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Sample records for reverse transcription-nested polymerase

  1. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  2. Detection of feline coronavirus in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feces by reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction in cheetahs with variable frequency of viral shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Patricia M; Kennedy, Melissa; Terio, Karen; Gardner, Ian; Lothamer, Chad; Coleman, Kathleen; Munson, Linda

    2012-12-01

    Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) are a highly threatened species because of habitat loss, human conflict, and high prevalence of disease in captivity. An epidemic of feline infectious peritonitis and concern for spread of infectious disease resulted in decreased movement of cheetahs between U.S. zoological facilities for managed captive breeding. Identifying the true feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection status of cheetahs is challenging because of inconsistent correlation between seropositivity and fecal viral shedding. Because the pattern of fecal shedding of FCoV is unknown in cheetahs, this study aimed to assess the frequency of detectable fecal viral shedding in a 30-day period and to determine the most efficient fecal sampling strategy to identify cheetahs shedding FCoV. Fecal samples were collected from 16 cheetahs housed at seven zoological facilities for 30 to 46 consecutive days; the samples were evaluated for the presence of FCoV by reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR). Forty-four percent (7/16) of cheetahs had detectable FCoV in feces, and the proportion of positive samples for individual animals ranged from 13 to 93%. Cheetahs shed virus persistently, intermittently, or rarely over 30-46 days. Fecal RT-nPCR results were used to calculate the probability of correctly identifying a cheetah known to shed virus given multiple hypothetical fecal collection schedules. The most efficient hypothetical fecal sample collection schedule was evaluation of five individual consecutive fecal samples, resulting in a 90% probability of identifying a known shedder. Demographic and management risk factors were not significantly associated (P cheetahs shed virus intermittently to rarely, fecal sampling schedules meant to identify all known shedders would be impractical with current tests and eradication of virus from the population unreasonable. Managing the captive population as endemically infected with FCoV may be a more feasible approach.

  3. 逆转录-套式PCR检测汉坦病毒感染的实验研究%Detection of hantavirus infection using reverse transcriptional - nested polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱子犁; 刘建军; 阳帆; 汪洪富; 何建凡

    2007-01-01

    目的:探讨逆转录-套式聚合酶链反应(RT-nested-PCR)检测汉坦病毒(Hantavirus,HV)感染的准确性和敏感性.方法:用RT-nested-PCR和直接免疫荧光法(direct immunofluorescence,FA)分别检测深圳市2005年肾综合征出血热宿主动物监测中捕获的鼠类中HV的感染情况.结果:在76份特异性总抗体阳性的鼠肺标本中,用RT-nested-PCR检出61份抗原阳性,而FA仅检出47份阳性.结论:RT-nested-PCR是一种比较准确的检测汉坦病毒感染的方法,其敏感性高于FA.

  4. A design proposal of the reverse DNA polymerase (3'-5' direction)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    DNA Polymerase is an enzyme that participates in the process of DNA replication. In general, forward DNA polymerase moves along the template strand in a 3'-5' direction, and the daughter strand is formed in a 5'-3' direction. This paper theoretically analyzes the mechanism of forward DNA polymerase, and gives the design proposal of a new reverse DNA polymerase (3'-5' direction).

  5. Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2014-02-05

    Feb 5, 2014 ... polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that allows one to detect very low transcription levels of functional ... If one can see or know where microbes in soil live, what roles in soil .... extraction buffer allowed both soil DNA and total soil RNA ... genomic DNA contamination in the RNA sample is trouble-.

  6. Analysis of liver connexin expression using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin mRNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  7. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of avian pneumovirus (Colorado strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A; Reynolds, D L

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for the detection of avian pneumovirus (Colorado strain) (APV-Col). The specific primers were designed from the published sequence of the matrix protein gene of APV-Col. The primers amplified a product of 631 nucleotides from APV-Col. The assay identified only APV-Col and did not react with Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus.

  8. Design and evaluation of reverse transcription nested PCR primers for the detection of betanodavirus in finfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, J Joseph Sahaya; Praveena, P Ezhil; Bhuvaneswari, T; Jithendran, K P

    2016-06-01

    Viral encephalopathy and retinopathy otherwise known as viral nervous necrosis (VNN) is a neuropathological condition affecting more than 50 fish species worldwide, mostly marine. Different PCR protocols with specific primers were reported from many countries for confirmation of VNN in fishes. In the present study, two pairs of primers were designed and evaluated for the diagnosis of clinical and subclinical cases of infections from field. These primers designated as BARL-F1/BARL-R1 amplified a 902 bp product in the variable region (T4) of the coat protein gene by first step PCR. Nested PCR primers BARL-F2/BARL-R2 amplified a fragment of 313 bp. The results were comparable with other commonly used primer sets such as F2/R3 and RG668f/RG919r primers. These new primers could detect betanodavirus in standard reference samples containing low, moderate and high viral load. Known positive and negative control samples of fish also revealed a predictive value of 100 % by RT-PCR diagnosis.

  9. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Typing of Poultry Influenza Virus (H5 and H7 by Reverse Transcription- Polymerase Chain Reaction

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    Cesare Bonacina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the influenza Orthomixovirus to undergo to continually antigenically changes that can affect its pathogenicity and its diffusion, explains the growing seriousness of this disease and the recent epizoozies in various parts of the world. There have been 15 HA and 9 NA type A sub-types of the influenza virus identified all of which are present in birds. Until now the very virulent avian influenza viruses identified were all included to the H5 and H7 sub-types. We here show that is possible to identify the H5 and H7 sub-types with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR by using a set of specific primers for each HA sub-type. The RT-PCR is a quick and sensitive method of identifying the HA sub-types of the influenza virus directly from homogenised organs.

  11. A Simple Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction for Dengue Type 2 Virus Identification

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    Figueiredo Luiz Tadeu M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here a simplified reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for identification of dengue type 2 virus. Three dengue type 2 virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD, as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected with the virus, and tissue culture fluids were collected after 7 days of infection period. The RT-PCR, a combination of RT and PCR done after a single addition of reagents in a single reaction vessel was carried out following a digestion of virus with 1% Nonidet P-40. The 50ml assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of a dengue type 2 specific primer pair amplifying a 210 base pair sequence of the envelope protein gene, 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5U of reverse transcriptase, and 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The reagent mixture was incubated for 15 min at 37oC for RT followed by a variable amount of cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92oC for 60 sec, 53oC for 60 sec with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized with UV light after gel incubation in ethidium bromide solution. DNA bands were observed after 25 and 30 cycles of PCR. Virus amount as low as 102.8 TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR. Specific DNA amplification was observed with the three dengue type 2 strains. This assay has advantages compared to other RT-PCRs: it avoids laborious extraction of virus RNA; the combination of RT and PCR reduces assay time, facilitates the performance and reduces risk of contamination; the two-step PCR cycle produces a clear DNA amplification, saves assay time and simplifies the technique

  12. Immuno-capture reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (]C RT-PCR) voor de detectie van slamozaoekvirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, M.; Koenraadt, H.P.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Wanneer bepaald moet worden of een monster besmet is met het slamozaiekvirus wordt gebruik gemaakt van de ELISA-toets. De interpretatie van de uitslagen is niet altijd even eenvoudig. Het IPO-DLO en de NAKG onderzochten daarom een gevoeliger methode, de Immunocapture Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase

  13. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Souza, William Marciel; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; de Araujo, Jansen; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  14. Diagnosis of Brazilian vesiculoviruses by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

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    Daniela Wey Bonutti

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and a nested-PCR for diagnosis of Piry, Carajás, Cocal, and Alagoas vesiculoviruses from Brazil. The RNA extracts of viral and clinical samples were submitted to a RT-PCR using Vesiculovirus G primers that amplify part of the glycoprotein gene. The RT-PCR produced amplicons of expected size, 290 base pair, for the four studied viruses. The RT-PCR showed a high sensitivity being 151.3 times (2.18 log more sensitive for the detection of Piry virus than the classical procedure for virus detection in tissue culture based on the viral cytophatic effect. Amplicons had nucleotides sequenced and were aligned in order to select internal primers for a nested-PCR to confirm the origin of Piry, Carajás, Cocal, and Alagoas Vesiculovirus. Ten blood and tarsal pad epithelial samples of infected Guinea-pigs had Vesiculovirus genome amplified by RT-nested-PCR.

  15. Detection of HCV-RNA by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Biotinylated and Radioiodinated Primers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Cheon, Jun Hong; Chung, Yoon Young; Park, Hung Dong; Chung, Young Hwa; Lee, Young Sang [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical applicability of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) kit of HCV-RNA using biotinylated and radioiodinated primers. Study subjects were 118 patients with positive anti-HCV. HCV-RNA in patients serum was extracted by guanidium thiocyanate method. After first amplification, the product was reamplified by primers labelled with biotin and I-125. The final amplification product was detected by counting the radioactivity after incubation in avidin coated tubes. In 51 samples, the test was repeated for evaluation of reproducibility. This new method was also compared with conventional RT-PCR methods in 34 samples from patients with chronic liver disease. The results were as follows, 1) HCV-RNA was positive in 85(97%)of 88 patients with chronic liver disease, and in 23 (73%) of 30 patients with normal liver function. 2) In comparison with conventional method, HCV-RNA was detected in 32(94%) of 34 patients with new method, whereas in 27(79% ) of the same group with conventional method 3) Repeated test with new method in 52 samples demonstrated 82% of concordant result. In conclusion, new method with biotinylated and radioiodinated primers was more sensitive than conventional method. However, great care must be taken for quality control because there were considerable interassay variation and possibility of false positivity and false negativity.

  16. MULTI INFEKSI PADA UDANG Litopenaeus vannamei : DIAGNOSIS DENGAN POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR DAN REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isti Koesharyani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini dilakukan karena adanya masalah yang dihadapi seperti pertumbuhan udang yang tidak seragam (ukuran bervariasi, penampakan klinis yang abnormal dan organ yang tidak sempurna. Gejala tersebut akibat dari infeksi penyakit yang disebabkan oleh virus. Untuk mengetahui jenis virus yang menyerang udang tersebut, maka dilakukan analisis Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR dan Reverse TranscriptasePolymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR menggunakan berbagai jenis spesifik primer WSSV, IHHNV, MBV, TSV, IMNV, dan PvNV. Sampel udang yang secara visual normal dan abnormal diambil lalu disimpan dalam larutan pengawet 90% Ethanol dan RNAlater kemudian dianalisis di laboratorium dengan metode yang sudah dikembangkan oleh Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Perikanan Budidaya. Hasilnya menunjukkan bahwa udang yang tumbuh lambat dan mempunyai rostrum bengkok dan warna otot daging memutih ternyata tidak hanya diserang oleh satu virus namun dua virus IHHNV dan IMNV. Hasil penelitian ini juga mengindikasikan bahwa udang yang terserang IHHNV akan tumbuh lambat walaupun tidak mematikan, sedangkan udang yang diserang IMNV otot daging di tubuh memutih terutama pada bagian punggung dan dapat menimbulkan kematian.

  17. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for identification of wild poliovirus 1 & 3

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Deepa K.; Nalavade, Uma P.; Deshpande, Jagadish M.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: The poliovirus serotype identification and intratypic differentiation by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay is suitable for serotype mixtures but not for intratypic mixtures of wild and vaccine poliovirus strains. This study was undertaken to develop wild poliovirus 1 and 3 (WPV1 and WPV3) specific rRT-PCR assays for use. Methods: Specific primers and probes for rRT-PCR were designed based on VP1 sequences of WPV1 and WPV3 isolat...

  18. Use of Existing Diagnostic Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Detection of Ebola Virus RNA in Semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, James; Higgs, Elizabeth S; Adams, Rick D; Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-04-15

    Sexual transmission of Ebola virus in Liberia has now been documented and associated with new clusters in regions previously declared Ebola free. Assays that have Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) and are routinely used to detect Ebola virus RNA in whole blood and plasma specimens at the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research were tested for their suitability in detecting the presence of Ebola virus RNA in semen. Qiagen AVL extraction protocols, as well as the Ebola Zaire Target 1 and major groove binder quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays, were demonstrably suitable for this purpose and should facilitate epidemiologic investigations, including those involving long-term survivors of Ebola.

  19. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic aid for synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, J; Crew, J; Birdsall, S; Gill, S; Clark, J; Fisher, C; Kelsey, A; Nojima, T; Sonobe, H; Cooper, C; Gusterson, B

    1996-02-01

    Identification of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) that is associated with a high proportion of synovial sarcoma can be a useful diagnostic aid. The translocation results in fusion of the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene, two homologous genes within Xp11.2. Two-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were assessed as approaches to identify the rearrangement in well characterized cases. The presence of the translocation, and the specific chromosome X gene disrupted, were inferred from the configuration of signals from chromosome-specific centromere probes, paints, and markers flanking each gene in preparations of interphase nuclei. Rearrangement was found in two cell lines and eight of nine tumor samples, including analysis of five touch imprints. This was consistent with cytogenetic data in four cases and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis using primers known to amplify both SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 transcripts. The transcripts were distinguished by restriction with LspI and SmaI. Contrary to previous suggestions, there was no obvious correlation between histological subtype and involvement of the SSX1 or SSX2 gene. These approaches could also be applied to the identification of tumor-free margins and metastatic disease.

  20. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction molecular testing of cytology specimens: Pre-analytic and analytic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Julia A

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of molecular testing into cytopathology laboratory practice has expanded the types of samples considered feasible for identifying genetic alterations that play an essential role in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a sensitive and specific technical approach for amplifying a defined segment of RNA after it has been reverse-transcribed into its DNA complement, is commonly used in clinical practice for the identification of recurrent or tumor-specific fusion gene events. Real-time RT-PCR (quantitative RT-PCR), a technical variation, also permits the quantitation of products generated during each cycle of the polymerase chain reaction process. This review addresses qualitative and quantitative pre-analytic and analytic considerations of RT-PCR as they relate to various cytologic specimens. An understanding of these aspects of genetic testing is central to attaining optimal results in the face of the challenges that cytology specimens may present. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:11-19. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  1. Quantification of Porcine Follicle-stimulating Hormone Receptor Messenger Ribonucleic Acid by Reverse Transcription-competitive Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An easy and reliable method was developed for construction and quantification of competitive templates, which shared the same sequence as the amplified target DNA except for a 20-bp insertion in the middle by recombinant polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among the advantages of competitive PCR is that any predictable or unpredictable variable that affects amplification has the same effect on both target and competitor species and that the final ratio of amplified products reflects exactly the initial targets. The utilization of a thermostable reverse transcriptase in the RT step was proposed to overcome the problem of the efficiency of target cDNA synthesis. In addition, to obtain reliable measurements, it was recommended to perform four PCR with amounts of competitive template flanking the concentration of the target mRNA.

  2. The sensitivity and specificity of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for the avian pneumovirus (Colorado strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J C; Reynolds, D L; Ali, A

    2000-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of avian pneumovirus (APV), Colorado strain (US/CO), was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. The single-tube RT-PCR assay utilized primers developed from the matrix (M) gene sequence of the US/CO APV. The RT-PCR amplified the US/CO APV but did not amplify other pneumoviruses, including the avian pneumoviruses subgroups A and B. The RT-PCR was capable of detecting between 10(0.25) mean tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and 10(-0.44) TCID50 of the US/CO APV. These results have demonstrated that the single-tube RT-PCR assay is a specific and sensitive assay for the detection of US/CO APV.

  3. Interaction of 2'-deoxyguanosine triphosphate analogue inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase with human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Adrian S; Feng, Joy Y; Murakami, Eisuke; Chu, Chung K; Schinazi, Raymond F; Anderson, Karen S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is a limiting factor in the use of some nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV. To further understand the impact of structural features on the incorporation and exonuclease removal of nucleoside monophosphate (MP) analogues by human mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol gamma), transient kinetic studies were done with analogues of 2'-deoxyguanosine triphosphate. The kinetic parameters for the incorporation and removal of carbovir (CBV)-MP, dioxolane guanosine (DXG)-MP and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydroguanosine (d4G)-MP were studied with pol gamma holoenzyme. The importance of the ribose oxygen in incorporation by pol gamma was illustrated by an approximate 3,000-fold decrease in the incorporation efficiency of an analogue lacking the ribose oxygen (CBV-TP) relative to those containing a ribose oxygen (DXG-TP and d4G-TP). As a result, a comparison with previous data for the incorporation by HIV reverse transcriptase showed CBV-TP to be approximately 800-8,000-fold more selective for its antiviral target over pol gamma relative to the other guanosine analogues. However, DXG-TP and d4G-TP were found to be much more selective than previously reported values for mitochondrial toxic nucleoside analogues. Structural modelling based on sequence homology with other polymerase A family members suggests that an interaction between the ribose oxygen and arginine 853 in pol gamma may play a critical role in causing this differential incorporation. Exonuclease removal of a chain-terminating CBV-MP was also found to be more efficient by pol gamma. These results help to further elucidate the structure activity relationships for pol gamma and should aid in the design of more selective antiviral agents.

  4. Application of chromosomal microdissection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and reverse chromosome painting in prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, N.; Xu, J.; Cedrone, E. [Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes have been found in about 0.04% of amniotic fluid cultures. The origin of these marker chromosomes is difficult to identify by routine chromosome banding analysis. In the present study, we applied microdissection, PCR, and reverse chromosome painting to two amniotic fluid cases with a karyotype of 47,XX,+mar, and 47,XX,+?i(9p), respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of the biotin-labeled DNA probe generated from 5 copies of the dissected marker chromosomes was applied to the normal metaphase spreads and revealed that the marker originated from the p arm of chromosomes 14 and 22, while the ?i(9p) was actually i(4p). Reverse painting of the same probe to the metaphase spreads of the patients completely painted the marker chromosomes in question, which confirms the accuracy of the analysis. Our study provides an example of the application of chromosome microdissection and molecular cytogenetics in prenatal diagnosis for the identification of marker chromosomes unidentifiable by routine analysis.

  5. Poly(A) Polymerase Modification and Reverse Transcriptase PCR Amplification of Environmental RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero, Lina M.; D'Imperio, Seth; Burr, Mark; McDermott, Timothy R.; Young, Mark; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a combination of two established techniques for a novel application for constructing full-length cDNA clone libraries from environmental RNA. The cDNA was cloned without the use of prescribed primers that target specific genes, and the procedure did not involve random priming. Purified RNA was first modified by addition of a poly(A) tail and then was amplified by using a commercially available reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) cDNA synthesis kit. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a cDNA clone library was constructed from size-fractionated RNA (targeting 16S rRNA) purified from a geothermally heated soil in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The resulting cDNA library contained clones representing Bacteria and Eukarya taxa and several mRNAs. There was no exact clone match between this library and a separate cDNA library generated from an RT-PCR performed with unmodified rRNA and Bacteria-specific forward and universal reverse primers that were designed from cultivated organisms; however, both libraries contained representatives of the Firmicutes and the α-Proteobacteria. Unexpectedly, there were no Archaea clones in the library generated from poly(A)-modified RNA. Additional RT-PCRs performed with universal and Archaea-biased primers and unmodified RNA demonstrated the presence of novel Archaea in the soil. Experiments with pure cultures of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Halobacterium halobium revealed that some Archaea rRNA may not be a suitable substrate for the poly(A) tail modification step. The protocol described here demonstrates the feasibility of directly accessing prokaryote RNA (rRNA and/or mRNA) in environmental samples, but the results also illustrate potentially important problems. PMID:15746328

  6. A Pipeline with Multiplex Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction and Microarray for Screening of Chromosomal Translocations in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Fei Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome rearrangements and fusion genes present major portion of leukemogenesis and contribute to leukemic subtypes. It is practical and helpful to detect the fusion genes in clinic diagnosis of leukemia. Present application of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method to detect the fusion gene transcripts is effective, but time- and labor-consuming. To set up a simple and rapid system, we established a method that combined multiplex RT-PCR and microarray. We selected 15 clinically most frequently observed chromosomal rearrangements generating more than 50 fusion gene variants. Chimeric reverse primers and chimeric PCR primers containing both gene-specific and universal sequences were applied in the procedure of multiplex RT-PCR, and then the PCR products hybridized with a designed microarray. With this approach, among 200 clinic samples, 63 samples were detected to have gene rearrangements. All the detected fusion genes positive and negative were validated with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Our data suggested that the RT-PCR-microarray pipeline could screen 15 partner gene pairs simultaneously at the same accuracy of the fusion gene detection with regular RT-PCR. The pipeline showed effectiveness in multiple fusion genes screening in clinic samples.

  7. Bluetongue virus detection: a safer reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for prediction of viremia in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shad, G; Wilson, W C; Mecham, J O; Evermann, J F

    1997-04-01

    A reversible target capture viral RNA extraction procedure was combined with a reverse-transcriptase nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to develop a capture PCR assay providing a rapid and safe prediction method for circulating bluetongue virus in infected ruminants. This new assay was compared with virus isolation and a recently developed antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of bluetongue virus. Eight Warhill crossbred sheep were inoculated subcutaneously with bluetongue virus serotype 10, and blood samples were taken sequentially over a period of 28 days. The capture PCR detected the peak of viremia, as determined by virus isolation and antigen-capture ELISA, from day 5 to day 14 after challenge. The results indicate that the rapid-capture bluetongue virus PCR provides a rapid indicator of samples in which virus can be isolated. In addition, this capture bluetongue virus PCR procedure does not require a lengthy phenol extraction or the use of the highly toxic methyl mercury hydroxide denaturant.

  8. Application of in situ reverse trancriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to tissue microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrett Jonathan A

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Detection of disease-associated gene transcripts in primary disease tissues is frequently confounded by the presence of non-involved cell types. Alternative methods of detecting gene expression directly within tissues involve either the generation of antibodies, which can be a lengthy process and may suffer from lack of specificity, or amplification of reverse-transcribed cDNA in tissue sections (in situ RT-PCR. The latter method is highly specific and enables detection of transcripts in the cells originally responsible for their synthesis, but is highly destructive of tissue structures and can be carried out on only one or a few sections per experiment, resulting in low reproducibility. In this study, in situ RT-PCR was applied for the first time to commercially available tissue section microarrays enabling the examination of up to 70 different samples simultaneously. Modifications to the technique are detailed that preserved visible tissue and cellular structures and improved transcript detection whilst preventing significant generation of artefacts.

  9. In Situ Reverse Transcriptase-Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction to Identify Intracellular Nucleic Acids without the Necessity of Dnase Pretreatment and Hybridisation

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Menschikowski; Margot Vogel; Rolf Eckey; Gerd Dinnebier; Werner Jaross

    2001-01-01

    In the present study a protocol of in situ reverse transcriptase‐nested polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT‐nested PCR) was examined based on the following modifications. (i) To exclude false positive signals caused by “DNA repair mechanisms” and “endogenous priming”, a two‐step PCR was applied after reverse transcription. The first step was performed in the presence of extrinsic primers and unlabeled nucleotides with a maximum of PCR cycles possible without destroying the cell morphology. ...

  10. Detection of dengue virus serotype 3 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae captured in Manaus, Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria CS Pinheiro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The detection of dengue virus serotypes from Aedes aegypti in Manaus, state of Amazonas was carried out using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique. Fourteen pools out 82 (17.1% were positive for DENV3, providing a minimal infection rate of 2.1% of all analyzed infected female specimens of three different areas of the city.

  11. Development of a rapid diagnostic assay for the detection of tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid based on isothermal reverse-transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    A molecular diagnostic assay utilizing reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) at an isothermal constant temperature of 39 °C and target-specific primers and probe were developed for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid (TCDVd) in ...

  12. Multiplex Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction untuk Deteksi Cepat Virus Flu Burung H5N1 (MULTIPLEX REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR RAPID DETECTION OF H5N1 AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raden Wasito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 (AIV H5N1 is highly pathogenic and fatal in poultry. The virusis still endemic with low virulence rate, although it may play a critical role in causing high morbidity andmortality rates in poultry in Indonesia. In general, diagnostic approach for AIV H5N1 is based onconventional serological and viral isolation methods that have the potential to produce consumings oftime and relatively expensive cost within the laboratory without compromising test utility. Thus, amolecular approach of multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR was developedand applied for the detection of matrix gene type A influenza viruses, AIV subtype subtype H5hemagglutinin gene with simultaneous detection of N1 nucleoprotein gene. Thirty sera specimens fromthe diseased commercial chickens that were specifically amplified positive-RT-PCR for AIV H5N1 wereselected for mRT-PCR. The mRT-PCR products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis and consistedof DNA fragments of AIV of 245 bp, 545 bp and 343 bp for M, H5 and N1 genes, respectively. Thus, themRT-PCR that can rapidly differentiate simultaneously between these genes is very important for thecontrol and even eradication of AIV transmission in poultry in Indonesia.

  13. Optimization of the elution buffer and concentration method for detecting hepatitis E virus in swine liver using a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Na Ry; Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Sheungwoo; Wang, Xiaoyu; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Lee, Jeong-Su; Joo, In-Sun; Hwang, In-Gyun; Choi, Changsun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optimal technique for detecting hepatitis E virus (HEV) in swine livers. Here, three elution buffers and two concentration methods were compared with respect to enhancing recovery of HEV from swine liver samples. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested RT-PCR were performed to detect HEV RNA. When phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) was used to concentrate HEV in swine liver samples using ultrafiltration, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 6 of the 26 samples. When threonine buffer was used to concentrate HEV using polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and ultrafiltration, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 1 and 3 of the 26 samples, respectively. When glycine buffer was used to concentrate HEV using ultrafiltration and PEG precipitation, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 1 and 3 samples of the 26 samples, respectively. When nested RT-PCR was used to detect HEV, all samples tested negative regardless of the type of elution buffer or concentration method used. Therefore, the combination of real-time RT-PCR and ultrafiltration with PBS buffer was the most sensitive and reliable method for detecting HEV in swine livers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction-based System for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Lily-infecting Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yeon Kwon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A detection system based on a multiplex reverse transcription (RT polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed to simultaneously identify multiple viruses in the lily plant. The most common viruses infecting lily plants are the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, lily mottle virus (LMoV, lily symptomless virus (LSV. Leaf samples were collected at lily-cultivation facilities located in the Kangwon province of Korea and used to evaluate the detection system. Simplex and multiplex RT-PCR were performed using virus-specific primers to detect single-or mixed viral infections in lily plants. Our results demonstrate the selective detection of 3 different viruses (CMV, LMoV and LSV by using specific primers as well as the potential of simultaneously detecting 2 or 3 different viruses in lily plants with mixed infections. Three sets of primers for each target virus, and one set of internal control primers were used to evaluate the detection system for efficiency, reliability, and reproducibility.

  15. Exogenous reference gene normalization for real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis under dynamic endogenous transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen Johnston; Zachary Gallaher; Krzysztof Czaja

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is widely used to investigate transcriptional changes following experimental manipulations to the nervous system. Despite the widespread utilization of qPCR, the interpretation of results is marred by the lack of a suitable reference gene due to the dynamic nature of endogenous transcription. To address this inherent deficiency, we investigated the use of an exogenous spike-in mRNA, luciferase, as an internal reference gene for the 2-ΔΔCt normalization method. To induce dynamic transcription, we systemically administered capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for C-type sensory neurons expressing the TRPV-1 receptor, to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We later isolated nodose ganglia for qPCR analysis with the reference being either exogenous luciferase mRNA or the commonly used endogenous reference β-III tubulin. The exogenous luciferase mRNA reference clearly demonstrated the dynamic expression of the endogenous reference. Furthermore, variability of the endogenous reference would lead to misinterpretation of other genes of interest. In conclusion, traditional reference genes are often unstable under physiologically normal situations, and certainly unstable following the damage to the nervous system. The use of exogenous spike-in reference provides a consistent and easily implemented alternative for the analysis of qPCR data.

  16. Analysis of plasma viral RNA levels during acute dengue virus infection using quantitative competitor reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiro, T M; Zivny, J; Ishiko, H; Green, S; Vaughn, D W; Kalayanarooj, S; Nisalak, A; Norman, J E; Ennis, F A; Rothman, A L

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the potential importance of viral burden in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There is little data available, however, describing the kinetics of viral replication in humans with natural dengue virus (DV) infection. Standard procedures for measuring titers of infectious virus in clinical specimens are either laborious or insensitive. We developed a method for measurement of DV RNA in plasma samples based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a mutant RNA target as a competitor. This technique was reproducible and accurate for samples containing any of the four DV serotypes, and could be applied to samples containing as few as 250 copies of RNA per reaction. We examined plasma viral RNA levels in 80 children with acute DV infection; sequential plasma samples were tested in 34 of these children. Plasma viral RNA levels ranged as high as 10(9) RNA copies/ml, and correlated with titers of infectious virus measured in mosquitoes (r= 0.69). Plasma viral RNA levels fell rapidly during the last several days of the febrile period. We did not find a significant difference in maximal plasma viral RNA levels between children with DHF and children with dengue fever, but peak viral RNA levels were identified in only 16 subjects. We conclude that this quantitative RT-PCR method will be valuable for further studies of natural DV infections.

  17. Multiplex Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction for Simultaneous Screening of 29 Chromosomal Translocation in Hematologic Malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) has been proved to possess great clinical potential for simultaneous screening of 29 chromosomal translocations in acute leukemia. To evaluate the clinical value of M-RT-PCR in hematologic malignancies, bone marrow samples from 90 patients with various hematologic malignancies, including 25 acute myeloge nous leukemia (AML), 22 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 27 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), 4 myeloproliferative diseases (MPD), 3 chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (CLL), 3 and 1 malignant histocytosis (MH) were subjected to both M-RT-PCR and chromosome karyotypic analysis. Some of cases were subjected to follow-up examination of M-RT-PCR during the period of ukemia. In our hand, 12 of 29chromosomal translocation transcripts including TEL/PDGFR, DEK/CAN, MLL/AF6, AML1/ETO,F9, BCR/ABL, MLL/MLL, PML/RARα, TLS/ERG, E2A/HLF, EVIl and HOXI1 were detected in 57 cases (63.3 %) of the 90 samples, which were in consistence with the results of karyore, M-RT-PCR had also shown good clinical relevance when used as an approach to detect minimal residual leukemia. We concluded that M-RT-PCR could be used as an effiy in the initial diagnosis of hematologic malignancies but also in subsequent monitor of minimal residual leukemia.

  18. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction-based method for selectively detecting vegetative cells of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Haru; Murase, Tomoko; Hagiya, Hideharu; Tagashira, Yasuaki; Fukuda, Tadashi; Iwaki, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Shibayama, Keigo

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory diagnostic methods for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) include toxigenic culture, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) to detect the toxins of C. difficile, and nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) to detect C. difficile toxin genes, but each of these methods has disadvantages; toxigenic cultures require a long time to produce results, EIAs have low sensitivity, and NAATs that target DNA cannot distinguish vegetative cells from spores and dead cells. Here we report a new detection method that uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to target the toxin-gene transcripts. This method was able to specifically detect the vegetative cells of toxigenic C. difficile in fecal samples in spike tests, with a minimum detection limit of 5 × 10(2) colony-forming units per 100 mg of stool specimen. The performance of this method was also demonstrated in a pilot scale evaluation using clinical fecal specimens, which showed that this method may be more sensitive than EIA and requires a shorter time than toxigenic culture. This method could potentially be applied in the clinical laboratory to detect C. difficile in fecal specimens. The ability of this method to discriminate the presence of vegetative cells from spores and dead cells could help to further the understanding of CDI.

  19. Detection of Avian bornavirus in multiple tissues of infected psittacine birds using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnatte, Pauline; Mak, Matthew; Ojkic, Davor; Raghav, Raj; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale A

    2014-03-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV), the cause of proventricular dilation disease in psittacine birds, has been detected in multiple tissues of infected birds using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the current study, real-time RT-PCR, using primers targeting the ABV matrix gene, was used to detect ABV in 146 tissues from 7 ABV-infected psittacine birds. Eighty-six percent of the samples tested positive, with crossing point values ranging from 13.82 to 37.82 and a mean of 22.3. These results were compared to the findings of a previous study using gel-based RT-PCR and IHC on the same samples. The agreement between the 2 RT-PCR techniques was 91%; when tests disagreed it was because samples were negative using gel-based RT-PCR but positive on real-time RT-PCR. Agreement with IHC was 77%; 16 out of 74 samples were negative using IHC but positive on real-time RT-PCR. The results suggest that real-time RT-PCR is a more sensitive technique than gel-based RT-PCR and IHC to detect ABV in tissues. The tissues that were ranked most frequently as having a high amount of viral RNA were proventriculus, kidney, colon, cerebrum, and cerebellum. Skeletal muscle, on the other hand, was found to have a consistently low amount of viral RNA.

  20. Candidate gene biodosimeters of mice and human exposure to ionizing radiation by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Rezaeejam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR is essential for the development of predictive markers useful for assessing human exposure. Biological markers of exposure to IR in human populations are of great interest for assessing normal tissue injury in radiation oncology and for biodosimetry in nuclear incidents and accidental radiation exposures. Traditional radiation exposure biomarkers based on cytogenetic assays (biodosimetry, are time-consuming and do not provide results fast enough and requires highly trained personnel for scoring. Hence, the development of rapid biodosimetry methods is one of the highest priorities. Exposure of cells to IR activates multiple signal transduction pathways, which result in complex alterations in gene-expression. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has become the benchmark for the detection and quantification of RNA targets and is being utilized increasingly in monitoring the specific genes with more accurately and sensitively. This review evaluates the RT-qPCR as a biodosimetry method and we investigated the papers from 2000 up to now, which identified the genes-expression related the DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis induced by ionization radiation in peripheral blood and determined as biodosimeters. In conclusion, it could be say that RT-qPCR technique for determining the specific genes as biodosimeters could be a fully quantitative reliable and sensitive method. Furthermore, the results of the current review will help the researchers to recognize the most expressed genes induced by ionization radiation.

  1. Culture and Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) Proven Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Endophthalmitis: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Ekta; Rishi, Pukhraj; Therese, K Lily; Ramasubban, Gayathri; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Sharma, Tarun; Bhende, Pramod; Susvar, Pradeep; Agarwal, Mamta; George, Amala Elizabeth; Delhiwala, Kushal; Sharma, Vishal Rajan

    2016-09-06

    To report early confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) endophthalmitis by detection of 85B mRNA in vitreous by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Retrospective, interventional case series of 5 patients with MTB endogenous endophthalmitis. Vitreous aspirate was subjected to Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining, BACTEC MicroMGIT culture, RT-PCR targeting the 85B gene, real-time PCR targeting the IS6110 region, and nested PCR targeting the MPB64 gene and IS6110 region. Correlation between detection of MTB RNA, culture positivity, and ZN staining was studied. Five patients with endophthalmitis with no history of tuberculosis revealed acid-fast bacilli on ZN staining of vitreous. RT-PCR detected 85B RNA within 24 h. Culture for MTB was positive in 3/5 patients after 1 month. None of the eyes recovered any useful vision. RT-PCR can detect viable MTB RNA and provide evidence of active infection much earlier than culture.

  2. A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for Newcastle disease virus and avian pneumovirus (Colorado strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A; Reynolds, D L

    2000-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian pneumovirus (APV) cause Newcastle disease and rhinotracheitis respectively, in turkeys. Both of these viruses infect the respiratory system. A one-tube, multiplex, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of both NDV and Colorado strain of APV (APV-Col) was developed and evaluated. The primers, specific for each virus, were designed from the matrix protein gene of APV-Col and the fusion protein gene of NDV to amplify products of 631 and 309 nucleotides, respectively. The multiplex RT-PCR assay, for detecting both viruses simultaneously, was compared with the single-virus RT-PCR assays for its sensitivity and specificity. The specific primers amplified products of predicted size from each virus in the multiplex as well as the single-virus RT-PCR assays. The multiplex RT-PCR assay was determined to be equivalent to the single-virus RT-PCR assays for detecting both NDV and APV-Col. This multiplex RT-PCR assay proved to be a sensitive method for the simultaneous and rapid detection of NDV and APV-Col. This assay has the potential for clinical diagnostic applications.

