta pinch are also discussed

  19. Intense ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense beams of light of heavy ions are being studied as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers for high yield and energy. Heavy and light ions have common interests in beam transport, targets, and alternative accelerators. Self-pinched transport is being jointly studied. This article reviews the development of intense ion beams for ICF. Light-ion drivers are highlighted because they are compact, modular, efficient and low cost. Issues facing light ions are: (1) decreasing beam divergence; (2) increasing beam brightness; and (3) demonstrating self-pinched transport. Applied-B ion diodes are favored because of efficiency, beam brightness, perceived scalability, achievable focal intensity, and multistage capability. A light-ion concept addressing these issues uses: (1) an injector divergence of ≤ 24 mrad at 9 MeV; (2) two-stage acceleration to reduce divergence to ≤ 12 mrad at 35 MeV; and (3) self-pinched transport accepting divergences up to 12 mrad. Substantial progress in ion-driven target physics and repetitive ion diode technology is also presented. Z-pinch drivers are being pursued as the shortest pulsed power path to target physics experiments and high-yield fusion. However, light ions remain the pulsed power ICF driver of choice for high-yield fusion energy applications that require driver standoff and repetitive operation. 100 refs

  20. Opacity measurements of tamped NaBr samples heated by z-pinch X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J.E.; Arnault, P.; Blenski, T.; Dejonghe, G.; Peyrusse, O.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Mancini, R.C.; Cuneo, M.E.; Nielsen, D.S.; Rochau, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory measurements provide benchmark data for wavelength-dependent plasma opacities to assist inertial confinement fusion, astrophysics, and atomic physics research. There are several potential benefits to using z-pinch radiation for opacity measurements, including relatively large cm-scale lateral sample sizes and relatively-long 3-5 ns experiment durations. These features enhance sample uniformity. The spectrally resolved transmission through a CH-tamped NaBr foil was measured. The z-pinch produced the X-rays for both the heating source and backlight source. The (50±4) eV foil electron temperature and (3±1)x10 21 cm -3 foil electron density were determined by analysis of the Na absorption features. LTE and NLTE opacity model calculations of the n=2 to 3, 4 transitions in bromine ionized into the M-shell are in reasonably good agreement with the data

  1. Plasma focus - dense Z pinch and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Shozo

    1986-02-01

    ''Workshop on the possibility of Z-pinch as a intense pulse light source'' in 1983 and ''Research meeting on plasma focus and Z-pinch'' in 1984 were held at Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University under a collaborating research program. Research activities reported at the meetings on plasma focus, dense Z-pinch, and related phenomena are summerized. (author)

  2. Recent experimental results on ICF target implosions by Z-pinch radiation sources and their relevance to ICF ignition studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T A; Bailey, J E; Bennett, G; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G; Cuneo, M E; Golovkin, I; Hanson, D L; Leeper, R J; MacFarlane, J J; Mancini, R C; Matzen, M K; Nash, T J; Olson, C L; Porter, J L; Ruiz, C L; Schroen, D G; Slutz, S A; Varnum, W; Vesey, R A

    2003-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions absorbing up to 35 kJ of x-rays from a ∼220 eV dynamic hohlraum on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have produced thermonuclear D-D neutron yields of (2.6±1.3) x 10 10 . Argon spectra confirm a hot fuel with T e ∼ 1 keV and n e ∼ (1-2) x 10 23 cm -3 . Higher performance implosions will require radiation symmetry control improvements. Capsule implosions in a ∼70 eV double-Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum have been radiographed by 6.7 keV x-rays produced by the Z-beamlet laser (ZBL), demonstrating a drive symmetry of about 3% and control of P 2 radiation asymmetries to ±2%. Hemispherical capsule implosions have also been radiographed in Z in preparation for future experiments in fast ignition physics. Z-pinch-driven inertial fusion energy concepts are being developed. The refurbished Z machine (ZR) will begin providing scaling information on capsule and Z-pinch in 2006. The addition of a short pulse capability to ZBL will enable research into fast ignition physics in the combination of ZR and ZBL-petawatt. ZR could provide a test bed to study NIF-relevant double-shell ignition concepts using dynamic hohlraums and advanced symmetry control techniques in the double-pinch hohlraum backlit by ZBL

