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Sample records for reverse transcriptasae inhibitors

  1. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewi, Paul; Heeres, Jan; Ariën, Kevin; Venkatraj, Muthusamy; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Vanham, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The CAPRISA 004 study in South Africa has accelerated the development of vaginal and rectal microbicides containing antiretrovirals that target specific enzymes in the reproduction cycle of HIV, especially reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). In this review we discuss the potential relevance of HIV-1 RTIs as microbicides, focusing in the nucleotide RTI tenofovir and six classes of nonnucleoside RTIs (including dapivirine, UC781, urea and thiourea PETTs, DABOs and a pyrimidinedione). Although tenofovir and dapivirine appear to be most advanced in clinical trials as potential microbicides, several issues remain unresolved, e.g., the importance of nonhuman primates as a "gatekeeper" for clinical trials, the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants, the combination of microbicides that target different phases of viral reproduction and the accessibility to microbicides in low-income countries. Thus, here we discuss the latest research on RTI as microbicides in the light of the continuing spread of the HIV pandemic from the point of view of medicinal chemistry, virological, and pharmaceutical studies.

  2. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as potential colorectal microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carolina; Cranage, Martin; McGowan, Ian; Anton, Peter; Shattock, Robin J

    2009-05-01

    We investigated whether reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (RTI) can be combined to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of colorectal tissue ex vivo as part of a strategy to develop an effective rectal microbicide. The nucleotide RTI (NRTI) PMPA (tenofovir) and two nonnucleoside RTI (NNRTI), UC-781 and TMC120 (dapivirine), were evaluated. Each compound inhibited the replication of the HIV isolates tested in TZM-bl cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and colorectal explants. Dual combinations of the three compounds, either NRTI-NNRTI or NNRTI-NNRTI combinations, were more active than any of the individual compounds in both cellular and tissue models. Combinations were key to inhibiting infection by NRTI- and NNRTI-resistant isolates in all models tested. Moreover, we found that the replication capacities of HIV-1 isolates in colorectal explants were affected by single point mutations in RT that confer resistance to RTI. These data demonstrate that colorectal explants can be used to screen compounds for potential efficacy as part of a combination microbicide and to determine the mucosal fitness of RTI-resistant isolates. These findings may have important implications for the rational design of effective rectal microbicides.

  3. HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanangamudi, Murugesan; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Design of inhibitors for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition (HIV-1 RT) is one of the successful chemotherapies for the treatment of HIV infection. Among the inhibitors available for HIV-1 RT, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have shown to be very promising......: The conformation dependent-alignment based (CoMFA and CoMSIA) methods have been proven very successful ligand based strategy in the drug design. Here, CoMFA and CoMSIA studies reported for structurally distinct NNRTIs including thiazolobenzimidazole, dipyridodiazepinone, 1,1,3-trioxo [1,2,4]-thiadiazine...

  4. Indanones as high-potency reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-05-01

    Recent reports document that α-tetralone (3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one) is an appropriate scaffold for the design of high-potency monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Based on the structural similarity between α-tetralone and 1-indanone, the present study involved synthesis of 34 1-indanone and related indane derivatives as potential inhibitors of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B. The results show that C6-substituted indanones are particularly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, with IC50 values ranging from 0.001 to 0.030 μM. C5-Substituted indanone and indane derivatives are comparatively weaker MAO-B inhibitors. Although the 1-indanone and indane derivatives are selective inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform, a number of homologues are also potent MAO-A inhibitors, with three homologues possessing IC50 values 1-indanone as a reversible MAO inhibitor with a competitive mode of inhibition. It may be concluded that 1-indanones are promising leads for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Do non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors contribute to lipodystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, David

    2005-01-01

    Lipodystrophy complications, including lipoatrophy (pathological fat loss) and metabolic complications, have emerged as important long-term toxicities associated with antiretroviral therapy in the current era. The wealth of data that has accumulated over the past 6 years has now clarified the contribution of specific antiretroviral drugs to the risk of these clinical endpoints, with evidence that lipoatrophy is strongly associated with the choice of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy (specifically, stavudine and to a lesser extent zidovudine). The aetiological basis of metabolic complications of antiretroviral therapy has proven to be complex, in that the risk appears to be modulated by a number of lifestyle factors that have made the metabolic syndrome highly prevalent in the general population, with additional contributions from HIV disease status itself, as well as from individual drugs within the HIV protease inhibitor class. The currently licensed non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) drugs, efavirenz and nevirapine, have been proven to have a favourable safety profile in terms of lipodystrophy complications. However, it must be noted that NNRTI drugs also have individual toxicity profiles that must be accounted for when considering and/or monitoring their use in the treatment of HIV infection.

  6. [Computational prediction of human immunodeficiency resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, O A; Filimonov, D A; Poroikov, V V

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and leads to over one million of deaths annually. Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is a gold standard in the HIV/AIDS therapy. Nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) are important component of HAART, but their effect depends on the HIV susceptibility/resistance. HIV resistance mainly occurs due to mutations leading to conformational changes in the three-dimensional structure of HIV RT. The aim of our work was to develop and test a computational method for prediction of HIV resistance associated with the mutations in HIV RT. Earlier we have developed a method for prediction of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistance; it is based on the usage of position-specific descriptors. These descriptors are generated using the particular amino acid residue and its position; the position of certain residue is determined in a multiple alignment. The training set consisted of more than 1900 sequences of HIV RT from the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance database; for these HIV RT variants experimental data on their resistance to ten inhibitors are presented. Balanced accuracy of prediction varies from 80% to 99% depending on the method of classification (support vector machine, Naive Bayes, random forest, convolutional neural networks) and the drug, resistance to which is obtained. Maximal balanced accuracy was obtained for prediction of resistance to zidovudine, stavudine, didanosine and efavirenz by the random forest classifier. Average accuracy of prediction is 89%.

  7. Rilpivirine: a new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Saravolatz, Louis D

    2013-02-01

    Rilpivirine is a new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is approved for HIV-1 treatment-naive adult patients in combination with other antiretroviral agents. The recommended dose is a 25 mg tablet once daily taken orally with a meal. Due to cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme induction or gastric pH increase, rilpivirine cannot be coadministered with a number of other drugs (anticonvulsants, rifabutin, rifampicin, rifapentine, proton pump inhibitors, systemic dexamethasone and St John's wort). Rilpivirine should be used with caution when coadministered with a drug with a known risk for torsade de pointes. Rilpivirine has a better tolerability than a comparative NNRTI, efavirenz, in clinical trials, with fewer central nervous system adverse effects, rashes, lipid abnormalities and discontinuation rates. Virological failure occurs more commonly with higher baseline viral loads (>100,000 copies/mL) and lower baseline CD4 counts (<50 cells/mm(3)). Seventeen NNRTI mutations have been associated with decreased susceptibility to rilpivirine: K101E/P, E138A/G/K/Q/R, V179L, Y181C/I/V, H221Y, F227C, M230I/L, Y188L and the combination L100I + K103N. Resistance to rilpivirine largely excludes future use of the NNRTI class.

  8. Effect of the scale inhibitor on ion content in reverse osmosis system for seawater desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuhua; Liu, Zhenfa; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Haihua

    2017-09-01

    A scale inhibitor was synthesized from polysuccinimide with 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid and aspartic acid. The effect of scale inhibitor on ion content in reverse osmosis system for seawater desalination was studied. The results showed that the ion content of permeate water is lower with the scale inhibitor added in RO system for seawater desalination than without scale inhibitor. On the contrary, the ion content of concentrate water is higher when with scale inhibitor in RO system.

  9. Nonnucleoside Reverse-transcriptase Inhibitor- vs Ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitor-based Regimens for Initial Treatment of HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H; Lundh, Andreas; Tendal, Britta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) cause faster virologic suppression, while ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r) recover more CD4 cells. However, individual trials have not been powered to compare clinical outcomes. METHODS: ...

  10. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors as Potential Colorectal Microbicides▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carolina; Cranage, Martin; McGowan, Ian; Anton, Peter; Shattock, Robin J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (RTI) can be combined to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of colorectal tissue ex vivo as part of a strategy to develop an effective rectal microbicide. The nucleotide RTI (NRTI) PMPA (tenofovir) and two nonnucleoside RTI (NNRTI), UC-781 and TMC120 (dapivirine), were evaluated. Each compound inhibited the replication of the HIV isolates tested in TZM-bl cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and colorectal explants. Dual combinations of the three compounds, either NRTI-NNRTI or NNRTI-NNRTI combinations, were more active than any of the individual compounds in both cellular and tissue models. Combinations were key to inhibiting infection by NRTI- and NNRTI-resistant isolates in all models tested. Moreover, we found that the replication capacities of HIV-1 isolates in colorectal explants were affected by single point mutations in RT that confer resistance to RTI. These data demonstrate that colorectal explants can be used to screen compounds for potential efficacy as part of a combination microbicide and to determine the mucosal fitness of RTI-resistant isolates. These findings may have important implications for the rational design of effective rectal microbicides. PMID:19258271

  11. Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H with an acylhydrazone inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qingguo; Menon, Lakshmi; Ilina, Tatiana; Miller, Lena G; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A; Ishima, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is a bifunctional enzyme, having both DNA polymerase (RNA- and DNA-dependent) and ribonuclease H activities. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been an exceptionally important target for antiretroviral therapeutic development, and nearly half of the current clinically used antiretrovirals target reverse transcriptase DNA polymerase. However, no inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H are on the market or in preclinical development. Several drug-like small molecule inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H have been described, but little structural information is available about the interactions between reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H and inhibitors that exhibit antiviral activity. In this report, we describe NMR studies of the interaction of a new ribonuclease H inhibitor, BHMP07, with a catalytically active HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain fragment. We carried out solution NMR experiments to identify the interaction interface of BHMP07 with the ribonuclease H domain fragment. Chemical shift changes of backbone amide signals at different BHMP07 concentrations clearly demonstrate that BHMP07 mainly recognizes the substrate handle region in the ribonuclease H fragment. Using ribonuclease H inhibition assays and reverse transcriptase mutants, the binding specificity of BHMP07 was compared with another inhibitor, dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone. Our results provide a structural characterization of the ribonuclease H inhibitor interaction and are likely to be useful for further improvements of the inhibitors. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Dissection of membrane protein degradation mechanisms by reversible inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The degradation of slowly turning over 125I-lactoperoxidase-labeled plasma membrane polypeptides in response to reversible temperature and lysosomotropic inhibitors was studied in rat hepatoma cultures. Cells were radiolabeled and left for 24 h to allow the removal of rapidly degraded proteins. Remaining trichloroacetic acid-precipitable protein was degraded (t 1/2 = 40-68 h) by an apparent first order process 60-86% sensitive to 10 mM NH4Cl or 5 mM methylamine and greater than 95% inhibited by temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Thus, membrane proteins are selected for degradation in a time-dependent manner by a system which is sensitive to both 18 degrees C and to lysosomotropic amines. When inhibitory conditions were removed after 40-48 h, degradation of 125I-labeled protein resumed at the same rate as that seen in their absence. Since membrane proteins do not exhibit accelerated degradation after removal of inhibitory conditions, there can be no marking or sorting of those proteins destined for degradation during the 40-h exposure to inhibitory conditions. Exposure to amines or 18 degrees C did not affect the position of two-dimensionally resolved labeled polypeptides. Fractionation of labeled cells on Percoll gradients after 40 h of exposure to low temperature or amines showed that labeled protein remained in the plasma membrane fractions of the gradient although shifted to a slightly lower buoyant density in the presence of amines. These results support the notion that selection of plasma membrane proteins for degradation requires their internalization into acidic vesicles. Lysosomotropic amines and reduced temperature interfere with the selection process by preventing membrane fusion events

  13. Reverse zymography alone does not confirm presence of a protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sangita; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-03-01

    Reverse zymography is applied for identification and semi-quantification of protease inhibitors that are of protein in nature. However, a protein that shows band in reverse zymography against a protease used for digestion of the gel need not be an inhibitor; it might be resistant to degradation by the protease. We demonstrate that in reverse zymography, avidin, streptavidin and the leaf extract of Catharanthus roseus behave like inhibitors of proteases like papain, ficin, bromelain extracts from pineapple leaf, stem and fruit and trypsin. Still, they do not act as inhibitors of those proteases when enzyme assays were done in solution. In reverse zymography, the extract of pineapple crown leaf shows two major inhibitor bands against its own proteases. Identification of these proteins from sequences derived from MALDI TOF MS analysis indicated that they are fruit and stem bromelains. Avidin, streptavidin and bromelains are 'kinetically stable proteins' that are usually resistant to proteolysis. Thus, it is recommended that identification of an inhibitor of a protease by reverse zymography should be supported by independent assay methods for confirmation.

  14. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  15. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  16. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legoabe LJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lesetja J Legoabe,1 Anél Petzer,1 Jacobus P Petzer1,21Centre of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South AfricaAbstract: Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15 and related compounds (two were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.Keywords: monoamine oxidase, MAO, inhibition, 2-acetylphenol, structure–activity relationship

  17. Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)--abacavir and didanosine--may each be associated with excess risk of myocardial infarction. The reproducibility of this finding in an independent dataset was explored and plausible biological mechanisms were sought. METHODS...

  18. Evolving uses of oral reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the HIV-1 epidemic: From treatment to prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.K. Gupta (Ravindra); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S. Manicklal (Sheetal); M.A. Wainberg (Mark)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe HIV epidemic continues unabated, with no highly effective vaccine and no cure. Each new infection has significant economic, social and human costs and prevention efforts are now as great a priority as global antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale up. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the

  19. A reversed-phase compatible thin-layer chromatography autography for the detection of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallo, I Ayelen; García, Paula; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2015-11-01

    A dual readout autographic assay to detect acetylcholinesterase inhibitors present in complex matrices adsorbed on reversed-phase or normal-phase thin-layer chromatography plates is described. Enzyme gel entrapment with an amphiphilic copolymer was used for assay development. The effects of substrate and enzyme concentrations, pH, incubation time, and incubation temperature on the sensitivity and the detection limit of the assay were evaluated. Experimental design and response surface methodology were used to optimize conditions with a minimum number of experiments. The assay allowed the detection of 0.01% w/w of physostigmine in both a spiked Sonchus oleraceus L. extract chromatographed on normal phase and a spiked Pimenta racemosa (Mill.) J.W. Moore leaf essential oil chromatographed on reversed phase. Finally, the reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography assay was applied to reveal the presence of an inhibitor in the Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf essential oil. The developed assay is able to detect acetylcholinesterase inhibitors present in complex matrixes that were chromatographed in normal phase or reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography. The detection limit for physostigmine on both normal and reversed phase was of 1×10(-4) μg. The results can be read by a change in color and/or a change in fluorescence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  1. Reversal of sodium pump inhibitor induced vascular smooth muscle contraction with digibind. Stoichiometry and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krep, H H; Graves, S W; Price, D A; Lazarus, M; Ensign, A; Soszynski, P A; Hollenberg, N K

    1996-01-01

    The possibility that a circulating sodium pump inhibitor contributes to the pathogenesis of volume-dependent hypertension via an action on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is supported by multiple lines of investigation, but remains controversial. We had two goals in this study. The first was to compare the pattern of contractile response of rabbit aorta induced by two candidates, ouabain and a labile sodium pump inhibitor that we have identified in the peritoneal dialysate of volume-expanded hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure. Our second goal was to examine the ability of Digibind, a Fab fragment of antisera directed against digoxin, to reverse VSM contraction induced by both agents. Ouabain induced a concentration-dependent contraction, which was delayed in onset, was gradual, and reached a stable plateau after many hours. The labile sodium pump inhibitor induced a qualitatively similar series of responses. Digibind rapidly reversed the contractile responses to both sodium pump inhibitors, with a rate of relaxation that matched that induced by physical removal of the pump inhibitor from the bath. For ouabain, the Digibind:ouabain stoichiometry was highly predictable. When Digibind was present in a molar concentration equivalent to that of ouabain, or less, it had no effect. When the Digibind concentration was twice that of ouabain, complete relaxation occurred. Although the concentration:VSM response relationship for ouabain was steep, the concentration:effect interaction with Digibind was even more steep. The molar concentration of Digibind required to reverse the effects of the labile endogenous inhibitor from peritoneal dialysate was consistently lower than that for ouabain, which is compatible with either greater potency of the labile factor in VSM or greater affinity for Digibind. These findings are compatible with a role for one or more endogenous sodium pump inhibitors as the determinant of vascular smooth muscle tone in the volume

  2. Structure-based methods to predict mutational resistance to diarylpyrimidine non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Syeda Maryam; Muwonge, Alecia N; Thakkar, Nehaben; Lam, Kristina W; Frey, Kathleen M

    2018-01-01

    Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) is a leading cause of HIV treatment failure. Often included in antiviral therapy, NNRTIs are chemically diverse compounds that bind an allosteric pocket of enzyme target reverse transcriptase (RT). Several new NNRTIs incorporate flexibility in order to compensate for lost interactions with amino acid conferring mutations in RT. Unfortunately, even successful inhibitors such as diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) inhibitor rilpivirine are affected by mutations in RT that confer resistance. In order to aid drug design efforts, it would be efficient and cost effective to pre-evaluate NNRTI compounds in development using a structure-based computational approach. As proof of concept, we applied a residue scan and molecular dynamics strategy using RT crystal structures to predict mutations that confer resistance to DAPYs rilpivirine, etravirine, and investigational microbicide dapivirine. Our predictive values, changes in affinity and stability, are correlative with fold-resistance data for several RT mutants. Consistent with previous studies, mutation K101P is predicted to confer high-level resistance to DAPYs. These findings were further validated using structural analysis, molecular dynamics, and an enzymatic reverse transcription assay. Our results confirm that changes in affinity and stability for mutant complexes are predictive parameters of resistance as validated by experimental and clinical data. In future work, we believe that this computational approach may be useful to predict resistance mutations for inhibitors in development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Biophysical Insights into the Inhibitory Mechanism of Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT plays a central role in HIV infection. Current United States Federal Drug Administration (USFDA-approved antiretroviral therapies can include one of five approved non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs, which are potent inhibitors of RT activity. Despite their crucial clinical role in treating and preventing HIV-1 infection, their mechanism of action remains elusive. In this review, we introduce RT and highlight major advances from experimental and computational biophysical experiments toward an understanding of RT function and the inhibitory mechanism(s of NNRTIs.

  4. Susceptibility of recombinant porcine endogenous retrovirus reverse transcriptase to nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, M; Fishman, J A; Pontikis, R; Aubertin, A M; Wilhelm, F X

    2002-12-01

    Transplantation of organs, tissues or cells from pigs to humans could be a potential solution to the shortage of human organs for transplantation. Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) remain a major safety concern for porcine xenotransplantation. Thus, finding drugs that could be used as virological prophylaxis (or therapy) against PERV replication would be desirable. One of the most effective ways to block retroviral multiplication is to inhibit the enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) which catalyzes the reverse transcription of viral RNA to proviral double-stranded DNA. We report here the cloning and expression of PERV RT and its susceptibility to several inhibitors. Our data demonstrate PERV susceptibility in vitro to the triphosphorylated nucleoside analog of zidovudine (AZT) and to ddGTP and to a lesser extent to ddTTP but almost no susceptibility to the non-nucleoside RT inhibitors tested.

  5. Review The Emerging Profile of Cross-Resistance among the Nonnucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2014-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infectio...

  6. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna Helene Santos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  7. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy: the D: A: D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyand, M.; Ryom, L.; Shepherd, L.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Grulich, A.; Reiss, P.; Wit, S. de; Monforte, A.M.; Furrer, H.; Pradier, C.; Lundgren, J.; Sabin, C.; Warris, A.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and cancer risk, especially regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), is unclear. METHODS: Participants were followed from the latest of D:A:D study entry or

  8. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy : the D: A: D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyand, Mathias; Ryom, Lene; Shepherd, Leah; Fatkenheuer, Gerd; Grulich, Andrew; Reiss, Peter; de Wit, Stéphane; D Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Furrer, Hansjakob; Pradier, Christian; Lundgren, Jens; Sabin, Caroline; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and cancer risk, especially regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), is unclear. METHODS: Participants were followed from the latest of D:A:D study entry or

  9. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafeyisetan O. Adebiyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT (groups I, II III, 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T (groups IV, V, VI and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII. Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy.

  10. Reversible Inhibitors of Monoamine Oxidase-A (RIMAs): Robust, Reversible Inhibition of Human Brain MAO-A by CX157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joanna S; Logan, Jean; Azzaro, Albert J; Fielding, Robert M; Zhu, Wei; Poshusta, Amy K; Burch, Daniel; Brand, Barry; Free, James; Asgharnejad, Mahnaz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Hubbard, Barbara; Jayne, Millard; King, Payton; Carter, Pauline; Carter, Scott; Xu, Youwen; Shea, Colleen; Muench, Lisa; Alexoff, David; Shumay, Elena; Schueller, Michael; Warner, Donald; Apelskog-Torres, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase-A (RIMA) inhibit the breakdown of three major neurotransmitters, serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, offering a multi-neurotransmitter strategy for the treatment of depression. CX157 (3-fluoro-7-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenoxathiin-10,10-dioxide) is a RIMA, which is currently in development for the treatment of major depressive disorder. We examined the degree and reversibility of the inhibition of brain monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and plasma CX157 levels at different times after oral dosing to establish a dosing paradigm for future clinical efficacy studies, and to determine whether plasma CX157 levels reflect the degree of brain MAO-A inhibition. Brain MAO-A levels were measured with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and [11C]clorgyline in 15 normal men after oral dosing of CX157 (20–80 mg). PET imaging was conducted after single and repeated doses of CX157 over a 24-h time course. We found that 60 and 80 mg doses of CX157 produced a robust dose-related inhibition (47–72%) of [11C]clorgyline binding to brain MAO-A at 2 h after administration and that brain MAO-A recovered completely by 24 h post drug. Plasma CX157 concentration was highly correlated with the inhibition of brain MAO-A (EC50: 19.3 ng/ml). Thus, CX157 is the first agent in the RIMA class with documented reversible inhibition of human brain MAO-A, supporting its classification as a RIMA, and the first RIMA with observed plasma levels that can serve as a biomarker for the degree of brain MAO-A inhibition. These data were used to establish the dosing regimen for a current clinical efficacy trial with CX157. PMID:19890267

  11. Potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors target HIV-1 Gag-Pol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Figueiredo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs target HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT by binding to a pocket in RT that is close to, but distinct, from the DNA polymerase active site and prevent the synthesis of viral cDNA. NNRTIs, in particular, those that are potent inhibitors of RT polymerase activity, can also act as chemical enhancers of the enzyme's inter-subunit interactions. However, the consequences of this chemical enhancement effect on HIV-1 replication are not understood. Here, we show that the potent NNRTIs efavirenz, TMC120, and TMC125, but not nevirapine or delavirdine, inhibit the late stages of HIV-1 replication. These potent NNRTIs enhanced the intracellular processing of Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins, and this was associated with a decrease in viral particle production from HIV-1-transfected cells. The increased polyprotein processing is consistent with premature activation of the HIV-1 protease by NNRTI-enhanced Gag-Pol multimerization through the embedded RT sequence. These findings support the view that Gag-Pol multimerization is an important step in viral assembly and demonstrate that regulation of Gag-Pol/Gag-Pol interactions is a novel target for small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 production. Furthermore, these drugs can serve as useful probes to further understand processes involved in HIV-1 particle assembly and maturation.