  3. Subtyping of new Brazilian avian metapneumovirus isolates from chickens and turkeys by reverse transcriptase-nested-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arce, Regina C F; Coswig, Lia T; Almeida, Renata S; Trevisol, Iara M; Monteiro, Maria C B; Rossini, Lavínia I; Di Fabio, José; Hafez, Hafez M; Arns, Clarice W

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to improve a reverse transcriptase (RT)-nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) able to differentiate avian pneumovirus (APV) subtypes A and B, and to characterize new Brazilian isolates. Representative APV strains and clinical field samples from chickens and turkey flocks were amplified in the chicken embryo-related cell line. Viral RNA was extracted from harvested cells, and submitted to cDNA synthesis. The primers utilized for RT-PCR were compatible with the G gene of both the A and B subtypes of APV, while the nested primers were subtype specific. This approach showed that three new APVs from chickens and one from turkeys were subtype A, confirmed by sequencing. This is the first report of APV isolation from turkeys in Brazil. Four other APVs were detected and classified as subtype A by RT-nested-PCR. These optimized techniques could be useful for differentiation of APV subtypes A and B, proving to be a valuable molecular epidemiological tool.

  4. RNA polymerase I-driven reverse genetics system for enterovirus 71 and its implications for vaccine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Tao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a virus that causes from mild hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD to severe neurological complications and deaths in infants and young children. Effective antiviral agents and vaccines against EV71 are not available. However, Vero cell-based chemically inactivated EV71 vaccines could be developed soon based on the success of inactivated polio vaccine. Like poliovirus, EV71 has a positive single-stranded RNA genome of about 7400 nucleotides which contains a single open reading frame (ORF flanked by conserved and untranslated regions at both the 5′ and 3′ ends. Results The universal amplification of the full length genome of EV71 regardless of its genetic diversity, and the subsequent construction of a human RNA polymerase I-driven reverse genetics (RG system to produce pure virus stocks in Vero cell within 10 days were described. The rescued viruses were characterized by DNA sequencing, cytopathic effect (CPE and indirect fluorescent assay (IFA in comparison with the wild-type viruses. Moreover, the rescued viruses grew to high titers and retained the same immunogenicity as the wild-type viruses. Conclusion We have established a simplified method to rescue RG EV71 virus from diverse clinical isolates with detailed genetic information and to prepare virus stocks in only 10 days. This method could accelerate EV71 vaccine development.

  5. Pengembangan Sejumlah Primer untuk Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction Guna Melacak Virus Flu Burung di Indonesia (DEVELOPMENt OF PRIMERS FOR REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TO DETECT AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Indi Dharmayanti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, two clades of of avian influenza viruses (AIVs designated as 2.3.2 and 2.2.3 havebeen circulating in Indonesia. Mutations of AIV genes have cretaed many more variants of the virus. It istherefore important to evaluate the appropriate methods used for the detection and diagnosis of AI virusin the field. Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR have been used as a standardmethod for detection of AIV in many laboratories in Indonesia. The success of RT-PCR for detection ofAIV virus is dependent on the nucleotide sequences of primer that match with the circulating of AIVs. Theaims of this study was to develop RT-PCR by designing primers for H5 subtype specific to the circulatingAIVs in the field. The primers were designed using Primer Design software, and optimization andvalidation of the primer were conducted using AIVs that have been characterized in the previous study.The primers were then used RT-PCR using AIV isolates from field samples and their sensitivity andspecificity were then determined. The results showed that the H5 primers designed in this study, H5-IDand H5-NLP, was able to detect the AIVs in field samples better than the H5-specific primers have beenused previously. In conclusion, H5 primers designed based on recent viruses in the field showed betterresults in the detection of AI virus as compared to the previous primers. As AIV-H5N1 subtype in the fieldwill continue to change and evolve, the use of primers designed in this study is recommended for diagnosisof H5 AIV.

  6. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Salmonella using invA primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Doris H; Critzer, Faith J; Golden, David A

    2009-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of Salmonella linked to fresh produce emphasize the need for rapid detection methods to help control the spread of disease. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) can detect the presence of mRNA (shorter half-life than DNA) with greater potential for detecting viable pathogens. The chromosomally located invA gene required for host invasion by Salmonella is widely used for detection of this pathogen by PCR. Detection of Salmonella was undertaken by real-time RT-PCR (rt-RT-PCR) using newly designed invA gene primers to develop a sensitive and specific assay. Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis were grown (7.68 log(10) CFU/mL) in Luria-Bertani broth overnight at 37 degrees C, and RNA was extracted, followed by rt-RT-PCR with and without SYBR green I and agarose gel electrophoresis. All experiments were replicated at least thrice. Detection for both serovars using traditional RT-PCR was lower ( approximately 10(5) CFU/mL) than rt-RT-PCR (10(3) CFU/mL) by gel electrophoresis. Melt curve analysis showed melt temperatures at 87.5 degrees C with Ct values from 12 to 15 for up to 10(3) CFU/mL and improved to 10(2) CFU/mL after further optimization. Further, addition of RNA internal amplification control constructed using in vitro transcription with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, to the RT-PCR assay also gave detection limits of 10(2) CFU/mL. Cross-reactivity was not observed against a panel of 21 non-Salmonella bacteria. Heat-inactivated (autoclaved) Salmonella showed faint or no detection by rt-RT-PCR or gel electrophoresis. This method has potential to be applied for the detection of Salmonella serovars in fresh produce and the simultaneous detection of foodborne viral (RNA viruses) and bacterial pathogens in a multiplex format.

  7. Rapid and sensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of rotavirus by magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan Fangfang; Zhou Xiaoming [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Xing Da, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2013-01-25

    Graphical abstract: In this work, we have developed and demonstrated a magnetic primer based RT-PCR assay for ECL detection of rotavirus. In the presence of two functional primers (magnetic primer and TBR-primer) and PCR reagents, cDNA from RT was amplified directly onto MPs during PCR cycles of denaturation, annealing and extension. The resulting MPs-TBR complexes were easily loaded on the electrode surface and produced a concentrated ECL signal. The figure shows the schematic illustration of magnetic primer RT-PCR based ECL assay for rotavirus detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the presence of magnetic primer, TBR-primer and PCR reagents, cDNA form RT was amplified directly onto MPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To obtain the best sensing and efficient performance, important parameters associated with the efficiency were investigated carefully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method will find numerous applications in food safety field and clinical diagnosis. - Abstract: A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed by integrating magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection. This is realized by accomplishing RT of rotavirus RNA in traditional way and performing PCR of the resulting cDNA fragment on the surface of magnetic particles (MPs). In order to implement PCR on MPs and achieve rapid ECL detection, forward and reverse primers are bounded to MPs and tris-(2,2 Prime -bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR), respectively. After RT-PCR amplification, the TBR labels are directly enriched onto the surface of MPs. Then the MPs-TBR complexes can be loaded on the electrode surface and analyzed by magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation process. So some laborious manual operations can be avoided to achieve rapid yet sensitive detection

  8. DETECTION OF MICROMETASTASES OF LUNG CANCER BY USING LUNX mRNA SPECIFIC REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱广迎; 刘德林; 王绪; 彭猛青; 刘惠; 沈万华; 张海舟; 王伟; 陈杰

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To detect of lung cancer micrometastases in peripheral blood and regional lymphatic nodes by using lunx mRNA specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Methods: RT-PCR was used to detect lunx mRNA in peripheral blood of 26 patients with lung cancer. We also detected 44 regional lymphatic nodes obtained from 25 patients with lung cancer who underwent curative lobectomy. All the 44 regional lymphatic nodes were also examined by histopathology. Micrometastatic tumor cells in the peripheral blood and regional lymphatic nodes were semiquantitatively determined with the ratio of lunx band intensity to the glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase band intensity. Results: The positive detection rate of lunx mRNA in peripheral blood for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients were 60% (12/20) and 67% (4/6) respectively. 16 (36.4%) of regional lymphatic nodes from 44 lung cancer patients were positive by RT-PCR while 6 (13.6%) were positive by histopathology (x2=6.06, P=0.014). However, no blood samples and lymphatic nodes from patients with benign pulmonary diseases or normal volunteers were positive for lunx mRNA. The positive detection rate of lunx mRNA in bone marrow of NSCLC amd SCLC patients were 65% (13/20) and 67% (4/6) respectively. Conclusion: RT-PCR amplification of lunx mRNA is an sensitive and specific means to detect early haematogenous and regional lymphatic nodes dissemination of cancer cells for patients with lung cancer.

  9. Optimization and Validation of a Real Time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction with RNA Internal Control to Detect Rubella RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winny Xie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: According to a report from WHO, cases of rubella infection in Indonesia has increased up to 10-fold from 2007 to 2011. Despite no data of congenital rubella syndrome in the report, there are approximately 45,000 cases of babies born with heart failure and 0.1-0.3% live births with congenital deafness in Indonesia. Allegedly, rubella infection during pregnancy may play a role in this condition. This study aimed to optimize and validate a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR method to detect rubella virus RNA as an aid for the diagnosis of congenital rubella infection. METHODS: Method optimization was conducted using nucleic acids extracted from Trimovax Merieux vaccine with the High Pure Viral Nucleic Acid Kit. One step RT-qPCR was performed with Quantifast Multiplex RTPCR+R Kit. Target synthetic DNA was designed and used to determine the sensitivity of the method. RNA internal control was synthesized to control the process of extraction and amplification. RESULTS: The analytical sensitivity of this method was as low as 5 copies target synthetic DNA/μl. The mean Coefficient of Variation (CV % of the critical threshold (Ct obtained were 2.71%, 1.20%, 1.62%, and 1.59% for within run, between run, between kit lots, and between operators, respectively. Recovery of the target synthetic DNA from amniotic fluid was 100.51% (by the log copies/μl at the concentration of 1,000,000 copies/μl. CONCLUSIONS: RT-qPCR is successfully used for the detection of rubella virus RNA in vaccine and synthetic nucleic acid. With its high sensitivity, good precision and recovery, this method offers a means to improve the diagnosis of congenital rubella infection in developing countries like Indonesia. KEYWORDS: congenital rubella, RT-qPCR, prenatal diagnosis, amniotic fluid.

  10. Aphids preserved in propylene glycol can be used for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of Potato virus Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xianzhou; Pelletier, Yvan; Mason, Nicola; Dilworth, Andrea; Giguère, Marie-Andrée

    2011-08-01

    The effectiveness of propylene glycol on the retention of RNA target of Potato virus Y (PVY), an aphid stylet-borne virus, in Myzus persicae was investigated in comparison to ethanol and liquid nitrogen/-80°C. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the PVY targets from the propylene glycol/ethanol/liquid nitrogen preserved single aphids after a 5min acquisition period from infected potato plants. In the liquid nitrogen/-80°C and 70% ethanol treatments, 55.6% and 38.8% aphids tested PVY-positive, respectively. In the 0-75% propylene glycol treatments, 12.2-44.7% aphids tested PVY-positive. The lowest detection rate was in the 0% (positive rate, 15.2%) and the 10% propylene glycol (positive rate, 12.2%). As the propylene glycol concentration increased to 25%, 29.8% aphids tested positive. A high PVY-positive rate was also found in 35-75% propylene glycol treatments at 44.7% (35% propylene glycol), 36.7% (50% propylene glycol) and 34.8% (75% propylene glycol), which is comparable to the rate shown in 70% ethanol. No significant difference in the positive detection rate was observed in aphids preserved in 50% propylene glycol at room temperature for 2, 4 and 10 days. These results demonstrate that propylene glycol at 25-75% can retain PVY targets effectively in aphids for an extended time period, and thus can be used in aphid traps to preserve viruliferous aphids for later RT-PCR detection of PVY.

  11. Selection of reference genes for quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction normalization in Brassica napus under various stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yu; Fang, Hedi; Shi, Haifeng; Chen, Keping; Zhang, Zhiyan; Tan, Xiaoli

    2014-10-01

    Data normalization is essential for reliable output of quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, as the unsuitable choice of reference gene(s), whose expression might be influenced by exogenous treatments in plant tissues, could cause misinterpretation of results. To date, no systematic studies on reference genes have been performed in stressed Brassica napus. In this study, we investigated the expression variations of nine candidate reference genes in 40 samples of B. napus leaves subjected to various exogenous treatments. Parallel analyses by geNorm and NormFinder revealed that optimal reference genes differed across the different sets of samples. The best-ranked reference genes were PP2A and TIP41 for salt stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for heavy metal (Cr(6+)) stress, PP2A and UBC21 for drought stress, F-box and SAND for cold stress, F-box and ZNF for salicylic acid stress, TIP41, ACT7, and PP2A for methyl jasmonate stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for abscisic acid stress, and TIP41, UBC21, and PP2A for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum stress. Two newly employed reference genes, TIP41 and PP2A, showed better performances, suggesting their suitability in multiple conditions. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes, the expression patterns of BnWRKY40 and BnMKS1 were studied in parallel. This study is the first systematic analysis of reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in B. napus, an agriculturally important crop, under different stress conditions. The results will contribute toward more accurate and widespread use of qRT-PCR in gene analysis of the genus Brassica.

  12. Feline coronavirus quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on effusion samples in cats with and without feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, Louise; Porter, Emily; Crossley, Victoria J; Hayhow, Sophie E; Helps, Christopher R; Tasker, Séverine

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine whether feline coronavirus (FCoV) RNA in effusion samples can be used as a diagnostic marker of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP); and in FCoV RNA-positive samples to examine amino acid codons in the FCoV spike protein at positions 1058 and 1060 where leucine and alanine, respectively, have been associated with systemic or virulent (FIP) FCoV infection. Methods Total RNA was extracted from effusion samples from 20 cats with confirmed FIP and 23 cats with other diseases. Feline coronavirus RNA was detected using a reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR), and positive samples underwent pyrosequencing of position 1058 with or without Sanger sequencing of position 1060 in the FCoV spike protein. Results Seventeen (85%) of the effusion samples from 20 cats with FIP were positive for FCoV RNA, whereas none of the 23 cats with other diseases were positive. Pyrosequencing of the 17 FCoV-positive samples showed that 11 (65%) of the cats had leucine and two (12%) had methionine at position 1058. Of the latter two samples with methionine, one had alanine at position 1060. Conclusions and relevance A positive FCoV qRT-PCR result on effusions appears specific for FIP and may be a useful diagnostic marker for FIP in cats with effusions. The majority of FCoVs contained amino acid changes previously associated with systemic spread or virulence (FIP) of the virus.

  13. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of three genotypes of Brassica yellows virus by multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Yanmei; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zongying; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Han, Chenggui

    2016-11-22

    Brassica yellows virus (BrYV), proposed to be a new polerovirus species, three distinct genotypes (BrYV-A, BrYV-B and BrYV-C) have been described. This study was to develop a simple, rapid, sensitive, cost-effective method for simultaneous detection and differentiation of three genotypes of BrYV. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of the three genotypes of BrYV. The three genotypes of BrYV and Tunip yellows virus (TuYV) could be differentiated simultaneously using six optimized specific oligonucleotide primers, including one universal primer for detecting BrYV, three BrYV genotype-specific primers, and a pair of primers for specific detection of TuYV. Primers were designed from conserved regions of each virus and their specificity was confirmed by sequencing PCR products. The mRT-PCR products were 278 bp for BrYV-A, 674 bp for BrYV-B, 505 bp for BrYV-C, and 205 bp for TuYV. Amplification of three target genotypes was optimized by increasing the PCR annealing temperatures to 62 °C. One to three fragments specific for the virus genotypes were simultaneously amplified from infected samples and identified by their specific molecular sizes in agarose gel electrophoresis. No specific products could be amplified from cDNAs of other viruses which could infect crucifer crops. Detection limits of the plasmids for multiplex PCR were 100 fg for BrYV-A and BrYV-B, 10 pg for BrYV-C, and 1 pg for TuYV, respectively. The mRT-PCR was applied successfully for detection of three BrYV genotypes from field samples collected in China. The simple, rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective mRT-PCR was developed successfully for detection and differentiation of the three genotypes of BrYV.

  14. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione analogues as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase associated ribonuclease H and polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Vernekar, Sanjeev Kumar V; Chen, Yue-Lei; Miller, Lena; Huber, Andrew D; Myshakina, Nataliya; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Parniak, Michael A; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-06-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not clinically validated as an antiviral target. 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) is known to confer active site directed inhibition of divalent metal-dependent enzymatic functions, such as HIV RNase H, integrase (IN) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a few C-5, C-6 or C-7 substituted HID subtypes as HIV RNase H inhibitors. Our data indicate that while some of these subtypes inhibited both the RNase H and polymerase (pol) functions of RT, potent and selective RNase H inhibition was achieved with subtypes 8-9 as exemplified with compounds 8c and 9c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection and strain differentiation of infectious bronchitis virus in tracheal tissues from experimentally infected chickens by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Comparison with an immunohistochemical technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kurt; Nielsen, O.L.; Pedersen, M.W.;

    1999-01-01

    Oligonucleotide pairs were constructed for priming the amplification of fragments of nucleocapsid (N) protein and spike glycoprotein (S) genes of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). One oligonucleotide pair amplified a common segment......3896 and 793B strains of IBV, respectively, Groups of specific pathogen free chickens were experimentally inoculated with the Massachusetts (H120, M41), the D1466 and the 793B strains of IBV, and tracheal tissue preparations were made from each bird for RT-PCR and for immunohistochemistry (IHC) up to 3...

  16. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: Interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernike, Kerstin; Bonilauri, Paolo; Dauber, Malte

    2012-01-01

    To compare the real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays used for the diagnosis of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a Europe-wide interlaboratory ring trial was conducted. A variety of PRRSV strains including North American...... (NA) and European (EU) genotype isolates were analyzed by the participants. Great differences regarding qualitative diagnostics as well as analytical sensitivity were observed between the individual RT-qPCR systems, especially when investigating strains from the EU genotype. None of the assays...

  17. Multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with on-chip electrophoresis as a rapid screening tool for candidate gene sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Salowsky, Rüdiger; Blaich, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Combining multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) with microfluidic amplicon analysis, we developed an assay for the rapid and reliable semiquantitative expression screening of 11 candidate genes for drug resistance in human malignant melanoma. The functionality...... of this approach was demonstrated by low interexperimental variations of amplicon quantities after endpoint analysis. When applied to RNA samples derived from drug-sensitive and -resistant melanoma cell lines, mRT-PCR delivered results qualitatively concordant with data obtained from Northern blot and array...

  18. Detection of Zaire Ebola virus by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Sierra Leone, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Licheng; Sun, Yang; Kargbo, Brima; Zhang, Chuntao; Feng, Huahua; Lu, Huijun; Liu, Wenseng; Wang, Chengyu; Hu, Yi; Deng, Yongqiang; Jiang, Jiafu; Kang, Xiaoping; Yang, Honglei; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yang, Yinhui; Kargbo, David; Qian, Jun; Chen, Weijun

    2015-09-15

    During the 2014 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak, a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was established to detect and identify the Zaire Ebola virus. We describe the use of this assay to screen 315 clinical samples from EVD suspected person in Sierra Leone. The detection rate in blood samples was 77.81% (207/266), and there were relatively higher detection rate (79.32% and 81.42%, respectively) during the first two weeks after onset of symptoms. In the two weeks that followed, the detection rate declined to 66.67% and 25.00%, respectively. There was the highest virus load at the first week and then decreased. The detection rate in swab samples was 89.79% (44/49). This may be benefit from the included patients. 46 of 49 swab samples were collected from died patients. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that the assay specifically and sensitively detects Zaire Ebola virus.

  19. Improvement and optimization of a multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection and typing of Vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Kate; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Velazques-Salinas, Lauro; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2010-05-01

    An improvement to a previously reported real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay for the detection of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is described. Results indicate that the new assay is capable of detecting a panel of genetically representative strains of VSV present in North, Central, and South America. The assay is specific for VSV and allows for simultaneous differentiation between Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus and Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus. This real-time RT-PCR is able to detect current circulating strains of VSV and can be used for rapid diagnosis of VSV and differentiation of VSV from other vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease.

  20. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.;

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  1. Development of field-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for detection of Chikungunya and O'nyong-nyong viruses in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darci R; Lee, John S; Jahrling, Jordan; Kulesh, David A; Turell, Michael J; Groebner, Jennifer L; O'Guinn, Monica L

    2009-10-01

    Chikungunya (CHIK) and O'nyong-nyong (ONN) are important emerging arthropod-borne diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these two viruses in mosquitoes has not been evaluated, and the effects of extraneous mosquito tissue on assay performance have not been tested. Additionally, no real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay exists for detecting ONN virus (ONNV) RNA. We describe the development of sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assays for detecting CHIK and ONN viral RNA in mosquitoes, which have application for field use. In addition, we compared three methods for primer/probe design for assay development by evaluating their sensitivity and specificity. This comparison resulted in development of virus-specific assays that could detect less than one plaque-forming unit equivalent of each of the viruses in mosquitoes. The use of these assays will aid in arthropod-borne disease surveillance and in the control of the associated diseases.

  2. Simultaneous detection of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of novel influenza A (H7N9) by duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Tao; Qi, Xian; Ge, Yiyue; Guo, Xiling; Wu, Bin; Yu, Huiyan; Zhu, Yefei; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Cui, Lunbiao; Zhou, Minghao

    2013-12-01

    A novel reassortant influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged recently in China. In this study, a duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of H7N9 influenza viruses. The sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 10 RNA copies per reaction for both HA and NA genes. No cross-reactivity was observed with other influenza virus subtypes or respiratory tract viruses. One hundred and forty-six clinical and environmental specimens were tested and compared with reference methods and were found to be consistent. The assay is suitable for large-scale screening due to short turnaround times and high specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility.

  3. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi May; Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range.

  4. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  5. Comparison between specific and multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for detection of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus and rotavirus in experimentally seeded oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Coelho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of gastroenteritis have occurred among consumers of raw or undercooked shellfish harvested from faecally polluted waters. A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was applied for the simultaneous detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV, poliovirus (PV and simian rotavirus (RV-SA11 and compared with specific primers for each genome sequence. Three amplified DNA products representing HAV (192 bp, PV (394 bp and RV (278 bp were identified when positive controls were used. However, when tested on experimentally contaminated raw oysters, this method was not able to detect the three viruses simultaneously. This is probably due to the low concentration of viral RNAs present in oyster extract which were partially lost during the extracts preparation.

  6. Detection of Citrus leprosis virus C using specific primers and TaqMan probe in one-step real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Wei, G; Govindarajulu, A; Roy, Avijit; Li, Wenbin; Picton, Deric D; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2015-11-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), a causal agent of the leprosis disease in citrus, is mostly present in the South and Central America and spreading toward the North America. To enable better diagnosis and inhibit the further spread of this re-emerging virus a quantitative (q) real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay is needed for early detection of CiLV-C when the virus is present in low titer in citrus leprosis samples. Using the genomic sequence of CiLV-C, specific primers and probe were designed and synthesized to amplify a 73 nt amplicon from the movement protein (MP) gene. A standard curve of the 73 nt amplicon MP gene was developed using known 10(10)-10(1) copies of in vitro synthesized RNA transcript to estimate the copy number of RNA transcript in the citrus leprosis samples. The one-step qRT-PCR detection assays for CiLV-C were determined to be 1000 times more sensitive when compared to the one-step conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) CiLV-C detection method. To evaluate the quality of the total RNA extracts, NADH dehydrogenase gene specific primers (nad5) and probe were included in reactions as an internal control. The one-step qRT-PCR specificity was successfully validated by testing for the presence of CiLV-C in the total RNA extracts of the citrus leprosis samples collected from Belize, Costa Rica, Mexico and Panama. Implementation of the one-step qRT-PCR assays for CiLV-C diagnosis should assist regulatory agencies in surveillance activities to monitor the distribution pattern of CiLV-C in countries where it is present and to prevent further dissemination into citrus growing countries where there is no report of CiLV-C presence.

  7. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction measured expression of MDR1 and MRP in primary breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, D W; Reddy, R K; Geles, K G; Bansal, S; Myint, M A; Rogakto, A; Leighton, J C; Goldstein, L J

    1998-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of drug resistance mechanisms in breast cancer, we examined the expression of MDR1 and MRP in primary breast carcinoma and normal adjacent tissue using a highly quantitative and reproducible reverse transcription-PCR assay. Expression of both genes was observed in all specimens examined, both tumor (n = 74) and normal adjacent tissue (n = 55). The expression of MDR1, however, was low, with the level of expression being 25 times less than the drug-resistant control cell line KB 8-5. Immunohistochemical analysis of P-glycoprotein corroborated the PCR results; only 6% (2 of 31) were positive for JSB1 staining, and 0 of 32 were positive for for UIC2. MRP expression did not exceed control cell line levels, and immunohistochemistry detected moderate levels of expression. MDR1 expression was independent of grade, stage, tumor size, nodal status, metastasis, and estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status. There was, however, a significant correlation of MDR1 expression with age and histology. Approximately twice the expression of MDR1 was observed in the 50 age group, and lobular carcinoma had 4 times the expression of MDR1 of other histological types. MRP expression was independent of all other clinical parameters. Thus, these results show that although MDR1 expression is detectable in primary breast carcinoma by PCR, this expression as measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR is extremely low. The significance of these low levels is yet to be determined. MDR1 expression was higher in < 50 age group and lobular carcinoma, which may contribute to poor prognosis associated with young age and lobular histology.

  8. Synergy between cucumber mosaic virus and zucchini yellow mosaic virus on Cucurbitaceae hosts tested by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Liao, Qiansheng; Feng, Junli; Li, Dingjun; Chen, Jishuang

    2007-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) are two principal viruses infecting cucurbitaceous crops, and their synergy has been repeatedly observed. In our present work, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedure was established to study the accumulation kinetics of these two viruses in single and combined infections at the molecular level. The accumulations of open reading frames (ORFs) for 1a, 2a, 3a and coat protein (CP) of CMV and CP of ZYMV were tested. In the single infection, CMV-Fny ORFs accumulated to their maxima in cucumber or bottle gourd at 14 d post-inoculation (dpi), and gradually declined thereafter. ZYMV-SD CP ORF reached maximal accumulation at 14 and 28 dpi on cucumber and bottle gourd, respectively. However, when co-infected with CMV-Fny and ZYMV-SD, the maximal accumulation levels of all viral ORFs were delayed. CMV-Fny ORFs reached their maxima at 21 dpi on both hosts, and ZYMV-SDCP ORF reached maximal accumulation at 21 and 28 dpi on cucumber and bottle gourd, respectively. Generally, the accumulation levels of CMV-Fny ORFs in the co-infection were higher than those in the single infection, whereas the accumulation of ZYMV-SD CP ORF showed a reverse result.

  9. In situ reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction to identify intracellular nucleic acids without the necessity of DNAse pretreatment and hybridisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menschikowski, M; Vogel, M; Eckey, R; Dinnebier, G; Jaross, W

    2001-01-01

    In the present study a protocol of in situ reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT-nested PCR) was examined based on the following modifications. (i) To exclude false positive signals caused by "DNA repair mechanisms" and "endogenous priming", a two-step PCR was applied after reverse transcription. The first step was performed in the presence of extrinsic primers and unlabeled nucleotides with a maximum of PCR cycles possible without destroying the cell morphology. The second step consisted of only one annealing/elongation reaction, the target sequence marked by addition of digoxigenin-labeled nucleotides and intrinsic primers. (ii) In order to prevent amplifications of genomic DNA nested primer pairs were applied crossing intron sequences. (iii) To minimize the diffusion of PCR products in cells, the extrinsic primers were extended with complementary 5(prime, variant)-tails. This approach results in the generation of high molecular weight concatamers during PCR cycles. By applying this protocol, immunostainings specific for phospholipase A2 of type IIA mRNA were exclusively detectable in the cytoplasm of HepG2 hepatoma cells, which were used as a model system, whereas the nuclei were unstained. Multiple control experiments yielded completely negative results. These data suggest that the in situ RT-nested PCR, which in comparison to the method of in situ RT-PCR-in situ-hybridisation is simpler and less time-consuming, can be used as an alternative approach to identify intracellular nucleic acids.

  10. An analysis of the subtypes of dengue fever infections in Barbados 2003–2007 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gittens-St Hilaire M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with IgM antibodies to dengue fever infection to determine the serotypes present by molecular techniques. A representative sample (~20%/per year of patients diagnosed with dengue fever infection were selected based on the detection of IgM antibodies in the acute phase serum sample. RNA was extracted from each sample and reverse transcribed. Following this, the amplicons were electrophoresed and serotyped based on band sizes. Results This study consisted of 71 males and 101 females ranging in age from 0 – 50+ yrs giving a total of 172 persons with an average of 34.4 patients per year. Onset averaged 6.9 days ranging from 0–90 days. Common symptoms were as follows: fever (69%, headache (52%, arthralgia (36%, ocular pain (32%, emesis (15% and lumbar pain (15%. All patients investigated with the exception of one, were infected with DENV-3. Conclusion DENV-3 is currently circulating on the island and not DENV-1 or DENV-2 as in previous years. This has implications for the enhancement of clinical, laboratory and environmental surveillance systems.

  11. Strand-Specific Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus Genomic and Antigenomic RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Haist

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses are bi-segmented, single-stranded RNA viruses that cause significant human disease. The manner in which they regulate the replication of their genome is not well-understood. This is partly due to the absence of a highly sensitive assay to measure individual species of arenavirus replicative RNAs. To overcome this obstacle, we designed a quantitative reverse transcription (RT-PCR assay for selective quantitation of each of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV genomic or antigenomic RNAs. During the course of assay design, we identified a nonspecific priming phenomenon whereby, in the absence of an RT primer, cDNAs complementary to each of the LCMV replicative RNA species are generated during RT. We successfully circumvented this nonspecific priming event through the use of biotinylated primers in the RT reaction, which permitted affinity purification of primer-specific cDNAs using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. As proof of principle, we used the assay to map the dynamics of LCMV replication at acute and persistent time points and to determine the quantities of genomic and antigenomic RNAs that are incorporated into LCMV particles. This assay can be adapted to measure total S or L segment-derived viral RNAs and therefore represents a highly sensitive diagnostic platform to screen for LCMV infection in rodent and human tissue samples and can also be used to quantify virus-cell attachment.

  12. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and virus isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 virus isolation (VI) assays. To conduct the study, OF was inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially 10-fold d...

  13. The stress kit: A new method based on competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to quantify the expression of human αB-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajramović, J.J.; Geutskens, S.B.; Bsibsi, M.; Boot, M.; Hassankhan, R.; Verhulst, K.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2000-01-01

    We describe a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method for the semiquantitative detection of mRNAs encoding the human heat shock proteins αβ-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60. The method involves the coamplification of cellular mRNA-derived cDNA with a dilution series of a competitor fragme

  14. The stress kit: A new method based on competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to quantify the expression of human αB-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajramović, J.J.; Geutskens, S.B.; Bsibsi, M.; Boot, M.; Hassankhan, R.; Verhulst, K.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2000-01-01

    We describe a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method for the semiquantitative detection of mRNAs encoding the human heat shock proteins αβ-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60. The method involves the coamplification of cellular mRNA-derived cDNA with a dilution series of a competitor

  15. Optimization of rapid Salmonella enterica detection in liquid whole eggs by SYBR green I-based real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techathuvanan, Chayapa; D'Souza, Doris Helen

    2011-04-01

    Eggs and egg products have a high risk of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis contamination leading to gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans. Thus, a rapid screening tool for viable Salmonella Enteritidis cells in the egg industry is needed. Our objective was to rapidly and sensitively detect viable Salmonella Enteritidis from spiked liquid whole eggs (LWEs) within 24 h using SYBR green I-based real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the Salmonella specific invA gene along with an internal amplification control in a Bio-Rad iCycler. LWE was inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis and mixed with tetrathionate broth, and 100 μL of serially diluted portions in phosphate-buffered saline was plated on Xylose Lysine Tergitol 4 agar or 5 mL were used for RNA extraction by the TRIzol method immediately or after enrichment of 6, 12, or 16 h at 37 °C. The real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay was carried out using previously described Salmonella invA gene primers. Melt temperature analysis of the PCR product was included to determine specific invA amplification. Without enrichment, the assay detection limit was 10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/25 mL LWE. After enrichment for 6 and 12 h, Salmonella Enteritidis could be detected from LWE up to 10(4) and 10(2) CFU/25 mL, respectively. Improved Salmonella Enteritidis detection up to 10(0) CFU/25 mL was obtained after 16-h enrichment. Even with 16-h enrichment, the results could be still be obtained within 24 h, which is much faster than by traditional cultural detection that takes several days. Therefore, this assay appears suitable for routine detection of Salmonella enterica contamination by the egg industry to help prevent the transmission of egg-associated Salmonella outbreaks and timely recall of contaminated products.

  16. Detection and identification of dengue virus isolates from Brazil by a simplified reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, L T; Batista, W C; Igarashi, A

    1997-01-01

    We show here a simplified RT-PCR for identification of dengue virus types 1 and 2. Five dengue virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected and supernatants were collected after 7 days. The RT-PCR, done in a single reaction vessel, was carried out following a 1/10 dilution of virus in distilled water or in a detergent mixture containing Nonidet P40. The 50 microliters assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of specific primers amplifying a 482 base pair sequence for dengue type 1 and 210 base pair sequence for dengue type 2. In other assays, we used dengue virus consensus primers having maximum sequence similarity to the four serotypes, amplifying a 511 base pair sequence. The reaction mixture also contained 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5 U of reverse transcriptase, 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The mixture was incubated for 5 minutes at 37 degrees C for reverse transcription followed by 30 cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92 degrees C for 60 seconds, 53 degrees C for 60 seconds) with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized by UV light after staining with ethidium bromide solution. Low virus titer around 10(3, 6) TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR for dengue type 1. Specific DNA amplification was observed with all the Brazilian dengue strains by using dengue virus consensus primers. As compared to other RT-PCRs, this assay is less laborious, done in a shorter time, and has reduced risk of contamination.