  3. Recent experimental results on ICF target implosions by Z-pinch radiation sources and their relevance to ICF ignition studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, James E.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Vesey, Roger Alan; Hanson, David Lester; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Porter, John Larry Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Varnum, William S.; Bennett, Guy R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Schroen, Diana Grace; Slutz, Stephen A.; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Golovkin, I.E.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Mancini, Roberto Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions absorbing up to 35 kJ of x-rays from a ∼220 eV dynamic hohlraum on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have produced thermonuclear D-D neutron yields of (2.6 ± 1.3) x 10 10 . Argon spectra confirm a hot fuel with Te ∼ 1 keV and n e ∼ (1-2) x 10 23 cm -3 . Higher performance implosions will require radiation symmetry control improvements. Capsule implosions in a ∼70 eV double-Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum have been radiographed by 6.7 keV x-rays produced by the Z-beamlet laser (ZBL), demonstrating a drive symmetry of about 3% and control of P 2 radiation asymmetries to ±2%. Hemispherical capsule implosions have also been radiographed in Z in preparation for future experiments in fast ignition physics. Z-pinch-driven inertial fusion energy concepts are being developed. The refurbished Z machine (ZR) will begin providing scaling information on capsule and Z-pinch in 2006. The addition of a short pulse capability to ZBL will enable research into fast ignition physics in the combination of ZR and ZBL-petawatt. ZR could provide a test bed to study NIF-relevant double-shell ignition concepts using dynamic hohlraums and advanced symmetry control techniques in the double-pinch hohlraum backlit by ZBL.

  4. Measurements of high-current electron beams from X pinches and wire array Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Bell, K. S.; Hammer, D. A.; Agafonov, A. V.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch cross point to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups are discussed. Results of computer simulation of electron beam propagation from the pinch to the Faraday cup give limits for the measured current for beams having different energy spreads. The beam is partially neutralized as it propagates from the X pinch to a diagnostic system, but within a Faraday cup diagnostic, space charge effects can be very important. Experimental results show evidence of such effects.

  5. Engineering prototypes for theta-pinch devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.; Hammer, C.F.; Hanks, K.W.; McDonald, T.E.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Past, present, and future engineering prototypes for theta-pinch plasma-physics devices at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are discussed. Engineering prototypes are designed to test and evaluate all components under system conditions expected on actual plasma-physics experimental devices. The importance of engineering prototype development increases as the size and complexity of the plasma-physics device increases. Past experiences with the Scyllac prototype and the Staged Theta-Pinch prototype are discussed and evaluated. The design of the proposed Staged Scyllac prototype and the Large Staged Scyllac implosion prototype assembly are discussed

  6. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  7. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  8. Classical impurity ion confinement in a toroidal magnetized fusion plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S T A; Den Hartog, D J; Caspary, K J; Magee, R M; Mirnov, V V; Chapman, B E; Craig, D; Fiksel, G; Sarff, J S

    2012-03-23

    High-resolution measurements of impurity ion dynamics provide first-time evidence of classical ion confinement in a toroidal, magnetically confined plasma. The density profile evolution of fully stripped carbon is measured in MST reversed-field pinch plasmas with reduced magnetic turbulence to assess Coulomb-collisional transport without the neoclassical enhancement from particle drift effects. The impurity density profile evolves to a hollow shape, consistent with the temperature screening mechanism of classical transport. Corroborating methane pellet injection experiments expose the sensitivity of the impurity particle confinement time to the residual magnetic fluctuation amplitude.