  12. Antitumor effect of combination of the inhibitors of two new oncotargets: proton pumps and reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugini, Luana; Sciamanna, Ilaria; Federici, Cristina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Fais, Stefano

    2017-01-17

    Tumor therapy needs new approaches in order to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity of the current treatments. The acidic microenvironment and the expression of high levels of endogenous non-telomerase reverse transcriptase (RT) are common features of malignant tumor cells. The anti-acidic proton pump inhibitor Lansoprazole (LAN) and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor Efavirenz (EFV) have shown independent antitumor efficacy. LAN has shown to counteract drug tumor resistance. We tested the hypothesis that combination of LAN and EFV may improve the overall antitumor effects. We thus pretreated human metastatic melanoma cells with LAN and then with EFV, both in 2D and 3D spheroid models. We evaluated the treatment effect by proliferation and cell death/apoptosis assays in classical and in pulse administration experiments. The action of EFV was negatively affected by the tumor microenvironmental acidity, and LAN pretreatment overcame the problem. LAN potentiated the cytotoxicity of EFV to melanoma cells and, when administered during the drug interruption period, prevented the replacement of tumor cell growth.This study supports the implementation of the current therapies with combination of Proton Pumps and Reverse Transcriptase inhibitors.

  13. Cuantificación de citocinas caninas mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa de transcriptasa reversa en tiempo real

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Saldarriaga

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los caninos son el principal reservorio domestico de la leishmaniasis visceral en el Nuevo y Viejo mundo. La reacción en cadena de la polimerasa de transcriptasa reversa en tiempo real para la medición de citocinas caninas no ha sido implementada para el estudio de la leishmaniasis visceral. Objetivo. Estandarizar la cuantificación relativa de IFN-g, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12p40 y IL-12p35 caninas utilizando reacción en cadena de la polimerasa de transcriptasa reversa en tiempo real. Materiales y métodos. Células mononucleares de sangre periférica de perros Fox-Hound fueron estimuladas con ConA, LPS y extracto de Staphylococcus aureus. El ARN fue utilizado en la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa de transcriptasa reversa en tiempo real de un solo paso para optimizar las concentraciones de iniciadores y sondas especificas de cada citocina, generar curvas estándar, confirmar la eficiencia de amplificación de las citocinas y del normalizador (18S ARNr y cuantificar la expresión de ARN. El método comparativo Ct fue utilizado para determinar los niveles relativos de expresión de ARN en las muestras, expresado como el incremento en el número de veces comparado con los controles. Resultados. El coeficiente de regresión para las curvas estándar y las eficiencias de amplificación de las citocinas y el normalizador, indicaron que la cuantificación fue confiable en un amplio rango de concentraciones de ARN. La activación de células mononucleares de sangre periférica resultó en un incremento en la expresión de IFN-g (132, IL-4 (8.8, IL-10 (7,2, y IL-12p40 (275, relativo a células control. La expresión basal de IL-12p35 fue también detectada. Conclusión. Esta metodología, comparada con los métodos convencionales disponibles para la medición de citocinas, ofrece varias ventajas y podría ser utilizada en estudios sobre inmunopatogenia e inmunidad en leishmaniasis visceral canina.

  14. DNA-directed control of enzyme-inhibitor complex formation: a modular approach to reversibly switch enzyme activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.M.G.; Engelen, W.; Merkx, M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-templated reversible assembly of an enzyme–inhibitor complex is presented as a new and highly modular approach to control enzyme activity. TEM1-ß-lactamase and its inhibitor protein BLIP were conjugated to different oligonucleotides, resulting in enzyme inhibition in the presence of template

  15. Identification and characterization of the novel reversible and selective cathepsin X inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonović, Urša Pečar; Mitrović, Ana; Knez, Damijan; Jakoš, Tanja; Pišlar, Anja; Brus, Boris; Doljak, Bojan; Stojan, Jure; Žakelj, Simon; Trontelj, Jurij; Gobec, Stanislav; Kos, Janko

    2017-09-13

    Cathepsin X is a cysteine peptidase involved in the progression of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Targeting this enzyme with selective inhibitors opens a new possibility for intervention in several therapeutic areas. In this study triazole-based reversible and selective inhibitors of cathepsin X have been identified. Their selectivity and binding is enhanced when the 2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine moiety is present as the R 1 substituent. Of a series of selected triazole-benzodioxine derivatives, compound 22 is the most potent inhibitor of cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity (K i  = 2.45 ± 0.05 μM) with at least 100-fold greater selectivity in comparison to cathepsin B or other related cysteine peptidases. Compound 22 is not cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells PC-3 or pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells at concentrations up to 10 μM. It significantly inhibits the migration of tumor cells and increases the outgrowth of neurites, both processes being under the control of cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity. Compound 22 and other characterized triazole-based inhibitors thus possess a great potential for further development resulting in several in vivo applications.

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitors reverse age-related increases in side effects of haloperidol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza L; Fisher, Daniel W; Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Fang, Deyu; Csernansky, John G; Dong, Hongxin

    2017-08-01

    Older patients can be especially susceptible to antipsychotic-induced side effects, and the pharmacodynamic mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. We hypothesized that age-related epigenetic alterations lead to decreased expression and functionality of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), contributing to this susceptibility. In this study, we treated young (2-3 months old) and aged (22-24 months old) C57BL/6 mice with the D2R antagonist haloperidol (HAL) once a day for 14 days to evaluate HAL-induced motor side effects. In addition, we pretreated separate groups of young and aged mice with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) or entinostat (MS-275) and then administered HAL. Our results show that the motor side effects of HAL are exaggerated in aged mice as compared to young mice and that HDAC inhibitors are able to reverse the severity of these deficits. HAL-induced motor deficits in aged mice are associated with an age- and drug-dependent decrease in striatal D2R protein levels and functionality. Further, histone acetylation was reduced while histone tri-methylation was increased at specific lysine residues of H3 and H4 within the Drd2 promoter in the striatum of aged mice. HDAC inhibitors, particularly VPA, restored striatal D2R protein levels and functionality and reversed age- and drug-related histone modifications at the Drd2 promoter. These results suggest that epigenetic changes at the striatal Drd2 promoter drive age-related increases in antipsychotic side effect susceptibility, and HDAC inhibitors may be an effective adjunct treatment strategy to reduce side effects in aged populations.

  17. Antitumor Activity and Mechanism of a Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor, Dapivirine, in Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Weiwen; Song, Xian-lu; Zhao, Shan-chao; He, Minyi; Wang, Hai; Chen, Ziyang; Xiang, Wei; Yi, Guozhong; Qi, Songtao; Liu, Yawei

    2018-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance: Dapivirine is one of reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). It is the prototype of diarylpyrimidines (DAPY), formerly known as TMC120 or DAPY R147681 (IUPAC name: 4- [[4-(2, 4, 6-trimethylphenyl) amino]-2-pyrimidinyl] amino]-benzonitrile; CAS no.244767-67-7). Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of dapivirine, one of the RTIs, on U87 glioblastoma (GBM) cells in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods: U87 GBM cells were cul...

  18. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, enhances inhibition of prepotent responding and spatial reversal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Holden D.; Amodeo, Dionisio A.; Sweeney, John A.; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings indicate treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) facilitates behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a learned response pattern. The present experiment investigated whether acute treatment with the SSRI, escitalopram, affects behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a naturally-biased response pattern (elevated conflict test) and/or reversal of a learned response pattern (spatial reversal learning). An additional experiment was carried out to determine whether escitalopram, at doses that affected behavioral flexibility, also reduced anxiety as tested in the elevated plus-maze. In each experiment, Long-Evans rats received an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or escitalopram (0.03, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to behavioral testing. Escitalopram, at all doses tested, enhanced acquisition in the elevated conflict test, but did not affect performance in the elevated plus-maze. Escitalopram (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) did not alter acquisition of the spatial discrimination, but facilitated reversal learning. In the elevated conflict and spatial reversal learning test, escitalopram enhanced the ability to maintain the relevant strategy after being initially selected. The present findings suggest that enhancing serotonin transmission with a SSRI facilitates inhibitory processes when conditions require a shift away from either a naturally-biased response pattern or a learned choice pattern. PMID:22219222

  19. TNF α is involved in neuropathic pain induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuexing; Ouyang, Handong; Liu, Shue; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2011-01-01

    In patients with HIV/AIDS, neuropathic pain is a common neurological complication. Infection with the HIV itself may lead to neuropathic pain, and painful symptoms are enhanced when patients are treated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). The mechanisms by which NRTIs contribute to the development of neuropathic pain are not known. In the current studies, we tested the role of TNFα in antiretroviral drug-induced neuropathic pain. We administered 2′,3′-dideoxycytidine (ddC, one of the NRTIs) systemically to induce mechanical allodynia. We found that ddC induced overexpression of both mRNA and proteins of GFAP and TNFα in the spinal dorsal horn. TNFα was colocalized with GFAP in the spinal dorsal horn and with NeuN in the DRG. Knockdown of TNFα with siRNA blocked the mechanical allodynia induced by ddC. Intrathecal administration of glial inhibitor or recombinant TNF soluble receptor, reversed mechanical allodynia induced by ddC. These results suggest that TNFα is involved in NRTI-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:21741472

  20. Polyurethane intravaginal ring for controlled delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kavita M; Pearce, Serena M; Poursaid, Azadeh E; Aliyar, Hyder A; Tresco, Patrick A; Mitchnik, Mark A; Kiser, Patrick F

    2008-10-01

    Women-controlled methods for prevention of male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV-1 are urgently needed. Providing inhibitory concentrations of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors to impede the replication of the virus in the female genital tissue offers a mechanism for prophylaxis of HIV-1. To this end, an intravaginal ring device that can provide long duration delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1, was developed utilizing a medical-grade polyether urethane. Monolithic intravaginal rings were fabricated and sustained release with cumulative flux linear with time was demonstrated under sink conditions for a period of 30 days. The release rate was directly proportional to the amount of drug loaded. Another release study conducted for a week utilizing liposome dispersions as sink conditions, to mimic the partitioning of dapivirine into vaginal tissue, also demonstrated release rates constant with time. These results qualify polyether urethanes for development of intravaginal rings for sustained delivery of microbicidal agents. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  1. Reversibility of membrane N-glycome of HeLa cells upon treatment with epigenetic inhibitors.

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    Tomislav Horvat

    Full Text Available Glycans are essential regulators of protein function and are now in the focus of research in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. There are numerous modes of regulating their biosynthesis, including epigenetic mechanisms implicated in the expression of glyco-genes. Since N-glycans located at the cell membrane define intercellular communication as well as a cellular response to a given environment, we developed a method to preferentially analyze this fraction of glycans. The method is based on incorporation of living cells into polyacrylamide gels, partial denaturation of membrane proteins with 3 M urea and subsequent release of N-glycans with PNGase F followed by HPLC analysis. Using this newly developed method, we revealed multiple effects of epigenetic inhibitors Trichostatin A, sodium butyrate and zebularine on the composition of N-glycans in human cells. The induced changes were found to be reversible after inhibitor removal. Given that many epigenetic inhibitors are currently explored as a therapeutic strategy in treatment of cancer, wherein surface glycans play an important role, the presented work contributes to our understanding of their efficiency in altering the N-glycan profile of cancer cells in culture.

  2. The reverse transcription inhibitor abacavir shows anticancer activity in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Carlini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transposable Elements (TEs comprise nearly 45% of the entire genome and are part of sophisticated regulatory network systems that control developmental processes in normal and pathological conditions. The retroviral/retrotransposon gene machinery consists mainly of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs-1 and Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs that code for their own endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT. Interestingly, RT is typically expressed at high levels in cancer cells. Recent studies report that RT inhibition by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs induces growth arrest and cell differentiation in vitro and antagonizes growth of human tumors in animal model. In the present study we analyze the anticancer activity of Abacavir (ABC, a nucleoside reverse transcription inhibitor (NRTI, on PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ABC significantly reduces cell growth, migration and invasion processes, considerably slows S phase progression, induces senescence and cell death in prostate cancer cells. Consistent with these observations, microarray analysis on PC3 cells shows that ABC induces specific and dose-dependent changes in gene expression, involving multiple cellular pathways. Notably, by quantitative Real-Time PCR we found that LINE-1 ORF1 and ORF2 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated by ABC treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the potential of ABC as anticancer agent able to induce antiproliferative activity and trigger senescence in prostate cancer cells. Noteworthy, we show that ABC elicits up-regulation of LINE-1 expression, suggesting the involvement of these elements in the observed cellular modifications.

  3. The structure of FIV reverse transcriptase and its implications for non-nucleoside inhibitor resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meytal Galilee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is the target for the majority of anti-HIV-1 drugs. As with all anti-AIDS treatments, continued success of RT inhibitors is persistently disrupted by the occurrence of resistance mutations. To explore latent resistance mechanisms potentially accessible to therapeutically challenged HIV-1 viruses, we examined RT from the related feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV. FIV closely parallels HIV-1 in its replication and pathogenicity, however, is resistant to all non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTI. The intrinsic resistance of FIV RT is particularly interesting since FIV harbors the Y181 and Y188 sensitivity residues absent in both HIV-2 and SIV. Unlike RT from HIV-2 or SIV, previous efforts have failed to make FIV RT susceptible to NNRTIs concluding that the structure or flexibility of the feline enzyme must be profoundly different. We report the first crystal structure of FIV RT and, being the first structure of an RT from a non-primate lentivirus, enrich the structural and species repertoires available for RT. The structure demonstrates that while the NNRTI binding pocket is conserved, minor subtleties at the entryway can render the FIV RT pocket more restricted and unfavorable for effective NNRTI binding. Measuring NNRTI binding affinity to FIV RT shows that the "closed" pocket configuration inhibits NNRTI binding. Mutating the loop residues rimming the entryway of FIV RT pocket allows for NNRTI binding, however, it does not confer sensitivity to these inhibitors. This reveals a further layer of resistance caused by inherent FIV RT variances that could have enhanced the dissociation of bound inhibitors, or, perhaps, modulated protein plasticity to overcome inhibitory effects of bound NNRTIs. The more "closed" conformation of FIV RT pocket can provide a template for the development of innovative drugs that could unlock the constrained pocket, and the resilient mutant version of the enzyme can offer a fresh model for the study

  4. Susceptibility of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K to Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Dube, Derek; Fujinaga, Koh; Kaplan, Mark H; Markovitz, David M

    2017-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) make up 8% of the human genome. The HERV type K (HERV-K) HML-2 (HK2) family contains proviruses that are the most recent entrants into the human germ line and are transcriptionally active. In HIV-1 infection and cancer, HK2 genes produce retroviral particles that appear to be infectious, yet the replication capacity of these viruses and potential pathogenicity has been difficult to ascertain. In this report, we screened the efficacy of commercially available reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) at inhibiting the enzymatic activity of HK2 RT and HK2 genomic replication. Interestingly, only one provirus, K103, was found to encode a functional RT among those examined. Several nucleoside analogue RTIs (NRTIs) blocked K103 RT activity and consistently inhibited the replication of HK2 genomes. The NRTIs zidovudine (AZT), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), and lamivudine (3TC), and the nucleotide RTI inhibitor tenofovir (TDF), show efficacy in blocking K103 RT. HIV-1-specific nonnucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), and integrase inhibitors (IIs) did not affect HK2, except for the NNRTI etravirine (ETV). The inhibition of HK2 infectivity by NRTIs appears to take place at either the reverse transcription step of the viral genome prior to HK2 viral particle formation and/or in the infected cells. Inhibition of HK2 by these drugs will be useful in suppressing HK2 infectivity if these viruses prove to be pathogenic in cancer, neurological disorders, or other diseases associated with HK2. The present studies also elucidate a key aspect of the life cycle of HK2, specifically addressing how they do, and/or did, replicate. IMPORTANCE Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancestral virus infections in the human genome. The most recent of these infections was caused by HK2. While HK2 often remains silent in the genome, this group of viruses is activated in HIV-1-infected and cancer cells. Recent evidence suggests that these

  5. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-01-29

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  6. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs.

  8. Identification of a methylated oligoribonucleotide as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Boyan; Bocquin, Anne; Gabus, Caroline; Avilov, Sergey; Mély, Yves; Agopian, Audrey; Divita, Gilles; Gottikh, Marina; Witvrouw, Myriam; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    Upon HIV-1 infection of a target cell, the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) copies the genomic RNA to synthesize the viral DNA. The genomic RNA is within the incoming HIV-1 core where it is coated by molecules of nucleocapsid (NC) protein that chaperones the reverse transcription process. Indeed, the RT chaperoning properties of NC extend from the initiation of cDNA synthesis to completion of the viral DNA. New and effective drugs against HIV-1 continue to be required, which prompted us to search for compounds aimed at inhibiting NC protein. Here, we report that the NC chaperoning activity is extensively inhibited in vitro by small methylated oligoribonucleotides (mODN). These mODNs were delivered intracellularly using a cell-penetrating-peptide and found to impede HIV-1 replication in primary human cells at nanomolar concentrations. Extensive analysis showed that viral cDNA synthesis was severely impaired by mODNs. Partially resistant viruses with mutations in NC and RT emerged after months of passaging in cell culture. A HIV-1 molecular clone (NL4.3) bearing these mutations was found to replicate at high concentrations of mODN, albeit with a reduced fitness. Small, methylated ODNs such as mODN-11 appear to be a new type of highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1.

  9. PD173074, a selective FGFR inhibitor, reverses MRP7 (ABCC10-mediated MDR

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    Nagaraju Anreddy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10 is a recently identified member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family, which adequately confers resistance to a diverse group of antineoplastic agents, including taxanes, vinca alkaloids and nucleoside analogs among others. Clinical studies indicate an increased MRP7 expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC compared to a normal healthy lung tissue. Recent studies revealed increased paclitaxel sensitivity in the Mrp7−/− mouse model compared to their wild-type counterparts. This demonstrates that MRP7 is a key contributor in developing drug resistance. Recently our group reported that PD173074, a specific fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR inhibitor, could significantly reverse P-glycoprotein-mediated MDR. However, whether PD173074 can interact with and inhibit other MRP members is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the ability of PD173074 to reverse MRP7-mediated MDR. We found that PD173074, at non-toxic concentration, could significantly increase the cellular sensitivity to MRP7 substrates. Mechanistic studies indicated that PD173074 (1 μmol/L significantly increased the intracellular accumulation and in-turn decreased the efflux of paclitaxel by inhibiting the transport activity without altering expression levels of the MRP7 protein, thereby representing a promising therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of chemoresistant cancer patients.

  10. Evaluation of nevirapine and/or hydroxyurea with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckenberg, Daniel H.; Wood, Robin; Horban, Andrzej; Beniowski, Marek; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Trocha, Hanna; Halota, Waldemar; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Jessen, Heiko; Lange, Joep M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of adding nevirapine (NVP) and/or hydroxyurea (HU) to a triple nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimen in terms of efficacy and tolerability. Methods: HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive adults were randomized, using a factorial design, to add

  11. Reversible Cysteine Protease Inhibitors Show Promise for a Chagas Disease Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Christian; Black, W. Cameron; Isabel, Elise; Vasquez-Camargo, Fabio; Nath-Chowdhury, Milli; Massé, Frédéric; Mellon, Christophe; Methot, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    The cysteine protease cruzipain is essential for the viability, infectivity, and virulence of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Thus, inhibitors of cruzipain are considered promising anti-T. cruzi chemotherapeutic agents. Reversible cruzipain inhibitors containing a nitrile “warhead” were prepared and demonstrated 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) as potent as 1 nM in baculovirus-generated cruzipain enzyme assays. In epimastigote and intracellular amastigote in vitro assays, the most potent compounds demonstrated antiparasitic behavior in the 5 to 10 μM IC50 range; however, trypomastigote production from the amastigote form was ∼90 to 95% inhibited at 2 μM. Two key compounds, Cz007 and Cz008, with IC50s of 1.1 and 1.8 nM, respectively, against the recombinant enzyme were tested in a murine model of acute T. cruzi infection, with oral dosing in chow for 28 days at doses from 3 to 50 mg/kg of body weight. At 3 mg/kg of Cz007 and 3 mg/kg of Cz008, the blood parasitemia areas under the concentration-time curves were 16% and 25% of the untreated group, respectively. At sacrifice, 24 days after immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, parasite presence in blood, heart, and esophagus was evaluated. Based on negative quantitative PCR results in all three tissues, cure rates in surviving animals were 90% for Cz007 at 3 mg/kg, 78% for Cz008 at 3 mg/kg, and 71% for benznidazole, the control compound, at 50 mg/kg. PMID:24323474

  12. Preclinical profile of befloxatone, a new reversible MAO-A inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curet, O; Damoiseau-Ovens, G; Sauvage, C; Sontag, N; Avenet, P; Depoortere, H; Caille, D; Bergis, O; Scatton, B

    1998-12-01

    Befloxatone, a novel oxazolidinone derivative, is a potent, selective and reversible monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitor in vitro (K1A = 1.9-3.6 nM) and ex vivo (ED50 MAO-A = 0.02 mg/kg, p.o.). It does not interact with a large number of receptors, monoamine transporters or other amine oxidases. Binding studies with [3H]-befloxatone in rat brain sections show that it labels with high affinity (Kd = 1.3 nM) a single population of sites with the pharmacological characteristics and regional distribution of MAO-A. In the rat brain, befloxatone (0.75 mg/kg, i.p.) increases tissue levels of monoamines and decreases levels of their deaminated metabolites. Acute administration of befloxatone (0.75 mg/kg, i.p.) induces an increase in extracellular striatal dopamine and cortical norepinephrine but not cortical serotonin levels in the rat. Befloxatone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) potently inhibits the firing rate of serotonergic neurons, partially decreases the firing of noradrenergic neurons and has no effect on the firing of dopaminergic neurons (a mirror image of its effects on monoamine release in terminal regions), suggesting that the relative effects of befloxatone on monoamine release may be governed by autoreceptor-mediated control of monoaminergic neurons at the cell body level. Befloxatone (0.03-0.3 mg/kg, p.o.) exhibits potent activity in behavioural models predictive of antidepressant activity. Befloxatone (up to 1.5 mg/kg, p.o.) does not potentiate the pressor effects of orally administered tyramine at centrally active doses and duodenal [3H]-befloxatone binding is displaced by increasing doses of orally administered tyramine (0.1-40 mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that befloxatone is a potent reversible MAO-A inhibitor with antidepressant potential and a wide safety margin with regard to the potentiation of the pressor effect of tyramine.

  13. Reversal of collapsing glomerulopathy in mice with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CYC202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, Dana; D'Agati, Vivette; Chu, Te-Hua Tearina; Barnett, Anna; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Gelman, Irwin H; Nelson, Peter J

    2004-05-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) has become an important cause of end-stage renal disease. Whether associated with HIV-1 or other potential etiologies, the pathogenesis of CG converges to induce aberrant proliferation of renal epithelium along the entire nephron. This raises the possibility that targeting cell-cycle progression may be an effective therapeutic strategy for CG. Here, we ask whether the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, CYC202 (R-roscovitine), could attenuate or reverse existing renal disease in Tg26 mice, a well characterized HIV-1 transgenic mouse model of CG. Tg26 mice were age and disease matched through analysis of urine (protein/creatinine) to generate 12 treatment pairs covering a range of mild to severe CG. One mouse from each pair received either vehicle or 75 mg/kg of CYC202 every 12 h for 20 d, a dose 20% above that needed to prevent the development of CG. After treatment, urinary, serologic, and histopathologic indices of nephrosis showed reversal of CG in 8 of 12 CYC202-treated mice compared with progression of CG in 10 of 12 vehicle-treated mice, demonstrating a significant therapeutic benefit from CYC202 (P < 0.05). Pharmacokinetic profiles showed that concentrations of CYC202 known to inhibit cell-cycle and transcriptional CDK in vitro were achieved in plasma at efficacious doses. However, amelioration of CG by CYC202 did not correlate with decreases in kidney HIV-1 transgene expression, indicating that suppression of HIV-1 transcription was not a prerequisite for the antiproliferative activity of CYC202. These results demonstrate a novel therapeutic strategy for CG.