  17. Detection and identification of dengue virus isolates from Brazil by a simplified reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIGUEIREDO Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here a simplified RT-PCR for identification of dengue virus types 1 and 2. Five dengue virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected and supernatants were collected after 7 days. The RT-PCR, done in a single reaction vessel, was carried out following a 1/10 dilution of virus in distilled water or in a detergent mixture containing Nonidet P40. The 50 µl assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of specific primers amplifying a 482 base pair sequence for dengue type 1 and 210 base pair sequence for dengue type 2. In other assays, we used dengue virus consensus primers having maximum sequence similarity to the four serotypes, amplifying a 511 base pair sequence. The reaction mixture also contained 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5 U of reverse transcriptase, 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The mixture was incubated for 5 minutes at 37ºC for reverse transcription followed by 30 cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92ºC for 60 seconds, 53ºC for 60 seconds with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized by UV light after staining with ethidium bromide solution. Low virus titer around 10 3, 6 TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR for dengue type 1. Specific DNA amplification was observed with all the Brazilian dengue strains by using dengue virus consensus primers. As compared to other RT-PCRs, this assay is less laborious, done in a shorter time, and has reduced risk of contamination

  18. In Situ Reverse Transcriptase-Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction to Identify Intracellular Nucleic Acids without the Necessity of Dnase Pretreatment and Hybridisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Menschikowski

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a protocol of in situ reverse transcriptase‐nested polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT‐nested PCR was examined based on the following modifications. (i To exclude false positive signals caused by “DNA repair mechanisms” and “endogenous priming”, a two‐step PCR was applied after reverse transcription. The first step was performed in the presence of extrinsic primers and unlabeled nucleotides with a maximum of PCR cycles possible without destroying the cell morphology. The second step consisted of only one annealing/elongation reaction, the target sequence marked by addition of digoxigenin‐labeled nucleotides and intrinsic primers. (ii In order to prevent amplifications of genomic DNA nested primer pairs were applied crossing intron sequences. (iii To minimize the diffusion of PCR products in cells, the extrinsic primers were extended with complementary 5′‐tails. This approach results in the generation of high molecular weight concatamers during PCR cycles. By applying this protocol, immunostainings specific for phospholipase A2 of type IIA mRNA were exclusively detectable in the cytoplasm of HepG2 hepatoma cells, which were used as a model system, whereas the nuclei were unstained. Multiple control experiments yielded completely negative results. These data suggest that the in situ RT‐nested PCR, which in comparison to the method of in situ RT‐PCR‐in situ‐hybridisation is simpler and less time‐consuming, can be used as an alternative approach to identify intracellular nucleic acids.

  19. Diagnosis of Avian bornavirus infection in psittaciformes by serum antibody detection and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay using feather calami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Arne H; Kerski, Anelle; de Kloet, Siwo R

    2011-05-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV) is the causative agent of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), a highly devastating and contagious disease of psittacines (parrots and parakeets), which has resulted in the death of many captive birds. Accurate diagnosis of bornavirus infection is therefore important for the identification and isolation of infected birds. The current study showed that nonvascular contour (chest) feather calami provide a ready and minimally invasive source of RNA for the detection of ABV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Storage of the feathers at room temperature for at least a month did not affect the results. Serological analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that identification of anti-bornaviral nucleoprotein P40 antibodies can identify many birds with a past or present infection. The presence of anti-avian bornaviral P24 phosphoprotein and P16 matrix protein antibodies was quite variable, rendering these antibodies less useful for diagnosis of ABV infection. The significance of the present findings is that the use of nonvascular feathers as a source of RNA allows sample collection under conditions where storage of other samples would be difficult. Serum detection by ELISA of anti-P40 antibodies allows the identification of infected birds when RT-PCR fails. © 2011 The Author(s)

  20. Hepatitis C virus in human B lymphocytes transformed by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro by in situ reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Lin Cheng; Bao Ling Liu; Yi Zhang; Wen Bin Tong; Zheng Yan; Bai Fang Feng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study persistence and replication ofheltitis C virus (HCV) in patients' peripheralblood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured invitro.METHODS Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was usedto transform the hepatitis C virus from a HCVpositive patient to permanent lymphoblastoidcell lines (LCL). Positive and negative HCV RNAstrands of the cultured cells and growth mediawere detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) eachmonth. Core and NS5 proteins of HCV werefurther tested using immunohistochemical SPmethod and in situ RT-PCR.RESULTS HCV RNA positive strands wereconsistently detected the cultured cells for oneyear. The negative-strand RNA in LCL cells andthe positive-strand RNA in supernatants wereobserved intermittently. Immunohistochemicalresults medicated expression of HCV NS3 and Cproteins in LCL cytoplasm mostly. The positivesignal of PCR product was dark blue and mainlylocalized to the LCL cytoplasm. The RT-PCRsignal was eliminated by overnight RNasedigestion but not DNase digestion.CONCLUSION HCV may exist and remainfunctional in a cultured cell line for a longperiod.

  1. Clinical validation of 3 commercial real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus from upper respiratory tract specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Deqa H; AlHetheel, AbdulKarim F; Mohamud, Hanat S; Aldosari, Kamel; Alzamil, Fahad A; Somily, Ali M

    2017-04-01

    Since discovery of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a novel betacoronavirus first isolated and characterized in 2012, MERS-CoV real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays represent one of the most rapidly expanding commercial tests. However, in the absence of extensive evaluations of these assays on positive clinical material of different sources, evaluating their diagnostic effectiveness remains challenging. We describe the diagnostic performance evaluation of 3 common commercial MERS-CoV rRT-PCR assays on a large panel (n = 234) of upper respiratory tract specimens collected during an outbreak episode in Saudi Arabia. Assays were compared to the RealStar® MERS-CoV RT-PCR (Alton Diagnostics, Hamburg, Germany) assay as the gold standard. Results showed i) the TIB MolBiol® LightMix UpE and Orf1a assays (TIB MolBiol, Berlin, Germany) to be the most sensitive, followed by ii) the Anyplex™ Seegene MERS-CoV assay (Seegene, Seoul, Korea), and finally iii) the PrimerDesign™ Genesig® HCoV_2012 assay (PrimerDesign, England, United Kingdom). We also evaluate a modified protocol for the PrimerDesign™ Genesig® HCoV_2012 assay.

  2. Multiplex Detection of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma Species Pathogens in Peripheral Blood by Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirigireddy, Kamesh R.; Ganta, Roman R.

    2005-01-01

    Tick-borne infections are responsible for many emerging diseases in humans and several vertebrates. These include human infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Ehrlichia ewingii. Because single or co-infections can result from tick bites, the availability of a rapid, multiplex molecular test will be valuable for timely diagnosis and treatment. Here, we describe a multiplex molecular test that can detect single or co-infections with up to five Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species. The test protocol includes the magnetic capture-based purification of 16S ribosomal RNA, its enrichment, and specific-pathogen(s) detection by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We also report a unique cloning strategy to develop positive controls in the absence of a pathogen’s genomic DNA. The test was assessed by examining blood samples from dogs suspected to be positive for ehrlichiosis. The dog was chosen as the model system because it is susceptible to acquire infections with up to five pathogens of the genera Ehrlichia and Anaplasma. The test identified single infections in the canine host with E. chaffeensis, E. canis, E. ewingii, A. phagocytophilum, and A. platys and co-infection with E. canis and A. platys. The multipathogen detection and novel positive control development procedures described here will be valuable in monitoring infections in people, other vertebrates, and ticks. PMID:15858156

  3. Establishment and Application of a TaqMan Real-Time Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Rubella Virus RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hong ZHAO; Yu-Yan MA; Hong WANG; Shu-Ping ZHAO; Wei-Ming ZHAO; Hua LI; Lei-Yi WANG

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish and apply a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for rubella virus (RV) RNA. First, the primer and TaqMan probe concentrations, as well as reaction temperatures were optimized to establish an efficient real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay for RV RNA. Next, an RV-specific PCR amplicon was made as an external standard to estimate the linearity, amplification efficiency, analytical sensitivity and reproducibility of the real time quantitative assay. Finally, the assay was applied to quantify RVRNA in clinical samples for rubella diagnosis.The RV-specific PCR amplicon was prepared for evaluation of the assay at 503 bp, and its original concentration was 2.75×109 copies/μl. The real time quantitative assay was shown to have good linearity (R2=0.9920), high amplification efficiency (E=1.91), high sensitivity (275 copies/ml), and high reproducibility (variation coefficient range, from 1.25% to 3.58%). Compared with the gold standard, the specificity and sensitivity of the assay in clinical samples was 96.4% and 86.4%, respectively. Therefore, the established quantitative RT-PCR method is a simple, rapid, less-labored, quantitative, highly specific and sensitive assay for RV RNA.

  4. Detection and differentiation of genotype I and III Japanese encephalitis virus in mosquitoes by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y Y; Lin, J W; Fan, Y C; Chiou, S S

    2014-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a disease that threatens both human and animal populations in Asian countries, and the causative agent of JE, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), has recently changed from genotype III (GIII) to genotype I (GI). However, a test for the rapid differentiation of GI and GIII JEV is still unavailable, especially one that can be used for mosquito-based surveillance. We have designed GI- and GIII-specific primer sets for the rapid detection and differentiation of GI and GIII JEV by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR). The GI-specific and GIII-specific primer sets were able to specifically amplify the target gene from GI and GIII JEV, respectively. The limitations of detection were 0.00225 and 0.225 pfu for the GI-specific and GIII-specific primers, respectively. Using a mixture of GI-specific and GIII-specific primers, the multiplex RT-PCR was able to specifically detect and differentiate GI and GIII JEV. The multiplex RT-PCR was able to successfully differentiate GI and GIII virus in JEV-infected mosquitoes. Thus, a sensitive and specific multiplex RT-PCR system for the rapid detection and differentiation of GI and GIII JEV has been developed, and this test is likely to be valuable when carrying out mosquito-based JEV surveillance. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Detection of EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts in paraffin embedded tissues of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors by nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixing Gong; Qinhe Fan; Zhihong Zhang; Weiming Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and significance of detecting EWS-FLIlfusion transcripts in paraffin embedded tissues of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) by nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Methods: Twelve formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of PNET were retrieved from archive and consultation materials,together with eight cases of controlled tumor. EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts were detected by nested RT-PCR. Home-keeping gene β-actin was used to detect the quality of mRNA. Results: β-actin mRNA was detected in 9 of the 12 tumor cases. EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts were detected in 6 cases, among which 4 had a "type 1" fusion transcript and 2 had a "type 2" fusion transcript. None of the controlled tumor was detected the fusion gene. Conclusion: RT-PCR is a feasible method for the detection of EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts in FFPE tissues in PNET and the result is meaningful in differential diagnosis and prognostic evaluation.

  6. Use of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in molecular screening of Newcastle disease virus in poultry and free-living bird populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Adriano de Oliveira Torres; Rodrigues, Juliana Nogueira Martins; Seki, Meire Christina; de Moraes, Fabricio Edgar; Silva, Jaqueline Raymondi; Durigon, Edison Luis; Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a simple molecular method of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to differentiate Newcastle disease virus strains according to their pathogenicity, in order to use it in molecular screening of Newcastle disease virus in poultry and free-living bird populations. Specific primers were developed to differentiate LaSota--LS--(vaccine strain) and Sao Joao do Meriti--SJM--strain (highly pathogenic strain). Chickens and pigeons were experimentally vaccinated/infected for an in vivo study to determine virus shedding in feces. Validation of sensitivity and specificity of the primers (SJM and LS) by experimental models used in the present study and results obtained in the molecular analysis of the primers by BLAST made it possible to generalize results. The development of primers that differentiate the level of pathogenicity of NDV stains is very important, mainly in countries where real-time RT-PCR is still not used as a routine test. These primers were able to determine the presence of the agent and to differentiate it according to its pathogenicity.

  7. A duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the detection and quantitation of avian leukosis virus subgroups A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Cai, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaolei; Niu, Chengming; Gao, Caixia; Si, Changde; Zhang, Wei; Qu, Liandong; Han, Lingxia

    2011-05-01

    Avian leukosis is a disease that is spreading widely in the world causing large economic losses to the poultry industry. In this study, a duplex quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed to detect and quantify avian leukosis virus subgroups A and B (ALVA/B). The assay was optimised to measure viral gp85 and chicken housekeeping (β-actin) genes. The result showed that the assay was specific for reference strains of ALVA/B subtype and no cross-reaction was detected with ALV subtypes E and J or with four other non-ALV viruses. The assay detected as few as 56 gp85 cDNA copies and was 100-fold more sensitive than a conventional RT-PCR. Seventy clinical blood samples were evaluated by both the qRT-PCR and the conventional RT-PCR assay, and the results show that 65 samples were positive by the qRT-PCR compared with 43 by the conventional RT-PCR. When this assay was used to quantify the viral load in ALV-inoculated embryos from three congenic chicken lines, the embryos from the B21 line showed the highest viral load, whereas the lowest load was found in the B5 line. This assay provides a powerful tool for quantitative detection of the ALVA/B and for the study of host genetic resistance to avian leukosis.

  8. Analytical validation of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test for Pan-American lineage H7 subtype Avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Ip, H.S.; Suarez, D.L.; Slemons, R.D.; Stallknecht, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test for the identification of the H7 subtype in North American Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) was first reported in 2002; however, recent AIV surveillance efforts in wild birds and H7 outbreaks in poultry demonstrated that the 2002 test did not detect all H7 AIVs present in North and South America. Therefore, a new test, the 2008 Pan-American H7 test, was developed by using recently available H7 nucleotide sequences. The analytical specificity of the new assay was characterized with an RNA panel composed of 19 H7 viruses from around the world and RNA from all hemagglutinin subtypes except H16. Specificity for North and South American lineage H7 viruses was observed. Assay limits of detection were determined to be between 103 and 104 gene copies per reaction with in vitro transcribed RNA, and 100.0 and 10 0.8 50% egg infectious doses per reaction. The 2008 Pan-American H7 test also was shown to perform similarly to the 2002 test with specimens from chickens experimentally exposed to A/Chicken/BritishColumbia/314514-2/04 H7N3 highly pathogenic AIV. Furthermore, the 2008 test was able to detect 100% (n = 27) of the H7 AIV isolates recovered from North American wild birds in a 2006-2007 sample set (none of which were detected by the 2002 H7 test).

  9. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Christa K; Zhang, Jianqiang; Strait, Erin; Harmon, Karen; Patnayak, Devi; Otterson, Tracy; Culhane, Marie; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Clement, Travis; Leslie-Steen, Pamela; Hesse, Richard; Anderson, Joe; Skarbek, Kevin; Vincent, Amy; Kitikoon, Pravina; Swenson, Sabrina; Jenkins-Moore, Melinda; McGill, Jodi; Rauh, Rolf; Nelson, William; O'Connell, Catherine; Shah, Rohan; Wang, Chong; Main, Rodger; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 assays based on real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 assays based on virus isolation (VI). The OF specimens were inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially diluted 10-fold (10(-1) to 10(-8)). Eight participating laboratories received 180 randomized OF samples (10 replicates × 8 dilutions × 2 IAV subtypes plus 20 IAV-negative samples) and performed the rRT-PCR and VI procedure(s) of their choice. Analysis of the results with a mixed-effect logistic-regression model identified dilution and assay as variables significant (P < 0.0001) for IAV detection in OF by rRT-PCR or VI. Virus subtype was not significant for IAV detection by either rRT-PCR (P = 0.457) or VI (P = 0.101). For rRT-PCR the cycle threshold (Ct) values increased consistently with dilution but varied widely. Therefore, it was not possible to predict VI success on the basis of Ct values. The success of VI was inversely related to the dilution of the sample; the assay was generally unsuccessful at lower virus concentrations. Successful swine health monitoring and disease surveillance require assays with consistent performance, but significant differences in reproducibility were observed among the assays evaluated.

  10. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernike, Kerstin; Bonilauri, Paolo; Dauber, Malte; Errington, Jane; LeBlanc, Neil; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Isaksson, Mats; Stadejek, Tomasz; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    To compare the real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays used for the diagnosis of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a Europe-wide interlaboratory ring trial was conducted. A variety of PRRSV strains including North American (NA) and European (EU) genotype isolates were analyzed by the participants. Great differences regarding qualitative diagnostics as well as analytical sensitivity were observed between the individual RT-qPCR systems, especially when investigating strains from the EU genotype. None of the assays or commercial kits used in the ring trial could identify all different PRRSV strains with an optimal analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. The genetic variability of the PRRSV strains, which is supposed to hinder the diagnostic of the RT-PCR because of mutations at the primer binding sites, was also confirmed by sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. In summary, a major problem in PRRSV diagnostics by RT-qPCR is false-negative results. To achieve maximum safety in the molecular diagnosis of PRRSV, the combined usage of different assays or kits is highly recommended.

  11. Variation in Bluetongue virus real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay results in blood samples of sheep, cattle, and alpaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Barbara P; Gardner, Ian A; Hietala, Sharon K; Crossley, Beate M

    2011-07-01

    Bluetongue is a vector-borne viral disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. The epidemiology of this disease has recently changed, with occurrence in new geographic areas. Various real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR) assays are used to detect Bluetongue virus (BTV); however, the impact of biologic differences between New World camelids and domestic ruminant samples on PCR efficiency, for which the BTV real-time qRT-PCR was initially validated are unknown. New world camelids are known to have important biologic differences in whole blood composition, including hemoglobin concentration, which can alter PCR performance. In the present study, sheep, cattle, and alpaca blood were spiked with BTV serotypes 10, 11, 13, and 17 and analyzed in 10-fold dilutions by real-time qRT-PCR to determine if species affected nucleic acid recovery and assay performance. A separate experiment was performed using spiked alpaca blood subsequently diluted in 10-fold series in sheep blood to assess the influence of alpaca blood on performance efficiency of the BTV real-time qRT-PCR assay. Results showed that BTV-specific nucleic acid detection from alpaca blood was consistently 1-2 logs lower than from sheep and cattle blood, and results were similar for each of the 4 BTV serotypes analyzed.

  12. A capsid gene-based real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of marine vesiviruses in the Caliciviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenahan, Shasta D.; Bok, Karin; Neill, John D.; Smith, Alvin W.; Rhodes, Crystal R.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Green, Kim Y.; Romero, Carlos H.

    2009-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) assay was developed for the identification of marine vesiviruses. The primers were designed to target a 176-nucleotide fragment within a highly conserved region of the San Miguel sea lion viruses (SMSVs) capsid gene. The assay detected viral RNA from nine marine vesivirus serotypes described previously, including two serotypes (SMSV-8 and SMSV-12) not identified with presently available molecular assays, a highly-related bovine vesivirus strain (Bos-1), a mink vesivirus strain (MCV), and two novel genotypes isolated recently from Steller sea lions (SSL V810 and V1415). The real-time assay did not amplify sequences from the corresponding genomic regions of feline calicivirus (also in the genus Vesivirus) and representative members of the genus Norovirus. The rtRT-PCR assay described below may prove useful as a diagnostic tool for the detection of currently circulating, emerging and previously described marine vesiviruses in clinical samples, especially when large numbers are screened in surveillance studies of these restricted viruses. PMID:19410604

  13. Up-regulation of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Gene Expression by Insulin-like Growth Factor-I Revealed by Real Time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua TIAN; Ioannis STOGIANNIDIS

    2006-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) strengthens cartilage by binding to type Ⅱ and typeⅨ collagen-forming bridges between collagen fibrils. It was hypothesized that perhaps one or more anabolic growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) or platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) increase COMP gene expression. Their effects on primary human chondrocytes and the chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 were studied using real time reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for quantification. IGF-I, but not the FGF-1 or PDGF-BB, up-regulated COMP gene expression by approximate 5-fold in human adult chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IGF-I exerted similar effects on ATDC5 cells. Results from these real time RT-PCR experiments were confirmed by transfecting into ATDC5 cells a full-length mouse COMP promoter cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. On stimulation with IGF-I, the luciferase reporter activity increased by about eight times. In conclusion, IGF-I seems to be an important positive regulator of COMP, which may play an important role in an attempted repair of either traumatized or degenerated cartilage.

  14. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSM) is expressed in various human tissues: implication for the use of PSM reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to detect hematogenous prostate cancer spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneberg, H; Friedetzky, A; Konrad, L; Kurek, R; Weingärtner, K; Wennemuth, G; Tunn, U W; Aumüller, G

    1999-01-01

    Detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM)-mRNA expression in blood samples using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is discussed as a new diagnostic marker of circulating micrometastases in prostate cancer patients. We applied the RT-PCR technique to different human tissues and obtained positive signals for PSM transcripts in human genital and multiple extra-genital tissue sites. The cDNAs were prepared from different human tissues and prostatic cell lines. RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR for PSM was performed with primers derived from the published PSM cDNA. The RT-PCR fragments obtained were cloned and showed 100% sequence homology to PSM. Southern blot hybridization with labeled probes was used to confirm the specificity of the amplicons. In addition to the known PSM expression in the human brain, PSM-mRNA was detected in cDNA isolated from human testis, epididymis and seminal vesicles and in the PC-3 prostatic cancer cell line. Furthermore, we found PSM-mRNA in heart, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, and thyroid gland. The results indicate that PSM expression is not restricted to the prostate gland, but represents a more general component of genital and extra-genital human tissues. This must be considered when RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR screening for PSM expression is performed as a diagnostic measure in blood from prostate cancer patients.

  15. Development of conventional and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to detect Tembusu virus in Culex tarsalis mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petz, Lawrence N; Turell, Michael J; Padilla, Susana; Long, Lewis S; Reinbold-Wasson, Drew D; Smith, Darci R; O'Guinn, Monica L; Melanson, Vanessa R; Lee, John S

    2014-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is an important emerging arthropod-borne virus that may cause encephalitis in humans and has been isolated in regions of southeast Asia, including Malaysia, Thailand, and China. Currently, detection and identification of TMUV are limited to research laboratories, because quantitative rapid diagnostic assays for the virus do not exist. We describe the development of sensitive and specific conventional and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for detecting TMUV RNA in infected cell culture supernatant and Culex tarsalis mosquitoes. We used this assay to document the replication of TMUV in Cx. tarsalis, where titers increased 1,000-fold 5 days after inoculation. These assays resulted in the detection of virus-specific RNA in the presence of copurified mosquito nucleic acids. The use of these rapid diagnostic assays may have future applications for field pathogen surveillance and may assist in early detection, diagnosis, and control of the associated arthropod-borne pathogens. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Lanthanide chelate complementation and hydrolysis enhanced luminescent chelate in real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for KLK3 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinezhad, Saeid; Väänänen, Riina-Minna; Lehmusvuori, Ari; Karhunen, Ulla; Soukka, Tero; Kähkönen, Esa; Taimen, Pekka; Alanen, Kalle; Pettersson, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for high-performance reporter probes in real-time detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has led to the use of time-resolved fluorometry of lanthanide chelates. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of the principle of lanthanide chelate complementation (LCC) in comparison with a method based on hydrolysis enhancement and quenching of intact probes. A real-time reverse transcription (RT) PCR assay for kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3, model analyte) was developed by using the LCC detection method. Both detection methods were tested with a standard series of purified PCR products, 20 prostatic tissues, 20 healthy and prostate cancer patient blood samples, and female blood samples spiked with LNCaP cells. The same limit of detection was obtained with both methods, and two cycles earlier detection with the LCC method was observed. KLK3 messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected in all tissue samples and in 1 of 20 blood samples identically with both methods. The background was 30 times lower, and the signal-to-background (S/B) ratio was 3 times higher, when compared with the reference method. Use of the new reporter method provided similar sensitivity and specificity as the reference method. The lower background, the improved S/B ratio, and the possibility of melting curve analysis and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection could be advantages for this new reporter probe.

  17. Myosin proteins identified from masseter muscle using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction--a pilot study of the relevance to orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchak, Archna; Hunt, Nigel P; Shah, Rishma; Sinanan, Andrea C M; Lloyd, Tim; Lewis, Mark P

    2009-04-01

    There is a clearly established relationship between masticatory muscle structure and facial form. Human studies in this area, however, have been limited, especially in consideration of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) family of contractile proteins. The aim of this pilot study was to assess if differences were detectable between genotype with respect to MyHC isoforms and the vertical facial phenotype in a sample of nine Caucasian female patients, age range 18-49 years, using a novel rapid technique. Masseter muscle biopsies were taken from patients with a range of vertical facial form. The levels of expression of the MyHC isoform genes MYH 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 were compared with the expression in a female calibrator patient aged 23 years with normal vertical facial form, using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Statistical analysis was undertaken using Pearson correlation coefficient. The results showed that there were distinct differences in gene expression between patients with a wide range of variation although changes in MYH1 were consistent with one cephalometric variable, the maxillo-mandibular angle. The full procedure, from start to finish, can be completed within half a day. Rapid genotyping of patients in this way could reveal important information of relevance to treatment. This technology has potential as a diagnostic and prognostic aid when considering correction of certain malocclusions.

  18. A novel duplex real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of hepatitis C viral RNA with armored RNA as internal control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Shuang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepatitis C virus (HCV genome is extremely heterogeneous. Several HCV infections can not be detected using currently available commercial assays, probably because of mismatches between the template and primers/probes. By aligning the HCV sequences, we developed a duplex real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay using 2 sets of primers/probes and a specific armored RNA as internal control. The 2 detection probes were labelled with the same fluorophore, namely, 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM, at the 5' end; these probes could mutually combine, improving the power of the test. Results The limit of detection of the duplex primer/probe assay was 38.99 IU/ml. The sensitivity of the assay improved significantly, while the specificity was not affected. All HCV genotypes in the HCV RNA Genotype Panel for Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques could be detected. In the testing of 109 serum samples, the performance of the duplex real-time RT-PCR assay was identical to that of the COBAS AmpliPrep (CAP/COBAS TaqMan (CTM assay and superior to 2 commercial HCV assay kits. Conclusions The duplex real-time RT-PCR assay is an efficient and effective viral assay. It is comparable with the CAP/CTM assay with regard to the power of the test and is appropriate for blood-donor screening and laboratory diagnosis of HCV infection.

  19. Microwave or autoclave treatments destroy the infectivity of infectious bronchitis virus and avian pneumovirus but allow detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhafi, G; Naylor, C J; Savage, C E; Jones, R C

    2004-06-01

    A method is described for enabling safe transit of denatured virus samples for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification without the risk of unwanted viable viruses. Cotton swabs dipped in avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) or avian pneumovirus (APV) were allowed to dry. Newcastle disease virus and avian influenza viruses were used as controls. Autoclaving and microwave treatment for as little as 20 sec destroyed the infectivity of all four viruses. However, both IBV and APV could be detected by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR after autoclaving and as long as 5 min microwave treatment (Newcastle disease virus and avian influenza viruses were not tested). Double microwave treatment of IBV and APV with an interval of 2 to 7 days between was tested. After the second treatment, RT-PCR products were readily detected in all samples. Swabs from the tracheas and cloacas of chicks infected with IBV shown to contain infectious virus were microwaved. Swabs from both sources were positive by RT-PCR. Microwave treatment appears to be a satisfactory method of inactivating virus while preserving nucleic acid for PCR identification.

  20. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  1. Very quick reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for detecting 2009 H1N1 influenza A using wire-guide droplet manipulationst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, David J; Tran, Phat L; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin; Patel, Deepa; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is currently a gold standard in identifying influenza A virus, especially H1N1 flu. Typical RT-PCR assays take about 1-2 h for thermocycling, and there is a growing need to further speed up the thermocycling to less than 30 min. Additionally, the PCR assay system should be made portable as a point-of-care detection tool. There have been attempts to further speed up the PCR assays by reducing its volume. There have also been attempts to use droplet microfluidics technology to PCR, primarily to automate the PCR enrichment processes and take advantage of its small volume. In all these attempts, heating and cooling is made by conduction heat transfer. Rapid movements of droplets (immersed in oil) over three different temperature zones make very quick PCR possible, as heating/cooling will be made by convection heat transfer, whose heat transfer coefficients are much higher than that of conduction. We used our newly-invented method of wire-guide droplet manipulations towards very quick RT-PCR. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of our system revealed that heating/cooling for each temperature change takes 1-4 s for a 10 microL droplet, as compared to >30 s in the other quick PCRs. Theoretically a 30-cycle process can take as short as 13 s x 30 cycles = 6 min 30 s. The entire system was made as a single instrument, with the components made by a milling machine and a rapid prototyping device. No additional equipment and external computers are required. With this newly developed system, 160 bp gene sequence was amplified from 2009 H1N1 influenza A (human origin). The 30-cycle process took as short as 6 min 50 s for a 10 microL droplet (with additional 4 min for reverse transcription). Its product was confirmed by traditional gel electrophoresis, subsequent imaging as well as gene sequencing, which has been very difficult with the other stationary droplet/nanodrop approaches. The proposed system has a

  2. Modified concentration method for the detection of enteric viruses on fruits and vegetables by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction or cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Eric; Agier, Cécilia; Traoré, Ousmane; Hennechart, Catherine; Merle, Ghislaine; Crucière, Catherine; Laveran, Henri

    2002-12-01

    Fruits and vegetables may act as a vehicle of human enteric virus if they are irrigated with sewage-contaminated water or prepared by infected food handlers. An elution-concentration method was modified to efficiently detect, by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or by cell culture, contamination by poliovirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV), and Norwalk-like virus (NLV) of various fresh and frozen berries and fresh vegetables. The protocol included washing the fruit or vegetable surface with 100 mM Tris-HCl, 50 mM glycine, and 3% beef extract, pH 9.5 buffer, which favors viral elution from acid-releasing berries, supplemented with 50 mM MgCl2 to reduce the decrease in viral infectivity during the process. The viral concentration method was based on polyethylene glycol precipitation. Copurified RT-PCR inhibitors and cytotoxic compounds were removed from viral concentrates by chloroform-butanol extraction. Viruses from 100 g of vegetal products could be recovered in volumes of 3 to 5 ml. Viral RNAs were isolated by a spin column method before molecular detection or concentrates were filtered (0.22-microm porosity) and inoculated on cell culture for infectious virus detection. About 15% of infectious poliovirus and 20% of infectious HAV were recovered from frozen raspberry surfaces. The percentage of viral RNA recovery was estimated by RT-PCR to be about 13% for NLV, 17% for HAV, and 45 to 100% for poliovirus. By this method, poliovirus and HAV RNA were detected on products inoculated with a titer of about 5 x 10(1) 50% tissue culture infectious dose per 100 g. NLV RNA was detected at an initial inoculum of 1.2 x 10(3) RT-PCR amplifiable units. This method would be useful for the viral analysis of fruits or vegetables during an epidemiological investigation of foodborne diseases.

  3. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to detect propionibacterial ribosomal RNA in the lymph nodes of Chinese patients with sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Wei, Y-R; Zhang, Y; Du, S-S; Baughman, R P; Li, H-P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of using the copy number of propionibacterial rRNA as a biomarker for sarcoidosis. Ribosomal RNA of Propionibacterium acnes and P. granulosum was measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue of lymph node biopsy from 65 Chinese patients with sarcoidosis, 45 with tuberculosis and 50 controls with other diseases (23 with non-specific lymphadenitis and 27 with mediastinal lymph node metastasis from lung cancer). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was analysed to determine an optimal cut-off value for diagnosis, and the diagnostic accuracy of the cut-off value was evaluated in additional tissue samples [24 patients with sarcoidosis and 22 with tuberculosis (TB)]. P. acnes or P. granulosum rRNA was detected in 48 of the 65 sarcoidosis samples but only in four of the 45 TB samples and three of the 50 control samples. Analysis of the ROC curve revealed that an optimal cut-off value of the copy number of propionibacterial rRNA for diagnosis of sarcoidosis was 50·5 copies/ml with a sensitivity and specificity of 73·8 and 92·6%, respectively. Based on the cut-off value, 19 of the 24 additional sarcoidosis samples exhibited positive P. acnes or P. granulosum, whereas only one of the 22 additional TB samples was positive, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 79·2 and 95·5%, respectively. These findings suggest that propionibacteria might be associated with sarcoidosis granulomatous inflammation. Detection of propionibacterial rRNA by RT-PCR might possibly distinguish sarcoidosis from TB.

  4. Analytical validation of a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay for evaluation of T-cell targeted immunosuppressive therapy in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, C; Archer, T; Fellman, C; Figueiredo, A S; Follows, J; Stokes, J; Wills, R; Mackin, A; Bulla, C

    2013-12-15

    Cyclosporine is an immunosuppressive agent that inhibits T-cell function by decreasing production of cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ(IFN-γ). In dogs, there is currently no reliable analytical method for determining effective cyclosporine dosages in individual patients. Our laboratory has developed a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay that measures IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression, with the goal of quantifying immunosuppression in dogs treated with cyclosporine. This study focuses on analytical validation of our assay, and on the effects of sample storage conditions on cyclosporine-exposed samples. Heparinized whole blood collected from healthy adult dogs was exposed to a typical post-treatment blood concentration for cyclosporine(500 ng/mL) for 1 h, and then stored for 0, 24, and 48 h at both room temperature and 4 ◦C.The study was then repeated using a cyclosporine concentration of 75 ng/mL, with sample storage for 0, 24, and 48 h at 4 ◦C. Cytokine gene expression was measured using RT-qPCR,and assay efficiency and inter- and intra-assay variability were determined. Storage for upto 24 h at room temperature, and up to 48 h at 4 ◦C, did not significantly alter results compared to samples that were processed immediately. Validation studies showed our assay to be highly efficient and reproducible and robust enough to be feasible under standard practice submission conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  6. A diagnostic one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for accurate detection of influenza virus type A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Influenza A is known as a public health concern worldwide. In this study, a novel one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) assay was designed and optimized for the detection of influenza A viruses. Material and methods The primers and probe were designed based on the analysis of 90 matrix nucleotide sequence data of influenza type A subtypes from the GenBank database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The influenza virus A/Tehran/5652/2010 (H1N1 pdm09) was used as a reference. The rtRT-PCR assay was optimized, compared with that of the World Health Organization (WHO), and its analytical sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility were evaluated. In total, 64 nasopharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and 41 samples without ILI symptoms were tested for the virus, using conventional cell culture, direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA) methods, and one-step rtRT-PCR with the designed primer set and probe and the WHO’s. Results The optimized assay results were similar to the WHO’s. The optimized assay results were similar to WHO’s, with non-significant differences for 10–103 copies of viral RNA/reaction (p > 0.05). It detected 10 copies of viral RNA/reaction with high reproducibility and no cross reactivity with other respiratory viruses. A specific cytopathic effect was observed in 6/64 (9.37%) of the ILI group using conventional culture and DFA staining methods; however, it was not seen in non-ILI. Also, the results of our assay and the WHO’s were similar to those of viral isolation and DFA staining. Conclusions Given the high specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility of this novel assay, it can serve as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of influenza A viruses in clinical specimens and lab experiments. PMID:27904520

  7. Detection of avian influenza A/H7N9/2013 virus by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoping; Wu, Weili; Zhang, Chuntao; Liu, Licheng; Feng, Huahua; Xu, Lizhi; Zheng, Xin; Yang, Honglei; Jiang, Yongqiang; Xu, Bianli; Xu, Jin; Yang, Yinhui; Chen, Weijun

    2014-09-01

    The first case of avian influenza A/H7N9 infection was reported in Shanghai in mid-February, 2013; by May 1, 2013, it had infected 127 people and caused 26 deaths in 10 provinces in China. Therefore, it is important to obtain reliable epidemiological data on the spread of this new infectious agent, a need that may be best met by the development of novel molecular methods. Here, a new method was described for the detection of avian influenza A/H7N9 using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). Using serial dilutions of avian influenza A H7N9 cultures, the detection limit of the assay was determined to be approximately 3.2×10(-4) HAUs (hemagglutination units) for the H7 gene and 6.4×10(-4) HAUs for N9 gene. In tests of serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed avian influenza A H7 and N9 gene RNA, positive results were obtained for target RNA containing at least three copies of the H7 gene and six copies of the N9 gene. Thirteen throat swabs from H7N9 patients were tested; all tested positive in the assay. Specificity was evaluated by testing 18 other subtypes of influenza viruses; all tested negative. A total of 180 throat swabs from patients infected with influenza virus, including 60 from patients infected with seasonal influenza A/H1N1 virus, 60 from patients infected with pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus, 30 from patients infected with seasonal influenza A/H3N2 virus and 30 from patients infected with influenza B virus, were also tested; all tested negative.