  9. Characterization of laser-cut copper foil X-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, G. W.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Wei, M. S.; Reed, C. T.; Forsman, A. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative data analyses of laser-cut Cu foil X-pinch experiments on the 150 ns quarter-period, ˜250 kA GenASIS driver are presented. Three different foil designs are tested to determine the effects of initial structure on pinch outcome. Foil X-pinch data are also presented alongside the results from wire X-pinches with comparable mass. The X-ray flux and temporal profile of the emission from foil X-pinches differed significantly from that of wire X-pinches, with all emission from the foil X-pinches confined to a ˜3 ns period as opposed to the delayed, long-lasting electron beam emission common in wire X-pinches. Spectroscopic data show K-shell as well as significant L-shell emission from both foil and wire X-pinches. Fits to synthetic spectra using the SCRAM code suggest that pinching foil X's produced a ˜1 keV, ne ≥ 1023 cm-3 plasma. The spectral data combined with the improved reliability of the source timing, flux, and location indicate that foil X-pinches generate a reproducible, K-shell point-projection radiography source that can be easily modified and tailored to suit backlighting needs across a variety of applications.

  10. A summary of the Berkeley and Livermore pinch programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling A [University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1958-07-01

    In order to progress toward practical thermonuclear devices, the principal objective must be to prolong containment times by improving the electrical conductivity of the plasma. Those pinch configurations which are grossly unstable are, of course, unsuitable for practical thermonuclear work. Therefore our purely dynamic experiments are conducted only to study basic shock heating and instability mechanisms. Our basic evaluation of progress in pinch-type experiments is the reduction of the dissipation rate of the magnetic fields. The present pessimistic viewpoint is that most of the pinch devices that depend upon high current density within the plasma are beset with an enhanced dissipation rate which is disastrous to pinch containment. This dissipation is derived either from an electron plasma current instability or from hydromagnetic turbulence. Both have been predicted in theory and observed in experiment. Studies have been presented for the following cases: linear and toroidal pinch experiments; sheet pinch devices of modest size; homopolar geometry; shock heating and screw dynamic pinch.

  11. Neutron energy distribution function reconstructed from time-of-flight signals in deuterium gas-puff Z-pinch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klír, D.; Kravárik, J.; Kubeš, J.; Rezac, K.; Ananev, S.S.; Bakshaev, Y. L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Kazakov, E.D.; Korolev, V. D.; Ustroev, G. I.; Juha, Libor; Krása, Josef; Velyhan, Andriy

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2009), s. 425-432 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024 Grant - others:IAEA(XE) RC 14817 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : deuterium * fusion reaction * gas puff * Monte Carlo reconstruction * neutron energy spectra * neutron s * Z-pinch Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.043, year: 2009

  12. Pinch Strengths in Healthy Iranian Children and Young Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Dianat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the physical strength capabilities are essential for design-ing safe and usable products and are useful in a wide range of clinical settings especially during treatment of disease affecting the function of the hand. The purpose of this study was to determine peak lateral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions in a healthy Iranian children and young adult population.Methods: The study was conducted among 511 participants (242 males and 269 females aged 7-30 years. Measurements were carried out with both dominant and non-dominant hands in standard sitting posture using a B&L pinch gauge. Two repetitions of each strength measurement were recorded for each condition and the average value of the two trials was used in the subsequent analysis.Results: The results showed significant differences in the pinch strength data in terms of the age, gender and hand dominance. The lateral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions by females were 68.4%, 68.8%, 78.8% and 81.8% of those exerted by males, respectively. Strength exertions with the non-dominant hand were 6.4%, 5.2%, 6.6% and 5.1% lower than strength exertions of the dominant hand for the lat-eral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions, respectively.Conclusion: These findings can be used to fill the gaps in strength data for Iranian population.

  13. Physical features of the wire-array Z-pinch plasmas imploding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chunming; Feng Kaiming

    2001-01-01

    In the process of research on controlled fusion reactors, scientists found that the Z-pinch plasma can produce very strong X-rays, comparing with other X-ray sources. In researching the process of imploding, the snowplow model and Haines model are introduced and proved. About amassing X-rays, several ways of discharging X-rays are carefully analyzed and the relative theories are proved. In doing simulations, the one dimension model is used in writing codes, the match relationships are calculated and the process of imploding is also simulated. Some useful and reasonable results are obtained

  14. Velocity-space particle loss in field-reversed theta pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, M.Y.

    1983-01-01

    A field-reversed theta pinch (FRTP) is a compact device for magnetic fusion. It has attracted much attention in recent years since encouraging experimental results have been obtained. However, the definite causes for the observed particle loss rate and plasma rotation are not well known. In this work, we study the velocity-space particle loss (VSPL), i.e., particle loss due to the existence of a loss region in velocity space, in FRTP's in order to have a better understanding about the characteristics of this device