  14. Dideoxynucleoside HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors and drug-related hepatotoxicity: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapadula Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report regards the case of a 43 year-old HIV-positive woman who developed an episode of serious transaminase elevation during stavudine-including antiretroviral therapy. Diagnostic assessment ruled out hepatitis virus co-infection, alcohol abuse besides other possible causes of liver damage. No signs of lactic acidosis were present. Liver biopsy showed portal inflammatory infiltrate, spotty necrosis, vacuoles of macro- and micro-vesicular steatosis, acidophil and foamy hepatocytes degeneration with organelles clumping, poorly formed Mallory bodies and neutrophil granulocytes attraction (satellitosis. A dramatic improvement in liver function tests occurred when stavudine was discontinued and a new antiretroviral regimen with different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was used. The importance of considering hepatotoxicity as an adverse event of HAART including stavudine, even in absence of other signs of mitochondrial toxicity should therefore be underlined. Liver biopsy may provide further important information regarding patients with severe transaminase elevation, for a better understanding of the etiology of liver damage.

  15. The emerging profile of cross-resistance among the nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-07-31

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infection. For example: (1) nevirapine is used to prevent mother-to-child transmission; (2) the ASPIRE (MTN 020) study will test whether a vaginal ring containing dapivirine can prevent HIV-1 infection in women; (3) a microbicide gel formulation containing the urea-PETT derivative MIV-150 is in a phase I study to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and acceptability; and (4) a long acting rilpivirine formulation is under-development for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Given their widespread use, particularly in resource-limited settings, as well as their low genetic barriers to resistance, there are concerns about overlapping resistance between the different NNRTIs. Consequently, a better understanding of the resistance and cross-resistance profiles among the NNRTI class is important for predicting response to treatment, and surveillance of transmitted drug-resistance.

  16. 3D QSAR Studies of DAMNI Analogs as Possible Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ganguly

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1-reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs are an important class of drugs employed in antiviral therapy. Recently, a novel family of NNRTIs commonly referred to as 1-[2-diarylmethoxy] ethyl 2-methyl-5-nitroimidazoles (DAMNI derivatives have been discovered. The 3D-QSAR studies on DAMNI derivatives as NNRTIs was performed by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA methods to determine the factors required for the activity of these compounds. The global minimum energy conformer of the template molecule 15, the most active molecule of the series, was obtained by simulated annealing method and used to build the structures of the molecules in the dataset. The combination of steric and electrostatic fields in CoMSIA gave the best results with cross-validated and conventional correlation coefficients of 0.654 and 0.928 respectively. The predictive ability of CoMFA and CoMSIA were determined using a test set of ten DAMNI derivatives giving predictive correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.98 respectively indicating good predictive power. Further, the robustness of the models was verified by bootstrapping analysis. The information obtained from CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D contour maps may be of utility in the design of more potent DAMNI analogs as NNRTIs in future.

  17. Review The Emerging Profile of Cross-Resistance among the Nonnucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infection. For example: (1 nevirapine is used to prevent mother-to-child transmission; (2 the ASPIRE (MTN 020 study will test whether a vaginal ring containing dapivirine can prevent HIV-1 infection in women; (3 a microbicide gel formulation containing the urea-PETT derivative MIV-150 is in a phase I study to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and acceptability; and (4 a long acting rilpivirine formulation is under-development for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Given their widespread use, particularly in resource-limited settings, as well as their low genetic barriers to resistance, there are concerns about overlapping resistance between the different NNRTIs. Consequently, a better understanding of the resistance and cross-resistance profiles among the NNRTI class is important for predicting response to treatment, and surveillance of transmitted drug-resistance.

  18. Antitumor Activity and Mechanism of a Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor, Dapivirine, in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwen; Song, Xian-Lu; Zhao, Shan-Chao; He, Minyi; Wang, Hai; Chen, Ziyang; Xiang, Wei; Yi, Guozhong; Qi, Songtao; Liu, Yawei

    2018-01-01

    Dapivirine is one of reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). It is the prototype of diarylpyrimidines (DAPY), formerly known as TMC120 or DAPY R147681 (IUPAC name: 4- [[4-(2, 4, 6-trimethylphenyl) amino]-2-pyrimidinyl] amino]-benzonitrile; CAS no.244767-67-7). The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of dapivirine, one of the RTIs, on U87 glioblastoma (GBM) cells in vitro and in vivo . U87 GBM cells were cultured and treated with or without dapivirine. Cell viability was evaluated by CCK-8 (Cell Counting Kit 8, CCK-8) assay; apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry; cell migration was evaluated by Boyden Chamber assay; Western blotting was performed to detect proteins related to apoptosis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and autophagy. PathScan intracellular signaling array kit was used to detect important and well-characterized signaling molecules. Tumor xenograft model in nude mice was used to evaluate the antitumorigenic effect in vivo . Dapivirine weakened proliferation of glioma cells and induced the apoptosis of U87 glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, dapivirine regulated autophagy and induced Akt, Bad and SAPK/JNK activations. Moreover, the inhibition of glioma cell growth by dapivirine was also observed in nude mice in vivo . In summary, in our study dapivirine exposure induces stress, resulting in JNK and PI3K/Akt pathway activation through diminished inhibition of the apoptosis and autophagy cascade in U87 GBM cells, which inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo .

  19. 4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine, MK-8591: a novel HIV-1 reverse transcriptase translocation inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Martin; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2018-07-01

    4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) with a novel mechanism of action, unique structure, and amongst NRTIs, unparalleled anti-HIV-1 activity. We will summarize its structure and function, antiviral activity, resistance profile, and potential as an antiretroviral for use in the treatment and preexposure prophylaxis of HIV-1 infection. EFdA is active against wild-type (EC50 as low as 50 pmol/l) and most highly NRTI-resistant viruses. The active metabolite, EFdA-triphosphate, has been shown to have a prolonged intracellular half-life in human and rhesus (Rh) blood cells. As a result, single drug doses tested in simian immunodeficiency virus mac251-infected Rh macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals exhibited robust antiviral activity of 7-10 days duration. Preclinical studies of EFdA as preexposure prophylaxis in the Rh macaque/simian/human immunodeficiency virus low-dose intrarectal challenge model have shown complete protection when given in clinically relevant doses. EFdA is a novel antiretroviral with activity against both wild-type and NRTI-resistant viruses. As a result of the prolonged intracellular half-life of its active moiety, it is amenable to flexibility in dosing of at least daily to weekly and perhaps longer.

  20. Intravaginal ring delivery of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor TMC 120 as an HIV microbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, A David; Malcolm, R Karl; Morrow, Ryan J; Toner, Clare F; McCullagh, Stephen D

    2006-11-15

    TMC 120 (Dapivirine) is a potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that is presently being developed as a vaginal HIV microbicide. To date, most vaginal microbicides under clinical investigation have been formulated as single-dose semi-solid gels, designed for application to the vagina before each act of intercourse. However, a clear rationale exists for providing long-term, controlled release of vaginal microbicides in order to afford continuous protection against heterosexually transmitted HIV infection and to improve user compliance. In this study we report on the incorporation of various pharmaceutical excipients into TMC 120 silicone, reservoir-type intravaginal rings (IVRs) in order to modify the controlled release characteristics of the microbicide. The results demonstrate that TMC 120 is released in zero-order fashion from the rings over a 28-day period and that release parameters could be modified by the inclusion of release-modifying excipients in the IVR. The hydrophobic liquid excipient isopropyl myristate had little effect on steady-state daily release rates, but did increase the magnitude and duration of burst release in proportion to excipient loading in the IVR. By comparison, the hydrophobic liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) had little effect on TMC 120 release parameters. A hydrophilic excipient, lactose, had the surprising effect of decreasing TMC 120 burst release while increasing the apparent steady-state daily release in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on previous cell culture data and vaginal physiology, TMC120 is released from the various ring formulations in amounts potentially capable of maintaining a protective vaginal concentration. It is further predicted that the observed release rates may be maintained for at least a period of 1 year from a single ring device. TMC 120 release profiles and the mechanical properties of rings could be modified by the physicochemical nature of hydrophobic and hydrophilic excipients

  1. HIV Salvage Therapy Does Not Require Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Karen T; Smeaton, Laura M; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Andrade, Adriana; Eron, Joseph J; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Johnson, Victoria A; Klingman, Karin L; Ritz, Justin; Hodder, Sally; Santana, Jorge L; Wilkin, Timothy; Haubrich, Richard H

    2015-12-15

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are often included in antiretroviral regimens in treatment-experienced patients in the absence of data from randomized trials. To compare treatment success between participants who omit versus those who add NRTIs to an optimized antiretroviral regimen of 3 or more agents. Multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00537394). Outpatient HIV clinics. Treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection and viral resistance. Open-label optimized regimens (not including NRTIs) were selected on the basis of treatment history and susceptibility testing. Participants were randomly assigned to omit or add NRTIs. The primary efficacy outcome was regimen failure through 48 weeks using a noninferiority margin of 15%. The primary safety outcome was time to initial episode of a severe sign, symptom, or laboratory abnormality before discontinuation of NRTI assignment. 360 participants were randomly assigned, and 93% completed a 48-week visit. The cumulative probability of regimen failure was 29.8% in the omit-NRTIs group versus 25.9% in the add-NRTIs group (difference, 3.2 percentage points [95% CI, -6.1 to 12.5 percentage points]). No significant between-group differences were found in the primary safety end points or the proportion of participants with HIV RNA level less than 50 copies/mL. No deaths occurred in the omit-NRTIs group compared with 7 deaths in the add-NRTIs group. Unblinded study design, and the study may not be applicable to resource-poor settings. Treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection starting a new optimized regimen can safely omit NRTIs without compromising virologic efficacy. Omitting NRTIs will reduce pill burden, cost, and toxicity in this patient population. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Boehringer Ingelheim, Janssen, Merck, ViiV Healthcare, Roche, and Monogram Biosciences (LabCorp).

  2. Human monoamine oxidase is inhibited by tobacco smoke: β-carboline alkaloids act as potent and reversible inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herraiz, Tomas; Chaparro, Carolina

    2005-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a mitochondrial outer-membrane flavoenzyme involved in brain and peripheral oxidative catabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotic amines, including neurotoxic amines, and a well-known target for antidepressant and neuroprotective drugs. Recently, positron emission tomography imaging has shown that smokers have a much lower activity of peripheral and brain MAO-A (30%) and -B (40%) isozymes compared to non-smokers. This MAO inhibition results from a pharmacological effect of smoke, but little is known about its mechanism. Working with mainstream smoke collected from commercial cigarettes we confirmed that cigarette smoke is a potent inhibitor of human MAO-A and -B isozymes. MAO inhibition was partly reversible, competitive for MAO-A, and a mixed-type inhibition for MAO-B. Two β-carboline alkaloids, norharman (β-carboline) and harman (1-methyl-β-carboline), were identified by GC-MS, quantified, and isolated from the mainstream smoke by solid phase extraction and HPLC. Kinetics analysis revealed that β-carbolines from cigarette smoke were competitive, reversible, and potent inhibitors of MAO enzymes. Norharman was an inhibitor of MAO-A (K i = 1.2 ± 0.18 μM) and MAO-B (K i = 1.12 ± 0.19 μM), and harman of MAO-A (K i = 55.54 ± 5.3 nM). β-Carboline alkaloids are psychopharmacologically active compounds that may occur endogenously in human tissues, including the brain. These results suggest that β-carboline alkaloids from cigarette smoke acting as potent reversible inhibitors of MAO enzymes may contribute to the MAO-reduced activity produced by tobacco smoke in smokers. The presence of MAO inhibitors in smoke like β-carbolines and others may help us to understand some of the purported neuropharmacological effects associated with smoking

  3. Azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, is a high-potency, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzer, Anél, E-mail: 12264954@nwu.ac.za [Unit for Drug Research and Development, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Harvey, Brian H. [Division of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Wegener, Gregers [Centre for Psychiatric Research, Aarhus University Hospital-Risskov, Skovagervej 2, 8240 Risskov (Denmark); Petzer, Jacobus P. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa)

    2012-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been shown to act at multiple cellular and molecular targets and as a result possesses diverse medical applications. Among these is a high potency reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) that may, at least in part, underlie its adverse effects but also its psycho- and neuromodulatory actions. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl species, is the major metabolite. Similar to MB, azure B also displays a variety of biological activities and may therefore contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these observations, the present study examines the interactions of azure B with recombinant human MAO-A and -B. The results show that azure B is a potent MAO-A inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 11 nM), approximately 6-fold more potent than is MB (IC{sub 50} = 70 nM) under identical conditions. Measurements of the time-dependency of inhibition suggest that the interaction of azure B with MAO-A is reversible. Azure B also reversibly inhibits the MAO-B isozyme with an IC{sub 50} value of 968 nM. These results suggest that azure B may be a hitherto under recognized contributor to the pharmacology and toxicology of MB by blocking central and peripheral MAO-A activity and as such needs to be considered during its use in humans and animals. Highlights: ► Methylene blue (MB) is a known potent MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, is more potent as a MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B may be a contributor to the CNS pharmacology and toxicology of MB.

  4. Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JM, and the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study Investigators. Validation of Nijmegen-Bethesda assay modifications to allow inhibitor ... webinars on blood disorders Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  5. In Vitro Evaluation of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Microbicides†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  6. Tranexamic Acid Failed to Reverse the Anticoagulant Effect and Bleeding by an Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor Edoxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yuko; Furugohri, Taketoshi; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2018-01-01

    Agents to reverse the anticoagulant effect of edoxaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, would be desirable in emergency situations. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic agent, on the anticoagulant activity and bleeding by edoxaban in rats. A supratherapeutic dose of edoxaban (3 mg/kg) was intravenously administered to rats. Three minutes after dosing, tranexamic acid (100 mg/kg) was given intravenously. Bleeding was induced by making an incision with a blade on the planta 8 min after edoxaban injection and bleeding time was measured. Prothrombin time (PT) and clot lysis were examined. A supratherapeutic dose of edoxaban significantly prolonged PT and bleeding time. Tranexamic acid did not affect PT or bleeding time prolonged by edoxaban, although tranexamic acid significantly inhibited clot lysis in rat plasma. An antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid failed to reverse the anticoagulant effect and bleeding by edoxaban in rats. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Structural studies of series HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-benzimidazoles with different 4-substituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, several anti-viral drugs have become available to fight the HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality of AIDS. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are specific and potentially nontoxic drugs against AIDS. The crystal structures of five nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are presented here. The structural parameters, especially those describing the angular orientation of the π-electron systems and influencing biological activity, were determined for all of the investigated inhibitors. The chemical character and orientation of the substituent at C4 position of the benzimidazole moiety substantially influences the anti-viral activity. The structural data of the investigated inhibitors is a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions for structure-assisted drug design.

  8. The interaction of quaternary reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with the nicotinic receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šepsová, V.; Krůšek, Jan; Zdarová Karasová, J.; Zemek, F.; Musílek, K.; Kuča, K.; Soukup, O.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 6 (2014), s. 771-777 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : acetylcholinesterase inhibitor * nicotin receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  9. A trypsin inhibitor from rambutan seeds with antitumor, anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and nitric oxide-inducing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nephelium lappaceum L., commonly known as "rambutan," is a typical tropical tree and is well known for its juicy and sweet fruit which has an exotic flavor. Chemical studies on rambutan have led to the identification of various components such as monoterpene lactones and volatile compounds. Here, a 22.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor (N . lappaceum trypsin inhibitor (NLTI)) was isolated from fresh rambutan seeds using liquid chromatographical techniques. NLTI reduced the proteolytic activities of both trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. Dithiothreitol reduced the trypsin inhibitory activity of NLTI at a concentration of 1 mM, indicating that an intact disulfide bond is essential to the activity. NLTI inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 0.73 μM. In addition, NLTI manifested a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on growth in many tumor cells. NLTI is one of the few trypsin inhibitors with nitric oxide-inducing activity and may find application in tumor therapy.

  10. Cardiovascular risk reduction by reversing endothelial dysfunction: ARBs, ACE inhibitors,  or both? Expectations from The ONTARGET  Trial Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel  Ruilope

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Luis Miguel  Ruilope1, Josep Redón2, Roland Schmieder31Servicio de Nefrologia, Unidad de Hipertension Hospital, 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinico University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat, Erlangen-Nurnberg, GermanyAbstract: Endothelial dysfunction is the initial pathophysiological step in a progression of vascular damage that leads to overt cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Angiotensin II, the primary agent of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS, has a central role in endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, RAS blockade with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor provides a rational approach to reverse endothelial dysfunction, reduce microalbuminuria, and, thus, improves cardiovascular and renal prognosis. ARBs and ACE inhibitors act at different points in the RAS pathway and recent evidence suggests that there are differences regarding their effects on endothelial dysfunction. In addition to blood pressure lowering, studies have shown that ARBs reduce target-organ damage, including improvements in endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes, proteinuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The ONgoing Telmisartan Alone in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET Programme is expected to provide the ultimate evidence of whether improved endothelial func tion translates into reduced cardiovascular and renal events in high-risk patients, and to assess possible differential outcomes with telmisartan, the ACE inhibitor ramipril, or a combination of both (dual RAS blockade. Completion of ONTARGET is expected in 2008. Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, endothelial dysfunction, ONTARGET, renin–angiotensin system, telmisartan

  11. Role of the K101E substitution in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in resistance to rilpivirine and other nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Huang, Wei; Oliveira, Maureen; Han, Yingshan; Quan, Yudong; Petropoulos, Christos J; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to the recently approved nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) rilpivirine (RPV) commonly involves substitutions at positions E138K and K101E in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), together with an M184I substitution that is associated with resistance to coutilized emtricitabine (FTC). Previous biochemical and virological studies have shown that compensatory interactions between substitutions E138K and M184I can restore enzyme processivity and the viral replication capacity. Structural modeling studies have also shown that disruption of the salt bridge between K101 and E138 can affect RPV binding. The current study was designed to investigate the impact of K101E, alone or in combination with E138K and/or M184I, on drug susceptibility, viral replication capacity, and enzyme function. We show here that K101E can be selected in cell culture by the NNRTIs etravirine (ETR), efavirenz (EFV), and dapivirine (DPV) as well as by RPV. Recombinant RT enzymes and viruses containing K101E, but not E138K, were highly resistant to nevirapine (NVP) and delavirdine (DLV) as well as ETR and RPV, but not EFV. The addition of K101E to E138K slightly enhanced ETR and RPV resistance compared to that obtained with E138K alone but restored susceptibility to NVP and DLV. The K101E substitution can compensate for deficits in viral replication capacity and enzyme processivity associated with M184I, while M184I can compensate for the diminished efficiency of DNA polymerization associated with K101E. The coexistence of K101E and E138K does not impair either viral replication or enzyme fitness. We conclude that K101E can play a significant role in resistance to RPV.

  12. Sex-Dependent Effects of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Sodium Valproate, on Reversal Learning After Developmental Arsenic Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina R. Steadman Tyler

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that exposure to arsenic in drinking water adversely affects brain development and cognitive function in adulthood. While the mechanism by which arsenic induces adverse neurological outcomes remains elusive, studies suggest a link between reduced levels of histone acetylation and impaired performance on a variety of behavioral tasks following arsenic exposure. Using our developmental arsenic exposure (DAE paradigm, we have previously reported reduced histone acetylation and associated histone acetyltransferase enzyme expression in the frontal cortex of C57BL/6J adult male mice, with no changes observed in the female frontal cortex. In the present study, we sought to determine if DAE produced sex-dependent deficits in frontal cortical executive function using the Y-maze acquisition and reversal learning tasks, which are specific for assessing cognitive flexibility. Further, we tested whether the administration of valproic acid, a class I–IIa histone deacetylase inhibitor, was able to mitigate behavioral and biochemical changes resulting from DAE. As anticipated, DAE inhibited acquisition and reversal learning performance in adult male, but not female, mice. Valproate treatment for 2 weeks restored reversal performance in the male arsenic-exposed offspring, while not affecting female performance. Protein levels of HDACs 1, 2, and 5 were elevated following behavioral assessment but only in DAE male mice; restoration of appropriate HDAC levels occurred after valproate treatment and was concurrent with improved behavioral performance, particularly during reversal learning. Female frontal cortical levels of HDAC enzymes were not impacted by DAE or valproate treatment. Finally, mRNA expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Bdnf, which has been implicated in the control of frontal cortical flexibility and is regulated by HDAC5, were elevated in DAE male mice and restored to normal levels following HDACi

  13. Identification of Cysteine Proteases and Screening of Cysteine Protease Inhibitors in Biological Samples by a Two-Dimensional Gel System of Zymography and Reverse Zymography

    OpenAIRE

    Saitoh, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Eishiro; Hayakawa, Yoshimi; Hoshino, Takashi; Sato, Ritsuko; Isemura, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Sadami; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the fi rst-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic...

  14. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  15. The development of HEPT-type HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and its implications for DABO family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenmin; Zhan, Peng; Wu, Jingde; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xinyong

    2012-01-01

    1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) was discovered as the first HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in 1989. The research on HEPT derivatives (HEPTs) has been lasted for more than 20 years and HEPT family is probably the most investigated NNRTI. Extensive molecular modifications on HEPT have led to many highly potent compounds with broad-resistance spectrum and optimal pharmacokinetic profiles. Moreover, X-crystallographic studies of HEPTs/RT complexes revealed the binding mode of HEPTs and the action mechanism of NNRTI, which has greatly facilitated the design of novel NNRTIs. Recently, the development of HEPTs was accelerated by the application of the "follow-on"-based chemical evolution strategies, such as designed multiple ligands (DMLs) and molecular hybridization (MH). Herein, this article will provide an insight into the development of HEPTs, including structural modifications, crystal structure of RT complexed with HEPTs and its structure-activity relationship (SAR). Additionally, this review also covers the emerging HEPT related dual inhibitors and HEPT-pyridinone hybrids, as well as the contributions of HEPTs to the development of dihydro-alkoxy-benzyl-oxopyrimidine (DABO) family, thus highlighting the importance of HEPTs on the development of NNRTIs.

  16. Inhibition and reversal of nickel-induced transformation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qunwei; Salnikow, Konstantin; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, L.C.; Su, W.C.; Costa, Max

    2003-01-01

    The carcinogenic process initiated by nongenotoxic carcinogens involves modulation of gene expression. Nickel compounds have low mutagenic activity, but are highly carcinogenic. In vitro both mouse and human cells can be efficiently transformed by soluble and insoluble nickel compounds to anchorage-independent growth. Because previous studies have shown that carcinogenic nickel compounds silence genes by inhibiting histone acetylation and enhancing DNA methylation, we investigated the effect of enhancing histone acetylation on cell transformation. The exposure of nickel-transformed cells to the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) resulted in the appearance of significant number of revertants measured by their inability to grow in soft agar. Using the Affymetrix GeneChip we found that the level of expression of a significant number of genes was changed (suppressed or upregulated) in nickel-transformed clones but returned to a normal level in revertants obtained following TSA treatment. Moreover, we found that treatment of cells with TSA inhibited the ability of nickel to transform mouse PW cells to anchorage-independent growth. Treatment with TSA also inhibited the ability of nickel to transform human HOS cells, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, treatment with TSA was not able to revert established cancer cell lines as readily as the nickel-transformed cells. These data indicated that modulation of gene expression is important for nickel-induced transformation

  17. Novel (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl) methanones with restricted conformation as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Šaman, David; Stepan, G.; Hu, E.; Lansdon, E. B.; Jansa, P.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, Oct 21 (2016), s. 185-195 ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) * etravirine * human immunodeficiency virus ( HIV ) * non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors * NNRTIs * rilpivirine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.519, year: 2016

  18. Identification of cysteine proteases and screening of cysteine protease inhibitors in biological samples by a two-dimensional gel system of zymography and reverse zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Eishiro; Hayakawa, Yoshimi; Hoshino, Takashi; Sato, Ritsuko; Isemura, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Sadami; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2007-11-18

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the first-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic acid (TCA) fixation. Protease activity in the 2D-gel was visualized as transparent spots where gelatin substrate was digested after commassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Some of the transparent spots from the skin mucus extract of rainbow trout were determined to be a cysteine protease through use of E-64 or CA-074. In the reverse zymography technique, the gel was incubated with papain solution at 37 degrees C for 18 h. Cysteine protease inhibitors from broad bean seeds were detected as clear blue spots after CBB staining. The amino (N-) terminal sequences of four papain inhibitor spots thus detected were demonstrated to be identical to that of favin beta chain, a broad bean lectin. Taken together, our system can be considered to be an efficient technique for discovering and characterizing new proteases and protease inhibitors in biological samples. This is the first report describing a 2D-gel system of zymography and reverse zymography.

