WorldWideScience

Sample records for reversed electron transport

  1. Magnetic turbulent electron transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.; Moses, R.

    1990-01-01

    A model of magnetic turbulent electron transport is presented. The model, based on the thermal conduction theory of Rechester and Rosenbluth, entails a Boltzmann description of electron dynamics in the long mean-free-path limit and quantitatively describes the salient features of superthermal electron measurements in the RFP edge plasma. Included are predictions of the mean superthermal electron energy, current density, and power flux asymmetry. A discussion of the transport model, the assumptions implicit in the model, and the relevance of this work to more general issue of magnetic turbulent transport in toroidal systems is presented. 32 refs., 3 figs

  2. Reversal of local spins in transport of electrons through a one-dimensional chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, D.-S.; Xiong, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the spin reversal of two coupled magnetic impurities in the transport processes of electrons in a one-dimensional chain. The impurities are side coupled to the chain and the electrons are injected and tunneling through it. The transmission coefficient of electrons and the polarization of impurities are calculated by the use of the equivalent single-particle network method for the correlated system. It is found that both the transmission coefficient and the polarization of impurities depend on the initial state of impurities and the impurity spins can be converted into the direction of electron spin if the injected electrons are polarized and the number of electrons is large enough. The evolution of the spin-reversal processes is studied in details

  3. Role of Mitochondrial Reverse Electron Transport in ROS Signaling: Potential Roles in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Scialò

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of aging and age-related diseases including cancer, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, mitochondria from old individuals have higher levels of ROS. However, ROS also participate in cellular signaling, are instrumental for several physiological processes and boosting ROS levels in model organisms extends lifespan. The current consensus is that low levels of ROS are beneficial, facilitating adaptation to stress via signaling, whereas high levels of ROS are deleterious because they trigger oxidative stress. Based on this model the amount of ROS should determine the physiological effect. However, recent data suggests that the site at which ROS are generated is also instrumental in determining effects on cellular homeostasis. The best example of site-specific ROS signaling is reverse electron transport (RET. RET is produced when electrons from ubiquinol are transferred back to respiratory complex I, reducing NAD+ to NADH. This process generates a significant amount of ROS. RET has been shown to be instrumental for the activation of macrophages in response to bacterial infection, re-organization of the electron transport chain in response to changes in energy supply and adaptation of the carotid body to changes in oxygen levels. In Drosophila melanogaster, stimulating RET extends lifespan. Here, we review what is known about RET, as an example of site-specific ROS signaling, and its implications for the field of redox biology.

  4. Electron transport in the stochastic fields of the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.-H.; Punjabi, A.

    1996-01-01

    We employ the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of anomalous transport developed by Punjabi and Boozer to calculate the particle diffusion coefficient for electrons in the stochastic magnetic fields of the reversed-field pinch (RFP). In the Monte Carlo calculations represented here, the transport mechanism is the loss of magnetic surfaces due to resistive perturbations. The equilibrium magnetic fields are represented by the Bessel function model for the RFP. The diffusion coefficient D is calculated as a function of a, the amplitude of the perturbation. We see three regimes as the amplitude of the tearing modes is increased: the Rechester-Rosenbluth regime where D scales as a 2 ; the anomalous regime where D scales more rapidly than a 2 ; and the Mynick-Krommes regime where D scales more slowly than a 2 . Inclusion of the effects of loop voltage on the particle drift orbits in the RFP does not affect the intervals in the amplitude a where these regimes operate. (Author)

  5. Suppressing Electron Turbulence and Triggering Internal Transport Barriers with Reversed Magnetic Shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jayson Luc

    2011-10-01

    Observations in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have found electron temperature gradients that greatly exceed the linear threshold for the onset for electron temperature gradient-driven (ETG) turbulence. These discharges, deemed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), coincide with a reversal in the shear of the magnetic field and with a reduction in electron-scale density fluctuations, qualitatively consistent with earlier gyrokinetic predictions. To investigate this phenomenon further, we numerically model electron turbulence in NSTX reversed-shear plasmas using the gyrokinetic turbulence code GYRO. These first-of-a-kind nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of NSTX e-ITBs confirm that reversing the magnetic shear can allow the plasma to reach electron temperature gradients well beyond the critical gradient for the linear onset of instability. This effect is very strong, with the nonlinear threshold for significant transport approaching three times the linear critical gradient in some cases, in contrast with moderate shear cases, which can drive significant ETG turbulence at much lower gradients. In addition to the experimental implications of this upshifted nonlinear critical gradient, we explore the behavior of ETG turbulence during reversed shear discharges. This work is supported by the SciDAC Center for the Study of Plasma Microturbulence, DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466, and used the resources of NCCS at ORNL and NERSC at LBNL. M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000).

  6. Reversibly Bistable Flexible Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-05-01

    Introducing the notion of transformational silicon electronics has paved the way for integrating various applications with silicon-based, modern, high-performance electronic circuits that are mechanically flexible and optically semitransparent. While maintaining large-scale production and prototyping rapidity, this flexible and translucent scheme demonstrates the potential to transform conventionally stiff electronic devices into thin and foldable ones without compromising long-term performance and reliability. In this work, we report on the fabrication and characterization of reversibly bistable flexible electronic switches that utilize flexible n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The transistors are fabricated initially on rigid (100) silicon substrates before they are peeled off. They can be used to control flexible batches of light-emitting diodes, demonstrating both the relative ease of scaling at minimum cost and maximum reliability and the feasibility of integration. The peeled-off silicon fabric is about 25 µm thick. The fabricated devices are transferred to a reversibly bistable flexible platform through which, for example, a flexible smartphone can be wrapped around a user’s wrist and can also be set back to its original mechanical position. Buckling and cyclic bending of such host platforms brings a completely new dimension to the development of flexible electronics, especially rollable displays.

  7. Reversibly Bistable Flexible Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introducing the notion of transformational silicon electronics has paved the way for integrating various applications with silicon-based, modern, high-performance electronic circuits that are mechanically flexible and optically semitransparent

  8. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. Y. [Nova Photonics Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  9. Reversible and nonvolatile ferroelectric control of two-dimensional electronic transport properties of ZrCuSiAs-type copper oxyselenide thin films with a layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu-Wen; Gao, Guan-Yin; Yan, Jian-Min; Chen, Lei; Xu, Meng; Zhao, Wei-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Xue; Guo, Lei; Liu, Yu-Kuai; Li, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Ren-Kui

    2018-05-01

    Copper-based ZrCuSiAs-type compounds of LnCuChO (Ln =Bi and lanthanides, Ch =S , Se, Te) with a layered crystal structure continuously attract worldwide attention in recent years. Although their high-temperature (T ≥ 300 K) electrical properties have been intensively studied, their low-temperature electronic transport properties are little known. In this paper, we report the integration of ZrCuSiAs-type copper oxyselenide thin films of B i0.94P b0.06CuSeO (BPCSO) with perovskite-type ferroelectric Pb (M g1 /3N b2 /3 ) O3-PbTi O3 (PMN-PT) single crystals in the form of ferroelectric field effect devices that allow us to control the electronic properties (e.g., carrier density, magnetoconductance, dephasing length, etc.) of BPCSO films in a reversible and nonvolatile manner by polarization switching at room temperature. Combining ferroelectric gating and magnetotransport measurements with the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory, we demonstrate two-dimensional (2D) electronic transport characteristics and weak antilocalization effect as well as strong carrier-density-mediated competition between weak antilocalization and weak localization in BPCSO films. Our results show that ferroelectric gating using PMN-PT provides an effective and convenient approach to probe the carrier-density-related 2D electronic transport properties of ZrCuSiAs-type copper oxyselenide thin films.

  10. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  11. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  12. Electronic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the electron transport properties of liquid alkali metals is described. Conductivity coefficients, Boltzmann theory, Ziman theory, alkali form factors, Ziman theory and alkalis, Faber-Ziman alloy theory, Faber-Ziman theory and alkali-alkali methods, status of Ziman theory, and other transport properties, are all discussed. (UK)

  13. Particle transport in field-reversed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Linford, R.K.

    1982-05-01

    Particle transport in field-reversed configurations is investigated using a one-dimensional, nondecaying, magnetic field structure. The radial profiles are constrained to satisfy an average ..beta.. condition from two-dimensional equilibrium and a boundary condition at the separatrix to model the balance between closed and open-field-line transport. When applied to the FRX-B experimental data and to the projected performance of the FRX-C device, this model suggests that the particle confinement times obtained with anomalous lower-hybrid-drift transport are in good agreement with the available numerical and experimental data. Larger values of confinement times can be achieved by increasing the ratio of the separatrix radius to the conducting wall radius. Even larger increases in lifetimes might be obtained by improving the open-field-line confinement.

  14. Particle transport in field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Linford, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    Particle transport in field-reversed configurations is investigated using a one-dimensional, nondecaying, magnetic field structure. The radial profiles are constrained to satisfy an average β condition from two-dimensional equilibrium and a boundary condition at the separatrix to model the balance between closed and open-field-line transport. When applied to the FRX-B experimental data and to the projected performance of the FRX-C device, this model suggests that the particle confinement times obtained with anomalous lower-hybrid-drift transport are in good agreement with the available numerical and experimental data. Larger values of confinement times can be achieved by increasing the ratio of the separatrix radius to the conducting wall radius. Even larger increases in lifetimes might be obtained by improving the open-field-line confinement

  15. Coupled transport in field-reversed configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Berk, H. L.; TAE Team

    2018-02-01

    Coupled transport is the close interconnection between the cross-field and parallel fluxes in different regions due to topological changes in the magnetic field. This occurs because perpendicular transport is necessary for particles or energy to leave closed field-line regions, while parallel transport strongly affects evolution of open field-line regions. In most toroidal confinement systems, the periphery, namely, the portion with open magnetic surfaces, is small in thickness and volume compared to the core plasma, the portion with closed surfaces. In field-reversed configurations (FRCs), the periphery plays an outsized role in overall confinement. This effect is addressed by an FRC-relevant model of coupled particle transport that is well suited for immediate interpretation of experiments. The focus here is particle confinement rather than energy confinement since the two track together in FRCs. The interpretive tool yields both the particle transport rate χn and the end-loss time τǁ. The results indicate that particle confinement depends on both χn across magnetic surfaces throughout the plasma and τǁ along open surfaces and that they provide roughly equal transport barriers, inhibiting particle loss. The interpretation of traditional FRCs shows Bohm-like χn and inertial (free-streaming) τǁ. However, in recent advanced beam-driven FRC experiments, χn approaches the classical rate and τǁ is comparable to classic empty-loss-cone mirrors.

  16. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressloff, Paul C; Karamched, Bhargav R

    2016-01-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states. (paper)

  17. Classical transport in field reversed mirrors: reactor implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.P.; Condit, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Assuming that the field-reversed mirror (or the closely related spheromak) turns out to be stable, the next crucial issue is transport of particles and heat. Of particular concern is the field null on axis (the X-point), which at first glance seems to allow particles to flow out unhindered. We have evaluated the classical diffusion coefficients for particles and heat in field-reversed mirrors, with particular reference to a class of Hill's vortex models. Two fairly surprising results emerge from this study. First, the diffusion-driven flow of particles and heat is finite at the X-points. This may be traced to the geometrical constraint that the current (and hence the ion-electron drag force, which causes cross-field transport) must vanish on axis. This conclusion holds for any transport model. Second, the classical diffusion coefficient D(psi), which governs both particle and heat flux, is finite on the separatrix. Indeed, in a wide class of Hill's vortex equilibria (spherical, oblate, or prolate) D(psi) is essentially independent of psi (except for the usual factor of n

  18. Reversed shear Alfven eigenmode stabilization by localized electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zeeland, M A; Hyatt, A W; Lohr, J; Petty, C C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608 San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Heidbrink, W W [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Nazikian, R; Solomon, W M; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G J [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Austin, M E [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Berk, H L [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Holcomb, C T; Makowski, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); McKee, G R [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sharapov, S E [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rhodes, T L [University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, 90095 (United States)], E-mail: vanzeeland@fusion.gat.com

    2008-03-15

    Reversed shear Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) activity in DIII-D is stabilized by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) applied near the minimum of the magnetic safety factor (q{sub min}) in neutral beam heated discharges with reversed-magnetic shear. The degree of RSAE stabilization, fast ion density and the volume averaged neutron production (S{sub n}) are highly dependent on ECH deposition location relative to q{sub min}. While discharges with ECH stabilization of RSAEs have higher S{sub n} and more peaked fast ion profiles than discharges with significant RSAE activity, neutron production remains strongly reduced (up to 60% relative to TRANSP predictions assuming classical fast ion transport) even when RSAEs are stabilized.

  19. Monte Carlo Transport for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. is adapted into a Monte Carlo transport method in order to better model the effects of non-local behavior. The end goal is a hybrid transport-diffusion method that combines Monte Carlo Transport with a discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC). The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in short mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions. The Monte Carlo nature of the approach allows the algorithm to be massively parallelized. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  20. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  1. Turbulent transport in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Roberts, K.V.

    1976-01-01

    MHD stability of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) relies on reversal of the toroidal field component in the outer plasma region. Interest in this configuration comes from its potential economic advantages as a thermonuclear reactor, since compared to a Tokamak the RFP supports a higher value of β, the ratio between plasma and total magnetic pressure. Results of computations on the time-evolution of the RFP using a 1D MHD model are reported. (orig./GG) [de

  2. Alcohol consumption stimulates early stemps in reverse cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, van der M.S.; Tol, van A.; Vermunt, S.H.F.; Scheek, L.M.; Schaafsma, G.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased HDL cholesterol levels, which may indicate stimulated reverse cholesterol transport. The mechanism is, however, not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of alcohol consumption on the first two steps of the reverse cholesterol

  3. Alcohol consumption stimulates early steps in reverse cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, M.S. van der; Tol, A. van; Vermunt, S.H.F.; Scheek, L.M.; Schaafsma, G.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased HDL cholesterol levels, which may indicate stimulated reverse cholesterol transport. The mechanism is, however, not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of alcohol consumption on the first two steps of the reverse cholesterol

  4. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on TFTR have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear (RS) plasmas. The profile evolutions of trace tritium and helium and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in enhanced reverse shear (ERS) plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the RS region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  5. Excess electron transport in cryoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshchenko, D.G.; Storchak, V.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Cottrell, S.P.; Cox, S.F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results on excess electron transport in solid and liquid phases of Ne, Ar, and solid N 2 -Ar mixture are presented and compared with those for He. Muon spin relaxation technique in frequently switching electric fields was used to study the phenomenon of delayed muonium formation: excess electrons liberated in the μ + ionization track converge upon the positive muons and form Mu (μ + e - ) atoms. This process is shown to be crucially dependent upon the electron's interaction with its environment (i.e., whether it occupies the conduction band or becomes localized in a bubble of tens of angstroms in radius) and upon its mobility in these states. The characteristic lengths involved are 10 -6 -10 -4 cm, the characteristic times range from nanoseconds to tens microseconds. Such a microscopic length scale sometimes enables the electron spend its entire free lifetime in a state which may not be detected by conventional macroscopic techniques. The electron transport processes are compared in: liquid and solid helium (where electron is localized in buble); liquid and solid neon (where electrons are delocalized in solid and the coexistence of localized and delocalized electrons states was found in liquid recently); liquid and solid argon (where electrons are delocalized in both phases); orientational glass systems (solid N 2 -Ar mixtures), where our results suggest that electrons are localized in orientational glass. This scaling from light to heavy rare gases enables us to reveal new features of excess electron localization on microscopic scale. Analysis of the experimental data makes it possible to formulate the following tendency of the muon end-of-track structure in condensed rare gases. The muon-self track interaction changes from the isolated pair (muon plus the nearest track electron) in helium to multi-pair (muon in the vicinity of tens track electrons and positive ions) in argon

  6. Ballistic transport and electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Kees M.; Kelly, Paul J.; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the electronic structure in determining the transport properties of ballistic point contacts is studied. The conductance in the ballistic regime is related to simple geometrical projections of the Fermi surface. The essential physics is first clarified for simple models. For real

  7. Electron transport code theoretical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubi, A.; Horowitz, Y.S.

    1978-04-01

    This report mainly describes the physical and mathematical considerations involved in the treatment of the multiple collision processes. A brief description is given of the traditional methods used in electron transport via Monte Carlo, and a somewhat more detailed description, of the approach to be used in the presently developed code

  8. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-09-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated.

  9. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-01-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated. (author)

  10. Excess electron transport in cryoobjects

    CERN Document Server

    Eshchenko, D G; Brewer, J H; Cottrell, S P; Cox, S F J

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results on excess electron transport in solid and liquid phases of Ne, Ar, and solid N sub 2 -Ar mixture are presented and compared with those for He. Muon spin relaxation technique in frequently switching electric fields was used to study the phenomenon of delayed muonium formation: excess electrons liberated in the mu sup + ionization track converge upon the positive muons and form Mu (mu sup + e sup -) atoms. This process is shown to be crucially dependent upon the electron's interaction with its environment (i.e., whether it occupies the conduction band or becomes localized in a bubble of tens of angstroms in radius) and upon its mobility in these states. The characteristic lengths involved are 10 sup - sup 6 -10 sup - sup 4 cm, the characteristic times range from nanoseconds to tens microseconds. Such a microscopic length scale sometimes enables the electron spend its entire free lifetime in a state which may not be detected by conventional macroscopic techniques. The electron transport proc...

  11. Electron Bifurcation and Confurcation in Methanogenesis and Reverse Methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Yan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of the disulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS–SCoB by heterodisulfide reductases (HdrED and HdrABC is the final step in all methanogenic pathways. Flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB by soluble HdrABC homologs play additional roles in driving essential endergonic reactions at the expense of the exergonic reduction of CoMS–SCoM. In the first step of the CO2 reduction pathway, HdrABC complexed with hydrogenase or formate dehydrogenase generates reduced ferredoxin (Fdx2- for the endergonic reduction of CO2 coupled to the exergonic reduction of CoMS–SCoB dependent on FBEB of electrons from H2 or formate. Roles for HdrABC:hydrogenase complexes are also proposed for pathways wherein the methyl group of methanol is reduced to methane with electrons from H2. The HdrABC complexes catalyze FBEB-dependent oxidation of H2 for the endergonic reduction of Fdx driven by the exergonic reduction of CoMS–SCoB. The Fdx2- supplies electrons for reduction of the methyl group to methane. In H2- independent pathways, three-fourths of the methyl groups are oxidized producing Fdx2- and reduced coenzyme F420 (F420H2. The F420H2 donates electrons for reduction of the remaining methyl groups to methane requiring transfer of electrons from Fdx2- to F420. HdrA1B1C1 is proposed to catalyze FBEB-dependent oxidation of Fdx2- for the endergonic reduction of F420 driven by the exergonic reduction of CoMS–SCoB. In H2- independent acetotrophic pathways, the methyl group of acetate is reduced to methane with electrons derived from oxidation of the carbonyl group mediated by Fdx. Electron transport involves a membrane-bound complex (Rnf that oxidizes Fdx2- and generates a Na+ gradient driving ATP synthesis. It is postulated that F420 is reduced by Rnf requiring HdrA2B2C2 catalyzing FBEB-dependent oxidation of F420H2 for the endergonic reduction of Fdx driven by the exergonic reduction of CoMS–SCoB. The Fdx2- is recycled by Rnf and HdrA2B2C2 thereby

  12. Lymphatic vasculature mediates macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martel, Catherine; Li, Wenjun; Fulp, Brian; Platt, Andrew M.; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Westerterp, Marit; Bittman, Robert; Tall, Alan R.; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Thomas, Michael J.; Kreisel, Daniel; Swartz, Melody A.; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) refers to the mobilization of cholesterol on HDL particles (HDL-C) from extravascular tissues to plasma, ultimately for fecal excretion. Little is known about how HDL-C leaves peripheral tissues to reach plasma. We first used 2 models of disrupted lymphatic

  13. Electron transport and shock ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, A R; Tzoufras, M, E-mail: t.bell1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) offers one possible route to commercial energy generation. In the proposed 'shock ignition' route to fusion, the target is compressed at a relatively low temperature and then ignited using high intensity laser irradiation which drives a strong converging shock into the centre of the fuel. With a series of idealized calculations we analyse the electron transport of energy into the target, which produces the pressure responsible for driving the shock. We show that transport in shock ignition lies near the boundary between ablative and heat front regimes. Moreover, simulations indicate that non-local effects are significant in the heat front regime and might lead to increased efficiency by driving the shock more effectively and reducing heat losses to the plasma corona.

  14. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  15. Turbulent transport in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempel, T.D.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spragins, C.W.; Sprott, J.C.; Stoneking, M.R.; Zita, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    Measurements of edge turbulence and the associated transport are ongoing in the Madison Symmetric Torus (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.52 m) reversed-field pinch using magnetic and electrostatic probes. Magnetic fluctuations are dominated by m = 1 and n ∼ 2R/a tearing modes. Particle losses induced by magnetic field fluctuations have been found to be ambipolar ( parallel B r > = O). Electrostatic fluctuations are broadband and turbulent, with mode widths δm ∼ 3--7 and δn ∼70--150. Particle, parallel current, and energy transport arising from coherent motion with the fluctuating ExB drift has been measured. Particle transport via this channel is comparable to the total particle loss from MST. Energy transport (from phi >/B o ) due to electrostatic fluctuations is relatively small, and parallel current transport (from parallel E chi >/B o ) may be small as well

  16. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  17. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Callen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-) ohmic

  18. Microinstabilities and turbulent transport in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Daniel Richard

    -analytic equilibrium, the adjusted circular model (ACM), is developed and implemented in the gyrokinetic code GENE to investigate representative PPCD discharges. The flexibility of the ACM enables it to be used for the high-theta PPCD discharges where the TBFM breaks down. The dominant linear instabilites for the discharges modeled here---ITG and the trapped electron mode (TEM)---are studied, as are their scaling properties in the PPCD regime. It is found that these instabilities are present outside of the reversal surface, where the driving gradients are strongest. Nonlinear simulations of the TEM turbulence are performed, the first such done for the RFP, and zonal flows are found to play an important role in the nonlinear saturation mechanism. These zonal flows lead to a large Dimits-like shift and suppressed transport. There is also evidence that residual global tearing mode fluctuations are a necessary part of modeling transport in the RFP, even in improved confinement PPCD discharges, and by modeling these residual fluctuations through the use of an externally imposed perpendicular magnetic field perturbation it is possible to bring simulated fluxes into agreement with experiment. Finally, the nature of the collisionless MTM, an instability seen to arise in some parameter regimes of the RFP, is investigated analytically using a fluid expansion in the drift-kinetic framework. Particular attention is paid to the role of magnetic drifts, and some evidence for their role in the collisionless instability is presented. Comparisons are made to gyrokinetic simulations and to earlier theory on the magnetic-curvature drift instability.

  19. Electronic transport in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Mikito

    2009-01-01

    We present theoretical studies on the transport properties and localization effects of bilayer graphene. We calculate the conductivity by using the effective mass model with the self-consistent Born approximation, in the presence and absence of an energy gap opened by the interlayer asymmetry. We find that, in the absence of the gap, the minimum conductivity approaches the universal value by increasing the disorder potential, and the value is robust in the strong disorder regime where mixing with high-energy states is considerable. The gap-opening suppresses the conductivity over a wide energy range, even in the region away from the gap.We also study the localization effects in the vicinity of zero energy in bilayer graphene. We find that the states are all localized in the absence of the gap, while the gap-opening causes a phase transition analogous to the quantum Hall transition, which is accompanied by electron delocalization.

  20. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    InN transport; mobility; energy and momentum relaxation; impurity scattering. ... future generation solar cell because the nitride alloys can cover the whole ... We apply the ensemble Monte Carlo method to investigate the electron transport in.

  1. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittweger, F.; Hinsche, N. F.; Mertig, I.

    2017-09-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the \

  2. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneking, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 10 6 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 10 11 cm -3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a∼0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a∼0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST

  3. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...... transmission at the Fermi energy. We propose and analyze a way of using π   stacking to design molecular junctions to control heat transport. We develop a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use density functional theory (DFT) to extract model parameters for a number of specific...

  4. Reverse electron flow-induced ROS production is attenuated by activation of mitochondrial Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, André; Aldakkak, Mohammed; Stowe, David F.; Rhodes, Samhita S.; Riess, Matthias L.; Varadarajan, Srinivasan G.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent on substrate conditions, O(2) concentration, redox state, and activity of the mitochondrial complexes. It is well known that the FADH(2)-linked substrate succinate induces reverse electron flow to complex I of the electron transport chain

  5. The Role of Macrophage Lipophagy in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Jin Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage cholesterol efflux is a central step in reverse cholesterol transport, which helps to maintain cholesterol homeostasis and to reduce atherosclerosis. Lipophagy has recently been identified as a new step in cholesterol ester hydrolysis that regulates cholesterol efflux, since it mobilizes cholesterol from lipid droplets of macrophages via autophagy and lysosomes. In this review, we briefly discuss recent advances regarding the mechanisms of the cholesterol efflux pathway in macrophage foam cells, and present lipophagy as a therapeutic target in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  6. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport

  7. Electron temperature diagnostics in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartiromo, R.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Murari, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Franz, P.; Martin, P.; Zabeo, L.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated approach to the problem of electron temperature diagnostics of the plasma in a reversed field pinch. Three different methods, sampling different portions of the electron distribution function, are adopted, namely Thomson scattering, soft X-ray spectroscopy by pulse-height analysis and filtered soft X-ray intensity ratio. A careful analysis of the different sources of systematic errors is performed and a novel statistical approach is adopted to mutually validate the three independent measurements. A satisfactory agreement is obtained over a large range of experimental conditions, indicating that in the plasma core the energy distribution function is well represented by a maxwellian. (author)

  8. Lymphatic vasculature mediates macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Li, Wenjun; Fulp, Brian; Platt, Andrew M; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Westerterp, Marit; Bittman, Robert; Tall, Alan R; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Thomas, Michael J; Kreisel, Daniel; Swartz, Melody A; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2013-04-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) refers to the mobilization of cholesterol on HDL particles (HDL-C) from extravascular tissues to plasma, ultimately for fecal excretion. Little is known about how HDL-C leaves peripheral tissues to reach plasma. We first used 2 models of disrupted lymphatic drainage from skin--1 surgical and the other genetic--to quantitatively track RCT following injection of [3H]-cholesterol-loaded macrophages upstream of blocked or absent lymphatic vessels. Macrophage RCT was markedly impaired in both models, even at sites with a leaky vasculature. Inhibited RCT was downstream of cholesterol efflux from macrophages, since macrophage efflux of a fluorescent cholesterol analog (BODIPY-cholesterol) was not altered by impaired lymphatic drainage. We next addressed whether RCT was mediated by lymphatic vessels from the aortic wall by loading the aortae of donor atherosclerotic Apoe-deficient mice with [2H]6-labeled cholesterol and surgically transplanting these aortae into recipient Apoe-deficient mice that were treated with anti-VEGFR3 antibody to block lymphatic regrowth or with control antibody to allow such regrowth. [2H]-Cholesterol was retained in aortae of anti-VEGFR3-treated mice. Thus, the lymphatic vessel route is critical for RCT from multiple tissues, including the aortic wall. These results suggest that supporting lymphatic transport function may facilitate cholesterol clearance in therapies aimed at reversing atherosclerosis.

  9. Ballistic electron transport in mesoscopic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconescu, D.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis, the electron transport in the ballistic regime has been studied. Ballistic means that the lateral sample dimensions are smaller than the mean free path of the electrons, i.e. the electrons can travel through the whole device without being scattered. This leads to transport characteristics that differ significantly from the diffusive regime which is realised in most experiments. Making use of samples with high mean free path, features of ballistic transport have been observed on samples with sizes up to 100 μm. The basic device used in ballistic electron transport is the point contact, from which a collimated beam of ballistic electrons can be injected. Such point contacts were realised with focused ion beam (FIB) implantation and the collimating properties were analysed using a two opposite point contact configuration. The typical angular width at half maximum is around 50 , which is comparable with that of point contacts defined by other methods. (orig.)

  10. Reversed magnetic shear suppression of electron-scale turbulence on NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Howard Y.; Levinton, F. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Smith, D. R.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Park, H. K.

    2009-11-01

    Electron thermal internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) are observed in reversed (negative) magnetic shear NSTX discharges^1. These e-ITBs can be created with either neutral beam heating or High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) RF heating. The e-ITB location occurs at the location of minimum magnetic shear determined by Motional Stark Effect (MSE) constrained equilibria. Statistical studies show a threshold condition in magnetic shear for e-ITB formation. High-k fluctuation measurements at electron turbulence wavenumbers^3 have been made under several different transport regimes, including a bursty regime that limits temperature gradients at intermediate magnetic shear. The growth rate of fluctuations has been calculated immediately following a change in the local magnetic shear, resulting in electron temperature gradient relaxation. Linear gyrokinetic simulation results for NSTX show that while measured electron temperature gradients exceed critical linear thresholds for ETG instability, growth rates can remain low under reversed shear conditions up to high electron temperatures gradients. ^1H. Yuh, et. al., PoP 16, 056120 ^2D.R. Smith, E. Mazzucato et al., RSI 75, 3840 ^3E. Mazzucato, D.R. Smith et al., PRL 101, 075001

  11. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic

  12. Stem compression reversibly reduces phloem transport in Pinus sylvestris trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Nils; Tarvainen, Lasse; Lim, Hyungwoo; Tor-Ngern, Pantana; Palmroth, Sari; Oren, Ram; Marshall, John; Näsholm, Torgny

    2015-10-01

    Manipulating tree belowground carbon (C) transport enables investigation of the ecological and physiological roles of tree roots and their associated mycorrhizal fungi, as well as a range of other soil organisms and processes. Girdling remains the most reliable method for manipulating this flux and it has been used in numerous studies. However, girdling is destructive and irreversible. Belowground C transport is mediated by phloem tissue, pressurized through the high osmotic potential resulting from its high content of soluble sugars. We speculated that phloem transport may be reversibly blocked through the application of an external pressure on tree stems. Thus, we here introduce a technique based on compression of the phloem, which interrupts belowground flow of assimilates, but allows trees to recover when the external pressure is removed. Metal clamps were wrapped around the stems and tightened to achieve a pressure theoretically sufficient to collapse the phloem tissue, thereby aiming to block transport. The compression's performance was tested in two field experiments: a (13)C canopy labelling study conducted on small Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees [2-3 m tall, 3-7 cm diameter at breast height (DBH)] and a larger study involving mature pines (∼15 m tall, 15-25 cm DBH) where stem respiration, phloem and root carbohydrate contents, and soil CO2 efflux were measured. The compression's effectiveness was demonstrated by the successful blockage of (13)C transport. Stem compression doubled stem respiration above treatment, reduced soil CO2 efflux by 34% and reduced phloem sucrose content by 50% compared with control trees. Stem respiration and soil CO2 efflux returned to normal within 3 weeks after pressure release, and (13)C labelling revealed recovery of phloem function the following year. Thus, we show that belowground phloem C transport can be reduced by compression, and we also demonstrate that trees recover after treatment, resuming C

  13. Hydrodynamic approach to electronic transport in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narozhny, Boris N. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gornyi, Igor V. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mirlin, Alexander D. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schmalian, Joerg [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The last few years have seen an explosion of interest in hydrodynamic effects in interacting electron systems in ultra-pure materials. In this paper we briefly review the recent advances, both theoretical and experimental, in the hydrodynamic approach to electronic transport in graphene, focusing on viscous phenomena, Coulomb drag, non-local transport measurements, and possibilities for observing nonlinear effects. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Electron transport effects in ion induced electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubus, A. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: adubus@ulb.ac.be; Pauly, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Roesler, M. [Karl-Pokern-Str. 12, D-12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Ion induced electron emission (IIEE) is usually described as a three-step process, i.e. electron excitation by the incident projectile, electron transport (and multiplication) and electron escape through the potential barrier at the surface. In many cases, the first step of the process has been carefully described. The second step of the process, i.e. electron transport and multiplication, has often been treated in a very rough way, a simple decreasing exponential law being sometimes used. It is precisely the aim of the present work to show the importance of a correct description of electron transport and multiplication in a theoretical calculation of IIEE. A short overview of the electron transport models developed for IIEE is given in this work. The so-called 'Infinite medium slowing-down model' often used in recent works is evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, the importance of considering correctly the semi-infinite character of the medium and the boundary condition at the vacuum-medium interface is discussed. Quantities like the electron escape depth are also briefly discussed. This evaluation has been performed in the particular case of protons (25keV

  15. Synergistic effects of the safety factor and shear flows on development of internal transport barriers in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.K.; Dong, J.Q.; Qu, W.X.; Qiu, X.M.

    2002-01-01

    A new suppression mechanism of turbulent transport, characteristic of the synergism between safety factor and shear flows, is proposed to explain the internal transport barriers (ITBs) observed in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges with reversed magnetic shear. It is shown that the evolution of turbulent transport with the strength of the suppression mechanism reproduces the basic features of the formation and development of ITBs observed in experiments. In addition, the present analyses predict the possibility of global ion and electron heat transport barriers

  16. Transport and equilibrium in field-reversed mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    Two plasma models relevant to compact torus research have been developed to study transport and equilibrium in field reversed mirrors. In the first model for small Larmor radius and large collision frequency, the plasma is described as an adiabatic hydromagnetic fluid. In the second model for large Larmor radius and small collision frequency, a kinetic theory description has been developed. Various aspects of the two models have been studied in five computer codes ADB, AV, NEO, OHK, RES. The ADB code computes two dimensional equilibrium and one dimensional transport in a flux coordinate. The AV code calculates orbit average integrals in a harmonic oscillator potential. The NEO code follows particle trajectories in a Hill's vortex magnetic field to study stochasticity, invariants of the motion, and orbit average formulas. The OHK code displays analytic psi(r), B/sub Z/(r), phi(r), E/sub r/(r) formulas developed for the kinetic theory description. The RES code calculates resonance curves to consider overlap regions relevant to stochastic orbit behavior

  17. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  18. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittweger, Florian; Hinsche, Nicki Frank; Mertig, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the k-dependent structure of the Éliashberg spectral function, the coupling strength...

  19. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.; Morel, J.E.; Hughes, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs

  20. Nonlinear electron transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Haines, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Electron transport in a magnetized plasma heated by inverse bremsstrahlung is studied numerically using a nonlinear Fokker--Planck model with self-consistent E and B fields. The numerical scheme is described. Nonlocal transport is found to alter many of the transport coefficients derived from linear transport theory, in particular, the Nernst and Righi--Leduc effects, in addition to the perpendicular heat flux q/sub perpendicular/, are substantially reduced near critical surface. The magnetic field, however, remains strongly coupled to the nonlinear q/sub perpendicular/ and, as has been found in hydrosimulations, convective amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the overdense plasma

  1. Electron transport in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcao, Rossana Cavalieri

    1992-05-01

    In this work it is presented a model to calculate dose enhancement in the vicinity of plane interfaces irradiated by therapeutic electron beams. The proposed model is based on an approximation of the Boltzmann Equation. The solutions presented to the equation are exact on its angular dependency, making it possible to observe that at low Z/high Z interfaces the dose enhancement is due to an increase of the backscattering. For the inverse situation a decrease of the backscattering can be observed. Calculations have been made for some tissue-metal interfaces irradiated by 13 MeV electron beam. The dose perturbations in tissue were obtained and the results were compared with experimental data as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In both cases the agreement found was very good. (author)

  2. Plasma channels for electron beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.F.; Smith, J.R.; Moffatt, M.E.; Nguyen, K.T.; Uhm, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in transport of intense relativistic electron beams using plasma channels. These channels are formed by either: ionization of an organic gas by UV photoionization or electron impact ionization of a low pressure gas utilizing a low energy (typically several hundred volts) electron gun. The second method is discussed here. As their electron gun, the authors used a 12 volt lightbulb filament which is biased to -400 volts with respect to the grounded 15 cm diameter drift tube. The electrons emitted from the filament are confined by an axial magnetic field of --100 Gauss to create a plasma channel which is less than 1 cm in radius. The channel density has been determined with Langmuir probes and the resulting line densities were found to be 10 11 to 10 12 per cm. When a multi-kiloamp electron beam is injected onto this channel, the beam space charge will eject the plasma electrons leaving the ions behind to charge neutralize the electron beam, hence allowing the beam to propagate. In this work, the authors performed experimental studies on the dynamics of the plasma channel. These include Langmuir probe measurements of a steady state (DC) channel, as well as time-resolved Langmuir probe studies of pulsed channels. In addition they performed experimental studies of beam propagation in these plasma channels. Specifically, they observed the behavior of current transport in these channels. Detailed results of beam transport and channel studies are presented

  3. Innovative electron transport methods in EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielajew, A.F.; Wilderman, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The initial formulation of a Monte Carlo scheme for the transport of high-energy (>≅ 100 keV) electrons was established by Berger in 1963. Calling his method the 'condensed history theory', Berger combined the theoretical results of the previous generation of research into developing approximate solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation with numerical algorithms for exploiting the power of computers to permit iterative, piece-wise solution of the transport equation in a computationally intensive but much less approximate fashion. The methods devised by Berger, with comparatively little modification, provide the foundation of all present day Monte Carlo electron transport simulation algorithms. Only in the last 15 years, beginning with the development and publication of the PRESTA algorithm, has there been a significant revisitation of the problem of simulating electron transport within the condensed history framework. Research in this area is ongoing, highly active, and far from complete. It presents an enormous challenge, demanding derivation of new analytical transport solutions based on underlying fundamental interaction mechanisms, intuitive insight in the development of computer algorithms, and state of the art computer science skills in order to permit deployment of these techniques in an efficient manner. The EGS5 project, a modern ground-up rewrite of the EGS4 code, is now in the design phase. EGS5 will take modern photon and electron transport algorithms and deploy them in an easy-to-maintain, modern computer language-ANSI-standard C ++. Moreover, the well-known difficulties of applying EGS4 to practical geometries (geometry code development, tally routine design) should be made easier and more intuitive through the use of a visual user interface being designed by Quantum Research, Inc., work that is presented elsewhere in this conference. This report commences with a historical review of electron transport models culminating with the proposal of a

  4. Reversal of lattice, electronic structure, and magnetism in epitaxial SrCoOx thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, H.; Choi, W. S.; Lee, J. H.; Cooper, V. R.; Lee, H. N.; Seo, S. S. A.; Rabe, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    SrCoOx (x = 2.5 - 3.0, SCO) is an ideal material to study the role of oxygen content for electronic structure and magnetism, since SCO has two distinct topotactic phases: the antiferromagnetic insulating brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 and the ferromagnetic metallic perovskite SrCoO3. In this presentation, we report direct observation of a reversible lattice and electronic structure evolution in SrCoOx epitaxial thin films as well as different magnetic and electronic ground states between the topotactic phases.[2] By magnetization measurements, optical absorption, and transport measurements drastically different electronic and magnetic ground states are found in the epitaxially grown SrCoO2.5 and SrCoO3 thin films by pulsed laser epitaxy. First-principles calculations confirm substantial, which originate from the modification in the Co valence states and crystallographic structures. By real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry, the two electronically and magnetically different phases can be reversibly changed by changing the ambient pressure at greatly reduced temperatures. Our finding provides an important pathway to understanding the novel oxygen-content-dependent phase transition uniquely found in multivalent transition metal oxides. The work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  5. Rethinking reverse cholesterol transport and dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rosales, Corina; Xu, Bingqing; Gotto, Antonio M; Pownall, Henry J

    2018-04-12

    Human plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations are a negative risk factor for atherosclerosis-linked cardiovascular disease. Pharmacological attempts to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by increasing plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol have been disappointing so that recent research has shifted from HDL quantity to HDL quality, that is, functional vs dysfunctional HDL. HDL has varying degrees of dysfunction reflected in impaired reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In the context of atheroprotection, RCT occurs by 2 mechanisms: one is the well-known trans-hepatic pathway comprising macrophage free cholesterol (FC) efflux, which produces early forms of FC-rich nascent HDL (nHDL). Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase converts HDL-FC to HDL-cholesteryl ester while converting nHDL from a disc to a mature spherical HDL, which transfers its cholesteryl ester to the hepatic HDL receptor, scavenger receptor B1 for uptake, conversion to bile salts, or transfer to the intestine for excretion. Although widely cited, current evidence suggests that this is a minor pathway and that most HDL-FC and nHDL-FC rapidly transfer directly to the liver independent of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity. A small fraction of plasma HDL-FC enters the trans-intestinal efflux pathway comprising direct FC transfer to the intestine. SR-B1 -/- mice, which have impaired trans-hepatic FC transport, are characterized by high plasma levels of a dysfunctional FC-rich HDL that increases plasma FC bioavailability in a way that produces whole-body hypercholesterolemia and multiple pathologies. The design of future therapeutic strategies to improve RCT will have to be formulated in the context of these dual RCT mechanisms and the role of FC bioavailability. Copyright © 2018 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogeweij, G M D [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Callen, J D [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1609 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-)ohmic plasmas in small to medium size tokamaks, inside internal transport barriers (ITBs) or edge transport barriers (H-mode pedestal). In this paper predictions of the paleoclassical transport model are compared in detail with data from such kinds of discharges: ohmic discharges from the RTP tokamak, EC heated RTP discharges featuring both dynamic and shot-to-shot scans of the ECH power deposition radius and off-axis EC heated discharges from the TEXTOR tokamak. For ohmically heated RTP discharges the T{sub e} profiles predicted by the paleoclassical model are in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations, and various parametric dependences are captured satisfactorily. The electron thermal ITBs observed in steady state EC heated RTP discharges and transiently after switch-off of off-axis ECH in TEXTOR are predicted very well by the paleoclassical model.