  8. Rapid detection and differentiation of wild-type and three attenuated lapinized vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Jong, Ming-Hwa; Huang, Yu-Liang; Huang, Tien-Shine; Chao, Parn-Hwa; Lai, Shiow-Suey

    2008-07-01

    A simple one-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed based on T-rich insertions in the viral genome for simultaneous detection and differentiation of wild type and vaccine strains of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The CSFV-specific primers were designed to contain the sequences of the T-rich insertion sites that exist uniquely in the 3' nontranslated regions (3' NTR) of the genome of lapinized CSFV vaccine strains. By using a one-step RT-PCR or a nested PCR followed by an agarose gel electrophoresis or a multicapillary electrophoresis, the wild-type and lapinized vaccine strains of CSFV in clinical samples could be detected and accurately distinguished. These assays can be applied to at least 3 attenuated lapinized vaccine strains, lapinized Philippines Coronel (LPC), hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV), and Chinese strain (C strain). The detection limit of the wild-type virus was 6.3 TCID(50) (50% tissue culture infective dose)/ml for RT-PCR and 0.63 TCID(50)/ml for nested PCR. In previous studies, notable T-rich insertions of 12-13 nucleotides (nt) were found in the 3' NTR of the genome of lapinized vaccine strains of CSFV. However, this study discovered that 2 T-rich insertions, 42 and 36 nt in length, are present in the viral genome of lapinized vaccine strains LPC/PRK (primary rabbit kidney) and LPC/TS (Tam-Sui), respectively. These T-rich insertions of 12, 36, and 42 nt length increases the size of PCR fragments, which are favorable genetic markers for rapid detection of and differentiation between wild-type and different lapinized vaccine strains of CSFV.

  9. A Rapid Field-Deployable Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Sensitive and Specific Detection of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambagala, A; Pahari, S; Fisher, M; Lee, P-Y A; Pasick, J; Ostlund, E N; Johnson, D J; Lung, O

    2017-04-01

    Bluetongue is a non-contagious, haemorrhagic, Culicoides-borne disease of ruminants. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV), is a member of the Orbivirus genus of the Reoviridae family. So far, 26 BTV serotypes have been identified worldwide. The global distribution of bluetongue has been expanding, and rapid detection of BTV, preferably in the field, is critical for timely implementation of animal movement restrictions and vector control measures. To date, many laboratory-based, molecular assays for detection of BTV have been developed. These methods require the samples to be shipped to a central laboratory with sophisticated instruments and highly skilled technicians to perform the assays, conduct analyses and interpret the results. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a rapid, portable, user-friendly, pan-BTV reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay that can potentially be used in low-resource field conditions. The total length of the assay was <60 min, and at the end of the assay, the results were automatically displayed as '+' or '-' without the need for data interpretation. The RT-iiPCR assay detected 36 BTV isolates and two in vitro transcribed RNA samples representing all 26 BTV serotypes. The assay did not cross-react with other animal viruses tested, including two closely related orbiviruses. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was as low as nine copies of in vitro transcribed double-stranded BTV RNA. Analysis of BTV-infected whole blood samples showed that the BTV RT-iiPCR assay was as sensitive as real-time RT-PCR. The assay can potentially be used for rapid screening of animals for BTV in routine diagnostics and for monitoring bluetongue outbreaks both in ruminants and in Culicoides vectors in the field and in the laboratory.

  10. Comparative Diagnosis of Human Bocavirus 1 Respiratory Infection With Messenger RNA Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), DNA Quantitative PCR, and Serology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Arku, Benedict; Jartti, Tuomas; Koskinen, Janne; Peltola, Ville; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2017-05-15

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 can cause life-threatening respiratory tract infection in children. Diagnosing acute HBoV1 infection is challenging owing to long-term airway persistence. We assessed whether messenger RNA (mRNA) detection would correlate better than DNA detection with acute HBoV1 infection. Paired serum samples from 121 children with acute wheezing were analyzed by means of serology. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription (RT) PCR were applied to nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) samples from all acutely HBoV1-infected children and from controls with nonacute infection. By serology, 16 of 121 children (13.2%) had acute HBoV1 infection, all of whom had HBoV1 DNA in NPS samples, and 12 of 16 (75%) had HBoV1 mRNA. Among 25 children with nondiagnostic results, 6 had HBoV1 DNA in NPS samples, and 1 had mRNA. All 13 mRNA-positive samples exhibited high DNA loads (≥106 copies/mL). No mRNA persisted for 2 weeks, whereas HBoV1 DNA persisted for 2 months in 4 children; 1 year later all 15 samples were DNA negative. Compared with serology, DNA PCR had high clinical sensitivity (100%) but, because of viral persistence, low specificity (76%). In contrast, mRNA RT-PCR had low clinical sensitivity (75%) but high specificity (96%). A combination of HBoV1 serology and nasopharyngeal DNA quantitative PCR and mRNA RT-PCR should be used for accurate diagnosis of HBoV1 infection.

  11. Comparison of the Diagnostic Value Between Real-Time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay and Histopathologic Examination in Sentinel Lymph Nodes for Patients With Gastric Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonjin; Nam, Soo Kyung; Shin, Eun; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Hee Eun; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-05-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN)-based diagnosis in gastric cancers has shown varied sensitivities and false-negative rates in several studies. Application of the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in SLN diagnosis has recently been proposed. A total of 155 SLNs from 65 patients with cT1-2, N0 gastric cancer were examined. The histopathologic results were compared with results obtained by real-time RT-PCR for detecting molecular RNA (mRNA) of cytokeratin (CK)19, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and CK20. The sensitivity and specificity of the multiple marker RT-PCR assay standardized against the results of the postoperative histological examination were 0.778 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577-0.914) and 0.781 (95% CI, 0.700-0.850), respectively. In comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative diagnosis were 0.819 (95% CI, 0.619-0.937) and 1.000 (95% CI, 0.972-1.000), respectively. The positive predictive value of the multiple-marker RT-PCR assay was 0.355 (95% CI, 0.192-0.546) for predicting non-SLN metastasis, which was lower than that of intraoperative diagnosis (0.813, 95% CI, 0.544-0.960). The real-time RT-PCR assay could detect SLN metastasis in gastric cancer. However, the predictive value of the real-time RT-PCR assay was lower than that of precise histopathologic examination and did not outweigh that of our intraoperative SLN diagnosis. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Detection of the Pandemic H1N1/2009 Influenza A Virus by a Highly Sensitive Quantitative Real-time Reverse-transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yang; Guoliang Mao; Yujun Liu; Yuan-Chuan Chen; Chengjing Liu; Jun Luo; Xihan Li

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been widely used successfully for detection and monitoring of the pandemic H1N 1/2009 influenza A virus.In this study,we report the design and characterization of a novel set of primers to be used in a qRT-PCR assay for detecting the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus.The newly designed primers target three regions that are highly conserved among the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of the pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and are different from those targeted by the WHO-recommended primers.The qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers are highly specific,and as specific as the WHO-recommended primers for detecting pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and other influenza viruses including influenza B viruses and influenza A viruses of human,swine,and raccoon dog origin.Furthermore,the qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers appeared to be at least 10-fold more sensitive than those with the WHO-recommended primers as the detection limits of the assays with our primers and the WHO-recommended primers were 2.5 and 25 copies of target RNA per reaction,respectively.When tested with 83 clinical samples,32 were detected to be positive using the qRT-PCR assays with our designed primers,while only 25 were positive by the assays with the WHO-recommended primers.These results suggest that the qRT-PCR system with the newly designed primers represent a highly sensitive assay for diagnosis of the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus infection.

  13. Detection of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus by Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction from Two Fish Species at Two Sites in Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Emily R.; Eckerlin, Geofrey E.; Getchell, Rodman G.; Groocock, Geoffrey H.; Thompson, Tarin M.; Batts, William N.; Casey, Rufina N.; Kurath, Gael; Winton, James R.; Bowser, Paul R.; Bain, Mark B.; Casey, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was first detected in the Laurentian Great Lakes in 2005 during a mortality event in the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario. Subsequent analysis of archived samples determined that the first known isolation of VHSV in the Laurentian Great Lakes was from a muskellunge Esox masquinongy collected in Lake St. Clair in 2003. By the end of 2008, mortality events and viral isolations had occurred in all of the Laurentian Great Lakes except Lake Superior. In 2009, a focused disease surveillance program was designed to determine whether VHSV was also present in Lake Superior. In this survey, 874 fish from 7 sites along the U.S. shoreline of Lake Superior were collected during June 2009. Collections were focused on nearshore species known to be susceptible to VHSV. All fish were dissected individually by using aseptic techniques and were tested for the presence of VHSV genetic material by use of a quantitative reverse transcription (qRT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the viral nucleoprotein gene. Seventeen fish from two host species at two different sites tested positive at low levels for VHSV. All attempts to isolate virus in cell culture were unsuccessful. However, the presence of viral RNA was confirmed independently in five fish by using a nested PCR that targeted the glycoprotein (G) gene. Partial G gene sequences obtained from three fish were identical to the corresponding sequence from the original 2003 VHSV isolate (MI03) from muskellunge. These detections represent the earliest evidence for the presence of VHSV in Lake Superior and illustrate the utility of the highly sensitive qRT-PCR assay for disease surveillance in aquatic animals.

  14. Evaluation and optimization of SYBR Green real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a tool for diagnosis of the Flavivirus genus in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Farignoli Romeiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The genus Flavivirus includes several pathogenic species that cause severe illness in humans. Therefore, a rapid and accurate molecular method for diagnosis and surveillance of these viruses would be of great importance. Here, we evaluate and optimize a quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method for the diagnosis of the Flavivirus genus. METHODS: We evaluated different commercial kits that use the SYBR Green system for real-time RT-PCR with a primer set that amplifies a fragment of the NS5 flavivirus gene. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay were tested using twelve flaviviruses and ribonucleic acid (RNA transcribed from the yellow fever virus. Additionally, this assay was evaluated using the sera of 410 patients from different regions of Brazil with acute febrile illness and a negative diagnosis for the dengue virus. RESULTS: The real-time RT-PCR amplified all flaviviruses tested at a melting temperature of 79.92 to 83.49°C. A detection limit of 100 copies per ml was determined for this assay. Surprisingly, we detected dengue virus in 4.1% (17/410 of samples from patients with febrile illness and a supposedly negative dengue infection diagnosis. The viral load in patients ranged from 2.1×107to 3.4×103copies per ml. CONCLUSIONS: The real-time RT-PCR method may be very useful for preliminary diagnoses in screenings, outbreaks, and other surveillance studies. Moreover, this assay can be easily applied to monitor viral activity and to measure viral load in pathogenesis studies.

  15. Development, Evaluation, and Integration of a Quantitative Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Diagnostic Test for Ebola Virus on a Molecular Diagnostics Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnops, Lieselotte; Van den Eede, Peter; Pettitt, James; Heyndrickx, Leo; De Smet, Birgit; Coppens, Sandra; Andries, Ilse; Pattery, Theresa; Van Hove, Luc; Meersseman, Geert; Van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Vergauwe, Nicolas; Thijs, Rein; Jahrling, Peter B; Nauwelaers, David; Ariën, Kevin K

    2016-10-15

     The 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa resulted in accelerated development of rapid diagnostic tests for emergency outbreak preparedness. We describe the development and evaluation of the Idylla™ prototype Ebola virus test, a fully automated sample-to-result molecular diagnostic test for rapid detection of Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV).  The Idylla™ prototype Ebola virus test can simultaneously detect EBOV and SUDV in 200 µL of whole blood. The sample is directly added to a disposable cartridge containing all reagents for sample preparation, RNA extraction, and amplification by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The performance was evaluated with a variety of sample types, including synthetic constructs and whole blood samples from healthy volunteers spiked with viral RNA, inactivated virus, and infectious virus.  The 95% limits of detection for EBOV and SUDV were 465 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL (1010 copies/mL) and 324 PFU/mL (8204 copies/mL), respectively. In silico and in vitro analyses demonstrated 100% correct reactivity for EBOV and SUDV and no cross-reactivity with relevant pathogens. The diagnostic sensitivity was 97.4% (for EBOV) and 91.7% (for SUDV), the specificity was 100%, and the diagnostic accuracy was 95.9%.  The Idylla™ prototype Ebola virus test is a fast, safe, easy-to-use, and near-patient test that meets the performance criteria to detect EBOV in patients with suspected Ebola. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients.

  17. Production of monoclonal antibodies for detection of Citrus leprosis virus C in enzyme-linked immuno-assays and immunocapture reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Roy, Avijit; Govindarajulu, A; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2014-09-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) causes damage in citrus production in the South and Central America. Since closely related types of citrus viruses have recently been described monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are needed for accurate and sensitive diagnosis of CiLV-C. In this study, MAbs to the expressed coat protein of CiLV-C were produced for serological detection of CiLV-C in crude extracts of infected tissues in double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (DAS-ELISA), dot blot immunosorbent assays (DBIA) and immuonocapture-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) procedures. Monoclonal antibodies were developed in mice to the purified expressed coat protein of CiLV-C. The published standard protocols of DAS-ELISA, DBIA and IC-RT-PCR were followed for the detection of coat protein p29 of CiLV-C in the crude extracts of CiLV-C infected tissues. Two monoclonal antibodies, designated G10 and C11, were identified from four potential candidates for the specific and sensitive detection of coat protein p29 of CiLV-C in the crude citrus extracts of CiLV-C infected tissues in DAS-ELISA, whereas G10 was also selected based on performance for use in the DBIA and IC-RT-PCR diagnostic assays. Sensitivity analysis comparing the three methods for detection of coat protein p29 of CiLV-C determined that IC-RT-PCR was more sensitive than DAS-ELISA and DBIA. The creation of MAbs to CiLV-C allows for the sensitive and accurate detection of the virus from CiLV-C infected citrus leaf tissues. Successful detection of the virus in three diagnostic assays formats provides flexibility to diagnosticians who can use either ELISA or DBIA for screening large numbers of samples, and IC-RT-PCR for rapid, sensitive confirmation testing. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Expression of dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus of the rat: characterization using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, G.; Liang, J.J. [Instituto de Fisiologia, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado postal 406, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sierra, A.; Martinez-Fong, D. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional de Mexico, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico City (Mexico); Quirion, R. [McGill Center for Research in Schizophrenia, Douglas Hospital Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Aceves, J. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional de Mexico, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico City (Mexico); Srivastava, L.K. [McGill Center for Research in Schizophrenia, Douglas Hospital Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    We analysed the expression of dopamine receptor subtypes in the subthalamic nucleus by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We also studied, using autoradiography, all pharmacologically characterized dopamine receptors in four subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. For comparison, dopamine receptor subtypes were also evaluated in brain regions where they are more abundant and well characterized. The radioligands used were: [{sup 3}H]SCH-23390, [{sup 3}H]emonapride and [{sup 3}H]2-dipropylamino-7-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene for dopamine D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} and D{sub 3} receptors, respectively; and [{sup 3}H]YM-09151-2 in the presence of raclopride for dopamine D{sub 4} receptors. Finally, we also evaluated the effect of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle on dopamine receptor levels expressed in the ipsilateral subthalamic nucleus. The lesion was estimated by decrease in the binding of [{sup 3}H]WIN-35428, a specific dopamine transporter label. D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} and D{sub 3} receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites were present in the subthalamic nucleus, but no messenger RNA for D{sub 4} receptors was found, although specific binding sites for these receptors were observed. As compared to the intact side, the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not change D{sub 1} receptors, increased D{sub 2} receptors, and decreased D{sub 3} receptors and the dopamine transporter. The results suggest that postsynaptic D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} or D{sub 3} receptors can mediate the effect of dopamine on subthalamic nucleus neuronal activity. D{sub 4} receptors would mediate exclusively presynaptic effects.These results reinforce the idea that dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus may play an important role in the physiology of the basal ganglia and in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Reference gene selection for quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction normalization during in vitro adventitious rooting in Eucalyptus globulus Labill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquali Giancarlo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus globulus and its hybrids are very important for the cellulose and paper industry mainly due to their low lignin content and frost resistance. However, rooting of cuttings of this species is recalcitrant and exogenous auxin application is often necessary for good root development. To date one of the most accurate methods available for gene expression analysis is quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; however, reliable use of this technique requires reference genes for normalization. There is no single reference gene that can be regarded as universal for all experiments and biological materials. Thus, the identification of reliable reference genes must be done for every species and experimental approach. The present study aimed at identifying suitable control genes for normalization of gene expression associated with adventitious rooting in E. globulus microcuttings. Results By the use of two distinct algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder, we have assessed gene expression stability of eleven candidate reference genes in E. globulus: 18S, ACT2, EF2, EUC12, H2B, IDH, SAND, TIP41, TUA, UBI and 33380. The candidate reference genes were evaluated in microccuttings rooted in vitro, in presence or absence of auxin, along six time-points spanning the process of adventitious rooting. Overall, the stability profiles of these genes determined with each one of the algorithms were very similar. Slight differences were observed in the most stable pair of genes indicated by each program: IDH and SAND for geNorm, and H2B and TUA for NormFinder. Both programs indentified UBI and 18S as the most variable genes. To validate these results and select the most suitable reference genes, the expression profile of the ARGONAUTE1 gene was evaluated in relation to the most stable candidate genes indicated by each algorithm. Conclusion Our study showed that expression stability varied between putative reference genes

  20. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus in various lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens by different reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Handberg, Kurt; Kusk, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, including two recently developed strain-specific assays, were employed for detection of ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three different IBDV strains in bursa tissue samples from experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens. The virus strains...

  1. Establishment of Vero cell RNA polymerase I-driven reverse genetics for Influenza A virus and its application for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Suk; Baek, Yun Hee; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-06-01

    The constant threat of newly emerging influenza viruses with pandemic potential requires the need for prompt vaccine production. Here, we utilized the Vero cell polymerase I (PolI) promoter, rather than the commonly used human PolI promoter, in an established reverse-genetics system to rescue viable influenza viruses in Vero cells, an approved cell line for human vaccine production. The Vero PolI promoter was more efficient in Vero cells and demonstrated enhanced transcription levels and virus rescue rates commensurate with that of the human RNA PolI promoter in 293T cells. These results appeared to be associated with more efficient generation of A(H1N1)pdm09- and H5N1-derived vaccine seed viruses in Vero cells, whilst the rescue rates in 293T cells were comparable. Our study provides an alternative means for improving vaccine preparation by using a novel reverse-genetics system for generating influenza A viruses.

  2. Application of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to the detection the matrix, H5 and H7 genes of avian influenza viruses in field samples from South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Oem, Jae-Ku; Bae, You-Chan; Kang, Min-Su; Lee, Hee-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Kuk

    2013-03-14

    The rapid and accurate identification of the H5 and H7 subtypes of avian influenza (AI) virus is an important step for the control and eradication of highly pathogenic AI outbreaks and for the surveillance of AI viruses that have the potential to undergo changes in pathogenicity in poultry and wild birds. Currently, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) is routinely used for the rapid detection of the H5 and H7 genes, but misidentification is frequent for emergent isolates and viruses isolated from diverse regions due to the high sequence variation among AI viruses. In this study, an RRT-PCR method was tested for the detection of matrix, H5 and H7 genes from diverse subtypes of AI viruses and from field samples obtained through AI surveillance in South Korea over the last four years. Both RRT-PCR and conventional experiment (virus isolation using egg inoculation followed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) agreed on the virus-positive samples. And the comparison of the results with 174 clinical samples showed a high level of agreement without decreasing the specificity and sensitivity. This assay could be useful tool for the rapid detection of AI using the field samples from domestic poultry and wild birds in South Korea, and continuous regional updates is needed to validate primer sets as the AI virus evolves.

  3. Towards quantitative mRNA analysis in paraffin-embedded tissues using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction: a methodological study on lymph nodes from melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, Helene Nortvig; Steiniche, Torben; Nexo, Ebba; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl

    2003-02-01

    Improved extraction techniques combined with sensitive real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction may allow detection of mRNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) materials, but the factors affecting mRNA quantification in clinical material using these methods have not been systematically analyzed. We designed analyses using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for quantification of MART-1, beta-actin, and beta(2)-microglobulin mRNAs. The analytical intra- and interassay imprecision (coefficient of variation) was in the range 10 to 20% for all three genes studied. Using these protocols, we studied the influence of tissue autolysis and length of formalin-fixation on mRNA detection in metastatic melanoma. Delay in freezing reduced detectable mRNA, although this was less than predicted and mostly occurred early in autolysis. MART-1, beta-actin, and beta(2)-microglobulin mRNAs were consistently detected in FFPE metastatic melanoma even after fixation for up to 3 weeks, although the total mRNA detected was markedly reduced in fixed compared with fresh tissues (up to 99%). Quantification of MART-1 was, however, possible if this was expressed relative to a housekeeping gene. The polymerase chain reaction product from FFPE tissues could be increased up to 100-fold amplifying short (tissue processing and in fixation length seem to be less important sources of imprecision than previously assumed. Our findings suggest that quantitative analysis of mRNA in archive and routine diagnostic tissues may be possible.

  4. Primary A (H1N1) pdm09 Influenza Pneumonia Diagnosed on Reverse Transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid but not Rapid Tests with Nasopharyngeal Swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Noriyuki; Tani, Mayuko; Nishitsuji, Masaru; Nishi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with a fever was highly suspected of having influenza A infection since his wife and son who lived with him had been diagnosed with influenza A. Although repeated rapid tests with a nasopharyngeal swab showed negative findings, the patient developed bilateral pneumonia and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for A (H1N1) pdm09 virus in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was positive. We therefore diagnosed him with primary influenza pneumonia and initiated treatment with peramivir plus corticosteroids, which rapidly improved his condition. During the influenza season, sample collection from the lower airway and PCR should be considered for the definitive diagnosis of primary influenza viral pneumonia.

  5. Classical swine fever virus detection: results of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction ring trial conducted in the framework of the European network of excellence for epizootic disease diagnosis and control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Blome, Sandra; Bonilauri, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The current study reports on a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) ring trial for the detection of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genomic RNA undertaken by 10 European laboratories. All laboratories were asked to use their routine in-house real-time RT......-PCR protocols and a standardized protocol commonly used by the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (FLI) on a panel of well-characterized samples. In general, all participants produced results within the acceptable range. The FLI assay, several in-house assays, and the commercial kits had high analytical sensitivity...... and specificity values. Nevertheless, some in-house systems had unspecific reactions or suboptimal sensitivity with only a single CSFV genotype. Follow-up actions involved either improvement of suboptimal assays or replacement of specific laboratory assays with the FLI protocol, with or without modifications...

  6. Cloning of the canine RNA polymerase I promoter and establishment of reverse genetics for influenza A and B in MDCK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Gregory M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent incidents where highly pathogenic influenza A H5N1 viruses have spread from avian species into humans have prompted the development of cell-based production of influenza vaccines as an alternative to or replacement of current egg-based production. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells are the primary cell-substrate candidate for influenza virus production but an efficient system for the direct rescue of influenza virus from cloned influenza cDNAs in MDCK cells did not exist. The objective of this study was to develop a highly efficient method for direct rescue of influenza virus in MDCK cells. Results The eight-plasmid DNA transfection system for the rescue of influenza virus from cloned influenza cDNAs was adapted such that virus can be generated directly from MDCK cells. This was accomplished by cloning the canine RNA polymerase I (pol I promoter from MDCK cells and exchanging it for the human RNA pol I promoter in the eight plasmid rescue system. The adapted system retains bi-directional transcription of the viral cDNA template into both RNA pol I transcribed negative-sense viral RNA and RNA pol II transcribed positive-sense viral mRNA. The utility of this system was demonstrated by rescue in MDCK cells of 6:2 genetic reassortants composed of the six internal gene segments (PB1, PB2, PA, NP, M and NS from either the cold-adapted (ca influenza A vaccine strain (ca A/Ann Arbor/1/60 or the ca influenza B vaccine strain (ca B/Ann Arbor/1/66 and HA and NA gene segments from wild type influenza A and B strains. Representative 6:2 reassortants were generated for influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H6N1, H7N3 and H9N2 and for both the Victoria and Yamagata lineages of influenza B. The yield of infectious virus in the supernatant of transfected MDCK cells was 106 to 107 plaque forming units per ml by 5 to 7 days post-transfection. Conclusion This rescue system will enable efficient production of both influenza A and influenza B

  7. Genotypic characterization of Indian isolates of infectious bursal disease virus strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadharsini, C V; Senthilkumar, T M A; Raja, P; Kumanan, K

    2016-03-01

    The reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is used for the differentiation of classical virulent (cv), virulent (v) and very virulent (vv) strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates from chicken bursal tissues in southern states of India. In the present study, six different isolates (MB11, HY12, PY12, BGE14, VCN14 and NKL14) of IBDV strains were subjected for genotyping along with vaccine virus (Georgia, intermediate strain) using RT-PCR for amplification of a 743 bp sequence in the hypervariable region of VP2 gene followed by restriction enzyme digestion with 5 different restriction enzymes (BspMI, SacI, HhaI, StuI and SspI). The RT-PCR products obtained from vvIBDV strains were digested by SspI enzyme except PY12, BGE14 and MB11 isolates. The SacI digested the isolate MB11, PY12 and the vaccine strain, but it did not cleave the very virulent isolates of IBDV. HhaI cleaved all the isolates with different restriction profile patterns. StuI digested all the vvIBDV isolates and BspMI was not able to differentiate field isolates from vaccine strain. Though RT-PCR combined with RFLP is a genotypic method, further confirmation of serotypes to distinguish the vvIBDV from cvIBDV has to be carried out using pathogenicity studies.

  8. Single-Step RNA Extraction from Different Hydrogel-Embedded Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Natascha; Schmiermund, Alexandra; Grubelnig, Stefan; Leber, Jasmin; Ehlicke, Franziska; Czermak, Peter; Salzig, Denise

    2016-06-01

    For many tissue engineering applications, cells such as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) must be embedded in hydrogels. The analysis of embedded hMSCs requires RNA extraction, but common extraction procedures often produce low yields and/or poor quality RNA. We systematically investigated four homogenization methods combined with eight RNA extraction protocols for hMSCs embedded in three common hydrogel types (alginate, agarose, and gelatin). We found for all three hydrogel types that using liquid nitrogen or a rotor-stator produced low RNA yields, whereas using a microhomogenizer or enzymatic/chemical hydrogel digestion achieved better yields regardless of which extraction protocol was subsequently applied. The hot phenol extraction protocol generally achieved the highest A260 values (representing up to 40.8 μg RNA per 10(6) cells), but the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method produced RNA of better quality, with A260/A280 and A260/A230 ratios and UV spectra similar to the pure RNA control. The RNA produced by this method was also suitable as a template for endpoint and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), achieving low Ct values of ∼20. The prudent choice of hydrogel homogenization and RNA extraction methods can ensure the preparation of high-quality RNA that generates reliable endpoint and quantitative RT-PCR data. We therefore propose a universal method that is suitable for the extraction of RNA from cells embedded in all three hydrogel types commonly used for tissue engineering.

  9. Significance of detecting circulating hepatocellular carcinoma cells in peripheral blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients by nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and its clinical value: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yue-ru; Wang, Long; Song, Rui-mei; Zhou, Bo; Song, Zhen-shun

    2014-01-01

    Circulating hepatocellular carcinoma cells may be detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We investigated the relationship between circulating hepatocellular carcinoma cells and hepatoma patient survival after different managements and survival periods. Peripheral vein blood (5 ml) samples were obtained from 113 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and from 33 control subjects (9 with liver cirrhosis after hepatitis B, 14 with chronic hepatitis B, 10 healthy individuals) between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013. To detect circulating hepatocellular carcinoma cells in peripheral blood, alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA was amplified from total RNA extracted from whole blood by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA was detected in 59 blood samples from the hepatocellular carcinoma patients (59/113, 52.2%). In contrast, there were no clinical control subjects whose samples showed detectable alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA. The presence of alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA in blood seemed to be correlated with the stage (by TNM classification) of hepatocellular carcinoma, serum alpha-fetoprotein value, and the presence of intrahepatic metastasis, portal vein thrombosis, tumor diameter and/or distant metastasis. In addition, alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA was detected in the blood of 25 patients showing distant metastasis at extrahepatic organs (100%), in contrast to 32 of 88 cases without metastasis (36.4%). All the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were followed. Seventeen patients with resection of a T 2 stage hepatocellular carcinoma had a survival of 3.2 years after surgical management, 38 cases with resection of a T3 stage hepatocellular carcinoma had a 1.3-year survival, and only 37 cases with T4 stage disease after different treatments except surgery survived for 0.6 years (P <0.01). The presence of alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA in peripheral blood may be an indicator of circulating

  10. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianjun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV, a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively.

  11. Temperature inactivation of Feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 in comparison with human noroviruses using an RNA exposure assay and reverse transcribed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-A novel method for predicting virus infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, J R; Schnerr, H; Haines, J; Scott, M; Carter, M J; Willcocks, M M; Bellamy, K; Brown, D W; Gray, J J; Gallimore, C I; Knight, A I

    2009-03-01

    A one-step reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) method in combination with RNase treatment and low copy number samples was developed in order to examine the effect of temperature on the ability of virus capsids to protect their RNA content. The method was applied to a non-cultivable virus (GII.4 norovirus) and Feline calicivirus vaccine strain F-9 (FCV) which is often used as a norovirus surrogate. Results demonstrated that FCV RNA is exposed maximally after 2min at 63.3 degrees C and this correlated with a greater than 4.5log reduction in infectivity as assessed by plaque assay. In contrast human GII.4 norovirus RNA present in diluted clinical specimens was not exposed maximally until 76.6 degrees C, at least 13.3 degrees C greater than that for FCV. These data suggest that norovirus possesses greater thermostability than this commonly used surrogate. Further, these studies indicate that current food processing regimes for pasteurisation are insufficient to achieve inactivation of GII.4 NoVs. The method provides a novel molecular method for predicting virus infectivity.

  12. The use of a one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) for the surveillance of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Nicholas B D; Patnayak, Devi P; Jiang, Yin; Goyal, Sagar M

    2012-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a highly contagious and pathogenic virus of fish. The virus infects more than 70 fish species worldwide, in both fresh and salt water. A new viral strain (VHSV-IVb) has proven both virulent and persistent, spreading throughout the Great Lakes of North America and to inland water bodies in the region. To better understand the geographic distribution of the virus, we used a modified real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for high-throughput testing of fish for VHSV. The assay was shown to be twice as sensitive as the gold standard, virus isolation, and did not cross react with other viruses found in fish. In addition, the diagnostic turnaround time was reduced from 28 to 30 d for virus isolation to 2-4 d for rRT-PCR. To demonstrate the usefulness of the rRT-PCR assay, 115 high-priority water bodies in Minnesota were tested by both methods from April 2010 to June 2011. All survey sites tested negative for VHSV by both methods. The survey results have informed fisheries managers on the absence of VHSV in Minnesota and have better prepared them for the eventual arrival of the disease. In addition, the results demonstrate the value of this rRT-PCR as a surveillance tool to rapidly identify an outbreak so that it can be controlled in a timely manner.

  13. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR based detection and serotyping of FMD Virus from field samples of Gazipur, Bangladesh, and adaptation of the virus in BHK-21 cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashraful Alam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed for the detection and serotyping of Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV circulating in Kapasia Upazila, Gazipur district of Bangladesh during 2013. Twelve samples comprising of tongue epithelium (n=8 and inter digital tissue (n=4 were collected from suspected cattle, and inocula were prepared. The inocula were inoculated into confluent BHK-21 cell line for virus propagation. After 3 subsequent passages; progressive cytopathic effects (CPE specific for FMDV i.e., rounding and flattening of cells, breaking down of the intercellular bridge and finally cell death (almost 100% were observed; these were indicative of successful virus propagation in the cells. Viral RNA was extracted, and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR was performed using three sets of primers corresponding to the serotype and lsquo;O', and lsquo;Asia-1' and and lsquo;A', respectively. Out of the 12 samples, 10 (83.33% were found to be positive for FMDV, and all of those were of serotype and lsquo;O'. It is concluded that FMDV serotype and lsquo;O' is circulating among the cattle of Gazipur district, Bangladesh. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 291-295

  14. Field detection of eastern equine encephalitis virus in the Amazon Basin region of Peru using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction adapted for field identification of arthropod-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S; Kondig, John P; Fernandez, Roberto; Carbajal, Faustino

    2004-02-01

    In support of efforts to develop rapid diagnostic assays for use in the field, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays were developed to detect arboviruses circulating in the Amazon Basin region of Peru. Previous knowledge of arthropod/pathogen relationships allowed a focused evaluation to be conducted in November 2000 that assessed the feasibility and reliability of a mobile, rapid, field-expedient RT-PCR diagnostic system aimed at detecting eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) in Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi mosquitoes. Modifications were made to a commercially available mobile molecular laboratory kit and assay procedures were tailored for use under harsh environmental conditions with field-collected and field-processed mosquitoes. From CO2 baited mosquito light traps, 3,227 Cx. (Mel.) pedroi mosquitoes were collected and sorted into 117 pools. The pools were processed and assayed in the field by RT-PCR and five of those pools were found positive for EEEV. Laboratory sequence analysis confirmed the presence of two distinct subtypes of EEEV.

  15. The development of a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay using TaqMan technology for the pan detection of bluetongue virus (BTV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Catherine; McMenamy, Michael J; Hoffmann, Bernd; Earley, Bernadette; Markey, Bryan; Cassidy, Joseph; Allan, Gordon; Welsh, Michael D; McKillen, John

    2017-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an infectious, non-contagious viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants that is transmitted by adult females of certain Culicoides species. Since 2006, several serotypes including BTV-1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9 and 16, have spread from the Mediterranean basin into Northern Europe for the first time. BTV-8 in particular, caused a major epidemic in northern Europe. As a result, it is evident that most European countries are at risk of BTV infection. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay based on TaqMan technology for the detection of representative strains of all BTV serotypes. Primers and probes were based on genome segment 10 of the virus, the NS3 gene. The assay was tested for sensitivity, and specificity. The analytical sensitivity of the rRT-PCR assay was 200 copies of RNA per reaction. The assay did not amplify the closely related orbivirus epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) but successfully detected all BTV reference strains including clinical samples from animals experimentally infected with BTV-8. This real time RT-PCR assay offers a sensitive, specific and rapid alternative assay for the pan detection of BTV that could be used as part of a panel of diagnostic assays for the detection of all serotypes of BTV. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction/pyrosequencing to characterize neuraminidase H275 residue of influenza A 2009 H1N1 virus for rapid and specific detection of the viral oseltamivir resistance marker in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jian R; Huard, Thomas K; Piscitelli, Arelis E; Tummala, Praveena R; Aleemi, Virginia E; Coon, Stephanie L; Master, Ronald N; Lewinski, Michael A; Clark, Richard B

    2011-12-01

    Pandemic 2009 H1N1 is normally susceptible to oseltamivir, but variants harboring the H275Y (CAC → TAC) mutation exhibit resistance. We describe the use of a combined reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)/pyrosequencing approach to identify the H275 residue. A total of 223 specimens were tested with this method: 216 randomly selected clinical specimens positive for 2009 H1N1 and 7 cell-culture supernatants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 4 resistant, 3 susceptible 2009 H1N1 strains). The assay detected H275Y in 1 clinical respiratory sample (0.5%) and all 4 oseltamivir-resistant strains from the CDC; the remaining 215 clinical and 3 susceptible CDC specimens were wild-type. Sanger sequencing confirmed the results for 50 of 50 selected isolates. The RT-PCR/pyrosequencing method was highly specific, producing no amplicons or valid sequences from samples containing non-H1N1 viruses or bacteria. Our findings suggest that this method provides a rapid tool for H275Y detection, with high sensitivity and potential benefit for patient care.