  19. A randomized trial comparing initial HAART regimens of nelfinavir/nevirapine and ritonavir/saquinavir in combination with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens D; Pedersen, Court

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A triple-class HAART regimen may be associated with a better virological effect than conventional regimens, but may also lead to toxicity and more profound resistance. METHODS: Randomized, controlled, open-label trial of 233 protease inhibitor- and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase...... inhibitor-naive HIV-infected patients allocated to a regimen of nelfinavir and nevirapine (1250/200 mg twice daily; n = 118) or ritonavir and saquinavir (400/400 mg twice daily; n = 115), both in combination with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The primary end-point was HIV RNA ... the long-term consequences of triple class HAART regimens, including the development of broad drug resistance....

  20. Regression of fibrosis and reversal of cirrhosis in rats by galectin inhibitors in thioacetamide-induced liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G Traber

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 protein is critical to the development of liver fibrosis because galectin-3 null mice have attenuated fibrosis after liver injury. Therefore, we examined the ability of novel complex carbohydrate galectin inhibitors to treat toxin-induced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Fibrosis was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injections with thioacetamide (TAA and groups were treated with vehicle, GR-MD-02 (galactoarabino-rhamnogalaturonan or GM-CT-01 (galactomannan. In initial experiments, 4 weeks of treatment with GR-MD-02 following completion of 8 weeks of TAA significantly reduced collagen content by almost 50% based on Sirius red staining. Rats were then exposed to more intense and longer TAA treatment, which included either GR-MD-02 or GM-CT-01 during weeks 8 through 11. TAA rats treated with vehicle developed extensive fibrosis and pathological stage 6 Ishak fibrosis, or cirrhosis. Treatment with either GR-MD-02 (90 mg/kg ip or GM-CT-01 (180 mg/kg ip given once weekly during weeks 8-11 led to marked reduction in fibrosis with reduction in portal and septal galectin-3 positive macrophages and reduction in portal pressure. Vehicle-treated animals had cirrhosis whereas in the treated animals the fibrosis stage was significantly reduced, with evidence of resolved or resolving cirrhosis and reduced portal inflammation and ballooning. In this model of toxin-induced liver fibrosis, treatment with two galectin protein inhibitors with different chemical compositions significantly reduced fibrosis, reversed cirrhosis, reduced galectin-3 expressing portal and septal macrophages, and reduced portal pressure. These findings suggest a potential role of these drugs in human liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  1. Structural and Preclinical Studies of Computationally Designed Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors for Treating HIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudalkar, Shalley N.; Beloor, Jagadish; Chan, Albert H.; Lee, Won-Gil; Jorgensen, William L.; Kumar, Priti; Anderson, Karen S.

    2017-02-06

    The clinical benefits of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) are hindered by their unsatisfactory pharmacokinetic (PK) properties along with the rapid development of drug-resistant variants. However, the clinical efficacy of these inhibitors can be improved by developing compounds with enhanced pharmacological profiles and heightened antiviral activity. We used computational and structure-guided design to develop two next-generation NNRTI drug candidates, compounds I and II, which are members of a class of catechol diethers. We evaluated the preclinical potential of these compounds in BALB/c mice because of their high solubility (510 µg/ml for compound I and 82.9 µg/ml for compound II), low cytotoxicity, and enhanced antiviral activity against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 RT and resistant variants. Additionally, crystal structures of compounds I and II with WT RT suggested an optimal binding to the NNRTI binding pocket favoring the high anti-viral potency. A single intraperitoneal dose of compounds I and II exhibited a prolonged serum residence time of 48 hours and concentration maximum (Cmax) of 4000- to 15,000-fold higher than their therapeutic/effective concentrations. These Cmax values were 4- to 15-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations observed in MT-2 cells. Compound II showed an enhanced area under the curve (0–last) and decreased plasma clearance over compound I and efavirenz, the standard of care NNRTI. Hence, the overall (PK) profile of compound II was excellent compared with that of compound I and efavirenz. Furthermore, both compounds were very well tolerated in BALB/c mice without any detectable acute toxicity. Taken together, these data suggest that compounds I and II possess improved anti-HIV-1 potency, remarkable in vivo safety, and prolonged in vivo circulation time, suggesting strong potential for further development as new NNRTIs for the potential treatment of HIV infection.

  2. In vitro cross-resistance profile of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) BMS-986001 against known NRTI resistance mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhufang; Terry, Brian; Olds, William; Protack, Tricia; Deminie, Carol; Minassian, Beatrice; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Sun, Yongnian; Dicker, Ira; Hwang, Carey; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J; Krystal, Mark

    2013-11-01

    BMS-986001 is a novel HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI). To date, little is known about its resistance profile. In order to examine the cross-resistance profile of BMS-986001 to NRTI mutations, a replicating virus system was used to examine specific amino acid mutations known to confer resistance to various NRTIs. In addition, reverse transcriptases from 19 clinical isolates with various NRTI mutations were examined in the Monogram PhenoSense HIV assay. In the site-directed mutagenesis studies, a virus containing a K65R substitution exhibited a 0.4-fold change in 50% effective concentration (EC50) versus the wild type, while the majority of viruses with the Q151M constellation (without M184V) exhibited changes in EC50 versus wild type of 0.23- to 0.48-fold. Susceptibility to BMS-986001 was also maintained in an L74V-containing virus (0.7-fold change), while an M184V-only-containing virus induced a 2- to 3-fold decrease in susceptibility. Increasing numbers of thymidine analog mutation pattern 1 (TAM-1) pathway mutations correlated with decreases in susceptibility to BMS-986001, while viruses with TAM-2 pathway mutations exhibited a 5- to 8-fold decrease in susceptibility, regardless of the number of TAMs. A 22-fold decrease in susceptibility to BMS-986001 was observed in a site-directed mutant containing the T69 insertion complex. Common non-NRTI (NNRTI) mutations had little impact on susceptibility to BMS-986001. The results from the site-directed mutants correlated well with the more complicated genotypes found in NRTI-resistant clinical isolates. Data from clinical studies are needed to determine the clinically relevant resistance cutoff values for BMS-986001.

  3. Development of elvitegravir resistance and linkage of integrase inhibitor mutations with protease and reverse transcriptase resistance mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Winters

    Full Text Available Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG and raltegravir (RAL can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point. Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48 typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs.

  4. Effects of befloxatone, a reversible selective monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor, on psychomotor function and memory in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warot, D; Berlin, I; Patat, A; Durrieu, G; Zieleniuk, I; Puech, A J

    1996-10-01

    Befloxatone is a new reversible and selective monoamine oxidase (MAO-A) inhibitor that has been shown to have antidepressant activity in various animal models. To assess the effects of single oral doses of befloxatone (5, 10, and 20 mg) on psychomotor performance and memory, a randomized, double-blind, five-way, crossover study with both placebo and amitriptyline (50 mg) was carried out in 15 healthy male volunteers. Psychomotor and cognitive functions were evaluated using both objective measures, including Critical Flicker Frequency (CFF), Choice Reaction Time (CRT), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), and a picture memory test and subjective measures, including Visual Analog Scales (VAS) and Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI), before and 2, 4, and 8 hours after administration. Pupil diameter was recorded by videopupillography. Single doses of befloxatone from 5 to 20 mg did not result in any detrimental effects on skilled performance and memory. In contrast, amitriptyline significantly impaired arousal (CFF), speed of reaction (CRT), information processing (DSST) and long-term memory (delayed free recall of pictures) and produced subjective sedation from 2 to 8 hours after administration. At the doses studied amitriptyline induced miosis but befloxatone did not modify pupil diameter. There was no evidence in this study to suggest that befloxatone, at the doses studied, has any sedative or amnesic effects in healthy subjects.

  5. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection by the candidate microbicide dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, P; Harman, S; Azijn, H; Armanasco, N; Manlow, P; Perumal, D; de Bethune, M-P; Nuttall, J; Romano, J; Shattock, R

    2009-02-01

    Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains the major route of infection worldwide; thus, there is an urgent need for additional prevention strategies, particularly strategies that could be controlled by women, such as topical microbicides. Potential microbicide candidates must be both safe and effective. Using cellular and tissue explant models, we have evaluated the activity of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine as a vaginal microbicide. In tissue compatibility studies, dapivirine was well tolerated by epithelial cells, T cells, macrophages, and cervical tissue explants. Dapivirine demonstrated potent dose-dependent inhibitory effects against a broad panel of HIV type 1 isolates from different clades. Furthermore, dapivirine demonstrated potent activity against a wide range of NNRTI-resistant isolates. In human cervical explant cultures, dapivirine was able not only to inhibit direct infection of mucosal tissue but also to prevent the dissemination of the virus by migratory cells. Activity was retained in the presence of semen or a cervical mucus simulant. Furthermore, dapivirine demonstrated prolonged inhibitory effects: it was able to prevent both localized and disseminated infection for as long as 6 days posttreatment. The prolonged protection observed following pretreatment of genital tissue and the lack of observable toxicity suggest that dapivirine has considerable promise as a potential microbicide candidate.

  6. Reversal of CD8 T-Cell–Mediated Mucocutaneous Graft-Versus-Host-Like Disease by the JAK Inhibitor Tofacitinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiyama, Naoko; Furumoto, Yasuko; Villarroel, Vadim A; Linton, Jay T; Tsai, Wanxia L; Gutermuth, Jan; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Gadina, Massimo; O'Shea, John J; Katz, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    The utility of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is limited by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Patients with GVHD exhibit cutaneous manifestations with histological features of interface dermatitis followed by scleroderma-like changes. JAK inhibitors represent a class of immunomodulatory drugs that inhibit signaling by multiple cytokines. Herein we report the effects of tofacitinib in a murine model of GVHD. Oral administration of tofacitinib prevented GVHD-like disease manifested by weight loss and mucocutaneous lesions. More importantly, tofacitinib was also effective in reversing established disease. Tofacitinib diminished the expansion and activation of murine CD8 T cells in this model, and had similar effects on IL-2-stimulated human CD8 T cells. Tofacitinib also inhibited the expression of IFN-γ-inducible chemoattractants by keratinocytes, and IFN-γ-inducible cell death of keratinocytes. Tofacitinib may be an effective drug for treatment against CD8 T-cell–mediated mucocutaneous diseases in patients with GVHD. PMID:24213371

  7. Standardized comparison of the relative impacts of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations on nucleoside RT inhibitor susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikian, George L; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia-Cancio, Paolo V; Zolopa, Andrew; Robbins, Gregory K; Kagan, Ron; Israelski, Dennis; Shafer, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Determining the phenotypic impacts of reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations on individual nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) has remained a statistical challenge because clinical NRTI-resistant HIV-1 isolates usually contain multiple mutations, often in complex patterns, complicating the task of determining the relative contribution of each mutation to HIV drug resistance. Furthermore, the NRTIs have highly variable dynamic susceptibility ranges, making it difficult to determine the relative effect of an RT mutation on susceptibility to different NRTIs. In this study, we analyzed 1,273 genotyped HIV-1 isolates for which phenotypic results were obtained using the PhenoSense assay (Monogram, South San Francisco, CA). We used a parsimonious feature selection algorithm, LASSO, to assess the possible contributions of 177 mutations that occurred in 10 or more isolates in our data set. We then used least-squares regression to quantify the impact of each LASSO-selected mutation on each NRTI. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the most common NRTI resistance mutations. Because our results were standardized, the study provides the first analysis that quantifies the relative phenotypic effects of NRTI resistance mutations on each of the NRTIs. In addition, the study contains new findings on the relative impacts of thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) on susceptibility to abacavir and tenofovir; the impacts of several known but incompletely characterized mutations, including E40F, V75T, Y115F, and K219R; and a tentative role in reduced NRTI susceptibility for K64H, a novel NRTI resistance mutation.

  8. Computational Analysis of Molecular Interaction Networks Underlying Change of HIV-1 Resistance to Selected Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierczak, Marcin; Dramiński, Michał; Koronacki, Jacek; Komorowski, Jan

    2010-12-12

    Despite more than two decades of research, HIV resistance to drugs remains a serious obstacle in developing efficient AIDS treatments. Several computational methods have been developed to predict resistance level from the sequence of viral proteins such as reverse transcriptase (RT) or protease. These methods, while powerful and accurate, give very little insight into the molecular interactions that underly acquisition of drug resistance/hypersusceptibility. Here, we attempt at filling this gap by using our Monte Carlo feature selection and interdependency discovery method (MCFS-ID) to elucidate molecular interaction networks that characterize viral strains with altered drug resistance levels. We analyzed a number of HIV-1 RT sequences annotated with drug resistance level using the MCFS-ID method. This let us expound interdependency networks that characterize change of drug resistance to six selected RT inhibitors: Abacavir, Lamivudine, Stavudine, Zidovudine, Tenofovir and Nevirapine. The networks consider interdependencies at the level of physicochemical properties of mutating amino acids, eg,: polarity. We mapped each network on the 3D structure of RT in attempt to understand the molecular meaning of interacting pairs. The discovered interactions describe several known drug resistance mechanisms and, importantly, some previously unidentified ones. Our approach can be easily applied to a whole range of problems from the domain of protein engineering. A portable Java implementation of our MCFS-ID method is freely available for academic users and can be obtained at: http://www.ipipan.eu/staff/m.draminski/software.htm.

  9. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies on triazolinone and pyridazinone, non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2010-06-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are allosteric inhibitors of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Recently a series of Triazolinone and Pyridazinone were reported as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 wild type reverse transcriptase. In the present study, docking and 3D quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) studies involving comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were performed on 31 molecules. Ligands were built and minimized using Tripos force field and applying Gasteiger-Hückel charges. These ligands were docked into protein active site using GLIDE 4.0. The docked poses were analyzed; the best docked poses were selected and aligned. CoMFA and CoMSIA fields were calculated using SYBYL6.9. The molecules were divided into training set and test set, a PLS analysis was performed and QSAR models were generated. The model showed good statistical reliability which is evident from the r2 nv, q2 loo and r2 pred values. The CoMFA model provides the most significant correlation of steric and electrostatic fields with biological activities. The CoMSIA model provides a correlation of steric, electrostatic, acceptor and hydrophobic fields with biological activities. The information rendered by 3D QSAR model initiated us to optimize the lead and design new potential inhibitors.

  10. Real-time zymography and reverse zymography: a method for detecting activities of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors using FITC-labeled collagen and casein as substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shunji; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Kiriyama, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Tsukao; Irie, Shinkichi

    2002-02-01

    Zymography and reverse zymography are widely used techniques for identifying the proteolytic activity of enzymes and the presence of protease inhibitors in polyacrylamide gels. In the current studies, we utilized a fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labeled substrate to develop novel zymographic and reverse zymographic methods for detecting matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of the metalloproteinases, respectively. Using a transilluminator, the results can be observed visually without stopping the enzymatic reaction. For this reason, we have named these methods real-time zymography and real-time reverse zymography. These methods have the following advantages compared with conventional protocols: (1) because the reaction can be repeatedly monitored on the polyacrylamide gels, optimization of the incubation time can be achieved without preliminary analyses; (2) higher sensitivity is achieved with a lower amount of substrate than with conventional methods; (3) a semi-quantitative analysis of matrix metalloproteinases is possible. An additional advantage of the real-time reverse zymography is that, because the fluorescence detection is specific for substrate digestion, the inhibitor bands can be easily distinguished from contaminating proteins.

  11. Kinetic analysis of enzyme systems with suicide substrate in the presence of a reversible competitive inhibitor, tested by simulated progress curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno-Dávila, M A; Garrido-del Solo, C; García-Moreno, M; Havsteen, B H; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Cánovas, F; Varón, R

    2001-02-01

    The use of suicide substrates remains a very important and useful method in enzymology for studying enzyme mechanisms and designing potential drugs. Suicide substrates act as modified substrates for the target enzymes and bind to the active site. Therefore the presence of a competitive reversible inhibitor decreases the rate of substrate-induced inactivation and protects the enzyme from this inactivation. This lowering on the inactivation rate has evident physiological advantages, since it allows the easy acquisition of experimental data and facilitates kinetic data analysis by providing another variable (inhibitor concentration). However despite the importance of the simultaneous action of a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibition, to date no corresponding kinetic analysis has been carried out. Therefore we present a general kinetic analysis of a Michaelis-Menten reaction mechanism with double inhibition caused by both, a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibitor. We assume rapid equilibrium of the reversible reaction steps involved, while the time course equations for the reaction product have been derived with the assumption of a limiting enzyme. The goodness of the analytical solutions has been tested by comparison with the simulated curves obtained by numerical integration. A kinetic data analysis to determine the corresponding kinetic parameters from the time progress curve of the product is suggested. In conclusion, we present a complete kinetic analysis of an enzyme reaction mechanism as described above in an attempt to fill a gap in the theoretical treatment of this type of system.

  12. Crystallographic Study of a Novel Sub-Nanomolar Inhibitor Provides Insight on the Binding Interactions of Alkenyldiarylmethanes with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) Reverse Transcriptase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Matthew D.; Ho, William C.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hartman, Tracy L.; Watson, Karen M.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Cushman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Two crystal structures have been solved for separate complexes of alkenyldiarylmethane (ADAM) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) 3 and 4 with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The structures reveal inhibitor binding is exclusively hydrophobic in nature and the shape of the inhibitor-bound NNRTI binding pocket is unique among other reported inhibitor-RT crystal structures. Primarily, ADAMs 3 and 4 protrude from a large gap in the backside of the binding pocket, placing portions of the inhibitors unusually close to the polymerase active site and allowing 3 to form a weak hydrogen bond with Lys223. The lack of additional stabilizing interactions, beyond the observed hydrophobic surface contacts, between 4 and RT is quite perplexing given the extreme potency of the compound (IC50 ≤ nM). ADAM 4 was designed to be hydrolytically stable in blood plasma, and an investigation of its hydrolysis in rat plasma demonstrated it has a significantly prolonged half-life in comparison to ADAM lead compounds 1 and 2. PMID:19775161

  13. Discovery of potent, reversible MetAP2 inhibitors via fragment based drug discovery and structure based drug design-Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvallath, Zacharia; Tang, Mingnam; McBride, Christopher; Komandla, Mallareddy; Miura, Joanne; Ton-Nu, Thu; Erikson, Phil; Feng, Jun; Farrell, Pamela; Lawson, J David; Vanderpool, Darin; Wu, Yiqin; Dougan, Douglas R; Plonowski, Artur; Holub, Corine; Larson, Chris

    2016-06-15

    Methionine aminopeptidase 2 (MetAP2) is an enzyme that cleaves an N-terminal methionine residue from a number of newly synthesized proteins. Pre-clinical and clinical studies suggest that MetAP2 inhibitors could be used as a novel treatment for obesity. Herein we describe our use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to quickly identify and elaborate an indazole fragment into a series of reversible MetAP2 inhibitors with <10nM potency, excellent selectivity, and favorable in vitro safety profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of single and boosted protease inhibitor versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing cART regimens in antiretroviral-naïve patients starting cART after January 1, 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Horban, A; Clumeck, N

    2006-01-01

    increase) response in antiretroviral-naïve patients starting either a single protease inhibitor (PI; n = 183), a ritonavir-boosted PI regimen (n = 197), or a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART regimen (n = 447) after January 1, 2000, and the odds of lack of virologic...... or immunologic response at 3 years after starting cART. METHOD: Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression. RESULTS: After adjustment, compared to patients taking an NNRTI-regimen, patients taking a single-PI regimen were significantly less likely to achieve a viral load (VL)

  15. Selective and membrane-permeable small molecule inhibitors of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase reverse high fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Harshini; Vance, Virginia; Wetzel, Michael D; Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; McHardy, Stanton F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Hommel, Jonathan D; Watowich, Stanley J

    2018-01-01

    reverse diet-induced obesity and validate NNMT as a viable target to treat obesity and related metabolic conditions. Increased flux of key cellular energy regulators, including NAD + and SAM, may potentially define the therapeutic mechanism-of-action of NNMT inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of the new second-generation nonnucleoside reverse- transcriptase inhibitor KM-023 in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha YJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jung Cha,1,* Kyoung Soo Lim,2,* Min-Kyu Park,1 Stephen Schneider,3 Brian Bray,3 Myung-Chol Kang,3 Jae-Yong Chung,1 Seo Hyun Yoon,1 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu11Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, South Korea; 3Kainos Medicine USA Inc., Morrisville, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: KM-023 is a new second-generation nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor that is under development for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 infection. Objective: This study determined KM-023 tolerability and pharmacokinetic characteristics in healthy subjects. Materials and methods: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study was conducted in 80 healthy South Korean male volunteers. The subjects were allocated to single- or multiple-dose (once daily for 7 days groups that received 75, 150, 300, or 600 mg drug or placebo in a 4:1 ratio. Safety and pharmacokinetic assessments were performed during the study. Plasma and urine concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The average maximum concentration (Cmax and area under the concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC∞ values of KM-023 for the 75–600 mg doses in the single-dose study ranged from 440.2 ng/mL to 1,245.4 ng/mL and 11,142.4 ng • h/mL to 33,705.6 ng • h/mL, respectively. Values of the mean Cmax at a steady state and AUC within the dosing interval ranged from 385.1 ng/mL to 1,096.7 ng/mL and 3,698.9 ng • h/mL to 10,232.6 ng • h/mL, respectively, following 75–600 mg doses in the multiple-dose study. Dose proportionality was not observed for KM-023. KM-023 showed a 0.6-fold accumulation after multiple doses in the 600

  17. Cognitive aspects of congenital learned helplessness and its reversal by the monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor deprenyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Daniela; Mirrione, Martine M; Henn, Fritz A

    2010-02-01

    Cognitive processes are assumed to change with learned helplessness, an animal model of depression, but little is known about such deficits. Here we investigated the role of cognitive and related functions in selectively bred helpless (cLH, n=10), non-helpless (cNLH, n=12) and wild type (WT, n=8) Sprague Dawley rats. The animals were exposed to an open field for 10min on each of two test days. On the third day, an object exploration paradigm was carried out. The animals were later tested for helplessness. Both cLH and cNLH rats were more active than WTs on the first day in the open field. Over trials, cNLH and WT rats lowered their activity less than cLH rats. This resistance-to-habituation co-varied with a resistance to develop helplessness. In cLH rats, higher 'anxiety' or less time spent in the center of the open field co-varied with severe helplessness. In WTs, a greater reactivity to novel objects and to a spatially relocated object predicted lower levels of helplessness. In cLH rats (n=4-5 per group), chronic treatment with a high dose of the monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor deprenyl (10mg/kg; i.p.), an anti-Parkinson, nootropic and antidepressant drug, attenuated helplessness. Remarkably, helplessness reversal required the experience of repeated test trials, reminiscent of a learning process. Chronic deprenyl (10mg/kg; i.p.) did not alter locomotion/exploration or 'anxiety' in the open field. In conclusion, helplessness may be related to altered mechanisms of reinforcement learning and working memory, and to abnormalities in MAO-A and/or MAO-B functioning. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk Factors for Incident Diabetes in a Cohort Taking First-Line Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamchand, Sumanth; Leisegang, Rory; Schomaker, Michael; Maartens, Gary; Walters, Lourens; Hislop, Michael; Dave, Joel A; Levitt, Naomi S; Cohen, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Efavirenz is the preferred nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in low- and middle-income countries, where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Randomized control trials have shown mild increases in plasma glucose in participants in the efavirenz arms, but no association has been reported with overt diabetes. We explored the association between efavirenz exposure and incident diabetes in a large Southern African cohort commencing NNRTI-based first-line ART. Our cohort included HIV-infected adults starting NNRTI-based ART in a private sector HIV disease management program from January 2002 to December 2011. Incident diabetes was identified by the initiation of diabetes treatment. Patients with prevalent diabetes were excluded. We included 56,298 patients with 113,297 patient-years of follow-up (PYFU) on first-line ART. The crude incidence of diabetes was 13.24 per 1000 PYFU. Treatment with efavirenz rather than nevirapine was associated with increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.46)) in a multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, baseline CD4 count, viral load, NRTI backbone, and exposure to other diabetogenic medicines. Zidovudine and stavudine exposure were also associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. We found that treatment with efavirenz, as well as stavudine and zidovudine, increased the risk of incident diabetes. Interventions to detect and prevent diabetes should be implemented in ART programs, and use of antiretrovirals with lower risk of metabolic complications should be encouraged.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of "AZT-HEPT", "AZT-pyridinone", and "ddC-HEPT" conjugates as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikis, R; Dollé, V; Guillaumel, J; Dechaux, E; Note, R; Nguyen, C H; Legraverend, M; Bisagni, E; Aubertin, A M; Grierson, D S; Monneret, C

    2000-05-18

    To test the concept that HIV reverse transcriptase could be effectively inhibited by "mixed site inhibitors", a series of seven conjugates containing both a nucleoside analogue component (AZT 1, ddC 2) and a nonnucleoside type inhibitor (HEPT analogue 12, pyridinone 27) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to block HIV replication. The (N-3 and C-5)AZT-HEPT conjugates 15, 22, and 23 displayed 2-5 microM anti-HIV activity, but they had no effect on the replication of HIV-2 or the HIV-1 strain with the Y181C mutation. The (C-5)AZT-pyridinone conjugates 34-37 were found to be inactive. In marked contrast, the ddC-HEPT molecule 26 displayed the same potency (EC(50) = 0.45 microM) against HIV-1 (wild type and the Y181C nevirapine-resistant strain) and HIV-2 in cell culture. No synergistic effect was observed for these bis-substrate inhibitors, suggesting that the two individual inhibitor components in these molecules do not bind simultaneously in their respective sites. Interestingly, however, the results indicate that the AZT-HEPT conjugates and the ddC-HEPT derivative 26 inhibit reverse transcriptase (RT) in an opposite manner. One explanation for this difference is that the former compounds interact preferentially with the hydrophobic pocket in RT, whereas 26 (after supposed triphosphorylation) inhibits RT through binding in the catalytic site.