  7. Effective Spend Management Through Electronic Reverse Auction Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojmír Prídavok

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyz wide range of possible auction strategies and configurations of eRA, with respect to the ever changing market conditions. Electronic reverse auction (eRA represents an electronic sourcing method of competitive bidding among a number of qualified suppliers. Theory assumes that eRA represents pure market environment with information perfectly distributed between both buyers and suppliers. Although initial eRA cost savings in B2B could be as high as 40%, without deeper knowledge of different auctions strategies and configurations, additional cost reductions are not possible. To identify crucial determinant, the statistical (correlation analysis on the data set of more than 18.000 auction items with different configuration parameters was conducted. Findings suggest that the more bidders are invited to the eRA, the better results could be expected. Additionally, the complexity of the eRA parameterization does not seem to influent the success of the eRA. These results can influence usage and SW development of eRA application in real environment. This research extends already realized studies in the field of electronic auctions for the B2B processes

  8. Energetic electron measurements in the edge of a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, J.C.; Ellis, R.F.; Downing, J.N.; Munson, C.P.; Weber, P.G.; Wurden, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The edge plasma of the ZT-40M [Fusion Technol. 8, 1571 (1985)] reversed-field pinch has been studied using a combination of three different plasma probes: a double-swept Langmuir probe, an electrostatic energy analyzer, and a calorimeter--Langmuir probe. The edge plasma has been measured both with and without a movable graphite tile limiter present nearby in the plasma. Without a limiter a fast nonthermal tail of electrons (T congruent 350 eV) is detected in the edge plasma with nearly unidirectional flow along B and having a density between 2% and 10% of the cold edge plasma (T congruent 20 eV). The toroidal sense of this fast electron flow is against the force of the applied electric field. A large power flux along B is measured flowing in the same direction as the fast electrons and is apparently carried by the fast electrons. With the limiter present the fast electrons are still detected in the plasma, but are strongly attenuated in the shadow of the limiter. The measured scrape-off lengths for both the fast electrons and the cold plasma indicate cross-field transport at the rate of, or less than, Bohm diffusion. Estimates indicate that the fast electrons could carry the reversed-field pinch current density at the edge and, from the measured transverse diffusion rates, could also account for the electron energy loss channel in ZT-40 M. The long mean-free-path kinetic nature of these fast electrons suggests that a kinetic process, rather than a magnetohydrodynamic process that is based upon a local Ohm's law formulation, is responsible for their generation

  9. Model Comparison for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Gregory; Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Four electron thermal transport models are compared for their ability to accurately and efficiently model non-local behavior in ICF simulations. Goncharov's transport model has accurately predicted shock timing in implosion simulations but is computationally slow and limited to 1D. The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. uses multigroup diffusion to speed up the calculation. Chenhall has expanded upon the iSNB diffusion model to a higher order simplified P3 approximation and a Monte Carlo transport model, to bridge the gap between the iSNB and Goncharov models while maintaining computational efficiency. Comparisons of the above models for several test problems will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  10. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains......Using a first-principles density-functional method we model electron transport through linear chains of monovalent atoms between two bulk electrodes. For noble-metal chains the transport resembles that for free electrons over a potential barrier whereas for alkali-metal chains resonance states...... and their phase is opposite to that of noble-metal chains....

  11. Electronic transport properties of pentacene single crystals upon exposure to air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurchescu, OD; Baas, J; Palstra, TTM; Jurchescu, Oana D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the effect of air exposure on the electronic properties of pentacene single crystals. Air can diffuse reversibly in and out of the crystals and influences the physical properties. We discern two competing mechanisms that modulate the electronic transport. The presence of oxygen increases

  12. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  13. Computational methods of electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of computational methods simulating the non-plasma transport of electrons and their attendant cascades is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linearized formalisms at electron energies above 1 keV. The effectiveness of various metods is discussed including moments, point-kernel, invariant imbedding, discrete-ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Future research directions and the potential impact on various aspects of science and engineering are indicated

  14. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulat...

  15. Perturbative transport experiments in JET low or reverse magnetic shear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); INFM, Department of Physics, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)] (and others)

    2002-10-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET low or reverse magnetic shear plasmas either in conditions of fully developed internal transport barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced either by laser ablation or by shallow pellet injection, and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Forward and Reverse Electron Fluxes in the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Votyakova, Tatyana V.; Pivtoraiko, Violetta N.; Zeak, Jennifer; Sukhomlin, Tatiana; Trucco, Massimo; Roca, Josep; Cascante, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) are primary signals that modulate cellular adaptation to environment, and are also destructive factors that damage cells under the conditions of hypoxia/reoxygenation relevant for various systemic diseases or transplantation. The important role of ROS in cell survival requires detailed investigation of mechanism and determinants of ROS production. To perform such an investigation we extended our rule-based model of complex III in order to account for electron transport in the whole RC coupled to proton translocation, transmembrane electrochemical potential generation, TCA cycle reactions, and substrate transport to mitochondria. It fits respiratory electron fluxes measured in rat brain mitochondria fueled by succinate or pyruvate and malate, and the dynamics of NAD+ reduction by reverse electron transport from succinate through complex I. The fitting of measured characteristics gave an insight into the mechanism of underlying processes governing the formation of free radicals that can transfer an unpaired electron to oxygen-producing superoxide and thus can initiate the generation of ROS. Our analysis revealed an association of ROS production with levels of specific radicals of individual electron transporters and their combinations in species of complexes I and III. It was found that the phenomenon of bistability, revealed previously as a property of complex III, remains valid for the whole RC. The conditions for switching to a state with a high content of free radicals in complex III were predicted based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally. These findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms of ROS production in RC. PMID:21483483

  17. Understanding charge transport in molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushmerick, J J; Pollack, S K; Yang, J C; Naciri, J; Holt, D B; Ratner, M A; Shashidhar, R

    2003-12-01

    For molecular electronics to become a viable technology the factors that control charge transport across a metal-molecule-metal junction need to be elucidated. We use an experimentally simple crossed-wire tunnel junction to interrogate how factors such as metal-molecule coupling, molecular structure, and the choice of metal electrode influence the current-voltage characteristics of a molecular junction.

  18. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  19. Electronic transport in torsional strained Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Garrido, Rodrigo; Muñoz, Enrique

    2018-05-01

    In a recent paper (Muñoz and Soto-Garrido 2017 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 29 445302) we have studied the effects of mechanical strain and magnetic field on the electronic transport properties in graphene. In this article we extended our work to Weyl semimetals (WSM). We show that although the WSM are 3D materials, most of the analysis done for graphene (2D material) can be carried out. In particular, we studied the electronic transport through a cylindrical region submitted to torsional strain and external magnetic field. We provide exact analytical expressions for the scattering cross section and the transmitted electronic current. In addition, we show the node-polarization effect on the current and propose a recipe to measure the torsion angle from transmission experiments.

  20. The effect of electron-electron interaction induced dephasing on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahnoj, Sina Soleimani; Touski, Shoeib Babaee [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourfath, Mahdi, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@iue.tuwien.ac.at [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 27–29/E360, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-08

    The effect of dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons is theoretically investigated. In the presence of disorder in graphene nanoribbons, wavefunction of electrons can set up standing waves along the channel and the conductance exponentially decreases with the ribbon's length. Employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism along with an accurate model for describing the dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction, we show that this kind of interaction prevents localization and transport of electrons remains in the diffusive regime where the conductance is inversely proportional to the ribbon's length.

  1. Electronic Transport in Two-Dimensional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Vinod K.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have captured the attention of the scientific community due to the wide range of unique properties at nanometer-scale thicknesses. While significant exploratory research in 2D materials has been achieved, the understanding of 2D electronic transport and carrier dynamics remains in a nascent stage. Furthermore, because prior review articles have provided general overviews of 2D materials or specifically focused on charge transport in graphene, here we instead highlight charge transport mechanisms in post-graphene 2D materials, with particular emphasis on transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. For these systems, we delineate the intricacies of electronic transport, including band structure control with thickness and external fields, valley polarization, scattering mechanisms, electrical contacts, and doping. In addition, electronic interactions between 2D materials are considered in the form of van der Waals heterojunctions and composite films. This review concludes with a perspective on the most promising future directions in this fast-evolving field.

  2. Intrinsic Rotation and Momentum Transport in Reversed Shear Plasmas with Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    The intrinsic rotation in fusion plasmas is believed to be generated via the residual stress without external momentum input. The physical mechanism responsible for the generation and transport of intrinsic rotation in L- and H-mode tokamak plasmas has been studied extensively. However, it is noted that the physics of intrinsic rotation generation and its relationship to the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in reversed shear (RS) tokamak plasmas have not been explored in detail, which is the main subject in the present work. A global gyrofluid code TRB is used for this study. It is found that the large intrinsic rotation (˜10-30% of the ion sound speed depending on ITB characteristics) is generated near the ITB region and propagates into the core. The intrinsic rotation increases linearly as the temperature gradient at ITB position increases, albeit not indefinitely. Key parameters related to the symmetry breaking, such as turbulent intensity and its gradient, the flux surface averaged parallel wavenumber are evaluated dynamically during the ITB formation. The role of reversed shear and the q-profile curvature is presented in relation to the symmetry breaking mechanism in RS plasmas.

  3. Fast electron transport in shaped solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anle Lei; Cao, L.H.; He, X.T.; Zhang, W.Y.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Nakamura, T.; Normatsu, T.; Yu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The scheme of fast ignition fusion energy relies on the ultra-intense ultra-short (UIUS) laser energy transport into the compressed core plasma. One solution is to insert a hollow cone in the fuel shell to block the UIUS laser from the coronal plasma, thus allowing it to reach the core plasma. The cone not only can guide the UIUS laser to its tip, but can play important roles in the specific cone-in-shell target designed for FI. It was found in a PIC simulation that the cone can guide the fast electrons generated at the inner wall to propagate along the wall surface toward its tip, which would increase the energy density at the tip and might enhance the heating of the core plasma. Surface guiding of fast electrons with planar foil targets has been demonstrated experimentally. However, the guided fast electrons will mix the electrons generated ahead by the laser light with a planar target, and hence one cannot experimentally quantitatively validate the guide of the fast electrons. We investigate the cone guiding of fast electrons with an inverse cone target. We found a novel surface current of fast electrons propagating along the cone wall. The fast electrons generated at the planar outer tip of the inverse cone are guided and confined to propagate along the inverse cone wall to form a surface current by induced transient electric and magnetic fields associated with the current itself. Once departing from the source at the outer tip, this surface current of fast electrons is 'clean', neither experiencing the interacting laser light nor mixing fast electrons ahead, unlike those in cone or planar targets. This surface current in the inverse cone may explicitly give the capability of the guide of fast electron energy by the cone wall. The guiding and confinement of fast electrons is of important for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion and several applications in high energy density science.

  4. Electron temperature in field reversed configurations and theta pinches with closed magnetic field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Field-reversed configurations (FRC) and theta pinches with trapped reversed bias field are essentially the same magnetic confinement systems using closed magnetic field lines inside an open-ended magnetic flux tube. A simple model of joule heating and parallel electron thermal conduction along the open flux lines to an external heat sink gives the electron temperature as Tsub(e)(eV) approx.= 0.05 Bsup(2/3)(G)Lsup(1/3)(cm), where B is the magnetic field and L is the coil length. This model appears to agree with measurements from present FRC experiments and past theta-pinch experiments which cover a range of 40-900 eV. The energy balance in the model is dominated by (a) parallel electron thermal conduction along the open field lines which has a steep temperature dependence, Q is proportional to Tsub(e)sup(7/2), and (b) the assumed rapid perpendicular transport in the plasma bulk which, in experiments to date, may be due to the small number of ion gyroradii across the plasma. (author)

  5. Theoretical investigations of molecular wires: Electronic spectra and electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Julio Leopoldo

    The results of theoretical and computational research are presented for two promising molecular wires, the Nanostar dendrimer, and a series of substituted azobenzene derivatives connected to aluminum electrodes. The electronic absorption spectra of the Nanostar (a phenylene-ethynylene dendrimer attached to an ethynylperylene chromophore) were calculated using a sequential Molecular Dynamics/Quantum Mechanics (MD/QM) method to perform an analysis of the temperature dependence of the electronic absorption process. We modeled the Nanostar as a series of connected units, and performed MD simulations for each chromophore at 10 K and 300 K to study how the temperature affected the structures and, consequently, the spectra. The absorption spectra of the Nanostar were computed using an ensemble of 8000 structures for each chromophore. Quantum Mechanical (QM) ZINDO/S calculations were performed for each conformation in the ensemble, including 16 excited states, for a total of 128,000 excitation energies. The spectral intensity was then scaled linearly with the number of conjugated units. Our calculations for both the individual chromophores and the Nanostar, are in good agreement with experiments. We explain in detail the effects of temperature and the consequences for the absorption process. The second part of this thesis presents a study of the effects of chemical substituents on the electron transport properties of the azobenzene molecule, which has been proposed recently as a component of a light-driven molecular switch. This molecule has two stable conformations (cis and trans) in its electronic ground state, with considerable differences in their conductance. The electron transport properties were calculated using first-principles methods combining non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) techniques with density functional theory (DFT). For the azobenzene studies, we included electron-donating groups and electron-withdrawing groups in meta- and ortho-positions with

  6. Charge transport through DNA based electronic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil R.; Chawda, Vivek; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Sinha, Niraj

    2018-05-01

    We report charge transport in electronic 'barriers' constructed by sequence engineering in DNA. Considering the ionization potentials of Thymine-Adenine (AT) and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) base pairs, we treat AT as 'barriers'. The effect of DNA conformation (A and B form) on charge transport is also investigated. Particularly, the effect of width of 'barriers' on hole transport is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on energy minimized DNA structures to obtain the electronic Hamiltonian. The quantum transport calculations are performed using the Landauer-Buttiker framework. Our main findings are contrary to previous studies. We find that a longer A-DNA with more AT base pairs can conduct better than shorter A-DNA with a smaller number of AT base pairs. We also find that some sequences of A-DNA can conduct better than a corresponding B-DNA with the same sequence. The counterions mediated charge transport and long range interactions are speculated to be responsible for counter-intuitive length and AT content dependence of conductance of A-DNA.

  7. Disorder and electronic transport in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucciolo, E R; Lewenkopf, C H

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we provide an account of the recent progress in understanding electronic transport in disordered graphene systems. Starting from a theoretical description that emphasizes the role played by band structure properties and lattice symmetries, we describe the nature of disorder in these systems and its relation to transport properties. While the focus is primarily on theoretical and conceptual aspects, connections to experiments are also included. Issues such as short- versus long-range disorder, localization (strong and weak), the carrier density dependence of the conductivity, and conductance fluctuations are considered and some open problems are pointed out. (topical review)

  8. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  9. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, Kateryna; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-09-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed.

  10. Sub-electron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel; Sverdlov, Viktor; Korotkov, Alexander; Likharev, Konstantin

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed quasi-continuous charge transport in two-dimensional tunnel junction arrays with a special distribution of background charges, providing a complete suppression of Coulomb blockade thresholds of tunneling between any pair of islands. Numerical simulations show that at low currents the dc I-V curve is indeed linear, while the shot noise is strongly suppressed and approaches 1/N of the Schottky value (where N is the array length). Thus both conditions of quasi-continuous transport, formulated earlier by Matsuoka and Likharev (Phys. Rev. B, v57, 15613, 1998), are satisfied. At higher fields the electron-hole pair production begins, and shot noise grows sharply. At higher voltages still, the array enters the "plasma" regime (with nearly balanced number of electrons and holes) and the Fano factor drops to 1/N once again. We have studied the resulting shot noise peak in detail, and concluded that its physics is close to that of critical opalescence.

  11. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics

  12. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L., E-mail: umbertofulco@gmail.com; Albuquerque, E. L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  13. Electron stopping powers for transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of radiation transport calculations depends on the accuracy of the input cross sections. Therefore, it is essential to review and update the cross sections from time to time. Even though the main interest of the author's group at NBS is in transport calculations and their applications, the group spends almost as much time on the analysis and preparation of cross sections as on the development of transport codes. Stopping powers, photon attenuation coefficients, bremsstrahlung cross sections, and elastic-scattering cross sections in recent years have claimed attention. This chapter deals with electron stopping powers (with emphasis on collision stopping powers), and reviews the state of the art as reflected by Report 37 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements

  14. Research on the Environmental Performance Evaluation of Electronic Waste Reverse Logistics Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Chen, Fei-Yang; Tong, Tong

    According to the characteristic of e-waste reverse logistics, environmental performance evaluation system of electronic waste reverse logistics enterprise is proposed. We use fuzzy analytic hierarchy process method to evaluate the system. In addition, this paper analyzes the enterprise X, as an example, to discuss the evaluation method. It's important to point out attributes and indexes which should be strengthen during the process of ewaste reverse logistics and provide guidance suggestions to domestic e-waste reverse logistics enterprises.

  15. Recent developments in discrete ordinates electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The discrete ordinates method is a deterministic method for numerically solving the Boltzmann equation. It was originally developed for neutron transport calculations, but is routinely used for photon and coupled neutron-photon transport calculations as well. The computational state of the art for coupled electron-photon transport (CEPT) calculations is not as developed as that for neutron transport calculations. The only production codes currently available for CEPT calculations are condensed-history Monte Carlo codes such as the ETRAN and ITS codes. A deterministic capability for production calculations is clearly needed. In response to this need, we have begun the development of a production discrete ordinates code for CEPT calculations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic approach we are taking, discuss the current status of the project, and present some new computational results. Although further characterization of the coupled electron-photon discrete ordinates method remains to be done, the results to date indicate that the discrete ordinates method can be just as accurate and from 10 to 100 times faster than the Monte Carlo method for a wide variety of problems. We stress that these results are obtained with standard discrete ordinates codes such as ONETRAN. It is clear that even greater efficiency can be obtained by developing a new generation of production discrete ordinates codes specifically designed to solve the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation. However, the prospects for such development in the near future appear to be remote

  16. Status of electron transport in MCNP trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    The latest version of MCNP, the Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code, has now been officially released. MCNP4B has been sent to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is responsible for the further distribution of the code within the US. International distribution of MCNP is done by the Nuclear Energy Agency (ECD/NEA), in Paris, France. Readers with access to the World-Wide-Web should consult the MCNP distribution site http://www-xdiv.lanl.gov/XTM/mcnp/about.html for specific information about contacting RSICC and OECD/NEA. A variety of new features are available in MCNP4B. Among these are differential operator perturbations, cross-section plotting capabilities, enhanced diagnostics for transport in repeated structures and lattices, improved efficiency in distributed-memory multiprocessing, corrected particle lifetime and lifespan estimators, and expanded software quality assurance procedures and testing, including testing of the multigroup Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck capability. New and improved cross section sets in the form of ENDF/B-VI evaluations have also been recently released and can be used in MCNP4B. Perhaps most significant for the interests of this special session, the electron transport algorithm has been improved, especially in the collisional energy-loss straggling and the angular-deflection treatments. In this paper, the author concentrates on a fairly complete documentation of the current status of the electron transport methods in MCNP

  17. Observation of trapped-electron-mode microturbulence in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, J. R.; Williams, Z. R.; Brower, D. L.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Pueschel, M. J.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.

    2018-01-01

    Density fluctuations in the large-density-gradient region of improved confinement Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas exhibit multiple features that are characteristic of the trapped-electron mode (TEM). Core transport in conventional RFP plasmas is governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from multiple long-wavelength tearing modes. Using inductive current profile control, these tearing modes are reduced, and global confinement is increased to that expected for comparable tokamak plasmas. Under these conditions, new short-wavelength fluctuations distinct from global tearing modes appear in the spectrum at a frequency of f ˜ 50 kHz, which have normalized perpendicular wavenumbers k⊥ρs≲ 0.2 and propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. They exhibit a critical-gradient threshold, and the fluctuation amplitude increases with the local electron density gradient. These characteristics are consistent with predictions from gyrokinetic analysis using the Gene code, including increased TEM turbulence and transport from the interaction of remnant tearing magnetic fluctuations and zonal flow.

  18. Nonvesicular inhibitory neurotransmission via reversal of the GABA transporter GAT-1

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yuanming; Wang, Wengang; Díez-Sampedro, Ana; Richerson, George B.

    2007-01-01

    GABA transporters play an important but poorly understood role in neuronal inhibition. They can reverse, but this is widely thought to occur only under pathological conditions. Here we use a heterologous expression system to show that the reversal potential of GAT-1 under physiologically relevant conditions is near the normal resting potential of neurons, and that reversal can occur rapidly enough to release GABA during simulated action potentials. We then use paired recordings from cultured ...

  19. Transport properties of mixed metallic salts through reverse osmosis membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Akio; Nishimaki, Kenzo

    1991-01-01

    Applicability of reverse osmosis to the treatment of radioactive liquid waste was investigated. In previous papers, we showed the ability of reverse osmosis to decontaminate liquid waste which contains ionic radionuclides with chloride ion. When sulfate ion coexists with chloride, logarithms of DFs of one cation are approximately expressed by a linear function of logarithms of SO 4 2- /Cl - ratio. In this paper, we investigate the relation between DFs and concentrations of coexisting ions in multicomponent cation/anion system. As a result of this study, DFs of cations change more seriously with coexisting anions composition than with cations. In the case of anion, these influences are the reverse. Logarithms of DFs of cations and anions are expressed by linear equation with the two variables, logarithmic concentration ratio of univalent/divalent cations and logarithmic concentration ratio of SO 4 2- /Cl - . (author)

  20. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada

    2018-01-23

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  1. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada; Yue, Wan; Jellett, Cameron; Xiao, Mingfei; Chen, Hung-Yang; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Hanifi, David A.; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Purushothaman, Balaji; Nikolka, Mark; Flores, Jean-Charles; Salleo, Alberto; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning; Hayoz, Pascal; McCulloch, Iain

    2018-01-01

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  2. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwubiko, Ada; Yue, Wan; Jellett, Cameron; Xiao, Mingfei; Chen, Hung-Yang; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Hanifi, David A; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Purushothaman, Balaji; Nikolka, Mark; Flores, Jean-Charles; Salleo, Alberto; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning; Hayoz, Pascal; McCulloch, Iain

    2018-01-29

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  3. Electron Transport Properties of Ge nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrath, Tobias; Khondaker, Saiful I.; Yao, Zhen; Korgel, Brian A.

    2003-03-01

    Electron Transport Properties of Ge nanowires Tobias Hanrath*, Saiful I. Khondaker, Zhen Yao, Brian A. Korgel* *Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Dept. of Physics, Texas Materials Institute, and Center for Nano- and Molecular Science and Technology University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1062 e-mail: korgel@mail.che.utexas.edu Germanium (Ge) nanowires with diameters ranging from 6 to 50 nm and several micrometer in length were grown via a supercritical fluid-liquid-solid synthesis. Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) was employed to study the band structure and electron density in the Ge nanowires. The observed increase in plasmon peak energy and peak width with decreasing nanowire diameter is attributed to quantum confinement effects. For electrical characterization, Ge nanowires were deposited onto a patterned Si/SiO2 substrate. E-beam lithography was then used to form electrode contacts to individual nanowires. The influence of nanowire diameter, surface chemistry and crystallographic defects on electron transport properties were investigated and the comparison of Ge nanowire conductivity with respect to bulk, intrinsic Ge will be presented.

  4. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  5. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Von Goeler, S.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  6. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion and reverse cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization the number one cause of death throughout the world is cardiovascular disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease. One possible way is to target the HDL-driven reverse cholesterol

  7. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper Toft; Gunst, Tue; Bøggild, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction for the ads......Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction...... for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15%) for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å) and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines......, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates...

  8. Formation conditions for electron internal transport barriers in JT-60U plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Fukuda, T [Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakamoto, Y [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ide, S [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Suzuki, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Takenaga, H [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ida, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Idei, H [Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Shimozuma, T [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujisawa, A [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohdachi, S [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Toi, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    The formation of electron internal transport barriers (ITBs) was studied using electron cyclotron (EC) heating in JT-60U positive shear (PS) and reversed shear (RS) plasmas with scan of neutral beam (NB) power. With no or low values of NB power and with a small radial electric field (E{sub r}) gradient, a strong, box-type electron ITB was formed in RS plasmas while a peaked profile with no strong electron ITBs was observed in PS plasmas within the available EC power. When the NB power and the E{sub r} gradient were increased, the electron transport in strong electron ITBs with EC heating in RS plasmas was not affected, while electron thermal diffusivity was reduced in conjunction with the reduction of ion thermal diffusivity, and strong electron and ion ITBs were formed in PS plasmas.

  9. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes have found applications in a broad range of industrial production processes. While high catalytic activity, selectivity and mild reaction conditions are attractive advantages of the biocatalysts, particularly costs arising from required cofactors pose a sever limitation. While cofactor-recycling systems are available, their use implies constraints for process set-up and conditions, which are a particular problem e.g. for solid-gas-phase reactions. Several oxidoreductases are able to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a reduction reaction circumventing redox-cofactors requirements. In such a set-up, hydrogenases could generate and provide electrons directly form gaseous hydrogen. This thesis describes the co-immobilization of the oxygen tolerant hydrogenases from C. eutropha or C. metallidurans and cytochrome P450BM3 as test system. Conductive material in the form of carbon nanotubes (CNT) serves as a suitable support. A combination of the hydrogenase and the catalytic domain of P450BM3 immobilized on carbon nanotubes were tested for the oxidation of lauric acid in the presence of hydrogen instead of an electron-transport cofactor. The GC-MS analysis reveals the conversion of 4% of lauric acid (LA) into three products, which correspond to the hydroxylated lauric acid in three different positions with a total turnover (TON) of 34. The product distribution is similar to that obtained when using the wildtype P450BM3 with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) cofactor. Such electronic coupling couldn’t be achieved for the conversion of other substrates such as propane and cyclohexane, probably due to the high uncoupling rate within the heme-domain of cytochrome P450BM3 when unnatural substrates are introduced.

  10. Intestinal cholesterol transport: Measuring cholesterol absorption and its reverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakulj, L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal cholesterol transport might serve as an attractive future target for cardiovascular disease reduction, provided that underlying molecular mechanisms are more extensively elucidated, combined with improved techniques to measure changes in cholesterol fluxes and their possible

  11. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angioni, C.

    2001-10-01

    central electron confinement (ICEC) regime in TCV, characterized by a precise heating scheme (strong electron cyclotron current drive in the counter-direction in the plasma center, and localized off-axis heating), with a specific time sequence. Transport simulations and investigations of this regime, in particular dedicated to the reconstruction of the current density profile during the high performance phase, have motivated further experiments which have confirmed numerical predictions. As a consequence, the magnetic shear reversal has been identified as the crucial ingredient for ICEC. (author)

  12. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  13. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, A.I.; Garcia, G.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; Munoz, A.; Jones, D.B.; Brunger, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic configuration of the furfural molecule is similar to the 5-membered ring structure constituting the sugar units of the DNA helix, hence its importance in biology. In this paper, we report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mtorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed

  14. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M; Eckern, U; Romero, A H; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  15. Electronic transport properties of phenylacetylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wen; Cheng Jie; Yan Cui-Xia; Li Hai-Hong; Wang Yong-Juan; Liu De-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Electronic transport properties of a kind of phenylacetylene compound— (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene are calculated by the first-principles method in the framework of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The molecular junction shows an obvious rectifying behaviour at a bias voltage larger than 1.0 V. The rectification effect is attributed to the asymmetry of the interface contacts. Moreover, at a bias voltage larger than 2.0 V, which is not referred to in a relevant experiment [Fang L, Park J Y, Ma H, Jen A K Y and Salmeron M 2007 Langmuir 23 11522], we find a negative differential resistance phenomenon. The negative differential resistance effect may originate from the change of the delocalization degree of the molecular orbitals induced by the bias. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  17. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  18. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CRPP-EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-05-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The {rho}{sub T}{sup *} (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength.

  19. Electron transport in heavily doped GdN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, T.; Trodahl, H. J.; Natali, F.; Ruck, B. J.; Vézian, S.

    2018-01-01

    We report measurements of electron transport phenomena in the intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductor GdN doped with 1.3 ×1021cm-3 electrons. The conductivity, carrier concentration, and thermoelectric power are compared with expectations based on an LSDA+U band structure. In the ferromagnetic state the carriers fill the majority-spin conduction band pockets to the bottom of the minority-spin band. The resistance implies an electron mobility of 18 cm2V-1s-1 at zero temperature, and in turn a mean-free path of 10-30 nm. Spin disorder scattering rapidly reduces the mobility near the 70 K Curie temperature (TC). The thermoelectric power is negative in the paramagnetic phase, as expected for a n -type conductor, with a magnitude that is in agreement with the Fermi energy implied by the band structure. The thermopower reverses sign to be positive in the ferromagnetic phase, which correlates with a strongly temperature-dependent electron diffusion from spin-disorder scattering that increases rapidly as the temperature rises toward TC.

  20. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G

    2004-01-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The ρ T * (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength

  1. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J A

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  2. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  3. ECRH and electron heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Dumont, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed during the ECRH experiments in tokamaks that the shape of the electron temperature profile in stationary regimes is not very sensitive to the ECRH power deposition i.e. the temperature profile remains peaked at the center even though the ECRH power deposition is off-axis. Various models have been invoked for the interpretation of this profile resilience phenomenon: the inward heat pinch, the critical temperature gradient, the Self-Organized Criticality, etc. Except the pinch effect, all of these models need a specific form of the diffusivity in the heat transport equation. In this work, our approach is to solve a simplified time-dependent heat transport equation analytically in cylindrical geometry. The features of this analytical solution are analyzed, in particular the relationship between the temperature profile resilience and the Eigenmode of the physical system with respect to the heat transport phenomenon. Finally, applications of this analytical solution for the determination of the transport coefficient and the polarization of the EC waves are presented. It has been shown that the solution of the simplified transport equation in a finite cylinder is a Fourier-Bessel series. This series represents in fact a decomposition of the heat source in Eigenmode, which are characterized by the Bessel functions of order 0. The physical interpretation of the Eigenmodes is the following: when the heat source is given by a Bessel function of order 0, the temperature profile has exactly the same form as the source at every time. At the beginning of the power injection, the effectiveness of the temperature response is the same for each Eigenmode, and the response in temperature, having the same form as the source, is local. Conversely, in the later phase of the evolution, the effectiveness of the temperature response for each Eigenmode is different: the higher the order, the lower the effectiveness. In this case the response in temperature appears as

  4. Importance of field-reversing ion ring formation in hot electron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, K.

    1975-11-01

    Formation of the field reversing ion ring in the mirror confined hot electron plasma may offer a device to confine the fusion plasma even under the restriction of the present technology. (Author) (GRA)

  5. Demonstration of Electron Bernstein Wave Heating in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Andrew H.

    The Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) presents an alternative to conventional electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in overdense plasmas, where electromagnetic waves are inaccessible. The first observation of rf heating in a reversed field pinch (RFP) using the EBW has been demonstrated on Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). The EBW propagates radially inward through a magnetic field that is either stochastic or has broken flux surfaces, before absorption on a substantially Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance (? = n*?_ce - k_parallel*v_parallel), where n is the harmonic number. Deposition depth is controllable with plasma current on a broad range (n=1-7) of harmonics. Novel techniques were required to measure the suprathermal electron tail generated by EBW heating in the presence of intense Ohmic heating. In the thick-shelled MST RFP, the radial accessibility of the EBW is limited to r/a > 0.8 ( 10 cm), where a=52cm is the minor radius, by magnetic field error induced by the porthole necessary for the antenna; accessibility in a thin-shelled device with actively controlled saddle coils (without the burden of substantial porthole field error) is likely to be r/a> 0.5 in agreement with ray tracing studies. Measured electron loss rates with falloff time constants in the 10s of micros imply a large, non-collisional radial diffusivity; collisional times with background particles are on the order of one millisecond. EBW-heated test electrons are used as a probe of edge (r/a > 0.9) radial transport, showing a modest transition from 'standard' to reduced-tearing RFP operation.

  6. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  7. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-09-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4×1010cm-3 for a central electron density of 1×1013cm-3. Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20m2 s-1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ˜2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge.

  8. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-01-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4x10 10 cm -3 for a central electron density of 1x10 13 cm -3 . Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20 m 2 s -1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ∼2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge

  9. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    Due to the sessile nature of plants, it is crucial for their survival and growth that they can handle a constantly changing, and thus stressful, ambient environment by modifying their structure and metabolism. The central metabolism of plants is characterized by many alternative options...... for metabolic pathways, which allow a wide range of adjustments of metabolic processes in response to environmental variations. Many of the metabolic pathways in plants involve the processing of redox compounds and the use of adenylates. They converge at the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) where...... redox compounds from carbon degradation are used for powering ATP synthesis. The standard ETC contains three sites of energy conservation in complexes I, III, and IV, which are in common with most other eukaryotes. However, the complexity of the plant metabolic system is mirrored in the ETC. In addition...

  10. Electronic transport study in PAMAM dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Nirton C.S.; Soares, Demetrio A.W.; Fernandes, Edson G.R.; Queiroz, Alvaro A.A. de

    2005-01-01

    Dendrimers are nanomaterials that have many potential applications in medicine, including diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. Dendrimers are isomolecular polymers, with a very well controlled architecture and a thousand times smaller than cells. Dendrimers containing biocatalysts are of great interest for clinical applications in biosensors because of the way in which their chemical and electric conduction mechanism can be tailored. In this work, the polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) of generation 4 was synthesized by divergent route and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The electronic transport properties of PAMAM in a metal-polymer type heterojunction were studied. The electrical conduction mechanism of PAMAM studied in the temperature range of 291-323 K indicates a conduction mechanism thermally activated. (author)

  11. Formation of Field-reversed-Configuration Plasma with Punctuated-betatron-orbit Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.; Cohen, S.A.; Genoni, T.C.; Glasser, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe ab initio, self-consistent, 3D, fully electromagnetic numerical simulations of current drive and field-reversed-configuration plasma formation by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMFo). Magnetic-separatrix formation and field reversal are attained from an initial mirror configuration. A population of punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons, generated by the RMFo, carries the majority of the field-normal azimuthal electrical current responsible for field reversal. Appreciable current and plasma pressure exist outside the magnetic separatrix whose shape is modulated by the RMFo phase. The predicted plasma density and electron energy distribution compare favorably with RMFo experiments.

  12. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies

  13. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville 4810 (Australia); McEachran, R. P. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  14. Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of Thermostable Newcastle ... 22) were monitored during storage and transport from vaccine production laboratory in Temeke, Dar es ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  15. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-01-01

    to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a

  16. Power Electronics Packaging Reliability | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packaging Reliability Power Electronics Packaging Reliability A photo of a piece of power electronics laboratory equipment. NREL power electronics packaging reliability research investigates the electronics packaging around a semiconductor switching device determines the electrical, thermal, and

  17. Thrust reverser design studies for an over-the-wing STOL transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, R. C.; Sowers, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic and acoustics analytical studies were conducted to evaluate three thrust reverser designs for potential use on commercial over-the-wing STOL transports. The concepts were: (1) integral D nozzle/target reverser, (2) integral D nozzle/top arc cascade reverser, and (3) post exit target reverser integral with wing. Aerodynamic flowpaths and kinematic arrangements for each concept were established to provide a 50% thrust reversal capability. Analytical aircraft stopping distance/noise trade studies conducted concurrently with flow path design showed that these high efficiency reverser concepts are employed at substantially reduced power settings to meet noise goals of 100 PNdB on a 152.4 m sideline and still meet 609.6 m landing runway length requirements. From an overall installation standpoint, only the integral D nozzle/target reverser concept was found to penalize nacelle cruise performance; for this concept a larger nacelle diameter was required to match engine cycle effective area demand in reverse thrust.

  18. The role of transition metal interfaces on the electronic transport in lithium–air batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jingzhe; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Low electronic conduction is expected to be a main limiting factor in the performance of reversible lithium–air, Li–O2, batteries. Here, we apply density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function calculations to determine the electronic transport through lithium peroxide, Li2O2, formed...... at the cathode during battery discharge. We find the transport to depend on the orientation and lattice matching of the insulator–metal interface in the presence of Au and Pt catalysts. Bulk lithium vacancies are found to be available and mobile under battery charging conditions, and found to pin the Fermi level...