  15. Z -Pinch-Generated X Rays Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Olson, R. E.; Bowers, R. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Derzon, M. S.; Hebron, D. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Mock, R. C.; Nash, T. J.; Peterson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Hohlraums measuring 6 mm in diameter by 7 mm in height have been heated by x rays from a Z pinch. Over the measured x-ray input powers P of 0.7 to 13 TW, the hohlraum radiation temperature T increases from ∼55 to ∼130 eV , and is in agreement with the Planckian relation T∼P 1/4 . The results suggest that indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments involving National Ignition Facility relevant pulse shapes and <2 mm diameter capsules can be studied using this arrangement. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  16. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed

  17. Analysis of staged Z-pinch implosion trajectories from experiments on Zebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mike P.; Conti, F.; Darling, T. W.; Ruskov, E.; Valenzuela, J.; Wessel, F. J.; Beg, F.; Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.

    2017-10-01

    The Staged Z-pinch plasma confinement concept relies on compressing an annular liner of high-Z plasma onto a target plasma column of deuterium fuel. The interface between the liner and target is stable against the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, which leads to effective fuel compression and makes the concept interesting as a potential fusion reactor. The liner initiates as a neutral gas puff, while the target plasma is a partially ionized (Zeff coaxial plasma gun. The Zebra pulsed power generator (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) provides the discharge that ionizes the liner and drives the Z-pinch implosion. Diverse diagnostics observe the 100-300 km/s implosions including silicon diodes, photo-conducting detectors (PCDs), laser shadowgraphy, an XUV framing camera, and a visible streak camera. The imaging diagnostics track instabilities smaller than 0.1 mm, and Z-pinch diameters below 2.5 mm are seen at peak compression. This poster correlates the data from these diagnostics to elucidate implosion behavior dependencies on liner gas, liner pressure, target pressure, and applied, axial-magnetic field. Funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  18. Parameter scaling toward high-energy density in a quasi-steady flow Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Sheared axial flows are utilized by the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment to stabilize MHD instabilities. The pinches formed are 50 cm long with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 cm. The plasma is generated in a coaxial acceleration region, similar to a Marshall gun, which provides a steady supply of plasma for approximately 100 us. The power to the plasma is partially decoupled between the acceleration and pinch assembly regions through the use of separate power supplies. Adiabatic scaling of the Bennett relation gives targets for future devices to reach high-energy density conditions or fusion reactors. The applicability of an adiabatic assumption is explored and work is done experimentally to clarify the plasma compression process, which may be more generally polytropic. The device is capable of a much larger parameter space than previous machine iterations, allowing flexibility in the initial conditions of the compression process to preserve stability. This work is supported by DoE FES and NNSA.

  19. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong, E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  20. The role of radial particle pinches in ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.; Evans, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The force balance in the plasma edge in a matched pair of DIII-D (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 6149) tokamak discharges with and without resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is evaluated in order to investigate the effects on particle transport of RMP applied for the purpose of suppressing edge-localized modes (ELMs). Experimental data are used to evaluate the radial and toroidal force balances, which may be written as a pinch-diffusion relation for the radial ion flux to facilitate investigation of transport effects. The radial electric field in the H-mode plasma had a sharp negative dip in the steep gradient region of the edge pedestal, associated with which was a large inward pinch velocity. The main effect of RMP was to make the edge electric field less negative or more positive, reducing this strong negative dip in the radial electric field (even reversing it from negative to positive over some regions), thereby reducing the strong inward particle pinch in the edge of an H-mode discharge, thus causing a reduction in edge density below the ELM threshold.

  1. DT ignition in a Z pinch compressed by an imploding liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, L.; Bernal, L.; Linhart, J.G.; Verri, G.