  17. Broadly reactive pan-paramyxovirus reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for the detection of Canine distemper virus in a case of canine meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzberg, Scott J.; Li, Qiang; Porter, Brian F.; Barber, Renee M.; Claiborne, Mary Kate; Levine, Jonathan M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Israel, Sarah K.; Young, Benjamin D.; Kiupel, Matti; Greene, Craig; Ruone, Susan; Anderson, Larry; Tong, Suxiang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immunologic protection associated with routine vaccination protocols, Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains an important pathogen of dogs. Antemortem diagnosis of systemic CDV infection may be made by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or immunohistochemical testing for CDV antigen; central nervous system infection often requires postmortem confirmation via histopathology and immunohistochemistry. An 8-month-old intact male French Bulldog previously vaccinated for CDV presented with multifocal neurologic signs. Based on clinical and postmortem findings, the dog’s disease was categorized as a meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Broadly reactive, pan-paramyxovirus RT-PCR using consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers, combined with sequence analysis, identified CDV amplicons in the dog’s brain. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CDV antigens, and a specific CDV RT-PCR based on the phosphoprotein gene identified a wild-type versus vaccinal virus strain. This case illustrates the utility of broadly reactive PCR and sequence analysis for the identification of pathogens in diseases with unknown etiology. PMID:19901287

  18. Two RNAs or DNAs May Artificially Fuse Together at a Short Homologous Sequence (SHS during Reverse Transcription or Polymerase Chain Reactions, and Thus Reporting an SHS-Containing Chimeric RNA Requires Extra Caution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingkun Xie

    Full Text Available Tens of thousands of chimeric RNAs have been reported. Most of them contain a short homologous sequence (SHS at the joining site of the two partner genes but are not associated with a fusion gene. We hypothesize that many of these chimeras may be technical artifacts derived from SHS-caused mis-priming in reverse transcription (RT or polymerase chain reactions (PCR. We cloned six chimeric complementary DNAs (cDNAs formed by human mitochondrial (mt 16S rRNA sequences at an SHS, which were similar to several expression sequence tags (ESTs.These chimeras, which could not be detected with cDNA protection assay, were likely formed because some regions of the 16S rRNA are reversely complementary to another region to form an SHS, which allows the downstream sequence to loop back and anneal at the SHS to prime the synthesis of its complementary strand, yielding a palindromic sequence that can form a hairpin-like structure.We identified a 16S rRNA that ended at the 4th nucleotide(nt of the mt-tRNA-leu was dominant and thus should be the wild type. We also cloned a mouse Bcl2-Nek9 chimeric cDNA that contained a 5-nt unmatchable sequence between the two partners, contained two copies of the reverse primer in the same direction but did not contain the forward primer, making it unclear how this Bcl2-Nek9 was formed and amplified. Moreover, a cDNA was amplified because one primer has 4 nts matched to the template, suggesting that there may be many more artificial cDNAs than we have realized, because the nuclear and mt genomes have many more 4-nt than 5-nt or longer homologues. Altogether, the chimeric cDNAs we cloned are good examples suggesting that many cDNAs may be artifacts due to SHS-caused mis-priming and thus greater caution should be taken when new sequence is obtained from a technique involving DNA polymerization.

  19. Development and evaluation of a reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay for detection of equine arteritis virus in equine semen and tissue samples using the POCKIT™ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carossino, Mariano; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Nam, Bora; Skillman, Ashley; Shuck, Kathleen M; Timoney, Peter J; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-08-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), a respiratory and reproductive disease of horses. Most importantly, EAV induces abortion in pregnant mares and can establish persistent infection in up to 10-70% of the infected stallions, which will continue to shed the virus in their semen. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) for the detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples. The newly developed assay had a limit of detection of 10 RNA copies and a 10-fold higher sensitivity than a previously described real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Evaluation of 125 semen samples revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 98.46% and 100.00%, respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 100.00% and 98.33%, respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. Both assays had the same accuracy (99.2%, k=0.98) compared to virus isolation. Corresponding values derived from testing various tissue samples (n=122) collected from aborted fetuses, foals, and EAV carrier stallions are as follows: relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.14%, 96.83%, and 92.62% (k=0.85), respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 98.31%, 92.06%, and 95.08% (k=0.90), respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. These results indicate that RT-iiPCR is a sensitive, specific, and a robust test enabling detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples with very considerable accuracy. Even though the RT-qPCR assay showed a sensitivity and specificity equal to virus isolation for semen samples, its diagnostic performance was somewhat limited for tissue samples. Thus, this new RT-iiPCR could be considered as an alternative tool in the implementation of EAV control and prevention strategies.

  20. Evaluation and application of a one-step duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the rapid detection of influenza A (H7N9) virus from poultry samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hongmei; Ma, Yong; Shi, Jianzhong; Zeng, Xianying; Zhao, Yuhui; Wang, Xiurong; Chen, Hualan

    2015-10-01

    In China, a novel reassortant influenza A (H7N9) virus, which has caused 435 cases of human infection, has recently emerged. Most cases of human infections with the H7N9 virus are known to be associated with a poultry farm and live-poultry markets. In this study, a one-step duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of the H7N9 virus for effective surveillance and early diagnosis of cases from clinical samples collected from live-poultry markets or poultry farms. The detection limit of this assay was as low as 0.1 EID50 of H7N9 viruses, which is similar to the detection limit of the real-time RT-PCR assay released by the Word Health Organization. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of both inter-assay and intra-assay reproducibility were less than 1.55 %, showing good reproducibility. No cross-reactivity was observed with RNA of other subtypes of influenza virus or other avian respiratory viruses. The assay can effectively detect H7N9 influenza virus RNA from multiple sources, including chickens, pigeons, ducks, humans, and the environment. Furthermore, the RRT-PCR assay was evaluated with more than 700 clinical samples collected from live-poultry markets and 120 experimentally infected chicken samples. Together, these results indicate that the duplex RRT-PCR assay is a specific, sensitive, and efficient diagnostic method for the epidemiological surveillance and diagnosis of H7N9 virus from different sources, particularly poultry samples.

  1. Phylogenetic and molecular characteristics of Eurasian H9 avian influenza viruses and their detection by two different H9-specific RealTime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, M J; Hanna, A; Mahmood, S; Govil, J; Krill, D; Manvell, R J; Shell, W; Arnold, M E; Banks, J; Brown, I H

    2013-03-23

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) of the H9 haemagglutinin subtype are endemic in many Asian and Middle-East countries, causing mortality and morbidity in poultry. Consequently there is a need for accurate and sensitive detection of Eurasian H9 subtype viruses. Two H9 RealTime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) tests, developed by Monne et al. (2008) and Ben Shabat et al. (2010), were originally validated with a limited number of H9 specimens. In the present study, the two tests have been assessed using 66 diverse H9 isolates and 139 clinical specimens from six H9 poultry outbreaks in four geographically disparate Eurasian countries. The Monne et al. (2008) test was modified and successfully detected all H9 viruses from all three Eurasian H9 lineages. Bayesian analysis of the clinical specimens' results revealed this test to be more sensitive (97%) than the Ben Shabat et al. (2010) test (31%). The latter test detected most H9 isolates of the G1 lineage, but no isolates from other H9 lineages. Mismatches in the primer/probe binding sequences accounted for sensitivity differences between the two H9 RRT-PCRs. Genetic analysis of 34 sequenced H9 haemagglutinin genes showed the South Asian and Middle-East H9 isolates to belong to the H9 G1 lineage, and possessed residues that appear to preferably bind alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid receptors which indicate a potential for human infection. European H9s clustered phylogenetically in a broader geographical group that includes recent North American H9 wild bird isolates and contemporary Asian viruses in the Y439 H9 lineage.

  2. Detection of Echinoderm Microtubule Associated Protein Like 4-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Fusion Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Clinical Samples by a Real-time Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jin-Yin; Chen, Zhi-Xia; Zhong, Wei; Li, Long-Yun; Liu, Li-Cheng; Hu, Xiao-Xu; Chen, Wei-Jun; Wang, Meng-Zhao

    2016-12-20

    Objective To establish a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR) for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer. Methods The specific primers for the four variants of EML4-ALK fusion genes (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) and Taqman fluorescence probes for the detection of the target sequences were carefully designed by the Primer Premier 5.0 software. Then, using pseudovirus containing EML4-ALK fusion genes variants (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) as the study objects, we further analyzed the lower limit, sensitivity, and specificity of this method. Finally, 50 clinical samples, including 3 ALK-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) positive specimens, were collected and used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes using this method. Results The lower limit of this method for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes was 10 copies/μl if no interference of background RNA existed. Regarding the method's sensitivity, the detection resolution was as high as 1% and 0.5% in the background of 500 and 5000 copies/μl wild-type ALK gene, respectively. Regarding the method's specificity, no non-specific amplification was found when it was used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes in leukocyte and plasma RNA samples from healthy volunteers. Among the 50 clinical samples, 47 ALK-FISH negative samples were also negative. Among 3 ALK-FISH positive samples, 2 cases were detected positive using this method, but another was not detected because of the failure of RNA extraction. Conclusion The proposed qRT-PCR assay for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes is rapid, simple, sensitive, and specific, which is deserved to be validated and widely used in clinical settings.

  3. Tissue and allelic-specific expression of hsp70 gene in chickens: basal and heat-stress-induced mRNA level quantified with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, F-S; Du, H-L; Xu, H-P; Luo, Q-B; Zhang, X-Q

    2006-08-01

    1. The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70) are a family of molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and participate in many cellular functions. The objective of the current research was to investigate the relationship between tissue or allele and the expression of chicken hsp70 under normal growth conditions and during acute heat stress (44 degrees C for 4 h). 2. A total of 279 individuals were genotyped for two single nucleotide polymorphisms (A258G and C276G) in chicken hsp70 gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. 3. The mRNA abundance of chicken hsp70 genes was evaluated by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of hsp70 gene in the liver (9.83 +/- 0.84, 10(7)) was significantly higher than that in the muscle (4.42 +/- 0.36, 10(7)) under normal growth conditions. However, during acute heat stress, the expression of hsp70 gene in the brain (1.82 +/- 0.25, 10(9)) was the highest and was significantly different from those in the liver (1.08 +/- 0.16, 10(9)) and muscle (1.08 +/- 0.13, 10(9)). 4. The expression of hsp70 among different genotypes or haplotype combinations is quite different under normal and heat-stress conditions. The haplotype H3 (GC) is probably advantageous to improving heat resistance of chickens. 5. The results from the present study indicate that the expression of hsp70 in chickens is affected by heat stress, and is tissue- and allele-dependent.

  4. Detection of African swine fever, classical swine fever, and foot-and-mouth disease viruses in swine oral fluids by multiplex reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Frederic R; Schroeder, Megan E; Mulhern, Erin L; McIntosh, Michael T; Bounpheng, Mangkey A

    2015-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF), classical swine fever (CSF), and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) are highly contagious animal diseases of significant economic importance. Pigs infected with ASF and CSF viruses (ASFV and CSFV) develop clinical signs that may be indistinguishable from other diseases. Likewise, various causes of vesicular disease can mimic clinical signs caused by the FMD virus (FMDV). Early detection is critical to limiting the impact and spread of these disease outbreaks, and the ability to perform herd-level surveillance for all 3 diseases rapidly and cost effectively using a single diagnostic sample and test is highly desirable. This study assessed the feasibility of simultaneous ASFV, CSFV, and FMDV detection by multiplex reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (mRT-qPCR) in swine oral fluids collected through the use of chewing ropes. Animal groups were experimentally infected independently with each virus, observed for clinical signs, and oral fluids collected and tested throughout the course of infection. All animal groups chewed on the ropes readily before and after onset of clinical signs and before onset of lameness or serious clinical signs. ASFV was detected as early as 3 days postinoculation (dpi), 2-3 days before onset of clinical disease; CSFV was detected at 5 dpi, coincident with onset of clinical disease; and FMDV was detected as early as 1 dpi, 1 day before the onset of clinical disease. Equivalent results were observed in 4 independent studies and demonstrate the feasibility of oral fluids and mRT-qPCR for surveillance of ASF, CSF, and FMD in swine populations. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Development and validation of a real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for investigation of wild poliovirus type 1-South Asian (SOAS) strain reintroduced into Israel, 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindiyeh, M Y; Moran-Gilad, J; Manor, Y; Ram, D; Shulman, L M; Sofer, D; Mendelson, E

    2014-02-20

    In February 2013, wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) was reintroduced into southern Israel and resulted in continuous silent circulation in the highly immune population. As a part of the public health emergency response, a novel real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed, to allow for the sensitive and specific detection of the circulatingWPV1-South Asian (SOAS) strain. Specific primers and probes derived from the VP-1 region were designed, based on sequenced sewage isolates, and used to simultaneously amplify this WPV1-SOAS sequence together with bacteriophage MS-2 as internal control. High titre WPV1-SOAS stock virus was used for assay optimisation and 50 processed sewage samples collected from southern Israel and tested by reference culture based methods were used for analytical validation of the assay’s performance. The limit of detection of the multiplex qRT-PCR (SOAS/MS-2) assay was 0.1 plaque-forming unit (pfu)/reaction (20 pfu/mL) for WPV1-SOAS RNA with 100% sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values when compared to the culture based method. The turnaround time was rapid, providing results for environmental samples within 24 to 48 hours from completion of sewage processing, instead of five to seven days by culture-based analysis. Direct sewage testing by qRT-PCR assay proved to be a useful tool for rapid detection and environmental surveillance of WPV1-SOAS circulating strain during emergency response. Application of the approach for detection of WPV1-SOAS in stool samples obtained during acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance or field surveys should be further evaluated.

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, histopathology, and immunohistochemical labeling for the detection of Rift Valley fever virus in naturally infected cattle and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendaal, Lieza; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Romito, Marco; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Clift, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), histopathology, and immunohistochemical labeling (IHC) were performed on liver specimens from 380 naturally infected cattle and sheep necropsied during the 2010 Rift Valley fever (RVF) epidemic in South Africa. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of real-time RT-PCR, histopathology, and IHC were estimated in a latent-class model using a Bayesian framework. The Se and Sp of real-time RT-PCR were estimated as 97.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.2-98.8%) and 71.7% (95% CI = 65-77.9%) respectively. The Se and Sp of histopathology were estimated as 94.6% (95% CI = 91-97.2%) and 92.3% (95% CI = 87.6-95.8%), respectively. The Se and Sp of IHC were estimated as 97.6% (95% CI = 93.9-99.8%) and 99.4% (95% CI = 96.9-100%), respectively. Decreased Sp of real-time RT-PCR was ascribed to cross-contamination of samples. Stratified analysis of the data suggested variations in test accuracy with fetuses and severely autolyzed specimens. The Sp of histopathology in fetuses (83%) was 9.3% lower than the sample population (92.3%). The Se of IHC decreased from 97.6% to 81.5% in the presence of severe autolysis. The diagnostic Se and Sp of histopathology was higher than expected, confirming the value of routine postmortem examinations and histopathology of liver specimens. Aborted fetuses, however, should be screened using a variety of tests in areas endemic for RVF, and results from severely autolyzed specimens should be interpreted with caution. The most feasible testing option for countries lacking suitably equipped laboratories seems to be routine histology in combination with IHC.

  7. New methods as alternative or corrective measures for the pitfalls and artifacts of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in cloning chimeric or antisense-accompanied RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengfu; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Min; Liao, D Joshua

    2013-06-01

    We established new methods for cloning cDNA ends that start with reverse transcription (RT) and soon proceed with the synthesis of the second cDNA strand, avoiding manipulations of fragile RNA. Our 3'-end cloning method does not involve poly-dT primers and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), is low in efficiency but high in fidelity and can clone those RNAs without a poly-A tail. We also established a cDNA protection assay to supersede RNA protection assay. The protected cDNA can be amplified, cloned and sequenced, enhancing sensitivity and fidelity. We report that RT product using gene-specific primer (GSP) cannot be gene- or strand-specific because RNA sample contains endogenous random primers (ERP). The gene-specificity may be improved by adding a linker sequence at the 5'-end of the GSP to prime RT and using the linker as a primer in the ensuing PCR. The strand-specificity may be improved by using strand-specific DNA oligos in our protection assay. The CDK4 mRNA and TSPAN31 mRNA are transcribed from the opposite DNA strands and overlap at their 3' ends. Using this relationship as a model, we found that the overlapped sequence might serve as a primer with its antisense as the template to create a wrong-template extension in RT or PCR. We infer that two unrelated RNAs or cDNAs overlapping at the 5'- or 3'-end might create a spurious chimera in this way, and many chimeras with a homologous sequence may be such artifacts. The ERP and overlapping antisense together set complex pitfalls, which one should be aware of.

  8. Real-Time Reverse-Transcription Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay Is a Feasible Method for the Relative Quantification of Heregulin Expression in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Kristof

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In preclinical studies, heregulin ( HRG expression was shown to be the most relevant predictive biomarker for response to patritumab, a fully human anti–epidermal growth factor receptor 3 monoclonal antibody. In support of a phase 2 study of erlotinib ± patritumab in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR assay for relative quantification of HRG expression from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE NSCLC tissue samples was developed and validated and described herein. Test specimens included matched FFPE normal lung and NSCLC and frozen NSCLC tissue, and HRG -positive and HRG -negative cell lines. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue was examined for functional performance. Heregulin distribution was also analyzed across 200 NSCLC commercial samples. Applied Biosystems TaqMan Gene Expression Assays were run on the Bio-Rad CFX96 real-time PCR platform. Heregulin RT-qPCR assay specificity, PCR efficiency, PCR linearity, and reproducibility were demonstrated. The final assay parameters included the Qiagen FFPE RNA Extraction Kit for RNA extraction from FFPE NSCLC tissue, 50 ng of RNA input, and 3 reference (housekeeping genes ( HMBS, IPO8 , and EIF2B1 , which had expression levels similar to HRG expression levels and were stable among FFPE NSCLC samples. Using the validated assay, unimodal HRG distribution was confirmed across 185 evaluable FFPE NSCLC commercial samples. Feasibility of an RT-qPCR assay for the quantification of HRG expression in FFPE NSCLC specimens was demonstrated.

  9. A comparison of the cytotoxicity and proinflammatory cytokine production of EndoSequence root repair material and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate in human osteoblast cell culture using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasca, Maria; Aminoshariae, Anita; Jin, Ge; Montagnese, Thomas; Mickel, Andre

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity and cytokine expression profiles of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM; Brasseler, Savannah, GA) putty, ERRM flowable, and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN) using osteoblast cells (MG-63). Four millimeters in diameter of each material was placed in the center of a 6-well culture plate, and a 2-mL suspension (10(5) cells/mL) of human osteoblasts was seeded in each well. Photomicrograph images were used to evaluate cytotoxicity as evidenced by the lack of osteoblast cell growth in relation to the materials with AH-26 (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) as the positive control. In addition, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Cytokine expression of MG-63 cells upon lipopolysaccharide treatment was used as controls. RT-PCR results were normalized by the expression of the housekeeping gene β-actin and were used to measure cytokine expression. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. Results showed that ERRM putty and MTA exhibited minimal levels of cytotoxicity; however, ERRM was slightly more cytotoxic although not statistically significant. The expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 was detected in all samples with minimal TNF-α expression. We concluded that ERRM and MTA showed similar cytotoxicity and cytokine expressions. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening of dengue virus in field-caught Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) by one-step SYBR green-based reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay during 2004-2007 in Southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Fu; Shu, Pei-Yun; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Su, Chien-Ling; Wu, Jhy-Wen; Wang, Jen-Hsin; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Wu, Ho-Sheng

    2010-12-01

    We carried out virological surveillance of dengue virus (DENV) in field-caught Aedes mosquitoes during 2004-2007 to estimate the monthly prevalence of infected females in dengue high-risk areas of Taiwan. A total of 92,892 Aedes aegypti (43,133 females and 49,759 males) and 79,315 Aedes albopictus (57,319 females and 21,996 males) adults were collected, grouped into 25,654 pools, and processed for virus detection using a one-step SYBR Green-based real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay. DENVs were periodically and sympatrically detected in Ae. aegypti females in accordance with major dengue outbreaks and the corresponding dengue serotypes. Only 0.2% of 7628 pools of Ae. aegypti females were positive for DENVs. This resulted in an overall estimated infection rate (maximum likelihood estimation) of 0.970 per 1000 mosquitoes (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.53-1.65). The total monthly infection rates ranged from 0.50 to 2.23 per 1000 mosquitoes (95% CI = 0.03-10.71). When sampling areas were scaled down to the city level, monthly infection rates increased to 0.73-12.59 (95% CI = 0.06-59.19). Monthly infection rates over all sampling areas and at the city level increased significantly by month. All positive pools were collected in July (one pool), August (two pools), September (one pool), October (three pools), November (four pools), and December (one pool). All four virus serotypes were detected in mosquitoes, which were consistent with dengue serotypes infecting humans in 2004 (DENV-4), 2005 and 2006 (DENV-2 and DENV-3), and 2007 (DENV-1). Our results provide supporting evidence that, in general, DENV infection rates were low in local Aedes mosquito population during 2004-2007 and that transovarial transmission may not be occurring or is occurring at much lower rates than evidenced in some endemic countries.

  11. Impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on plasma HIV-1 RNA Quantification: usefulness of the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation long terminal repeat-based real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, François; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Burgard, Marianne; Peeters, Martine; Damond, Florence; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Msellati, Philippe; Ferradini, Laurent; Rukobo, Sandra; Maréchal, Valérie; Schvachsa, Nilda; Wakrim, Lahcen; Rafalimanana, Christian; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Viard, Jean-Paul; Seigneurin, Jean-Marie; Rouzioux, Christine

    2007-08-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 has a major impact on the quantification of plasma HIV-1 RNA, representing an increasingly difficult challenge. A total of 898 plasma specimens positive for HIV-1 RNA by commercial assays (Amplicor v1.5; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Alameda, CA or Versant v3.0; Bayer Diagnostics, Emeryville, CA) were tested using the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation (G2) real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test: 518 samples containing HIV-1 of known subtype, including 88 from 2 subtype panels and 430 harboring B (n = 266) and non-B (n = 164) group M HIV-1 subtypes from patients followed up in 2002 through 2005 at Necker Hospital (Paris, France), and 380 samples from 10 different countries (Argentina, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, France, Ivory Coast, Madagascar, Morocco, Thailand, and Zimbabwe). HIV-1 RNA values obtained by G2 real-time PCR were highly correlated with those obtained by the Amplicor v1.5 for B and non-B subtypes (R = 0.892 and 0.892, respectively) and for samples from diverse countries (R = 0.867 and 0.893 for real-time PCR vs. Amplicor v1.5 and real-time PCR vs. Versant v3.0, respectively). Approximately 30% of specimens harboring non-B subtypes were underquantified by at least -0.51 log10 in Amplicor v1.5 versus 5% underquantified in G2 real-time PCR. Discrepant results were also obtained with subtype B samples (14% underquantified by Amplicor v1.5 vs. 7% by G2 real-time PCR). Similar percentages were observed when comparing results obtained with the G2 real-time PCR assay with those obtained using the Versant assay. Addressing HIV-1 diversity, continual monitoring of HIV-1 RNA assays, together with molecular epidemiology studies, is required to improve the accuracy of all HIV RNA assays.

  12. Comparison of real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, serum and cell-free body cavity effusion for the diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenges, Stephanie J; Weber, Karin; Dorsch, Roswitha; Fux, Robert; Hartmann, Katrin

    2017-04-01

    Objectives Diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) remains challenging, especially in cats without effusions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detecting feline coronavirus (FCoV) RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and serum in comparison with the same real-time RT-PCR in cell-free body cavity effusion. Methods This prospective case-control study included 92 cats. Forty-three cats had a definitive diagnosis of FIP, established either by histopathological examination (n = 28) or by positive immunofluorescence staining of FCoV antigen in macrophages of effusions (n = 11), or by both methods (n = 4). Forty-nine control cats had other diseases but similar clinical signs. Real-time RT-PCR was performed on PBMCs of 37 cats (21 cats with FIP, 16 controls), on serum of 51 cats (26 cats with FIP, 25 controls) and on cell-free body cavity effusion of 69 cats (36 cats with FIP, 33 controls). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, including 95% confidence intervals (CI), were calculated. Results Real-time RT-PCR of PBMCs, serum and cell-free body cavity effusion showed a specificity of 100% (95% CI 79.4-100% in PBMCs, 86.3-100% in serum, 89.4-100% in cell-free body cavity effusion) and a sensitivity of 28.6% (95% CI 11.3-52.2%) in PBMCs, 15.4% (95% CI 4.4-34.9%) in serum and 88.9% (95% CI 73.9-96.9%) in cell-free body cavity effusion to diagnose FIP. Conclusions and relevance Although it is known that RT-PCR can often provide false-positive results in healthy cats, this real-time RT-PCR was shown to be a specific tool for the diagnosis of FIP when applied in a clinical setting. Sensitivity in cell-free body cavity effusion was high but low in PBMCs and serum. PBMC samples showed a higher sensitivity than serum samples, and are therefore a better choice if no effusion is present.

  13. Structure and function of the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (or, the virtues of simplicity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, W T

    1993-01-01

    A consideration of the properties of a number of mutants of T7 RNA polymerase, together with emerging structural information (Sousa et al., 1993) allows an interpretation of the the mechanics of transcription by this relatively simple RNA polymerase. Evidence indicating features in common with other nucleotide polymerases (such as DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases) is reviewed.

  14. DNA Polymerase e - More Than a Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Pospiech

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive review of the structure and function of DNA polymerase e. Together with DNA polymerases a and d, this enzyme replicates the nuclear DNA in the eukaryotic cell. During this process, DNA polymerase a lays down RNA-DNA primers that are utilized by DNA polymerases d and e for the bulk DNA synthesis. Attempts have been made to assign these two enzymes specifically to the synthesis of the leading and the lagging strand. Alternatively, the two DNA polymerases may be needed to replicate distinct regions depending on chromatin structure. Surprisingly, the essential function of DNA polymerase e does not depend on its catalytic activity, but resides in the nonenzymatic carboxy-terminal domain. This domain not only mediates the interaction of the catalytic subunit with the three smaller regulatory subunits, but also links the replication machinery to the S phase checkpoint. In addition to its role in DNA replication, DNA polymerase e fulfils roles in the DNA synthesis step of nucleotide excision and base excision repair, and has been implicated in recombinational processes in the cell.

  15. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction: principles and applications in dentistry Transcrição reversa e reação em cadeia da polimerase: princípios e aplicações em odontologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ferreira dos Santos

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Various molecular biology techniques have become available in the last few years. One of the most revolutionary of these techniques regarding nucleic acid analysis is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, which was first described in 1985. This method relies on the exponential amplification of specific DNA fragments, resulting in millions of copies that can serve as templates for different kinds of analyses. PCR can be preceded by a reverse transcription (RT reaction in order to produce cDNA from RNA (RT-PCR. RT-PCR provides the possibility to assess gene transcription in cells or tissues. PCR and RT-PCR techniques have been instrumental in dental research, and show potential to be used for diagnosis as well as for treatment and prevention of many diseases (dental caries, periodontal disease, endodontic infections and oral cancer. Compared to other traditional methodologies, PCR and RT-PCR show many advantages including high specificity, sensitivity, and speed. Since PCR and RT-PCR are relatively new techniques and are not available to most students and professionals involved with dentistry, the aim of this work is to present the details of these techniques as well as dental literature reports in which they were used.Várias técnicas de biologia molecular têm sido disponibilizadas nos últimos anos. Uma que revolucionou a análise de ácidos nucléicos foi a reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR, descrita pela primeira vez em 1985. Esta técnica baseia-se na possibilidade de amplificação exponencial de fragmentos específicos de DNA, com a criação de milhões de cópias que servirão como matéria-prima para diferentes tipos de análises. A PCR pode ser precedida por uma reação de transcrição reversa (RT para a obtenção de cDNA a partir de RNA (RT-PCR, representando, por exemplo, uma possibilidade de análise de expressão gênica em células ou tecidos. As técnicas de PCR e RT-PCR têm sido utilizadas em pesquisas odontológicas como

  16. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  17. A deep phylogeny of viral and cellular right-hand polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; de A Zanotto, Paolo M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Right-hand polymerases are important players in genome replication and repair in cellular organisms as well as in viruses. All right-hand polymerases are grouped into seven related protein families: viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, reverse transcriptases, single-subunit RNA polymerases, and DNA polymerase families A, B, D, and Y. Although the evolutionary relationships of right-hand polymerases within each family have been proposed, evolutionary relationships between families remain elusive because their sequence similarity is too low to allow classical phylogenetic analyses. The structure of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases recently was shown to be useful in inferring their evolution. Here, we address evolutionary relationships between right-hand polymerase families by combining sequence and structure information. We used a set of 22 viral and cellular polymerases representing all right-hand polymerase families with known protein structure. In contrast to previous studies, which focused only on the evolution of particular families, the current approach allowed us to present the first robust phylogenetic analysis unifying evolution of all right-hand polymerase families. All polymerase families branched into discrete lineages, following a fairly robust adjacency pattern. Only single-subunit RNA polymerases formed an inner group within DNA polymerase family A. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of RNA viruses and reverse transcriptases of retroviruses formed two sister groups and were distinguishable from all other polymerases. DNA polymerases of DNA bacteriophages did not form a monophyletic group and are phylogenetically mixed with cellular DNA polymerase families A and B. Based on the highest genetic variability and structural simplicity, we assume that RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are the most ancient group of right-hand polymerases, in agreement with the RNA World hypothesis, because RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are enzymes that could serve in replication of

  18. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  19. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  20. Prompt detection of influenza A and B viruses using the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B, Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA, and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B compared to real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jim; Obuekwe, Joy; Baun, Traci; Rogers, Justin; Patel, Twinkle; Snow, Linda

    2014-05-01

    The performance characteristics of rapid influenza diagnostic tests vary widely. This study evaluated the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B (Veritor; BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD, USA), Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA (Sofia; Quidel Corp., San Diego, CA, USA), and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B (Binax; Alere Scarborough, Inc., Scarborough, ME, USA) compared to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of influenza viruses in nasal wash specimens from 240 pediatric patients. Positive percent agreements for influenza A and B virus detection were 93.8% and 94.2%, 95.8% and 98.1%, and 79.2% and 80.8% for Veritor, Sofia, and Binax, respectively. The Veritor and Binax tests demonstrated negative percent agreements >97.9% for detection of both influenza viruses, but the negative percent agreement of the Sofia test was 91.1% for influenza A and 70.7% for influenza B virus. Overall, the Veritor and Sofia tests were nearly as sensitive as RT-PCR and considerably more sensitive than Binax for detection of influenza viruses. However, the accuracy of the Sofia test was significantly lower than either Veritor or Binax.

  1. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and r...

  2. Reverse logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); S.D.P. Flapper; R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper gives an overview of scientific literature that describes and discusses cases of reverse logistics activities in practice. Over sixty case studies are considered. Based on these studies we are able to indicate critical factors for the practice of reverse logistics. In addi

  3. Transcrição reversa na determinação da expressão do mRNA para a enzima conversora de angiotensina testicular em animais tratados com zinco Assessment of the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction technique in the determination of the mRNA expression for the testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme in zinc treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Simeone Henriques

    2005-12-01

    , primer concentration, hybridization temperature and number of denaturation, hybridization and extension cycles were evaluated. For this purpose, samples of testis from Wistar rats fed a zinc containing diet were used to extract total RNA using the phenol-chloroform-isothiocyanate reaction. Stable cDNA was then generated by the reverse transcription reaction. Using specific primers, the gene of interest (testicular isoform of the angiotensin-converting enzyme and the housekeeping gene for the expression of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase were amplified. The samples were then submitted to gel eletrophoresis in agarose gel, stained with ethide bromide and visualized in a UV chamber. RESULTS: The results showed that the best reaction conditions for the chain reaction by the testicular isoform polymerase of the angiotensin-converting enzyme and for Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase were: (1 initial cDNA concentration of 2 µg, (2 primer concentration of 200nM, (3 hybridization temperature between 57.5ºC and 60.1ºC and (4 33 cycles. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that this optimization minimized interference of the technique, contributing to the production of true, comparative data for the testicular angiotensin- converting enzyme gene expression.

  4. A comparative analysis of the suitability of different peripheral blood samples for reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Análise comparativa da adequação de diferentes amostras de sangue periférico em ensaios de reação em cadeia da polimerase via transcriptase reversa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriene Siqueira de Melo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Venipuncture is one of the easiest clinical procedures to obtain viable blood samples to evaluate gene expression using mRNA analysis. However, the use of this sample type in reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests (RT-PCR without prior treatment is controversial. We therefore propose to compare the suitability of different peripheral blood samples (whole blood without treatment, whole blood with hemolysis, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and frozen whole blood for RT-PCR analysis. The results showed that, despite the blood sample being peripheral, it is possible to extract a fair amount of RNA and perform target gene amplification. Thus, peripheral blood without prior treatment could be used to investigate the gene expression using Real Time PCR.A punção venosa representa um dos procedimentos clínicos mais simples na obtenção de amostras de sangue periférico e avaliação da expressão gênica através da análise do RNA mensageiro. Contudo, a utilização desta amostra, sem um tratamento prévio, em ensaios de Transcrição Reversa (RT-PCR é controverso. Desta forma, propomos comparar a adequação de diferentes amostras de sangue periférico (sangue total sem tratamento, sangue total após hemólise, células mononucleares do sangue periférico e sangue total congelado em ensaios de Transcrição Reversa Os resultados mostraram que independente da amostra de sangue periférico é possível extrair RNA em quantidade adequada e realizar a amplificação do gene alvo. Desta forma, o sangue periférico sem tratamento prévio pode ser utilizado em abordagens que envolvam a avaliação da expressão gênica por reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR em tempo real.