  19. Ratchet Transport of Chiral Particles Caused by the Transversal Asymmetry: Current Reversals and Particle Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-li; Lu, Shi-cai; Ai, Bao-quan

    2018-06-01

    Due to the chirality of active particles, the transversal asymmetry can induce the the longitudinal directed transport. The transport of chiral active particles in a periodic channel is investigated in the presence of two types of the transversal asymmetry, the transverse force and the transverse rigid half-circle obstacles. For all cases, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions. For the case of the only transverse force, the chiral active particles can reverse their directions when increasing the transverse force. When the transverse rigid half-circle obstacles are introduced, the transport behavior of particles becomes more complex and multiple current reversals occur. The direction of the transport is determined by the competition between two types of the transversal asymmetry. For a given chirality, by suitably tailoring parameters, particles with different self-propulsion speed can move in different directions and can be separated.

  20. Molecular electronics--resonant transport through single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörtscher, Emanuel; Riel, Heike

    2010-01-01

    The mechanically controllable break-junction technique (MCBJ) enables us to investigate charge transport through an individually contacted and addressed molecule in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment at variable temperature ranging from room temperature down to 4 K. Using a statistical measurement and analysis approach, we acquire current-voltage (I-V) characteristics during the repeated formation, manipulation, and breaking of a molecular junction. At low temperatures, voltages accessing the first molecular orbitals in resonance can be applied, providing spectroscopic information about the junction's energy landscape, in particular about the molecular level alignment in respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. Thereby, we can investigate the non-linear transport properties of various types of functional molecules and explore their potential use as functional building blocks for future nano-electronics. An example will be given by the reversible and controllable switching between two distinct conductive states of a single molecule. As a proof-of-principle for functional molecular devices, a single-molecule memory element will be demonstrated.

  1. Electronic transport in graphene; Elektronischer Transport in Graphen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Timm

    2010-06-08

    In 2004 graphene, a monolayer of carbon atoms, has been isolated as the first real two-dimensional solid by the group of A. Geim at the University of Manchester. Graphene's properties have been theoretically investigated since the 1950s. Until the successful preparation by Geim et al., graphene was suspected to be unstable under ambient conditions above 0 K (Mermin-Wagner theorem). Its two dimensionality and hexagonal lattice symmetry cause interesting novel properties and effects. At experimentally relevant energies, graphene has a linear band structure and charge carrier dynamics must be treated using Dirac's equation. Therefore charge carriers in graphene are called ''Dirac fermions''. Beside exotic effects like ''Klein tunneling'' an unconventional quantum Hall effect (QHE) can be observed with a Hall conductance quantized in units of 2e{sup 2}/h, 6e{sup 2}/h, 10e{sup 2}/h, 14e{sup 2}/h. As a starting point for in-depth transport measurements the processing of graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) has been developed and optimized, based on the pioneering work by Novoselov et al. The optimized process provides samples with carrier mobilities up to 16000 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a well defined Hall geometry. These samples are used to investigate external influences on the electronic properties of graphene. Among those influences molecular adsorbates are responsible for various effects of freshly prepared graphene samples e.g. an intrinsic p-doping, a mobility asymmetry of electrons and holes, the so called ''minimal conductivity'' and a field effect hysteresis at room temperature. In collaboration with the group of A. Yacoby (Harvard) density fluctuations in the vicinity of the Dirac point (''electron-hole puddles'') could be observed using a scanning single electron transistor (SSET). These fluctuations might be one reason for the ''minimal conductivity'' at

  2. Generic transmission zeros in time-reversal symmetric single channel transport through quasi-1d systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    Wh study phase coherent transport in a single channel system using the scattering matrix approach. It is show that the Friedel sum rule and the time-reversal symmetry result in the generic appearance of transmission zeros in quasi-1d systems. The transmission zeros naturally lead to abrupt phase changes (without any intrinsic energy scale) and in-phase resonances, thus providing insights to recent experiments on phase coherent transport through a quantum dot

  3. Hypoinsulinemia regulates amphetamine-induced reverse transport of dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Williams

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine (AMPH arise from their ability to elicit increases in extracellular dopamine (DA. These AMPH-induced increases are achieved by DA transporter (DAT-mediated transmitter efflux. Recently, we have shown that AMPH self-administration is reduced in rats that have been depleted of insulin with the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin (STZ. In vitro studies suggest that hypoinsulinemia may regulate the actions of AMPH by inhibiting the insulin downstream effectors phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and protein kinase B (PKB, or Akt, which we have previously shown are able to fine-tune DAT cell-surface expression. Here, we demonstrate that striatal Akt function, as well as DAT cell-surface expression, are significantly reduced by STZ. In addition, our data show that the release of DA, determined by high-speed chronoamperometry (HSCA in the striatum, in response to AMPH, is severely impaired in these insulin-deficient rats. Importantly, selective inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 within the striatum results in a profound reduction in the subsequent potential for AMPH to evoke DA efflux. Consistent with our biochemical and in vivo electrochemical data, findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments reveal that the ability of AMPH to elicit positive blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in the striatum is significantly blunted in STZ-treated rats. Finally, local infusion of insulin into the striatum of STZ-treated animals significantly recovers the ability of AMPH to stimulate DA release as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry. The present studies establish that PI3K signaling regulates the neurochemical actions of AMPH-like psychomotor stimulants. These data suggest that insulin signaling pathways may represent a novel mechanism for regulating DA transmission, one which may be targeted for the treatment of AMPH abuse and potentially other dopaminergic disorders.

  4. Turbulence, transport, and zonal flows in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Z. R.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Hauff, T.

    2017-12-01

    The robustness and the effect of zonal flows in trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) are investigated from numerical solutions of the gyrokinetic equations with and without magnetic external perturbations introduced to model tearing modes. For simulations without external magnetic field perturbations, zonal flows produce a much larger reduction of transport for the density-gradient-driven TEM turbulence than they do for the ITG turbulence. Zonal flows are studied in detail to understand the nature of their strong excitation in the RFP and to gain insight into the key differences between the TEM- and ITG-driven regimes. The zonal flow residuals are significantly larger in the RFP than in tokamak geometry due to the low safety factor. Collisionality is seen to play a significant role in the TEM zonal flow regulation through the different responses of the linear growth rate and the size of the Dimits shift to collisionality, while affecting the ITG only minimally. A secondary instability analysis reveals that the TEM turbulence drives zonal flows at a rate that is twice that of the ITG turbulence. In addition to interfering with zonal flows, the magnetic perturbations are found to obviate an energy scaling relation for fast particles.

  5. Problems of linear electron (polaron) transport theory in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, M I

    1979-01-01

    Problems of Linear Electron (Polaron) Transport Theory in Semiconductors summarizes and discusses the development of areas in electron transport theory in semiconductors, with emphasis on the fundamental aspects of the theory and the essential physical nature of the transport processes. The book is organized into three parts. Part I focuses on some general topics in the theory of transport phenomena: the general dynamical theory of linear transport in dissipative systems (Kubo formulae) and the phenomenological theory. Part II deals with the theory of polaron transport in a crystalline semicon

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus impairs reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedi Mujawar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from human macrophages, a condition previously shown to be highly atherogenic. In HIV-1-infected cells, this effect was mediated by Nef. Transfection of murine macrophages with Nef impaired cholesterol efflux from these cells. At least two mechanisms were found to be responsible for this phenomenon: first, HIV infection and transfection with Nef induced post-transcriptional down-regulation of ABCA1; and second, Nef caused redistribution of ABCA1 to the plasma membrane and inhibited internalization of apolipoprotein A-I. Binding of Nef to ABCA1 was required for down-regulation and redistribution of ABCA1. HIV-infected and Nef-transfected macrophages accumulated substantial amounts of lipids, thus resembling foam cells. The contribution of HIV-infected macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis was supported by the presence of HIV-positive foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques of HIV-infected patients. Stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophages significantly reduced infectivity of the virions produced by these cells, and this effect correlated with a decreased amount of virion-associated cholesterol, suggesting that impairment of cholesterol efflux is essential to ensure proper cholesterol content in nascent HIV particles. These results reveal a previously unrecognized dysregulation of intracellular lipid metabolism in HIV-infected macrophages and identify Nef and ABCA1 as the key players responsible for this effect. Our findings

  7. Melatonin and the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin protects the electron transport chain (ETC) in multiple ways. It reduces levels of ·NO by downregulating inducible and inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, nNOS), thereby preventing excessive levels of peroxynitrite. Both ·NO and peroxynitrite-derived free radicals, such as ·NO 2 , hydroxyl (·OH) and carbonate radicals (CO 3 · - ) cause blockades or bottlenecks in the ETC, by ·NO binding to irons, protein nitrosation, nitration and oxidation, changes that lead to electron overflow or even backflow and, thus, increased formation of superoxide anions (O 2 · - ). Melatonin improves the intramitochondrial antioxidative defense by enhancing reduced glutathione levels and inducing glutathione peroxidase and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) in the matrix and Cu,Zn-SOD in the intermembrane space. An additional action concerns the inhibition of cardiolipin peroxidation. This oxidative change in the membrane does not only initiate apoptosis or mitophagy, as usually considered, but also seems to occur at low rate, e.g., in aging, and impairs the structural integrity of Complexes III and IV. Moreover, elevated levels of melatonin inhibit the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and shorten its duration. Additionally, high-affinity binding sites in mitochondria have been described. The assumption of direct binding to the amphipathic ramp of Complex I would require further substantiation. The mitochondrial presence of the melatonin receptor MT 1 offers the possibility that melatonin acts via an inhibitory G protein, soluble adenylyl cyclase, decreased cAMP and lowered protein kinase A activity, a signaling pathway shown to reduce Complex I activity in the case of a mitochondrial cannabinoid receptor.

  8. Impact of LDL apheresis on atheroprotective reverse cholesterol transport pathway in familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orsoni, Alexina; Villard, Elise F.; Bruckert, Eric; Robillard, Paul; Carrie, Alain; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Chapman, M. John; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Guerin, Maryse

    2012-01-01

    In familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with functional alterations of HDL particles that reduce their capacity to mediate the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway. The objective of this study was to evaluate the consequences of LDL apheresis

  9. Chrometric properties of curvilinear beam transport channels with reverses of longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapchinskij, M.I.; Korenev, I.L.; Roginskij, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of charged particle beams in curvilinear transport channels comprising sections with counter direction of longitudinal focusing magnetic field is considered. It is shown that such magnetic field reverses reduce sufficiently the particle deflections conditioned by momentum spread of longitudinal motion and their application allows one to completely project the achromatic channel

  10. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-09-10

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature.

  11. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL Facilities Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities NREL's power electronics and electric machines thermal management experimentation facilities feature a wide range of four researchers in discussion around a piece of laboratory equipment. Power electronics researchers

  12. Electron transport through a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Electron transport through a diatomic molecular tunnel junction shows wave like interference phenomenon. By using Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory, we have explicitly presented current and differential conductance calculation for a diatomic molecular and two isolated atoms (two atoms having zero hybridization between their energy orbitals) tunnel junctions. In case of a diatomic molecular tunnel junction, Green's function propagators entering into current and differential conductance formula interfere constructively for a molecular anti-bonding state and destructively for bonding state. Consequently, conductance through a molecular bonding state is suppressed, and to conserve current, conductance through anti-bonding state is enhanced. Therefore, current steps and differential conductance peaks amplitude show asymmetric correspondence between molecular bonding and anti-bonding states. Interestingly, for a diatomic molecule, comprising of two atoms of same energy level, these propagators interfere completely destructively for molecular bonding state and constructively for molecular anti-bonding state. Hence under such condition, a single step or a single peak is shown up in current versus voltage or differential conductance versus voltage studies.

  13. Electron transport and improved confinement on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.T.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Aniel, T.; Giruzzi, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Horton, W.; Zhu, P.; Budny, R.V.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic shear is found to play an important role for triggering various improved confinement regimes through the electron channel. A wide database of hot electron plasmas (T e >2T i ) heated by fast wave electron heating (FWEH) is analyzed for electron thermal transport. A critical gradient is clearly observed. It is found that the critical gradient linearly increases with the ratio between local magnetic shear (s) and safety factor (q). The Horton model, based on the electromagnetic turbulence driven by the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode, is found to be a good candidate for electron transport modeling. (author)

  14. A computer code package for electron transport Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code package was developed for solving various electron transport problems by Monte Carlo simulation. It is based on condensed history Monte Carlo algorithm. In order to get reliable results over wide ranges of electron energies and target atomic numbers, specific techniques of electron transport were implemented such as: Moliere multiscatter angular distributions, Blunck-Leisegang multiscatter energy distribution, sampling of electron-electron and Bremsstrahlung individual interactions. Path-length and lateral displacement corrections algorithms and the module for computing collision, radiative and total restricted stopping powers and ranges of electrons are also included. Comparisons of simulation results with experimental measurements are finally presented. (author)

  15. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  16. Power Electronics Thermal Management | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power Electronics Thermal Management Power Electronics Thermal Management A photo of water boiling in liquid cooling lab equipment. Power electronics thermal management research aims to help lower the investigates and develops thermal management strategies for power electronics systems that use wide-bandgap

  17. Nonequilibrium Transport and the Bernoulli Effect of Electrons in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ismet I.

    2013-02-01

    Nonequilibrium transport of charged carriers in a two-dimensional electron gas is summarized from an experimental point of view. The transport regime in which the electron-electron interactions are enhanced at high bias leads to a range of striking effects in a two-dimensional electron gas. This regime of transport is quite different than the ballistic transport in which particles propagate coherently with no intercarrier energy transfer and the diffusive transport in which the momentum of the electron system is lost with the involvement of the phonons. Quite a few hydrodynamic phenomena observed in classical gasses have the electrical analogs in the current flow. When intercarrier scattering events dominate the transport, the momentum sharing via narrow angle scattering among the hot and cold electrons lead to negative resistance and electron pumping which can be viewed as the analog of the Bernoulli-Venturi effect observed classical gasses. The recent experimental findings and the background work in the field are reviewed.

  18. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A., E-mail: gavoth@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, Computation Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA and Computing, Environment and Life Sciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  19. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A 2− , a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A 2- by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site

  20. A one-dimensional plasma and impurity transport model for reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1991-11-01

    In this thesis a one-dimensional (1-D) plasma and impurity transport model is developed to address issues related to impurity behavior in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) fusion plasmas. A coronal non-equilibrium model is used for impurities. The impurity model is incorporated into an existing one dimensional plasma transport model creating a multi-species plasma transport model which treats the plasma and impurity evolution self-consistently. Neutral deuterium particles are treated using a one-dimensional (slab) model of neutral transport. The resulting mode, RFPBI, is then applied to existing RFP devices such as ZT-40M and MST, and also to examine steady state behavior of ZTH based on the design parameters. A parallel algorithm for the impurity transport equations is implemented and tested to determine speedup and efficiency

  1. Electron transport chain in a thermotolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Martínez-Mora, José A; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Yeasts capable of growing and surviving at high temperatures are regarded as thermotolerant. For appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival, the maintenance of an optimal redox state is critical of reducing and oxidizing species. We studied mitochondrial functions of the thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus SLP1 and the mesophilic OFF1 yeasts, through the evaluation of its mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), ATPase activity, electron transport chain (ETC) activities, alternative oxidase activity, lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial membrane potential and the cytoplasmic free Ca 2+ ions (Ca 2+ cyt) increased in the SLP1 yeast when exposed to high temperature, compared with the mesophilic yeast OFF1. ATPase activity in the mesophilic yeast diminished 80% when exposed to 40° while the thermotolerant SLP1 showed no change, despite an increase in the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. The SLP1 thermotolerant yeast exposed to high temperature showed a diminution of 33% of the oxygen consumption in state 4. The uncoupled state 3 of oxygen consumption did not change in the mesophilic yeast when it had an increase of temperature, whereas in the thermotolerant SLP1 yeast resulted in an increase of 2.5 times when yeast were grown at 30 o , while a decrease of 51% was observed when it was exposed to high temperature. The activities of the ETC complexes were diminished in the SLP1 when exposed to high temperature, but also it was distinguished an alternative oxidase activity. Our results suggest that the mitochondria state, particularly ETC state, is an important characteristic of the thermotolerance of the SLP1 yeast strain.

  2. Electron transport in the presence of a Coulomb field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdoerfer, J.; Gibbons, J.

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the modifications of the transport behavior of electrons in dense media due to the presence of a strong Coulomb field generated by an ion moving initially in close phase-space correlation with the electrons. These modifications play a profound role in convoy electron emission in ion-solid collisions. The transport behavior is studied within the framework of a classical phase-space master equation. The nonseparable master equation is solved numerically using test-particle discretization and Monte Carlo sampling. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb forces the master equation becomes separable and can be reduced to standard one-dimensional kinetic equations for free-electron transport that can be solved exactly. The comparison to free-electron transport is used to gauge both the reliability of test-particle discretization and the significance of Coulomb distortion of the distribution functions. Applications to convoy-electron emission are discussed

  3. Active control of internal transport barrier and confinement database in JT-60U reversed shear plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Kamada, Yutaka; Ide, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Yoshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Active control of internal transport barrier (ITB) and confinement properties of plasma with ITB have been studied in reversed shear plasmas. Modifications of the radial electric field (E{sub r}) profile by changing the combination of tangential neutral beams can control the ITB strength, where the contribution to E{sub r} from the toroidal rotation plays an important role. The ITB confinement database of reversed shear plasmas has been constructed. Stored energy is strongly correlated with poloidal magnetic field at the ITB foot. (author)

  4. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Publications | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL and Electric Machines Publications Power Electronics and Electric Machines Publications NREL and its partners have produced many papers and presentations related to power electronics and from power electronics and electric machines research are available to the public. Photo by Pat Corkery

  5. Global plasma oscillations in electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udintsev, V S; Sauter, O; Asp, E; Fable, E; Goodman, T P; Turri, G; Graves, J P; Zucca, C [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL/SB/CRPP, Station 13, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Scarabosio, A [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Zhuang, G [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2008-12-15

    In the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) (Hofmann F et al1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 B277), global plasma oscillations have been discovered in fully non-inductively driven plasmas featuring electron internal transport barriers (ITB) with strong ECRH/ECCD. These oscillations are linked to the destabilization and stabilization of MHD modes near the foot of the ITB and can lead to large oscillations of the total plasma current and line-averaged density, among others. They are intrinsically related to the fact that ITBs have large pressure gradients in a region of low magnetic shear. Therefore, the ideal MHD limit is relatively low and infernal modes can be unstable. Depending on the proximity to the ideal limit, small crashes or resistive modes can appear which affect the time evolution of the discharge. Being near marginal stability, the modes can self-stabilize due to the modification of the pressure gradient and local q-profile. The plasma recovers good confinement, reverses shear and the ITB builds up, until a new MHD mode is destabilized. TCV results show that this cycling behaviour can be controlled by modifying the current density or the pressure profiles, either with Ohmic current density perturbation or by modifying the ECH/ECCD power. It is demonstrated that many observations such as q {>=} 2 sawteeth, beta collapses, minor disruptions and oscillation regimes in ITBs can be assigned to the same physics origin: the proximity to the infernal mode stability limit.

  6. Global plasma oscillations in electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udintsev, V. S.; Sauter, O.; Asp, E.; Fable, E.; Goodman, T. P.; Turri, G.; Graves, J. P.; Scarabosio, A.; Zhuang, G.; Zucca, C.; TCV Team

    2008-12-01

    In the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) (Hofmann F et al1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 B277), global plasma oscillations have been discovered in fully non-inductively driven plasmas featuring electron internal transport barriers (ITB) with strong ECRH/ECCD. These oscillations are linked to the destabilization and stabilization of MHD modes near the foot of the ITB and can lead to large oscillations of the total plasma current and line-averaged density, among others. They are intrinsically related to the fact that ITBs have large pressure gradients in a region of low magnetic shear. Therefore, the ideal MHD limit is relatively low and infernal modes can be unstable. Depending on the proximity to the ideal limit, small crashes or resistive modes can appear which affect the time evolution of the discharge. Being near marginal stability, the modes can self-stabilize due to the modification of the pressure gradient and local q-profile. The plasma recovers good confinement, reverses shear and the ITB builds up, until a new MHD mode is destabilized. TCV results show that this cycling behaviour can be controlled by modifying the current density or the pressure profiles, either with Ohmic current density perturbation or by modifying the ECH/ECCD power. It is demonstrated that many observations such as q >= 2 sawteeth, beta collapses, minor disruptions and oscillation regimes in ITBs can be assigned to the same physics origin: the proximity to the infernal mode stability limit.

  7. The imperfect price reversibility of non-transport oil demand in the OECD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dargay, J.; Gately, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the price reversibility of OECD non-transport oil demand and its components: residual (heavy) fuel oil, non-transport distillates and other non-transport oil products. Our purpose is to determine the extent to which the reductions in demand following the oil price increases of the 1970s have been - and will be - reversed by the price cuts of the 1980s. The analysis is based on an econometric model which utilizes price decomposition methods to measure separately the effects of price increases and price decreases. These methods allow empirical testing of irreversibility and hysteresis, and should be applicable in other areas of economics where asymmetry of response or persistence of effect are evident. Based on the statistical evidence, we reject the conventional specification of demand being perfectly price reversible. We conclude that the response to the price cuts of the 1980s has been significantly smaller than to the price increases of the 1970s. Demand has followed a ratchet process: price increases reduced demand substantially when demanders conserved and switched away from oil, but price cuts did not reverse this process completely, if at all. This has important implications for projections of oil demand, especially under low price assumptions: the OECD's dependency on oil will not increase as much as some analysts may have feared. There is, however, another aspect of imperfect price reversibility: the possibilities of adjusting to future price rises may not be as great as they have been in the past. The easiest and least costly demand savings have already been made, and oil has been replaced by other energy sources in many uses: what's done is done. (author)

  8. The Role of Reversed Equatorial Zonal Transport in Terminating an ENSO Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. C.; Hu, Z. Z.; Huang, B.; Sui, C. H.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a sudden reversal of anomalous equatorial zonal current at the peaking ENSO phase triggers the rapid termination of an ENSO event. Throughout an ENSO cycle, the anomalous equatorial zonal current is strongly controlled by the concavity of the anomalous thermocline meridional structure near the equator. During the ENSO developing phase, the anomalous zonal current in the central and eastern Pacific generally enhances the ENSO growth through its zonal SST advection. In the mature phase of ENSO, however, the equatorial thermocline depth anomalies are reflected in the eastern Pacific and slowly propagate westward off the equator in both hemispheres. As a result, the concavity of the thermocline anomalies near the equator is reversed, i.e., the off-equatorial thermocline depth anomalies become higher than that on the equator for El Niño events and lower for La Niño events. This meridional change of thermocline structure reverses zonal transport rapidly in the central-to-eastern equatorial Pacific, which weakens the ENSO SST anomalies by reversed advection. More importantly, the reversed zonal mass transport weakens the existing zonal tilting of equatorial thermocline and suppresses the thermocline feedback. Both processes are concentrated in the eastern equatorial Pacific and can be effective on subseasonal time scales. These current reversal effects are built-in to the ENSO peak phase and independent of the zonal wind effect on thermocline slope. It functions as an oceanic control on ENSO evolution during both El Niño and La Niña events.

  9. Transport anomalies and quantum criticality in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu; Yu, Heshan; He, Ge; Hu, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Zhu, Beiyi [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jin, Kui, E-mail: kuijin@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Electrical transport and its complementary thermal transport on electron-doped cuprates are reviewed. • The common features of electron-doped cuprates are sorted out and shown in the last figure. • The complex superconducting fluctuations and quantum fluctuations are distinguished. - Abstract: Superconductivity research is like running a marathon. Three decades after the discovery of high-T{sub c} cuprates, there have been mass data generated from transport measurements, which bring fruitful information. In this review, we give a brief summary of the intriguing phenomena reported in electron-doped cuprates from the aspect of electrical transport as well as the complementary thermal transport. We attempt to sort out common features of the electron-doped family, e.g. the strange metal, negative magnetoresistance, multiple sign reversals of Hall in mixed state, abnormal Nernst signal, complex quantum criticality. Most of them have been challenging the existing theories, nevertheless, a unified diagram certainly helps to approach the nature of electron-doped cuprates.

  10. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Cheol-Hee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein.

  11. Reversible electron heating vs. wave-particle interactions in quasi-perpendicular shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, P.; Mangeney, A.; Scudder, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The energy necessary to explain the electron heating in quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks can be derived either from the electron acceleration in the d.c. cross shock electric potential, or by the interactions between the electrons and the waves existing in the shock. A Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to study the electron distribution function evolution through the shock structure, with and without particle diffusion on waves. This simulation has allowed us to clarify the relative importance of the two possible energy sources; in particular it has been shown that the electron parallel temperature is determined by the d.c. electromagnetic field and not by any wave-particle-induced heating. Wave particle interactions are effective in smoothing out the large gradients in phase space produced by the 'reversible' motion of the electrons, thus producing a 'cooling' of the electrons.

  12. CFRX, a one-and-a-quarter-dimensional transport code for field-reversed configuration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao Mingyuan

    1989-01-01

    A one-and-a-quarter-dimensional transport code, which includes radial as well as some two-dimensional effects for field-reversed configurations, is described. The set of transport equations is transformed to a set of new independent and dependent variables and is solved as a coupled initial-boundary value problem. The code simulation includes both the closed and open field regions. The axial effects incorporated include global axial force balance, axial losses in the open field region, and flux surface averaging over the closed field region. A typical example of the code results is also given. (orig.)

  13. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...... confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...... exchanging organisms have major biogeochemical importance as they allow widely separated electron donors and acceptors to react with one another....

  14. Electron currents in field reversed mirror dynamics: Theory and hybrid simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    To model the dynamics of the Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) as a whole we have developed a 1-D radical hybrid code which also incorporates the above electron null current model. This code, named FROST, models the plasma as azimuthally symmetric with no axial dependence. A multi-group method in energy and canonical angular momentum describes the large-orbit ions from the beam. Massless fluid equations describe electrons and low energy ions. Since a fluid treatment for electrons is invalid near a field null, the null region electron current model discussed above has been included for this region, a unique feature. Results of simulation of neutral beam start-up in a 2XIIB-like plasma is discussed. There FROST predicts that electron currents will retard, but not prevent reversal of the magnetic field at the plasma center. These results are optimistic when compared to actual reversal experiments in 2XIIB, because there finite axial length effects and micro-instabilities substantially deteriorated the ion confinement. Nevertheless, because of the importance of the electron current in a low field region in the FRM, FROST represents a valuable intermediate step toward a more complete description of FRM dynamics. 54 refs., 50 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Molecular electronics: some views on transport junctions and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Christian; Ratner, Mark A

    2005-06-21

    The field of molecular electronics comprises a fundamental set of issues concerning the electronic response of molecules as parts of a mesoscopic structure and a technology-facing area of science. We will overview some important aspects of these subfields. The most advanced ideas in the field involve the use of molecules as individual logic or memory units and are broadly based on using the quantum state space of the molecule. Current work in molecular electronics usually addresses molecular junction transport, where the molecule acts as a barrier for incoming electrons: This is the fundamental Landauer idea of "conduction as scattering" generalized to molecular junction structures. Another point of view in terms of superexchange as a guiding mechanism for coherent electron transfer through the molecular bridge is discussed. Molecules generally exhibit relatively strong vibronic coupling. The last section of this overview focuses on vibronic effects, including inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, hysteresis in junction charge transport, and negative differential resistance in molecular transport junctions.

  16. Tunneling explains efficient electron transport via protein junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereiro, Jerry A; Yu, Xi; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Cahen, David

    2018-05-15

    Metalloproteins, proteins containing a transition metal ion cofactor, are electron transfer agents that perform key functions in cells. Inspired by this fact, electron transport across these proteins has been widely studied in solid-state settings, triggering the interest in examining potential use of proteins as building blocks in bioelectronic devices. Here, we report results of low-temperature (10 K) electron transport measurements via monolayer junctions based on the blue copper protein azurin (Az), which strongly suggest quantum tunneling of electrons as the dominant charge transport mechanism. Specifically, we show that, weakening the protein-electrode coupling by introducing a spacer, one can switch the electron transport from off-resonant to resonant tunneling. This is a consequence of reducing the electrode's perturbation of the Cu(II)-localized electronic state, a pattern that has not been observed before in protein-based junctions. Moreover, we identify vibronic features of the Cu(II) coordination sphere in transport characteristics that show directly the active role of the metal ion in resonance tunneling. Our results illustrate how quantum mechanical effects may dominate electron transport via protein-based junctions.

  17. Transport of runaway and thermal electrons due to magnetic microturbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ratio of the runaway electron confinement to thermal electron energy confinement is derived for tokamaks where both processes are determined by free streaming along stochastic magnetic field lines. The runaway electron confinement is enhanced at high runaway electron energies due to phase averaging over the magnetic perturbations when the runaway electron drift surfaces are displaced from the magnetic surfaces. Comparison with experimental data from LT-3, Ormak, PLT, ST, and TM-3 indicates that magnetic stochasticity may explain the relative transport rates of runaways and thermal electron energy

  18. Temperature gradient driven electron transport in NSTX and Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Wong, H.V.; Morrison, P.J.; Wurm, A.; Kim, J.H.; Perez, J.C.; Pratt, J.; Hoang, G.T.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Ball, R.

    2005-01-01

    Electron thermal fluxes are derived from the power balance for Tore Supra (TS) and NSTX discharges with centrally deposited fast wave electron heating. Measurements of the electron temperature and density profiles, combined with ray tracing computations of the power absorption profiles, allow detailed interpretation of the thermal flux versus temperature gradient. Evidence supporting the occurrence of electron temperature gradient turbulent transport in the two confinement devices is found. With control of the magnetic rotational transform profile and the heating power, internal transport barriers are created in TS and NSTX discharges. These partial transport barriers are argued to be a universal feature of transport equations in the presence of invariant tori that are intrinsic to non-monotonic rotational transforms in dynamical systems

  19. Electronic and vibrational hopping transport in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1991-01-01

    General concepts of hopping-type transport and localization are reviewed. Disorder, electronic correlations and atomic displacements, effects ignored in electronic band structure calculations, foster localization of electronic charge carriers. Examples are given that illustrate the efficacy of these effects in producing localization. This introduction is followed by a brief discussion of the relation between hopping-type transport and localization. The fundamentals of the formation, localization, and hopping transport of small polarons and/or bipolarons is then described. Electronic transport in boron carbides is presented as an example of the adiabatic hopping of small bipolarons. Finally, the notion of vibrational hopping is introduced. The high-temperature thermal diffusion in boron carbides is presented as a potential application of this idea

  20. Nonequilibrium electron transport through quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfle, Peter; Paaske, Jens; Rosch, Achim

    2005-01-01

    Electron transport at large bias voltage through quantum dots in the Kondo regime is described within the perturbative renormalization group extended to nonequilibrium. The conductance, local magnetization, dynamical spin susceptibility and local spectral function are calculated. We show how...

  1. Transport of electrons in lead oxide studied by CELIV technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semeniuk, O; Juska, G; Oelerich, J O; Jandieri, K; Baranovskii, S D; Reznik, A

    2017-01-01

    Although polycrystalline lead oxide (PbO) has a long history of application in optoelectronics and imaging, the transport mechanism for electrons in this material has not yet been clarified. Using the photo-generated charge extraction by linear increasing voltage (photo-CELIV) technique, we provide the temperature- and field-dependences of electron mobility in poly-PbO. It is found that electrons undergo dispersive transport, i.e. their mobility decreases in the course of time. Multiple trapping of electrons from the conduction band into the developed band tail is revealed as the dominant transport mechanism. This differs dramatically from the dispersive transport of holes in the same material, dominated by topological factors and not by energy disorder. (paper)

  2. Physics of strong internal transport barriers in JT-60U reversed-magnetic-shear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, N; Takizuka, T; Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T; Kamada, Y; Ide, S; Koide, Y [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The physics of strong internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JT-60U reversed-magnetic-shear (RS) plasmas has been studied through the modelling on the 1.5 dimensional transport simulation. The key physics to produce two scalings on the basis of the JT-60U box-type ITB database are identified. As for the scaling for the narrow ITB width proportional to the ion poloidal gyroradius, the following three physics are important: (1) the sharp reduction of the anomalous transport below the neoclassical level in the RS region, (2) the autonomous formation of pressure and current profiles through the neoclassical transport and the bootstrap current and (3) the large difference between the neoclassical transport and the anomalous transport in the normal-shear region. As for the scaling for the energy confinement inside ITB ({epsilon}{sub f}{beta}{sub p,core} {approx} 0.25, where {epsilon}{sub f} is the inverse aspect ratio at the ITB foot and {beta}{sub p,core} is the core poloidal beta value), the value of 0.25 is found to be a saturation value due to the MHD equilibrium. The value of {epsilon}{sub f}{beta}{sub p,core} reaches the saturation value, when the box-type ITB is formed in the strong RS plasma with a large asymmetry of the poloidal magnetic field, regardless of the details of the transport and the non-inductively driven current.

  3. Simulation of electron thermal transport in H-mode discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, T.; Pankin, A. Y.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A. H.; Halpern, F. D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron thermal transport in DIII-D H-mode tokamak plasmas [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated by comparing predictive simulation results for the evolution of electron temperature profiles with experimental data. The comparison includes the entire profile from the magnetic axis to the bottom of the pedestal. In the simulations, carried out using the automated system for transport analysis (ASTRA) integrated modeling code, different combinations of electron thermal transport models are considered. The combinations include models for electron temperature gradient (ETG) anomalous transport and trapped electron mode (TEM) anomalous transport, as well as a model for paleoclassical transport [J. D. Callen, Nucl. Fusion 45, 1120 (2005)]. It is found that the electromagnetic limit of the Horton ETG model [W. Horton et al., Phys. Fluids 31, 2971 (1988)] provides an important contribution near the magnetic axis, which is a region where the ETG mode in the GLF23 model [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] is below threshold. In simulations of DIII-D discharges, the observed shape of the H-mode edge pedestal is produced when transport associated with the TEM component of the GLF23 model is suppressed and transport given by the paleoclassical model is included. In a study involving 15 DIII-D H-mode discharges, it is found that with a particular combination of electron thermal transport models, the average rms deviation of the predicted electron temperature profile from the experimental profile is reduced to 9% and the offset to -4%.

  4. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    Since the invention of the transistor in 1947 and the development of integrated circuits in the late 1950’s, there was a rapid progress in the development and miniaturization of the solid state devices and electronic circuit components. This miniaturization raises a question “How small do we have...

  5. Electronic transport and lasing in microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lax, M.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the interaction of hot carriers with hot phonons in a quantum well. Transport is considered in the transverse direction and tunneling through the well barriers. Time-dependent transport effects down to the femto-second regime are included, as are strong and/or microwave fields, with negative resistance effects. Resonant tunneling assisted by phonon relaxation and infra-red radiation will be explored. The limitations on transmission of information due to partition noise, as influenced by the design of semiconductor feedback lasers will be considered. The use of light scattering and decision theory to detect shell-like aerosols is examined

  6. Improving the reverse recovery of power MOSFET integral diodes by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliga, B.J.; Walden, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Using 3 MeV electron irradiation at room temperature it was found that the reverse recovery charge in the integral diode could be continuously reduced in a well controlled manner from over 500nC to less than 100nC without any significant increase in the forward voltage drop of the integral diode under typical operating peak currents. The reverse recovery time was also observed to decrease from 3 microseconds to less than 200 nsec when the radiation dose was increased from 0 to 16 Megarads. The damage produced in gate oxide of the MOSFET due to the electron radiation damage was found to cause an undesirable decrease in the gate threshold voltage. This resulted in excessive channel leakage current flow in the MOSFET at zero gate bias. It was found that this channel leakage current was substantially reduced by annealing the devices at 140 0 C without influencing the integral diode reverse recovery speed. Thus, the electron irradiation technique was found to be effective in controlling the integral diode reverse recovery characteristics without any degradation of the power MOSFET characteristics. (author)

  7. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...