    2001-01-01

    It has been shown that an m=0 instability of a Z pinch carrying a current of the order of 10 MA with a rise time of less than 10 ns can generate a spark capable of igniting a fusion detonation in the adjacent DT plasma channel. A possible method for generating such currents, necessary for the implosion of an initial large radius, low temperature Z pinch, can be a radial implosion of a cylindrical fast liner. The problem has been addressed in previous publications without considering the role played by an initially impressed m=0 perturbation, a mechanism indispensable for the generation of a spark. The liner-Z pinch dynamics can be solved at several levels of physical model completeness. The first corresponds to a zero dimensional model in which the liner has a given mass per unit length and a zero thickness, the plasma is compressed adiabatically and is isotropic, and there are no energy losses or Joule heating. The second level is one dimensional. The Z pinch plasma is described by the full set of MHD, two-fluid equations. The liner is treated first as thin and incompressible, and subsequently it is assumed that it has a finite thickness and is composed of a heavy ion plasma, having an artificial but realistic equation of state. Both plasma and liner are considered uniform in the Z direction and only DT reactions are considered. It is shown that, given sufficient energy and speed of the liner, the Z pinch can reach a volume ignition. The third level is two dimensional. Plasma and liner are treated as in the second level but either the Z pinch or the liner is perturbed by an m=0 non-uniformity. Provided the liner energy is high enough and the initial m=0 perturbation is correctly chosen, the final neck plasma can act as a spark for DT ignition. It is also shown that the liner energy required for generating a spark and the subsequent detonation propagation are considerably less than in the case of volume ignition. (author)

  2. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density...... gradient length, with an experimental scaling for the pinch number being -Rvpinch/χφ = 1.2R/Ln +1.4. There is no dependence of the pinch number on collisionality, whereas the pinch seems to depend weakly on q-profile, the pinch number decreasing with increasing q. The Prandtl number was not found to depend...... either on R/Ln, collisionality or on q. The gyro-kinetic simulations show qualitatively similar dependence of the pinch number on R/Ln, but the dependence is weaker in the simulations. Gyro-kinetic simulations do not find any clear parametric dependence in the Prandtl number, in agreement...

  3. Evolution of the MHD sheet pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaeus, W.H.; Montgomery, D.

    1979-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) problem of recurrent interest for both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas is the evolution of the unstable sheet pinch, a current sheet across which a dc magnetic field reverses sign. The evolution of such a sheet pinch is followed with a spectral-method, incompressible, two-dimensional, MHD turbulence code. Spectral diagnostics are employed, as are contour plots of vector potential (magnetic field lines), electric current density, and velocity stream function (velocity streamlines). The nonlinear effect which seems most important is seen to be current filamentation: the concentration of the current density onto sets of small measure near a mgnetic X point. A great deal of turbulence is apparent in the current distribution, which, for high Reynolds numbers, requires large spatial grids (greater than or equal to (64) 2 ). 11 figures, 1 table

  4. Pinching Solutions of Slender Cylindrical Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681.2This research was supported in part by Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Cientifico y Tecnologico (FONDE...concentrate on inviscid irrotational flows of liquid jets. A review article has been written by Bogy [2]. Of relevance is also the work of Chandrasekhar...equations become elliptic and allow the possibility of admissible pinching solutions described in this article . It is interesting to find that for jets

  5. ZAPP: Z-pinch atomic physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K.

    1983-01-01

    High-density and high-temperature plasmas have been produced in a z-pinch with a hollow gas puff. A number of interesting atomic-physics phenomena occur in these plasmas and some of these phenomena provide important diagnostic information for characterizing the plasmas. We have been interested in collisions of high-energy electrons with highly stripped ions in these plasmas. Such collisions may produce a population inversion which could result in stimulated emission in the x-ray regime

  6. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  7. On the instability increments of a stationary pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of stationary pinch to helical modes is numerically studied. It is shown that in the case of a rather fast plasma pressure decrease to the pinch boundary, for example, for an isothermal diffusion pinch with Gauss density distribution instabilities with m=0 modes are the most quickly growing. Instability increments are calculated. A simple analytical expression of a maximum increment of growth of sausage instability for automodel Gauss profiles is obtained

  8. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovinec, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The study entitled, 'Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems,' (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the 'sawtooth' collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to 'monster' or 'giant' sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two

  9. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  10. ''Turbulent Equipartition'' Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Diamond, P.H.; Gurcan, O.D.; Rewaldt, G.