  5. Rapid Amplification and Detection of Foodborne Pathogenic Rotavirus by Continuous-flow Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Integrated with Online Fluorescence Analysis%集在线荧光分析的连续流动反转录-聚合酶链式反应快速扩增检测食源致病性轮状病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章春笋; 李彧媛; 王海英

    2011-01-01

    采用含RNA反转录(Reverse transcription,RT)和在线荧光分析的连续流动聚合酶链式反应(Po1ymerase chain reaction,PCR)微流控技术检测食源致病性轮状病毒.此RT-PCR微流控装置以加热铜块组成恒温带,以聚四氟乙烯毛细管微通道为反应体系构建而成.采用循环水冷却退火区,此装置能获得低至31℃的退火温度,而且温度控制及其稳定性良好,因而能满足不同PCR的要求.为了充分体现PCR微流控技术的优越性,在线荧光分析被用于检测PCR产物.当流速为7.5 mm/s时,轮状病毒RNA的cDNA扩增和在线荧光分析能在约12 min完成(扩增约10 min,在线分析约2 min).在此集成化的RT-PCR微流控装置上,Ih可完成轮状病毒RNA的RT-PCR以及其扩增产物的在线荧光分析,样品检出限达到6.4×10(4)copies/μL.%A continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microfluidics integrated with reverse transcription (RT) of RNA and online fluorescence analysis has been introduced, which has been successfully applied for fast amplification and identification of foodborne pathogenic Rotavirus. On this continuous-flow RT-PCR device, the isothermal heating copper blocks provides the temperatures for RT-PCR, and the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillary was used as the RT-PCR reaction channel. By using the cycling water to cool the annealing zone, the annealing temperature as low as 31 ℃ could be obtained for the presented device, where good temperature control and stability was also achieved. Therefore, this device can meet different PCR requirements. To make the best of the advantages of microfluidic PCR, the online fluorescence analysis of amplification products has been performed. When the flow rate of 7.5 mm/s was used, the amplification of cDNA synthesized from Rotavirus RNA and then the online fluorescence analysis of amplification products could be completed in about 12 min ( about 10 min for amplification and 2 min for analysis). By using

  6. Detection of Salmonella Typhi in blood with real time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction%利用实时荧光定量反转录-聚合酶链反应方法检测血液中伤寒沙门菌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊粉霞; 娄静; 陈建才; 聂艳妮; 阚飙; 闫梅英

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish an assay of real time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) to detect Salmonella Typhi in blood. Methods Specific primers STY1631 gene of S. Typhi were designed and modified to establish rRT-PCR assay and the specificity and sensitivity of rRT-PCR with RNA as template were evaluated and verified by checking cultured Salmonella spp. in 51 serotypes, predominant non-salmonella enteric diarrheal pathogens and eight species of bacteria inducing bacteremia with fever as major symptom. The simulative blood specimens supplemented with S. Typhi were tested by the rRT-PCR assay. Results The established rRT-PCR assay successfully detected STY1631 gene of S. Typhi. Totally 48 S. Typhi isolates were amplified to be positive. Other isolates, including non-salmonella strains in 33 serotypes, predominant non-salmonella enteric diarrheal pathogens and eight species of bacteria causing bacteremia with fever, were amplified to be negative. For purified total RNA from pure cultured isolates, the detection limit of the assay was 1 pg per reaction, equal to 194 copies per reaction. The sensitivity achieved 1 × 102 cfu /ml with the purified nucleotide from simulative blood. Conclusion The rRT-PCR assay for detecting S. Typhi with high sensitivity and specificity was established, which would be suitable for the rapid diagnosis of S. Typhi infection and identification of other pathogens causing fever for the early warning, prevention and treatment of typhoid fever.%目的 建立实时荧光定量反转录-聚合酶链反应(real time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction,rRT-PCR)方法检测伤寒沙门菌.方法 针对伤寒沙门菌STY1631基因设计特异性引物,通过优化反应条件,建立检测该靶基因的rRT-PCR方法,利用51个血清型的纯培养伤寒和非伤寒沙门菌菌株、常见非沙门致腹泻病原菌以及发热为主要症状的8种常见病原菌核糖

  7. Reversible Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  8. Variants and quasispecies of reverse franscriptase region in polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus during lamivudine treatment%拉米夫定治疗中乙型肝炎病毒基因序列变异特点及其准种研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田国保; 曾争; 黄中红; 陆海英; 于敏; 公维波; 王东; 斯崇文

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究拉米夫定治疗中乙型肝炎病毒(HBV)逆转录酶区核苷酸序列变异、特点、含量及其与基因型和病毒载量的关系.方法 普通DNA测序法检测拉米夫定治疗的117份慢乙肝患者血清HBV逆转录酶区基因序列及其基因型;其中99份用TaqMan法定量HBV DNA;64份用焦磷酸测序(Pyrosequencing)检测YMDD基序中碱基的频率.结果 HBV YMDD变异组中C型43例,B型10例,A/B混合型1例;YMDD不变异组中C型54例,B型8例,D型1例,HBV DNA含量平均对数值在变异组和不变异组分别为:6.5699和6.6165;YMDD变异与其基因型及病毒载量无统计学意义;rtL180M位点变异与rtM204I/V位点变异高度相关;并且HBV野生株与变异株均同时存在.结论 结合两种测序方法 可以用来研究拉米夫定治疗中HBV基因序列变异情况及对YMDD耐药株进行定量.%Objective To investigate the variants and quasispecies of reverse transcriptase region in polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) during lamivudine treatment and their relationship with genotypes and viral loads. Methods HBV DNA of 117 chronic hepatitis B patients treated with lamivudine were amplified by using PCR. The PCR products including the YMDD motif were sequenced by DNA sequencer, of which, HBV DNA viral loads of 99 patients were determined by real-time PCR and 64 samples were sequenced by Pyrosequencing. Results In HBV YMDD variant group and no variant group, the HBV genotypes were 79.6% and 86. 7% of type C, 18.5% and 12. 7% of type B, 1.9% of A/B recombinant type and 2.6% of type D, respectively. The viral loads ( log 10) were 6. 5699 and 6. 6165, respectively.There was no significant difference in HBV genotypes and viral loads between these two groups. The rtL180M variant was found in association with the rtM204I/V variant, HBV variants and wild-type in YMDD motif all existed together in these two groups. Conclusions HBV variants (quasispecies) in YMDD motif could be quantified by

  9. Mechanism of the interaction between Au nano- particles and polymerase in nanoparticle PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticle PCR is a novel method to optimize DNA amplification. It performs well in improving specificity, enhancing sensitivity and speed. Several mechanisms were proposed in previous studies: one was based on the interaction between gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and DNA while the other was attributed to the heat transfer property of AuNPs. In this paper, we propose that the interaction between AuNPs and DNA polymerase can significantly influence PCR. First, the addition of DNA polymerase can eliminate the inhibitory effects of excess AuNPs. Second, the addition of AuNPs will increase yield of the desired PCR product and make the optimum concentration of DNA polymerase move to higher value. Third, while excess polymerase might inhibit amplification efficiency, AuNPs can reverse this process and the yield of PCR amplification. Based on these results we propose a possible mechanism that AuNPs might modulate the activity of polymerase and improve PCR amplification.

  10. Norovirus proteinase-polymerase and polymerase are both active forms of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Green, Kim Y

    2005-02-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro(-)Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro(-)Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis.

  11. Unfaithful DNA polymerase caught in the act

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The 3D structures of all 12 mispairs formed in the active site of a DNA polymerase help explain their differential effects on polymerase stalling and on translocation of the primer terminus to the enzyme's proofreading site.

  12. 逆转录-聚合酶链反应检测滑膜肉瘤石蜡包埋组织中SYT-SSX融合基因%Detection of SYT-SSX fusion transcripts in paraffin-embedded tissues of synovial sarcoma by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏永昆; 王坚; 朱雄增; 施达仁; 久(冈)正典; 桥本洋

    2002-01-01

    目的探讨用逆转录-聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)技术检测滑膜肉瘤石蜡包埋组织中SYT-SSX融合基因的可行性。方法 我们采用RT-PCR方法对37例福尔马林固定、石蜡包埋的滑膜肉瘤组织中SYT-SSX融合基因转录本进行了检测。为探讨SYT-SSX融合基因对滑膜肉瘤的特异性,一系列非滑膜肉瘤的肿瘤标本作为阴性对照。融合基因检测结果用测序的方法进行了证实。结果 37例滑膜肉瘤中33例(89.2%)可检测出SYT-SSX融合基因。34例非滑膜肉瘤的肿瘤标本中均未显示SYT-SSX融合基因产物扩增信号。此34例标本中均可检测到PBGD mRNA表达。33例SYT-SSX阳性滑膜肉瘤中,SYT-SSX1阳性22例,SYT-SSX2阳性6例,其余5例无法区分融合基因类型。融合基因类型与组织学亚型间存在相关性。所有10例双相型滑膜肉瘤均为SYT-SSX1型,而所有SYT-SSX2阳性滑膜肉瘤均为单相型(P<0.05)。 结论 我们的结果提示,RT-PCR技术可以用于存档的福尔马林固定、石蜡包埋组织,作为滑膜肉瘤诊断和鉴别诊断敏感而且可靠的技术。SYT-SSX融合基因类型与组织学亚型间存在相关性。SYT-SSX2型仅见于单相型滑膜肉瘤。%Objective To assess the feasibility of detecting SYT-SSX fusion transcripts in paraffin-embedded tissues of synovial sarcoma by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Methods RT-PCR was used to amplify the SYT-SSX fusion transcripts using archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from a series of 37 synovial sarcoma cases. To investigate the specificity of the SYT-SSX fusion transcripts, a variety of non-synovial sarcoma tumors were included in the study as negative controls. The detected messages derived from fusion genes were confirmed by subsequent sequence analysis. Results SYT-SSX fusion transcripts were detected in 33 of 37 (89.2%) synovial sarcomas. None of the 34 cases of non

  13. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  14. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  15. HLA-DQA1 typing in Danes by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Madsen, H O; Morling, N

    1995-01-01

    A total of 280 persons were HLA-DQA1 typed by two different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods; (i) a reverse dot-blot (RDB) method, which can differentiate between six alleles, and (ii) a combined PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and allele-specific amplification...

  16. Sustaines high throughput polymerase chain reaction diagnostics during the European epidemic of Bluetongue serotype 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van P.A.; Heutink, C.G.; Boonstra, J.; Kramps, J.A.; Gennip, van H.G.P.

    2012-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR test) based on genome segment 10 of Bluetongue virus (BTV) was developed. The PCR test consists of robotized viral RNA isolation from blood samples and an all-in-one method including initial denaturation of genomic

  17. Application of Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method to Identify H1 Genotype of Measles Virus Infection and Measles Vaccine Related Cases%应用限制性片段长度多态性分析方法鉴别H1基因型麻疹野病毒感染病例和麻疹疫苗相关病例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立群; 余文; 赵智娴; 丁峥嵘

    2012-01-01

    Objective Application the method to rapid identify the wild measles strain and China measles vaccine strain in Yunnan province. Method To apply method of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RT-PCR-RFLP) and sequence analysis method to detect 8 strains of measles virus. Results The RT-PCR-RFLP method for H1 genotype was used for identifying 8 strains of measles virus, the 5 specimens of wild-type, measles viruses RT-PCR products were cut into 2 fragments, 408 bp and 159 bp, the results showed that 5 specimens of wild-type measles viruses were caused by H1 genotype. The RT-PCR-RFLP method for China vaccine strain identification was used for identifying 3 specimen of measles. 1 specimen RT-PCR products were cut into 2 fragments, 287 bp and 151 bp, which showed that this case was caused by China vaccine strain. 2 specimens of measles were non-H1 wild-type measles viruses. Conclusion The RT-PCR-RFLP method can be used to identify H1 genotype of measles virus and measles vaccine strain. The results are same as the method of nucleoprotein gene sequencing.%目的 在云南省应用H1基因型麻疹野病毒鉴定方法,鉴别H1基因型麻疹野病毒感染病例,应用中国麻疹疫苗株病毒鉴定方法,鉴别接种麻疹疫苗后出现的麻疹样病例是否为麻疹疫苗相关病例.方法 采用逆转录-聚合酶链反应-限制性片段长度多态性分析(Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism,RT-PCR-RFLP)方法、序列分析方法鉴别8株麻疹病毒.结果 应用H1基因型麻疹野病毒RT-PCR-RFLP方法对8份标本进行鉴定,其中5份标本RT-PCR产物经 Sal I酶切后,被切成两个片段,分别为408个碱基对(base pair,bp)和159bp,显示5个病例是由H1基因型麻疹野病毒引起的.应用中国麻疹疫苗株病毒RT-PCR-RFLP方法对3份标本进行鉴定,其中1份标本RT-PCR产物经Af1Ⅱ酶切,被切成两个片段,分别为287

  18. In Vitro Assays for RNA Binding and Protein Priming of Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Jones, Scott A; Hu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase synthesizes the viral DNA genome from the pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) template through reverse transcription. Initiation of viral DNA synthesis is accomplished via a novel protein priming mechanism, so named because the polymerase itself acts as a primer, whereby the initiating nucleotide becomes covalently linked to a tyrosine residue on the viral polymerase. Protein priming, in turn, depends on specific recognition of the packaging signal on pgRNA called epsilon. These early events in viral DNA synthesis can now be dissected in vitro as described here.The polymerase is expressed in mammalian cells and purified by immunoprecipitation. The purified protein is associated with host cell factors, is enzymatically active, and its priming activity is epsilon dependent. A minimal epsilon RNA construct from pgRNA is co-expressed with the polymerase in cells. This RNA binds to and co-immunoprecipitates with the polymerase. Modifications can be made to either the epsilon RNA or the polymerase protein by manipulating the expression plasmids. Also, the priming reaction itself can be modified to assay for the initiation or subsequent DNA synthesis during protein priming, the susceptibility of the polymerase to chemical inhibitors, and the precise identification of the DNA products upon their release from the polymerase. The identity of associated host factors can also be evaluated. This protocol closely mirrors our current understanding of the RNA binding and protein priming steps of the HBV replication cycle, and it is amenable to modification. It should therefore facilitate both basic research and drug discovery.

  19. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  20. The RNA polymerase II elongation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, T; Conaway, J W; Conaway, R C

    1995-11-01

    The initiation stage of transcription by RNA polymerase II has long been regarded as the primary site for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence reveals that the RNA polymerase II elongation complex is also a major target for regulation. Biochemical studies are implicating an increasing number of transcription factors in the regulation of elongation, and these transcription factors are being found to function by a diverse collection of mechanisms. Moreover, unexpected features of the structure and catalytic mechanism of RNA polymerase II are forcing a reconsideration of long-held views on the mechanics of some of the most basic aspects of polymerase function. In this review, we will describe recent insights into the structures and functions of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factors that control its activity during the elongation stage of eukaryotic messenger RNA synthesis.

  1. Bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase — Sequenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An ideal DNA polymerase for chain-terminating DNA sequencing should possess the following features: 1 incorporate dideoxy- and other modified nucleotides at an efficiency similar to that of the cognate deoxynucleotides; 2 high processivity; 3 high fidelity in the absence of proofreading/exonuclease activity; and 4 production of clear and uniform signals for detection. The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 is naturally endowed with or can be engineered to have all these characteristics. The chemically or genetically modified enzyme (Sequenase expedited significantly the development of DNA sequencing technology. This article reviews the history of studies on T7 DNA polymerase with emphasis on the serial key steps leading to its use in DNA sequencing. Lessons from the study and development of T7 DNA polymerase have and will continue to enlighten the characterization of novel DNA polymerases from newly discovered microbes and their modification for use in biotechnology.

  2. DNA polymerase preference determines PCR priming efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important developments in modern biotechnology. However, PCR is known to introduce biases, especially during multiplex reactions. Recent studies have implicated the DNA polymerase as the primary source of bias, particularly initiation of polymerization on the template strand. In our study, amplification from a synthetic library containing a 12 nucleotide random portion was used to provide an in-depth characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias. The synthetic library was amplified with three commercially available DNA polymerases using an anchored primer with a random 3’ hexamer end. After normalization, the next generation sequencing (NGS) results of the amplified libraries were directly compared to the unamplified synthetic library. Results Here, high throughput sequencing was used to systematically demonstrate and characterize DNA polymerase priming bias. We demonstrate that certain sequence motifs are preferred over others as primers where the six nucleotide sequences at the 3’ end of the primer, as well as the sequences four base pairs downstream of the priming site, may influence priming efficiencies. DNA polymerases in the same family from two different commercial vendors prefer similar motifs, while another commercially available enzyme from a different DNA polymerase family prefers different motifs. Furthermore, the preferred priming motifs are GC-rich. The DNA polymerase preference for certain sequence motifs was verified by amplification from single-primer templates. We incorporated the observed DNA polymerase preference into a primer-design program that guides the placement of the primer to an optimal location on the template. Conclusions DNA polymerase priming bias was characterized using a synthetic library amplification system and NGS. The characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias was then utilized to guide the primer-design process and demonstrate varying amplification

  3. DNA Polymerases Drive DNA Sequencing-by-Synthesis Technologies: Both Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yao eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. E. coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ⱷ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ⱷ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  4. Accuracy of replication in the polymerase chain reaction. Comparison between Thermotoga maritima DNA polymerase and Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Diaz

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available For certain applications of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, it may be necessary to consider the accuracy of replication. The breakthrough that made PCR user friendly was the commercialization of Thermus aquaticus (Taq DNA polymerase, an enzyme that would survive the high temperatures needed for DNA denaturation. The development of enzymes with an inherent 3' to 5' exonuclease proofreading activity, lacking in Taq polymerase, would be an improvement when higher fidelity is needed. We used the forward mutation assay to compare the fidelity of Taq polymerase and Thermotoga maritima (ULTMA™ DNA polymerase, an enzyme that does have proofreading activity. We did not find significant differences in the fidelity of either enzyme, even when using optimal buffer conditions, thermal cycling parameters, and number of cycles (0.2% and 0.13% error rates for ULTMA™ and Taq, respectively, after reading about 3,000 bases each. We conclude that for sequencing purposes there is no difference in using a DNA polymerase that contains an inherent 3' to 5' exonuclease activity for DNA amplification. Perhaps the specificity and fidelity of PCR are complex issues influenced by the nature of the target sequence, as well as by each PCR component.

  5. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse logistics. The thesis brings insights on reverse logistics decision-making and it lays down theoretical principles for reverse logistics as a research field.In particular it puts together a framework ...

  6. Pelacakan Kasus Flu Burung pada Ayam dengan Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction* (DETECTION OF AVIAN INFLUENZA IN CHICKENS BY REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Avian Influenza (AI or Bird Flu is a fatal zoonotic disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza(HPAI virus of H5N1 sub-type. The disease is still endemic in Indonesia. This study was conducted toinvestigate AI cases in chickens in Bali. Virus isolation was performed in 9 day-old embryonated chickeneggs, and then followed by serologic testing by haemaglutination (HA and Haemaglutination Inhibition(HI assay using standard microtiter procedure. All of the samples were further tested with reversetrancriptasepolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. All work has been done in the Biomedical and MolecularBiology Laboratory, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, during the period2009-2011. A total of ten samples were examined A total of ten chicken samples consisting of 6 fieldsamples and 4 meat samples have been confirmed to be AIV H5N1. All field cases showed clinical signsand gross pathology that were typical to the infection of avian influenza. The result indicates that AI casesare still prevalent among chickens in Bali.

  7. Structural Insight into Processive Human Mitochondrial DNA Synthesis and Disease-Related Polymerase Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Sam; Kennedy, W. Dexter; Yin, Y. Whitney; (Texas)

    2010-09-07

    Human mitochondrial DNA polymerase (Pol {gamma}) is the sole replicase in mitochondria. Pol {gamma} is vulnerable to nonselective antiretroviral drugs and is increasingly associated with mutations found in patients with mitochondriopathies. We determined crystal structures of the human heterotrimeric Pol {gamma} holoenzyme and, separately, a variant of its processivity factor, Pol {gamma}B. The holoenzyme structure reveals an unexpected assembly of the mitochondrial DNA replicase where the catalytic subunit Pol {gamma}A interacts with its processivity factor primarily via a domain that is absent in all other DNA polymerases. This domain provides a structural module for supporting both the intrinsic processivity of the catalytic subunit alone and the enhanced processivity of holoenzyme. The Pol {gamma} structure also provides a context for interpreting the phenotypes of disease-related mutations in the polymerase and establishes a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of toxicity of anti-retroviral drugs targeting HIV reverse transcriptase.

  8. Sry-negative XX sex reversal in a French Bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, M; Moreno-Manzano, V; García-Roselló, M; García-Roselló, E

    2011-02-01

    Here, we describe a 3-month-old XX male French Bulldog. The diagnosis was based on the clinical signs, gonadal histology and cytogenetic analysis. Additionally, the dog was confirmed to be Sry negative by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (sqRT-PCR). Canine Sry-negative XX sex reversal is a disorder of gonadal development where individuals who have a female karyotype develop testes or ovotestes. To our knowledge, this case is the first XX male sex reversion described in a French Bulldog.

  9. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse

  10. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse log

  11. Polymerase chain reaction of Au nanoparticle-bound primers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hebai; HU Min; YANG Zhongnan; WANG Chen; ZHU Longzhang

    2005-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a useful technique for in vitro amplification of a DNA fragment. In this paper, a PCR procedure using Au nanoparticle (AuNP) -bound primers was systemically studied. The 5′-SH- (CH2)6-modified primers were covalently attached to the AuNP surface via Au-S bonds, and plasmid pBluescript SK was used as a template. The effects of the concentration of AuNP-bound primers, annealing temperature and PCR cycles were evaluated, respectively. The results indicate that PCR can proceed successfully under optimized condition, with either forward or reverse primers bound to the AuNP surface or with both the two primers bound to the AuNP surface. Development of PCR procedure based on AuNPs not only makes the isolation of PCR products very convenient, but also provides novel methods to prepare AuNP-bound ssDNA and nanostructured material.

  12. On the evolution of the single-subunit RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermakian, N; Ikeda, T M; Miramontes, P; Lang, B F; Gray, M W; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Many eukaryotic nuclear genomes as well as mitochondrial plasmids contain genes displaying evident sequence similarity to those encoding the single-subunit RNA polymerase (ssRNAP) of bacteriophage T7 and its relatives. We have collected and aligned these ssRNAP sequences and have constructed unrooted phylogenetic trees that demonstrate the separation of ssRNAPs into three well-defined and nonoverlapping clusters (phage-encoded, nucleus-encoded, and plasmid-encoded). Our analyses indicate that these three subfamiles of T7-like RNAPs shared a common ancestor; however, the order in which the groups diverged cannot be inferred from available data. On the basis of structural similarities and mutational data, we suggest that the ancestral ssRNAP gene may have arisen via duplication and divergence of a DNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase gene. Considering the current phylogenetic distribution of ssRNAP sequences, we further suggest that the origin of the ancestral ssRNAP gene closely paralleled in time the introduction of mitochondria into eukaryotic cells through a eubacterial endosymbiosis.

  13. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  14. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  15. An unusual polyanion from Physarum polycephalum that inhibits homologous DNA polymerase. alpha. in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H.; Erdmann, S.; Holler, E. (Universitaet Regensburg (West Germany))

    1989-06-13

    From extracts of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum and their culture medium, an unusual substance was isolated which inhibited homologous DNA polymerase {alpha} of this slime mold but not {beta}-like DNA polymerase and not heterologous DNA polymerases. Analysis, especially NMR spectroscopy, revealed the major component to be an anionic polyester of L-malic acid and the inhibition to be due to poly(L-malate) in binding reversibly to DNA polymerase {alpha}. The mode of inhibition is competitive with substrate DNA and follows an inhibition constant K{sub i} = 10 ng/mL. Inhibition is reversed in the presence of spermine, spermidine, poly(ethylene imine), and calf thymus histone H1. According to its ester nature, the inhibitor is slightly labile at neutral and instable at acid and alkaline conditions. Its largest size corresponds to a molecular mass of 40-50 kDa, but the bulk of the material after purification has lower molecular masses. The inhibitory activity depends on the polymer size and has a minimal size requirement.

  16. LNA探针同时检测人副流感病毒1,2,3型多重荧光定量RT-PCR方法的建立%Simultaneous detection of human parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3 by multiplex real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with LNA probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬奕昕; 毛乃颖; 王焕焕; 谢正德; 许文波

    2012-01-01

    目的 人副流感病毒1,2,3型是呼吸道感染的主要病原.本研究建立了特异、快速、灵敏的多重荧光定量RT-PCR方法用于人副流感1,2,3型病毒临床标本检测.方法 针对人副流感1,2,3型病毒设计特异性引物探针,优化荧光RT-PCR反应条件.应用体外转录方法分别制备人副流感1,2,3型病毒的标准品.验证荧光定量RT-PCR方法的特异性,敏感性和稳定性.结果 该方法对人副流感1,2,3型病毒核酸检测有高度特异性,检测的灵敏度HPIV1为10个拷贝,HPIV2为100个拷贝,HPIV3为100个拷贝.可从临床患者鼻咽吸出物标本中直接检出.结论 本研究建立的LNA探针同时检测人副流感病毒1,2,3型多重荧光定量RT-PCR方法具有较高的特异性和敏感性.适用于临床早期诊断和实验室病原谱筛查.%Objective Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) types 1,2 and 3 are major viral pathogens responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections.In this study,a real-time RT-PCR was developed using multiplex primers-probe (HPIV-1,2,3) for the simultaneous detection of both HPIV1,HPIV2 and HPIV3 genomes.Methods Optimal primers and probes were designed using specialized software.The conditions for multiplex real-time RT-PCR had been optimized.The synthesis of RNA standards of HPIV1,2,3 were used a T7 RNA polymerase.Check the specificity sensitivities and stability of one step RT-PCR assay.Results Obtained in a 10-fold dilution series assay demonstrate a high sensitivity of the assay with a lowest detection limit of 10 copies for HPIV1,100 copies for HPIV2 and 100 copies for HPIV3.Conclusion The assays demonstrates an improved sensitivity and scope of detecting HPIV1,2,3 viruses relative to routine antigen detection assays while the quantitative utility may facilitate investigation of the pre-diagnosis and respiratory virus pathogenesis.

  17. Structural basis of transcription: Backtracked RNA polymerase II at 3.4 Å resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dong; Bushnell, David A; Huang, Xuhui; Westover, Kenneth D.; Levitt, Michael; Kornberg, Roger D

    2009-01-01

    X-ray crystal structure determination of RNA polymerase II in the reverse translocated, or “backtracked” state completes the picture of the transcribing enzyme. The notable feature of the backtracked structure is a binding pocket for the first backtracked nucleotide, but no significant interaction with additional backtracked residues. The structure in the presence of the elongation factor TFIIS reveals a rearrangement whereby cleavage of the RNA may occur, with the release of a dinucleotide. ...

  18. Pyrovanadolysis, a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate, Mn2+, and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akabayov, Barak; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Theile, Christopher; McLaughlin, Larry W.; Beauchamp, Benjamin; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3'-5'-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PPi). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry

  19. High-Level Production of a Functional Recombinant Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase in Insect Cells with a Baculovirus Expression System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaoyan; GAO Linlin; DENG Fei; ZHANG Yanfang; LI Yan; LIN Jusheng

    2007-01-01

    HBV polymerase has intrinsic RNA-dependent reverse transcriptase, DNA-dependent DNA polymerase as well as RNaseH activity. Analysis of HBV polymerase has been hampered for many years due to the inability to express functional enzyme in a recombinant system. To obtain active polymerase at a high level, we have taken advantage of baculovirus expression system. The gene of HBV polymerase was amplified by PCR and cloned into pFastBac Dual to construct the recombinant plasmid pFastbac Dual-pol. The recombinant donor plasmid, pFastbac Dual-pol, was constructed by inserting HBV polymerase gene into EcoRI and PstI sites controlled by polyhedrin promoter. The recombinant donor plasmid was transformed into DH10Bac competent cells for transposition. Recombinant bacmid was constructed by inserting of the mini-Tn7 element from the donor plasmid into the mini-attTn7 attachment site on the bacmid. The recombinant bacmid DNA was isolated and transfected into the Sf9 cells to produce the recombinant virus, and healthy insect Sf9 cells were infected with the recombinant virus containing HBV polymerse gene to express the target protein. HBV polymerse expressed in insect cells was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. PCR results showed recombinant donor plasmid, pFastbac Dual-pol, was constructed successfully. The recombinant hepatitis B virus polymerase was expressed in insect cells at high level. The recombinant hepatitis B virus polymerase should facilitate the analysis of HBV polymerase biological characteristics, allow the investigation for new anti-HBV drugs specifically blocking HBV polymerase.

  20. Reverse logistics - a framework

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa; Dekker, Rommert

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of products, processes and actors. In addition we provide a decision framework for Reverse Logistics and we present it according to long, medium and short term decisions, i.e. strategic-tactic-operational decis...

  1. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  2. Reverse logistics - a framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of product

  3. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-05-31

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells.

  4. DNA polymerase activity of tomato fruit chromoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, E C; Carrillo, N

    1990-11-26

    DNA polymerase activity was measured in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruits. Plastids isolated from young leaves or mature red fruits showed similar DNA polymerase activities. The same enzyme species was present in either chloroplasts or chromoplasts as judged by pH and temperature profiles, sensitivities towards different inhibitors and relative molecular mass (Mr 88 kDa). The activities analyzed showed the typical behaviour of plastid-type polymerases. The results presented here suggest that chromoplast maintain their DNA synthesis potential in fruit tissue at chloroplast levels. Consequently, the sharp decrease of the plastid chromosome transcription observed at the onset of fruit ripening could not be due to limitations in the availability of template molecules. Other mechanisms must be involved in the inhibition of chromoplast RNA synthesis.

  5. Analysis of human cytomegalovirus using the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, M

    2000-01-01

    As with numerous other branches of science, the study of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection has been revolutionized by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method first devised by Mullis and Faloona (1). PCR allows the in vitro amplification of HCMV DNA sequences by the simultaneous primer extension of complementary DNA strands. Similarly, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) allows the study of targeted gene expression, by reverse transcription of RNA to complementary DNA (cDNA), followed by amplification of target DNA using predetermined primers. The PCR method is used in the clinical diagnosis of HCMV infection, particularly in the setting of transplantation medicine and in those patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In addition, the advent of PCR and RT-PCR has transformed our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCMV infection, central to which is the definition of the sites of latency, the degree and type of gene expression within the latently infected cell, and the factors influencing both the maintenance of latency and reactivation of the virus during immunosuppression.

  6. Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain enhances the processivity and fidelity of Taq DNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain (TBD) into the distantly related thermostable Taq DNA polymerase at an analogous position in the thumb domain, converts the Taq DNA polymerase from a low processive to a highly processive enzyme. Processivity is dependent on the presence of thioredoxin. The enhancement in processivity is 20–50-fold when compared with the wild-type Taq DNA polymerase or to the recombinant polymerase in the absence of thioredoxin. The recombinant Taq...

  7. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of...

  8. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  9. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  10. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  11. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol epsilon and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-03-18

    Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase epsilon consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol epsilon evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol epsilon parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol epsilon, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol alpha, Pol delta, and Pol zeta. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polepsilon shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  12. Biochemical characterization of enzyme fidelity of influenza A virus RNA polymerase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Aggarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that the highly error prone replication process of influenza A virus (IAV, together with viral genome assortment, facilitates the efficient evolutionary capacity of IAV. Therefore, it has been logically assumed that the enzyme responsible for viral RNA replication process, influenza virus type A RNA polymerase (IAV Pol, is a highly error-prone polymerase which provides the genomic mutations necessary for viral evolution and host adaptation. Importantly, however, the actual enzyme fidelity of IAV RNA polymerase has never been characterized. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we established new biochemical assay conditions that enabled us to assess both polymerase activity with physiological NTP pools and enzyme fidelity of IAV Pol. We report that IAV Pol displays highly active RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity at unbiased physiological NTP substrate concentrations. With this robust enzyme activity, for the first time, we were able to compare the enzyme fidelity of IAV Pol complex with that of bacterial phage T7 RNA polymerase and the reverse transcriptases (RT of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MuLV, which are known to be low and high fidelity enzymes, respectively. We observed that IAV Pol displayed significantly higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT and T7 RNA polymerase and equivalent or higher fidelity than MuLV RT. In addition, the IAV Pol complex showed increased fidelity at lower temperatures. Moreover, upon replacement of Mg(++ with Mn(++, IAV Pol displayed increased polymerase activity, but with significantly reduced processivity, and misincorporation was slightly elevated in the presence of Mn(++. Finally, when the IAV nucleoprotein (NP was included in the reactions, the IAV Pol complex exhibited enhanced polymerase activity with increased fidelity. SIGNIFICANCE: Our study indicates that IAV Pol is a high fidelity enzyme. We envision that the high fidelity nature of IAV Pol may be

  13. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  14. Introduction to reversible computing

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Few books comprehensively cover the software and programming aspects of reversible computing. Filling this gap, Introduction to Reversible Computing offers an expanded view of the field that includes the traditional energy-motivated hardware viewpoint as well as the emerging application-motivated software approach. Collecting scattered knowledge into one coherent account, the book provides a compendium of both classical and recently developed results on reversible computing. It explores up-and-coming theories, techniques, and tools for the application of rever

  15. Reversible Logic Circuit Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Shende, V V; Markov, I L; Prasad, A K; Hayes, John P.; Markov, Igor L.; Prasad, Aditya K.; Shende, Vivek V.

    2002-01-01

    Reversible, or information-lossless, circuits have applications in digital signal processing, communication, computer graphics and cryptography. They are also a fundamental requirement for quantum computation. We investigate the synthesis of reversible circuits that employ a minimum number of gates and contain no redundant input-output line-pairs (temporary storage channels). We propose new constructions for reversible circuits composed of NOT, Controlled-NOT, and TOFFOLI gates (the CNT gate library) based on permutation theory. A new algorithm is given to synthesize optimal reversible circuits using an arbitrary gate library. We also describe much faster heuristic algorithms. We also pursue applications of the proposed techniques to the synthesis of quantum circuits.

  16. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abd El Wahed

    Full Text Available Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF. Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV. Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA assays were developed to detect DENV1-4.Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4 to 241 (DENV1-3 RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal and in Bangkok (Thailand. In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38 °C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31 and 100% (n=23, respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90 and 100%(n=41, respectively.During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations.

  17. Reverse Core Engine with Thrust Reverser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An engine system has a gas generator, a bi-fi wall surrounding at least a portion of the gas generator, a casing surrounding a fan, and the casing having first and second thrust reverser doors which in a deployed position abut each other and the bi-fi wall.

  18. Pyrovanadolysis: a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate MN2plus and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Akabayov; A Kulczyk; S Akabayov; C Thiele; L McLaughlin; B Beauchamp; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3'-5'-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry of the oxygen connecting the two phosphorus atoms of PP{sub i}, a variety of compounds was examined for their ability to carry out a reaction similar to pyrophosphorolysis. We describe a manganese-mediated pyrophosphorolysis-like activity using pyrovanadate (VV) catalyzed by the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. We designate this reaction pyrovanadolysis. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a shorter Mn-V distance of the polymerase-VV complex than the Mn-P distance of the polymerase-PP{sub i} complex. This structural arrangement at the active site accounts for the enzymatic activation by Mn-VV. We propose that the Mn{sup 2+}, larger than Mg{sup 2+}, fits the polymerase active site to mediate binding of VV into the active site of the polymerase. Our results may be the first documentation that vanadium can substitute for phosphorus in biological processes.

  19. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubitt, Toby [Department of Computer Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom and Centre for Quantum Information and Foundations, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kastoryano, Michael [NBIA, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Montanaro, Ashley [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Temme, Kristan [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  20. Clocked Thrust Reversers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft includes a fuselage including a propulsion system supported within an aft portion. A thrust reverser is mounted proximate to the propulsion system for directing thrust in a direction to slow the aircraft. The thrust reverser directs thrust at an angle relative to a vertical plane to reduce interference on control surfaces and reduce generation of underbody lift.

  1. Atrioventricular Pacemaker Lead Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet K Aktas, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During cardiac surgery temporary epicardial atrial and ventricular leads are placed in case cardiac pacing is required postoperatively. We present the first reported series of patients with reversal of atrioventricular electrodes in the temporary pacemaker without any consequent deleterious hemodynamic effect. We review the electrocardiographic findings and discuss the findings that lead to the discovery of atrioventricular lead reversal.

  2. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  3. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  4. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  5. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  6. Towards Reversible Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tiezzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we incorporate reversibility into structured communication-based programming, to allow parties of a session to automatically undo, in a rollback fashion, the effect of previously executed interactions. This permits taking different computation paths along the same session, as well as reverting the whole session and starting a new one. Our aim is to define a theoretical basis for examining the interplay in concurrent systems between reversible computation and session-based interaction. We thus enrich a session-based variant of pi-calculus with memory devices, dedicated to keep track of the computation history of sessions in order to reverse it. We discuss our initial investigation concerning the definition of a session type discipline for the proposed reversible calculus, and its practical advantages for static verification of safe composition in communication-centric distributed software performing reversible computations.