  8. Discontinuity model for internal transport barrier formation in reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Kim, J-Y.; Horton, W.; Tajima, T.; LeBrun, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    To aid in understanding the internal transport barrier (ITB) being formed in reversed magnetic shear experiments, in addition to the well known shear flow effect, we point out an important nonlocal effect and/or finite size effect which comes from the complex behavior of the nonlocal mode over a finite radial region around the minimum q(safety factor)-surface. The nonlocal mode changes its structure depending on the sign of the magnetic shear and due to this fact, the nonlocal modes are weakly excited across the q min -surface. This leads to a discontinuity or gap which disconnects the phase relation in the global wave structure across the q min -surface. Once such a discontinuity (or gap) is formed, transport suppression occurs and therefore a transport barrier can be expected near the q min -surface. We confirm the existence of this discontinuity using a toroidal particle simulation. (author)

  9. Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Muller, Erik [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-01-05

    The development of the Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) has produced significant results under our previous HEP funded efforts both on the fabrication of working devices and the understanding of the underlying physics governing its performance. The results presented here substantiate the use of diamond as both a secondary electron amplifier for high-brightness, high-average-current electron sources and as a photon and particle detector in harsh radiation environments. Very high average current densities (>10A/cm2) have been transported through diamond material. The transport has been measured as a function of incident photon energy and found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. Measurements of the charge transport for photon energies near the carbon K-edge (290 eV for sp3 bonded carbon) have provided insight into carrier loss due to diffusion; modeling of this aspect of charge transport is underway. The response of diamond to nanosecond x-ray pulses has been measured; in this regime the charge transport is as expected. Electron emission from hydrogenated diamond has been measured using both electron and x-ray generated carriers; a gain of 178 has been observed for electron-generated carriers. The energy spectrum of the emitted electrons has been measured, providing insight into the electron affinity and ultimately the thermal emittance. The origin of charge trapping in diamond has been investigated for both bulk and surface trapping

  10. Electronic Reverse Auctions: Integrating an E-Sourcing Tool into a Sales and Purchasing Cross-Course Negotiation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline A.; Dobie, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Electronic reverse auctions are increasingly being used by firms to improve firm financial and operational performance. The described teaching innovation serves as a model for introducing electronic reverse auctions as a central element in a comprehensive negotiation exercise involving sales management and purchasing management students. Results…

  11. Macrophage mitochondrial damage from StAR transport of 7-hydroperoxycholesterol: implications for oxidative stress-impaired reverse cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytowski, Witold; Wawak, Katarzyna; Pabisz, Pawel; Schmitt, Jared C; Girotti, Albert W

    2014-01-03

    StAR family proteins in vascular macrophages participate in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We hypothesize that under pathophysiological oxidative stress, StARs will transport not only cholesterol to macrophage mitochondria, but also pro-oxidant cholesterol hydroperoxides (7-OOHs), thereby impairing early-stage RCT. Upon stimulation with dibutyryl-cAMP, RAW264.7 macrophages exhibited a strong time-dependent induction of mitochondrial StarD1 and plasma membrane ABCA1, which exports cholesterol. 7α-OOH uptake by stimulated RAW cell mitochondria (like cholesterol uptake) was strongly reduced by StarD1 knockdown, consistent with StarD1 involvement. Upon uptake by mitochondria, 7α-OOH (but not redox-inactive 7α-OH) triggered lipid peroxidation and membrane depolarization while reducing ABCA1 upregulation. These findings provide strong initial support for our hypothesis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Testing of a benchscale Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport system for treating contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, K.M.; Lunsford, T.R.; Panjabi, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport process is a innovative means of removing radionuclides from contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site. Specifically, groundwater in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site has been contaminated with uranium, technetium, and nitrate. Investigations are proceeding to determine the most cost effective method to remove these contaminants. The process described in this paper combines three different membrane technologies (reverse osmosis, coupled transport, and nanofiltration to purify the groundwater while extracting and concentrating uranium, technetium, and nitrate into separate solutions. This separation allows for the future use of the radionuclides, if needed, and reduces the amount of waste that will need to be disposed of. This process has the potential to concentrate the contaminants into solutions with volumes in a ratio of 1/10,000 of the feed volume. This compares to traditional volume reductions of 10 to 100 for ion exchange and stand-alone reverse osmosis. The successful demonstration of this technology could result in significant savings in the overall cost of decontaminating the groundwater

  13. Memory function formalism applied to electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Lima, I.C. da

    1984-01-01

    Memory function formalism is briefly reviewed and applied to electronic transport using the projection operator technique. The resistivity of a disordered 2-D electron gas under strong magnetic field is obtained in terms of force-force correlation function. (Author) [pt

  14. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  15. Dynamic behavior of transport in normal and reversed shear plasmas with internal barriers in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudatchin, Sergi V.; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Isayama, Akihiko; Kamada, Yutaka; Koide, Yoshihiko

    2001-12-01

    Transport evolution in normal shear (NrS) and reversed shear (RS) JT-60U tokamak plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is described as a combination of various fast and slow time scale processes. Abrupt in time (ms time scale) and wide in space (∼0.3 of minor radius) variations of electron and ion heat diffusivities χ e,i (δχ e,i ), which are called ITB-events and seen as simultaneous rise and decay of electron and ion temperatures in two spatial zones, are found for weak ITBs in both NrS and RS plasmas. Profiles of δχ e in RS plasmas with strong ITBs are usually localized near ITB foot inside smaller space region. The maximum of the heat flux variation is located near position of the minimum of safety factor in various RS plasmas, and variation is extended in positive shear region. Inward and outward heat pulse propagations created by the jump of χ e and the sawtooth-like crash are analyzed. Small values of χ e and the absence of heat pinch are found inside strong ITBs. Another non-local abrupt variations of χ e inside most of the plasma volume, including significant part of weak ITB inside RS zone of RS plasmas, are seen at the ELM-induced H-L transition and the L-H recovery. (author)

  16. The Impacts of Phosphorus Deficiency on the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient, and P deficiency limits plant productivity. Recent work showed that P deficiency affects electron transport to photosystem I (PSI), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive biological model describing how P deficiency disrupts the photosynthetic machinery and the electron transport chain through a series of sequential events in barley (Hordeum vulgare). P deficiency reduces the orthophosphate concentration in the chloroplast stroma to levels that inhibit ATP synthase activity. Consequently, protons accumulate in the thylakoids and cause lumen acidification, which inhibits linear electron flow. Limited plastoquinol oxidation retards electron transport to the cytochrome b6f complex, yet the electron transfer rate of PSI is increased under steady-state growth light and is limited under high-light conditions. Under P deficiency, the enhanced electron flow through PSI increases the levels of NADPH, whereas ATP production remains restricted and, hence, reduces CO2 fixation. In parallel, lumen acidification activates the energy-dependent quenching component of the nonphotochemical quenching mechanism and prevents the overexcitation of photosystem II and damage to the leaf tissue. Consequently, plants can be severely affected by P deficiency for weeks without displaying any visual leaf symptoms. All of the processes in the photosynthetic machinery influenced by P deficiency appear to be fully reversible and can be restored in less than 60 min after resupply of orthophosphate to the leaf tissue. PMID:29540590

  17. The Impacts of Phosphorus Deficiency on the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Andreas; Herdean, Andrei; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Sharma, Anurag; Spetea, Cornelia; Pribil, Mathias; Husted, Søren

    2018-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient, and P deficiency limits plant productivity. Recent work showed that P deficiency affects electron transport to photosystem I (PSI), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive biological model describing how P deficiency disrupts the photosynthetic machinery and the electron transport chain through a series of sequential events in barley ( Hordeum vulgare ). P deficiency reduces the orthophosphate concentration in the chloroplast stroma to levels that inhibit ATP synthase activity. Consequently, protons accumulate in the thylakoids and cause lumen acidification, which inhibits linear electron flow. Limited plastoquinol oxidation retards electron transport to the cytochrome b 6 f complex, yet the electron transfer rate of PSI is increased under steady-state growth light and is limited under high-light conditions. Under P deficiency, the enhanced electron flow through PSI increases the levels of NADPH, whereas ATP production remains restricted and, hence, reduces CO 2 fixation. In parallel, lumen acidification activates the energy-dependent quenching component of the nonphotochemical quenching mechanism and prevents the overexcitation of photosystem II and damage to the leaf tissue. Consequently, plants can be severely affected by P deficiency for weeks without displaying any visual leaf symptoms. All of the processes in the photosynthetic machinery influenced by P deficiency appear to be fully reversible and can be restored in less than 60 min after resupply of orthophosphate to the leaf tissue. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Role of Hepatic Lipase and Endothelial Lipase in High-Density Lipoprotein-Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Wijtske; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) constitutes a key part of the atheroprotective properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL) are negative regulators of plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Although overexpression of EL decreases overall

  19. Thermal Transport in Diamond Films for Electronics Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0219 THERMAL TRANSPORT IN DIAMOND FILMS FOR ELECTRONICS THERMAL MANAGEMENT Samuel Graham Georgia Institute of Technology MARCH... ELECTRONICS THERMAL MANAGEMENT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-15-C-7517 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61101E 6. AUTHOR(S) Samuel...seeded sample (NRL 010516, Die A5). The NCD membrane and Al layer thicknesses, tNCD, were measured via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The

  20. Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Excited-State Aromaticity: Capturing Electronic Structures and Conformations upon Aromaticity Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juwon; Sung, Young Mo; Hong, Yongseok; Kim, Dongho

    2018-03-06

    Aromaticity, the special energetic stability derived from cyclic [4 n + 2]π-conjugated electronic structures, has been the topic of intense interest in chemistry because it plays a critical role in rationalizing molecular stability, reactivity, and physical/chemical properties. Recently, the pioneering work by Colin Baird on aromaticity reversal, postulating that aromatic (antiaromatic) character in the ground state reverses to antiaromatic (aromatic) character in the lowest excited triplet state, has attracted much scientific attention. The completely reversed aromaticity in the excited state provides direct insight into understanding the photophysical/chemical properties of photoactive materials. In turn, the application of aromatic molecules to photoactive materials has led to numerous studies revealing this aromaticity reversal. However, most studies of excited-state aromaticity have been based on the theoretical point of view. The experimental evaluation of aromaticity in the excited state is still challenging and strenuous because the assessment of (anti)aromaticity with conventional magnetic, energetic, and geometric indices is difficult in the excited state, which practically restricts the extension and application of the concept of excited-state aromaticity. Time-resolved optical spectroscopies can provide a new and alternative avenue to evaluate excited-state aromaticity experimentally while observing changes in the molecular features in the excited states. Time-resolved optical spectroscopies take advantage of ultrafast laser pulses to achieve high time resolution, making them suitable for monitoring ultrafast changes in the excited states of molecular systems. This can provide valuable information for understanding the aromaticity reversal. This Account presents recent breakthroughs in the experimental assessment of excited-state aromaticity and the verification of aromaticity reversal with time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements. To

  1. Kinetic Theory of Electronic Transport in Random Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    We present the theory of quasiparticle transport in perturbatively small inhomogeneous magnetic fields across the ballistic-to-hydrodynamic crossover. In the hydrodynamic limit, the resistivity ρ generically grows proportionally to the rate of momentum-conserving electron-electron collisions at large enough temperatures T . In particular, the resulting flow of electrons provides a simple scenario where viscous effects suppress conductance below the ballistic value. This new mechanism for ρ ∝T2 resistivity in a Fermi liquid may describe low T transport in single-band SrTiO3 .

  2. Runaway electron transport studies in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen; Qi Changwei; Ding Xuantong; Li Wenzhong

    2002-01-01

    The transport of runaway electrons in a hot plasma has been studied in four experiments, which provide the runaway diffusivity D r The first experiment obtained runaway electrons using a steady state approach for values of the runaway confinement time τ r , deduced from hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra. In the second experiment, diffusion has been interpreted in terms of the magnetic fluctuation, from which a electron thermal diffusivity can be deduced. Runaway electro diffusion coefficient is determined by intrinsic magnetic fluctuations, rather than electrostatic fluctuations because of the high energy involved. The results presented here demonstrate the efficiency of using runaway transport techniques for determining intrinsic magnetic fluctuations

  3. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems

  4. A ballistic transport model for electronic excitation following particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, S.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a ballistic model for the transport of electronic excitation energy induced by keV particle bombardment onto a solid surface. Starting from a free electron gas model, the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is employed to follow the evolution of the temporal and spatial distribution function f (r → , k → , t) describing the occupation probability of an electronic state k → at position r → and time t. Three different initializations of the distribution function are considered: i) a thermal distribution function with a locally and temporally elevated electron temperature, ii) a peak excitation at a specific energy above the Fermi level with a quasi-isotropic distribution in k-space and iii) an anisotropic peak excitation with k-vectors oriented in a specific transport direction. While the first initialization resembles a distribution function which may, for instance, result from electronic friction of moving atoms within an ion induced collision cascade, the peak excitation can in principle result from an autoionization process after excitation in close binary collisions. By numerically solving the BTE, we study the electronic energy exchange along a one dimensional transport direction to obtain a time and space resolved excitation energy distribution function, which is then analyzed in view of general transport characteristics of the chosen model system.

  5. Unconventional aspects of electronic transport in delafossite oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Ramzy; Frésard, Raymond; Eyert, Volker; Hébert, Sylvie; Maignan, Antoine

    2017-12-01

    The electronic transport properties of the delafossite oxides ? are usually understood in terms of two well-separated entities, namely the triangular ? and (? layers. Here, we review several cases among this extensive family of materials where the transport depends on the interlayer coupling and displays unconventional properties. We review the doped thermoelectrics based on ? and ?, which show a high-temperature recovery of Fermi-liquid transport exponents, as well as the highly anisotropic metals ?, ?, and ?, where the sheer simplicity of the Fermi surface leads to unconventional transport. We present some of the theoretical tools that have been used to investigate these transport properties and review what can and cannot be learned from the extensive set of electronic structure calculations that have been performed.

  6. Diffusion tensor in electron swarm transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makabe, T.; Mori, T.

    1983-01-01

    Expression for the diffusion tensor of the electron (or light ion) swarm is presented from the higher-order expansion of the velocity distribution in the Boltzmann equation in hydrodynamic stage. Derived diffusion coefficients for the transverse and longitudinal directions include the additional terms representative of the curvature effect under the action of an electric field with the usual-two-term expressions. Numerical analysis is given for the electron swarm in model gases having the momentum transfer cross section Qsub(m)(epsilon)=Q 0 epsilon sup(beta) (β=0, 1/2, 1) using the present theory. As the result, appreciable degree of discrepancy appears between the transverse diffusion coefficient defined here and the conventional expression with increasing of β in Qsub(m). (Author)

  7. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  8. Polarization reversal of electron cyclotron wave due to radial boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kaneko, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2004-01-01

    The electron cyclotron wave is an important plasma wave in the fields of basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion. Propagation and absorption of electromagnetic waves with electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) frequency are experimentally and theoretically investigated for the case of inhomogeneously magnetized plasma column with peripheral vacuum layer, when a left-hand polarized wave (LHPW) is selectively launched. The polarization reversal from the LHPW to the right-hand polarized wave is found to occur near the ECR point. As a result, it is clarified that the LHPW, which has been considered not to be absorbed at the ECR point, is absorbed near the ECR point. The phenomena can be explained by taking into account the effects of the radial boundary conditions. In addition, it is found that the polarization reversal point can be adjusted by the external parameters, for example, plasma radius. (authors)

  9. 1.4D quasistatic profile model of transport in a field-reversed configuration (FRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    Global confinement models are useful for determining how a given transport mechanism (dependent on local parameters) translates into global confinement times. Such models are also useful for inferring the overall magnitudes of transport rates, and limited information about their spatial profiles. They are especially important in a field reversed configuration (FRC) where the equilibrium and transport rates are so intimately coupled, and where the flux loss time is such an important factor. An earlier global FRC confinement model, sometimes called QUASI, was based on the assumption of a quasi-steady equilibrium. The equilibrium was assumed to have square-ends with some features of 2D equilibria: (1) equal pressure on inner and outer branches of the flux lines; and (2) average-beta relation. Models of this type have been called 1-1/4D transport models. The same general approach has now been applied in a straightforward way to an equilibrium with realistic axial structure. This might be called a 1.4D quasisteady transport model. The assumed axial structure can be that of an analytic equilibrium, or a more complicated computed equilibrium as desired. The example used here is an elongated Hill's vortex equilibrium. As will be shown later, the equilibrium is reflected by two integral quantities that appear in the quasistatic diffusion equation

  10. Electron density and temperature profile diagnostics for C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H.; Kinley, J. S.; Schroeder, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The 9-point Thomson scattering diagnostic system for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas is improved and the measured electron temperature profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. Rayleigh scattering revealed a finite line width of the ruby laser emission, which complicates density calibration. Taking advantage of the plasma wobble motion, density profile reconstruction accuracy from the 6-chord two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer data is improved.

  11. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, A.; Bergsaaker, H.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred MWm -2 . To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a LaB 6 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local Hα measurements and radial dependences, are presented. (author)

  12. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.; Bergsåker, H.

    1998-02-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred 0741-3335/40/2/011/img1. To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a 0741-3335/40/2/011/img2 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local 0741-3335/40/2/011/img3 measurements and radial dependences, are presented.

  13. Effects of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Simon Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the role of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems. We first consider a novel non-linear sigma model in order to microscopically treat the effects of disorder and electronic interaction. We successfully reproduce the perturbative results for the zero-bias anomaly and the interaction correction to the conductivity in a weakly disordered system, and discuss possible directions for future work. Secondly we consider the fluctuations of the dephasing rate for a closed diffusive and quantum dot system. Using the Keldysh technique we derive an expression for the inelastic scattering rate with which we self-consistently obtain the fluctuations in the dephasing rate. For the diffusive regime we find the relative fluctuations is given by F ∼ (L φ /L) 2 /g 2 , where g is the dimensionless conductance, L φ is the dephasing length and L is the sample size. For the quantum dot regime we find a perturbative divergence due to the presence of the zero mode. By mapping divergent diagrams to those for the two-level correlation function, we conjecture the existence of an exact relation between the two. Finally we discuss the consequences of this relation. (author)

  14. Voluntary exercise increases cholesterol efflux but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuipers Folkert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Physical exercise beneficially impacts on the plasma lipoprotein profile as well as on the incidence of cardiovascular events and is therefore recommended in primary and secondary prevention strategies against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of exercise remain largely unknown. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that voluntary exercise in mice impacts on cholesterol efflux and in vivo reverse cholesterol transport (RCT. After two weeks of voluntary wheel running (average 10.1 ± 1.4 km/day plasma triglycerides were lower (p

  15. Tearing relaxation and the globalization of transport in field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, Loren; Barnes, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Tearing instability of field-reversed configurations (FRC) is investigated using the method of neighboring equilibria. It is shown that the conducting wall position in experiment lies very close to the location needed for tearing stability. This strongly suggests that vigorous but benign tearing modes, acting globally, are the engine of continual self-organization in FRCs, i.e., tearing relaxation. It also explains the ''profile consistency'' and anomalous loss rate of magnetic flux. In effect, tearing globalizes the effect of edge-driven transport.

  16. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  17. Electron Bernstein wave emission from an overdense reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Anderson, J.K.; Biewer, T.M.; Craig, D.; Forest, C.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    Blackbody levels of emission in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies have been observed from an overdense (ω pe ∼3ω ce ) Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed field pinch plasma, a result of electrostatic electron Bernstein waves emitted from the core and mode converted into electromagnetic waves at the extreme plasma edge. Comparison of the measured radiation temperature with profiles measured by Thomson scattering indicates that the mode conversion efficiency can be as high as ∼75%. Emission is preferentially in the X-mode polarization, and is strongly dependent upon the density and magnetic field profiles at the mode conversion point

  18. Modelling transport in single electron transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien; Huynh Lam Thu Thao; Le Hoang Minh

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of single electron transistor (SET). Simulation programme of SET is used as the exploratory tool in order to gain better understanding of process and device physics. This simulator includes a graphic user interface (GUI) in Matlab. The SET was simulated using GUI in Matlab to get current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. In addition, effects of device capacitance, bias, temperature on the I-V characteristics were obtained. In this work, we review the capabilities of the simulator of the SET. Typical simulations of the obtained I-V characteristics of the SET are presented.

  19. Angular dependent transport of auroral electrons in the upper atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of auroral electrons through the upper atmosphere is analyzed. The transport equation is solved using a discrete ordinate method including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons resulting in changes of pitch angle, and degradation in energy as the electrons penetrate into the atmosphere. The transport equation is solved numerically for the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle, and energy. In situ measurements of the pitch angle and energy distribution of precipitating electrons over an auroral arc provide boundary conditions for the calculation. The electron spectra from various locations over the aurora present a variety of anisotropic pitch angle distributions and energy spectra. Good agreement is found between the observed backscattered electron energy spectra and model predictions. Differences occur at low energies (below 500 eV) in the structure of the pitch angle distribution. Model calculations were carried out with various different phase functions for elastic and inelastic collisions to attempt changing the angular scattering, but the observed pitch angle distributions remain unexplained. We suggest that mechanisms other than collisional scattering influence the angular distribution of auroral electrons at or below 300 km altitude in the low energy domain. (author)

  20. Fast electron transport study for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touati, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A new hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas is presented. It is based on the two first angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation completed with the Minerbo maximum angular entropy closure. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the electrons in collisions with plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing the kinetic distribution function evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a collimated and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense Hydrogen plasma and hybrid PIC simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport in a solid target. The model is applied to the study of the emission of Kα photons in laser-solid experiments and to the generation of shock waves. (author) [fr

  1. Momentum transport during reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritsyn, Alexey

    2008-11-01

    During reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch momentum parallel to the magnetic field is observed to be suddenly transported from the core to the edge. This occurs simultaneous with a surge in multiple resistive tearing instabilities. From measurements of the plasma flow and the forces arising from tearing instability (Maxwell and Reynolds stresses) we have established that tearing instabilities induce strong momentum transport. Comparison with nonlinear MHD computation of tearing fluctuations supports this conclusion, although it also indicates that effects beyond single-fluid MHD are likely to be important. The radial profile of the parallel velocity is reconstructed from a combination of diagnostics: Rutherford scattering of injected neutral atoms (for majority ions), charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (for minority ions), and Mach probes (for edge majority ion flow). Maxwell stress has been measured previously in the core by laser Faraday rotation, and both stresses are measured in the edge with probes. A surprising observation is that both the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are each ten times larger than needed to account for the observed momentum transport (i.e., larger than the inertial and viscous terms in the momentum balance equation). However, they are oppositely directed such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The large magnitude of the individual stresses is not predicted by MHD theory; the Maxwell stress also produces a Hall dynamo effect, implying that a two-fluid theory might be necessary for a complete description of momentum transport. To test further the relation between momentum transport and tearing fluctuations, momentum transport was measured perturbatively, by altering plasma rotation with inserted biased electrodes. Biasing is applied in plasmas with large tearing activity and improved confinement plasmas in which tearing activity is reduced by inductive current profile

  2. Mechanism of molecular transport in novel reverse-selective nanocomposite membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, T.C.; Freeman, B.D.; Spontak, R.J.; Meakin, P.; Hill, A.J.; Monash University, VIC

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Polymer nanocomposites continue to receive tremendous attention as organic-inorganic hybrid materials exhibiting a wide range of interesting, as well as technologically relevant, properties. This work reports a novel use of polymer nanocomposites as reverse-selective membranes. We have found that physical dispersion of nonporous fumed silica [FS] into glassy poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] simultaneously enhances membrane permeability (by as much as 240%) and selectivity for large organic molecules over small permanent gases. This surprising observation, in stark contrast to conventional filled polymer systems, reflects silica-induced disruption of local polymer chain packing and, as discerned by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy [PALS], a resulting subtle increase in the size of free volume elements through which molecular transport occurs. Such nanoscale hybridization represents an innovative means of tuning the transport properties of glassy polymeric media through control of molecular ordering

  3. Toroidal equilibrium states with reversed magnetic shear and parallel flow in connection with the formation of Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap.; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.

    2015-08-01

    We construct nonlinear toroidal equilibria of fixed diverted boundary shaping with reversed magnetic shear and flows parallel to the magnetic field. The equilibria have hole-like current density and the reversed magnetic shear increases as the equilibrium nonlinearity becomes stronger. Also, application of a sufficient condition for linear stability implies that the stability is improved as the equilibrium nonlinearity correlated to the reversed magnetic shear gets stronger with a weaker stabilizing contribution from the flow. These results indicate synergetic stabilizing effects of reversed magnetic shear, equilibrium nonlinearity and flow in the establishment of Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs).

  4. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  5. Gyrofluid Simulations of Intrinsic Rotation Generation in Reversed Shear Plasmas with Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Kwon, J. M.; Terzolo, L.; Kim, J. Y.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    It is accepted that the intrinsic rotation is generated via the residual stress, which is non-diffusive components of the turbulent Reynolds stress, without external momentum input. The physics leading to the onset of intrinsic rotation in L- and H- mode plasmas have been elucidated elsewhere. However, the physics responsible for the generation and transport of the intrinsic rotation and its relationship to the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in reversed shear (RS) plasmas have not been explored in detail, which is the main subject in the present work. The revised version of the global gyrofluid code TRB is used for this study. It is found that the large intrinsic rotation (˜10-30% of the ion sound speed depending on ITB characteristics) is generated near the ITB region and propagates into the core. The intrinsic rotation increases linearly as the temperature gradient at ITB position increases, albeit not indefinitely. Key parameters related to the symmetry breaking, such as turbulent intensity and its gradient, the flux surface averaged parallel wavenumber are evaluated dynamically during the ITB formation. In particular, the role of reversed shear and the q-profile curvature is presented in relation to the symmetry breaking in RS plasmas.

  6. Electron thermal transport in tokamak: ETG or TEM turbulences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Chen, L.; Nishimura, Y.; Qu, H.; Hahm, T.S.; Lewandowski, J.; Rewoldt, G.; Wang, W.X.; Diamond, P.H.; Holland, C.; Zonca, F.; Li, Y.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports progress on numerical and theoretical studies of electron transport in tokamak including: (1) electron temperature gradient turbulence; (2) trapped electron mode turbulence; and (3) a new finite element solver for global electromagnetic simulation. In particular, global gyrokinetic particle simulation and nonlinear gyrokinetic theory find that electron temperature gradient (ETG) instability saturates via nonlinear toroidal couplings, which transfer energy successively from unstable modes to damped modes preferably with longer poloidal wavelengths. The electrostatic ETG turbulence is dominated by nonlinearly generated radial streamers. The length of streamers scales with the device size and is much longer than the distance between mode rational surfaces or electron radial excursions. Both fluctuation intensity and transport level are independent of the streamer size. These simulations with realistic plasma parameters find that the electron heat conductivity is much smaller than the experimental value and in contrast with recent findings of flux-tube simulations that ETG turbulence is responsible for the anomalous electron thermal transport in fusion plasmas. The nonlinear toroidal couplings represent a new paradigm for the spectral cascade in plasma turbulence. (author)

  7. Discontinuity model for internal transport barrier formation in reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Dettrick, S.A.; Li, J.Q.; Shirai, S.; Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W.; Tajima, T.; LeBrun, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    It is becoming clear that tokamak anomalous transport is dominated by radially extended non-local modes which originate from strong toroidal coupling of rational surfaces in non-uniform plasmas. To aid in understanding the internal transport barrier (ITB) formed in reversed magnetic shear experiments, in addition to the well known shear flow effect, the article points out an important non-local effect and/or finite size effect which comes from the complex behaviour of the mode over a finite radial region around the minimum q (safety factor) surface. The non-local mode, which is characterized by its radial extent and the degree of tilting in the poloidal direction (Δr, θ 0 ), changes its structure depending on the sign of the magnetic shear, and as a result such modes are weakly excited across the q min surface. This leads to a discontinuity or gap which disconnects the phase relation in the global wave structure across the q min surface. Once such a discontinuity (or gap) is formed, transport suppression occurs and therefore a transport barrier can be expected near the q min surface. The existence of this discontinuity is confirmed through use of a toroidal particle simulation. It is also shown that whether such a discontinuity is efficiently established depends on the presence of the radial electric field and the related plasma shear flow. (author)

  8. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Power electronics is based on the switching operating mode of semiconductor components. On this basis, the concepts of type (voltage or current) and reversibility of interconnected sources make it possible to apply a methodology for the synthesis of various types of converters. This book also focuses on the importance of packaging by reviewing the electrical representation of components’ thermal models and the currently available electronics’ cooling technologies. Modeling is discussed, as well as different technological aspects used in the engineering design of an electronic power converter, useful for obtaining satisfactory performance and reliability.

  9. Role of electron-electron scattering on spin transport in single layer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahniman Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of electron-electron scattering on spin transport in single layer graphene is studied using semi-classical Monte Carlo simulation. The D’yakonov-P’erel mechanism is considered for spin relaxation. It is found that electron-electron scattering causes spin relaxation length to decrease by 35% at 300 K. The reason for this decrease in spin relaxation length is that the ensemble spin is modified upon an e-e collision and also e-e scattering rate is greater than phonon scattering rate at room temperature, which causes change in spin relaxation profile due to electron-electron scattering.

  10. Electron and impurity transport studies in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, D.

    2013-05-15

    In this thesis electron and impurity transport are studied in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. Understanding particle transport is primordial for future nuclear fusion power plants. Modeling of experiments in many specific plasma scenarios can help to understand the common elements of the physics at play and to interpret apparently contradictory experiments on the same machine and across different machines. The first part of this thesis deals with electron transport in TCV high confinement mode plasmas. It was observed that the electron density profile in these plasmas flatten when intense electron heating is applied, in contrast to observations on other machines where the increase of the profile peakedness was reported. It is shown with quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations that this effect, usually interpreted as collisionality dependence, stems from the combined effect of many plasma parameters. The influence of the collisionality, electron to ion temperature ratio, the ratio of temperature gradients, and the Ware-pinch are studied with detailed parameter scans. It is shown that the complex interdependence of the various plasma parameters is greatly simplified when the simulation results are interpreted as a function of the average frequency of the main modes contributing to radial transport. In this way the model is able to explain the experimental results. It was also shown that the same basic understanding is at play in L-modes, H-modes and electron internal transport barriers. The second part of the thesis is devoted to impurity transport. A multi-purpose gas injection system is developed, commissioned and calibrated. It is shown that the system is capable of massive gas injections to provoke disruptions and delivering small puffs of gaseous impurities for perturbative transport experiments. This flexible tool is exploited in a series of impurity transport measurements with argon and neon injections. The impurities

  11. Electron and impurity transport studies in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis electron and impurity transport are studied in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. Understanding particle transport is primordial for future nuclear fusion power plants. Modeling of experiments in many specific plasma scenarios can help to understand the common elements of the physics at play and to interpret apparently contradictory experiments on the same machine and across different machines. The first part of this thesis deals with electron transport in TCV high confinement mode plasmas. It was observed that the electron density profile in these plasmas flatten when intense electron heating is applied, in contrast to observations on other machines where the increase of the profile peakedness was reported. It is shown with quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations that this effect, usually interpreted as collisionality dependence, stems from the combined effect of many plasma parameters. The influence of the collisionality, electron to ion temperature ratio, the ratio of temperature gradients, and the Ware-pinch are studied with detailed parameter scans. It is shown that the complex interdependence of the various plasma parameters is greatly simplified when the simulation results are interpreted as a function of the average frequency of the main modes contributing to radial transport. In this way the model is able to explain the experimental results. It was also shown that the same basic understanding is at play in L-modes, H-modes and electron internal transport barriers. The second part of the thesis is devoted to impurity transport. A multi-purpose gas injection system is developed, commissioned and calibrated. It is shown that the system is capable of massive gas injections to provoke disruptions and delivering small puffs of gaseous impurities for perturbative transport experiments. This flexible tool is exploited in a series of impurity transport measurements with argon and neon injections. The impurities

  12. Increased expression of electron transport chain genes in uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncal, Akile; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Askar, Niyazi; Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Ergenoglu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Akdemir, Ali; Ak, Handan

    2014-01-01

    The etiology and pathophysiology of uterine leiomyomas, benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus, are not well understood. To evaluate the role of mitochondria in uterine leiomyoma, we compared electron transport gene expressions of uterine leiomyoma tissue with myometrium tissue in six uterine leiomyoma patients by RT-PCR array. Our results showed an average of 1.562 (±0.445) fold increase in nuclear-encoded electron transport genes. These results might suggest an increase in size, number, or activity of mitochondria in uterine leiomyoma that, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. © 2014 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  13. Coupled electron/photon transport in static external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A. Sr.; Vandevender, W.H.

    A model is presented which describes coupled electron/photon transport in the presence of static magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. The method combines state-of-the-art condensed-history electron collisional Monte Carlo and single-scattering photon Monte Carlo, including electron energy-loss straggling and the production and transport of all generations of secondaries, with numerical field integration via the best available variable-step-size Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg or variable-order/variable-step-size Adams PECE differential equation solvers. A three-dimensional cartesian system is employed in the description of particle trajectories. Although the present model is limited to multilayer material configurations, extension to more complex material geometries should not be difficult. Among the more important options are (1) a feature which permits the neglect of field effects in regions where transport is collision dominated and (2) a method for describing the transport in variable-density media where electron energies and material densities are sufficiently low that the density effect on electronic stopping powers may be neglected. (U.S.)

  14. Analytic approach to auroral electron transport and energy degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamnes, K.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of a beam of auroral electrons with the atmosphere is described by the linear transport equation, encompassing discrete energy loss, multiple scattering, and secondary electrons. A solution to the transport equation provides the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle (with respect to the geomagnetic field) and energy. A multi-stream (discrete ordinate) approximation to the transport equation is developed. An analytic solution is obtained in this approximation. The computational scheme obtained by combining the present transport code with the energy degradation method of Swartz (1979) conserves energy identically. The theory provides a framework within which angular distributions can be easily calculated and interpreted. Thus, a detailed study of the angular distributions of 'non-absorbed' electrons (i.e., electrons that have lost just a small fraction of their incident energy) reveals a systematic variation with incident angle and energy, and with penetration depth. The present approach also gives simple yet accurate solutions in low order multi-stream approximations. The accuracy of the four-stream approximation is generally within a few per cent, whereas two-stream results for backscattered mean intensities and fluxes are accurate to within 10-15%. (author)

  15. NMR studies of transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, E.C.; Bubb, W.A.; Kuchel, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Electron transport systems exist in the plasma membranes of all cells. These systems appear to play a role in cell growth and proliferation, intracellular signalling, hormone responses, apoptotic events, cell defence and perhaps most importantly they enable the cell to respond to changes in the redox state of both the intra- and extracellular environments. Previously, 13 C NMR has been used to study transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes, specifically the reduction of extracellular 13 C-ferricyanide. NMR is a particularly useful tool for studying such systems as changes in the metabolic state of the cell can be observed concomitantly with extracellular reductase activity. We investigated the oxidation of extracellular NADH by human erythrocytes using 1 H and 31 P NMR spectroscopy. Recent results for glucose-starved human erythrocytes indicate that, under these conditions, extracellular NADH can be oxidised at the plasma membrane with the electron transfer across the membrane resulting in reduction of intracellular NAD + . The activity is inhibited by known trans-plasma membrane electron transport inhibitors (capsaicin and atebrin) and is unaffected by inhibition of the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter. These results suggest that electron import from extracellular NADH allows the cell to re-establish a reducing environment after the normal redox balance is disturbed

  16. Electron cyclotron waves, transport and instabilities in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerhof, E.

    1987-01-01

    A number of topics relevant to the magnetic confinement approach to the thermonuclear fusion is addressed. The absorption and emission of electron cyclotron waves in a thermal plasma with a small population of supra-thermal, streaming electrons is examined and the properties of electron cyclotron waves in a plasma with a pure loss-cone distribution are studied. A report is given on the 1-D transport code simulations that were performed to assist the interpretation of the electron cyclotron heating experiments on the TFR tokamak. Transport code simulations of sawteeth discharges in the T-10 tokamak are discussed in order to compare the predictions of different models for the sawtooth oscillations with the experimental findings. 149 refs.; 69 figs.; 7 tabs

  17. Nonequilibrium statistical operator in hot-electron transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, D.Y.; Liu, M.

    1991-09-01

    The Nonequilibrium Statistical Operator method developed by Zubarev is generalized and applied to the study of hot-electron transport in semiconductors. The steady-state balance equations for momentum and energy are derived to the lowest order in the electron-lattice coupling. We show that the derived balance equations are exactly the same as those obtained by Lei and Ting. This equivalence stems from the fact that to the linear order in the electron-lattice coupling, two statistical density matrices have identical effect when they are used to calculate the average value of a dynamical operator. The application to the steady-state and transient hot-electron transport in multivalley semiconductors is also discussed. (author). 28 refs, 1 fig

  18. Electron transport in magnetic multilayers: effect of disorder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Bruno, P.; Dederichs, P. H.; Turek, Ilja; Weinberger, P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 65, - (2002), s. 214414-1-214414-8 ISSN 0163-1829 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC P5.30; GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA AV ČR IAA1010829; GA AV ČR IBS2041105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron transport * magnetic multilayers * ballistic transport * diffusive transport * disorder Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.327, year: 2002

  19. Electronic transport properties of nanostructured MnSi-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, D.; Steinki, N.; Scarioni, A. Fernández; Schumacher, H. W.; Süllow, S.; Menzel, D.

    2018-05-01

    MnSi, which crystallizes in the cubic B20 structure, shows intriguing magnetic properties involving the existence of skyrmions in the magnetic phase diagram. Bulk MnSi has been intensively investigated and thoroughly characterized, in contrast to MnSi thin film, which exhibits widely varying properties in particular with respect to electronic transport. In this situation, we have set out to reinvestigate the transport properties in MnSi thin films by means of studying nanostructure samples. In particular, Hall geometry nanostructures were produced to determine the intrinsic transport properties.

  20. Electron transport in EBT in the low collision frequency limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A variational principle formulation is used to calculate the electron neoclassical transport coefficients in a bumpy torus for the low collisionality regime. The electron radial drift is calculated as a function of the plasma position and the poloidal electric field which is determined self-consistently. A bounce-averaged differential collision operator is used and the results are compared to previous treatments using a BGK operator

  1. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    If the operation of electronic components switching scheme to reduce congestion and losses (in power converters in general and switching power supplies in particular), it also generates electromagnetic type of pollution in its immediate environment. Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 4 is devoted to electromagnetic compatibility. It presents the sources of disturbance and the square wave signal, spectral modeling generic perturbation. Disturbances propagation mechanisms called ""lumped"" by couplings such as a common impedance, a parasitic capacitance or a mutual and ""dis

  2. Microtearing Instabilities and Electron Transport in the NSTX Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Kaye, S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Krommes, J.A.; Hill, K.; Bell, R.; LeBlanc, B.

    2007-01-01

    We report a successful quantitative account of the experimentally determined electron thermal conductivity χ e in a beam-heated H mode plasma by the magnetic fluctuations from microtearing instabilities. The calculated χ e based on existing nonlinear theory agrees with the result from transport analysis of the experimental data. Without using any adjustable parameter, the good agreement spans the entire region where there is a steep electron temperature gradient to drive the instability

  3. Enhanced energy deposition symmetry by hot electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.; Mack, J.; Stover, E.; VanHulsteyn, D.; McCall, G.; Hauer, A.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electrons produced by resonance absorption carry the CO 2 laser energy absorbed in a laser fusion pellet. The symmetrization that can be achieved by lateral transport of the hot electrons as they deposit their energy is discussed. A K/sub α/ experiment shows a surprising symmetrization of energy deposition achieved by adding a thin layer of plastic to a copper sphere. Efforts to numerically model this effect are described

  4. Thermal electron transport in regimes with low and negative magnetic shear in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Aniel, T.; Becoulet, A.; Erba, M.; Joffrin, E.; Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Peysson, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic shear effect on thermal electron transport is studied in a large variety of non-inductive plasmas in Tore Supra. An improved confinement in the region of low and negative shear was observed and quantified with an exponential dependence on the magnetic shear (Litaudon, et al., Fusion Energy 1996 (Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Montreal, 1996), Vol. 1, IAEA, Vienna (1997) 669). This is interpreted as a consequence of a decoupling of the global modes (Romanelli and Zonca, Phys. Fluids B 5 (1993) 4081) that are thought to be responsible for anomalous transport. This dependence is proposed in order to complete the Bohm-like L mode local electron thermal diffusivity so as to describe the transition from Bohm-like to gyroBohm transport in the plasma core. The good agreement between the predictive simulations of the different Tore Supra regimes (hot core lower hybrid enhanced performance, reversed shear plasmas and combined lower hybrid current drive and fast wave electron heating) and experimental data provides a basis for extrapolation of this magnetic shear dependence in the local transport coefficients to future machines. As an example, a scenario for non-inductive current profile optimization and control in ITER is presented. (author)

  5. Electron heat transport in shaped TCV L-mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camenen, Y; Pochelon, A; Bottino, A; Coda, S; Ryter, F; Sauter, O; Behn, R; Goodman, T P; Henderson, M A; Karpushov, A; Porte, L; Zhuang, G

    2005-01-01

    Electron heat transport experiments are performed in L-mode discharges at various plasma triangularities, using radially localized electron cyclotron heating to vary independently both the electron temperature T e and the normalized electron temperature gradient R/L T e over a large range. Local gyro-fluid (GLF23) and global collisionless gyro-kinetic (LORB5) linear simulations show that, in the present experiments, trapped electron mode (TEM) is the most unstable mode. Experimentally, the electron heat diffusivity χ e is shown to decrease with increasing collisionality, and no dependence of χ e on R/L T e is observed at high R/L T e values. These two observations are consistent with the predictions of TEM simulations, which supports the fact that TEM plays a crucial role in electron heat transport. In addition, over the broad range of positive and negative triangularities investigated, the electron heat diffusivity is observed to decrease with decreasing plasma triangularity, leading to a strong increase of plasma confinement at negative triangularity

  6. Self-consistent electron transport in collisional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme has been developed to model electron transport in evolving plasmas of arbitrary classical collisionality. The electrons and ions are treated as either multiple donor-cell fluids, or collisional particles-in-cell. Particle suprathermal electrons scatter off ions, and drag against fluid background thermal electrons. The background electrons undergo ion friction, thermal coupling, and bremsstrahlung. The components move in self-consistent advanced E-fields, obtained by the Implicit Moment Method, which permits Δt >> ω/sub p/ -1 and Δx >> lambda/sub D/ - offering a 10 2 - 10 3 -fold speed-up over older explicit techniques. The fluid description for the background plasma components permits the modeling of transport in systems spanning more than a 10 7 -fold change in density, and encompassing contiguous collisional and collisionless regions. Results are presented from application of the scheme to the modeling of CO 2 laser-generated suprathermal electron transport in expanding thin foils, and in multi-foil target configurations

  7. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaskey, A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Warnock, M.; Burzuri, E.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Park, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters,

  8. Magnetic fluctuation driven cross-field particle transport in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.; Liu, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations generally cause cross-field particle transport in confined plasmas. Thus core localized turbulence must be kept at low levels for sufficient energy confinement in magnetic fusion plasmas. Reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibria can, theoretically, be completely stable to ideal and resistive (tearing) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes at zero beta. Unstable resistive interchange modes are, however, always present at experimentally relevant values of the poloidal beta β θ . An analytical quasilinear, ambipolar diffusion model is here used to model associated particle transport. The results indicate that core density fluctuations should not exceed a level of about 1% for plasmas of fusion interest. Parameters of experimentally relevant stationary states of the RFP were adjusted to minimize growth rates, using a fully resistive linearized MHD stability code. Density gradient effects are included through employing a parabolic density profile. The scaling of particle diffusion [D(r)∝λ 2 n 0.5 T/aB, where λ is the mode width] is such that the effects of particle transport are milder in present day RFP experiments than in future reactor-relevant plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Nonequilibrium Electron Transport Through a Quantum Dot from Kubo Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue Rong; Zhang Guangming

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Kubo formula for an electron tunneling junction, we revisit the nonequilibrium transport properties through a quantum dot. Since the Fermi level of the quantum dot is set by the conduction electrons of the leads, we calculate the electron current from the left side by assuming the quantum dot coupled to the right lead as another side of the tunneling junction, and the other way round is used to calculate the current from the right side. By symmetrizing these two currents, an effective local density states on the dot can be obtained, and is discussed at high and low temperatures, respectively.