  20. Efavirenz Has the Highest Anti-Proliferative Effect of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors against Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hecht

    Full Text Available Cancer prevention and therapy in HIV-1-infected patients will play an important role in future. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI Efavirenz and Nevirapine are cytotoxic against cancer cells in vitro. As other NNRTIs have not been studied so far, all clinically used NNRTIs were tested and the in vitro toxic concentrations were compared to drug levels in patients to predict possible anti-cancer effects in vivo.Cytotoxicity was studied by Annexin-V-APC/7AAD staining and flow cytometry in the pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and Panc-1 and confirmed by colony formation assays. The 50% effective cytotoxic concentrations (EC50 were calculated and compared to the blood levels in our patients and published data.The in vitro EC50 of the different drugs in the BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells were: Efavirenz 31.5 μmol/l (= 9944 ng/ml, Nevirapine 239 μmol/l (= 63,786 ng/ml, Etravirine 89.0 μmol/l (= 38,740 ng/ml, Lersivirine 543 μmol/l (= 168,523 ng/ml, Delavirdine 171 μmol/l (= 78,072 ng/ml, Rilpivirine 24.4 μmol/l (= 8941 ng/ml. As Efavirenz and Rilpivirine had the highest cytotoxic potential and Nevirapine is frequently used in HIV-1 positive patients, the results of these three drugs were further studied in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells and confirmed with colony formation assays. 205 patient blood levels of Efavirenz, 127 of Rilpivirine and 31 of Nevirapine were analyzed. The mean blood level of Efavirenz was 3587 ng/ml (range 162-15,363 ng/ml, of Rilpivirine 144 ng/ml (range 0-572 ng/ml and of Nevirapine 4955 ng/ml (range 1856-8697 ng/ml. Blood levels from our patients and from published data had comparable Efavirenz levels to the in vitro toxic EC50 in about 1 to 5% of all patients.All studied NNRTIs were toxic against cancer cells. A low percentage of patients taking Efavirenz reached in vitro cytotoxic blood levels. It can be speculated that in HIV-1 positive patients having high Efavirenz blood levels pancreatic

  1. TNF-α protein synthesis inhibitor restores neuronal function and reverses cognitive deficits induced by chronic neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belarbi Karim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neuroinflammation is a hallmark of several neurological disorders associated with cognitive loss. Activated microglia and secreted factors such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α are key mediators of neuroinflammation and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction. Our study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a novel analog of thalidomide, 3,6'-dithiothalidomide (DT, an agent with anti-TNF-α activity, in a model of chronic neuroinflammation. Methods Lipopolysaccharide or artificial cerebrospinal fluid was infused into the fourth ventricle of three-month-old rats for 28 days. Starting on day 29, animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of DT (56 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 14 days. Thereafter, cognitive function was assessed by novel object recognition, novel place recognition and Morris water maze, and animals were euthanized 25 min following water maze probe test evaluation. Results Chronic LPS-infusion was characterized by increased gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus. Treatment with DT normalized TNF-α levels back to control levels but not IL-1β. Treatment with DT attenuated the expression of TLR2, TLR4, IRAK1 and Hmgb1, all genes involved in the TLR-mediated signaling pathway associated with classical microglia activation. However DT did not impact the numbers of MHC Class II immunoreactive cells. Chronic neuroinflammation impaired novel place recognition, spatial learning and memory function; but it did not impact novel object recognition. Importantly, treatment with DT restored cognitive function in LPS-infused animals and normalized the fraction of hippocampal neurons expressing the plasticity-related immediate-early gene Arc. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that the TNF-α synthesis inhibitor DT can significantly reverse hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits induced by chronic neuroinflammation. These results suggest that TNF-α is a

  2. Type 2 diabetes impairs odour detection, olfactory memory and olfactory neuroplasticity; effects partly reversed by the DPP-4 inhibitor Linagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzau, Grazyna; Davidsson, William; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Chiazza, Fausto; Nathanson, David; Pintana, Hiranya; Skogsberg, Josefin; Klein, Thomas; Nyström, Thomas; Darsalia, Vladimer; Patrone, Cesare

    2018-02-23

    Recent data suggest that olfactory deficits could represent an early marker and a pathogenic mechanism at the basis of cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, research is needed to further characterize olfactory deficits in diabetes, their relation to cognitive decline and underlying mechanisms.The aim of this study was to determine whether T2D impairs odour detection, olfactory memory as well as neuroplasticity in two major brain areas responsible for olfaction and odour coding: the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and the piriform cortex (PC), respectively. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) are clinically used T2D drugs exerting also beneficial effects in the brain. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether DPP-4i could reverse the potentially detrimental effects of T2D on the olfactory system.Non-diabetic Wistar and T2D Goto-Kakizaki rats, untreated or treated for 16 weeks with the DPP-4i linagliptin, were employed. Odour detection and olfactory memory were assessed by using the block, the habituation-dishabituation and the buried pellet tests. We assessed neuroplasticity in the MOB by quantifying adult neurogenesis and GABAergic inhibitory interneurons positive for calbindin, parvalbumin and carletinin. In the PC, neuroplasticity was assessed by quantifying the same populations of interneurons and a newly identified form of olfactory neuroplasticity mediated by post-mitotic doublecortin (DCX) + immature neurons.We show that T2D dramatically reduced odour detection and olfactory memory. Moreover, T2D decreased neurogenesis in the MOB, impaired the differentiation of DCX+ immature neurons in the PC and altered GABAergic interneurons protein expression in both olfactory areas. DPP-4i did not improve odour detection and olfactory memory. However, it normalized T2D-induced effects on neuroplasticity.The results provide new knowledge on the detrimental effects of T2D on the olfactory system. This knowledge could constitute essentials for

  3. Class 1-Selective Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors Enhance HIV Latency Reversal while Preserving the Activity of HDAC Isoforms Necessary for Maximal HIV Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikos, Thomas D; Painter, Mark M; Sebastian Kettinger, Nadia T; Terry, Valeri H; Collins, Kathleen L

    2018-03-15

    Combinations of drugs that affect distinct mechanisms of HIV latency aim to induce robust latency reversal leading to cytopathicity and elimination of the persistent HIV reservoir. Thus far, attempts have focused on combinations of protein kinase C (PKC) agonists and pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) despite the knowledge that HIV gene expression is regulated by class 1 histone deacetylases. We hypothesized that class 1-selective HDIs would promote more robust HIV latency reversal in combination with a PKC agonist than pan-HDIs because they preserve the activity of proviral factors regulated by non-class 1 histone deacetylases. Here, we show that class 1-selective agents used alone or with the PKC agonist bryostatin-1 induced more HIV protein expression per infected cell. In addition, the combination of entinostat and bryostatin-1 induced viral outgrowth, whereas bryostatin-1 combinations with pan-HDIs did not. When class 1-selective HDIs were used in combination with pan-HDIs, the amount of viral protein expression and virus outgrowth resembled that of pan-HDIs alone, suggesting that pan-HDIs inhibit robust gene expression induced by class 1-selective HDIs. Consistent with this, pan-HDI-containing combinations reduced the activity of NF-κB and Hsp90, two cellular factors necessary for potent HIV protein expression, but did not significantly reduce overall cell viability. An assessment of viral clearance from in vitro cultures indicated that maximal protein expression induced by class 1-selective HDI treatment was crucial for reservoir clearance. These findings elucidate the limitations of current approaches and provide a path toward more effective strategies to eliminate the HIV reservoir. IMPORTANCE Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, HIV evades eradication in a latent form that is not affected by currently available drug regimens. Pharmacologic latency reversal that leads to death of cellular reservoirs has been proposed as a strategy for

  4. Nelfinavir and Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Salvage Regimes in Heavily Hiv Pretreated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Guy Baril

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of nelfinavir mesylate (NFV in combination with delavirdine mesylate(DLV or efavirenz (EFV and other antiretroviral agents following virological failure on other protease inhibitor (PI-based regimens.

  5. Design and synthesis of N₁-aryl-benzimidazoles 2-substituted as novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Anna-Maria; Ferro, Stefania; De Luca, Laura; Lo Surdo, Giuseppa; Morreale, Francesca; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Chimirri, Alba

    2014-02-15

    A series of novel N1-aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Some of them proved to be effective in inhibiting HIV-1 replication at submicromolar and nanomolar concentration acting as HIV-1 non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), with low cytotoxicity. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these new derivatives was discussed and rationalized by docking studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D; Mislak, Andrea C; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Anderson, Karen S

    2014-06-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3'-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3'-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Etravirine and Rilpivirine Drug Resistance Among HIV-1 Subtype C Infected Children Failing Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Regimens in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Shanmugam; Kausalya, Bagavathi; Gomathi, Selvamurthi; Sivamalar, Sathasivam; Pachamuthu, Balakrishnan; Selvamuthu, Poongulali; Pradeep, Amrose; Sunil, Solomon; Mothi, Sarvode N; Smith, Davey M; Kantor, Rami

    2017-06-01

    We have analyzed reverse transcriptase (RT) region of HIV-1 pol gene from 97 HIV-infected children who were identified as failing first-line therapy that included first-generation non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (Nevirapine and Efavirenz) for at least 6 months. We found that 54% and 65% of the children had genotypically predicted resistance to second-generation non-nucleoside RT inhibitors drugs Etravirine (ETR) and Rilpivirine, respectively. These cross-resistance mutations may compromise future NNRTI-based regimens, especially in resource-limited settings. To complement these investigations, we also analyzed the sequences in Stanford database, Monogram weighted score, and DUET weighted score algorithms for ETR susceptibility and found almost perfect agreement between the three algorithms in predicting ETR susceptibility from genotypic data.

  8. In Vitro Cross-Resistance Profiles of Rilpivirine, Dapivirine, and MIV-150, Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Microbicides in Clinical Development for the Prevention of HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    Rilpivirine (RPV), dapivirine (DPV), and MIV-150 are in development as microbicides. It is not known whether they will block infection of circulating nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants. Here, we demonstrate that the activity of DPV and MIV-150 is compromised by many resistant viruses containing single or double substitutions. High DPV genital tract concentrations from DPV ring use may block replication of resistant viruses. However, MIV-150 genital tract concentrations may be insufficient to inhibit many resistant viruses, including those harboring K103N or Y181C. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Reversible dual inhibitor against G9a and DNMT1 improves human iPSC derivation enhancing MET and facilitating transcription factor engagement to the genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Roberto Rodriguez-Madoz

    Full Text Available The combination of defined factors with small molecules targeting epigenetic factors is a strategy that has been shown to enhance optimal derivation of iPSCs and could be used for disease modelling, high throughput screenings and/or regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we showed that a new first-in-class reversible dual G9a/DNMT1 inhibitor compound (CM272 improves the efficiency of human cell reprogramming and iPSC generation from primary cells of healthy donors and patient samples, using both integrative and non-integrative methods. Moreover, CM272 facilitates the generation of human iPSC with only two factors allowing the removal of the most potent oncogenic factor cMYC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mechanistically, treatment with CM272 induces heterochromatin relaxation, facilitates the engagement of OCT4 and SOX2 transcription factors to OSKM refractory binding regions that are required for iPSC establishment, and enhances mesenchymal to epithelial transition during the early phase of cell reprogramming. Thus, the use of this new G9a/DNMT reversible dual inhibitor compound may represent an interesting alternative for improving cell reprogramming and human iPSC derivation for many different applications while providing interesting insights into reprogramming mechanisms.

  10. L-Chicoric acid inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in vivo and is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, Ryan A.; Lee, Deborah J.; McDougall, Brenda R.; King, Peter J.; Victoria, Joseph; Mao Yingqun; Lei Xiangyang; Reinecke, Manfred G.; Robinson, W. Edward

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) must covalently join the viral cDNA into a host chromosome for productive HIV infection. L-Chicoric acid (L-CA) enters cells poorly but is a potent inhibitor of IN in vitro. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), L-CA inhibits integration at concentrations from 500 nM to 10 μM but also inhibits entry at concentrations above 1 μM. Using recombinant HIV IN, steady-state kinetic analyses with L-CA were consistent with a noncompetitive or irreversible mechanism of inhibition. IN, in the presence or absence of L-CA, was successively washed. Inhibition of IN diminished, demonstrating that L-CA was reversibly bound to the protein. These data demonstrate that L-CA is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of IN in vitro and of HIV integration in vivo. Thus, L-CA likely interacts with amino acids other than those which bind substrate

  11. Reversible dual inhibitor against G9a and DNMT1 improves human iPSC derivation enhancing MET and facilitating transcription factor engagement to the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan Roberto; San Jose-Eneriz, Edurne; Rabal, Obdulia; Zapata-Linares, Natalia; Miranda, Estibaliz; Rodriguez, Saray; Porciuncula, Angelo; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Garate, Leire; Segura, Victor; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Agirre, Xabier; Oyarzabal, Julen; Prosper, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    The combination of defined factors with small molecules targeting epigenetic factors is a strategy that has been shown to enhance optimal derivation of iPSCs and could be used for disease modelling, high throughput screenings and/or regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we showed that a new first-in-class reversible dual G9a/DNMT1 inhibitor compound (CM272) improves the efficiency of human cell reprogramming and iPSC generation from primary cells of healthy donors and patient samples, using both integrative and non-integrative methods. Moreover, CM272 facilitates the generation of human iPSC with only two factors allowing the removal of the most potent oncogenic factor cMYC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mechanistically, treatment with CM272 induces heterochromatin relaxation, facilitates the engagement of OCT4 and SOX2 transcription factors to OSKM refractory binding regions that are required for iPSC establishment, and enhances mesenchymal to epithelial transition during the early phase of cell reprogramming. Thus, the use of this new G9a/DNMT reversible dual inhibitor compound may represent an interesting alternative for improving cell reprogramming and human iPSC derivation for many different applications while providing interesting insights into reprogramming mechanisms.

  12. Reversal of atherogenic lipoprotein profile in HIV-1 infected patients with lipodystrophy after replacing protease inhibitors by nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negredo, Eugenia; Ribalta, Josep; Paredes, Roger; Ferré, Raimón; Sirera, Guillem; Ruiz, Lidia; Salazar, Juliana; Reiss, Peter; Masana, Lluís; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2002-01-01

    Background: The widespread use of protease inhibitors (PI) has been associated with abnormalities in the lipid profile of HIV-1-infected patients. Treatment simplification approaches in which PI are replaced by nevirapine (NVP) have been shown to improve PI-related toxicity. Objective: To assess the

  13. Molecular insights into human monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition by 1,4-naphthoquinone: evidences for menadione (vitamin K3) acting as a competitive and reversible inhibitor of MAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Cerqueira, Eduardo; Netz, Paulo Augusto; Diniz, Cristiane; Petry do Canto, Vanessa; Follmer, Cristian

    2011-12-15

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of biogenic and exogenous amines and its inhibitors have therapeutic value for several conditions including affective disorders, stroke, neurodegenerative diseases and aging. The discovery of 2,3,6-trimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (TMN) as a nonselective and reversible inhibitor of MAO, has suggested 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) as a potential scaffold for designing new MAO inhibitors. Combining molecular modeling tools and biochemical assays we evaluate the kinetic and molecular details of the inhibition of human MAO by 1,4-NQ, comparing it with TMN and menadione. Menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a multitarget drug that acts as a precursor of vitamin K and an inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition. Herein we show that MAO-B was inhibited competitively by 1,4-NQ (K(i)=1.4 μM) whereas MAO-A was inhibited by non-competitive mechanism (K(i)=7.7 μM). Contrasting with TMN and 1,4-NQ, menadione exhibited a 60-fold selectivity for MAO-B (K(i)=0.4 μM) in comparison with MAO-A (K(i)=26 μM), which makes it as selective as rasagiline. Fluorescence and molecular modeling data indicated that these inhibitors interact with the flavin moiety at the active site of the enzyme. Additionally, docking studies suggest the phenyl side groups of Tyr407 and Tyr444 (for MAO-A) or Tyr398 and Tyr435 (for MAO-B) play an important role in the interaction of the enzyme with 1,4-NQ scaffold through forces of dispersion as verified for menadione, TMN and 1,4-NQ. Taken together, our findings reveal the molecular details of MAO inhibition by 1,4-NQ scaffold and show for the first time that menadione acts as a competitive and reversible inhibitor of human MAO. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and validation of a rapid reversed-phase HPLC method for the determination of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine from polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno; Amiji, Mansoor M; Bahia, Maria Fernanda

    2010-06-05

    The objective of this work was to develop and validate a rapid reversed-phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the in vitro pharmaceutical characterization of dapivirine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. Chromatographic runs were performed on a RP C18 column with a mobile phase comprising acetonitrile-0.5% (w/v) triethanolamine solution in isocratic mode (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. Dapivirine was detected at a wavelength of 290 nm. The method was shown to be specific, linear in the range of 1-50 microg/ml (R(2)=0.9998), precise at the intra-day and inter-day levels as reflected by the relative standard deviation values (less than 0.85%), accurate (recovery rate of 100.17+/-0.35%), and robust to changes in the mobile phase and column brand. The detection and quantitation limits were 0.08 and 0.24 microg/ml, respectively. The method was successfully used to determine the loading capacity and association efficiency of dapivirine in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based nanoparticles and its in vitro release. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Discovery of potent, reversible MetAP2 inhibitors via fragment based drug discovery and structure based drug design-Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Christopher; Cheruvallath, Zacharia; Komandla, Mallareddy; Tang, Mingnam; Farrell, Pamela; Lawson, J David; Vanderpool, Darin; Wu, Yiqin; Dougan, Douglas R; Plonowski, Artur; Holub, Corine; Larson, Chris

    2016-06-15

    Methionine aminopeptidase-2 (MetAP2) is an enzyme that cleaves an N-terminal methionine residue from a number of newly synthesized proteins. This step is required before they will fold or function correctly. Pre-clinical and clinical studies with a MetAP2 inhibitor suggest that they could be used as a novel treatment for obesity. Herein we describe the discovery of a series of pyrazolo[4,3-b]indoles as reversible MetAP2 inhibitors. A fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) approach was used, beginning with the screening of fragment libraries to generate hits with high ligand-efficiency (LE). An indazole core was selected for further elaboration, guided by structural information. SAR from the indazole series led to the design of a pyrazolo[4,3-b]indole core and accelerated knowledge-based fragment growth resulted in potent and efficient MetAP2 inhibitors, which have shown robust and sustainable body weight loss in DIO mice when dosed orally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Insight into the mechanism of action and selectivity of caspase-3 reversible inhibitors through in silico studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minini, Lucía; Ferraro, Florencia; Cancela, Saira; Merlino, Alicia

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide for which there is currently no cure. Recently, caspase-3 has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for treating AD. Since this enzyme is overexpressed in brains from AD patients its selective modulation by non-covalent inhibitors becomes an interesting strategy in the search of potential drugs against this neuropathology. With this in mind, we have combined molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and QM calculations of unliganded caspase-3 and caspase-7 and in complex with a series of known inhibitors of caspase-3 described in the literature in order to assess the structural features responsible for good inhibitory activity and selectivity against this potential target. This work has allowed us to identify hotspots for drug binding as well as the importance of shape and charge distribution for interacting into the substrate binding cleft or into the dimer interface in each enzyme. Our results showed that most selective compounds against caspsase-3 bind into the substrate binding cleft acting as competitive inhibitors whereas in caspase-7 they bind close to an allosteric site at the dimer interface but since they are weakly bound their presence would not be affecting enzyme dynamics or function. In addition, for both enzymes we have found evidence indicating that differences in shape and accessibility exist between the substrate binding site of each monomer which could be modulating the binding affinity of non-covalent molecules.