  7. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR): general methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel L E; Shapter, Frances M

    2014-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) converts very low quantities of DNA into very high quantities and is the foundation of many specialized techniques of molecular biology. PCR utilizes components of the cellular machinery of mitotic cell division in vitro which respond predictably to user inputs. This chapter introduces the principles of PCR and discusses practical considerations from target sequence definition through to optimization and application.

  8. Nucleolin Is Required for RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vivo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, Brenden; Flint, S. J.; Cole, Michael D.; LeRoy, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged with histones and accessory proteins in the form of chromatin. RNA polymerases and their accessory proteins are sufficient for transcription of naked DNA, but not of chromatin, templates in vitro. In this study, we purified and identified nucleolin as a protein that allows RNA polymerase II to transcribe nucleosomal templates in vitro. As immunofluorescence confirmed that nucleolin localizes primarily to nucleoli with RNA polymerase I, we demonstrated that nucleolin allows RNA polymerase I transcription of chromatin templates in vitro. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments established that nucleolin is associated with chromatin containing rRNA genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I but not with genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II or III. Knockdown of nucleolin by RNA interference resulted in specific inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription. We therefore propose that an important function of nucleolin is to permit RNA polymerase I to transcribe nucleolar chromatin. PMID:17130237

  9. Molecular architecture and function of adenovirus DNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, A.B. (Arjan Bernard)

    2003-01-01

    Central to this thesis is the role of adenovirus DNA polymerase (Ad pol) in adenovirus DNA replication. Ad pol is a member of the family B DNA polymerases but belongs to a distinct subclass of polymerases that use a protein as primer. As Ad pol catalyses both the initiation and elongation phases and

  10. Structural basis of transcription: backtracked RNA polymerase II at 3.4 angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Bushnell, David A; Huang, Xuhui; Westover, Kenneth D; Levitt, Michael; Kornberg, Roger D

    2009-05-29

    Transcribing RNA polymerases oscillate between three stable states, two of which, pre- and posttranslocated, were previously subjected to x-ray crystal structure determination. We report here the crystal structure of RNA polymerase II in the third state, the reverse translocated, or "backtracked" state. The defining feature of the backtracked structure is a binding site for the first backtracked nucleotide. This binding site is occupied in case of nucleotide misincorporation in the RNA or damage to the DNA, and is termed the "P" site because it supports proofreading. The predominant mechanism of proofreading is the excision of a dinucleotide in the presence of the elongation factor SII (TFIIS). Structure determination of a cocrystal with TFIIS reveals a rearrangement whereby cleavage of the RNA may take place.

  11. Enhanced Specificity of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction via CdTe Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaofeng; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Yanliang; Li, Shuchun; Shao, Youhua; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles were recently reported to be able to improve both efficiency and specificity in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, CdTe QDs were introduced into multi-PCR systems. It was found that an appropriate concentration of CdTe QDs could enhance the performance of multi-PCR by reducing the formation of nonspecific products in the complex system, but an excessive amount of CdTe QDs could suppress the PCR. The effects of QDs on PCR can be reversed by increasing the polymerase concentration or by adding bovine serum albumin (BSA). The mechanisms underlying these effects were also discussed. The results indicated that CdTe QDs could be used to optimize the amplification products of the PCR, especially in the multi-PCR system with different primers annealing temperatures, which is of great significance for molecular diagnosis.

  12. Detection of specific polymerase chain reaction product by utilizing the 5'----3' exonuclease activity of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The 5'----3' exonuclease activity of the thermostable enzyme Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase may be employed in a polymerase chain reaction product detection system to generate a specific detectable signal concomitantly with amplification. An oligonucleotide probe, nonextendable at the 3' end, labeled at the 5' end, and designed to hybridize within the target sequence, is introduced into the polymerase chain reaction assay. Annealing of probe to one of the polymerase chain reaction product s...

  13. An algebra of reversible computation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules, basic reversible processes algebra (BRPA), algebra of reversible communicating processes (ARCP), recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  14. An Algebra of Reversible Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Yong WANG

    2014-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules, basic reversible processes algebra (BRPA), algebra of reversible communicating processes (ARCP), recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  15. An algebra of reversible computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules: basic reversible processes algebra, algebra of reversible communicating processes, recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  16. Reversible Data Hiding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Yadav

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reversible data hiding is a technique that is used to hide data inside an image. The data is hidden in such a way that the exact or original data is not visible. The hidden data can be retrieved as and when required. There are several methods that are used in reversible data hiding techniques like Watermarking, Lossless embedding and encryption. In this paper we present a review of reversible watermarking techniques and show different methods that are used to get reversible data hiding technique with higher embedding capacity and invisible objects. Watermark need not be hidden. Watermarking can be applied to 1. Images, 2. Text, 3. Audio/video, 4. Software.

  17. Reversible flowchart languages and the structured reversible program theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Many irreversible computation models have reversible counterparts, but these are poorly understood at present. We introduce reversible flowcharts with an assertion operator and show that any reversible flowchart can be simulated by a structured reversible flowchart using only three control flow o...... justification for low-level machine code for reversible microprocessors as well as high-level block-structured reversible languages. We give examples for both such languages and illustrate them with a lossless encoder for permutations given by Dijkstra....

  18. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  19. Are there three polynucleotide strands in the catalytic centre of DNA polymerases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestienne, Patrick P

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA may undergo large-scale rearrangements, thus leading to diseases. The mechanisms of these rearrangements are still the matter of debates. Several lines of evidence indicate that breakpoints are characterized by direct repeats (DR), one of them being eliminated from the normal genome. Analysis of DR showed their skewed nucleotide content compatible with the formation of known triple helices. Here, I propose a novel mechanism involving the formation of triplex structures that result from the dissociation of the [synthesized repeat-DNA polymerase] complex. Upon binding to the homologous sequence, replication is initiated from the primer bound in a triple helix manner. This feature implies the initiation of replication on the double-stranded DNA from the triple helix primer. Hereby, I review evidences supporting this model. Indeed, all short d(G)-rich primers 10 nucleotides long can be elongated on double-stranded DNA by phage, bacterial, reverse transcriptases and eukaryotic DNA polymerases. Mismatches may be tolerated between the primer and its double-stranded binding site. In contrast to previous studies, evidences for the parallel binding of the triple helix to its homologous strand are provided. This suggest the displacement of the non-template strand by the triple helix primer upon binding within the DNA polymerase catalytic centre. Computer modelling indicates that the triple helix primer lies within the major groove of the double helix, with its 3' hydroxyl end nearby the catalytic amino acids. Taken together, I bring new concepts on DNA rearrangements, and novel features of triple helices and DNA polymerases that can bind three polynucleotide strands similar to RNA polymerases.

  20. Proteinase-Polymerase Precursor as the Active Form of Feline Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Lai; Huhn, Jason S.; Mory, Aaron; Pathak, Harsh B.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Green, Kim Y.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the active form of the feline calicivirus (FCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Multiple active forms of the FCV RdRP were identified. The most active enzyme was the full-length proteinase-polymerase (Pro-Pol) precursor protein, corresponding to amino acids 1072 to 1763 of the FCV polyprotein encoded by open reading frame 1 of the genome. Deletion of 163 amino acids from the amino terminus of Pro-Pol (the Val-1235 amino terminus) caused a three...

  1. Interplay between polymerase II- and polymerase III-assisted expression of overlapping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-11-15

    Up to 15% of the genes in different genomes overlap. This architecture, although beneficial for the genome size, represents an obstacle for simultaneous transcription of both genes. Here we analyze the interference between RNA-polymerase II (Pol II) and RNA-polymerase III (Pol III) when transcribing their target genes encoded on opposing strands within the same DNA fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of a Pol II-dependent protein-coding gene negatively correlated with the transcription of a Pol III-dependent, tRNA-coding gene set. We suggest that the architecture of the overlapping genes introduces an additional layer of control of gene expression.

  2. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Phalen, D.N.; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By us...

  3. RNA polymerase: the vehicle of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borukhov, Sergei; Nudler, Evgeny

    2008-03-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the principal enzyme of gene expression and regulation for all three divisions of life: Eukaryota, Archaea and Bacteria. Recent progress in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP illuminates this enzyme as a flexible, multifunctional molecular machine. During each step of the transcription cycle, RNAP undergoes elaborate conformational changes. As many fundamental and previously mysterious aspects of how RNAP works begin to be understood, this enzyme reveals intriguing similarities to man-made engineered devices. These resemblances can be found in the mechanics of RNAP-DNA complex formation, in RNA chain initiation and in the elongation processes. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding RNAP function and regulation.

  4. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transc...

  5. Baculovirus RNA Polymerase: Activities, Composition, and Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Lorena Passarelli

    2007-01-01

    Baculoviruses are the only nuclear replicating DNA-containing viruses that encode their own DNA-directed RNA polymerase (RNAP). The baculovirus RNAP is specific for the transcription of genes expressed after virus DNA replication. It is composed of four subunits, making it the simplest multisubunit RNAP known. Two subunits contain motifs found at the catalytic center of other RNAPs and a third has capping enzyme functions. The function of the fourth subunit is not known. Structural studies on this unique RNAP will provide new insights into the functions of this enzyme and the regulation of viral genes and may be instrumental to optimize the baculovirus gene expression system.

  6. Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwater, J.; Tagami, S.; Kimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of catalytically active RNA enzymes (ribozymes) is widely believed to have been an important transition in the origin of life. In the context of a likely heterogeneous chemical environment, substrate specificity and selectivity of these primordial enzymes would have been critical...... for function. Here we have explored the chemical fidelity, i.e. substrate selectivity and specificity for both single and multiple catalytic steps of the Z RNA polymerase ribozyme-a modern day analogue of the primordial RNA replicase. Using a wide range of nucleotide analogues and ionic conditions, we observe...

  7. ppGpp: magic beyond RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2012-02-16

    During stress, bacteria undergo extensive physiological transformations, many of which are coordinated by ppGpp. Although ppGpp is best known for enhancing cellular resilience by redirecting the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to certain genes, it also acts as a signal in many other cellular processes in bacteria. After a brief overview of ppGpp biosynthesis and its impact on promoter selection by RNAP, we discuss how bacteria exploit ppGpp to modulate the synthesis, stability or activity of proteins or regulatory RNAs that are crucial in challenging environments, using mechanisms beyond the direct regulation of RNAP activity.

  8. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  9. Rapid Detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus isolates in clinical samples using real time polymerase chain reaction assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Abdul Wajid, Muhammad Wasim, Tahir Yaqub, Shafqat F Rehmani, Tasra Bibi, Nadia Mukhtar, Javed Muhammad, Umar Bacha, Suliman Qadir Afridi, Muhammad Nauman Zahid, Zia u ddin, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Kamran Abbas & Muneer Ahmad ### Abstract In the present protocol we describe the real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for the rapid detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isoaltes in clinical samples. Fusion gene and matrix ...

  10. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Youri I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We

  11. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  12. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Morcillo, María [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Taylor, Nicholas M. I. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gruene, Tim [Georg-August-University, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Legrand, Pierre [SOLEIL Synchrotron, L’Orme de Merisiers, Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rashid, Umar J. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruiz, Federico M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  14. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  15. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  16. Reversible Communicating Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Brown

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reversible distributed programs have the ability to abort unproductive computation paths and backtrack, while unwinding communication that occurred in the aborted paths. While it is natural to assume that reversibility implies full state recovery (as with traditional roll-back recovery protocols, an interesting alternative is to separate backtracking from local state recovery. For example, such a model could be used to create complex transactions out of nested compensable transactions where a programmer-supplied compensation defines the work required to "unwind" a transaction. Reversible distributed computing has received considerable theoretical attention, but little reduction to practice; the few published implementations of languages supporting reversibility depend upon a high degree of central control. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a practical reversible distributed language can be efficiently implemented in a fully distributed manner. We discuss such a language, supporting CSP-style synchronous communication, embedded in Scala. While this language provided the motivation for the work described in this paper, our focus is upon the distributed implementation. In particular, we demonstrate that a "high-level" semantic model can be implemented using a simple point-to-point protocol.

  17. Development and validation of quantitative polymerase chain reaction protocols targeting the ‘L’, ‘M’, and ‘S’ ribonucleic acid of Soybean vein necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean vein necrosis virus (SVNV) was first reported in Wisconsin in 2012. SVNV is a new member of the Tospovirus family and is becoming more frequent in occurrence in the north central region USA. New real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) protocols were d...

  18. Selection of suitable reference genes for normalization of genes of interest in canine soft tissue sarcomas using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zornhagen, K. W.; Kristensen, A. T.; Hansen, Anders Elias;

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression. Stably expressed reference genes are necessary for normalization of RT-qPCR data. Only a few articles have been published on reference genes in canine tumours...

  19. Radiation controlling reversible window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, H.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A coated glass glazing system is presented including a transparent glass substrate having one surface coated with a radiation absorptive film which is overcoated with a radiation reflective film by a technique which renders the radiation reflective film radiation absorptive at the surface contracting the radiating absorptive film. The coated glass system is used as glazing for storm windows which are adapted to be reversible so that the radiation reflective surface may be exposed to the outside of the dwelling during the warm seasons to prevent excessive solar radiation from entering a dwelling and reversed during cold seasons to absorb solar radiation and utilize it to aid in keeping the dwelling interior warm.

  20. Validation of a multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR ELISA for the detection of 19 respiratory tract pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppe, W.; Weigl, J.; Groendahl, B.; Knuf, M.; Rockahr, S.; von Bismarck, P.; Aron, G.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Schmitt, H. -J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Since acute respiratory tract infections inflict a high burden of disease in children worldwide, a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction combined with a microwell hybridization assay (m-RT-PCR ELISA) to detect 19 different respiratory pathogens was developed and vali

  1. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  2. PEMERIKSAAN BAKTERI LEPTOSPIRA PADA SAMPEL DARAH MANUSIA SUSPECT LEPTOSPIROSIS MENGGUNAKAN METODE PCR (POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefrita Tri Utami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLeptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, which is caused by leptospira. Leptospirosis cases often show no specificclinical symptoms and is difficult to diagnose without testing samples in the laboratory. Testing using PCR(Polymerase Chain Reaction is considered more accurate than the other methods. Components required in theexamination Leptospira bacteria in human blood samples using PCR method is DNA template, DNA polymeraseenzyme, forward primer (PU1 and SU1 and reverse primer (Lep R1, nuclease free water, Mg 2 +, and dNTPs.Examination of Leptospira bacteria in human blood samples include sampling, DNA isolation, examination byPCR, and electrophoresis running.Key words: leptospirosis, Leptospira, PCR methodsABSTRAKLeptospirosis adalah penyakit zoonosis yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Leptospira. Kasus leptospirosis seringtidak menunjukkan gejala klinis yang spesifik dan sulit didiagnosis tanpa pengujian sampel di laboratorium.Pengujian dengan menggunakan metode PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction dinilai lebih akurat dibandingkandengan metode yang lain. Komponen-komponen yang dibutuhkan dalam pemeriksaan bakteri Leptospira padasampel darah manusia menggunakan metode PCR adalah DNA template, enzim polymerase, Primer PU 1 danPrimer SU 1, Primer Lep R1, air, Mg2+ , dan dNTP. Pemeriksaan bakteri Leptospira pada sampel darah manusiameliputi pengambilan sampel, isolasi DNA, pemeriksaan dengan metode PCR, dan running elektroforesis.Kata kunci: leptospirosis, Leptospira, metode PCR

  3. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction on a Viral Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr-Smith, James; Pacheco-Gómez, Raúl; Little, Haydn A; Hicks, Matthew R; Sandhu, Sandeep; Steinke, Nadja; Smith, David J; Rodger, Alison; Goodchild, Sarah A; Lukaszewski, Roman A; Tucker, James H R; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2015-12-18

    The field of synthetic biology includes studies that aim to develop new materials and devices from biomolecules. In recent years, much work has been carried out using a range of biomolecular chassis including α-helical coiled coils, β-sheet amyloids and even viral particles. In this work, we show how hybrid bionanoparticles can be produced from a viral M13 bacteriophage scaffold through conjugation with DNA primers that can template a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This unprecedented example of a PCR on a virus particle has been studied by flow aligned linear dichroism spectroscopy, which gives information on the structure of the product as well as a new protototype methodology for DNA detection. We propose that this demonstration of PCR on the surface of a bionanoparticle is a useful addition to ways in which hybrid assemblies may be constructed using synthetic biology.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction with nearby primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garafutdinov, Ravil R; Galimova, Aizilya A; Sakhabutdinova, Assol R

    2017-02-01

    DNA analysis of biological specimens containing degraded nucleic acids such as mortal remains, archaeological artefacts, forensic samples etc. has gained more attention in recent years. DNA extracted from these samples is often inapplicable for conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), so for its amplification the nearby primers are commonly used. Here we report the data that clarify the features of PCR with nearby and abutting primers. We have shown that the proximity of primers leads to significant reduction of the reaction time and ensures the successful performance of DNA amplification even in the presence of PCR inhibitors. The PCR with abutting primers is usually characterized by the absence of nonspecific amplification products that causes extreme sensitivity with limit of detection on single copy level. The feasibility of PCR with abutting primers was demonstrated on species identification of 100 years old rotten wood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity...... in 25 patients in whose nasopharyngeal secretions BP had been demonstrated after 4-7 days of culture. The detection limit of PCR in aqueous solution was 1-2 BP bacteria per reaction tube. PCR was 100% specific for BP, showing no response with other Bordetella species or other bacteria known to colonize...... of PCR for the diagnosis of BP, we used known concentrations of BP, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica in aqueous solutions. PCR was furthermore carried out on species of bacteria that might be isolated from the nasopharynx. The applicability of PCR to patient specimens was tested...

  8. [Polymerase chain reaction and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárosi, I; Gerald, E; Girish, V N

    1992-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important new methods in molecular biology. It is widely used in genetic and anthropologic basic research, in oncology and virology, in all those fields, where molecular biologic methods can give answers to the questions raised. The procedure enables one to multiply with extreme precision targeted pieces of amounts as little as one target molecule of DNA or RNA by five to six logs, making them easy to be handled and examined by routine molecular biological methods. The method is presented through one possible application field, that is of great importance in the study of hepatocarcinogenesis. Sensitivity of PCR in detection of hepatitis B virus DNA is greater by four logs than animal inoculation, the last most sensitive method known.

  9. The punctilious RNA polymerase II core promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo Ngoc, Long; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Kassavetis, George A; Kadonaga, James T

    2017-07-01

    The signals that direct the initiation of transcription ultimately converge at the core promoter, which is the gateway to transcription. Here we provide an overview of the RNA polymerase II core promoter in bilateria (bilaterally symmetric animals). The core promoter is diverse in terms of its composition and function yet is also punctilious, as it acts with strict rules and precision. We additionally describe an expanded view of the core promoter that comprises the classical DNA sequence motifs, sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors, chromatin signals, and DNA structure. This model may eventually lead to a more unified conceptual understanding of the core promoter. © 2017 Vo ngoc et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Time reversal communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  11. Engineering Encounters: Reverse Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Veronica Cassone; Ventura, Marcia; Bell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information on how students' everyday experiences can support science learning through engineering design. In this article, the authors outline a reverse-engineering model of instruction and describe one example of how it looked in our fifth-grade…

  12. Reverse Coherent Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  13. Reversed extension flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2008-01-01

    Afilament stretching rheometer (FSR) was used for measuring the start-up of uni-axial elongational flow followed by reversed bi-axial flow, both with a constant elongational rate. A narrow molecular mass distribution linear polystyrene with a molecular weight of 145 kg / mole wis subjected to the...

  14. REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DOMAGAŁA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the presentation of the reverse supply chain, of which the role in the modern business grows along with the increasing number of environmental regulations and possibilities of reducing an operating cost. The paper also describes main problems in developing the profitable chain and possibilities to take an action in order to overcome them.

  15. On reverse hypercontractivity

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan; Sen, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    We study the notion of reverse hypercontractivity. We show that reverse hypercontractive inequalities are implied by standard hypercontractive inequalities as well as by the modified log-Sobolev inequality. Our proof is based on a new comparison lemma for Dirichlet forms and an extension of the Strook-Varapolos inequality. A consequence of our analysis is that {\\em all} simple operators $L=Id-\\E$ as well as their tensors satisfy uniform reverse hypercontractive inequalities. That is, for all $qreverse hypercontractive inequalities established here imply new mixing and isoperimetric results for short random walks in product spaces, for certain card-shufflings, for Glauber dynamics in high-temperat...

  16. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  17. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  18. A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balm, Michelle N D; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Chiu, Lily; Koay, Evelyn S C; Tang, Julian W

    2012-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.

  19. Arenavirus reverse genetics for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; Carlos de la Torre, Juan; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-06-01

    Arenaviruses are important human pathogens with no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccines available and current antiviral therapy being limited to an off-label use of the nucleoside analogue ribavirin of limited prophylactic efficacy. The development of reverse genetics systems represented a major breakthrough in arenavirus research. However, rescue of recombinant arenaviruses using current reverse genetics systems has been restricted to rodent cells. In this study, we describe the rescue of recombinant arenaviruses from human 293T cells and Vero cells, an FDA-approved line for vaccine development. We also describe the generation of novel vectors that mediate synthesis of both negative-sense genome RNA and positive-sense mRNA species of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) directed by the human RNA polymerases I and II, respectively, within the same plasmid. This approach reduces by half the number of vectors required for arenavirus rescue, which could facilitate virus rescue in cell lines approved for human vaccine production but that cannot be transfected at high efficiencies. We have shown the feasibility of this approach by rescuing both the Old World prototypic arenavirus LCMV and the live-attenuated vaccine Candid#1 strain of the New World arenavirus Junín. Moreover, we show the feasibility of using these novel strategies for efficient rescue of recombinant tri-segmented both LCMV and Candid#1.

  20. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  1. Application of Reverse Transcription-PCR and Real-Time PCR in Nanotoxicity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Qunwei

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique to determine the expression level of target genes and is widely used in biomedical science research including nanotoxicology studies for semiquantitative analysis. Real-time PCR allows for the detection of PCR amplification in the exponential growth phase of the reaction and is much more quantitative than traditional RT-PCR. Although a number of kits and reagents for RT-PCR and real-time PCR are commercially available, the basic principles are the same. Here, we describe the procedures for total RNA isolation by using TRI Reagent, for reverse transcription (RT) by M-MLV reverse transcriptase, and for PCR by GoTaq® DNA Polymerase. And real-time PCR will be performed on an iQ5 multicolor real-time PCR detection system by using iQ™ SYBR Green Supermix. PMID:22975959

  2. Partial Reversible Gates(PRG) for Reversible BCD Arithmetic

    CERN Document Server

    Thapliyal, Himanshu; Bajpai, Rajnish; Sharma, Kamal K

    2007-01-01

    IEEE 754r is the ongoing revision to the IEEE 754 floating point standard and a major enhancement to the standard is the addition of decimal format. Furthermore, in the recent years reversible logic has emerged as a promising computing paradigm having its applications in low power CMOS, quantum computing, nanotechnology, and optical computing. The major goal in reversible logic is to minimize the number of reversible gates and garbage outputs. Thus, this paper proposes the novel concept of partial reversible gates that will satisfy the reversibility criteria for specific cases in BCD arithmetic. The partial reversible gate is proposed to minimize the number of reversible gates and garbage outputs, while designing the reversible BCD arithmetic circuits.

  3. The polymerase chain reaction: current and future clinical applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, J R; Brown, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction has undergone rapid improvement since its initial development, such that the technique currently permits rapid, accurate, predictive tests to be made in the field of prenatal diagnosis and has greatly aided forensic medicine. It is anticipated that the polymerase chain reaction will also facilitate advances in other fields, in particular preimplantation diagnosis, virology, bacteriology, and cancer therapy.

  4. Role for DNA polymerase beta in response to ionizing radiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Cramers, P.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for a role of DNA polymerase beta in determining radiosensitivity is conflicting. In vitro assays show an involvement of DNA polymerase beta in single strand break repair and base excision repair of oxidative damages, both products of ionizing radiation. Nevertheless the lack of DNA polymer

  5. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S. (Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter (Oakland, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Meijer, Laurent (Roscoff, FR)

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  6. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  7. The RNA polymerase of marine cyanophage Syn5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Tabor, Stanley; Raytcheva, Desislava A; Hernandez, Alfredo; King, Jonathan A; Richardson, Charles C

    2013-02-01

    A single subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified and purified to apparent homogeneity from cyanophage Syn5 that infects the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus. Syn5 is homologous to bacteriophage T7 that infects Escherichia coli. Using the purified enzyme its promoter has been identified by examining transcription of segments of Syn5 DNA and sequencing the 5'-termini of the transcripts. Only two Syn5 RNAP promoters, having the sequence 5'-ATTGGGCACCCGTAA-3', are found within the Syn5 genome. One promoter is located within the Syn5 RNA polymerase gene and the other is located close to the right genetic end of the genome. The purified enzyme and its promoter have enabled a determination of the requirements for transcription. Unlike the salt-sensitive bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, this marine RNA polymerase requires 160 mm potassium for maximal activity. The optimal temperature for Syn5 RNA polymerase is 24 °C, much lower than that for T7 RNA polymerase. Magnesium is required as a cofactor although some activity is observed with ferrous ions. Syn5 RNA polymerase is more efficient in utilizing low concentrations of ribonucleotides than T7 RNA polymerase.

  8. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  9. Genotypic frequency of calpastatin gene in lori sheep by polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... consequently the balance of calpain-calpastatin activity in muscles is believed to dictate the rate of tenderization in post-mortem meat. ... Polymerase chain reaction was performed to amplify a 622 bp fragment of this gene. Restriction reaction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was done using MspI enzyme.

  10. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  11. Reversible multi-head finite automata characterize reversible logarithmic space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic and non-deterministic multi-head finite automata are known to characterize the deterministic and non- deterministic logarithmic space complexity classes, respectively. Recently, Morita introduced reversible multi-head finite automata (RMFAs), and posed the question of whether RMFAs...... characterize reversible logarithmic space as well. Here, we resolve the question affirmatively, by exhibiting a clean RMFA simulation of logarithmic space reversible Turing machines. Indirectly, this also proves that reversible and deterministic multi-head finite automata recognize the same languages....

  12. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  13. Role of polymerase η in mitochondrial mutagenesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Pabla, Ritu [Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Siede, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.siede@unthsc.edu [Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► DNA polymerase η is detectable in mitochondria of budding yeast. ► Pol η reduces UV-induced mitochondrial base pair substitutions and frameshifts. ► For UV-induced base pair substitutions, Pol η and Pol ζ interact epistatically. -- Abstract: DNA polymerase η mostly catalyzes an error-free bypass of the most frequent UV lesions, pyrimidine dimers of the cyclobutane-type. In addition to its nuclear localization, we show here for the first time its mitochondrial localization in budding yeast. In mitochondria, this polymerase improves bypass replication fidelity opposite UV damage as shown in base pair substitution and frameshift assays. For base pair substitutions, polymerase η appears to be related in function and epistatic to DNA polymerase ζ which, however, plays the opposite role in the nucleus.

  14. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  15. Actinobaculum suis Detection Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Román Amigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinobaculum suis is an important agent related to urinary infection in swine females. Due to its fastidious growth characteristics, the isolation of this anaerobic bacterium is difficult, thus impairing the estimation of its prevalence. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection and identification of A. suis and then compare these results with traditional isolation methods. Bacterial isolation and PCR were performed on one hundred and ninety-two urine samples from sows and forty-five preputial swabs from boars. The results indicate that this PCR was specific for A. suis, presenting a detection limit between 1.0×101 CFU/mL and 1.0×102 CFU/mL. A. suis frequencies, as measured by PCR, were 8.9% (17/192 in sow urine samples and 82.2% (37/45 in preputial swabs. Assessed using conventional culturing techniques, none of the urine samples were positive for A. suis; however, A. suis was detected in 31.1% (14/45 of the swabs. This PCR technique was shown to be an efficient method for the detection of A. suis in urine and preputial swabs.

  16. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Rothenberger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses.

  17. Trapping Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuqiao; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Wang, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Recent findings indicate that a major mechanism by which poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors kill cancer cells is by trapping PARP1 and PARP2 to the sites of DNA damage. The PARP enzyme-inhibitor complex "locks" onto damaged DNA and prevents DNA repair, replication, and transcription, leading to cell death. Several clinical-stage PARP inhibitors, including veliparib, rucaparib, olaparib, niraparib, and talazoparib, have been evaluated for their PARP-trapping activity. Although they display similar capacity to inhibit PARP catalytic activity, their relative abilities to trap PARP differ by several orders of magnitude, with the ability to trap PARP closely correlating with each drug's ability to kill cancer cells. In this article, we review the available data on molecular interactions between these clinical-stage PARP inhibitors and PARP proteins, and discuss how their biologic differences might be explained by the trapping mechanism. We also discuss how to use the PARP-trapping mechanism to guide the development of PARP inhibitors as a new class of cancer therapy, both for single-agent and combination treatments. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. [Reverse Chaddock sign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Kunio

    2011-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the Babinski reflex is the most well-known and important pathological reflex in clinical neurology. Among many other pathological reflexes that elicit an upgoing great toe, such as Chaddock, Oppenheim, Gordon, Schaefer, and Stransky, only the Chaddock reflex is said to be as sensitive as the Babinski reflex. The optimal receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes are the lateral plantar surface and the external inframalleolar area of the dorsum, respectively. It has been said that the Babinski reflex, obtained by stroking the sole, is by far the best and most reliable method of eliciting an upgoing great toe. However, the Chaddock reflex, the external malleolar sign, is also considered sensitive and reliable according to the literature and everyday neurological practice. The major problems in eliciting the Babinski reflex by stroking the lateral part of the sole are false positive or negative responses due to foot withdrawal, tonic foot response, or some equivocal movements. On the other hand, according to my clinical experience, the external inframalleolar area, which is the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex, is definitely suitable for eliciting the upgoing great toe. In fact, the newly proposed method to stimulate the dorsum of the foot from the medial to the lateral side, which I term the "reversed Chaddock method," is equally sensitive to demonstrate pyramidal tract involvement. With the "reversed Chaddock method", the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex may be postulated to be in the territory of the sural nerve, which could be supported by the better response obtained on stimulation of the postero-lateral calf than the anterior shin. With regard to the receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes, the first sacral dermatome (S1) is also considered a reflexogenous zone, but since the dermatome shows marked overlapping, the zones vary among individuals. As upgoing toe responses are consistently observed in

  19. Viral disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950243 Genotypic investigation of hepatitis C virusin patients with primary hepatic carcinoma liver cir-rhosis and hepatitis.YANG jianmin(杨建民).et al.Dept Gasrroenterol,Southwest Hosp,3rd Milit MedUniv,Chongqing,630038.Chin J Infect Dis 1995;13(1):1—3.Using reverse transcription nested polymerase chainreaction and restriction fragment length poly-morphsim,genotypic invsestigation of hepatitis C virus(HCV)in its 5’—noncoding region was carried out inHCV—infected patients with primary hepatic carcino-

  20. Reverse Engineering of RFID devices

    OpenAIRE

    Bokslag, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the relevance and potential impact of both RFID and reverse engineering of RFID technology, followed by a discussion of common protocols and internals of RFID technology. The focus of the paper is on providing an overview of the different approaches to reverse engineering RFID technology and possible countermeasures that could limit the potential of such reverse engineering attempts.

  1. L-Homoserylaminoethanol, a novel dipeptide alcohol inhibitor of eukaryotic DNA polymerase from a plant cultured cells, Nicotina tabacum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Isoko; Asano, Naoki; Kato, Ikuo; Oshige, Masahiko; Sugino, Akio; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    We found a novel inhibitor specific to eukaryotic DNA polymerase epsilon(pol epsilon) from plant cultured cells, Nicotina tabacum L. The compound (compound 1) was a dipeptide alcohol, L-homoserylaminoethanol. The 50% inhibition of pol epsilon activity by the compound was 43.6 microg/mL, and it had almost no effect on the activities of the other eukaryotic DNA polymerases such as alpha, beta, gamma and delta, prokaryotic DNA polymerases, nor DNA metabolic enzymes such as human telomerase, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, T7 RNA polymerase, human DNA topoisomerase I and II, T4 polynucleotide kinase and bovine deoxyribonuclease I. Kinetic studies showed that inhibition of pol epsilon by the compound was non-competitive with respect to both template-primer DNA and nucleotide substrate. We succeeded in chemically synthesizing the stereoisomers, L-homoserylaminoethanol and D-homoserylaminoethanol, and found both were effective to the same extent. The IC(50) values of L- and D-homoserylaminoethanols for pol epsilon were 42.0 and 41.5 microg/mL, respectively. This represents the second discovery of a pol epsilon-specific inhibitor, and the first report on a water-soluble peptide-like compound as the inhibitor, which is required in biochemical studies of pol epsilon.

  2. Human DNA ligase and DNA polymerase as molecular targets for heavy metals and anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.

    1992-01-01

    DNA ligase and DNA polymerase play important roles in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Frequencies of spontaneous and chemical- and physical-induced mutations are correlated to the fidelity of DNA replication. This dissertation elucidates the mechanisms of the DNA ligation reaction by DNA ligases and demonstrates that human DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase [alpha] are the molecular targets for two metal ions, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+], and an anticancer drug, F-ara-ATP. The formation of the AMP-DNA intermediate and the successive ligation reaction by human DNA ligases were analyzed. Both reactions showed their substrate specificity for ligases I and II, required Mg2+, and were inhibited by ATP. A protein inhibitor from HeLa cells and specific for human DNA ligase I but not ligase II and T4 ligase was discovered. It reversibly inhibited DNA ligation activity but not the AMP-binding activity due to the formation of a reversible ligase I-inhibitor complex. F-ara-ATP inhibited human DNA ligase I activity by competing with ATP for the AMP-binding site of DNA ligase I, forming a ligase I-F-ara-AMP complex, as well as when it was incorporated at 3[prime]-terminus of DNA nick by DNA polymerase [alpha]. All steps of the DNA ligation reaction were inhibited by Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] in a concentration-dependent manner. Both ions did not show the ability to change the fidelity of DNA ligation reaction catalyzed by human DNA ligase I. However, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] showed their contradictory effects on the fidelity of the reaction by human DNA polymerase [alpha]. Zn[sup 2+] decreased the frequency of misinsertion but less affected that of mispair extension. On the contrary, Cd[sup 2+] increased the frequencies of both misinsertion and mispair extension at very low concentration. The data provided strong evidence in the molecular mechanisms for the mutagenicity of zinc and cadmium, and were comparable with the results previously reported.

  3. Reverse Engineering Malicious Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Cristian Iacob

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Detecting new and unknown malware is a major challenge in today’s software. Security profession. A lot of approaches for the detection of malware using data mining techniques have already been proposed. Majority of the works used static features of malware. However, static detection methods fall short of detecting present day complex malware. Although some researchers proposed dynamic detection methods, the methods did not use all the malware features. In this work, an approach for the detection of new and unknown malware was proposed and implemented. Each sample was reverse engineered for analyzing its effect on the operating environment and to extract the static and behavioral features. 