  10. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Anticancer Drugs Targeting the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.-F.; Ralph, S.J.; Neužil, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2011), s. 2951-2974 ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Targets for anticancer drugs * mitochondrial electron transport chain * mitocans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.456, year: 2011

  12. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  13. Electron spin transport in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    Electron spin transport in grafeen en in koolstof nanobuisjes Grafeen, is een kristaal laag van koolstof atomen die slechts één atoomlaag dik is. Een koolstof nanobuisje is te verkrijgen door een grafeen laag op te rollen. In dit proefschrift laten we zien, met behulp van experimenten, dat deze

  14. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects

  15. Molecular electronics: insight from first-principles transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect the electronic transport. Here we describe key computational ingredients and discuss these in relation to simulations for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments with C60 molecules where the experimental geometry is well characterized. We then show how molecular dynamics simulations may be combined with transport calculations to study more irregular situations, such as the evolution of a nanoscale contact with the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Finally we discuss calculations of inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a characterization technique that reveals information about the atomic arrangement and transport channels.

  16. Flux and reactive contributions to electron transport in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, K.F.; Nolan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A previously developed theoretical analysis (Nolan et al. 1997) is applied to the study of electron transport in methane for reduced electric fields in the range 1 to 1000 Td. The technique of analysis identifies the flux and reactive components of the measurable transport, without resort to the two-term approximation. A comparison of the results of the Monte Carlo method with those of a multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis (Ness and Robson 1986) shows good agreement. The sensitivity of the modelled electron transport to post-ionisation energy partitioning is studied by comparison of three ionisation energy partitioning regimes at moderate (300 Td) and high (1000 Td) values of the reduced electric field. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  17. Electronic repository and standardization of processes and electronic documents in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DĘBICKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the idea of the use of electronic repository to store standardised scheme of processes between a Logistics Service Provider and its business partners. Application of repository for automatic or semi-automatic configuration of interoperability in electronic data interchange between information systems of differentcompanies based on transport (road, rail, sea and combined related processes. Standardisation includes processes, scheme of cooperation and related to them, electronic messages.

  18. Achromatic and isochronous electron beam transport for tunable free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Kim, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    We have continued the study of a suitable electron beam transport line, which is both isochronous and achromatic, for the free electron laser being designed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A refined version of the beam transport optics is discussed that accommodates two different modes of FEL wavelength tuning. For the fine tuning involving a small change of the electron beam energy, sextupoles are added to cancel the leading nonlinear dispersion. For the main tuning involving the change of the undulator gap, a practical solution of maintaining the beam matching condition is presented. Calculation of the higher order aberrations is facilitated by a newly developed code. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Search for Time Reversal Violation in Neutron Decay: A Measurement of the Transverse Polarization of Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, K.; Kaczmarek, A.; Kistryn, St.; Kuzniak, M.; Zejma, J.; Pulut, J.; Kirch, K.; Bialek, A.; Kozela, A.; Ban, G.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Gorel, P.; Beck, M.; Lindroth, A.; Severijns, N.; Stephan, E.; Czarnecki, A.

    2006-01-01

    A non-zero value of the R-correlation coefficient due to the e - polarization component, perpendicular to the plane spanned by the spin of the decaying neutron and the electron momentum, would signal a violation of time reversal symmetry and thus physics beyond the Standard Model. The value of the N-correlation coefficient, given by the transverse e - polarization component within that plane, is expected to be finite. The measurement of N serves as an important systematic check of the apparatus for the R-measurement. The first phase of data taking has been completed. Preliminary results from a limited data sample show no deviations from the Standard Model predictions

  20. Electron collision cross sections and transport parameters in Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinhao, N.; Chouki, A.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular chlorine, Cl 2 , is a widely used gas with important application in gas discharge physics, namely in plasma etching, UV lasers and gas-filled particle detectors. However, due to experimental difficulties and to a complicated electronic spectrum, only some of the electron collision cross section have been measured and only recently the electronic structure has been resolved. This situation hampered the theoretical analysis of chlorine mixtures by a lack of relevant transport parameters. To our best knowledge there is only one published measurement of electron drift velocity and characteristic energy. Regrettably these data are considered of doubtful quality. There is also only one measurement of attachment and ionisation coefficients and one published set of cross sections. However those authors used the transport data from a He-Cl 2 mixture (80/20) where chlorine's effect can be hidden by the other component. Consequently that set is not completely consistent with the measurements in pure chlorine. This paper presents a new proposal of a consistent set of electron collision cross sections and the corresponding transport parameters and collision frequencies

  1. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  2. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities. (author)

  3. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-05-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities.

  4. Characteristics of internal transport barrier in JT-60U reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Takizuka, T.; Koide, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Oikawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of internal transport barrier (ITB) structure are studied and the active ITB control has been developed in JT-60U reversed shear plasmas. The following results are found. Outward propagation of the ITB with steep T i gradient is limited to the minimum safety factor location (ρ qmin ). However the ITB with reduced T i gradient can move to the outside of ρ qmin . Lower boundary of ITB width is proportional to the ion poloidal gyroradius at the ITB center. Furthermore the demonstration of the active control of the ITB strength based on the modification of the radial electric field shear profile is successfully performed by the toroidal momentum injection in different directions or the increase of heating power by neutral beams. (author)

  5. Influence of 2 MeV electrons irradiation on gallium phosphide light-emitting diodes reverse currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobiov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of reverse electrophysical characteristics study of red and green LEDs, initial and irradiated with 2 MeV electrons were given. It was found that reverse current was predominantly caused by carriers tunneling at Urev ≤ 9 V, and by the avalanche multiplication at Urev ≥ 13 V, in the range U = 9 ÷ 13 V both mechanisms are available. Current increase at high voltage areas (Urev > 19 V is limited by the base resistance of diode. In the case of significant reverse currents (I > 1 mA irradiation of diodes leads to the shift of reverse current-voltage characteristics into the high voltages direction.

  6. GREEN ECONOMY AND THE REVERSE LOGISTICS OF WASTE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Augusto Silva Marins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available From the way globally accepted for economic growth representation of evolution of a country related to the findings of non consideration of environmental assets and liabilities as a measure of occupancy in the economy of the countries, this study suggests a paradigm shift in the operation of the world economy with the implementation of the Green Economy concept seeking the achievement of environmental goals necessary to a level considered optimal in terms of pollution at lower cost to society. The focus of the study is given to the management of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE, particularly in the reverse logistics of WEEE as a potential tool for economic growth maintenance condition with sustainability. A diagnosis on the use of reverse logistics of WEEE in the world is also presented based on research conducted in countries on five continents. At the end of the study it was concluded that the application of reverse logistics in the world is still incipient with no evidence of the use of economic instruments that give opportunity for growth and sustainability. Accordingly, it is emphasized that the management of WEEE practiced in most countries has shown motivation solely on financial profit based on the export / import of waste in a kind of ruse coated green taking into account the environmental and health risks of the population in developing countries or in development, which are the main final destination of WEEE.

  7. Electron heat transport analysis of low-collisionality plasmas in the neoclassical-transport-optimized configuration of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Arimitsu

    2002-01-01

    Electron heat transport in low-collisionality LHD plasma is investigated in order to study the neoclassical transport optimization effect on thermal plasma transport with an optimization level typical of so-called ''advanced stellarators''. In the central region, a higher electron temperature is obtained in the optimized configuration, and transport analysis suggests the considerable effect of neoclassical transport on the electron heat transport assuming the ion-root level of radial electric field. The obtained experimental results support future reactor design in which the neoclassical and/or anomalous transports are reduced by magnetic field optimization in a non-axisymmetric configuration. (author)

  8. Hybrid transport and diffusion modeling using electron thermal transport Monte Carlo SNB in DRACO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Moses, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet) multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into an Electron Thermal Transport Monte Carlo (ETTMC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. Previously, the ETTMC model had been implemented in the 2D DRACO multiphysics code and found to produce consistent results with the iSNB method. Current work is focused on a hybridization of the computationally slower but higher fidelity ETTMC transport method with the computationally faster iSNB diffusion method in order to maximize computational efficiency. Furthermore, effects on the energy distribution of the heat flux divergence are studied. Work to date on the hybrid method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  9. Electron and ion beam transport to fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.; Baker, L.; Miller, P.A.; Mix, L.P.; Olsen, J.N.; Poukey, J.W.; Wright, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    ICF reactors have been proposed which incorporate a gas-filled chamber to reduce x-ray and debris loading of the first wall. Focused beams of either electrons or ions must be transported efficiently for 2-4 m to a centrally located fusion target. Laser-initiated current-carrying plasma discharge channels provide the guiding magnetic field and the charge- and current-neutralizing medium required for beam propagation. Computational studies of plasma channel formation in air using a 1-D MHD model with multigroup radiation diffusion have provided a good comparison with the expansions velocity and time dependent refractivity profile determined by holographic interferometry. Trajectory calculations have identified a beam expansion mechanism which combines with the usual ohmic dissipation to reduce somewhat the transported beam fluence for electrons. Additional trajectory calculations have been performed for both electrons and light ions to predict the limits on the particle current density which can be delivered to a central target by overlapping the many independently-generated beams. Critical features of the use of plasma channels for transport and overlap of charged particle beams are being tested experimentally with up to twelve electron beams from the Proto II accelerator

  10. Vibronic coupling effect on the electron transport through molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Masaru; Mitsutake, Kunihiro

    2007-03-01

    Electron transport through molecular bridges or molecular layers connected to nano-electrodes is determined by the combination of coherent and dissipative processes, controlled by the electron-vibron coupling, transfer integrals between the molecular orbitals, applied electric field and temperature. We propose a novel theoretical approach, which combines ab initio molecular orbital method with analytical many-boson model. As a case study, the long chain model of the thiophene oligomer is solved by a variation approach. Mixed states of moderately extended molecular orbital states mediated and localised by dress of vibron cloud are found as eigen-states. All the excited states accompanied by multiple quanta of vibration can be solved, and the overall carrier transport properties including the conductance, mobility, dissipation spectra are analyzed by solving the master equation with the transition rates estimated by the golden rule. We clarify obtained in a uniform systematic way, how the transport mode changes from a dominantly coherent transport to the dissipative hopping transport.

  11. Mechanisms to explain the reverse perivascular transport of solutes out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, D; Carare-Nnadi, R; Please, C P; Perry, V H; Weller, R O

    2006-02-21

    Experimental studies and observations in the human brain indicate that interstitial fluid and solutes, such as amyloid-beta (Abeta), are eliminated from grey matter of the brain along pericapillary and periarterial pathways. It is unclear, however, what constitutes the motive force for such transport within blood vessel walls, which is in the opposite direction to blood flow. In this paper the potential for global pressure differences to achieve such transport are considered. A mathematical model is constructed in order to test the hypothesis that perivascular drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes out of brain tissue is driven by pulsations of the blood vessel walls. Here it is assumed that drainage occurs through a thin layer between astrocytes and endothelial cells or between smooth muscle cells. The model suggests that, during each pulse cycle, there are periods when fluid and solutes are driven along perivascular spaces in the reverse direction to the flow of blood. It is shown that successful drainage may depend upon some attachment of solutes to the lining of the perivascular space, in order to produce a valve-like effect, although an alternative without this requirement is also postulated. Reduction in pulse amplitude, as in ageing cerebral vessels, would prolong the attachment time, encourage precipitation of Abeta peptides in vessel walls, and impair elimination of Abeta from the brain. These factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and in the accumulation of Abeta in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Semiclassical electronic transport in MnAs thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, C.; Milano, J.; Steren, L.; Llois, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-transport experiments have been recently performed on MnAs thin films. Hall effect and transverse magnetoresistance measurements have shown interesting and, until now, unknown results. For instance, the transverse magnetoresistance shows no saturation in the presence of very high magnetic fields. In order to understand the contribution of the electronic band structure to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, we perform ab initio calculations, using the Wien2K code and analyze the magneto-transport properties within the semiclassical approximation. We show that non-saturation may be due to the presence of open orbits on the majority Fermi surface

  13. Semiclassical electronic transport in MnAs thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, C. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: helman@tandar.cnea.gov.ar; Milano, J.; Steren, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. Bariloche (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Magneto-transport experiments have been recently performed on MnAs thin films. Hall effect and transverse magnetoresistance measurements have shown interesting and, until now, unknown results. For instance, the transverse magnetoresistance shows no saturation in the presence of very high magnetic fields. In order to understand the contribution of the electronic band structure to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, we perform ab initio calculations, using the Wien2K code and analyze the magneto-transport properties within the semiclassical approximation. We show that non-saturation may be due to the presence of open orbits on the majority Fermi surface.

  14. Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. is adapted to a Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) solution method for eventual inclusion in a hybrid IMC-DDMC (Implicit Monte Carlo) method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in short mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions. The Monte Carlo nature of the approach allows the algorithm to be massively parallelized. Work to date on the iSNB-DDMC method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque.

  15. Electronic transport behavior of diameter-graded Ag nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuewei; Yuan Zhihao

    2010-01-01

    Ag nanowires with a graded diameter in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were fabricated by the direct-current electrodeposition. The Ag nanowires have a graded-change in diameter from 8 to 32 nm, which is matched with the graded-change of the AAO pore diameter. Electronic transport measurements show that there is a transport behavior similar to that of a metal-semiconductor junction along the axial direction in the diameter-graded Ag nanowires. Such a novel homogeneous nanojunction will be of great fundamental and practical significance.

  16. Electronic transport behavior of diameter-graded Ag nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue Wei; Yuan, Zhi Hao

    2010-05-01

    Ag nanowires with a graded diameter in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were fabricated by the direct-current electrodeposition. The Ag nanowires have a graded-change in diameter from 8 to 32 nm, which is matched with the graded-change of the AAO pore diameter. Electronic transport measurements show that there is a transport behavior similar to that of a metal-semiconductor junction along the axial direction in the diameter-graded Ag nanowires. Such a novel homogeneous nanojunction will be of great fundamental and practical significance.

  17. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  18. Transition phenomena and thermal transport property in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.

    2005-01-01

    Two kinds of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by Counter (CNTR) and Co Neutral Beam Injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). One shows transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and has a clear electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) in CNTR NBI plasma. Another has no clear transition and no ECH power threshold, but shows a broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient, which indicates the improved core confinement with additional ECH in Co NBI plasma. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated by using the heat pulse propagation excited by Modulated ECH (MECH). The difference of the features could be caused by the existence of the m/n=2/1 rational surface or island determined by the direction of NBI beam-driven current. (author)

  19. Transition phenomena and thermal transport properties in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.; Tokuzawa, T.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Ida, K.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Muto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Notake, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watari, T.; Komori, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused electron cyclotron heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by counter (CNTR) and Co neutral beam injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device. The CNTR NBI plasma displayed transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and had a clear electron internal transport barrier, while the Co NBI plasma did not show a clear transition or an ECH power threshold but showed broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient. This indicated that the Co NBI plasma with additional ECH also had an improved core confinement. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated using heat pulse propagation excited by modulated ECH. These effects appear to be related to the m/n = 2/1 rational surface or the island induced by NBI beam-driven current

  20. Electron density measurements during ion beam transport on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, B.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    High-sensitivity laser interferometry was used to measure the electron density created when an intense proton beam (100 kA, 1 MeV, 50 ns) from the Gamble II generator was transported through low-pressure gas as part of a project investigating Self-Pinched Transport (SPT) of intense ion beams. This measurement is non-perturbing and sufficiently quantitative to allow benchmarking of codes (particularly IPROP) used to model beam-gas interaction and ion-beam transport. Very high phase sensitivity is required for this measurement. For example, a 100-kA, 1-MeV, 10-cm-radius proton beam with uniform current density has a line-integrated proton density equal to n b L = 3 x 10 13 cm -2 . An equal electron line-density, n e L = n b L, (expected for transport in vacuum) will be detected as a phase shift of the 1.064 microm laser beam of only 0.05degree, or an optical path change of 1.4 x 10 -4 waves (about the size of a hydrogen atom). The time-history of the line-integrated electron density, measured across a diameter of the transport chamber at 43 cm from the input aperture, starts with the proton arrival time and decays differently depending on the gas pressure. The gas conditions included vacuum (10 -4 Torr air), 30 to 220 mTorr He, and 1 Torr air. The measured densities vary by three orders of magnitude, from 10 13 to 10 16 cm -2 for the range of gas pressures investigated. In vacuum, the measured electron densities indicate only co-moving electrons (n e L approximately n b L). In He, when the gas pressure is sufficient for ionization by beam particles and SPT is observed, n e L increases to about 10 n b L. At even higher pressures where electrons contribute to ionization, even higher electron densities are observed with an ionization fraction of about 2%. The diagnostic technique as used on the SPT experiment will be described and a summary of the results will be given. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions from the IPROP code

  1. Generation and confinement of hot ions and electrons in a reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B E; Almagri, A F; Anderson, J K; Caspary, K J; Clayton, D J; Den Hartog, D J; Ennis, D A; Fiksel, G; Gangadhara, S; Kumar, S; Magee, R M; O'Connell, R; Parke, E; Prager, S C; Reusch, J A; Sarff, J S; Stephens, H D; Brower, D L; Ding, W X; Craig, D

    2010-01-01

    By manipulating magnetic reconnection in Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) discharges, we have generated and confined for the first time a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma with an ion temperature >1 keV and an electron temperature of 2 keV. This is achieved at a toroidal plasma current of about 0.5 MA, approaching MST's present maximum. The manipulation begins with intensification of discrete magnetic reconnection events, causing the ion temperature to increase to several kiloelectronvolts. The reconnection is then quickly suppressed with inductive current profile control, leading to capture of a portion of the added ion heat with improved ion energy confinement. Electron energy confinement is simultaneously improved, leading to a rapid ohmically driven increase in the electron temperature. A steep electron temperature gradient emerges in the outer region of the plasma, with a local thermal diffusivity of about 2 m 2 s -1 . The global energy confinement time reaches 12 ms, the largest value yet achieved in the RFP and which is roughly comparable to the H-mode scaling prediction for a tokamak with the same plasma current, density, heating power, size and shape.

  2. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  3. Transport of a nonneutral electron plasma due to electron collisions with neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, M.H.; O'Neil, T.M.

    1978-01-01

    Transport of a nonneutral electron plasma across a magnetic field is caused by electron scattering from ambient neutral atoms. A theoretical model of such transport is presented, assuming the plasma is quiescent and the scattering is elastic scattering from infinite mass scattering centers of constant momentum transfer cross section. This model is motivated by recent experiments. A reduced transport equation is obtained by expanding the Boltzmann equation for the electron distribution in inverse powers of the magnetic field. The equation together with Poisson's equation for the radial electric field, which must exist in a nonneutral column, determine the evolution of the system. When these two equations are properly scaled, they contain only a single parameter: the ratio of initial Debye length to initial column radius. For cases where this parameter is either large or small, analytical solutions, or at least partial solutions, are obtained. For intermediate values of the parameter, numerical solutions are obtained

  4. Experimental study of fast electron transport in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisseau, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The framework of this PhD thesis is the inertial confinement fusion for energy production, in the context of the electron fast ignition scheme. The work consists in a characterization of the transport mechanisms of fast electrons, driven by intense laser pulses (10 19 - 10 20 W/cm 2 ) in both cold-solid and warm-dense matter. The first goal was to study the propagation of a fast electron beam, characterized by a current density ≥ 10 11 A/cm 2 , in aluminum targets initially heated close to the Fermi temperature by a counter-propagative planar shock. The planar compression geometry allowed us to discriminate the energy losses due to the resistive mechanisms from collisional ones by comparing solid and compressed targets of the same initial areal densities. We observed for the first time a significant increase of resistive energy losses in heated aluminum samples. The confrontation of the experimental data with the simulations, including a complete characterization of the electron source, of the target compression and of the fast electron transport, allowed us to study the time-evolution of the material resistivity. The estimated resistive electron stopping power in a warm-compressed target is of the same order as the collisional one. We studied the transport of the fast electrons generated in the interaction of a high-contrast laser pulse with a hollow copper cone, buried into a carbon layer, compressed by a counter-propagative planar shock. A X-ray imaging system allowed us to visualize the coupling of the laser pulse with the cone at different moments of the compression. This diagnostic, giving access to the fast electron spatial distribution, showed a fast electron generation in the entire volume of the cone for late times of compression, after shock breakout from the inner cone tip. For earlier times, the interaction at a high-contrast ensured that the source was contained within the cone tip, and the fast electron beam was collimated into the target depth by

  5. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q fi ) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes

  6. Does menaquinone participate in brain astrocyte electron transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovern, Douglas; Marbois, Beth

    2013-10-01

    Quinone compounds act as membrane resident carriers of electrons between components of the electron transport chain in the periplasmic space of prokaryotes and in the mitochondria of eukaryotes. Vitamin K is a quinone compound in the human body in a storage form as menaquinone (MK); distribution includes regulated amounts in mitochondrial membranes. The human brain, which has low amounts of typical vitamin K dependent function (e.g., gamma carboxylase) has relatively high levels of MK, and different regions of brain have different amounts. Coenzyme Q (Q), is a quinone synthesized de novo, and the levels of synthesis decline with age. The levels of MK are dependent on dietary intake and generally increase with age. MK has a characterized role in the transfer of electrons to fumarate in prokaryotes. A newly recognized fumarate cycle has been identified in brain astrocytes. The MK precursor menadione has been shown to donate electrons directly to mitochondrial complex III. Vitamin K compounds function in the electron transport chain of human brain astrocytes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of power electronic converters (DC / DC, DC / AC, AC / DC and AC / AC) conventionally used in industrial and transportation applications, specifically for the supply of electric machines with variable speed drop off window. From the perspective of design and sizing, this book presents the different functions encountered in a modular way for power electronics.Power Converters and Their Control details less traditional topics such as matrix converters and multilevel converters. This book also features a case study design of an industrial controller, wh

  8. Electron transport in ethanol & methanol absorbed defected graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandeliya, Sushmita; Srivastava, Anurag

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, the sensitivity of ethanol and methanol molecules on surface of single vacancy defected graphene has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The changes in structural and electronic properties before and after adsorption of ethanol and methanol were analyzed and the obtained results show high adsorption energy and charge transfer. High adsorption happens at the active site with monovacancy defect on graphene surface. Present work confirms that the defected graphene increases the surface reactivity towards ethanol and methanol molecules. The presence of molecules near the active site affects the electronic and transport properties of defected graphene which makes it a promising choice for designing methanol and ethanol sensor.

  9. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Some power electronic converters are specifically designed to power equipment under a smoothed DC voltage. Therefore, the filtering part necessarily involves the use of auxiliary passive components (inductors and capacitors). This book deals with technical aspects such as classical separation between isolated and non-isolated power supplies, and soft switching through a special converter. It addresses the problem of regulating the output voltage of the switching power supplies in terms of modeling and obtaining transfer of SMPS functions.Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 3,

  10. On the physics of dispersive electron transport characteristics in SnO2 nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Aditya; Vijayaraghavan, S N; Unni, Gautam E; Nair, Shantikumar V; Shanmugam, Mariyappan

    2018-04-27

    The present study elucidates dispersive electron transport mediated by surface states in tin oxide (SnO 2 ) nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Transmission electron microscopic studies on SnO 2 show a distribution of ∼10 nm particles exhibiting (111) crystal planes with inter-planar spacing of 0.28 nm. The dispersive transport, experienced by photo-generated charge carriers in the bulk of SnO 2 , is observed to be imposed by trapping and de-trapping processes via SnO 2 surface states present close to the band edge. The DSSC exhibits 50% difference in performance observed between the forward (4%) and reverse (6%) scans due to the dispersive transport characteristics of the charge carriers in the bulk of the SnO 2 . The photo-generated charge carriers are captured and released by the SnO 2 surface states that are close to the conduction band-edge resulting in a very significant variation; this is confirmed by the hysteresis observed in the forward and reverse scan current-voltage measurements under AM1.5 illumination. The hysteresis behavior assures that the charge carriers are accumulated in the bulk of electron acceptor due to the trapping, and released by de-trapping mediated by surface states observed during the forward and reverse scan measurements.

  11. On the physics of dispersive electron transport characteristics in SnO2 nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Aditya; Vijayaraghavan, S. N.; Unni, Gautam E.; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Shanmugam, Mariyappan

    2018-04-01

    The present study elucidates dispersive electron transport mediated by surface states in tin oxide (SnO2) nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Transmission electron microscopic studies on SnO2 show a distribution of ˜10 nm particles exhibiting (111) crystal planes with inter-planar spacing of 0.28 nm. The dispersive transport, experienced by photo-generated charge carriers in the bulk of SnO2, is observed to be imposed by trapping and de-trapping processes via SnO2 surface states present close to the band edge. The DSSC exhibits 50% difference in performance observed between the forward (4%) and reverse (6%) scans due to the dispersive transport characteristics of the charge carriers in the bulk of the SnO2. The photo-generated charge carriers are captured and released by the SnO2 surface states that are close to the conduction band-edge resulting in a very significant variation; this is confirmed by the hysteresis observed in the forward and reverse scan current-voltage measurements under AM1.5 illumination. The hysteresis behavior assures that the charge carriers are accumulated in the bulk of electron acceptor due to the trapping, and released by de-trapping mediated by surface states observed during the forward and reverse scan measurements.

  12. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hu, Zhou; Ben-Liang, Zhou; Guang-Hui, Zhou; Zi-Gang, Duan

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the electronic transport property through a square potential barrier in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). Using the Dirac equation with the continuity condition for wave functions at the interfaces between regions with and without a barrier, we calculate the mode-dependent transmission probability for both semiconducting and metallic AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, the transmission probability is generally an oscillating function of the height and range of the barrier for both types of AGNRs. The main difference between the two types of systems is that the magnitude of oscillation for the semiconducting AGNR is larger than that for the metallic one. This fact implies that the electronic transport property for AGNRs depends sensitively on their widths and edge details due to the Dirac nature of fermions in the system

  13. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eylon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: S_Eylon@lbl.gov; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Roy, P.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  14. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons

  15. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P. K.; Yu, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  16. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  17. Two-point model for electron transport in EBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.C.; Guest, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The electron transport in EBT is simulated by a two-point model corresponding to the central plasma and the edge. The central plasma is assumed to obey neoclassical collisionless transport. The edge plasma is assumed turbulent and modeled by Bohm diffusion. The steady-state temperatures and densities in both regions are obtained as functions of neutral influx and microwave power. It is found that as the neutral influx decreases and power increases, the edge density decreases while the core density increases. We conclude that if ring instability is responsible for the T-M mode transition, and if stability is correlated with cold electron density at the edge, it will depend sensitively on ambient gas pressure and microwave power

  18. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  19. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron transfer in the octahedral sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2003-01-01

    The two principal FeII/III electron exchange reactions underlying charge transport in the octahedral sheet of ideal end-member annite were modeled using a combination of ab initio calculations and Marcus electron transfer theory. A small polaron model was applied which yielded electron hopping activation energies that agree well with the limited available experimental data. A small ab initio cluster model successfully reproduced several important structural, energetic, and magnetic characteristics of the M1 and M2 Fe sites in the annite octahedral sheet. The cluster enabled calculation of the internal reorganization energy and electronic coupling matrix elements for the M2-M2 and M1-M2 electron transfer reactions. The M2-M2 electron transfer is symmetric with a predicted forward/reverse electron hopping rate of 106 s-1. The M1-M2 electron transfers are asymmetric due to the higher ionization potential by 0.46 eV of FeII in the M1 site. The electronic coupling matrix elements for these reactions are predicted to be small and of similar magnitude, suggesting the possibility that the coupling is essentially direction independent amongst hopping directions in the octahedral sheet. M1 Fe sites are predicted to be efficient electron traps and charge transport should occur by nearest-neighbor electron hops along the M2 Fe sublattice

  20. Nonlinear features of the electron temperature gradient mode and electron thermal transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.; Singh, R.; Weiland, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical investigations of several linear and nonlinear features of ETG turbulence are reported. The linear theory includes effects such as finite beta induced electromagnetic shielding, coupling to electron magnetohydrodynamic modes like whistlers etc. It is argued that nonlinearly, turbulence and transport are dominated by radially extended modes called 'streamers'. A nonlinear mechanism generating streamers based on a modulational instability theory of the ETG turbulence is also presented. The saturation levels of the streamers using a Kelvin Helmholtz secondary instability mechanism are calculated and levels of the electron thermal transport due to streamers are estimated. (author)

  1. Electron beam induced electronic transport in alkyl amine-intercalated VOx nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dwyer, C.; Lavayen, V.; Clavijo-Cedeno, C.; Torres, C.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The electron beam induced electronic transport in primary alkyl amine-intercalated V 2 O 5 nanotubes is investigated where the organic amine molecules are employed as molecular conductive wires to an aminosilanized substrate surface and contacted to Au interdigitated electrode contacts. The results demonstrate that the high conductivity of the nanotubes is related to the non-resonant tunnelling through the amine molecules and a reduced polaron hopping conduction through the vanadium oxide itself. Both nanotube networks and individual nanotubes exhibit similarly high conductivities where the minority carrier transport is bias dependent and nanotube diameter invariant. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Stable solutions of nonlocal electron heat transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Electron heat transport equations with a nonlocal heat flux are in general ill-posed and intrinsically unstable, as proved by the present authors [Phys. Fluids B 1, 2430 (1989)]. A straightforward numerical solution of these equations will therefore lead to absurd results. It is shown here that by imposing a minimal set of constraints on the problem it is possible to arrive at a globally stable, consistent, and energy conserving numerical solution

  3. Discussion of electron cross sections for transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with selected aspects of the cross sections needed as input for transport calculations and for the modeling of radiation effects in biological materials. Attention is centered mainly on the cross sections for inelastic interactions between electrons and water molecules and the use of these cross sections for the calculation of energy degradation spectra and of ionization and excitation yields. 40 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  4. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Do, T. P. T. [School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  5. Electronic structure and charge transport in nonstoichiometric tantalum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalov, T. V.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Gismatulin, A. A.; Voronkovskii, V. A.; Gerasimova, A. K.; Aliev, V. Sh; Prosvirin, I. A.

    2018-06-01

    The atomic and electronic structure of nonstoichiometric oxygen-deficient tantalum oxide TaO x<2.5 grown by ion beam sputtering deposition was studied. The TaO x film content was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by quantum-chemistry simulation. TaO x is composed of Ta2O5, metallic tantalum clusters and tantalum suboxides. A method for evaluating the stoichiometry parameter of TaO x from the comparison of experimental and theoretical photoelectron valence band spectra is proposed. The charge transport properties of TaO x were experimentally studied and the transport mechanism was quantitatively analyzed with four theoretical dielectric conductivity models. It was found that the charge transport in almost stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric tantalum oxide can be consistently described by the phonon-assisted tunneling between traps.

  6. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  7. Landauer-Datta-Lundstrom Generalized Transport Model for Nano electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglyak, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Landauer-Datta-Lundstrom electron transport model is briefly summarized. If a band structure is given, the number of conduction modes can be evaluated and if a model for a mean-free-path for backscattering can be established, then the near-equilibrium thermoelectric transport coefficients can be calculated using the final expressions listed below for 1D, 2D, and 3D resistors in ballistic, quasi ballistic, and diffusive linear response regimes when there are differences in both voltage and temperature across the device. The final expressions of thermoelectric transport coefficients through the Fermi-Dirac integrals are collected for 1D, 2D, and 3D semiconductors with parabolic band structure and for 2D graphene linear dispersion in ballistic and diffusive regimes with the power law scattering.

  8. Radial transport of high-energy runaway electrons in ORMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Swain, D.W.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of high-energy runaway electrons near the outside of a low-density ORMAK discharge is investigated by measuring the flux of runaways to the outer limiter during and after an inward shift of the plasma column. The experimental results are interpreted through a runaway confinement model which includes both the classical outward displacement of the runaway orbit with increasing energy and an additional runaway spatial diffusion coefficient which simulates an unspecified source of anomalous transport. Diffusion coefficients in the range D approximately equal to 10 2 -10 4 cms -1 are found under various discharge conditions indicating a significant non-collisional runaway transport near the outside of the discharge, particularly in the presence of MHD instability. (author)

  9. Nonlinear transport behavior of low dimensional electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingqiao

    The nonlinear behavior of low-dimensional electron systems attracts a great deal of attention for its fundamental interest as well as for potentially important applications in nanoelectronics. In response to microwave radiation and dc bias, strongly nonlinear electron transport that gives rise to unusual electron states has been reported in two-dimensional systems of electrons in high magnetic fields. There has also been great interest in the nonlinear response of quantum ballistic constrictions, where the effects of quantum interference, spatial dispersion and electron-electron interactions play crucial roles. In this thesis, experimental results of the research of low dimensional electron gas systems are presented. The first nonlinear phenomena were observed in samples of highly mobile two dimensional electrons in GaAs heavily doped quantum wells at different magnitudes of DC and AC (10 KHz to 20 GHz) excitations. We found that in the DC excitation regime the differential resistance oscillates with the DC current and external magnetic field, similar behavior was observed earlier in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures [C.L. Yang et al. ]. At external AC excitations the resistance is found to be also oscillating as a function of the magnetic field. However the form of the oscillations is considerably different from the DC case. We show that at frequencies below 100 KHz the difference is a result of a specific average of the DC differential resistance during the period of the external AC excitations. Secondly, in similar samples, strong suppression of the resistance by the electric field is observed in magnetic fields at which the Landau quantization of electron motion occurs. The phenomenon survives at high temperatures at which the Shubnikov de Haas oscillations are absent. The scale of the electric fields essential for the effect, is found to be proportional to temperature in the low temperature limit. We suggest that the strong reduction of the longitudinal resistance

  10. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte; Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina

    2006-01-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [ 11 C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  11. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [{sup 11}C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  12. Detecting Electron Transport of Amino Acids by Using Conductance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The single molecular conductance of amino acids was measured by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM break junction. Conductance measurement of alanine gives out two conductance values at 10−1.85 G0 (1095 nS and 10−3.7 G0 (15.5 nS, while similar conductance values are also observed for aspartic acid and glutamic acid, which have one more carboxylic acid group compared with alanine. This may show that the backbone of NH2–C–COOH is the primary means of electron transport in the molecular junction of aspartic acid and glutamic acid. However, NH2–C–COOH is not the primary means of electron transport in the methionine junction, which may be caused by the strong interaction of the Au–SMe (methyl sulfide bond for the methionine junction. The current work reveals the important role of the anchoring group in the electron transport in different amino acids junctions.

  13. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen, Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au@CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au@BSPP, Au@TDSP, Au@MPA and Au@MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values.

  14. Electron heat transport studies using transient phenomena in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacchia, A.; Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Ryter, F.; Apostoliceanu, M.; Conway, G.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Kirov, K.K.; Leuterer, F.; Reich, M.; Sutttrop, W.; Cirant, S.; Mantica, P.; De Luca, F.; Weiland, J.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments in tokamaks suggest that a critical gradient length may cause the resilient behavior of T e profiles, in the absence of ITBs. This agrees in general with ITG/TEM turbulence physics. Experiments in ASDEX Upgrade using modulation techniques with ECH and/or cold pulses demonstrate the existence of a threshold in R/L Te when T e >T i and T e ≤T i . For T e >T i linear stability analyses indicate that electron heat transport is dominated by TEM modes. They agree in the value of the threshold (both T e and n e ) and for the electron heat transport increase above the threshold. The stabilization of TEM modes by collisions yielded by gyro-kinetic calculations, which suggests a transition from TEM to ITG dominated transport at high collisionality, is experimentally demonstrated by comparing heat pulse and steady-state diffusivities. For the T e ∼T i discharges above the threshold the resilience, normalized by T e 3/2 , is similar to that of the TEM dominated cases, despite very different conditions. The heat pinch predicted by fluid modeling of ITG/TEM turbulence is investigated by perturbative transport in off-axis ECH-heated discharges. (author)

  15. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  16. Role of the current density profile on drift wave stability in internal transport barrier reversed magnetic shear experiments at JET and Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourment, C; Hoang, G T; Eriksson, L-G; Garbet, X; Litaudon, X; Tresset, G [EURATOM-CEA Association, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-03-01

    The role of the current density profile on drift wave stability is investigated using a linear electrostatic gyro-kinetic code. The growth rates are shown to have a linear dependence on the normalized temperature gradients above a certain threshold. A parametric study of the threshold shows a dramatic stabilizing effect of negative magnetic shear, especially for large scale instabilities. A set of handy formulae fitting the threshold as a function of the magnetic shear and the safety factor is proposed. Analysis of reversed magnetic shear discharges with internal transport barrier (ITB) in JET shows that ion ITBs can be triggered by the negative magnetic shear in the core of the plasma. Subsequently, the increase of the ExB shearing rate allows for the expansion of the ITB, despite the increase of the linear growth rates due to the temperature gradient peaking. In the case of the electron ITB obtained in the Tore Supra LHEP mode, the central increase of the confinement is associated with the stabilization of large scale trapped electron modes by the negative magnetic shear effect, whereas the steep electron temperature gradient destabilizes the small scale electron temperature gradient modes, which prevent the electron heat transport to reach neoclassical levels.