  17. Design, synthesis and antiviral evaluation of novel heteroarylcarbothioamide derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H and RDDP functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Angela; Onnis, Valentina; Deplano, Alessandro; Bianco, Giulia; Demurtas, Monica; Distinto, Simona; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Alcaro, Stefano; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2017-08-31

    In the continuous effort to identify new HIV-1 inhibitors endowed with innovative mechanisms, the dual inhibition of different viral functions would provide a significant advantage against drug-resistant variants. The HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is the only viral-encoded enzymatic activity that still lacks an efficient inhibitor. We synthesized a library of 3,5-diamino-N-aryl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbothioamide and 4-amino-5-benzoyl-N-phenyl-2-(substituted-amino)-1H-pyrrole-3-carbothioamide derivatives and tested them against RNase H activity. We identified the pyrazolecarbothioamide derivative A15, able to inhibit viral replication and both RNase H and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RDDP) RT-associated activities in the low micromolar range. Docking simulations hypothesized its binding to two RT pockets. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that, with respect to wt RT, V108A substitution strongly reduced A15 IC50 values (12.6-fold for RNase H inhibition and 4.7-fold for RDDP), while substitution A502F caused a 9.0-fold increase in its IC50 value for RNase H, not affecting the RDDP inhibition, reinforcing the hypothesis of a dual-site inhibition. Moreover, A15 retained good inhibition potency against three non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant enzymes, confirming a mode of action unrelated to NNRTIs and suggesting its potential as a lead compound for development of new HIV-1 RT dual inhibitors active against drug-resistant viruses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Reversal of oncogene transformation and suppression of tumor growth by the novel IGF1R kinase inhibitor A-928605

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappano, William N; Sheppard, George S; Donawho, Cherrie; Buchanan, Fritz G; Davidsen, Steven K; Bell, Randy L; Wang, Jieyi; Jung, Paul M; Meulbroek, Jonathan A; Wang, Yi-Chun; Hubbard, Robert D; Zhang, Qian; Grudzien, Meagan M; Soni, Niru B; Johnson, Eric F

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is an important signaling pathway in the growth and survival of many cell and tissue types. This pathway has also been implicated in many aspects of cancer progression from tumorigenesis to metastasis. The multiple roles of IGF signaling in cancer suggest that inhibition of the pathway might yield clinically effective therapeutics. We describe A-928605, a novel pyrazolo [3,4-d]pyrimidine small molecule inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases (IGF1R and IR) responsible for IGF signal transduction. This compound was first tested for its activity and selectivity via conventional in vitro kinome profiling and cellular IGF1R autophosphorylation. Additionally, cellular selectivity and efficacy of A-928605 were analyzed in an IGF1R oncogene-addicted cell line by proliferation, signaling and microarray studies. Finally, in vivo efficacy of A-928605 was assessed in the oncogene-addicted cell line and in a neuroblastoma model as a single agent as well as in combination with clinically approved therapeutics targeting EGFR in models of pancreatic and non-small cell lung cancers. A-928605 is a selective IGF1R inhibitor that is able to abrogate activation of the pathway both in vitro and in vivo. This novel compound dosed as a single agent is able to produce significant growth inhibition of neuroblastoma xenografts in vivo. A-928605 is also able to provide additive effects when used in combination with clinically approved agents directed against EGFR in non-small cell lung and human pancreatic tumor models. These results suggest that a selective IGF1R inhibitor such as A-928605 may provide a useful clinical therapeutic for IGF pathway affected tumors and warrants further investigation

  19. Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-amines as potential HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bode, ML

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ? Discovery Studio 2.5.5). The crystal structures of both the wild-type and K103N mutant forms of HIV-1 RT containing the diarylpyrimidine inhibitor rilpivirine (TMC-278) were used (pdb codes MEE and 3MEG, respectively).27 Etravirine (TMC-125... These drugs act by binding to a lipophilic, non-substrate binding pocket located about 10? from the substrate binding site. Binding induces conformational changes in the catalytic site, slowing catalytic activity markedly.3 About fifty structurally diverse...

  20. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione analogues as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase associated ribonuclease H and polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Vernekar, Sanjeev Kumar V; Chen, Yue-Lei; Miller, Lena; Huber, Andrew D; Myshakina, Nataliya; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Parniak, Michael A; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-06-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not clinically validated as an antiviral target. 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) is known to confer active site directed inhibition of divalent metal-dependent enzymatic functions, such as HIV RNase H, integrase (IN) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a few C-5, C-6 or C-7 substituted HID subtypes as HIV RNase H inhibitors. Our data indicate that while some of these subtypes inhibited both the RNase H and polymerase (pol) functions of RT, potent and selective RNase H inhibition was achieved with subtypes 8-9 as exemplified with compounds 8c and 9c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovery of 8-Amino-imidazo[1,5- a ]pyrazines as Reversible BTK Inhibitors for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Guiadeen, Deodial; Krikorian, Arto; Gao, Xiaolei; Wang, James; Boga, Sobhana Babu; Alhassan, Abdul-Basit; Yu, Younong; Vaccaro, Henry; Liu, Shilan; Yang, Chundao; Wu, Hao; Cooper, Alan; de Man, Jos; Kaptein, Allard; Maloney, Kevin; Hornak, Viktor; Gao, Ying-Duo; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Raaijmakers, Hans; Vu-Pham, Diep; Presland, Jeremy; Mansueto, My; Xu, Zangwei; Leccese, Erica; Zhang-Hoover, Jie; Knemeyer, Ian; Garlisi, Charles G.; Bays, Nathan; Stivers, Peter; Brandish, Philip E.; Hicks, Alexandra; Kim, Ronald; Kozlowski, Joseph A. (Merck); (WuXi App Tec)

    2016-02-11

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a Tec family kinase with a well-defined role in the B cell receptor (BCR) pathway. It has become an attractive kinase target for selective B cell inhibition and for the treatment of B cell related diseases. We report a series of compounds based on 8-amino-imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine that are potent reversible BTK inhibitors with excellent kinase selectivity. Selectivity is achieved through specific interactions of the ligand with the kinase hinge and driven by aminopyridine hydrogen bondings with Ser538 and Asp539, and by hydrophobic interaction of trifluoropyridine in the back pocket. These interactions are evident in the X-ray crystal structure of the lead compounds 1 and 3 in the complex with the BTK enzyme. Our lead compounds show desirable PK profiles and efficacy in the preclinical rat collagen induced arthritis model.

  2. Viral resuppression and detection of drug resistance following interruption of a suppressive non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Zoe; Phillips, Andrew; Cohen, Cal

    2008-01-01

    the NRTIs, or by replacing the NNRTI with another drug before interruption. Simultaneous interruption of all antiretrovirals was discouraged. Resuppression rates 4-8 months after reinitiating NNRTI-therapy were assessed, as was the detection of drug-resistance mutations within 2 months of the treatment...... regimen. NNRTI drug-resistance mutations were observed in a relatively high proportion of patients. These data provide additional support for a staggered or switched interruption strategy for NNRTI drugs.......BACKGROUND: Interruption of a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-regimen is often necessary, but must be performed with caution because NNRTIs have a low genetic barrier to resistance. Limited data exist to guide clinical practice on the best interruption strategy to use...

  3. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel pyrrolyl aryl sulfones: HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors active at nanomolar concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Silvestri, R; Pagnozzi, E; Bruno, B; Novellino, E; Greco, G; Massa, S; Ettorre, A; Loi, A G; Scintu, F; La Colla, P

    2000-05-04

    Pyrrolyl aryl sulfones (PASs) have been recently reported as a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors acting at the non-nucleoside binding site of this enzyme (Artico, M.; et al. J. Med. Chem. 1996, 39, 522-530). Compound 3, the most potent inhibitor within the series (EC(50) = 0.14 microM, IC(50) = 0.4 microM, and SI > 1429), was then selected as a lead compound for a synthetic project based on molecular modeling studies. Using the three-dimensional structure of RT cocrystallized with the alpha-APA derivative R95845, we derived a model of the RT/3 complex by taking into account previously developed structure-activity relationships. Inspection of this model and docking calculations on virtual compounds prompted the design of novel PAS derivatives and related analogues. Our computational approach proved to be effective in making qualitative predictions, that is in discriminating active versus inactive compounds. Among the compounds synthesized and tested, 20 was the most active one, with EC(50) = 0.045 microM, IC(50) = 0.05 microM, and SI = 5333. Compared with the lead 3, these values represent a 3- and 8-fold improvement in the cell-based and enzyme assays, respectively, together with the highest selectivity achieved so far in the PAS series.

  4. The reverse-mode NCX1 activity inhibitor KB-R7943 promotes prostate cancer cell death by activating the JNK pathway and blocking autophagic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhou; Chen, BaiJun; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, ZhenXing; Dong, XingYou; Xia, LiuBin; Huang, ShengQuan; Hu, XiaoYan; Song, Bo; Li, LongKun

    2016-07-05

    We explored the effects of KB-R7943, an inhibitor of reverse-mode NCX1 activity, in prostate cancer (PCa). NCX1 was overexpressed in PCa tissues and cell lines, and higher NCX1 levels were associated higher PCa grades. At concentrations greater than 10 μM, KB-R7943 dose-dependently decreased PC3 and LNCaP cell viability. KB-R7943 also increased cell cycle G1/S phase arrest and induced apoptosis in PC3 cells. KB-R7943 increased autophagosome accumulation in PCa cells as indicated by increases in LC3-II levels and eGFP-LC3 puncta. Combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ) and KB-R7943 decreased P62 and increased LC3-II protein levels in PC3 cells, indicating that KB-R7943 blocked autophagic flux. KB-R7943 induced autophagosome accumulation mainly by downregulating the PI3K/AKT/m-TOR pathway and upregulating the JNK pathway. In xenograft experiments, KB-R7943 inhibited tumor growth. Combined treatment with KB-R7943 and an autophagy inhibitor inhibited growth and increased apoptosis. These results indicate that KB-R7943 promotes cell death in PCa by activating the JNK signaling pathway and blocking autophagic flux.

  5. The VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine affects effort-related decision making in a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice task: reversal with antidepressant drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Randall

    Full Text Available Behavioral activation is a fundamental feature of motivation, and organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon evaluations of reinforcement value and response costs. Furthermore, people with major depression and other disorders often show anergia, psychomotor retardation, fatigue, and alterations in effort-related decision making. Tasks measuring effort-based decision making can be used as animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine induces depressive symptoms in humans, and also preferentially depletes dopamine (DA. Rats were assessed using a concurrent progressive ratio (PROG/chow feeding task, in which they can either lever press on a PROG schedule for preferred high-carbohydrate food, or approach and consume a less-preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. Previous work has shown that the DA antagonist haloperidol reduced PROG work output on this task, but did not reduce chow intake, effects that differed substantially from those of reinforcer devaluation or appetite suppressant drugs. The present work demonstrated that tetrabenazine produced an effort-related shift in responding on the PROG/chow procedure, reducing lever presses, highest ratio achieved and time spent responding, but not reducing chow intake. Similar effects were produced by administration of the subtype selective DA antagonists ecopipam (D1 and eticlopride (D2, but not by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor neutral antagonist and putative appetite suppressant AM 4413, which suppressed both lever pressing and chow intake. The adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3, the antidepressant and catecholamine uptake inhibitor bupropion, and the MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl, all reversed the impairments induced by tetrabenazine. This work demonstrates the potential utility of the PROG/chow procedure as a

  6. Indolylarylsulfones as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: new cyclic substituents at indole-2-carboxamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Coluccia, Antonio; Brancale, Andrea; Piscitelli, Francesco; Gatti, Valerio; Maga, Giovanni; Samuele, Alberta; Pannecouque, Christophe; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Novellino, Ettore; Silvestri, Romano

    2011-03-24

    New indolylarylsulfone derivatives bearing cyclic substituents at indole-2-carboxamide linked through a methylene/ethylene spacer were potent inhibitors of the WT HIV-1 replication in CEM and PBMC cells with inhibitory concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Against the mutant L100I and K103N RT HIV-1 strains in MT-4 cells, compounds 20, 24-26, 36, and 40 showed antiviral potency superior to that of NVP and EFV. Against these mutant strains, derivatives 20, 24-26, and 40 were equipotent to ETV. Molecular docking experiments on this novel series of IAS analogues have also suggested that the H-bond interaction between the nitrogen atom in the carboxamide chain of IAS and Glu138:B is important in the binding of these compounds. These results are in accordance with the experimental data obtained on the WT and on the mutant HIV-1 strains tested.

  7. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-10-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir and a three-drug combination of nelfinavir with ZDV and 3TC against an acute HIV-1 strain RF infection of CEM-SS cells in vitro. Quantitative assessment of drug interaction was evaluated by a universal response surface approach (W. R. Greco, G. Bravo, and J. C. Parsons, Pharm. Rev. 47:331-385, 1995) and by the method of M. N. Prichard and C. Shipman (Antiviral Res. 14:181-206, 1990). Both analytical methods yielded similar results and showed that the two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the reverse transcriptase inhibitors ZDV, 3TC, ddI, d4T, and ddC and the three-drug combination with ZDV and 3TC resulted in additive to statistically significant synergistic interactions. In a similar manner, the combination of nelfinavir with the three protease inhibitors resulted in additive (ritonavir and saquinavir) to slightly antagonistic (indinavir) interactions. In all combinations, minimal cellular cytotoxicity was observed with any drug alone and in combination. These results suggest that administration of combinations of the appropriate doses of nelfinavir with other currently approved antiretroviral therapeutic agents in vivo may result in enhanced antiviral activity with no associated increase in cellular cytotoxicity.

  8. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjeong Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV. The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for

  9. Alterations in brain Protein Kinase A activity and reversal of morphine tolerance by two fragments of native Protein Kinase A inhibitor peptide (PKI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, George D; Smith, Forrest L; Smith, Paul A; Dewey, William L

    2005-04-01

    Two peptide fragments of native Protein Kinase A inhibitor (PKI), PKI-(6-22)-amide and PKI-(Myr-14-22)-amide, significantly reversed low-level morphine antinociceptive tolerance in mice. The inhibition of Protein Kinase A (PKA) activity by both peptide fragments was then measured in specific brain regions (thalamus, periaqueductal gray (PAG), and medulla) and in lumbar spinal cord (LSC), which in previous studies have been shown to play a role in morphine-induced analgesia. In drug naive animals, cytosolic PKA activity was greater than particulate PKA activity in each region, while cytosolic and particulate PKA activities were greater in thalamus and PAG compared to medulla and LSC. The addition of both peptides to homogenates from each region completely abolished cytosolic and particulate PKA activities in vitro. Following injection into the lateral ventricle of the brain of drug naive mice and morphine-tolerant mice, both peptides inhibited PKA activity in the cytosolic, but not the particulate fraction of LSC. In addition, cytosolic and particulate PKA activities were inhibited by both peptides in thalamus. These results demonstrate that the inhibition of PKA reverses morphine tolerance. Moreover, the inhibition of PKA activity in specific brain regions and LSC from morphine-tolerant mice by PKI analogs administered i.c.v. is evidence that PKA plays a role in morphine tolerance.

  10. Active methamphetamine use is associated with transmitted drug resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in individuals with HIV infection of unknown duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Moini, Niousha; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Pesano, Rick; Lie, Yolanda S; Aiem, Heidi; Butler, David M; Letendre, Scott; Mathews, Wm Christopher; Smith, Davey M

    2007-01-01

    Frequent methamphetamine use among recently HIV infected individuals is associated with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI); however, the reversion time of TDR to drug susceptible HIV may exceed 3 years. We assessed whether recreational substance use is associated with detectable TDR among individuals newly diagnosed with HIV infection of unknown duration. Cross-sectional analysis. Subjects were enrolled at the University California, San Diego Early Intervention Program. Demographic, clinical and substance use data were collected using structured interviews. Genotypic resistance testing was performed using GeneSeq, Monogram Biosciences. We analyzed the association between substance use and TDR using bivariate analyses and the corresponding transmission networks using phylogenetic models. Between April 2004 and July 2006, 115 individuals with genotype data were enrolled. The prevalence of alcohol, marijuana and methamphetamine use were 98%, 71% and 64% respectively. Only active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis was independently associated with TDR to NNRTI (OR: 6.6; p=0.002). Despite not knowing the duration of their HIV infection, individuals reporting active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis are at an increased risk of having HIV strains that are resistant to NNRTI.

  11. Active Methamphetamine Use is Associated with Transmitted Drug Resis-tance to Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in Individuals with HIV Infection of Unknown Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Moini, Niousha; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Pesano, Rick; Lie, Yolanda S; Aiem, Heidi; Butler, David M; Letendre, Scott; Mathews, Wm. Christopher; Smith, Davey M

    2007-01-01

    Background: Frequent methamphetamine use among recently HIV infected individuals is associated with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI); however, the reversion time of TDR to drug susceptible HIV may exceed 3 years. We assessed whether recreational substance use is associated with detectable TDR among individuals newly diagnosed with HIV infection of unknown duration. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Methods: Subjects were enrolled at the University California, San Diego Early Intervention Program. Demographic, clinical and substance use data were collected using structured interviews. Genotypic resistance testing was performed using GeneSeq™, Monogram Biosciences. We analyzed the association between substance use and TDR using bivariate analyses and the corresponding transmission networks using phylogenetic models. Results: Between April 2004 and July 2006, 115 individuals with genotype data were enrolled. The prevalence of alcohol, marijuana and methamphetamine use were 98%, 71% and 64% respectively. Only active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis was independently associated with TDR to NNRTI (OR: 6.6; p=0.002). Conclusion: Despite not knowing the duration of their HIV infection, individuals reporting active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis are at an increased risk of having HIV strains that are resistant to NNRTI. PMID:18923691

  12. Free Energy-Based Virtual Screening and Optimization of RNase H Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baofeng; D'Erasmo, Michael P; Murelli, Ryan P; Gallicchio, Emilio

    2016-09-30

    We report the results of a binding free energy-based virtual screening campaign of a library of 77 α-hydroxytropolone derivatives against the challenging RNase H active site of the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme of human immunodeficiency virus-1. Multiple protonation states, rotamer states, and binding modalities of each compound were individually evaluated. The work involved more than 300 individual absolute alchemical binding free energy parallel molecular dynamics calculations and over 1 million CPU hours on national computing clusters and a local campus computational grid. The thermodynamic and structural measures obtained in this work rationalize a series of characteristics of this system useful for guiding future synthetic and biochemical efforts. The free energy model identified key ligand-dependent entropic and conformational reorganization processes difficult to capture using standard docking and scoring approaches. Binding free energy-based optimization of the lead compounds emerging from the virtual screen has yielded four compounds with very favorable binding properties, which will be the subject of further experimental investigations. This work is one of the few reported applications of advanced-binding free energy models to large-scale virtual screening and optimization projects. It further demonstrates that, with suitable algorithms and automation, advanced-binding free energy models can have a useful role in early-stage drug-discovery programs.

  13. Molecular Docking Studies of Marine Diterpenes as Inhibitors of Wild-Type and Mutants HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. T. de Souza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIDS is a pandemic responsible for more than 35 million deaths. The emergence of resistant mutations due to drug use is the biggest cause of treatment failure. Marine organisms are sources of different molecules, some of which offer promising HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitory activity, such as the diterpenes dolabelladienotriol (THD, IC50 = 16.5 µM, (6R-6-hydroxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (HDD, IC50 = 10 µM and (6R-6-acetoxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (ADD, IC50 = 35 µM, isolated from a brown algae of the genus Dictyota, showing low toxicity. In this work, we evaluated the structure-activity relationship (SAR of THD, HDD and ADD as anti HIV-1 RT, using a molecular modeling approach. The analyses of stereoelectronic parameters revealed a direct relationship between activity and HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital-LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital gap (ELUMO–EHOMO, where antiviral profile increases with larger HOMO-LUMO gap values. We also performed molecular docking studies of THD into HIV-1 RT wild-type and 12 different mutants, which showed a seahorse conformation, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds with important residues of the binding pocket. Based on in vitro experiments and docking studies, we demonstrated that mutations have little influence in positioning and interactions of THD. Following a rational drug design, we suggest a modification of THD to improve its biological activity.

  14. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol

  15. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  16. Tautomerism of N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide - A new selective, highly potent and reversible MAO-B inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetkov, Nikolay T.; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Antonov, Liudmil

    2017-12-01

    The tautomeric properties of an N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide (NTZ-1006, 2) derivative, developed as highly potent, reversible and selective MAO-B inhibitor useful for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurological disorders, have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. The theoretical data (M06-2X, B3LYP and MP2-4 quantum chemical calculations) have shown that due to aromaticity reasons the 1H tautomer strongly dominates over the 2H form. There are no substantial spectral changes by changing the solvent and the concentration, which leads to a conclusion that compound 2 exists in solution as 1H tautomer and its tautomerism is not influenced by the solvents and the concentration. The results are in line with the understanding for the tautomerism of 1H-indazole and shows that substitution at the C5 position in the indazole unit does not influence the tautomeric state. The isolated crystal structure of 2 is in an excellent agreement with the computation in respect of the most stable tautomer. Combined single X-ray/molecular modeling studies including HYdrogen-DEsolvation (HYDE) analysis provided not only insights into the enzyme-inhibitor interaction within the binding site of the human MAO-B isoform, but also a valuable information regarding the most stable 1H-indazole tautomeric form of NTZ-1006 that contributes to its high potency against hMAO-B enzyme (IC50 0.586 nm) and selectivity (>17000-fold) over the hMAO-A isoenzyme.

  17. Etravirine and rilpivirine resistance in HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE-infected adults failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Kantipong, Pacharee; Jirajariyavej, Supunnee; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Munsakul, Warangkana; Prasithsirikul, Wisit; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Bowonwattanuwong, Chureeratana; Klinbuayaem, Virat; Petoumenos, Kathy; Hirschel, Bernard; Bhakeecheep, Sorakij; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2011-01-01

    We studied prevalence of etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) resistance in HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE infection with first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) failure. A total of 225 adults failing two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus 1 NNRTI in Thailand with HIV RNA>1,000 copies/ml were included. Genotypic resistance results and HIV-1 subtype were interpreted by Stanford DR database. ETR resistance was calculated by the new Monogram weighted score (Monogram WS; ≥ 4 indicating high-level ETR resistance) and by DUET weighted score (DUET WS; 2.5-3.5 and ≥ 4 resulted in intermediate and reduce ETR response, respectively). RPV resistance interpretation was based on previous reports. Median (IQR) age was 38 (34-42) years, 41% were female and CDC A:B:C were 22%:21%:57%. HIV subtypes were 96% CRF01_AE and 4% B. Antiretrovirals at failure were lamivudine (100%), stavudine (93%), nevirapine (90%) and efavirenz (10%) with a median (IQR) duration of 3.4 (1.8-4.5) years. Median (IQR) CD4(+) T-cell count and HIV RNA were 194 (121-280) cells/mm³ and 4.1 (3.6-4.6) log₁₀ copies/ml, respectively. The common NNRTI mutations were Y181C (41%), G190A (22%) and K103N (19%). The proportion of patients with Monogram WS score ≥ 4 was 61.3%. By DUET WS, 49.8% and 7.5% of patients were scored 2.5-3.5 and ≥4, respectively. Only HIV RNA ≥ 4 log₁₀ copies/ml at failure was associated with both Monogram WS ≥ 4 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.9; P=0.003) and DUET WS ≥ 2.5 (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3; P=0.02). The RVP resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) detected were K101P (1.8%), Y181I (2.7%) and Y181V (3.6%). All patients with RPV mutation had ETR resistance. No E138R/E138K mutations were detected. Approximately 60% of patients had high-level ETR resistance. The role of ETR in second-line therapy is limited in late NNRTI failure settings. RVP RAMs were uncommon, but cross-resistance between ETR and RVP was high.