  4. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  5. Reversibly Bistable Flexible Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-05-01

    Introducing the notion of transformational silicon electronics has paved the way for integrating various applications with silicon-based, modern, high-performance electronic circuits that are mechanically flexible and optically semitransparent. While maintaining large-scale production and prototyping rapidity, this flexible and translucent scheme demonstrates the potential to transform conventionally stiff electronic devices into thin and foldable ones without compromising long-term performance and reliability. In this work, we report on the fabrication and characterization of reversibly bistable flexible electronic switches that utilize flexible n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The transistors are fabricated initially on rigid (100) silicon substrates before they are peeled off. They can be used to control flexible batches of light-emitting diodes, demonstrating both the relative ease of scaling at minimum cost and maximum reliability and the feasibility of integration. The peeled-off silicon fabric is about 25 µm thick. The fabricated devices are transferred to a reversibly bistable flexible platform through which, for example, a flexible smartphone can be wrapped around a user’s wrist and can also be set back to its original mechanical position. Buckling and cyclic bending of such host platforms brings a completely new dimension to the development of flexible electronics, especially rollable displays.

  6. Optical tweezers studies of transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisica, Ana; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information and it is carried out by large macromolecular enzymes called RNA polymerases. Transcription has been studied for many years and with a myriad of experimental techniques, ranging from bulk studies to high-resolution transcript sequencing. In this review, we emphasise the advantages of using single-molecule techniques, particularly optical tweezers, to study transcription dynamics. We give an overview of the latest results in the single-molecule transcription field, focusing on transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases. Finally, we evaluate recent quantitative models that describe the biophysics of RNA polymerase translocation and backtracking dynamics.

  7. Fundamentals of reversible flowchart languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2016-01-01

    . Although reversible flowcharts are superficially similar to classical flowcharts, there are crucial differences: atomic steps are limited to locally invertible operations, and join points require an explicit orthogonalizing conditional expression. Despite these constraints, we show that reversible......Abstract This paper presents the fundamentals of reversible flowcharts. They are intended to naturally represent the structure and control flow of reversible (imperative) programming languages in a simple computation model, in the same way classical flowcharts do for conventional languages......, structured reversible flowcharts are as expressive as unstructured ones, as shown by a reversible version of the classic Structured Program Theorem. We illustrate how reversible flowcharts can be concretized with two example programming languages, complete with syntax and semantics: a low-level unstructured...

  8. Using mechanical force to probe the mechanism of pausing and arrest during continuous elongation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Nancy R.; Izhaky, David; Woodcock, Glenna R.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2002-09-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase translocates along the DNA discontinuously during the elongation phase of transcription, spending proportionally more time at some template positions, known as pause and arrest sites, than at others. Current models of elongation suggest that the enzyme backtracks at these locations, but the dynamics are unresolved. Here, we study the role of lateral displacement in pausing and arrest by applying force to individually transcribing molecules. We find that an assisting mechanical force does not alter the translocation rate of the enzyme, but does reduce the efficiency of both pausing and arrest. Moreover, arrested molecules cannot be rescued by force, suggesting that arrest occurs by a bipartite mechanism: the enzyme backtracks along the DNA followed by a conformational change of the ternary complex (RNA polymerase, DNA and transcript), which cannot be reversed mechanically.

  9. An integrated one-chip-sensor system for microRNA quantitative analysis based on digital droplet polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Masahiko; Wiederkehr, Rodrigo Sergio; Cai, Qing; Majeed, Bivragh; Fiorini, Paolo; Stakenborg, Tim; Matsuno, Toshinobu

    2016-04-01

    A silicon microfluidic chip was developed for microRNA (miRNA) quantitative analysis. It performs sequentially reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in a digital droplet format. Individual processes take place on different cavities, and reagent and sample mixing is carried out on a chip, prior to entering each compartment. The droplets are generated on a T-junction channel before the polymerase chain reaction step. Also, a miniaturized fluorescence detector was developed, based on an optical pick-up head of digital versatile disc (DVD) and a micro-photomultiplier tube. The chip integrated in the detection system was tested using synthetic miRNA with known concentrations, ranging from 300 to 3,000 templates/µL. Results proved the functionality of the system.

  10. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Joon [Chungnam National Univ. School of Medicine, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong [Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Myungji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Deuk [College of Medicine Pochon CHA Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  11. The inhibition of P338 lymphocytic leukemia DNA polymerase alpha activity by cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) and related derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, C B; Hall, I H

    1989-01-01

    Cis-platinum derivatives were observed to inhibit the activity of DNA polymerase alpha of P388 lymphocytic leukemia cells. A 600g nuclear preparation of the polymerase alpha was inhibited by cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) [cDDP], diamminemalonatoplatinum(II) [MAL], (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)-dichloroplatinum(II) [DACH-Pt-CL2], and (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)malonato-platinum(II) [DACH-Pt-MAL]. cDDP was a more potent inhibitor of the enzyme activity which was positively correlated with the observed inhibition of DNA synthesis of P388 cells in vivo and in vitro. The inhibition of the 600g preparation by cDDP could be partially reversed by the addition of exogenous ctDNA, but 35% inhibition was not retreivable by adding new template. Isolation of the P388 DNA polymerase alpha enzyme by DEAE column chromatography led to an enzyme with 100 fold purification, which was sensitive to N-ethyl maleimide at 0.1 mM concentration. cDDP inhibited the activity of this enzyme in a dose dependent manner. However, MAL, DACH-Pt-Cl2 and DACH-Pt-MAL afforded no inhibition, nor did the latter two derivatives bind to the enzyme. cDDP inhibition of the activity of purified enzyme was partially reversed by the addition of exogenous ctDNA and by the addition of dGTP, whereas addition of other d(NTP)s had no effect on the recovery of the enzyme activity. These studies suggest that cDDP inhibits DNA polymerase alpha activity and that the inhibition is not the sole mechanism of the action of the drug in suppression of DNA synthesis and cell death. Preliminary studies suggest that the drug may bind to the apoprotein of the enzyme in a competitive manner with dGTP.

  12. Theoretical analysis of transcription process with polymerase stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidences show that in gene transcription, RNA polymerase has the possibility to be stalled at certain position of the transcription template. This may be due to the template damage, or protein barriers. Once stalled, polymerase may backtrack along the template to the previous nucleotide to wait for the repair of the damaged site, or simply bypass the barrier or damaged site and consequently synthesize an incorrect messenger RNA, or degrade and detach from the template. Thus, the {\\it effective} transcription rate (the rate to synthesize correct product mRNA) and the transcription {\\it effectiveness} (the ratio of the {\\it effective} transcription rate to the {\\it effective} transcription initiation rate) are both influenced by polymerase stalling events. This study shows that, Without backtracking, detachment of stalled polymerase can also help to increase the {\\it effective} transcription rate and transcription {\\it effectiveness}. Generally, the increase of bypass rate of the stalled polymeras...

  13. Tetrahydrobenzothiophene inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, M G; Lessen, T A; Leister, L; Cebzanov, D; Amparo, E; Faust, C; Ortlip, D; Bailey, T R; Nitz, T J; Chunduru, S K; Young, D C; Burns, C J

    2006-01-01

    A novel series of selective HCV NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors has been disclosed. These compounds contain an appropriately substituted tetrahydrobenzothiophene scaffold. This communication will detail the SAR and activities of this series.

  14. Sexing bovine pre-implantation embryos using the polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... polymerase chain reaction: A model for human embryo ... Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine ... obtain and there is no ethical issue related to their use for research.

  15. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... HBV is distributed into various genotypes based on nucleic acid sequence variation. ... compared to genotype B and higher incidence of HCC in genotype D ... DNA sequencing technology to sequence HBV DNA polymerase ...

  16. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates...

  17. Proofreading genotyping assays mediated by high fidelity exo+ DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai; Pardinas, Jose R; Sommer, Steve S; Yao, Kai-Tai

    2005-02-01

    DNA polymerases with 3'-5' proofreading function mediate high fidelity DNA replication but their application for mutation detection was almost completely neglected before 1998. The obstacle facing the use of exo(+) polymerases for mutation detection could be overcome by primer-3'-termini modification, which has been tested using allele-specific primers with 3' labeling, 3' exonuclease-resistance and 3' dehydroxylation modifications. Accordingly, three new types of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays have been developed to carry out genome-wide genotyping making use of the fidelity advantage of exo(+) polymerases. Such SNP assays might also provide a novel approach for re-sequencing and de novo sequencing. These new mutation detection assays are widely adaptable to a variety of platforms, including real-time PCR, multi-well plate and microarray technologies. Application of exo(+) polymerases to genetic analysis could accelerate the pace of personalized medicine.

  18. Translesion Synthesis Polymerases in the Prevention and Promotion of Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jay Stallons

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in the transformation of cells to the malignant state of cancer is the induction of mutations in the DNA of cells damaged by genotoxic agents. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS is the process by which cells copy DNA containing unrepaired damage that blocks progression of the replication fork. The DNA polymerases that catalyze TLS in mammals have been the topic of intense investigation over the last decade. DNA polymerase η (Pol η is best understood and is active in error-free bypass of UV-induced DNA damage. The other TLS polymerases (Pol ι, Pol κ, REV1, and Pol ζ have been studied extensively in vitro, but their in vivo role is only now being investigated using knockout mouse models of carcinogenesis. This paper will focus on the studies of mice and humans with altered expression of TLS polymerases and the effects on cancer induced by environmental agents.

  19. an overview on the application of polymerase chain reaction (pcr)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences, 2(1): 109 - 114 ... Keywords: Polymerase chain reaction, Diagnosis, Bacteria, Infections .... A brain abscess is a localized pyogenic bacterial ... as encephalitis and skin rash. ... Streptococcus.

  20. Genotypic frequency of calpastatin gene in lori sheep by polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... meat. Genomic DNA was extracted from 100 sheep blood sample. Polymerase chain ... The effect of calpains gene polymorphism on ... dation and meat tenderness after slaughter. Increased ... to -20°C freezer. Genomic DNA ...

  1. Engineered DNA Polymerase Improves PCR Results for Plastid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Schori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Secondary metabolites often inhibit PCR and sequencing reactions in extractions from plant material, especially from silica-dried and herbarium material. A DNA polymerase that is tolerant to inhibitors improves PCR results. Methods and Results: A novel DNA amplification system, including a DNA polymerase engineered via directed evolution for improved tolerance to common plant-derived PCR inhibitors, was evaluated and PCR parameters optimized for three species. An additional 31 species were then tested with the engineered enzyme and optimized protocol, as well as with regular Taq polymerase. Conclusions: PCR products and high-quality sequence data were obtained for 96% of samples for rbcL and 79% for matK, compared to 29% and 21% with regular Taq polymerase.

  2. Diagnosis of hepatitis C virus in Brazilian blood donors using a reverse transcriptase nested polymerase chain reaction: comparison with enzyme immunoassay and recombinant protein immunoblot assay Diagnóstico da hepatite por vírus C em doadores de sangue brasileiros, usando a reação de transcrição reversa e a reação em cadeia da polimerase "nested": comparação com os ensaios imunoenzimáticos e imunoblot recombinante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva S. L. GONÇALES

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Screening blood donations for anti-HCV antibodies and alanine aminotransferase (ALT serum levels generally prevents the transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV by transfusion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA screening policy in identifying potentially infectious blood donors capable to transmit hepatitis C through blood transfusion. We have used a reverse transcriptase (RT-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR to investigate the presence of HCV-RNA in blood donors. The prevalence of HCV-RNA positive individuals was compared with the recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA-2 results in order to assess the usefulness of both tests as confirmatory assays. Both tests results were also compared with the EIA-2 OD/C ratio (optical densities of the samples divided by the cut off value. ALT results were expressed as the ALT quotient (qALT, calculated dividing the ALT value of the samples by the maximum normal value (53UI/l for the method. Donors (n=178 were divided into five groups according to their EIA anti-HCV status and qALT: group A (EIA > or = 3, ALT or = 3, ALT>1, group C (11 and group E (EIA or = 3 and detectable HCV-RNA by RT-nested PCR. We have also noted that blood donors with RIBA-2 indeterminate presented a high degree of detectable HCV-RNA using RT-nested PCR (75%, especially when the c22.3 band was detected.Na prevenção da transmissão de Hepatite por Vírus C (HCV em transfusões de hemocomponentes, utiliza-se rotineiramente, como testes de triagem de doadores de sangue, ensaios que detectam anticorpos anti-HCV e dosagens da enzima alanina-aminotransferase (ALT. O presente estudo tem como objetivo principal avaliar a eficiência do ensaio imunoenzimático de segunda geração (EIA-2 como teste de triagem, na identificação de doadores de sangue potencialmente infectados, e portanto, capazes de transmitir hepatite C pelos hemocomponentes. Nós utilizamos o ensaio de transcri

  3. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Senesac, Lawrence R [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  4. Is Computation Reversible?

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, M C; Parker, Michael C.; Walker, Stuart D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent investigations into the physical nature of information and fundamental limits to information transmission have revealed questions such as the possibility of superluminal data transfer or not; and whether reversible computation (information processing) is feasible. In some respects these uncertainties stem from the determination of whether information is inherent in points of non-analyticity (discontinuities) or smoother functions. The close relationship between information and entropy is also well known, e.g. Brillouin's concept of negentropy (negative entropy) as a measure for information. Since the leading edge of a step-discontinuity propagates in any dispersive medium at the speed of light in vacuum as a precursor to the main body of the dispersed pulse, we propose in this paper to treat information as being intrinsic to points of non-analyticity (discontinuities). This allows us to construct a theory addressing these dilemmas in a fashion consistent with causality, and the fundamental laws of ther...

  5. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  6. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  7. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  8. The Role of Polymerase Gamma Mutations in Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Saada A, Shaag A, Mandel A, Nevo Y, Eriksson S, Elpeleg O. Mutant mitochondrial thymidine kinase in mitochondrial DNA depletion myopathy . Nat. Genet...Functional defects due to spacer-region mutations of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase in a family with an ataxia- myopathy syndrome. Hum. Mol. Genet...polymerase gamma (POLG) have led to depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mutations in mtDNA. This proposal seeks to determine the effect of POLG

  9. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  10. Favipiravir (T-705), a novel viral RNA polymerase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) is an antiviral drug that selectively inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus. It is phosphoribosylated by cellular enzymes to its active form, favipiravir-ribofuranosyl-5′-triphosphate (RTP). Its antiviral effect is attenuated by the addition of purine nucleic acids, indicating the viral RNA polymerase mistakenly recognizes favipiravir-RTP as a purine nucleotide. Favipiravir is active against a broad range of ...

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA polymerases with exonuclease proofreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics are applied to DNA polymerases with exonuclease activity, taking into account the dependence of the rates on the previously incorporated nucleotide. The replication fidelity is shown to increase significantly thanks to this dependence at the basis of the mechanism of exonuclease proofreading. In particular, this dependence can provide up to a 100-fold lowering of the error probability under physiological conditions. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  12. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfman, W.B.; Perrault, J. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  13. Deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase III of Escherichia coli. Purification and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, D M; Hinkle, D C; Richardson, C C

    1975-01-25

    DNA polymerase III has been purified 4,500-fold from the Escherichis coli mutant, HMS83, which lacks DNA polymerases I and II. When subjected to disc gel electrophoresis, the most purified fraction exhibits a single major protein band from which enzymatic activity may be recovered. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions produces two protein bands with molecular weights of 140,000 and 40,000. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme is 7.0 S, and the Stokes radius is 62 A. Taken together these tow parameters indicate a native molecular weight of 180,000. Purified DNA polymerase III catalyzes the polymerization of nucleotides into DNA when provided with both a DNA template and a complementary primer strand. The newly synthesized DNA is covalently attached to the 3' terminus of the primer strand. Because the extent of polymerization is only 10 to 100 nucleotides, the best substrates are native DNA molecules with small single-stranded regions. The most purified enzyme preparation is devoid of endonuclease activities. In addition to the two exonuclease activities described in the accompanying paper, purified polymerase III also catalyzes pyrophosphorolysis and the exchange of pyrophosphate into deoxynucleoside triphosphates. DNA polymerase III has also been isolated from wild type E. coli containing the other two known DNA polymerases. Futhermore, the enzyme purified from three different polC mutants exhibits altered polymerase III activity, confirming that polC is the structural gene for DNA polymerase III (Gefter, M., Hirota, Y., Kornberb, T., Wechsler, J., and Barnoux, C. (1971) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 68, 3150-3153).

  14. Investigation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity in Pig Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncorgé, Olivier; Long, Jason S.; Cauldwell, Anna V.; Zhou, Hongbo; Lycett, Samantha J.

    2013-01-01

    Reassortant influenza viruses with combinations of avian, human, and/or swine genomic segments have been detected frequently in pigs. As a consequence, pigs have been accused of being a “mixing vessel” for influenza viruses. This implies that pig cells support transcription and replication of avian influenza viruses, in contrast to human cells, in which most avian influenza virus polymerases display limited activity. Although influenza virus polymerase activity has been studied in human and avian cells for many years by use of a minigenome assay, similar investigations in pig cells have not been reported. We developed the first minigenome assay for pig cells and compared the activities of polymerases of avian or human influenza virus origin in pig, human, and avian cells. We also investigated in pig cells the consequences of some known mammalian host range determinants that enhance influenza virus polymerase activity in human cells, such as PB2 mutations E627K, D701N, G590S/Q591R, and T271A. The two typical avian influenza virus polymerases used in this study were poorly active in pig cells, similar to what is seen in human cells, and mutations that adapt the avian influenza virus polymerase for human cells also increased activity in pig cells. In contrast, a different pattern was observed in avian cells. Finally, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 polymerase activity was tested because this subtype has been reported to replicate only poorly in pigs. H5N1 polymerase was active in swine cells, suggesting that other barriers restrict these viruses from becoming endemic in pigs. PMID:23077313

  15. A Reversible Processor Architecture and its Reversible Logic Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design of a purely reversible computing architecture, Bob, and its instruction set, BobISA. The special features of the design include a simple, yet expressive, locally-invertible instruction set, and fully reversible control logic and address calculation. We have designed...... an architecture with an ISA that is expressive enough to serve as the target for a compiler from a high-level structured reversible programming language. All-in-all, this paper demonstrates that the design of a complete reversible computing architecture is possible and can serve as the core of a programmable...

  16. Structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsid in complex with the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the small polymerase cofactor, P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; (UAB-MED)

    2009-10-05

    The negative-strand RNA viruses (NSRVs) are unique because their nucleocapsid, not the naked RNA, is the active template for transcription and replication. The viral polymerase of nonsegmented NSRVs contains a large polymerase catalytic subunit (L) and a nonenzymatic cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P). Insight into how P delivers the polymerase complex to the nucleocapsid has long been pursued by reverse genetics and biochemical approaches. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P of vesicular stomatitis virus, a prototypic nonsegmented NSRV, bound to nucleocapsid-like particles. P binds primarily to the C-terminal lobe of 2 adjacent N proteins within the nucleocapsid. This binding mode is exclusive to the nucleocapsid, not the nucleocapsid (N) protein in other existing forms. Localization of phosphorylation sites within P and their proximity to the RNA cavity give insight into how the L protein might be oriented to access the RNA template.

  17. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  18. Kinetic characterization of exonuclease-deficient Staphylococcus aureus PolC, a C-family replicative DNA polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Lahiri

    Full Text Available PolC is the C-family replicative polymerase in low G+C content Gram-positive bacteria. To date several structures of C-family polymerases have been reported, including a high resolution crystal structure of a ternary complex of PolC with DNA and incoming deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP. However, kinetic information needed to understand the enzymatic mechanism of C-family polymerases is limited. For this study we have performed a detailed steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic characterization of correct dNTP incorporation by PolC from the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, using a construct lacking both the non-conserved N-terminal domain and the 3'-5' exonuclease domain (Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo. We find that Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo has a very fast catalytic rate (k(pol 330 s(-1 but also dissociates from DNA rapidly (k(off ∼150 s(-1, which explains the low processivity of PolC in the absence of sliding clamp processivity factor. Although Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo follows the overall enzymatic pathway defined for other polymerases, some significant differences exist. The most striking feature is that the nucleotidyl transfer reaction for Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo is reversible and is in equilibrium with dNTP binding. Simulation of the reaction pathway suggests that rate of pyrophosphate release, or a conformational change required for pyrophosphate release, is much slower than rate of bond formation. The significance of these findings is discussed in the context of previous data showing that binding of the β-clamp processivity factor stimulates the intrinsic nucleotide incorporation rate of the C-family polymerases, in addition to increasing processivity.

  19. Noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Jegu, Teddy; Latrasse, David; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Christ, Aurélie; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2014-08-07

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes.

  20. Extragenic accumulation of RNA polymerase II enhances transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Listerman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent genomic data indicate that RNA polymerase II (Pol II function extends beyond conventional transcription of primarily protein-coding genes. Among the five snRNAs required for pre-mRNA splicing, only the U6 snRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. Here we address the question of how Pol II coordinates the expression of spliceosome components, including U6. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and high-resolution mapping by PCR to localize both Pol II and Pol III to snRNA gene regions. We report the surprising finding that Pol II is highly concentrated approximately 300 bp upstream of all five active human U6 genes in vivo. The U6 snRNA, an essential component of the spliceosome, is synthesized by Pol III, whereas all other spliceosomal snRNAs are Pol II transcripts. Accordingly, U6 transcripts were terminated in a Pol III-specific manner, and Pol III localized to the transcribed gene regions. However, synthesis of both U6 and U2 snRNAs was alpha-amanitin-sensitive, indicating a requirement for Pol II activity in the expression of both snRNAs. Moreover, both Pol II and histone tail acetylation marks were lost from U6 promoters upon alpha-amanitin treatment. The results indicate that Pol II is concentrated at specific genomic regions from which it can regulate Pol III activity by a general mechanism. Consequently, Pol II coordinates expression of all RNA and protein components of the spliceosome.

  1. A novel thermostable polymerase for RNA and DNA Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh eChander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the goal of providing point of care (POC tests for molecular detection of pathogens in low resource settings places stringent demands on all aspects of the technology. OmniAmp DNA polymerase (Pol is a thermostable viral enzyme that enables true POC use in clinics or in field by overcoming important barriers to isothermal amplification. In this paper, we describe the multiple advantages of OmniAmp Pol as an isothermal amplification enzyme and provide examples of its use in loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP for pathogen detection. The inherent reverse transcriptase activity of OmniAmp Pol allows single enzyme detection of RNA targets in RT-LAMP. Common methods of nucleic acid amplification are highly susceptible to sample contaminants, necessitating elaborate nucleic acid purification protocols that are incompatible with POC or field use. OmniAmp Pol was found to be less inhibited by whole blood components typical in certain crude sample preparations . Moreover, the thermostability of the enzyme compared to alternative DNA polymerases (Bst and reverse transcriptases allows pretreatment of complete reaction mixes immediately prior to amplification, which facilitates amplification of highly structured genome regions. Compared to Bst, OmniAmp Pol has a faster time to result, particularly with more dilute templates. Molecular diagnostics in field settings can be challenging due to the lack of refrigeration. The stability of OmniAmp Pol is compatible with a dry format that enables long term storage at ambient temperatures. A final requirement for field operability is compatibility with either commonly available instruments or, in other cases, a simple, inexpensive, portable detection mode requiring minimal training or power. Detection of amplification products is shown using lateral flow strips and analysis on a real-time PCR instrument. Results of this study show that OmniAmp Pol is ideally suited for low resource molecular

  2. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Branko; Kostić, Vladimir; Sternić, Nadezda; Kolar, Jovo; Tasić, Nebojsa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome was introduced into clinical practice in 1996 in order to describe unique syndrome, clinically expressed during hypertensive and uremic encephalopathy, eclampsia and during immunosuppressive therapy [1]. First clinical investigations showed that leucoencephalopathy is major characteristic of the syndrome, but further investigations showed no significant destruction in white cerebral tissue [2, 3, 4]. In majority of cases changes are localise in posterior irrigation area of the brain and in the most severe cases anterior region is also involved. Taking into consideration all above mentioned facts, the suggested term was Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) for the syndrome clinically expressed by neurological manifestations derived from cortical and subcortical changes localised in posterior regions of cerebral hemispheres, cerebral trunk and cerebellum [5]. Patient, aged 53 years, was re-hospitalized in Cardiovascular Institute "Dediwe" two months after successful aorto-coronary bypass performed in June 2001 due to the chest bone infection. During the treatment of the infection (according to the antibiogram) in September 2001, patient in evening hours developed headache and blurred vision. The recorded blood pressure was 210/120 mmHg so antihypertensive treatment was applied (Nifedipin and Furosemid). After this therapy there was no improvement and intensive headache with fatigue and loss of vision developed. Neurological examination revealed cortical blindness and left hemiparesis. Manitol (20%, 60 ccm every 3 hours) and i.v. Nytroglicerin (high blood pressure). Brain CT revealed oedema of parieto-occipital regions of both hemispheres, more emphasized on the right. (Figure 1a, b, c). There was no sign of focal ischemia even in deeper sections (Figure 1d, e, f). Following three days enormous high blood pressure values were registered. On the fourth day the significant clinical improvement occurred

  3. THE METHOD OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR SEX DETERMINATION IN HUCHEN (HUCHO HUCHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Rud

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyse the nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome and to determine the fragment for specific primers selection and also to develop the PCR based method for sex determination in huchen H. hucho. Methodology. Using the ClustalW algorithm in MEGA 5.2, the nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome were analysed. For developing of method for rapid diagnostic of huchen sex the polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was used. Tne nucleotide sequences of amplified products were investigated by sequencing. Findings. Using PCR assay the method of sex determination in huchen H. hucho was developed. It was shown that specific PCR products in size of 450 nucleotides were visible in huchen males only. In addition we showed that selected primers can be used in sex determination of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and this fact is proved the high rate of sdY locus similarity and its wide destribution in salmonids. Originality. The nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome were analysed and highly conservative region of sdY locus for specific primers selection, which covers sex-linked marker, was identified. Practical Value. Rapid sex determination in huchen by the developed method will allow to identify reversal males in process of gormonal sex reversion. At the stage of reversal males screening, this method will allow to identify the genotypic males (XY in experimental group and discard them because only phenotypic males with XX genotype (reversal males must be used in the crosses with native femelas for getting of 100 % all-females stock.

  4. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  5. Aspiration Level and the Reversal of the Preference Reversal Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    American Economic Review , 69, 623- 638...Grether, D. M., & Plott, C. R. (1982). Economic theory of choice and the preference reversal phenomenon: Reply. The American Economic Review , 72, 575. Har...34 - . • . ...... ., .. . -. -.,- ... , .. ... - ., . . . . .. . ... . . . . . . . *~~~7 T, W.. 1 d~ I t Y ~ VVW ~ Page 26 1 loomes, G., & Sugden, R. (1983). A rationale for preference reversal. The American Economic Review ,

  6. Design of Reversible Sequential Circuit Using Reversible Logic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Belayet Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reversible logic is one of the most vital issue at present time and it has different areas for its application,those are low power CMOS, quantum computing, nanotechnology, cryptography, optical computing, DNA computing, digital signal processing (DSP, quantum dot cellular auto meta, communication, computer graphics. It is not possible to realize quantum computing without implementation of reversible logic. The main purposes of designing reversible logic are to decrease quantum cost, depth of the circuits and the number of garbage outputs. In this paper, we have proposed a new reversible gate. And we have designed RS flip flop and D flip flop by using our proposed gate and Peres gate. The proposed designs are better than the existing proposed ones in terms of number of reversible gates and garbage outputs. So, this realization is more efficient and less costly than other realizations.

  7. Design of Reversible Sequential Circuit Using Reversible Logic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mosharof Hossin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible logic is one of the most vital issue at present time and it has different areas for its application, those are low power CMOS, quantum computing, nanotechnology, cryptography, optical computing, DNA computing, digital signal processing (DSP, quantum dot cellular automata, communication, computer graphics. It is not possible to realize quantum computing without implementation of reversible logic. The main purposes of designing reversible logic are to decrease quantum cost, depth of the circuits and the number of garbage outputs. In this paper, we have proposed a new reversible gate. And we have designedRS flip flop and D flip flop by using our proposed gate and Peres gate. The proposed designs are better than the existing proposed ones in terms of number of reversible gates and garbage outputs. So, this realization is more efficient and less costly than other realizations.

  8. Time Reversal Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  9. Enzymatic reactions in reversed micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    It has been recognised that enzymes in reversed micelles have potential for application in chemical synthesis. Before these expectations will be realised many problems must be overcome. This thesis deals with some of them.In Chapter 1 the present knowledge about reversed micelles and micellar enzymo

  10. Enzyme recovery using reversed micelles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery of extracellular enzymes. The potentials of reaching this goal by using reversed micelles in an organic solvent have been investigated.Reversed micelles are aggregates of surfactant molecules containing an

  11. Biochemical characterization of rhinovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Magdeleine; Gibbs, Craig S; Tsiang, Manuel

    2002-11-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) represent the single most important causative agent of the common cold. The HRV genome encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) designated 3D polymerase that is required for replication of the HRV RNA genome. We have expressed and purified recombinant HRV-16 3D polymerase to near homogeneity from Escherichia coli transformed with an expression plasmid containing the full-length 460 amino acid HRV-16 3D sequence with a methionine at the N-terminus and a glycine-serine linker followed by a 6-histidine affinity tag at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant protein has rifampicin-resistant activity in a poly(A)-dependent poly(U) polymerase assay while corresponding fractions similarly purified from E. coli transformed with an expression plasmid without the HRV-16 3D sequence showed no activity. The optimal conditions for temperature, pH, divalent cations Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), and KCl were determined. The recombinant protein has RNA polymerase activity on homopolymeric templates poly(A) and poly(C) and heteropolymeric RNA templates primed with either RNA or DNA oligonucleotide primers or self-primed by a copy-back mechanism. A unique, secondary structureless heteropolymeric RNA template that is an efficient substrate was developed to facilitate kinetic characterizations of the enzyme. In the presence of Mg(2+), the enzyme displayed strong base and sugar specificity. However, when Mg(2+) was replaced by Mn(2+) specificity for ribonucleotides was lost, utilization of deoxynucleotides became possible and primer-independent activity was observed on the poly(C) template. Zn(2+) was found to inhibit HRV-16 3D polymerase with an IC(50) as low as 0.6 microM by a mechanism distinct from the magnesium ion stimulation. The activity of this 6His-tagged HRV-16 3D polymerase was compared with that of a recombinant HRV-16 3D polymerase expressed without the 6His-tag and was found to be identical. The availability of recombinant rhinovirus RdRp in a

  12. Recovery of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus from plasmids encoding EMCV IRES in stable cell lines expressing T7 polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Green, Kim Y; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V

    2015-06-01

    Reverse genetics systems constitute one of the most important and powerful tools to study the molecular biology of viruses. We developed a new strategy for the recovery of murine norovirus from a single plasmid in which a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7pol) promoter for transcription and an EMCV IRES for efficient translation were engineered immediately upstream of the viral genome. Infectious noroviruses were recovered following transfection of the newly designed plasmid into nonpermissive BHK-21 and HEK293T cell lines that were engineered to express T7pol constitutively. Recovery of the virus did not require the presence of a ribozyme at the 3'-end of the virus genome. The strategy worked also for the efficient recovery of feline calicivirus in these normally nonpermissive cell types. This simplified reverse genetics approach may be broadly applicable to other caliciviruses. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eKillelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR, cDNA cloning, genome sequencing and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3’ primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  14. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  15. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  16. What do reversible programs compute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Reversible computing is the study of computation models that exhibit both forward and backward determinism. Understanding the fundamental properties of such models is not only relevant for reversible programming, but has also been found important in other fields, e.g., bidirectional model...... transformation, program transformations such as inversion, and general static prediction of program properties. Historically, work on reversible computing has focussed on reversible simulations of irreversible computations. Here, we take the viewpoint that the property of reversibility itself should...... are not strictly classically universal, but that they support another notion of universality; we call this RTM-universality. Thus, even though the RTMs are sub-universal in the classical sense, they are powerful enough as to include a self-interpreter. Lifting this to other computation models, we propose r...

  17. Optimization of reversible sequential circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sayem, Abu Sadat Md

    2010-01-01

    In recent years reversible logic has been considered as an important issue for designing low power digital circuits. It has voluminous applications in the present rising nanotechnology such as DNA computing, Quantum Computing, low power VLSI and quantum dot automata. In this paper we have proposed optimized design of reversible sequential circuits in terms of number of gates, delay and hardware complexity. We have designed the latches with a new reversible gate and reduced the required number of gates, garbage outputs, and delay and hardware complexity. As the number of gates and garbage outputs increase the complexity of reversible circuits, this design will significantly enhance the performance. We have proposed reversible D-latch and JK latch which are better than the existing designs available in literature.

  18. Reversed polarity patches at the CMB and geomagnetic field reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Wenyao(徐文耀); WEI; Zigang(魏自刚)

    2002-01-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field models (IGRF) for 1900-2000 are used to calculate the geomagnetic field distribution in the Earth' interior from the ground surface to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) under the assumption of insulated mantle. Four reversed polarity patches, as one of the most important features of the CMB field, are revealed. Two patches with +Z polarity (downward) at the southern African and the southern American regions stand out against the background of -Z polarity (upward) in the southern hemisphere, and two patches of -Z polarity at the North Polar and the northern Pacific regions stand out against the +Z background in the northern hemisphere. During the 1900-2000 period the southern African (SAF) patch has quickly drifted westward at a speed of 0.2-0.3°/a; meanwhile its area has expanded 5 times, and the magnetic flux crossing the area has intensified 30 times. On the other hand, other three patches show little if any change during this 100-year period. Extending upward, each of the reversed polarity patches at the CMB forms a chimney-shaped "reversed polarity column" in the mantle with the bottom at the CMB. The height of the SAF column has grown rapidly from 200km in 1900 to 900km in 2000. If the column grows steadily at the same rate in the future, its top will reach to the ground surface in 600-700 years. And then a reversed polarity patch will be observed at the Earth's surface, which will be an indicator of the beginning of a magnetic field reversal. On the basis of this study, one can describe the process of a geomagnetic polarity reversal, the polarity reversal may be observed firstly in one or several local regions; then the areas of these regions expand, and at the same time, other new reversed polarity regions may appear. Thus several poles may exist during a polarity reversal.

  19. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Spl.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Gon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Bon.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Gon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Spleen SR...X062981,SRX143838,SRX020253 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Placent...a http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Pancrea...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Liver SR...1013886 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Prostate ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Neural ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Uterus ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Others ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Neu.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adult ...SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395531 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Blood SR...,SRX017986,SRX017985,SRX728781,SRX017717,SRX005163,SRX024360,SRX017718 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Larvae SR...SRX661503,SRX026742,SRX013070,SRX013072,SRX182775,SRX151961,SRX013082,SRX013113 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II All cell...X1388758,SRX1388756,SRX1388757 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Epiderm...is http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell ...050604,SRX050605,SRX013077 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Pancrea...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Kidney ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...363,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Muscle SR.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Embryo SR...SRX099707 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Pancreas ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Cardiovas...X373591,SRX373605,SRX680476,SRX346170,SRX346169 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.YSt.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Yeast... strain SRX092435,SRX497381,SRX360914,SRX497380,SRX497382,SRX360917 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pluripot...833412,SRX149642,SRX702059 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX800016,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III All cel...l types ERX204069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Epiderm...is http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Muscle SR.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Brs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Breast ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Kidney SR...X661587,SRX062964,SRX143850,SRX236087,SRX020250 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...866,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pancreas... SRX190244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Blood h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryo ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Unclass...ified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassif...ied SRX254629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Digesti...ve tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Placenta ...SRX160402,SRX112969 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Cardiov...ascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Muscle ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adult SR...SRX1388757,SRX1388756 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Lung SRX0...62976,SRX143816,SRX020252 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Lng.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Pancrea...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Lung SRX1...43816,SRX062976,SRX020252 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Yeast... strain SRX092435,SRX360917,SRX360914,SRX497380,SRX497382,SRX497381,SRX360915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Others ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Unclass...ified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...