  17. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are comparable with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down (CSD) portion and elastic-scattering portion of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion

  18. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages to using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g., immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and synthetic radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT, and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down and elastic-scattering portions of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion

  19. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  20. Electronic transport in VO2—Experimentally calibrated Boltzmann transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinaci, Alper; Rosenmann, Daniel; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Kado, Motohisa; Ling, Chen; Zhu, Gaohua; Banerjee, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    Materials that undergo metal-insulator transitions (MITs) are under intense study, because the transition is scientifically fascinating and technologically promising for various applications. Among these materials, VO 2 has served as a prototype due to its favorable transition temperature. While the physical underpinnings of the transition have been heavily investigated experimentally and computationally, quantitative modeling of electronic transport in the two phases has yet to be undertaken. In this work, we establish a density-functional-theory (DFT)-based approach with Hubbard U correction (DFT + U) to model electronic transport properties in VO 2 in the semiconducting and metallic regimes, focusing on band transport using the Boltzmann transport equations. We synthesized high quality VO 2 films and measured the transport quantities across the transition, in order to calibrate the free parameters in the model. We find that the experimental calibration of the Hubbard correction term can efficiently and adequately model the metallic and semiconducting phases, allowing for further computational design of MIT materials for desirable transport properties

  1. Electronic transport in VO{sub 2}—Experimentally calibrated Boltzmann transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinaci, Alper; Rosenmann, Daniel; Chan, Maria K. Y., E-mail: debasish.banerjee@toyota.com, E-mail: mchan@anl.gov [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kado, Motohisa [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ling, Chen; Zhu, Gaohua; Banerjee, Debasish, E-mail: debasish.banerjee@toyota.com, E-mail: mchan@anl.gov [Materials Research Department, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Materials that undergo metal-insulator transitions (MITs) are under intense study, because the transition is scientifically fascinating and technologically promising for various applications. Among these materials, VO{sub 2} has served as a prototype due to its favorable transition temperature. While the physical underpinnings of the transition have been heavily investigated experimentally and computationally, quantitative modeling of electronic transport in the two phases has yet to be undertaken. In this work, we establish a density-functional-theory (DFT)-based approach with Hubbard U correction (DFT + U) to model electronic transport properties in VO{sub 2} in the semiconducting and metallic regimes, focusing on band transport using the Boltzmann transport equations. We synthesized high quality VO{sub 2} films and measured the transport quantities across the transition, in order to calibrate the free parameters in the model. We find that the experimental calibration of the Hubbard correction term can efficiently and adequately model the metallic and semiconducting phases, allowing for further computational design of MIT materials for desirable transport properties.

  2. Theoretical modeling of electronic transport in molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinin, Simone

    In this thesis a novel approach for simulating electronic transport in nanoscale structures is introduced. We consider an open quantum system (the electrons of structure) accelerated by an external electromotive force and dissipating energy through inelastic scattering with a heat bath (phonons) acting on the electrons. This method can be regarded as a quantum-mechanical extension of the semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation. We use periodic boundary conditions and employ Density Functional Theory to recast the many-particle problem in an effective single-particle mean-field problem. By explicitly treating the dissipation in the electrodes, the behavior of the potential is an outcome of our method, at variance with the scattering approaches based on the Landauer formalism. We study the self-consistent steady-state solution, analyzing the out-of-equilibrium electron distribution, the electrical characteristics, the behavior of the self-consistent potential and the density of states of the system. We apply the method to the study of electronic transport in several molecular devices, consisting of small organic molecules or atomic wires sandwiched between gold surfaces. For gold wires we recover the experimental evidence that transport in short wires is ballistic, independent of the length of the wire and with conductance of one quantum. In benzene-1,4-dithiol we find that the delocalization of the frontier orbitals of the molecule is responsible for the high value of conductance and that, by inserting methylene groups to decouple the sulfur atoms from the carbon ring, the current is reduced, in agreement with the experimental measurements. We study the effect a geometrical distortion in a molecular device, namely the relative rotation of the carbon rings in a biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol molecule. We find that the reduced coupling between pi orbitals of the rings induced by the rotation leads to a reduction of the conductance and that this behavior is captured by a

  3. Transport of a relativistic electron beam through hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, P. de.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the transport properties of an electron beam through vacuum and through hydrogen gas with pressure ranging from 25 to 1000 Pa. Maximum beam energy and current are 0.8 MeV and 6 kA, respectively. The pulse length is around 150 ns. A description is given of the experimental device. Also the diagnostics for probing the beam and the plasma, produced by the beam, are discussed, as well as the data acquisition system. The interaction between the beam and hydrogen gas with a pressure around 200 Pa is considered. A plasma with density around 10 19 m -3 is produced within a few nanoseconds. Measurements yield the atomic hydrogen temperature, electron density, beam energy loss, and induced plasma current and these are compared with the results of a model combining gas ionization and dissociation, and turbulent plasma heating. The angular distribution of the beam electrons about the magnetic field axis is discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Numerical shoves and countershoves in electron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippone, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    The justification for applying the relatively complex (compared to S/sub n/) streaming ray (SR) algorithm to electron transport problems is its potential for doing rapid and accurate calculations. Because of the Lagrangian treatment of the cell-uncollided electrons, the only significant sources of error are the numerical treatment of the scattering kernel and the spatial differencing scheme used for the cell-collided electrons. Considerable progress has been made in reducing the former source of error. If one is willing to pay the price, the latter source of error can be reduced to any desired level by refining the mesh size or by using high-order differencing schemes. Here the method of numerical shoves and countershoves is introduced, which reduces spatial differencing errors using relatively little additional computational effort

  5. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Park, Kyungwha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters, vibrational energies, and electron-vibron coupling strengths of the Fe4 are computed using DFT. A giant spin model is applied to the Fe4 with only two charge states, specifically a neutral state with a total spin S =5 and a singly charged state with S =9 /2 , which is consistent with our DFT result and experiments on Fe4 single-molecule transistors. In sequential electron tunneling, we find that the magnetic anisotropy gives rise to new features in the conductance peaks arising from vibrational excitations. In particular, the peak height shows a strong, unusual dependence on the direction as well as magnitude of applied B field. The magnetic anisotropy also introduces vibrational satellite peaks whose position and height are modified with the direction and magnitude of applied B field. Furthermore, when multiple vibrational modes with considerable electron-vibron coupling have energies close to one another, a low-bias current is suppressed, independently of gate voltage and applied B field, although that is not the case for a single mode with a similar electron-vibron coupling. In the former case, the conductance peaks reveal a stronger B -field dependence than in the latter case. The new features appear because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is of the same order of magnitude as the energies of vibrational modes with significant electron-vibron coupling. Our findings clearly show the interesting interplay between magnetic anisotropy and electron-vibron coupling in electron transport via the Fe4. Similar behavior can be observed in transport via other anisotropic magnetic molecules.

  6. Characterization of Isomeric Glycans by Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography-Electronic Excitation Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Wei, Juan; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2018-04-01

    The occurrence of numerous structural isomers in glycans from biological sources presents a severe challenge for structural glycomics. The subtle differences among isomeric structures demand analytical methods that can provide structural details while working efficiently with on-line glycan separation methods. Although liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful tool for mixture analysis, the commonly utilized collision-induced dissociation (CID) method often does not generate a sufficient number of fragments at the MS2 level for comprehensive structural characterization. Here, we studied the electronic excitation dissociation (EED) behaviors of metal-adducted, permethylated glycans, and identified key spectral features that could facilitate both topology and linkage determinations. We developed an EED-based, nanoscale, reversed phase (RP)LC-MS/MS platform, and demonstrated its ability to achieve complete structural elucidation of up to five structural isomers in a single LC-MS/MS analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Atomistic simulations of divacancy defects in armchair graphene nanoribbons: Stability, electronic structure, and electron transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zeng, Hui, E-mail: zenghui@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei, Jianwei [College of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Li, Biao; Xu, Dahai [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China)

    2014-01-17

    Using the first principles calculations associated with nonequilibrium Green's function, we have studied the electronic structures and quantum transport properties of defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) in the presence of divacancy defects. The triple pentagon–triple heptagon (555–777) defect in the defective AGNR is energetically more favorable than the pentagon–octagon–pentagon (5–8–5) defect. Our calculated results reveal that both 5–8–5-like defect and 555–777-like defect in AGNR could improve the electron transport. It is anticipated that defective AGNRs can exhibit large range variations in transport behaviors, which are strongly dependent on the distributions of the divacancy defect.

  8. Theory of Ion and Water Transport in Reverse-Osmosis Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Y. S.; Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a theory for ion and water transport through reverse-osmosis (RO) membranes based on a Maxwell-Stefan framework combined with hydrodynamic theory for the reduced motion of particles in thin pores. We take into account all driving forces and frictions both on the fluid (water) and on the ions including ion-fluid friction and ion-wall friction. By including the acid-base characteristic of the carbonic acid system, the boric acid system, H3O+/OH- , and the membrane charge, we locally determine p H , the effective charge of the membrane, and the dissociation degree of carbonic acid and boric acid. We present calculation results for an experiment with fixed feed concentration, where effluent composition is a self-consistent function of fluxes through the membrane. A comparison with experimental results from literature for fluid flow vs pressure, and for salt and boron rejection, shows that our theory agrees very well with the available data. Our model is based on realistic assumptions for the effective size of the ions and makes use of a typical pore size of a commercial RO membrane.

  9. Effects of Dietary Flavonoids on Reverse Cholesterol Transport, HDL Metabolism, and HDL Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Courtney L; Duclos, Quinn; Blesso, Christopher N

    2017-03-01

    Strong experimental evidence confirms that HDL directly alleviates atherosclerosis. HDL particles display diverse atheroprotective functions in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic processes. In certain inflammatory disease states, however, HDL particles may become dysfunctional and proatherogenic. Flavonoids show the potential to improve HDL function through their well-documented effects on cellular antioxidant status and inflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the basic science and clinical research examining the effects of dietary flavonoids on RCT and HDL function. Based on preclinical studies that used cell culture and rodent models, it appears that many flavonoids (e.g., anthocyanidins, flavonols, and flavone subclasses) influence RCT and HDL function beyond simple HDL cholesterol concentration by regulating cellular cholesterol efflux from macrophages and hepatic paraoxonase 1 expression and activity. In clinical studies, dietary anthocyanin intake is associated with beneficial changes in serum biomarkers related to HDL function in a variety of human populations (e.g., in those who are hyperlipidemic, hypertensive, or diabetic), including increased HDL cholesterol concentration, as well as HDL antioxidant and cholesterol efflux capacities. However, clinical research on HDL functionality is lacking for some flavonoid subclasses (e.g., flavanols, flavones, flavanones, and isoflavones). Although there has been a tremendous effort to develop HDL-targeted drug therapies, more research is warranted on how the intake of foods or specific nutrients affects HDL function. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Reverse Cholesterol Transport: Molecular Mechanisms and the Non-medical Approach to Enhance HDL Cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro R. Marques

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia (high concentrations of LDL-c and low concentrations of HDL-c is a major cause of cardiovascular events, which are the leading cause of death in the world. On the other hand, nutrition and regular exercise can be an interesting strategy to modulate lipid profile, acting as prevention or treatment, inhibiting the risk of diseases due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic characteristics. Additionally, the possibility of controlling different training variables, such as type, intensity and recovery interval, can be used to maximize the benefits of exercise in promoting cardiovascular health. However, the mechanisms by which exercise and nutrients act in the regulation of cholesterol and its fractions, such as reverse cholesterol transport, receptors and transcription factors involved, such as PPARs and their role related to exercise, deserve further discussion. Therefore, the objective of this review is to debate about non-medical approaches to increase HDL-c, such as nutritional and training strategies, and to discuss the central mechanisms involved in the modulation of lipid profile during exercise, as well as that can be controlled by physical trainers or sports specialists in attempt to maximize the benefits promoted by exercise. The search for papers was performed in the databases: Medline (Pubmed, Science Direct, Scopus, Sport Discus, Web of Science, Scielo and Lilacs until February 2016.

  11. Differential effects of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate on reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages to feces in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotllan, Noemí; Llaverías, Gemma; Julve, Josep; Jauhiainen, Matti; Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2011-02-01

    Gemfibrozil and fenofibrate, two of the fibrates most used in clinical practice, raise HDL cholesterol (HDLc) and are thought to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. These drugs act as PPARα agonists and upregulate the expression of genes crucial in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In the present study, we determined the effects of these two fibrates on RCT from macrophages to feces in vivo in human apoA-I transgenic (hApoA-ITg) mice. [(3)H]cholesterol-labeled mouse macrophages were injected intraperitoneally into hApoA-ITg mice treated with intragastric doses of fenofibrate, gemfibrozil or a vehicle solution for 17days, and radioactivity was determined in plasma, liver and feces. Fenofibrate, but not gemfibrozil, enhanced [(3)H]cholesterol flux to plasma and feces of female hApoA-ITg mice. Fenofibrate significantly increased plasma HDLc, HDL phospholipids, hApoA-I levels and phospholipid transfer protein activity, whereas these parameters were not altered by gemfibrozil treatment. Unlike gemfibrozil, fenofibrate also induced the generation of larger HDL particles, which were more enriched in cholesteryl esters, together with higher potential to generate preβ-HDL formation and caused a significant increase in [(3)H]cholesterol efflux to plasma. Our findings demonstrate that fenofibrate promotes RCT from macrophages to feces in vivo and, thus, highlight a differential action of this fibrate on HDL. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance and cost of energy transport and storage systems for dish applications using reversible chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredder, J. M.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The use of reversible chemical reactions for energy transport and storage for parabolic dish networks is considered. Performance and cost characteristics are estimated for systems using three reactions (sulfur-trioxide decomposition, steam reforming of methane, and carbon-dioxide reforming of methane). Systems are considered with and without storage, and in several energy-delivery configurations that give different profiles of energy delivered versus temperature. Cost estimates are derived assuming the use of metal components and of advanced ceramics. (The latter reduces the costs by three- to five-fold). The process that led to the selection of the three reactions is described, and the effects of varying temperatures, pressures, and heat exchanger sizes are addressed. A state-of-the-art survey was performed as part of this study. As a result of this survey, it appears that formidable technical risks exist for any attempt to implement the systems analyzed in this study, especially in the area of reactor design and performance. The behavior of all components and complete systems under thermal energy transients is very poorly understood. This study indicates that thermochemical storage systems that store reactants as liquids have efficiencies below 60%, which is in agreement with the findings of earlier investigators.

  13. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E x B flow and Shafranov-shift gradients are examined for TFTR. Enhanced Reverse-Shear plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E x B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E x B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly-steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E x B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balanced injection

  14. Taking an electron-magnon duality shortcut from electron to magnon transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, Alexander; Göbel, Börge; Henk, Jürgen; Mertig, Ingrid

    2018-04-01

    The quasiparticles in insulating magnets are the charge-neutral magnons, whose magnetic moments couple to electromagnetic fields. For collinear easy-axis magnets, this coupling can be mapped elegantly onto the scenario of charged particles in electromagnetic fields. From this mapping we obtain equations of motion for magnon wave packets equal to those of electron wave packets in metals. Thus, well-established electronic transport phenomena can be carried over to magnons: this duality shortcut facilitates the discussion of magnon transport. We identify the magnon versions of normal and anomalous Hall, Nernst, Ettingshausen, and Righi-Leduc effects. They are discussed for selected types of easy-axis magnets: ferromagnets, antiferromagnets, and ferrimagnets. Besides a magnon Wiedemann-Franz law and the magnon counterpart of the negative magnetoresistance of electrons in Weyl semimetals, we predict that certain low-symmetry ferrimagnets exhibit a nonlinear version of the anomalous magnon Hall-effect family.

  15. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-10-19

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  16. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  17. Electronic Structure and Transport in Solids from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Jamal Ibrahim

    The focus of this dissertation is the determination of the electronic structure and trans- port properties of solids. We first review some of the theory and computational methodology used in the calculation of electronic structure and materials properties. Throughout the dissertation, we make extensive use of state-of-the-art software packages that implement density functional theory, density functional perturbation theory, and the GW approximation, in addition to specialized methods for interpolating matrix elements for extremely accurate results. The first application of the computational framework introduced is the determination of band offsets in semiconductor heterojunctions using a theory of quantum dipoles at the interface. This method is applied to the case of heterojunction formed between a new metastable phase of silicon, with a rhombohedral structure, and cubic silicon. Next, we introduce a novel method for the construction of localized Wannier functions, which we have named the optimized projection functions method (OPFM). We illustrate the method on a variety of systems and find that it can reliably construct localized Wannier functions with minimal user intervention. We further develop the OPFM to investigate a class of materials called topological insulators, which are insulating in the bulk but have conductive surface states. These properties are a result of a nontrivial topology in their band structure, which has interesting effects on the character of the Wannier functions. In the last sections of the main text, the noble metals are studied in great detail, including their electronic properties and carrier dynamics. In particular, we investigate, the Fermi surface properties of the noble metals, specifically electron-phonon scattering lifetimes, and subsequently the transport properties determined by carriers on the Fermi surface. To achieve this, a novel sampling technique is developed, with wide applicability to transport calculations

  18. Monte Carlo transport of electrons and positrons through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Idoeta, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the different measurements made with electrons traversing matter it becomes useful the knowledge of its transmission through that medium, their paths and their angular distribution through matter so as to process and get information about the traversed medium and to improve and innovate the techniques that employ electrons, as medical applications or materials irradiation. This work presents a simulation of the transport of beams of electrons and positrons through thin foils using an analog Monte Carlo code that simulates in a detailed way every electron movement or interaction in matter. As those particles penetrate thin absorbers it has been assumed that they interact with matter only through elastic scattering, with negligible energy loss. This type of interaction has been described quite precisely because its angular form influences very much the angular distribution of electrons and positrons in matter. With this code it has been calculated the number of particles, with energies between 100 and 3000 keV, that are transmitted through different media of various thicknesses as well as its angular distribution, showing a good agreement with experimental data. The discrepancies are less than 5% for thicknesses lower than about 30% of the corresponding range in the tested material. As elastic scattering is very anisotropic, angular distributions resemble a collimated incident beam for very thin foils becoming slowly more isotropic when absorber thickness is increased. (author)

  19. Electron and hole transport in ambipolar, thin film pentacene transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudari, Sangameshwar R.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2015-01-01

    Solution-processed, ambipolar, thin-film pentacene field-effect transistors were employed to study both electron and hole transport simultaneously in a single, organic solid-state device. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted from the respective unipolar saturation regimes and show thermally activated behavior and gate voltage dependence. We fit the gate voltage dependent saturation mobility to a power law to extract the characteristic Meyer-Neldel (MN) energy, a measure of the width of the exponential distribution of localized states extending into the energy gap of the organic semiconductor. The MN energy is ∼78 and ∼28 meV for electrons and holes, respectively, which reflects a greater density of localized tail states for electrons than holes. This is consistent with the lower measured electron than hole mobility. For holes, the well-behaved linear regime allows for four-point probe measurement of the contact resistance independent mobility and separate characterization of the width of the localized density of states, yielding a consistent MN energy of 28 meV

  20. Electron and hole transport in ambipolar, thin film pentacene transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saudari, Sangameshwar R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kagan, Cherie R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    Solution-processed, ambipolar, thin-film pentacene field-effect transistors were employed to study both electron and hole transport simultaneously in a single, organic solid-state device. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted from the respective unipolar saturation regimes and show thermally activated behavior and gate voltage dependence. We fit the gate voltage dependent saturation mobility to a power law to extract the characteristic Meyer-Neldel (MN) energy, a measure of the width of the exponential distribution of localized states extending into the energy gap of the organic semiconductor. The MN energy is ∼78 and ∼28 meV for electrons and holes, respectively, which reflects a greater density of localized tail states for electrons than holes. This is consistent with the lower measured electron than hole mobility. For holes, the well-behaved linear regime allows for four-point probe measurement of the contact resistance independent mobility and separate characterization of the width of the localized density of states, yielding a consistent MN energy of 28 meV.

  1. Helium, iron and electron particle transport and energy transport studies on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor

  2. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  3. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  4. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  5. Excess electron transport and delayed muonium formation in condensed rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshchenko, D.G.; Storchak, V.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Morris, G.D.; Cottrell, S.P.; Cox, S.F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies of excess electron transport in solid and liquid phases of Ne and Ar are presented and compared with those for He. The technique of muon spin relaxation in frequently reversed electric fields was used to study the phenomenon of delayed muonium formation, whereby excess electrons liberated in the μ + ionization track converge upon the positive muons and form μ + e - atoms. This process is shown to be crucially dependent upon the electron's interaction with its environment (i.e., whether it occupies the conduction band or becomes localized) and upon its mobility in these states. The characteristic lengths involved are 10 -6 to 10 -4 cm; the characteristic times range from nanoseconds to tens of microseconds. Such a microscopic length scale sometimes enables the electron to spend its entire free lifetime in a state which may not be detected by conventional macroscopic techniques. The end-of-track processes are compared in (i) liquid and solid helium (where the electron is known to be localized in a bubble in the liquid phase and is thought to behave in a similar manner in the solid); (ii) liquid and solid neon (where both localized and bandlike electrons are found in the liquid phase while most are delocalized in the solid); and (iii) liquid and solid argon (where most electrons are bandlike in both phases). This scaling from light to heavy rare gases enables us to demonstrate new features of excess electron localization on the microscopic scale and provides insight into the structure of the end of the muon track in condensed rare gases

  6. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  7. Reversible assembly of protein-DNA nanostructures triggered by mediated electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Stephan; Wenderhold-Reeb, Sabine; Nöll, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Stable protein-DNA nanostructures have been assembled by reconstitution of the multi-ligand binding flavoprotein dodecin on top of flavin-terminated dsDNA monolayers on gold electrodes. These structures could be disassembled by electrochemical flavin reduction via mediated electron transfer. For this purpose a negative potential was applied at the Au working electrode in the presence of the redox mediator bis-(ammoniumethyl)-4,4′-bipyridinium tetrabromide. The stepwise formation of the flavin-terminated dsDNA monolayers as well as the binding and electrochemically triggered release of apododecin were monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. The assembly and disassembly of the protein-DNA nanostructures were fully reversible processes, which could be carried out multiple times at the same flavin-dsDNA modified surface. When a negative potential was applied in the absence of a redox mediator apododecin could not be released, i.e. direct electron transfer was not possible. As alternative redox mediators also methylene blue and phenosafranine were studied, but in the presence of these molecules apododecin was released without applying a potential, probably because the tricyclic aromatic compounds are able to replace the flavins at the binding sites.

  8. Electronic transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borlenghi, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the mutual influence between electronic transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic hybrid metallic nano-structures. At first, we have developed a theoretical model, based on random matrix theory, to describe at microscopic level spin dependent transport in a heterogeneous nano-structure. This model, called Continuous Random Matrix Theory (CRMT), has been implemented in a simulation code that allows one to compute local (spin torque, spin accumulation and spin current) and macroscopic (resistance) transport properties of spin valves. To validate this model, we have compared it with a quantum theory of transport based on the non equilibrium Green's functions formalism. Coupling the two models has allowed to perform a multi-scale description of metallic hybrid nano-structures, where ohmic parts are described using CRMT, while purely quantum parts are described using Green's functions. Then, we have coupled CRMT to a micro-magnetic simulation code, in order to describe the complex dynamics of the magnetization induced by spin transfer effect. The originality of this approach consists in modelling a spectroscopic experiment based on a mechanical detection of the ferromagnetic resonance, and performed on a spin torque nano-oscillator. This work has allowed us to obtain the dynamical phase diagram of the magnetization, and to detect the selection rules for spin waves induced by spin torque, as well as the competition between the Eigen-modes of the system when a dc current flows through the multilayer, in partial agreement with experimental data. (author)

  9. Relativistic electron-beam transport in curved channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Morel, J.E.; Wright, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    Collisionless single particle trajectories are modeled for a single plasma channel having one section curved in a circular arc. The magnetic field is developed by superposition of straight and curved channel segments. The plasma density gives charge and beam-current neutralization. High transport efficiencies are found for turning a relativistic electron beam 90 0 under reasonable conditions of plasma current, beam energy, arc radius, channel radius, and injection distributions in velocity and in position at the channel entrance. Channel exit distributions in velocity and position are found consistent with those for a straight plasma channel of equivalent length. Such transport problems are important in any charged particle-beam application constrained by large diode-to-target distance or by requirements of maximum power deposition in a confined area

  10. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong; Hellstrom, Sondra; Bao, Zhenan; Boyanov, Boyan; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Strain modification on electronic transport of the phosphorene nanoribbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawen Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate theoretically how local strains can be tailored to control quantum transport of carriers on monolayer armchair and zigzag phosphorene nanoribbon. We find that the electron tunneling is forbidden when the in-plane strain exceeds a critical value. The critical strain is different for different crystal orientation of the ribbons, widths, and incident energies. By tuning the Fermi energy and strain, the channels can be transited from opaque to transparent. Moreover, for the zigzag-phosphorene nanoribbon, the two-fold degenerate quasi-flat edge band splits completely under certain strain. These properties provide us an efficient way to control the transport of monolayer phosphorene-based microstructure.

  12. New Computational Approach to Electron Transport in Irregular Graphene Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Douglas; Heller, Eric; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    For novel graphene devices of nanoscale-to-macroscopic scale, many aspects of their transport properties are not easily understood due to difficulties in fabricating devices with regular edges. Here we develop a framework to efficiently calculate and potentially screen electronic transport properties of arbitrary nanoscale graphene device structures. A generalization of the established recursive Green's function method is presented, providing access to arbitrary device and lead geometries with substantial computer-time savings. Using single-orbital nearest-neighbor tight-binding models and the Green's function-Landauer scattering formalism, we will explore the transmission function of irregular two-dimensional graphene-based nanostructures with arbitrary lead orientation. Prepared by LBNL under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Computer Science Graduate Fellowship under grant DE-FG02-97ER25308.

  13. Discrete-ordinates electron transport calculations using standard neutron transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The primary purpose of this work was to develop a method for using standard neutron transport codes to perform electron transport calculations. The method is to develop approximate electron cross sections which are sufficiently well-behaved to be treated with standard S/sub n/ methods, but which nonetheless yield flux solutions which are very similar to the exact solutions. The main advantage of this approach is that, once the approximate cross sections are constructed, their multigroup Legendre expansion coefficients can be calculated and input to any standard S/sub n/ code. Discrete-ordinates calculations were performed to determine the accuracy of the flux solutions for problems corresponding to 1.0-MeV electrons incident upon slabs of aluminum and gold. All S/sub n/ calculations were compared with similar calculations performed with an electron Monte Carlo code, considered to be exact. In all cases, the discrete-ordinates solutions for integral flux quantities (i.e., scalar flux, energy deposition profiles, etc.) are generally in agreement with the Monte Carlo solutions to within approximately 5% or less. The central conclusion is that integral electron flux quantities can be efficiently and accurately calculated using standard S/sub n/ codes in conjunction with approximate cross sections. Furthermore, if group structures and approximate cross section construction are optimized, accurate differential flux energy spectra may also be obtainable without having to use an inordinately large number of energy groups. 1 figure

  14. Effect of contact barrier on electron transport in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang-Bo; Han, Bing-Hong; Liao, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Jun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2010-01-14

    The influence of the barrier between metal electrodes and graphene on the electrical properties was studied on a two-electrode device. A classical barrier model was used to analyze the current-voltage characteristics. Primary parameters including barrier height and effective resistance were achieved. The electron transport properties under magnetic field were further investigated. An abnormal peak-valley-peak shape of voltage-magnetoresistance curve was observed. The underlying mechanisms were discussed under the consideration of the important influence of the contact barrier. Our results indicate electrical properties of graphene based devices are sensitive to the contact interface.

  15. Quantum oscillations and the electronic transport properties in multichain nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racolta, D.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a system of multichain nanorings in static electric and magnetic field. The magnetic field induces characteristic phase changes. These phase shifts produce interference phenomena in the case of nanosystems for which the coherence length is larger than the sample dimension. We obtain energy solutions that are dependent on the number of sites N α characterizing a chain, of phase on the phase φ α and on the applied voltage. We found rich oscillations structures exhibited by the magnetic flux and we established the transmission probability. This proceeds by applying Landauer conductance formulae which opens the way to study electronic transport properties. (authors)

  16. Monte Carlo methods in electron transport problems. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleri, F.

    1989-01-01

    The condensed-history Monte Carlo method for charged particles transport is reviewed and discussed starting from a general form of the Boltzmann equation (Part I). The physics of the electronic interactions, together with some pedagogic example will be introduced in the part II. The lecture is directed to potential users of the method, for which it can be a useful introduction to the subject matter, and wants to establish the basis of the work on the computer code RECORD, which is at present in a developing stage

  17. Electron transport in silicon nanowires having different cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscato Orazio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport phenomena in silicon nanowires with different cross-section are investigated using an Extended Hydrodynamic model, coupled to the Schrödinger-Poisson system. The model has been formulated by closing the moment system derived from the Boltzmann equation on the basis of the maximum entropy principle of Extended Thermodynamics, obtaining explicit closure relations for the high-order fluxes and the production terms. Scattering of electrons with acoustic and non polar optical phonons have been taken into account. The bulk mobility is evaluated for square and equilateral triangle cross-sections of the wire.

  18. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Benliang; Zhou Benhu; Liao Wenhu; Zhou Guanghui

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties through a rectangular potential barrier embedded in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) of various widths. Using the Landauer formula and Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the conductance and Fano factor for the both metallic and semiconducting AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, at Dirac point the both types of AGNRs own a minimum conductance associated with the maximum Fano factor. The results are discussed and compared with the previous relevant works.

  19. Electronic transport properties in [n]cycloparaphenylenes molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lizhi; Guo, Yandong; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Hongli; Zhou, Jie

    2017-07-01

    The electronic transport of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) is investigated based on nonequilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with the density-functional theory. Negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon is observed. Further analysis shows that the reduction of the transmission peak induced by the bias changing near Fermi energy results in the NDR effect. Replacing the electrode (from carbon chain to Au electrode), doping with N atom and changing the size of the nanohoop (n = 5, 6, 8, 10) have also been studied and the NDR still exists, suggesting the NDR behavior is the intrinsic feature of such [n]CPPs systems, which would be quite useful in future nanoelectronic devices.

  20. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  1. Transport Characteristics of Mesoscopic Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A. H.; Kirah, K.; Aly, N. A. I.; El-Sayes, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    The transport property of a quantum dot under the influence of external time-dependent field is investigated. The mesoscopic device is modelled as semiconductor quantum dot coupled weakly to superconducting leads via asymmetric double tunnel barriers of different heights. An expression for the current is deduced by using the Landauer–Buttiker formula, taking into consideration of both the Coulomb blockade effect and the magnetic field. It is found that the periodic oscillation of the current with the magnetic field is controlled by the ratio of the frequency of the applied ac-field to the electron cyclotron frequency. Our results show that the present device operates as a radio-frequency single electron transistor

  2. Fundamental models of electronic transport in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1982-01-01

    Significant fundamental questions lie at the heart of our understanding of the electronic and optical properties of semiconducting and insulating glasses. In this article the principal features of the Mott-CFO model and the small-polaron model are described. While the Mott-CFO model seems to apply to the high-mobility electron transport in glassy SiO 2 and Cd 2 As 3 it does not appear applicable to the most frequently studied chalocogenide glasses. Furthermore, the Mott-CFO model does not account for as basic a feature as the sign of the Hall effect. On the other hand, the small-polaron model accounts for the observed d.c. conductivity, Peltier heat and Hall mobility in a very simple and direct manner

  3. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  4. Kelvin probe microscopy and electronic transport measurements in reduced graphene oxide chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, Christopher E; MacNaughton, Samuel; Sonkusale, Sameer; Staii, Cristian

    2013-06-21

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is an electronically hybrid material that displays remarkable chemical sensing properties. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the chemical gating effects in RGO-based chemical sensors. The gas sensing devices are patterned in a field-effect transistor geometry, by dielectrophoretic assembly of RGO platelets between gold electrodes deposited on SiO2/Si substrates. We show that these sensors display highly selective and reversible responses to the measured analytes, as well as fast response and recovery times (tens of seconds). We use combined electronic transport/Kelvin probe microscopy measurements to quantify the amount of charge transferred to RGO due to chemical doping when the device is exposed to electron-acceptor (acetone) and electron-donor (ammonia) analytes. We demonstrate that this method allows us to obtain high-resolution maps of the surface potential and local charge distribution both before and after chemical doping, to identify local gate-susceptible areas on the RGO surface, and to directly extract the contact resistance between the RGO and the metallic electrodes. The method presented is general, suggesting that these results have important implications for building graphene and other nanomaterial-based chemical sensors.

  5. Kelvin probe microscopy and electronic transport measurements in reduced graphene oxide chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, Christopher E.; MacNaughton, Samuel; Sonkusale, Sameer; Staii, Cristian

    2013-06-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is an electronically hybrid material that displays remarkable chemical sensing properties. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the chemical gating effects in RGO-based chemical sensors. The gas sensing devices are patterned in a field-effect transistor geometry, by dielectrophoretic assembly of RGO platelets between gold electrodes deposited on SiO2/Si substrates. We show that these sensors display highly selective and reversible responses to the measured analytes, as well as fast response and recovery times (tens of seconds). We use combined electronic transport/Kelvin probe microscopy measurements to quantify the amount of charge transferred to RGO due to chemical doping when the device is exposed to electron-acceptor (acetone) and electron-donor (ammonia) analytes. We demonstrate that this method allows us to obtain high-resolution maps of the surface potential and local charge distribution both before and after chemical doping, to identify local gate-susceptible areas on the RGO surface, and to directly extract the contact resistance between the RGO and the metallic electrodes. The method presented is general, suggesting that these results have important implications for building graphene and other nanomaterial-based chemical sensors.

  6. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron-electron interactions, application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron-electron (e-e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e-e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e-e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  7. Identifying the molecular functions of electron transport proteins using radial basis function networks and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Nguyen, Trinh-Trung-Duong; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-05-01

    The electron transport proteins have an important role in storing and transferring electrons in cellular respiration, which is the most proficient process through which cells gather energy from consumed food. According to the molecular functions, the electron transport chain components could be formed with five complexes with several different electron carriers and functions. Therefore, identifying the molecular functions in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. This work includes two phases for discriminating electron transport proteins from transport proteins and classifying categories of five complexes in electron transport proteins. In the first phase, the performances from PSSM with AAIndex feature set were successful in identifying electron transport proteins in transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 94.1%, and accuracy of 91.3%, with MCC of 0.64 for independent data set. With the second phase, our method can approach a precise model for identifying of five complexes with different molecular functions in electron transport proteins. The PSSM with AAIndex properties in five complexes achieved MCC of 0.51, 0.47, 0.42, 0.74, and 1.00 for independent data set, respectively. We suggest that our study could be a power model for determining new proteins that belongs into which molecular function of electron transport proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  9. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  10. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Valeo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background

  11. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  12. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal K. Thakur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron diffusion length (Ln is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D structures such as nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs as electron transport layers (ETLs is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs. ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs. This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  13. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. PMID:28468280

  14. Electronic transport in bismuth selenide in the topological insulator regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun

    The 3D topological insulators (TIs) have an insulating bulk but spin-momentum coupled metallic surface states stemming from band inversion due to strong spin-orbit interaction, whose existence is guaranteed by the topology of the band structure of the insulator. While the STI surface state has been studied spectroscopically by e.g. photoemission and scanned probes, transport experiments have failed to demonstrate clear signature of the STI due to high level of bulk conduction. In this thesis, I present experimental results on the transport properties of TI material Bi2Se3 in the absence of bulk conduction (TI regime), achieved by applying novel p-type doping methods. Field effect transistors consisting of thin (thickness: 5-17 nm) Bi2Se3 are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation of single crystals, and a combination of conventional dielectric (300 nm thick SiO2) and electrochemical or chemical gating methods are used to move the Fermi energy through the surface Dirac point inside bulk band gap, revealing the ambipolar gapless nature of transport in the Bi2Se3 surface states. The minimum conductivity of the topological surface state is understood within the self-consistent theory of Dirac electrons in the presence of charged impurities. The intrinsic finite-temperature resistivity of the topological surface state due to electron-acoustic phonon scattering is measured to be 60 times larger than that of graphene largely due to the smaller Fermi and sound velocities in Bi2Se 3, which will have implications for topological electronic devices operating at room temperature. Along with semi-classical Boltzmann transport, I also discuss 2D weak anti-localization (WAL) behavior of the topological surface states. By investigating gate-tuned WAL behavior in thin (5-17 nm) TI films, I show that WAL in the TI regime is extraordinarily sensitive to the hybridization induced quantum mechanical tunneling between top and bottom topological surfaces, and interplay of phase coherence

  15. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  16. Internal tilting and classical transport for field-reversed configurations based on the Maschke--Hernegger solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, R.A.; Grillo, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that elongated field-reversed configurations based on the Maschke--Hernegger solution of the Grad--Shafranov equation are unstable to internal tilting. The particle transport properties across the flux surfaces of such a model are also considered in the limit of large elongation of the separatrix. An estimation of the time of confinement of particles in terms of classical conductivity, which is lower than previous estimates, is given

  17. Electronic Interactions of n-Doped Perylene Diimide Groups Appended to Polynorbornene Chains: Implications for Electron Transport in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh T; Biberdorf, Joshua D; Holliday, Bradley J; Jones, Richard A

    2017-11-01

    A polymer consisting of a polynorbornene backbone with perylene diimide (PDI) pendant groups on each monomeric unit is synthesized via ring opening metathesis polymerization. The PDI pendant groups along the polymer backbone, studied by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in addition to electrochemical methods, show evidence of molecular aggregation and corresponding electronic coupling with neighboring groups, which forms pathways for efficient electron transport from one group to another in a specific reduced form. When n-doped, the title polymer shows redox conductivity of 5.4 × 10 -3 S cm -1 , comparable with crystalline PDI materials, and is therefore a promising material for use in organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell O Khunjar

    Full Text Available The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  19. Transport in a toroidally confined pure electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, S.M.; ONeil, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    O close-quote Neil and Smith [T.M. O close-quote Neil and R.A. Smith, Phys. Plasmas 1, 8 (1994)] have argued that a pure electron plasma can be confined stably in a toroidal magnetic field configuration. This paper shows that the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field of necessity causes slow cross-field transport. The transport mechanism is similar to magnetic pumping and may be understood by considering a single flux tube of plasma. As the flux tube of plasma undergoes poloidal ExB drift rotation about the center of the plasma, the length of the flux tube and the magnetic field strength within the flux tube oscillate, and this produces corresponding oscillations in T parallel and T perpendicular . The collisional relaxation of T parallel toward T perpendicular produces a slow dissipation of electrostatic energy into heat and a consequent expansion (cross-field transport) of the plasma. In the limit where the cross section of the plasma is nearly circular the radial particle flux is given by Γ r =1/2ν perpendicular,parallel T(r/ρ 0 ) 2 n/(-e∂Φ/∂r), where ν perpendicular,parallel is the collisional equipartition rate, ρ 0 is the major radius at the center of the plasma, and r is the minor radius measured from the center of the plasma. The transport flux is first calculated using this simple physical picture and then is calculated by solving the drift-kinetic Boltzmann equation. This latter calculation is not limited to a plasma with a circular cross section. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Cross sections for electron and photon processes required by electron-transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J.M.