  18. Reduced skeletal muscle inhibitor of kappaB beta content is associated with insulin resistance in subjects with type 2 diabetes: reversal by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Christ-Roberts, Christine; Berria, Rachele; Eagan, Phyllis; Pratipanawatr, Thongchai; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Musi, Nicolas

    2006-03-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. It recently has been hypothesized that excessive activity of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB)/nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) inflammatory pathway is a mechanism underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance. However, it is not known whether IkappaB/NFkappaB signaling in muscle from subjects with type 2 diabetes is abnormal. We studied IkappaB/NFkappaB signaling in vastus lateralis muscle from six subjects with type 2 diabetes and eight matched control subjects. Muscle from type 2 diabetic subjects was characterized by a 60% decrease in IkappaB beta protein abundance, an indicator of increased activation of the IkappaB/NFkappaB pathway. IkappaB beta abundance directly correlated with insulin-mediated glucose disposal (Rd) during a hyperinsulinemic (40 mU x m(-2) x min(-1))-euglycemic clamp (r = 0.63, P = 0.01), indicating that increased IkappaB/NFkappaB pathway activity is associated with muscle insulin resistance. We also investigated whether reversal of this abnormality could be a mechanism by which training improves insulin sensitivity. In control subjects, 8 weeks of aerobic exercise training caused a 50% increase in both IkappaB alpha and IkappaB beta protein. In subjects with type 2 diabetes, training increased IkappaB alpha and IkappaB beta protein to levels comparable with that of control subjects, and these increments were accompanied by a 40% decrease in tumor necrosis factor alpha muscle content and a 37% increase in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. In summary, subjects with type 2 diabetes have reduced IkappaB protein abundance in muscle, suggesting excessive activity of the IkappaB/NFkappaB pathway. Moreover, this abnormality is reversed by exercise training.

  19. Characterization of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Associated Mutations in the RNase H Region of HIV-1 Subtype C Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngcapu, Sinaye; Theys, Kristof; Libin, Pieter; Marconi, Vincent C; Sunpath, Henry; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Gordon, Michelle L

    2017-11-08

    The South African national treatment programme includes nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in both first and second line highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens. Mutations in the RNase H domain have been associated with resistance to NRTIs but primarily in HIV-1 subtype B studies. Here, we investigated the prevalence and association of RNase H mutations with NRTI resistance in sequences from HIV-1 subtype C infected individuals. RNase H sequences from 112 NRTI treated but virologically failing individuals and 28 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals were generated and analysed. In addition, sequences from 359 subtype C ART-naive sequences were downloaded from Los Alamos database to give a total of 387 sequences from ART-naive individuals for the analysis. Fisher's exact test was used to identify mutations and Bayesian network learning was applied to identify novel NRTI resistance mutation pathways in RNase H domain. The mutations A435L, S468A, T470S, L484I, A508S, Q509L, L517I, Q524E and E529D were more prevalent in sequences from treatment-experienced compared to antiretroviral treatment naive individuals, however, only the E529D mutation remained significant after correction for multiple comparison. Our findings suggest a potential interaction between E529D and NRTI-treatment; however, site-directed mutagenesis is needed to understand the impact of this RNase H mutation.

  20. Design, synthesis and biological evaluations of N-Hydroxy thienopyrimidine-2,4-diones as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanala, Jayakanth; Kirby, Karen A; Huber, Andrew D; Casey, Mary C; Wilson, Daniel J; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is the only HIV enzymatic function not targeted by current antiviral drugs. Although various chemotypes have been reported to inhibit HIV RNase H, few have shown significant antiviral activities. We report herein the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel N-hydroxy thienopyrimidine-2,3-dione chemotype (11) which potently and selectively inhibited RNase H with considerable potency against HIV-1 in cell culture. Current structure-activity-relationship (SAR) identified analogue 11d as a nanomolar inhibitor of RNase H (IC 50  = 0.04 μM) with decent antiviral potency (EC 50  = 7.4 μM) and no cytotoxicity (CC 50  > 100 μM). In extended biochemical assays compound 11d did not inhibit RT polymerase (pol) while inhibiting integrase strand transfer (INST) with 53 fold lower potency (IC 50  = 2.1 μM) than RNase H inhibition. Crystallographic and molecular modeling studies confirmed the RNase H active site binding mode. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Diaryltriazine non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potent candidates for pre-exposure prophylaxis in the prevention of sexual HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariën, Kevin K; Venkatraj, Muthusamy; Michiels, Johan; Joossens, Jurgen; Vereecken, Katleen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Abdellati, Saïd; Cuylaerts, Vicky; Crucitti, Tania; Heyndrickx, Leo; Heeres, Jan; Augustyns, Koen; Lewi, Paul J; Vanham, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis and topical microbicides are important strategies in the prevention of sexual HIV transmission, especially since partial protection has been shown in proof-of-concept studies. In search of new candidate drugs with an improved toxicity profile and with activity against common non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant HIV, we have synthesized and investigated a library of 60 new diaryltriazine analogues. From this library, 15 compounds were evaluated in depth using a broad armamentarium of in vitro assays that are part of a preclinical testing algorithm for microbicide development. Antiviral activity was assessed in a cell line, and in primary human cells, against both subtype B and subtype C HIV-1 and against viruses resistant to therapeutic NNRTIs and the candidate NNRTI microbicide dapivirine. Toxicity towards primary blood-derived cells, cell lines originating from the female reproductive tract and female genital microflora was also studied. We identified several compounds with highly potent antiviral activity and toxicity profiles that are superior to that of dapivirine. In particular, compound UAMC01398 is an interesting new candidate that warrants further investigation because of its superior toxicity profile and potent activity against dapivirine-resistant viruses.

  2. Discovery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor, as a broad-spectrum antiviral against both influenza A and B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanmei; Zhang, Jiantao; Musharrafieh, Rami Ghassan; Ma, Chunlong; Hau, Raymond; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant influenza viruses poses a persistent threat to public health. The current prophylaxis and therapeutic interventions for influenza virus infection have limited efficacy due to the continuous antigenic drift and antigenic shift of influenza viruses. As part of our ongoing effort to develop the next generation of influenza antivirals with broad-spectrum antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to drug resistance, in this study we report the discovery of dapivirine, an FDA-approved HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, as a broad-spectrum antiviral against multiple strains of influenza A and B viruses with low micromolar efficacy. Mechanistic studies revealed that dapivirine inhibits the nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoproteins at the early stage of viral replication. As a result, viral RNA and protein synthesis were inhibited. Furthermore, dapivirine has a high in vitro genetic barrier to drug resistance, and its antiviral activity is synergistic with oseltamivir carboxylate. In summary, the in vitro antiviral results of dapivirine suggest it is a promising candidate for the development of the next generation of dual influenza and HIV antivirals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Characterization of a Vaginal Film Containing Dapivirine, a Non- nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI), for prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Ayman; Parniak, Michael A; Dezzuitti, Charlene S; Moncla, Bernard J; Cost, Marilyn R; Li, Mingguang; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2011-06-01

    Dapivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is a potent and promising anti-HIV molecule. It is currently being investigated for use as a vaginal microbicide in two dosage forms, a semi-solid gel and a silicone elastomer ring. Quick-dissolving films are promising and attractive dosage forms that may provide an alternative platform for the vaginal delivery of microbicide drug candidates. Vaginal films may provide advantages such as discreet use, no product leakage during use, lack of requirement for an applicator for insertion, rapid drug release and minimal packaging and reduced wastage. Within this study the in vitro bioactivity of dapivirine as compared to the NNRTI UC781 was further established and a quick dissolve film was developed for vaginal application of dapivirine for prevention of HIV infection. The developed film was characterized with respect to its physical and chemical attributes including water content, mechanical strength, drug release profile, permeability, compatibility with lactobacilli and bioactivity. The anti-HIV activity of the formulated dapivirine film was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo models. Importantly the physical and chemical properties of the film as well as its bioactivity were maintained for a period of 18 months. In conclusion, a vaginal film containing dapivirine was developed and characterized. The film was shown to prevent HIV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo and have acceptable characteristics which make this film a promising candidate for testing as vaginal microbicide.

  4. Gibbs Free Energy of Hydrolytic Water Molecule in Acyl-Enzyme Intermediates of a Serine Protease: A Potential Application for Computer-Aided Discovery of Mechanism-Based Reversible Covalent Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yosuke; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In order to predict the potencies of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors, the relationships between calculated Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule in acyl-trypsin intermediates and experimentally measured catalytic rate constants (k cat ) were investigated. After obtaining representative solution structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, hydration thermodynamics analyses using WaterMap™ were conducted. Consequently, we found for the first time that when Gibbs free energy of the hydrolytic water molecule was lower, logarithms of k cat were also lower. The hydrolytic water molecule with favorable Gibbs free energy may hydrolyze acylated serine slowly. Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule might be a useful descriptor for computer-aided discovery of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors of hydrolytic enzymes.

  5. Evaluation of a series of 2-napthamide derivatives as inhibitors of the drug efflux pump AcrB for the reversal of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinhu; Mowla, Rumana; Guo, Liwei; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Rahman, Taufiq; De Barros Lopes, Miguel A; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-15

    Drug efflux pumps confer multidrug resistance to dangerous pathogens which makes these pumps important drug targets. We have synthesised a novel series of compounds based on a 2-naphthamide pharmacore aimed at inhibiting the efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria. The archeatypical transporter AcrB from Escherichia coli was used as model efflux pump as AcrB is widely conserved throughout Gram-negative organisms. The compounds were tested for their antibacterial action, ability to potentiate the action of antibiotics and for their ability to inhibit Nile Red efflux by AcrB. None of the compounds were antimicrobial against E. coli wild type cells. Most of the compounds were able to inhibit Nile Red efflux indicating that they are substrates of the AcrB efflux pump. Three compounds were able to synergise with antibiotics and reverse resistance in the resistant phenotype. Compound A3, 4-(isopentyloxy)-2-naphthamide, reduced the MICs of erythromycin and chloramphenicol to the MIC levels of the drug sensitive strain that lacks an efflux pump. A3 had no effect on the MIC of the non-substrate rifampicin indicating that this compound acts specifically through the AcrB efflux pump. A3 also does not act through non-specific mechanisms such as outer membrane or inner membrane permeabilisation and is not cytotoxic against mammalian cell lines. Therefore, we have designed and synthesised a novel chemical compound with great potential to further optimisation as inhibitor of drug efflux pumps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D-QSAR CoMFA of a series of DABO derivatives as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Monique Araújo; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Cirino, José Jair Vianna; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Castro, Helena Carla; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2008-08-01

    A series of 74 dihydroalkoxybenzyloxopyrimidines (DABOs), a class of highly potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), was retrieved from the literature and studied by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) in order to derive three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models. The CoMFA study has been performed with a training set of 59 compounds, testing three alignments and four charge schemes (DFT, HF, AM1, and PM3) and using defaults probe atom (Csp (3), +1 charge), cutoffs (30 kcal.mol (-1) for both steric and electrostatic fields), and grid distance (2.0 A). The best model ( N = 59), derived from Alignment 1 and PM3 charges, shows q (2) = 0.691, SE cv = 0.475, optimum number of components = 6, r (2) = 0.930, SEE = 0.226, and F-value = 115.544. The steric and electrostatic contributions for the best model were 43.2% and 56.8%, respectively. The external predictive ability (r (2) pred = 0.918) of the resultant best model was evaluated using a test set of 15 compounds. In order to design more potent DABO analogues as anti-HIV/AIDS agents, attention should be taken in order to select a substituent for the 4-oxopyrimidine ring, since, as revealed by the best CoMFA model, there are a steric restriction at the C2-position, a electron-rich group restriction at the C6-position ( para-substituent of the 6-benzyl group), and a steric allowed region at the C5-position.

  7. New oral antithrombotics: focus on dabigatran, an oral, reversible direct thrombin inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahl OE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ola E Dahl1,21Department of Orthopaedics, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Elverum Central Hospital, Elverum, Norway; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: Venous thromboembolism, presenting as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is a major challenge for health care systems. It is the third most common vascular disease after coronary heart disease and stroke, and many hospitalized patients have at least one risk factor. In particular, patients undergoing hip or knee replacement are at risk, with an incidence of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis of 40%–60% without thromboprophylaxis. Venous thromboembolism is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, with patients being at risk of recurrence, post-thrombotic syndrome, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Arterial thromboembolism is even more frequent, and atrial fibrillation, the most common embolic source (cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke. Strokes due to atrial fibrillation tend to be more severe and disabling and are more often fatal than strokes due to other causes. Currently, recommended management of both venous and arterial thromboembolism involves the use of anticoagulants such as coumarin and heparin derivatives. These agents are effective, although have characteristics that prevent them from providing optimal anticoagulation and convenience. Hence, new improved oral anticoagulants are being investigated. Dabigatran is a reversible, direct thrombin inhibitor, which is administered as dabigatran etexilate, the oral prodrug. Because it is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been licensed in many countries worldwide for thromboprophylaxis following orthopedic surgery and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, this compound will be the main focus of this review. Dabigatran has been investigated for the treatment of established venous thromboembolism and prevention of

  8. Introducing Catastrophe-QSAR. Application on Modeling Molecular Mechanisms of Pyridinone Derivative-Type HIV Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Lazea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom’s polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the “optimal molecular structural domains” and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted.

  9. Application of 3D-QSAR, Pharmacophore, and Molecular Docking in the Molecular Design of Diarylpyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Genyan; Wang, Wenjie; Wan, Youlan; Ju, Xiulian; Gu, Shuangxi

    2018-05-11

    Diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs), acting as HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), have been considered to be one of the most potent drug families in the fight against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). To better understand the structural requirements of HIV-1 NNRTIs, three-dimensional quantitative structure⁻activity relationship (3D-QSAR), pharmacophore, and molecular docking studies were performed on 52 DAPY analogues that were synthesized in our previous studies. The internal and external validation parameters indicated that the generated 3D-QSAR models, including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA, q 2 = 0.679, R 2 = 0.983, and r pred 2 = 0.884) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA, q 2 = 0.734, R 2 = 0.985, and r pred 2 = 0.891), exhibited good predictive abilities and significant statistical reliability. The docking results demonstrated that the phenyl ring at the C₄-position of the pyrimidine ring was better than the cycloalkanes for the activity, as the phenyl group was able to participate in π⁻π stacking interactions with the aromatic residues of the binding site, whereas the cycloalkanes were not. The pharmacophore model and 3D-QSAR contour maps provided significant insights into the key structural features of DAPYs that were responsible for the activity. On the basis of the obtained information, a series of novel DAPY analogues of HIV-1 NNRTIs with potentially higher predicted activity was designed. This work might provide useful information for guiding the rational design of potential HIV-1 NNRTI DAPYs.

  10. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, Kaleb C.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 μM), AZT monophosphate (150 μM), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 μM) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 μM) and ddC (1 μM). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-γ activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug

  11. Understanding the Molecular Determinant of Reversible Human Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors Containing 2H-Chromen-2-One Core: Structure-Based and Ligand-Based Derived Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Predictive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović, Milan; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Pirolli, Adele; Sabatino, Manuela; Ragno, Rino

    2017-04-24

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of aryalkylamines neurotransmitters with concomitant reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, the enzyme's malfunction can induce oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA and mediates development of Parkinson's disease. Thus, MAO B emerges as a promising target for developing pharmaceuticals potentially useful to treat this vicious neurodegenerative condition. Aiming to contribute to the development of drugs with the reversible mechanism of MAO B inhibition only, herein, an extended in silico-in vitro procedure for the selection of novel MAO B inhibitors is demonstrated, including the following: (1) definition of optimized and validated structure-based three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) models derived from available cocrystallized inhibitor-MAO B complexes; (2) elaboration of SAR features for either irreversible or reversible MAO B inhibitors to characterize and improve coumarin-based inhibitor activity (Protein Data Bank ID: 2V61 ) as the most potent reversible lead compound; (3) definition of structure-based (SB) and ligand-based (LB) alignment rule assessments by which virtually any untested potential MAO B inhibitor might be evaluated; (4) predictive ability validation of the best 3-D QSAR model through SB/LB modeling of four coumarin-based external test sets (267 compounds); (5) design and SB/LB alignment of novel coumarin-based scaffolds experimentally validated through synthesis and biological evaluation in vitro. Due to the wide range of molecular diversity within the 3-D QSAR training set and derived features, the selected N probe-derived 3-D QSAR model proves to be a valuable tool for virtual screening (VS) of novel MAO B inhibitors and a platform for design, synthesis and evaluation of novel active structures. Accordingly, six highly active and selective MAO B inhibitors (picomolar to low nanomolar range of activity) were disclosed as a

  12. Measuring enzymatic HIV-1 susceptibility to two reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a rapid and simple approach to HIV-1 drug-resistance testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective approaches for HIV drug-resistance testing are highly desirable for managing increasingly expanding HIV-1 infected populations who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly in resource-limited settings. Non-nucleoside reverse trancriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based regimens with an NRTI backbone containing lamivudine (3TC or emtricitabine (FTC are preferred first ART regimens. Failure with these drug combinations typically involves the selection of NNRTI- and/or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses. Therefore, the availability of simple assays to measure both types of drug resistance is critical. We have developed a high throughput screening test for assessing enzymatic resistance of the HIV-1 RT in plasma to 3TC/FTC and NNRTIs. The test uses the sensitive "Amp-RT" assay with a newly-developed real-time PCR format to screen biochemically for drug resistance in single reactions containing either 3TC-triphosphate (3TC-TP or nevirapine (NVP. Assay cut-offs were defined based on testing a large panel of subtype B and non-subtype B clinical samples with known genotypic profiles. Enzymatic 3TC resistance correlated well with the presence of M184I/V, and reduced NVP susceptibility was strongly associated with the presence of K103N, Y181C/I, Y188L, and G190A/Q. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting resistance were 97.0% and 96.0% in samples with M184V, and 97.4% and 96.2% for samples with NNRTI mutations, respectively. We further demonstrate the utility of an HIV capture method in plasma by using magnetic beads coated with CD44 antibody that eliminates the need for ultracentifugation. Thus our results support the use of this simple approach for distinguishing WT from NNRTI- or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses in clinical samples. This enzymatic testing is subtype-independent and can assist in the clinical management of diverse populations particularly in resource-limited settings.

  13. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of doravirine, a novel HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, after single and multiple doses in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matt S; Gilmartin, Jocelyn; Cilissen, Caroline; De Lepeleire, Inge; Van Bortel, Luc; Dockendorf, Marissa F; Tetteh, Ernestina; Ancona, June K; Liu, Rachael; Guo, Ying; Wagner, John A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with potent activity against wild-type virus (95% inhibitory concentration 19 nM, 50% human serum). Doravirine has low potential to cause drug-drug interactions since it is primarily eliminated by oxidative metabolism and does not inhibit or significantly induce drug-metabolizing enzymes. The pharmacokinetics and safety of doravirine were investigated in two double-blind, dose-escalation studies in healthy males. Thirty-two subjects received single doses of doravirine (6-1,200 mg) or matching placebo tablets; 40 subjects received doravirine (30-750 mg) or matching placebo tablets once daily for 10 days. In addition, the effect of doravirine (120 mg for 14 days) on single-dose pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam was evaluated (10 subjects). The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of doravirine was achieved within 1-5 h with an apparent terminal half-life of 12-21 h. Consistent with single-dose pharmacokinetics, steady state was achieved after approximately 7 days of once daily administration, with accumulation ratios (day 10/day 1) of 1.1-1.5 in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUC0-24 h), Cmax and trough plasma concentration (C24 h). All dose levels produced C24 h>19 nM. Administration of 50 mg doravirine with a high-fat meal was associated with slight elevations in AUC time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) and C24 h with no change in Cmax. Midazolam AUC0-∞ was slightly reduced by coadministration of doravirine (geometric mean ratio 0.82, 90% CI 0.70, 0.97). There was no apparent relationship between adverse event frequency or intensity and doravirine dose. No rash or significant central nervous system events other than headache were reported. Doravirine is generally well tolerated in single doses up to 1,200 mg and multiple doses up to 750 mg once daily for up to 10 days, with a pharmacokinetic profile supportive of once

  14. KB-R7943, an inhibitor of the reverse Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and inhibits mitochondrial complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brittain, Matthew K; Sheets, Patrick L; Cummins, Theodore R; Pinelis, Vsevolod; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE An isothiourea derivative (2-[2-[4-(4-nitrobenzyloxy)phenyl]ethyl]isothiourea methane sulfonate (KB-R7943), a widely used inhibitor of the reverse Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCXrev), was instrumental in establishing the role of NCXrev in glutamate-induced Ca2+ deregulation in neurons. Here, the effects of KB-R7943 on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and mitochondrial complex I were tested. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Fluorescence microscopy, electrophysiological patch-clamp techniques and cellular respirometry with Seahorse XF24 analyzer were used with cultured hippocampal neurons; membrane potential imaging, respirometry and Ca2+ flux measurements were made in isolated rat brain mitochondria. KEY RESULTS KB-R7943 inhibited NCXrev with IC50= 5.7 ± 2.1 µM, blocked NMDAR-mediated ion currents, and inhibited NMDA-induced increase in cytosolic Ca2+ with IC50= 13.4 ± 3.6 µM but accelerated calcium deregulation and mitochondrial depolarization in glutamate-treated neurons. KB-R7943 depolarized mitochondria in a Ca2+-independent manner. Stimulation of NMDA receptors caused NAD(P)H oxidation that was coupled or uncoupled from ATP synthesis depending on the presence of Ca2+ in the bath solution. KB-R7943, or rotenone, increased NAD(P)H autofluorescence under resting conditions and suppressed NAD(P)H oxidation following glutamate application. KB-R7943 inhibited 2,4-dinitrophenol-stimulated respiration of cultured neurons with IC50= 11.4 ± 2.4 µM. With isolated brain mitochondria, KB-R7943 inhibited respiration, depolarized organelles and suppressed Ca2+ uptake when mitochondria oxidized complex I substrates but was ineffective when mitochondria were supplied with succinate, a complex II substrate. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS KB-R7943, in addition to NCXrev, blocked NMDA receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons and inhibited complex I in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. These findings are critical for the correct interpretation of experimental

  15. Staurosporine scaffold-based rational discovery of the wild-type sparing reversible inhibitors of EGFR T790M gatekeeper mutant in lung cancer with analog-sensitive kinase technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xingcai; Ding, Xi

    2017-04-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been established as an attractive target for lung cancer therapy. However, an acquired EGFR T790M gatekeeper mutation is frequently observed in patients treated with first-line anticancer agents such as gefitinib and erlotinib to cause drug resistance, largely limiting the application of small-molecule kinase inhibitors in EGFR-targeted chemotherapy. Previously, the reversible pan-kinase inhibitor staurosporine and its several analogs such as Gö6976 and K252a have been reported to selectively inhibit the EGFR T790M mutant (EGFR T790M ) over wild-type kinase (EGFR WT ), suggesting that the staurosporine scaffold is potentially to develop the wild-type sparing reversible inhibitors of EGFR T790M . Here, we systematically evaluated the inhibitor response of 28 staurosporine scaffold-based compounds to EGFR T790M mutation at structural, energetic, and molecular levels by using an integrated in silico-in vitro analog-sensitive (AS) kinase technology. With the strategy, we were able to identify 4 novel wild-type sparing inhibitors UCN-01, UCN-02, AFN941, and SB-218078 with high or moderate selectivity of 30-, 45-, 5-, and 8-fold for EGFR T790M over EGFR WT , respectively, which are comparable with or even better than that of the parent compound staurosporine (24-fold). Molecular modeling and structural analysis revealed that van der Waals contacts and hydrophobic forces can form between the side chain of mutated residue Met790 and the pyrrolidinone moiety of inhibitor ligand UCN-02, which may simultaneously improve the favorable interaction energy between the kinase and inhibitor, and reduce the unfavorable desolvation penalty upon the kinase-inhibitor binding. A hydroxyl group of UCN-02 additional to staurosporine locates at the pyrrolidinone moiety, which can largely alter the electronic distribution of pyrrolidinone moiety and thus promote the intermolecular interaction with Met790 residue. This can well explain

  16. Reverse Zymography: Overview and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kanika; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2017-01-01

    Reverse zymography is a technique by which protease inhibitor(s) in a sample could be electrophoretically separated in a substrate-impregnated acrylamide gel and their relative abundance could be semi-quantified. The gel after electrophoresis is incubated with a protease when the impregnated substrate and all other proteins of the sample are degraded into small peptides except the inhibitor(s) that show clear bands against a white background. Since reverse zymography cannot distinguish between a protease inhibitor and a protein that is resistant against proteolysis, the results should be confirmed from inhibition of protease activity by solution state assay.