    2008-01-01

    The mode-independent part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density (Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)) which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nm i U # parallel# R/B 2 , and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  11. X-ray backlighting of two-wire Z-pinch plasma using X-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Zhao; Xiao-Bing, Zou; Ran, Zhang; Xin-Xin, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two 50-μm Mo wires in parallel used as a Z-pinch load are electrically exploded with a pulsed current rising to 275 kA in 125 ns and their explosion processes are backlighted using an X-pinch as an x-ray source. The backlighting images show clearly the processes similar to those occurring in the initial stages of a cylindrical wire-array Z-pinch, including the electric explosion of single wires characterised by the dense wire cores surrounded by a low-density coronal plasma, the expansion of the exploding wire, the sausage instability (m = 0) in the coronal plasma around each wire, the motion of the coronal plasma as well as the wire core toward the current centroid, the formation of the precursor plasma column with a twist structure something like that of higher mode instability, especially the kink instability (m = 1). (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  12. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  13. Implosion dynamics of a megampere wire-array Z-pinch with an inner low-density foam shell at the Angara-5-1 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, V. V.; Bolkhovitinov, E. A.; Volkov, G. S.; Grabovski, E. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Medovshchikov, S. F.; Oleinik, G. M.; Rupasov, A. A.; Frolov, I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The implosion dynamics of a pinch with a highly inhomogeneous initial axial distribution of the load mass was studied experimentally. A cascade array consisting of a double nested tungsten wire array and a coaxial inner cylindrical shell located symmetrically with respect to the high-voltage electrodes was used as a load of the Angara-5-1 high-current generator. The cylindrical foam shell was half as long as the cathode− anode gap, and its diameter was equal to the diameter of the inner wire array. It is shown experimentally that two stages are typical of the implosion dynamics of such a load: the formation of two separate pinches formed as a result of implosion of the wire array near the cathode and anode and the subsequent implosion of the central part of the load containing the cylindrical foam shell. The conditions are determined at which the implosion of the central part of the pinch with the foam cylinder is preceded by intense irradiation of the foam with the soft X-ray (SXR) emission generated by the near-electrode pinches and converting it into the plasma state. Using such a load, which models the main elements of the scheme of a dynamic hohlraum for inertial confinement fusion, it is possible to increase the efficiency of interaction between the outer accelerated plasma sheath and the inner foam shell by preionizing the foam with the SXR emission of the near-electrode pinches.

  14. Plasma dynamics in aluminium wire array Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bland, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    The wire array Z-pinch is the world's most powerful laboratory X-ray source. An achieved power of ∼280TW has generated great interest in the use of these devices as a source of hohlraum heating for inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, the physics underlying how wire array Z-pinches implode is not well understood. This thesis presents the first detailed measurements of plasma dynamics in wire array experiments. The MAGPIE generator, with currents of up to 1.4MA, 150ns 10-90% rise-time, was used to implode arrays of 16mm diameter typically containing between 8 and 64 15μm aluminium wires. Diagnostics included: end and side-on laser probing with interferometry, schlieren and shadowgraphy channels; radial and axial streak photography; gated X-ray imaging; XUV and hard X-ray spectrometry; filtered XRDs and diamond PCDs; and a novel X-ray backlighting system to probe high density plasma. It was found that the plasma formed from the wires consisted of cold, dense cores, which ablated producing hot, low density coronal plasma. After an initial acceleration around the cores, coronal plasma streams flowed force-free towards the axis, with an instability wavelength determined by the core size. At ∼50% of the implosion time, the streams collided on axis forming a precursor plasma which appeared to be uniform, stable, and inertially confined. The existence of core-corona structure significantly affected implosion dynamics. For arrays with <64 wires, the wire cores remained in their original positions until ∼80% of the implosion time before accelerating rapidly. At 64 wires a transition in implosion trajectories to 0-D like occurred indicating a possible merger of current carrying plasma close to the cores - the cores themselves did not merge. During implosion, the cores initially developed uncorrelated instabilities that then transformed into a longer wavelength global mode of instability. The study of nested arrays (2 concentric arrays, one inside the other