    1979-11-01

    Electron-transport calculations rely on a large collection of electron-atom and photon-atom cross-section data to represent the response characteristics of the target medium. These basic atomic-physics quantities, and certain qualities derived from them that are now commonly in use, are critically reviewed. Publications appearing after 1978 are not given consideration. Processes involving electron or photon energies less than 1 keV are ignored, while an attempt is made to exhaustively cover the remaining independent parameters and target possibilities. Cases for which data improvements can be made from existing information are identified. Ranges of parameters for which state-of-the-art data are not available are sought out, and recommendations for explicit measurements and/or calculations with presently available tools are presented. An attempt is made to identify the maturity of the atomic-physics data and to predict the possibilities for rapid changes in the quality of the data. Finally, weaknesses in the state-of-the-art atomic-physics data and in the conceptual usage of these data in the context of electron-transport theory are discussed. Brief attempts are made to weight the various aspects of these questions and to suggest possible remedies

  1. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  2. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10 7  cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10 11  cm −2 . An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs

  3. Closing the Loop : Reverse supply chain management andproduct return processes in electronics retailing

    OpenAIRE

    Gorskova, Julija; Ortega, Edrion

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Problem There is a gap in the knowledge concerning reverse product flows due to a lack of research and empirical data in the field of reverse supply chain management in general. Furthermore, more research is needed to investigate the factors influencing the decision making process regarding the right reverse supply chain recovery option choice for companies in order to close the supply chain loop. Processing product returns has become a critical activity for organisations as the volu...

  4. Enzymology of Electron Transport: Energy Generation with Geochemical Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dichristina, Thomas J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2005-12-20

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. DMRB occupy a central position in the biogeochemical cycles of metals, metalloids and radionuclides, and serve as catalysts for a variety of other environmentally important processes including biomineralization, biocorrosion, bioremediation and mediators of ground water quality. DMRB are presented, however, with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (e.g., Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (e.g., U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal and radionuclide solubility, DMRB are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3- and SO42-. The novel respiratory strategies include (1) direct enzymatic reduction at the outer membrane, (2) electron shuttling pathways and (3) metal solubilization by exogenous or bacterially-produced organic ligands followed by reduction of soluble organic-metal compounds. The first section of this chapter highlights the latest findings on the enzymatic mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction by two of the most extensively studied DMRB (Geobacter and Shewanella), with particular emphasis on electron transport chain enzymology. The second section emphasizes the geochemical consequences of DMRB activity, including the direct and indirect effects on metal solubility, the reductive transformation of Fe- and Mn-containing minerals, and the biogeochemical cycling of metals at redox interfaces in chemically stratified environments.

  5. Enzymology of Electron Transport: Energy Generation with Geochemical Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichristina, Thomas J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. DMRB occupy a central position in the biogeochemical cycles of metals, metalloids and radionuclides, and serve as catalysts for a variety of other environmentally important processes including biomineralization, biocorrosion, bioremediation and mediators of ground water quality. DMRB are presented, however, with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (e.g., Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (e.g., U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal and radionuclide solubility, DMRB are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3- and SO42-. The novel respiratory strategies include (1) direct enzymatic reduction at the outer membrane, (2) electron shuttling pathways and (3) metal solubilization by exogenous or bacterially-produced organic ligands followed by reduction of soluble organic-metal compounds. The first section of this chapter highlights the latest findings on the enzymatic mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction by two of the most extensively studied DMRB (Geobacter and Shewanella), with particular emphasis on electron transport chain enzymology. The second section emphasizes the geochemical consequences of DMRB activity, including the direct and indirect effects on metal solubility, the reductive transformation of Fe- and Mn-containing minerals, and the biogeochemical cycling of metals at redox interfaces in chemically stratified environments

  6. Electron cyclotron absorption in Tokamak plasmas in the presence of radial transport of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Paulo R. da S.; Ziebell, Luiz F.

    1998-01-01

    We use quasilinear theory to study effects of particle radial transport on the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient by a current carrying plasma, in a tokamak modelated as a plasma slab. Our numerical results indicate significant modification in the profile of the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient when transport is taken into account relative to the situation without transport. (author)

  7. New evidence for efficient collisionless heating of electrons at the reverse shock of a young supernova remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Petre, Robert [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Eriksen, Kristoffer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O' Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Foster, Adam R.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K., E-mail: hiroya.yamaguchi@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Although collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics, certain key aspects of them are not well understood. In particular, the process known as collisionless electron heating, whereby electrons are rapidly energized at the shock front, is one of the main open issues in shock physics. Here, we present the first clear evidence for efficient collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR), revealed by Fe K diagnostics using high-quality X-ray data obtained by the Suzaku satellite. We detect Kβ (3p → 1s) fluorescence emission from low-ionization Fe ejecta excited by energetic thermal electrons at the reverse shock front, which peaks at a smaller radius than Fe Kα (2p → 1s) emission dominated by a relatively highly ionized component. Comparisons with our hydrodynamical simulations imply instantaneous electron heating to a temperature 1000 times higher than expected from Coulomb collisions alone. The unique environment of the reverse shock, which is propagating with a high Mach number into rarefied ejecta with a low magnetic field strength, puts strong constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for this heating and favors a cross-shock potential created by charge deflection at the shock front. Our sensitive observation also reveals that the reverse shock radius of this SNR is about 10% smaller than the previous measurement using the Fe Kα morphology from the Chandra observations. Since strong Fe Kβ fluorescence is expected only from low-ionization plasma where Fe ions still have many 3p electrons, this feature is key to diagnosing the plasma state and distribution of the immediate postshock ejecta in a young SNR.

  8. New Evidence for Efficient Collisionless Heating of Electrons at the Reverse Shock of a Young Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Badenes, Carles; Hughes, John P.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Foster, Adam R.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Petre, Robert; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Although collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics, certain key aspects of them are not well understood. In particular, the process known as collisionless electron heating, whereby electrons are rapidly energized at the shock front, is one of the main open issues in shock physics. Here, we present the first clear evidence for efficient collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR), revealed by Fe K diagnostics using high-quality X-ray data obtained by the Suzaku satellite. We detect K beta (3p yields 1s) fluorescence emission from low-ionization Fe ejecta excited by energetic thermal electrons at the reverse shock front, which peaks at a smaller radius than Fe K alpha (2p yields 1s) emission dominated by a relatively highly ionized component. Comparisons with our hydrodynamical simulations imply instantaneous electron heating to a temperature 1000 times higher than expected from Coulomb collisions alone. The unique environment of the reverse shock, which is propagating with a high Mach number into rarefied ejecta with a low magnetic field strength, puts strong constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for this heating and favors a cross-shock potential created by charge deflection at the shock front. Our sensitive observation also reveals that the reverse shock radius of this SNR is about 10% smaller than the previous measurement using the Fe K alpha morphology from the Chandra observations. Since strong Fe K beta fluorescence is expected only from low-ionization plasma where Fe ions still have many 3p electrons, this feature is key to diagnosing the plasma state and distribution of the immediate postshock ejecta in a young SNR.

  9. Test of models for electron transport in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombant, D.G.; Manheimer, W.M.; Busquet, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines five different models of electron thermal transport in laser produced spherical implosions. These are classical, classical with a flux limit f, delocalization, beam deposition model, and Fokker-Planck solutions. In small targets, the results are strongly dependent on f for flux limit models, with small f's generating very steep temperature gradients. Delocalization models are characterized by large preheat in the center of the target. The beam deposition model agrees reasonably well with the Fokker-Planck simulation results. For large, high gain fusion targets, the delocalization model shows the gain substantially reduced by the preheat. However, flux limitation models show gain largely independent of f, with the beam deposition model also showing the same high gain

  10. Transport and acceleration of low-emittance electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, H.

    1989-01-01

    Linear accelerators for colliders and for free-electron lasers require beams with both high brightness and low emittance. Their transport and acceleration is limited by single-particle effects originating from injection jitter, from the unavoidable position jitter of components, and from chromaticity. Collective phenomena, essentially due to wake fields acting within the bunch, are most severe in the case of high-frequency structures, i.e. a small aperture. Whilst, in the past, the transverse wake-field effects were believed to be most serious, we know that they can even be beneficial when inducing a corresponding spread in betatron oscillation either by an energy spread along the bunch or by an RF focusing system acting on the bunch scale. This paper evaluates the different effects by simple analytical means after making use of the smooth focusing approximation and the two-particle model. Numerical simulation results are used for verification. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Hot Electron Generation and Transport Using Kα Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akli, K.U.; Stephens, R.B.; Key, M.H.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F.N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, C.D.; Fedosejevs, R.; Freeman, R.R.; Friesen, H.; Giraldez, E.; Green, J.S.; Hey, D.S.; Higginson, D.P.; Hund, J.; Jarrott, L.C.; Kemp, G.E.; King, J.A.; Kryger, A.; Lancaster, K.; LePape, S.; Link, A.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.J.; MacPhee, A.G.; McLean, H.S.; Murphy, C.; Norreys, P.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Patel, P.K.; Ping, Y.; Sawada, H.; Schumacher, D.; Theobald, W.; Tsui, Y.Y.; Van Woerkom, L.D.; Wei, M.S.; Westover, B.; Yabuuchi, T.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted experiments on both the Vulcan and Titan laser facilities to study hot electron generation and transport in the context of fast ignition. Cu wires attached to Al cones were used to investigate the effect on coupling efficiency of plasma surround and the pre-formed plasma inside the cone. We found that with thin cones 15% of laser energy is coupled to the 40(micro)m diameter wire emulating a 40(micro)m fast ignition spot. Thick cone walls, simulating plasma in fast ignition, reduce coupling by x4. An increase of prepulse level inside the cone by a factor of 50 reduces coupling by a factor of 3.

  12. Effect of doping on the electron transport in polyfluorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, Manisha, E-mail: mansa83@gmail.com [Soft Materials Research Laboratory, Centre of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, 211002 (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Srivastava, Ritu [Physics for Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Dhar, Ravindra [Soft Materials Research Laboratory, Centre of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, 211002 (India); Tiwari, R. S. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, electron transport of pure and DMC doped polyfluorne (PF) films have been studied at various doping concentrations. Pure films show space charge limited conduction with field and temperature dependent mobility. The J–V characteristics of doped PF were ohmic at low voltages due to thermally released carriers from dopant states. At higher voltages the current density increases nonlinearly due to field dependent mobility and carrier concentration thereby filling of tail states of HOMO of the host. The conductivity of doped films were analyzed using the Unified Gaussian Disorder Model (UGDM). The carrier concentration obtained from the fitting show a non-linear dependence on doping concentration which may be due to a combined effect of thermally activated carrier generation and increased carrier mobility.

  13. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Cheng, Yan; Sanvito, Stefano; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Modeling Blazar Spectra by Solving an Electron Transport Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are luminous active galaxies across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectral formation mechanisms, especially the particle acceleration, in these sources are not well understood. We develop a new theoretical model for simulating blazar spectra using a self-consistent electron number distribution. Specifically, we solve the particle transport equation considering shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration due to MHD waves, Bohm diffusive particle escape, synchrotron radiation, and Compton radiation, where we implement the full Compton cross-section for seed photons from the accretion disk, the dust torus, and 26 individual broad lines. We used a modified Runge-Kutta method to solve the 2nd order equation, including development of a new mathematical method for normalizing stiff steady-state ordinary differential equations. We show that our self-consistent, transport-based blazar model can qualitatively fit the IR through Fermi g-ray data for 3C 279, with a single-zone, leptonic configuration. We use the solution for the electron distribution to calculate multi-wavelength SED spectra for 3C 279. We calculate the particle and magnetic field energy densities, which suggest that the emitting region is not always in equipartition (a common assumption), but sometimes matter dominated. The stratified broad line region (based on ratios in quasar reverberation mapping, and thus adding no free parameters) improves our estimate of the location of the emitting region, increasing it by ~5x. Our model provides a novel view into the physics at play in blazar jets, especially the relative strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration, where our model is well suited to distinguish between these processes, and we find that the latter tends to dominate.

  16. Electron transport determines the electrochemical properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomäki, Tommi; Wester, Niklas; Caro, Miguel A.; Sainio, Sami; Protopopova, Vera; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous carbon based electrodes are very promising for electrochemical sensing applications. In order to better understand their structure-function relationship, the effect of film thickness on the electrochemical properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) electrodes was investigated. ta-C thin films of 7, 15, 30, 50 and 100 nm were characterized in detail with Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to assess (i) the surface properties of the films, (ii) the effect of film thickness on their structure and electrical properties and (iii) the subsequent correlation with their electrochemistry. The electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using two different outer-sphere redox probes, Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+/2+ and FcMeOH, and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Computational simulations using density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to rationalize the experimental findings. The characterization results showed that the sp 2 /sp 3 ratio increased with decreasing ta-C film thickness. This correlated with a decrease in mobility gap value and an increase in the average current through the films, which was also consistent with the computational results. XAS indicated that the surface of the ta-C films was always identical and composed of a sp 2 -rich layer. The CV measurements indicated reversible reaction kinetics for both outer-sphere redox probes at 7 and 15 nm ta-C films with a change to quasi-reversible behavior at a thickness of around 30 nm. The charge transfer resistance, obtained from EIS measurements, decreased with decreasing film thickness in accordance with the CV results. Based on the characterization and electrochemical results, we conclude that the reaction kinetics in the case of outer-sphere redox systems is determined mainly by the electron transport through the

  17. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation); Shidlovskiy, S. V. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  18. ETRAN, Electron Transport and Gamma Transport with Secondary Radiation in Slab by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A - Nature of physical problem solved: ETRAN computes the transport of electrons and photons through plane-parallel slab targets that have a finite thickness in one dimension and are unbound in the other two-dimensions. The incident radiation can consist of a beam of either electrons or photons with specified spectral and directional distribution. Options are available by which all orders of the electron-photon cascade can be included in the calculation. Thus electrons are allowed to give rise to secondary knock-on electrons, continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays; and photons are allowed to produce photo-electrons, Compton electrons, and electron- positron pairs. Annihilation quanta, fluorescence radiation, and Auger electrons are also taken into account. If desired, the Monte- Carlo histories of all generations of secondary radiations are followed. The information produced by ETRAN includes the following items: 1) reflection and transmission of electrons or photons, differential in energy and direction; 2) the production of continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays by electrons and the emergence of such radiations from the target (differential in photon energy and direction); 3) the spectrum of the amounts of energy left behind in a thick target by an incident electron beam; 4) the deposition of energy and charge by an electron beam as function of the depth in the target; 5) the flux of electrons, differential in energy, as function of the depth in the target. B - Method of solution: A programme called DATAPAC-4 takes data for a particular material from a library tape and further processes them. The function of DATAPAC-4 is to produce single-scattering and multiple-scattering data in the form of tabular arrays (again stored on magnetic tape) which facilitate the rapid sampling of electron and photon Monte Carlo histories in ETRAN. The photon component of the electron-photon cascade is calculated by conventional random sampling that imitates

  19. Transport and confinement studies in the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, P.; Alfier, A.; Carraro, L.; Lorenzini, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Terranova, D.

    2007-01-01

    In the modified RFX experiment (RFX-mod) external magnetic field coils and a close fitting thin conductive shell control radial magnetic fields. In the so-called virtual shell (VS) operation, radial field zeroing at the thin shell radius is stationary provided by the feedback-controlled coils. First experiments on RFX-mod proved the capability of the active scheme to steadily reduce the radial magnetic field. Furthermore it has been found that such edge magnetic field control extends its beneficial effects to the whole plasma. With respect to the old RFX, where magnetohydrodynamic modes amplitude was controlled by the use of a passive thick conductive shell, a stationary 2- to 3-fold reduction of the B r field amplitude in the core is obtained. The reduction of field fluctuations positively reflects on confinement. In fact, a strong reduction of the loop voltage is observed and correspondingly a 3-fold increase in pulse length is achieved by using the same poloidal flux swing. Temperature and particle measurements confirm the improved confinement properties of the VS operation. With a lower ohmic input power, higher electron temperature and lower particle influx are measured. Particle and heat transport have been studied by means of a 1D code. Local power balance was used to compute the heat conductivity profile: for the VS discharges a lower conductivity over a significant region of the plasma is found. The improved properties of RFX-mod VS operation provide a better confinement scaling in terms of plasma current. The results show that compared with the thick shell configuration, a significant confinement improvement can be obtained under stationary conditions by actively controlling the plasma magnetic boundary

  20. Electron Acceleration in the Field-reversed Configuration (FRC) by Slowly Rotation Odd-parity Magnetic Fields (RMFo)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.; Cohen, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The trajectories of individual electrons are studied numerically in a 3D, prolate, FRC [field-reversed configuration] equilibrium magnetic geometry with added small-amplitude, slowly rotating, odd-parity magnetic fields (RMFos). RMFos cause electron heating by toroidal acceleration near the O-point line and by field-parallel acceleration away from it, both followed by scattering from magnetic-field inhomogeneities. Electrons accelerated along the O-point line move antiparallel to the FRC's current and attain average toroidal angular speeds near that of the RMFo, independent of the sense of RMFo rotation. A conserved transformed Hamiltonian, dependent on electron energy and RMFo sense, controls electron flux-surface coordinate

  1. Electron-temperature-gradient-driven drift waves and anomalous electron energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Murtaza, G.; Weiland, J.

    1990-01-01

    By means of a kinetic description for ions and Braginskii's fluid model for electrons, three coupled nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency short-wavelength electrostatic waves in the presence of equilibrium density temperature and magnetic-field gradients in a two-component magnetized plasma are derived. In the linear limit a dispersion relation that admits new instabilities of drift waves is presented. An estimate of the anomalous electron energy transport due to non-thermal drift waves is obtained by making use of the saturated wave potential, which is deduced from the mixing-length hypothesis. Stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations governing the interaction of linearly unstable drift waves are also presented. The relevance of this investigation to wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out. (author)

  2. Humidity effects on the electronic transport properties in carbon based nanoscale device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jun; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    By applying nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density functional theory, we investigate the effect of humidity on the electronic transport properties in carbon based nanoscale device. The results show that different humidity may form varied localized potential barrier, which is a very important factor to affect the stability of electronic transport in the nanoscale system. A mechanism for the humidity effect is suggested. -- Highlights: ► Electronic transport in carbon based nanoscale device. ► Humidity affects the stability of electronic transport. ► Different humidity may form varied localized potential barrier.

  3. Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in strongly interacting two-dimensional electron layers in silicon and germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, S; Mahapatra, S; Scappucci, G; Klesse, W M; Simmons, M Y; Ghosh, A

    2014-06-13

    We report experimental evidence of a remarkable spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking in two-dimensional electron systems formed by atomically confined doping of phosphorus (P) atoms inside bulk crystalline silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge). Weak localization corrections to the conductivity and the universal conductance fluctuations were both found to decrease rapidly with decreasing doping in the Si:P and Ge:P delta layers, suggesting an effect driven by Coulomb interactions. In-plane magnetotransport measurements indicate the presence of intrinsic local spin fluctuations at low doping, providing a microscopic mechanism for spontaneous lifting of the time-reversal symmetry. Our experiments suggest the emergence of a new many-body quantum state when two-dimensional electrons are confined to narrow half-filled impurity bands.

  4. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 chemotaxis proteins and electron-transport chain components essential for congregation near insoluble electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, H Wayne; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells utilize a behaviour response called electrokinesis to increase their speed in the vicinity of IEAs (insoluble electron acceptors), including manganese oxides, iron oxides and poised electrodes [Harris, El-Naggar, Bretschger, Ward, Romine, Obraztsova and Nealson (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 326-331]. However, it is not currently understood how bacteria remain in the vicinity of the IEA and accumulate both on the surface and in the surrounding medium. In the present paper, we provide results indicating that cells that have contacted the IEAs swim faster than those that have not recently made contact. In addition, fast-swimming cells exhibit an enhancement of swimming reversals leading to rapid non-random accumulation of cells on, and adjacent to, mineral particles. We call the observed accumulation near IEAs 'congregation'. Congregation is eliminated by the loss of a critical gene involved with EET (extracellular electron transport) (cymA, SO_4591) and is altered or eliminated in several deletion mutants of homologues of genes that are involved with chemotaxis or energy taxis in Escherichia coli. These genes include chemotactic signal transduction protein (cheA-3, SO_3207), methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins with the Cache domain (mcp_cache, SO_2240) or the PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain (mcp_pas, SO_1385). In the present paper, we report studies of S. oneidensis MR-1 that lend some insight into how microbes in this group can 'sense' the presence of a solid substrate such as a mineral surface, and maintain themselves in the vicinity of the mineral (i.e. via congregation), which may ultimately lead to attachment and biofilm formation.

  5. Lysine desuccinylase SIRT5 binds to cardiolipin and regulates the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Lu, Jie; Maringer, Katherine V; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Prochownik, Edward V; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2017-06-16

    SIRT5 is a lysine desuccinylase known to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and the urea cycle. Here, SIRT5 was observed to bind to cardiolipin via an amphipathic helix on its N terminus. In vitro , succinyl-CoA was used to succinylate liver mitochondrial membrane proteins. SIRT5 largely reversed the succinyl-CoA-driven lysine succinylation. Quantitative mass spectrometry of SIRT5-treated membrane proteins pointed to the electron transport chain, particularly Complex I, as being highly targeted for desuccinylation by SIRT5. Correspondingly, SIRT5 -/- HEK293 cells showed defects in both Complex I- and Complex II-driven respiration. In mouse liver, SIRT5 expression was observed to localize strictly to the periportal hepatocytes. However, homogenates prepared from whole SIRT5 -/- liver did show reduced Complex II-driven respiration. The enzymatic activities of Complex II and ATP synthase were also significantly reduced. Three-dimensional modeling of Complex II suggested that several SIRT5-targeted lysine residues lie at the protein-lipid interface of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B. We postulate that succinylation at these sites may disrupt Complex II subunit-subunit interactions and electron transfer. Lastly, SIRT5 -/- mice, like humans with Complex II deficiency, were found to have mild lactic acidosis. Our findings suggest that SIRT5 is targeted to protein complexes on the inner mitochondrial membrane via affinity for cardiolipin to promote respiratory chain function. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Monte Carlo Studies of Electron Transport In Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Brian David

    An Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) computer code has been developed to simulate, semi-classically, spin-dependent electron transport in quasi two-dimensional (2D) III-V semiconductors. The code accounts for both three-dimensional (3D) and quasi-2D transport, utilizing either 3D or 2D scattering mechanisms, as appropriate. Phonon, alloy, interface roughness, and impurity scattering mechanisms are included, accounting for the Pauli Exclusion Principle via a rejection algorithm. The 2D carrier states are calculated via a self-consistent 1D Schrodinger-3D-Poisson solution in which the charge distribution of the 2D carriers in the quantization direction is taken as the spatial distribution of the squared envelope functions within the Hartree approximation. The wavefunctions, subband energies, and 2D scattering rates are updated periodically by solving a series of 1D Schrodinger wave equations (SWE) over the real-space domain of the device at fixed time intervals. The electrostatic potential is updated by periodically solving the 3D Poisson equation. Spin-polarized transport is modeled via a spin density-matrix formalism that accounts for D'yakanov-Perel (DP) scattering. Also, the code allows for the easy inclusion of additional scattering mechanisms and structural modifications to devices. As an application of the simulator, the current voltage characteristics of an InGaAs/InAlAs HEMT are simulated, corresponding to nanoscale III-V HEMTs currently being fabricated by Intel Corporation. The comparative effects of various scattering parameters, material properties and structural attributes are investigated and compared with experiments where reasonable agreement is obtained. The spatial evolution of spin-polarized carriers in prototypical Spin Field Effect Transistor (SpinFET) devices is then simulated. Studies of the spin coherence times in quasi-2D structures is first investigated and compared to experimental results. It is found that the simulated spin coherence times for

  7. Calmodulin kinase II interacts with the dopamine transporter C terminus to regulate amphetamine-induced reverse transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d...

  8. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A ampersand M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  9. Changes in mitochondrial electron transport chain activity during insect metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, M E

    2007-02-01

    The midgut of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) is a highly aerobic tissue that is destroyed by programmed cell death during larval-pupal metamorphosis. The death of the epithelium begins after commitment to pupation, and the oxygen consumption of isolated midgut mitochondria decreases soon after commitment. To assess the role of the electron transport chain in this decline in mitochondrial function, the maximal activities of complexes I-IV of the respiratory chain were measured in isolated midgut mitochondria. Whereas there were no developmental changes in the activity of complex I or III, activities of complexes II and IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] were higher in mitochondria from precommitment than postcommitment larvae. This finding is consistent with a higher rate of succinate oxidation in mitochondria isolated from precommitment larvae and reveals that the metamorphic decline in mitochondrial respiration is due to the targeted destruction or inactivation of specific sites within the mitochondria, rather than the indiscriminate destruction of the organelles. The COX turnover number (e- x s(-1) x cytochrome aa3(-1)) was greater for the enzyme from precommitment than postcommitment larvae, indicating a change in the enzyme structure and/or its lipid environment during the early stages of metamorphosis. The turnover number of COX in the intact mitochondria (in organello COX) was also lower in postcommitment larvae. In addition to changes in the protein or membrane phospholipids, the metamorphic decline in this rate constant may be a result of the observed loss of endogenous cytochrome c.

  10. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  11. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A ampersand M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document

  13. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.

    2016-06-03

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  14. A one-and-a-quarter-dimensional transport code for field-reversed configuration studies: A user's guide for CFRX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Ming-Yuan; Werley, K.A.; Ling, Kuok-Mee.

    1988-05-01

    A one-and-a-quarter-dimensional transport code, which includes radial as well as some two-dimensional effects for field-reversed configurations, is described. The set of transport equations is transformed to a set of new independent and dependent variables and is solved as a coupled initial-boundary value problem. The code simulation includes both the closed and open field regions. The axial effects incorporated include global axial force balance, axial losses in the open field region, and flux surface averaging over the closed field region. Input, output, and structure of the code are described in detail. A typical example of the code results is also given. 20 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Electron Temperature Fluctuation Measurements and Transport Model Validation at Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Anne [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-06-22

    for studying core turbulence are needed in order to assess the accuracy of gyrokinetic models for turbulent-driven particle, heat and momentum transport. New core turbulence diagnostics at the world-class tokamaks Alcator C-Mod at MIT and ASDEX Upgrade at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics have been designed, developed, and operated over the course of this project. These new instruments are capable of measuring electron temperature fluctuations and the phase angle between density and temperature fluctuations locally and quantitatively. These new data sets from Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade are being used to fill key gaps in our understanding of turbulent transport in tokamaks. In particular, this project has results in new results on the topics of the Transport Shortfall, the role of ETG turbulence in tokamak plasmas, profile stiffness, the LOC/SOC transition, and intrinsic rotation reversals. These data are used in a rigorous process of “Transport model validation”, and this group is a world-leader on using turbulence models to design new hardware and new experiments at tokamaks. A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic is an instrument used to measure micro-scale fluctuations (mm-scale, compared to the machine size of meters) of electron temperature in magnetically confined fusion plasmas, such as those in tokamaks and stellarators. These micro-scale fluctuations are associated with drift-wave type turbulence, which leads to enhanced cooling and mixing of particles in fusion plasmas and limits achieving the required temperatures and densities for self-sustained fusion reactions. A CECE system can also be coupled with a reflectometer system that measured micro-scale density fluctuations, and from these simultaneous measurements, one can extract the phase between the density (n) and temperature (T) fluctuations, creating an nT phase diagnostic. Measurements of the fluctuations and the phase angle between them are extremely useful for

  16. Field reversal in mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, L.D.; Anderson, D.V.; Boozer, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    This report discusses some of the physics issues anticipated in field-reversed mirrors. The effect of current cancellation due to electrons is described. An estimate is made of the required impurity level to maintain a field-reversed configuration. The SUPERLAYER code is used to simulate the high-β 2XIIB results, and favorable comparisons require inclusion of quasilinear RF turbulence. Impact of a quadrupole field on field-line closure and resonant transport is discussed. A simple self-consistent model of ion currents is presented. Conditions for stability of field-reversed configurations to E x B driven rotations are determined

  17. Using Adobe Flash Animations of Electron Transport Chain to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash…

  18. In silico analysis of the regulation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain in C3 plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Sierra, A.; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven Michiel; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M.; Struik, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and non-cyclic alternative electron transport),

  19. Impact of radial transport on the quasilinear plateau formation due to electron cyclotron wave absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, A.G.; Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations using a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck code show that for small tokamaks the transport of electrons across the magnetic surfaces at a level consistent with anomalous transport has a large influence on the formation of the quasilinear plateau during electron cyclotron resonant

  20. Electron and phonon drag in thermoelectric transport through coherent molecular conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Hedegård, Per

    2016-01-01

    We study thermoelectric transport through a coherent molecular conductor connected to two electron and two phonon baths using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. We focus on the mutual drag between electron and phonon transport as a result of ‘momentum’ transfer, which happens only when...

  1. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of the Magnetization Reversal Mechanism in Information Storage Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford-Long; Portier; Bayle-Guillemaud; Anthony; Brug

    1998-05-01

    : The Foucault and Fresnel modes of Lorentz microscopy, together with a quantitative magnetization mapping technique, summed image differential phase-contrast imaging, were used to study the magnetization reversal mechanism of the sense layer in spin-valve structures exhibiting the giant magnetoresistance effect. In addition to studies of sheet film, lithographically defined spin-valve elements were investigated. A current can be passed through the element during magnetizing so that the effect of the applied current on the giant magnetoresistance and magnetization reversal mechanism can be studied. Results are presented for a number of different spin-valve structures.

  2. Inhibitory effect of the reversal agents V-104, GF120918 and Pluronic L61 on MDR1 Pgp-, MRP1- and MRP2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, R.; Kool, M.; Smith, A. J.; van Deemter, L.; de Haas, M.; Borst, P.

    2000-01-01

    The human multidrug transporter MDR1 P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 transport a range of cytotoxic drugs, resulting in multidrug resistance in tumour cells. To overcome this form of drug resistance in patients, several inhibitors (reversal agents) of these

  3. Power Electronics and Thermal Management | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power Electronics and Thermal Management Power Electronics and Thermal Management This is the March Gearhart's testimony. Optical Thermal Characterization Enables High-Performance Electronics Applications New vehicle electronics systems are being developed at a rapid pace, and NREL is examining strategies to

  4. Power Electronics and Electric Machines | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power Electronics and Electric Machines NREL's power electronics and electric machines research helping boost the performance of power electronics components and systems, while driving down size, weight technical barriers to EDV commercialization. EDVs rely heavily on power electronics to distribute the proper

  5. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation. [ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a[<=]18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T[sub e] modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Multi-scale modelling and numerical simulation of electronic kinetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duclous, R.

    2009-11-01

    This research thesis which is at the interface between numerical analysis, plasma physics and applied mathematics, deals with the kinetic modelling and numerical simulations of the electron energy transport and deposition in laser-produced plasmas, having in view the processes of fuel assembly to temperature and density conditions necessary to ignite fusion reactions. After a brief review of the processes at play in the collisional kinetic theory of plasmas, with a focus on basic models and methods to implement, couple and validate them, the author focuses on the collective aspect related to the free-streaming electron transport equation in the non-relativistic limit as well as in the relativistic regime. He discusses the numerical development and analysis of the scheme for the Vlasov-Maxwell system, and the selection of a validation procedure and numerical tests. Then, he investigates more specific aspects of the collective transport: the multi-specie transport, submitted to phase-space discontinuities. Dealing with the multi-scale physics of electron transport with collision source terms, he validates the accuracy of a fast Monte Carlo multi-grid solver for the Fokker-Planck-Landau electron-electron collision operator. He reports realistic simulations for the kinetic electron transport in the frame of the shock ignition scheme, the development and validation of a reduced electron transport angular model. He finally explores the relative importance of the processes involving electron-electron collisions at high energy by means a multi-scale reduced model with relativistic Boltzmann terms

  7. 41 CFR 102-118.65 - Can my agency receive electronic billing for payment of transportation services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electronic billing for payment of transportation services? 102-118.65 Section 102-118.65 Public Contracts and... Transportation Services § 102-118.65 Can my agency receive electronic billing for payment of transportation... to use electronic billing for the procurement and billing of transportation services. ...

  8. Physics of electron internal transport barrier in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Toda, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.; Diamond, P.H.

    2006-10-01

    The role of zonal flows in the formation of the transport barrier in the helical plasmas is analyzed using the transport code. A set of one-dimensional transport equations is analyzed, including the effect of zonal flows. The turbulent transport coefficient is shown to be suppressed when the plasma state changes from the weak negative radial electric field to the strong positive one. This bifurcation of the turbulent transport is newly caused by the change of the damping rate of zonal flows. It is theoretically demonstrated that the damping rate of zonal flows governs the global confinement in toroidal plasmas. (author)

  9. Insights into the post-transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirey, Tamara M; Ponting, Chris P

    2016-10-15

    The regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is central to the control of cellular homeostasis. There are significant gaps in our understanding of how the expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genome-encoded components of the electron transport chain are co-ordinated, and how the assembly of the protein complexes that constitute the electron transport chain are regulated. Furthermore, the role post-transcriptional gene regulation may play in modulating these processes needs to be clarified. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the post-transcriptional gene regulation of the electron transport chain and highlights how noncoding RNAs may contribute significantly both to complex electron transport chain regulatory networks and to mitochondrial dysfunction. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. An improved clustering algorithm based on reverse learning in intelligent transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoqing; Kou, Qianqian; Niu, Ting

    2017-05-01

    With the development of artificial intelligence and data mining technology, big data has gradually entered people's field of vision. In the process of dealing with large data, clustering is an important processing method. By introducing the reverse learning method in the clustering process of PAM clustering algorithm, to further improve the limitations of one-time clustering in unsupervised clustering learning, and increase the diversity of clustering clusters, so as to improve the quality of clustering. The algorithm analysis and experimental results show that the algorithm is feasible.

  11. Optimising reverse logistics network to support policy-making in the case of Electrical and Electronic Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achillas, Ch; Vlachokostas, Ch; Aidonis, D; Moussiopoulos, N; Iakovou, E; Banias, G

    2010-12-01

    Due to the rapid growth of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) volumes, as well as the hazardousness of obsolete electr(on)ic goods, this type of waste is now recognised as a priority stream in the developed countries. Policy-making related to the development of the necessary infrastructure and the coordination of all relevant stakeholders is crucial for the efficient management and viability of individually collected waste. This paper presents a decision support tool for policy-makers and regulators to optimise electr(on)ic products' reverse logistics network. To that effect, a Mixed Integer Linear Programming mathematical model is formulated taking into account existing infrastructure of collection points and recycling facilities. The applicability of the developed model is demonstrated employing a real-world case study for the Region of Central Macedonia, Greece. The paper concludes with presenting relevant obtained managerial insights. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Monte Carlo study of electron-plasmon scattering effects on hot electron transport in GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.V.; Bagaeva, T.Yu.; Solodkaya, T.I.

    1994-07-01

    It is shown using Monte Carlo simulation that electron-plasmon scattering affects substantially the hot-electron energy distribution function and transport properties in bulk GaAs. However, this effect is found to be much less than that predicted in earlier paper of other authors. (author). 5 refs, 7 figs

  13. Suprathermal-electron generation, transport, and deposition in CO2-laser-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer, A.; Goldman, R.; Kristal, R.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments on both axial and lateral energy transport and deposition in spherical targets are described. A variety of diagnostics have been used to measure hot-electron transport and deposition including bremsstrahlung and inner-shell radiation and soft x-ray temperature measurements. Self-generated electric and magnetic fields play an important role in the transport and deposition of the hot electrons. In some cases distinct patterns of surface deposition consistent with magnetic-field configurations have been observed

  14. Evolution of thermal ion transport barriers in reversed shear/ optimised shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Garbet, X.; Moreau, D.; Bush, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gohil, P.; Kinsey, J.E.; Talyor, T.S.; Litaudon, X.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic and ExB rotation shears on the thermal ion transport in advanced tokamak scenarios are analyzed through the predictive modelling of the evolution of internal transport barriers. Such a modelling is performed with an experimentally validated L-mode thermal diffusivity completed with a semi-empirical shear correction which is based on simple theoretical arguments from turbulence studies. A multi-machine test of the model on relevant discharges from the ITER Data Base (TFTR, DIII-D and JET) is presented. (author)

  15. Behavior of electron and ion transport in discharges with an internal transport barrier in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Staebler, G.M.; Rettig, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    We report results of experiments to further determine the underlying physics behind the formation and development of internal transport barriers (ITB) in the DIII-D tokamak. The initial ITB formation occurs when the neutral beam heating power exceeds a threshold value during the early stages of the current ramp in low-density discharges. This region of reduced transport, made accessible by suppression of long-wavelength turbulence by sheared flows, is most evident in the ion temperature and impurity rotation profiles. In some cases, reduced transport is also observed in the electron temperature and density profiles. If the power is near the threshold, the barrier remains stationary and encloses only a small fraction of the plasma volume. If, however, the power is increased, the transport barrier expands to encompass a larger fraction of the plasma volume. The dynamic behavior of the transport barrier during the growth phase exhibits rapid transport events that are associated with both broadening of the profiles and reductions in turbulence and associated transport. In some, but not all, cases, these events are correlated with the safety factor q passing through integer values. The final state following this evolution is a plasma exhibiting ion thermal transport at or below neoclassical levels. Typically, the electron thermal transport remains anomalously high. Recent experimental results are reported in which rf electron heating was applied to plasmas with an ion ITB, thereby increasing both the electron and ion transport. Although the results are partially in agreement with the usual E-vector x B-vector shear suppression hypothesis, the results still leave questions that must be addressed in future experiments. (author)

  16. Behavior of electron and ion transport in discharges with an internal transport barrier in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Staebler, G.M.; Rettig, C.L.

    1998-12-01

    The authors report results of experiments to further determine the underlying physics behind the formation and development of internal transport barriers (ITB) in the DIII-D tokamak. The initial ITB formation occurs when the neutral beam heating power exceeds a threshold value during the early stages of the current ramp in low-density discharges. This region of reduced transport, made accessible by suppression of long-wavelength turbulence by sheared flows, is most evident in the ion temperature and impurity rotation profiles. In some cases, reduced transport is also observed in the electron temperature and density profiles. If the power is near the threshold, the barrier remains stationary and enclosed only a small fraction of the plasma volume. If, however, the power is increased, the transport barrier expands to encompass a larger fraction of the plasma volume. The dynamic behavior of the transport barrier during the growth phase exhibits rapid transport events that are associated with both broadening of the profiles and reductions in turbulence and associated transport. In some, but not all, cases, these events are correlated with the safety factor q passing through integer values. The final state following this evolution is a plasma exhibiting ion thermal transport at or below neoclassical levels. Typically, the electron thermal transport remains anomalously high. Recent experimental results are reported in which rf electron heating was applied to plasmas with an ion ITB, thereby increasing both the electron and ion transport. Although the results are partially in agreement with the usual rvec E x rvec B shear suppression hypothesis, the results still leave questions that must be addressed in future experiments

  17. Reversibility of magnetic field driven transition from electronic phase separation state to single-phase state in manganites: A microscopic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Lin, Lingfang; Yu, Yang; Lin, Hanxuan; Zhu, Yinyan; Miao, Tian; Bai, Yu; Shi, Qian; Cai, Peng; Kou, Yunfang; Lan, Fanli; Wang, Wenbin; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dong, Shuai; Yin, Lifeng; Shen, Jian

    2017-11-01

    Electronic phase separation (EPS) is a common phenomenon in strongly correlated oxides. For colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites, the EPS is so pronounced that not only does it govern the CMR behavior, but also raises a question whether EPS exists as a ground state for systems or a metastable state. While it has been well known that a magnetic field can drive the transition of the EPS state into a single-phase state in manganites, the reversibility of this transition is not well studied. In this work we use magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to directly visualize the reversibility of the field driven transition between the EPS state and the single-phase state at different temperatures. The MFM images correspond well with the global magnetic and transport property measurements, uncovering the underlying mechanism of the field driven transition between the EPS state and the single-phase state. We argue that EPS state is a consequence of system quenching whose response to an external magnetic field is governed by a local energy landscape.