  15. Investigation on the pinch point position in heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lisheng; Shi, Weixiu

    2016-06-01

    The pinch point is important for analyzing heat transfer in thermodynamic cycles. With the aim to reveal the importance of determining the accurate pinch point, the research on the pinch point position is carried out by theoretical method. The results show that the pinch point position depends on the parameters of the heat transfer fluids and the major fluid properties. In most cases, the pinch point locates at the bubble point for the evaporator and the dew point for the condenser. However, the pinch point shifts to the supercooled liquid state in the near critical conditions for the evaporator. Similarly, it shifts to the superheated vapor state with the condensing temperature approaching the critical temperature for the condenser. It even can shift to the working fluid entrance of the evaporator or the supercritical heater when the heat source fluid temperature is very high compared with the absorbing heat temperature. A wrong position for the pinch point may generate serious mistake. In brief, the pinch point should be founded by the iterative method in all conditions rather than taking for granted.

  16. Deuterated fibre Z-pinch on the S-300 generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Bakshaev, Yu L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Danko, S. A.; Korolev, V. D.; Ustroev, G. I.; Ivanov, M. I.; Cai, Hongchun

    2006-01-01

    Dense Z-pinch experiments were carried out on the S-300 generator (3.5 MA, 100 ns, 0.15 Omega) at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow. The experiments were performed at a peak current of 2 MA with a rise time of about 100 ns. The Z-pinch was formed from a deuterated polyethylene fibre of 100 mu m

  17. Self-pinched lithium beam transport experiments on SABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.; Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Shokir, I.; Cuneo, M.E.; Menge, P.R.; Johnston, R.R.; Welch, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Self-pinched transport of ion beams has many advantages for ion-driven ICF applications involving high yield and energy production. The authors are currently preparing for a self-pinched lithium beam transport experiment on the SABRE accelerator. There are three transport elements that must eventually be demonstrated: (1) efficient lithium beam generation and ballistic transport to a focus at the self-pinched transport channel entrance; (2) self-pinched transport in the channel, requiring optimized injection conditions and gas breakdown; and (3) self-pinched transport of the equilibrated beam from the channel into free space, with associated aiming and stability considerations. In the present experiment, a hollow annular lithium beam from an applied-B extraction ion diode will be focused to small radius (r ≤ 2 cm) in a 60 cm long ballistic focus section containing argon gas at a pressure of a few Torr. The self-pinched transport channel will contain a low pressure background gas of 10--40 mTorr argon to allow sufficient net current to confine the beam for long distance transport. IPROP simulations are in progress to optimize the design of the ballistic and self-pinched transport sections. Progress on preparation of this lithium self-pinched transport experiment, including a discussion of transport system design, important gas breakdown issues, and diagnostics, will be presented

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting, Innovative approaches to fusion energy, Pleasanton, CA, October 20-23, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    The Purpose of this Meeting is to provide a forum for discussion of approaches to fusion other than conventional tokamaks and stellarators, such as: (1) quasi-steady-state systems (mirrors, RFP's, spheromaks, FRC'S, spherical tori,...); (2) short-pulsed systems (liners, Z-pinch variants, plasma foci, novel ICF, ...); and (3) fusion technology innovations

  19. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  20. Influence of pinches on magnetic reconnection in turbulent space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Divin, Andrey

    A generally accepted scenario of magnetic reconnection in space plasmas is the breakage of magnetic field lines in X-points. In laboratory, reconnection is widely studied in pinches, current channels embedded into twisted magnetic fields. No model of magnetic reconnection in space plasmas considers both null-points and pinches as peers. We have performed a particle-in-cell simulation of magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional configuration where null-points are present nitially, and Z-pinches are formed during the simulation. The X-points are relatively stable, and no substantial energy dissipation is associated with them. On contrary, turbulent magnetic reconnection in the pinches causes the magnetic energy to decay at a rate of approximately 1.5 percent per ion gyro period. Current channels and twisted magnetic fields are ubiquitous in turbulent space plasmas, so pinches can be responsible for the observed high magnetic reconnection rates.