  18. Electronic band alignment and electron transport in Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenkevich, A. [NRNU ' Moscow Engineering Physics Institute,' 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Minnekaev, M.; Matveyev, Yu.; Lebedinskii, Yu. [NRNU ' Moscow Engineering Physics Institute,' 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bulakh, K.; Chouprik, A.; Baturin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Maksimova, K. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, 236041 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Thiess, S.; Drube, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-02-11

    Electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions is controlled by changes in the electrostatic potential profile across the junction upon polarization reversal of the ultrathin ferroelectric barrier layer. Here, hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is used to reconstruct the electric potential barrier profile in as-grown Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}(001)/Pt(001) heterostructures. Transport properties of Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt junctions with a sub-{mu}m Cr top electrode are interpreted in terms of tunneling electroresistance with resistance changes of a factor of {approx}30 upon polarization reversal. By fitting the I-V characteristics with the model employing an experimentally determined electric potential barrier we derive the step height changes at the BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt (Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}) interface +0.42(-0.03) eV following downward to upward polarization reversal.

  19. Electronic band alignment and electron transport in Cr/BaTiO3/Pt ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenkevich, A.; Minnekaev, M.; Matveyev, Yu.; Lebedinskii, Yu.; Bulakh, K.; Chouprik, A.; Baturin, A.; Maksimova, K.; Thiess, S.; Drube, W.

    2013-01-01

    Electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions is controlled by changes in the electrostatic potential profile across the junction upon polarization reversal of the ultrathin ferroelectric barrier layer. Here, hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is used to reconstruct the electric potential barrier profile in as-grown Cr/BaTiO 3 (001)/Pt(001) heterostructures. Transport properties of Cr/BaTiO 3 /Pt junctions with a sub-μm Cr top electrode are interpreted in terms of tunneling electroresistance with resistance changes of a factor of ∼30 upon polarization reversal. By fitting the I-V characteristics with the model employing an experimentally determined electric potential barrier we derive the step height changes at the BaTiO 3 /Pt (Cr/BaTiO 3 ) interface +0.42(−0.03) eV following downward to upward polarization reversal.

  20. Reversal of resistance by GF120918 in cell lines expressing the ABC half-transporter, MXR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruin, M; Miyake, K; Litman, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    -80, a subline expressing a newly identified mitoxantrone transporter, MXR. GF120918 was ineffective in sensitizing MRP-overexpressing MCF-7 VP-16 cells to etoposide as determined by cytotoxicity studies. In flow cytometry experiments, rhodamine 123 efflux in S1-B1-20 cells was decreased at GF120918...

  1. Reversible Dopamine Transporter Modifications in Response to Methylphenidate Treatment of ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT was used to monitor the dopamine transporter activity in 5 males, ages 8 to 10, with ADHD, after cessation of methylphenidate (MPH treatment, in a study at the University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  2. Modeling and control of the current density profile in Tokamaks and its relation to electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca, C.

    2009-04-01

    The current density in tokamak plasmas strongly affects transport phenomena, therefore its understanding and control represent a crucial challenge for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of tokamak studies, three topics have been tackled in the course of the present thesis: first, the modelling of the current density evolution in electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) discharges in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV); second, the study of current diffusion and inversion of electron transport properties observed during Swing Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (Swing ECCD) discharges in TCV; third, the analysis of the current density tailoring obtained by local ECCD driven by the improved EC system for sawtooth control and reverse shear scenarios in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The work dedicated to the study of eITBs in TCV has been undertaken to identify which of the main parameters, directly related to the current density, played a relevant role in the confinement improvement created during these advanced scenarios. In this context, the current density has to be modeled, there being no measurement currently available on TCV. Since the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) model has been validated on TCV ohmic heated plasmas, the corresponding scaling factor has often been used as a measure of improved confinement on TCV. The many interpretative simulations carried on different TCV discharges have shown that the thermal confinement improvement factor, H RLW , linearly increases with the absolute value of the minimum shear outside ρ > 0.3, ρ indicating a normalized radial coordinate. These investigations, performed with the transport code ASTRA, therefore confirmed a general observation, formulated through previous studies, that the formation of the transport barrier is correlated with the magnetic shear reversal. This was, indeed, found to be true in all cases studied, regardless of the different heating and

  3. Energetic Electron Acceleration, Injection, and Transport in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Baker, D. N.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2018-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in Mercury’s magnetotail by dipolarization events, flux ropes, and magnetic reconnection directly. Following energization, these electrons are injected close to Mercury where they drift eastward in Shabansky-like orbits.

  4. A new method to describe two-phase solvent extraction based on net transport potential derived as linear combinations of forward and reverse constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabeshima, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    With the view to avoiding the difficulties encountered in estimating thermodynamic activities of the multiple chemical species in two-phase liquid system, a set of forward, reverse, net and total transport potentials are defined to represent the chemical state of a transferring solute during transient using bulk concentrations. The net transport potential corresponds to that in the conventional two-film model of diffusion-controlled processes. The overall driving forces of mass transport are redefined as the derivatives of the relevant transport potentials differentiated with respect to a state variable newly defined in terms of the bulk concentrations of the solute contained in both phases. Net and total quantities, i.e. transport potentials, overall driving forces and the molar fluxes are obtained as linear combinations of those for forward and reverse directions. The topical features presented by these quantities and their mutual relations are discussed in detail. The experimental new overall transport coefficient for U(VI) varied in accord with the changes in the theoretical net transport potential and overall driving force. The present method permits describing the extractive mass transport consistently both to forward and reverse directions of transport. (author)

  5. Phenomenological studies of electron-beam transport in wire-plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Beezhold, W.

    1980-01-01

    Multiple electron-beam transport in air through plasma channels is an important method for delivering many intense beams to a bremsstrahlung converter system. This paper reports work intended to optimize this transport technique with emphasis on transport through curved channels and on transport efficiencies. Curved-channel transport allows accelerators such as Sandia's PROTO II and PBFA I facilities to be used as flash x-ray sources for weapon effects simulation without reconfiguring the diodes or developing advanced converters. The formation mechanisms of wire-initiated plasma channels in air were examined and the subsequent transport efficiencies of relativistic electron beams through various-length straight and curved plasma channels were determined. Electron transport efficiency through a channel was measured to be 80 to 100% of a zero length channel for 40 cm long straight channels and for curved channels which re-directed the electron beam through an angle of 90 0 . Studies of simultaneous e-beam transport along two curved channels closely spaced at the converter showed that transport efficiency remained at 80 to 100%. However, it was observed that the two e-beams were displaced towards each other. Transport efficiency was observed to depend only weakly on parameters such as wire material, wire length and shape, diode anode aperture, e-beam injection time, and wire-channel applied voltage. For off-center injection conditions the electron beam strongly perturbed the plasma channel in periodic or regularly spaced patterns even though the total energy lost by the electron beam remained small. Plasma-channel transport, when all experimental parameters have been optimized for maximum transport efficiency, is a workable method for directing electron beams to a converter target

  6. Magnetic fluctuation induced transport and edge dynamo measurements in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.

    1994-09-01

    Probe measurements in MST indicate that RFP particle and energy loss is governed by magnetic fluctuations inside r/a = 0.8, with energy carried out convectively by superthermal electrons. The radial loss rate is lower than the Rechester-Rosenbluth level, presumably due to the establishment of a restraining ambipolar potential. Several aspects of these measurements contradict the Kinetic Dynamo Theory, while the MHD dynamo EMF is measured to be large enough to drive the edge current carried by these superthermal electrons

  7. Nonadiabaticity and single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, Karsten; Niu, Q.; Pustilnik, M.

    1999-01-01

    Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves (SAW) through a narrow constriction, formed in a two-dimensional electron gas, is studied theoretically. Due to long-range Coulomb interaction, the tunneling coupling between the electron gas and the moving minimum of the SAW...

  8. Core density fluctuations in reverse magnetic shear plasmas with internal transport barrier on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Kramer, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is reported. The measurements are obtained using a newly installed correlation reflectometer operating in the upper X-mode. Before transport barrier formation in the low beam power current ramp-up phase of the discharge, reflectometer measurements indicate density fluctuation levels n-tilde/n∼0.1-0.2% and radial correlation lengths 2-3 cm (k r p i ≤0.5) in the central plasma region (r/a r p i ∼3. However, fluctuation levels are considerably higher than measured near the magnetic axis. Reflectometer measurements obtained at the foot of the ITB also indicate high fluctuation levels compared to measurements in the central region of the discharge. (author)

  9. Subacute ethanol consumption reverses p-xylene-induced decreases in axonal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, S.; Lyerly, D.L.; Pope, C.N.

    1992-01-01

    Organic solvants, as a class, have been implicated as neurotoxic agents in humans and laboratory animals. The study was designed to assess the interaction between subacute ingestion of moderate levels of ethanol and the p-xylene-induced decreases in protein and glycoprotein synthesis and axonal transport in the rat optic system. The results indicated that animals maintained on 10% ethanol as a drinking liquid show less p-xylene-induced neurotoxicity than animals receiving no ethanol supplement.

  10. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.; Malinowski, P. E.; Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10 nA/cm 2 at a bias voltage of −2 V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5 nm with specific detectivity of 3 × 10 12 Jones at the wavelength of 550 nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiO x as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment

  11. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, H. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Phelma–Grenoble INP, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, 38016 Grenoble Cedex 01 (France); Malinowski, P. E., E-mail: pawel.malinowski@imec.be; Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heremans, P. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); ESAT, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-04-06

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10 nA/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of −2 V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5 nm with specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 12} Jones at the wavelength of 550 nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiO{sub x} as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment.

  12. Implementation on Electronic Circuits and RTR Pragmatical Adaptive Synchronization: Time-Reversed Uncertain Dynamical Systems' Analysis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We expose the chaotic attractors of time-reversed nonlinear system, further implement its behavior on electronic circuit, and apply the pragmatical asymptotically stability theory to strictly prove that the adaptive synchronization of given master and slave systems with uncertain parameters can be achieved. In this paper, the variety chaotic motions of time-reversed Lorentz system are investigated through Lyapunov exponents, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams. For further applying the complex signal in secure communication and file encryption, we construct the circuit to show the similar chaotic signal of time-reversed Lorentz system. In addition, pragmatical asymptotically stability theorem and an assumption of equal probability for ergodic initial conditions (Ge et al., 1999, Ge and Yu, 2000, and Matsushima, 1972 are proposed to strictly prove that adaptive control can be accomplished successfully. The current scheme of adaptive control—by traditional Lyapunov stability theorem and Barbalat lemma, which are used to prove the error vector—approaches zero, as time approaches infinity. However, the core question—why the estimated or given parameters also approach to the uncertain parameters—remains without answer. By the new stability theory, those estimated parameters can be proved approaching the uncertain values strictly, and the simulation results are shown in this paper.

  13. Multi-component transport in polymers: hydrocarbon / hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membrane; Transport multi-composants dans les polymeres: separation hydrocarbures / hydrogene par membrane a selectivite inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauviel, G.

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membranes is investigated. The first goal is to develop materials showing an increased selectivity. Silicone membranes loaded with inorganic fillers have been prepared, but the expected enhancement is not observed. The second goal is to model the multi- component transport through rubbers. Indeed the permeability model is not able to predict correctly permeation when a vapour is present. Thus many phenomena have to be considered: diffusional inter-dependency, sorption synergy, membrane swelling and drag effect. The dependence of diffusivities with the local composition is modelled according to free-volume theory. The model resolution allows to predict the permeation flow-rates of mixed species from their pure sorption and diffusion data. For the systems under consideration, the diffusional inter-dependency is shown to be preponderant. Besides, sorption synergy importance is pointed out, whereas it is most often neglected. (author)

  14. REVERSE CHARGING PURCHASES TO INTRA-TRANSPORTATION MEANS IN THE CONTEXT OF NEW TAX REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecobici Nicolae

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available New tax rules with effect from 1 May 2009 with a series of changes on the tax deductibility of the value added acquisitions related to transport and fuel use. The measure is very obvious nature of politics in order to bring the state budget amounts as required under the current government crisis in the financial world. The book focuses on not commenting policy modifications as required on the implications that they bring in on the accounting chargeback. Therefore, in the paper we will address the resolution of these legal provisions in the economic accounts.

  15. Bifunctional electroluminescent and photovoltaic devices using bathocuproine as electron-transporting material and an electron acceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.L.; Li, W.L.; Li, M.T.; Chu, B.

    2007-01-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) devices, using 4, 4',4''-tris (2-methylphenyl- phenylamino) triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) as hole-transporting material and bathocuproine (BCP) as an electron-transporting material, were fabricated, which emitted bright green light peaked at 520 nm instead of the emission of m-MTDATA or BCP. It was attributed to the exciplex formation and emission at the interface of m-MTDATA and BCP. EL performance was significantly enhanced by a thin mixed layer (5 nm) of m-MTDATA and BCP inserted between the two organic layers of the original m-MTDATA/BCP bilayer device. The trilayer device showed maximum luminance of 1,205 cd/m 2 at 8 V. At a luminance of 100 cd/m 2 , the power efficiency is 1.64 cd/A. Commission International De L'Eclairoge (CIE) color coordinates of the output spectrum of the devices at 8 V are x=0.244 and y=0.464. These devices also showed photovoltaic (PV) properties, which were sensitive to UV light. The PV diode exhibits high open-circuit voltage (V oc ) of 2.10 V under illumination of 365 nm UV light with 2 mW/cm 2 . And the short-circuit current (I sc ) of 92.5x10 -6 A/cm 2 , fill factor (FF) of 0.30 and power conversion efficiency (η e ) of 2.91% are respectively achieved. It is considered that strong exciplex emission in an EL device is a good indicator of efficient charge transfer at the organic interface, which is a basic requirement for good PV performance. Both the bilayer and trilayer devices showed EL and PV properties, suggesting their potential use as multifunction devices

  16. Bifunctional electroluminescent and photovoltaic devices using bathocuproine as electron-transporting material and an electron acceptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.L. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, 130024 (China); Li, W.L. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)]. E-mail: wllioel@yahoo.com.cn; Li, M.T. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Chu, B. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Electroluminescence (EL) devices, using 4, 4',4''-tris (2-methylphenyl- phenylamino) triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) as hole-transporting material and bathocuproine (BCP) as an electron-transporting material, were fabricated, which emitted bright green light peaked at 520 nm instead of the emission of m-MTDATA or BCP. It was attributed to the exciplex formation and emission at the interface of m-MTDATA and BCP. EL performance was significantly enhanced by a thin mixed layer (5 nm) of m-MTDATA and BCP inserted between the two organic layers of the original m-MTDATA/BCP bilayer device. The trilayer device showed maximum luminance of 1,205 cd/m{sup 2} at 8 V. At a luminance of 100 cd/m{sup 2}, the power efficiency is 1.64 cd/A. Commission International De L'Eclairoge (CIE) color coordinates of the output spectrum of the devices at 8 V are x=0.244 and y=0.464. These devices also showed photovoltaic (PV) properties, which were sensitive to UV light. The PV diode exhibits high open-circuit voltage (V {sub oc}) of 2.10 V under illumination of 365 nm UV light with 2 mW/cm{sup 2}. And the short-circuit current (I {sub sc}) of 92.5x10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2}, fill factor (FF) of 0.30 and power conversion efficiency ({eta} {sub e}) of 2.91% are respectively achieved. It is considered that strong exciplex emission in an EL device is a good indicator of efficient charge transfer at the organic interface, which is a basic requirement for good PV performance. Both the bilayer and trilayer devices showed EL and PV properties, suggesting their potential use as multifunction devices.

  17. Electronic transport properties of 4f shell elements of liquid metal using hard sphere Yukawa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic transport properties are analyzed for 4f shell elements of liquid metals. To examine the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q), we used our own parameter free model potential with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system. The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been examined by using different screening functions like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar (S). The correlations of our resultsand other data with available experimental values are intensely promising. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable of explaining the above mentioned electronic transport properties.

  18. Dispersive electron transport in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) probed by impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berleb, Stefan; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2002-12-31

    Electron transport in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) is investigated by impedance spectroscopy under conditions of space-charge limited conduction (SCLC). Existing SCLC models are extended to include the field dependence of the charge carrier mobility and energetically distributed trap states. The dispersive nature of electron transport is revealed by a frequency-dependent mobility with a dispersion parameter alpha in the range 0.4-0.5, independent of temperature. This indicates that positional rather than energetic disorder is the dominant mechanism for the dispersive transport of electrons in Alq3.

  19. Electron transport chains in organohalide-respiring bacteria and bioremediation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanquan; Qiu, Lan; Liu, Xiaowei; Xu, Guofang; Siegert, Michael; Lu, Qihong; Juneau, Philippe; Yu, Ling; Liang, Dawei; He, Zhili; Qiu, Rongliang

    2018-04-06

    In situ remediation employing organohalide-respiring bacteria represents a promising solution for cleanup of persistent organohalide pollutants. The organohalide-respiring bacteria conserve energy by utilizing H 2 or organic compounds as electron donors and organohalides as electron acceptors. Reductive dehalogenase (RDase), a terminal reductase of the electron transport chain in organohalide-respiring bacteria, is the key enzyme that catalyzes halogen removal. Accumulating experimental evidence thus far suggests that there are distinct models for respiratory electron transfer in organohalide-respirers of different lineages, e.g., Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter, Desulfitobacterium and Sulfurospirillum. In this review, to connect the knowledge in organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains to bioremediation applications, we first comprehensively review molecular components and their organization, together with energetics of the organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains, as well as recent elucidation of intramolecular electron shuttling and halogen elimination mechanisms of RDases. We then highlight the implications of organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains in stimulated bioremediation. In addition, major challenges and further developments toward understanding the organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains and their bioremediation applications are identified and discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transport Theory for Kinetic Emission of Secondary Electrons from Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    a solid is derived. To find the former, existing computations for ion slowing down and experimental and theoretical ones for electron bombardment can be utilized. The energy and angular distribution of the secondary electrons and the secondary electron yield are both expressed as products of the deposited...... in the keV region is largely taken into account. The predicted energy and angular distribution agree with absolute spectra for incident electrons, whereas the agreement with absolute spectra for incident protons is less satisfactory. Extrapolation of the energy distribution down to the vacuum level gives...

  1. Changes in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawater

    KAUST Repository

    Valentino, Lauren; Renkens, Tennie; Maugin, Thomas; Crouè , Jean-Philippe Philippe; Mariñ as, Benito J.

    2015-01-01

    This study contributed to improving our understanding of how disinfectants, applied to control biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, result in membrane performance degradation. We investigated changes in physicochemical properties and permeation performance of a RO membrane with fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer. Membrane samples were exposed to varying concentrations of monochloramine, bromide, and iodide in both synthetic and natural seawater. Elemental analysis of the membrane active layer by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) revealed the incorporation of bromine and iodine into the polyamide. The kinetics of polyamide bromination were first order with respect to the concentration of the secondary oxidizing agent Br2 for the conditions investigated. Halogenated membranes were characterized after treatment with a reducing agent and heavy ion probes to reveal the occurrence of irreversible ring halogenation and an increase in carboxylic groups, the latter produced as a result of amide bond cleavage. Finally, permeation experiments revealed increases in both water permeability and salt passage as a result of oxidative damage.

  2. Changes in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawater

    KAUST Repository

    Valentino, Lauren

    2015-02-17

    This study contributed to improving our understanding of how disinfectants, applied to control biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, result in membrane performance degradation. We investigated changes in physicochemical properties and permeation performance of a RO membrane with fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer. Membrane samples were exposed to varying concentrations of monochloramine, bromide, and iodide in both synthetic and natural seawater. Elemental analysis of the membrane active layer by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) revealed the incorporation of bromine and iodine into the polyamide. The kinetics of polyamide bromination were first order with respect to the concentration of the secondary oxidizing agent Br2 for the conditions investigated. Halogenated membranes were characterized after treatment with a reducing agent and heavy ion probes to reveal the occurrence of irreversible ring halogenation and an increase in carboxylic groups, the latter produced as a result of amide bond cleavage. Finally, permeation experiments revealed increases in both water permeability and salt passage as a result of oxidative damage.

  3. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  4. Creation and dynamical co-evolution of electron and ion channel transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of magnetic confinement devices have found transitions to an enhanced confinement regime. Simple dynamical models have been able to capture much of the dynamics of these barriers however an open question has been the disconnected nature of the electron thermal transport channel sometimes observed in the presence of a standard ('ion channel' barrier. By adding to simple barrier model an evolution equation for electron fluctuations we can investigate the interaction between the formation of the standard ion channel barrier and the somewhat less common electron channel barrier. Barrier formation in the electron channel is even more sensitive to the alignment of the various gradients making up the sheared radial electric field than the ion barrier is. Electron channel heat transport is found to significantly increase after the formation of the ion channel barrier but before the electron channel barrier is formed. This increased transport is important in the barrier evolution. (author)

  5. Hydration effect on the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong-Liang, Li; Huai-Zhi, Li; Yong, Ma; Guang-Ping, Zhang; Chuan-Kui, Wang

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles computational method based on the hybrid density functional theory is developed to simulate the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions with H 2 O molecules accumulated in the vicinity as recently reported by Na et al. [Nanotechnology 18 424001 (2007)]. The numerical results show that the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecule and H 2 O molecules result in the localisation of the molecular orbitals and lead to the lower transition peaks. The H 2 O molecular chains accumulated in the vicinity of the molecular junction can not only change the electronic structure of the molecular junctions, but also open additional electronic transport pathways. The obvious influence of H 2 O molecules on the electronic structure of the molecular junction and its electronic transport properties is thus demonstrated. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  6. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  7. Nonequilibrium Green function techniques applied to hot electron quantum transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauho, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    During the last few years considerable effort has been devoted to deriving quantum transport equations for semiconductors under extreme conditions (high electric fields, spatial quantization in one or two directions). Here we review the results obtained with nonequilibrium Green function techniques as formulated by Baym and Kadanoff, or by Keldysh. In particular, the following topics will be discussed: (i) Systematic approaches to reduce the transport equation governing the correlation function to a transport equation for the Wigner function; (ii) Approximations reducing the nonmarkovian quantum transport equation to a numerically tractable form, and results for model semiconductors; (iii) Recent progress in extending the formalism to inhomogeneous systems; and (iv) Nonequilibrium screening. In all sections we try to direct the reader's attention to points where the present understanding is (at best) incomplete, and indicate possible lines for future work. (orig.)

  8. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  9. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  10. Coupling effect on the electronic transport through dimolecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Meng-Qiu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Li, Xiao-Fei; Zou, B.S.; Shuai, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Using nonequilibrium Green's function and first-principle calculations, we investigate the transport behaviors of a dimolecule device with two 1,4-Dithiolbenzenes (DTB) sandwiched between two gold electrodes. The results show that the intermolecular coupling effect plays an important role in the conducting behavior of the system. By changing the dihedral angles between the two DTB molecules, namely changing the magnitude of the intermolecular interaction, a different transport behavior can be observed in the system

  11. ITS - The integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    The TIGER series of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes is a group of multimaterial, multidimensional codes designed to provide a state-of-the-art description of the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade. The codes follow both electrons and photons from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV, and the user has the option of combining the collisional transport with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Source particles can be either electrons or photons. The most important output data are (a) charge and energy deposition profiles, (b) integral and differential escape coefficients for both electrons and photons, (c) differential electron and photon flux, and (d) pulse-height distributions for selected regions of the problem geometry. The base codes of the series differ from one another primarily in their dimensionality and geometric modeling. They include (a) a one-dimensional multilayer code, (b) a code that describes the transport in two-dimensional axisymmetric cylindrical material geometries with a fully three-dimensional description of particle trajectories, and (c) a general three-dimensional transport code which employs a combinatorial geometry scheme. These base codes were designed primarily for describing radiation transport for those situations in which the detailed atomic structure of the transport medium is not important. For some applications, it is desirable to have a more detailed model of the low energy transport. The system includes three additional codes that contain a more elaborate ionization/relaxation model than the base codes. Finally, the system includes two codes that combine the collisional transport of the multidimensional base codes with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence

  12. Nonlinear trapped electron mode and anomalous heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    We take the phenomenological point of view that the anomalous electron thermal conductivity produced by the non-linear trapped electron mode should also influence the stability properties of the mode itself. Using a model equation, we show that this effect makes the mode self-stabilizing. A simple expression for the anomalous thermal conductivity is derived, and its scaling properties are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Estimation of edge electron temperature profiles via forward modelling of the electron cyclotron radiation transport at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathgeber, S K; Barrera, L; Eich, T; Fischer, R; Suttrop, W; Wolfrum, E; Nold, B; Willensdorfer, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to obtain reliable edge profiles of the electron temperature by forward modelling of the electron cyclotron radiation transport. While for the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, straightforward analysis of electron cyclotron intensity measurements based on the optically thick plasma approximation is usually justified, reasonable analysis of the steep and optically thin plasma edge needs to consider broadened emission and absorption profiles and radiation transport processes. This is carried out in the framework of integrated data analysis which applies Bayesian probability theory for joint analysis of the electron density and temperature with data of different interdependent and complementary diagnostics. By this means, electron cyclotron radiation intensity delivers highly spatially resolved electron temperature data for the plasma edge. In H-mode, the edge gradient of the electron temperature can be several times higher than the one of the radiation temperature. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the ‘shine-through’ peak—the observation of increased radiation temperatures at frequencies resonant in the optically thin scrape-off layer. This phenomenon is caused by strongly down-shifted radiation of Maxwellian tail electrons located in the H-mode edge region and, therefore, contains valuable information about the electron temperature edge gradient. (paper)

  14. The multiplicity of dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain of plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Geisler, Daniela A; Møller, Ian Max

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport chain in mitochondria of different organisms contains a mixture of common and specialised components. The specialised enzymes form branches to the universal electron path, especially at the level of ubiquinone, and allow the chain to adjust to different cellular and metabolic...... and their consequences for the understanding of electron transport and redundancy of electron paths...... requirements. In plants, specialised components have been known for a long time. However, recently, the known number of plant respiratory chain dehydrogenases has increased, including both components specific to plants and those with mammalian counterparts. This review will highlight the novel branches...

  15. Reversed electron transport in syntrophic degradation of glucose, butyrate and ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    The anaerobic bacteria investigated in this thesis can gain energy from metabolization of their respective substrates only by close cooperation with methanogenic archaea. By fermentation of the substrate through the fermenting bacterium hydrogen is being formed, which is used by the hydrogen-scavenging partner bacterium for the production of methane. Thus a low hydrogen partial pressure is being maintained which allows the oxidation of the thermodynamically unfavourable substrate. This except...

  16. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [3H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment.

  17. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakhshan, V; Ketabi, S A; Moghaddam, A G

    2016-01-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin–orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x – y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z -axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x – y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable. (paper)

  18. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  19. 41 CFR 102-118.80 - Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? 102-118.80 Section 102-118.80... Transportation and Transportation Services § 102-118.80 Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? Your agency's internal financial regulations will identify...

  20. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  1. The Role of Shape on Electronic Structure and Charge Transport in Faceted PbSe Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.; Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current

  2. Optoelectronic devices, low temperature preparation methods, and improved electron transport layers

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed S.; El, Labban Abdulrahman; Usman, Anwar; Beaujuge, Pierre; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    An optoelectronic device such as a photovoltaic device which has at least one layer, such as an electron transport layer, which comprises a plurality of alternating, oppositely charged layers including metal oxide layers. The metal oxide can be zinc

  3. Towards electron transport measurements in chemically modified graphene: effect of a solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Arnhild; Ensslin, Klaus [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J, E-mail: arnhildj@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: fabian.koehler@chem.ethz.ch [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    The chemical functionalization of graphene modifies the local electron density of carbon atoms and hence electron transport. Measuring these changes allows for a closer understanding of the chemical interaction and the influence of functionalization on the graphene lattice. However, not only chemistry, in this case diazonium chemistry, has an effect on electron transport. The latter is also influenced by defects and dopants resulting from different processing steps. Here, we show that the solvents used in the chemical reaction process change the transport properties. In more detail, the investigated combination of isopropanol and heating treatment reduces the doping concentration and significantly increases the mobility of graphene. Furthermore, isopropanol treatment alone increases the concentration of dopants and introduces an asymmetry between electron and hole transport, which might be difficult to distinguish from the effect of functionalization. The results shown in this work demand a closer look at the influence of solvents used for chemical modification in order to understand their influence.

  4. Towards electron transport measurements in chemically modified graphene: effect of a solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Arnhild; Ensslin, Klaus; Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J

    2010-01-01

    The chemical functionalization of graphene modifies the local electron density of carbon atoms and hence electron transport. Measuring these changes allows for a closer understanding of the chemical interaction and the influence of functionalization on the graphene lattice. However, not only chemistry, in this case diazonium chemistry, has an effect on electron transport. The latter is also influenced by defects and dopants resulting from different processing steps. Here, we show that the solvents used in the chemical reaction process change the transport properties. In more detail, the investigated combination of isopropanol and heating treatment reduces the doping concentration and significantly increases the mobility of graphene. Furthermore, isopropanol treatment alone increases the concentration of dopants and introduces an asymmetry between electron and hole transport, which might be difficult to distinguish from the effect of functionalization. The results shown in this work demand a closer look at the influence of solvents used for chemical modification in order to understand their influence.

  5. Electron transport parameters in CO$_2$: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    OpenAIRE

    Vass, M.; Korolov, I.; Loffhagen, D.; Pinhao, N.; Donko, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15Td

  6. Tailoring atomic structure to control the electronic transport in zigzag graphene nanoribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Hui; Zhao, Jun; Wei, Jianwei; Zeng, Xianliang; Xu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We have performed ab initio density functional theory calculation to study the electronic transport properties of the tailored zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with particular electronic transport channels. Our results demonstrated that tailoring the atomic structure had significantly influenced the electronic transport of the defective nanostructures, and could lead to the metal-semiconducting transition when sufficient atoms are tailored. The asymmetric I–V characteristics as a result of symmetry breaking have been exhibited, which indicates the route to utilize GNR as a basic component for novel nanoelectronics. -- Highlights: ► M–S transition induced by tailoring nanostructure. ► Asymmetric I–V curve due to symmetry breaking. ► Controllable electron transport by designing nanofiguration.

  7. Tailoring atomic structure to control the electronic transport in zigzag graphene nanoribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zhao, Jun, E-mail: zhaojun@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei, Jianwei [College of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Zeng, Xianliang [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Xu, Yang [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2012-10-01

    We have performed ab initio density functional theory calculation to study the electronic transport properties of the tailored zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with particular electronic transport channels. Our results demonstrated that tailoring the atomic structure had significantly influenced the electronic transport of the defective nanostructures, and could lead to the metal-semiconducting transition when sufficient atoms are tailored. The asymmetric I–V characteristics as a result of symmetry breaking have been exhibited, which indicates the route to utilize GNR as a basic component for novel nanoelectronics. -- Highlights: ► M–S transition induced by tailoring nanostructure. ► Asymmetric I–V curve due to symmetry breaking. ► Controllable electron transport by designing nanofiguration.

  8. Experimental investigation of focusing and transport of heavy-current electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranchikov, E.I.; Gordeev, A.V.; Koba, Yu.V.; Korolev, V.D.; Pen'kina, V.S.; Rudakov, L.I.; Smirnov, V.P.; Sukhov, A.D.; Tarumov, E.Z.

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of beam transfer through transverse magnetic fields are outlined. The injection and transport of an annular relativistic electron beam due to a magnetic trap of acute-angle geometry are experimentally studied

  9. Numerical design of electron guns and space charge limited transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the capabilities and limitations of computer programs used to design electron guns and similarly space-charge limited transport systems. Examples of computer generated plots from several different types of gun problems are included

  10. The Role of Electron Transport and Trapping in MOS Total-Dose Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, O.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Leray, J.L.; Paillet, P.; Riewe, L.C.; Winokur, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Deep and shallow electron traps form in irradiated thermal SiO 2 as a natural response to hole transport and trapping. The density and stability of these defects are discussed, as are their implications for total-dose modeling

  11. Decoupled electron and phonon transports in hexagonal boron nitride-silicene bilayer heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yongqing; Pei, Qing-Xiang, E-mail: peiqx@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Gang, E-mail: peiqx@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2016-02-14

    Calculations based on the density functional theory and empirical molecular dynamics are performed to investigate interlayer interaction, electronic structure and thermal transport of a bilayer heterostructure consisting of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In this heterostructure, the two layers are found to interact weakly via a non-covalent binding. As a result, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved with the Dirac cone point being located exactly at the Fermi level, and only a small amount of electrons are transferred from h-BN to silicene, suggesting that silicene dominates the electronic transport. Molecular dynamics calculation results demonstrate that the heat current along h-BN is six times of that along silicene, suggesting that h-BN dominates the thermal transport. This decoupled role of h-BN and silicene in thermal and electronic transport suggests that the BN-silicene bilayer heterostructure is promising for thermoelectric applications.

  12. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron–electron interactions, application to graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron–electron (e–e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e–e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e–e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  13. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron–electron interactions, application to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Piotr, E-mail: pborow@poczta.onet.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Thobel, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.thobel@iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies, UMR CNRS 8520, Université Lille 1, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France); Adamowicz, Leszek, E-mail: adamo@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland)

    2017-07-15

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron–electron (e–e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e–e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e–e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  14. Models for the transport of low energy electrons in water and the yield of hydrated electrons at early times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.; Miller, J.H.; Ritchie, R.H.; Bichsel, H.

    1985-01-01

    An insulator model with four experimental energy bands was used to fit the optical properties of liquid water and to extend these data to non-zero momentum transfer. Inelastic mean free paths derived from this dielectric response function provided the basic information necessary to degrade high energy electrons to the subexcitation energy domain. Two approaches for the transport of subexcitation electrons were investigated. (i) Gas phase cross sections were used to degrade subexcitation electrons to thermal energy and the thermalization lengths were scaled to unit density. (ii) Thermalization lengths were estimated by age-diffusion theory with a stopping power deduced from the data on liquid water and transport cross sections derived from elastic scattering in water vapor. Theoretical ranges were compared to recent experimental results. A stochastic model was used to calculate the rapid diffusion and reaction of hydrated electrons with other radiolysis products. The sensitivity of the calculated yields to the model assumptions and comparison with experimental data are discussed

  15. Electron transport in quantum wires: possible current instability mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sablikov, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrons nonlinear and dynamic transition in quantum wires connecting the electron reservoirs, are studies with an account of the Coulomb interaction distribution of electron density between the reservoirs and the wire. It is established that there exist two processes, leading to electrical instability in such structure. One of them is expressed in form of multistability of the charge accumulated in the wire, and negative differential conductivity. The other one is connected with origination of negative dynamic conductivity in the narrow frequency range near the resonance frequency of the charge waves on the wire length [ru

  16. Correlating substituent parameter values to electron transport properties of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedova-Brook, Natalie; Matsunaga, Nikita; Sohlberg, Karl

    2004-01-01

    There are a vast number of organic compounds that could be considered for use in molecular electronics. Because of this, the need for efficient and economical screening tools has emerged. We demonstrate that the substituent parameter values (σ), commonly found in advanced organic chemistry textbooks, correlate strongly with features of the charge migration process, establishing them as useful indicators of electronic properties. Specifically, we report that ab initio derived electronic charge transfer values for 16 different substituted aromatic molecules for molecular junctions correlate to the σ values with a correlation coefficient squared (R 2 ) of 0.863

  17. A computer code package for Monte Carlo photon-electron transport simulation Comparisons with experimental benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2000-01-01

    A computer code package (PTSIM) for particle transport Monte Carlo simulation was developed using object oriented techniques of design and programming. A flexible system for simulation of coupled photon, electron transport, facilitating development of efficient simulation applications, was obtained. For photons: Compton and photo-electric effects, pair production and Rayleigh interactions are simulated, while for electrons, a class II condensed history scheme was considered, in which catastrophic interactions (Moeller electron-electron interaction, bremsstrahlung, etc.) are treated in detail and all other interactions with reduced individual effect on electron history are grouped together using continuous slowing down approximation and energy straggling theories. Electron angular straggling is simulated using Moliere theory or a mixed model in which scatters at large angles are treated as distinct events. Comparisons with experimentally benchmarks for electron transmission and bremsstrahlung emissions energy and angular spectra, and for dose calculations are presented

  18. Lateral electron transport in monolayers of short chains at interfaces: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Christopher B.; Szleifer, Igal; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electron hopping between electroactive sites in a monolayer composed of redox-active and redox-passive molecules. - Abstract: Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study lateral electronic diffusion in dense monolayers composed of a mixture of redox-active and redox-passive chains tethered to a surface. Two charge transport mechanisms are considered: the physical diffusion of electroactive chains and electron hopping between redox-active sites. Results indicate that by varying the monolayer density, the mole fraction of electroactive chains, and the electron hopping range, the dominant charge transport mechanism can be changed. For high density monolayers in a semi-crystalline phase, electron diffusion proceeds via electron hopping almost exclusively, leading to static percolation behavior. In fluid monolayers, the diffusion of chains may contribute more to the overall electronic diffusion, reducing the observed static percolation effects.

  19. The Role of Electron Transport and Trapping in MOS Total-Dose Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Riewe, L.C.; Flament, O.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced hole and electron transport and trapping are fundamental to MOS total-dose models. Here we separate the effects of electron-hole annihilation and electron trapping on the neutralization of radiation-induced charge during switched-bias irradiation for hard and soft oxides, via combined thermally stimulated current (TSC) and capacitance-voltage measurements. We also show that present total-dose models cannot account for the thermal stability of deeply trapped electrons near the Si/SiO 2 interface, or the inability of electrons in deep or shallow traps to contribute to TSC at positive bias following (1) room-temperature, (2) high-temperature, or (3) switched-bias irradiation. These results require revisions of modeling parameters and boundary conditions for hole and electron transport in SiO 2 . The nature of deep and shallow electron traps in the near-interfacial SiO 2 is discussed

  20. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Nazin, G. V.; Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2005-01-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks correspondi...