  17. IDH1/2 Mutations Sensitize Acute Myeloid Leukemia to PARP Inhibition and This Is Reversed by IDH1/2-Mutant Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Nagata, Yasunobu; Khurshed, Mohammed; Przychodzen, Bartolomiej; Makishima, Hideki; Xu, Mingjiang; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Wilmink, Johanna W; Carraway, Hetty E; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Sekeres, Mikkael A; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: Somatic mutations in IDH1/2 occur in approximately 20% of patients with myeloid neoplasms, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IDH1/2 MUT enzymes produce D -2-hydroxyglutarate ( D 2HG), which associates with increased DNA damage and improved responses to chemo/radiotherapy and PARP inhibitors in solid tumor cells. Whether this also holds true for IDH1/2 MUT AML is not known. Experimental Design: Well-characterized primary IDH1 MUT , IDH2 MUT , and IDH1/2 WT AML cells were analyzed for DNA damage and responses to daunorubicin, ionizing radiation, and PARP inhibitors. Results: IDH1/2 MUT caused increased DNA damage and sensitization to daunorubicin, irradiation, and the PARP inhibitors olaparib and talazoparib in AML cells. IDH1/2 MUT inhibitors protected against these treatments. Combined treatment with a PARP inhibitor and daunorubicin had an additive effect on the killing of IDH1/2 MUT AML cells. We provide evidence that the therapy sensitivity of IDH1/2 MUT cells was caused by D 2HG-mediated downregulation of expression of the DNA damage response gene ATM and not by altered redox responses due to metabolic alterations in IDH1/2 MUT cells. Conclusions: IDH1/2 MUT AML cells are sensitive to PARP inhibitors as monotherapy but especially when combined with a DNA-damaging agent, such as daunorubicin, whereas concomitant administration of IDH1/2 MUT inhibitors during cytotoxic therapy decrease the efficacy of both agents in IDH1/2 MUT AML. These results advocate in favor of clinical trials of PARP inhibitors either or not in combination with daunorubicin in IDH1/2 MUT AML. Clin Cancer Res; 24(7); 1705-15. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D.; Mislak, Andrea C.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3′-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3′-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed. PMID:24632447

  19. Linear Discriminant Analysis for the in Silico Discovery of Mechanism-Based Reversible Covalent Inhibitors of a Serine Protease: Application of Hydration Thermodynamics Analysis and Semi-empirical Molecular Orbital Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yosuke; Yoshida, Tomoki; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    We recently reported that the Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecules (ΔG wat ) in acyl-trypsin intermediates calculated by hydration thermodynamics analysis could be a useful metric for estimating the catalytic rate constants (k cat ) of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors. For thorough evaluation, the proposed method was tested with an increased number of covalent ligands that have no corresponding crystal structures. After modeling acyl-trypsin intermediate structures using flexible molecular superposition, ΔG wat values were calculated according to the proposed method. The orbital energies of antibonding π* molecular orbitals (MOs) of carbonyl C=O in covalently modified catalytic serine (E orb ) were also calculated by semi-empirical MO calculations. Then, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed to build a model that can discriminate covalent inhibitor candidates from substrate-like ligands using ΔG wat and E orb . The model was built using a training set (10 compounds) and then validated by a test set (4 compounds). As a result, the training set and test set ligands were perfectly discriminated by the model. Hydrolysis was slower when (1) the hydrolytic water molecule has lower ΔG wat ; (2) the covalent ligand presents higher E orb (higher reaction barrier). Results also showed that the entropic term of hydrolytic water molecule (-TΔS wat ) could be used for estimating k cat and for covalent inhibitor optimization; when the rotational freedom of the hydrolytic water molecule is limited, the chance for favorable interaction with the electrophilic acyl group would also be limited. The method proposed in this study would be useful for screening and optimizing the mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors.

  20. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D.; Mislak, Andrea C.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3′-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3′-hydroxyl-containing RT inh...

  1. 2-Methoxy-2,4-diphenyl-3(2H)-furanone-labeled gelatin zymography and reverse zymography: a rapid real-time method for quantification of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Danqing; Lyons, James Guy; Jia, Junhong; Lo, Lisa; McLennan, Susan V

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) by the techniques of zymography and reverse zymography provide useful information regarding the status of matrix accumulation or breakdown. This report describes the use of 2-methoxy-2,4-diphenyl-3(2H)-furanone (MDPF), a fluorescent compound which can be used to label gelatin as a substrate for detection of the gelatin degrading MMP-2 and -9 by zymography. In addition, a modification of the zymographic technique by addition of excess MMPs enables the use of the MDPF-labeled gelatin substrate for the identification and quantification of TIMPs by reverse zymography. Both systems are real-time sensitive reliable quantification techniques, easily used for measurement of these MMPs and TIMPs in clinical, biological, and tissue culture samples.

  2. 5-Hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one derivatives as novel dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H and integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Gao, Ping; Dong, Guanyu; Zhang, Xujie; Cheng, Xiqiang; Ding, Xiao; Wang, Xueshun; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2018-06-18

    We reported herein the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of 5-hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one derivatives as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) ribonuclease H (RNase H) inhibitors using a privileged structure-guided scaffold refining strategy. In view of the similarities between the pharmacophore model of RNase H and integrase (IN) inhibitors as well as their catalytic sites, we also performed IN inhibition assays. Notably, the majority of these derivatives inhibited RNase H and IN at micromolar concentrations. Among them, compound 7a exhibited similar inhibitory activity against RNase H and IN (IC 50 RNase H  = 1.77 μM, IC 50 IN  = 1.18 μM, ratio = 1.50). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported dual HIV-1 RNase H-IN inhibitor based on a 5-hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one structure. Molecular modeling has been used to predict the binding mode of 7a in complex with the catalytic cores of HIV-1 RNase H and IN. Taken together these results strongly support the feasibility of developing HIV-1 dual inhibitors from analog-based optimization of divalent metal ion chelators. Recently, the identification of dual inhibitors proved to be a highly effective strategy for novel antivirals discovery. Therefore, these compounds appear to be useful leads that can be further modified to develop more valuable anti-HIV-1 molecules with suitable drug profiles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards discovering dual functional inhibitors against both wild type and K103N mutant HIV-1 reverse transcriptases: molecular docking and QSAR studies on 4,1-benzoxazepinone analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenshan; Zheng, Mingyue; Du, Li; Shen, Jianhua; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang

    2006-05-01

    To find useful information for discovering dual functional inhibitors against both wild type (WT) and K103N mutant reverse transcriptases (RTs) of HIV-1, molecular docking and 3D-QSAR approaches were applied to a set of twenty-five 4,1-benzoxazepinone analogues of efavirenz (SUSTIVA®), some of them are active against the two RTs. 3D-QSAR models were constructed, based on their binding conformations determined by molecular docking, with r 2 cv values ranging from 0.656 to 0.834 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. The models were then validated to be highly predictive and extrapolative by inhibitors in two test sets with different molecular skeletons. Furthermore, CoMFA models were found to be well matched with the binding sites of both WT and K103N RTs. Finally, a reasonable pharmacophore model of 4,1-benzoxazepinones were established. The application of the model not only successfully differentiated the experimentally determined inhibitors from non-inhibitors, but also discovered two potent inhibitors from the compound database SPECS. On the basis of both the 3D-QSAR and pharmacophore models, new clues for discovering and designing potent dual functional drug leads against HIV-1 were proposed: (i) adopting positively charged aliphatic group at the cis-substituent of C3; (ii) reducing the electronic density at the position of O4; (iii) positioning a small branched aliphatic group at position of C5; (iv) using the negatively charged bulky substituents at position of C7.

  4. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Reynel; Silvestri, Romano; Ragno, Rino; Artico, Marino; De Martino, Gabriella; La Regina, Giuseppe; Crespan, Emmanuele; Zanoli, Samantha; Hübscher, Ulrich; Spadari, Silvio; Maga, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfone (IAS) nonnucleoside inhibitors have been shown to potently inhibit the growth of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but their exact mechanism of action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we describe the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by selected IAS derivatives. Our results showed that, depending on the substitutions introduced in the IAS common pharmacophore, these compounds can be made selective for different enzyme-substrate complexes. Moreover, we showed that the molecular basis for this selectivity was a different association rate of the drug to a particular enzymatic form along the reaction pathway. By comparing the activities of the different compounds against wild-type RT and the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutant Lys103Asn, it was possible to hypothesize, on the basis of their mechanism of action, a rationale for the design of drugs which could overcome the steric barrier imposed by the Lys103Asn mutation. PMID:16251294

  5. Structural optimization of N1-aryl-benzimidazoles for the discovery of new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors active against wild-type and mutant HIV-1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Anna Maria; De Luca, Laura; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Pannecouque, Christophe; Ferro, Stefania

    2018-02-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are recommended components of preferred combination antiretroviral therapies used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These regimens are extremely effective in suppressing virus replication. Recently, our research group identified some N 1 -aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles as a novel class of NNRTIs. In this research work we report the design, the synthesis and the structure-activity relationship studies of new compounds (20-34) in which some structural modifications have been introduced in order to investigate their effects on reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition and to better define the features needed to increase the antiviral activity. Most of the new compounds proved to be highly effective in inhibiting both RT enzyme at nanomolar concentrations and HIV-1 replication in MT4 cells with minimal cytotoxicity. Among them, the most promising N 1 -aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles and N 1 -aryl-2-aryloxyacetamido-benzimidazoles were also tested toward a panel of single- and double-mutants strain responsible for resistance to NNRTIs, showing in vitro antiviral activity toward single mutants L100I, K103N, Y181C, Y188L and E138K. The best results were observed for derivatives 29 and 33 active also against the double mutants F227L and V106A. Computational approaches were applied in order to rationalize the potency of the new synthesized inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term analysis of resistance development in HIV-1 positive patients treated with protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors: Correlation of the genotype and disease progression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prejdová, Jana; Weber, Jan; Machala, L.; Reiniš, Milan; Linka, M.; Brůčková, M.; Vandasová, M.; Staňková, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2005), 29-36 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NI6339 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV * protease inhibitors * resistance development Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.696, year: 2005

  7. Interaction of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib, vandetanib, pelitinib and neratinib with the ABCG2 multidrug transporter: implications for the emergence and reversal of cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Csilla; Truta-Feles, Krisztina; Antalffy, Géza; Várady, György; Német, Katalin; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Kéri, György; Orfi, László; Szakács, Gergely; Settleman, Jeffrey; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-08-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that provides physiological protection against xenobiotics. ABCG2 also significantly influences biodistribution of drugs through pharmacological tissue barriers and confers multidrug resistance to cancer cells. Moreover, ABCG2 is the molecular determinant of the side population that is characteristically enriched in normal and cancer stem cells. Numerous tumors depend on unregulated EGFR signaling, thus inhibition of this receptor by small molecular weight inhibitors such as gefitinib, and the novel second generation agents vandetanib, pelitinib and neratinib, is a promising therapeutic option. In the present study, we provide detailed biochemical characterization regarding the interaction of these EGFR inhibitors with ABCG2. We show that ABCG2 confers resistance to gefitinib and pelitinib, whereas the intracellular action of vandetanib and neratinib is unaltered by the presence of the transporter. At higher concentrations, however, all these EGFR inhibitors inhibit ABCG2 function, thereby promoting accumulation of ABCG2 substrate drugs. We also report enhanced expression of ABCG2 in gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells, suggesting potential clinical relevance of ABCG2 in acquired drug resistance. Since ABCG2 has important impact on both the pharmacological properties and anti-cancer efficiencies of drugs, our results regarding the novel EGFR inhibitors should provide useful information about their therapeutic applicability against ABCG2-expressing cancer cells depending on EGFR signaling. In addition, the finding that these EGFR inhibitors efficiently block ABCG2 function may help to design novel drug-combination therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Addition of vitamin D reverses the decline in GFR following treatment with ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Abel Esteves; Maes, Michael; Godeny, Paula; Matsumoto, Andressa Keiko; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; da Silva, Taysa Antonia F; Souza, Flávio Henrique M O; Delfino, Vinicius Daher Alvares

    2017-12-15

    Vitamin D has anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic effect, and may block the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system. Adequate vitamin D levels in conjunction with the use of Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors/Angiotensin Receptor Blockers may help to slow down chronic kidney disease progression. To study a possible beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in chronic kidney disease patients using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers on chronic kidney disease progression we performed a clinical study involving vitamin D supplementation in patients with deficiency of this vitamin. This study was conducted in two chronic kidney disease clinics in the city of Londrina, Brazil, from October 2010 to December 2012. It was involved stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate between 60 and 15mL/min/1.73m 2 ) patients with and without vitamin D deficiency. The patients ingested six-month cholecalciferol 50,000IU oral supplementation to chronic kidney disease patients with vitamin D deficiency. We hypothesize changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate over study period. Our data demonstrate reservation of estimated glomerular filtration with cholecalciferol supplementation to chronic kidney disease patients taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers. The combination treatment of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers with cholecalciferol prevents the decline in estimated glomerular filtration in patients with chronic kidney disease following treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and may represent a valid approach to reduce renal disease progression in chronic kidney disease patients with vitamin D deficiency. This result needs confirmation in prospective controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Postnatal changes of gene expression for tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 and cystatins S and C, in rat submandibular gland demonstrated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, T; Abe, K

    1999-01-01

    The rat submandibular gland is not fully developed at birth and definitive differentiation takes place postnatally. The steady-state mRNA expression for the four proteinase inhibitor molecules, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2, and cystatins S and C, and for a housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), in rat submandibular glands was measured by quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at different stages of postnatal development. The gene-expression patterns of TIMP-1 and -2 relative to G3PDH were similar to each other. The TIMP-2 and cystatin C genes were more highly expressed than those of TIMP-1 and cystatin S at all stages. Moreover, the gene expressions of TIMP-1 and -2, and of cystatins S and C, were predominant between 1 and 7, and 7 and 12 weeks of age, respectively, and coincided developmentally with the regression of terminal tubule cells and the differentiation of granular convoluted tubule cells, respectively. Quantitative competitive RT-PCR allowed accurate measurement of small changes in the steady-state concentrations of these proteinase-inhibitor mRNA molecules.

  10. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev (Merck)

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  11. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-01-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritona...

  12. Development of potential selective and reversible pyrazoline based MAO-B inhibitors as MAO-B PET tracer precursors and reference substances for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudorfer, Catharina; Shanab, Karem; Jurik, Andreas; Schreiber, Veronika; Neudorfer, Carolina; Vraka, Chrysoula; Schirmer, Eva; Holzer, Wolfgang; Ecker, Gerhard; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Spreitzer, Helmut

    2014-09-15

    Since high MAO-B levels are present in early stages of AD, the MAO-B system can be designated as an appropriate and prospective tracer target of molecular imaging biomarkers for the detection of early AD. According to the preceding investigations of Mishra et al. the aim of this work was the development of a compound library of selective and reversible MAO-B inhibitors by performing bioisosteric modifications of the core structure of 3-(anthracen-9-yl)-5-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazoles. In conclusion, 13 new pyrazoline based derivatives have been prepared, which will serve as precursor substances for future radiolabeling as well as reference compounds for the investigation of increased MAO-B levels in AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the D:A:D study: a multi-cohort collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabin, Caroline A; Worm, Signe W; Weber, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    cohort of HIV-infected patients. METHODS: We used Poisson regression models to quantify the relation between cumulative, recent (currently or within the preceding 6 months), and past use of zidovudine, didanosine, stavudine, lamivudine, and abacavir and development of myocardial infarction in 33 347......BACKGROUND: Whether nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors increase the risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected individuals is unclear. Our aim was to explore whether exposure to such drugs was associated with an excess risk of myocardial infarction in a large, prospective observational...... patients enrolled in the D:A:D study. We adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors that are unlikely to be affected by antiretroviral therapy, cohort, calendar year, and use of other antiretrovirals. FINDINGS: Over 157,912 person-years, 517 patients had a myocardial infarction. We found no associations...

  14. Different modes of data processing and statistical testing applied to the same set of pharmaco-EEG recordings: effects on the evaluation of a selective and reversible MAO A inhibitor (brofaromine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, I W; Jobert, M; Gleiter, C H; Turri, M; Bieck, P R; Herrmann, W M

    1996-01-01

    The comparison of two different modes of data processing and two different approaches to statistical testing both applied to the same set of EEG recordings was the main objective of this pharmacological study. Brofaromine (CGP 11,305 A), a new selective and reversible monoamine oxidase type A inhibitor was used as an example for investigating a potentially antidepressant drug in clinical development. The two modes of pharmaco-EEG (PEEG) data processing differed mainly in the sampling frequency and definition of spectral parameters. Patterns of significant changes were noted in terms of descriptive data analysis using either a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test or an ANOVA of transformed data, as suggested by Conover and Iman. These data clearly demonstrate that slight discrepancies in the results may simply arise from differences in data processing and statistical approach applied. In spite of these discrepancies, the pattern of brofaromine-induced PEEG changes was very similar regardless of the mode of data handling used.

  15. CyclinG1 Amplification Enhances Aurora Kinase Inhibitor-Induced Polyploid Resistance and Inhibition of Bcl-2 Pathway Reverses the Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: CyclinG1 (CycG1 is frequently overexpressed in solid tumors and overexpression of CycG1 promotes cell survival upon paclitaxel exposure by inducing polyploidy. Whether and how CycG1 regulates polyploidization caused by small molecular targeted inhibitors remains unclear. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting were utilized to examine protein expression. Cell proliferation was measured by ATPlite assay, and cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry and/or DNA fragmentation assays. Results: Overexpression of CycG1 in breast cancer cells caused apoptosis-resistant polyploidy upon treatment with Aurora kinase inhibitor, ZM447439 (ZM. Addition of ABT-263, a small-molecule BH3 mimetic, to ZM, produced a synergistic loss of cell viability with greater sustained tumor growth inhibition in breast cancer cell lines. Decrease of Mcl-1 and increase of NOXA caused by ZM treatment, were responsible for the synergy. Furthermore, CycG1 was highly expressed in Triple-Negative-Breast-Cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and was paralleled by decreased cell survival. Conclusion: CycG1 is a crucial factor in ZM-induced polyploidy resistance, and ABT-263/ZM combination hold therapeutic utility in the CycG1-amplified subset of breast cancer and CycG1, thus, is a promising target in breast cancer.

  16. Sodium Butyrate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Reverses Behavioral and Mitochondrial Alterations in Animal Models of Depression Induced by Early- or Late-life Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Budni, Josiane; Dal-Pont, Gustavo C; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Réus, Gislaine Z; Carvalho, André F; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Furlanetto, Camila B; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of sodium butyrate on depressive-like behavior and mitochondrial alteration parameters in animal models of depression induced by maternal deprivation or chronic mild stress in Wistar rats. maternal deprivation was established by separating pups from their mothers for 3 h daily from postnatal day 1 to day 10. Chronic mild stress was established by water deprivation, food deprivation, restraint stress, isolation and flashing lights. Sodium butyrate or saline was administered twice a day for 7 days before the behavioral tests. Depressive behavior was evaluated using the forced swim test. The activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes (succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase) and of mitochondrial chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) was measured in the striatum of rats. From these analyses it can be observed that sodium butyrate reversed the depressive-like behavior observed in both animal models of depression. Additionally, maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress inhibited mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and increased the activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Sodium butyrate treatment reversed -maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress- induced dysfunction in the striatum of rats. In conclusion, sodium butyrate showed antidepressant effects in maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress-treated rats, and this effect can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression.

  17. Reverse Algols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reverse Algols, binary systems with a semidetached configuration in which the more massive component is in contact with the critical equipotential surface, are examined. Observational evidence for reverse Algols is presented and the parameters of seven reverse Algols are listed. The evolution of Algols and reverse Algols is discussed. It is suggested that, because reverse Algols represent the premass-reversal semidetached phase of close binary evolution, the evolutionary time scale between regular and reverse Algols is the ratio of the number of confirmed systems of these two Algol types.

  18. Reversibility of peripheral blood leukocyte phenotypic and functional changes after exposure to and withdrawal from tofacitinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, Kent J; Bukowski, Jack F; Brennan, Todd V; Noveck, Robert J; Staats, Janet S; Lin, Liwen; Stempora, Linda; Hammond, Constance; Wouters, Ann; Mojcik, Christopher F; Cheng, John; Collinge, Mark; Jesson, Michael I; Hazra, Anasuya; Biswas, Pinaki; Lan, Shuping; Clark, James D; Hodge, Jennifer A

    2018-06-01

    This study evaluated the short-term effects of tofacitinib treatment on peripheral blood leukocyte phenotype and function, and the reversibility of any such effects following treatment withdrawal in healthy volunteers. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive subjects received oral tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily for 4 weeks and were followed for 4 weeks after drug withdrawal. There were slight increases in total lymphocyte and total T-cell counts during tofacitinib treatment, and B-cell counts increased by up to 26%. There were no significant changes in granulocyte or monocyte counts, or granulocyte function. Naïve and central memory T-cell counts increased during treatment, while all subsets of activated T cells were decreased by up to 69%. T-cell subsets other than effector memory cluster of differentiation (CD)4+, activated naïve CD4+ and effector CD8+ T-cell counts and B-cell counts, normalized 4 weeks after withdrawal. Following ex vivo activation, measures of CMV-specific T-cell responses, and antigen non-specific T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon (IFN)-γ production, decreased slightly. These T-cell functional changes were most pronounced at Day 15, partially normalized while still on tofacitinib and returned to baseline after drug withdrawal. Total natural killer (NK)-cell counts decreased by 33%, returning towards baseline after drug withdrawal. NK-cell function decreased during tofacitinib treatment, but without a consistent time course across measured parameters. However, markers of NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production were decreased up to 42% 1 month after drug withdrawal. CMV DNA was not detectable in whole blood, and there were no cases of herpes zoster reactivation. No new safety concerns arose. In conclusion, the effect of short-term tofacitinib treatment on leukocyte composition and function in healthy CMV+ volunteers is modest and largely reversible 4 weeks after withdrawal

  19. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  20. Downregulation of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs in malignant melanoma: inverse correlation with membrane-type 1-matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomasso, Thiago; Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Sogayar, Mari C; Winnischofer, Sheila M B

    2014-02-01

    The invasive phenotype of many tumors is associated with an imbalance between the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and the membrane-anchored reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK). RECK inhibits MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP, and has been linked to patient survival and better prognosis in several types of tumors. However, despite the wide implication of these MMPs in melanoma establishment and progression, the role of RECK in this type of tumor is still unknown. Here, we analyzed the expression of RECK, TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, MT1MMP, MMP2, and MMP9 in two publicly available melanoma microarray datasets and in a panel of human melanoma cell lines. We found that RECK is downregulated in malignant melanoma, accompanied by upregulation of MT1MMP and TIMP2. In both datasets, we observed that the group of samples displaying higher RECK levels show lower median expression levels of MT1MMP and TIMP2 and higher levels of TIMP3. When tested in a sample-wise manner, these correlations were statistically significant. Inverse correlations between RECK, MT1MMP, and TIMP2 were verified in a panel of human melanoma cell lines and in a further reduced model that includes a pair of matched primary tumor-derived and metastasis-derived cell lines. Taken together, our data indicate a consistent correlation between RECK, MT1MMP, and TIMP2 across different models of clinical samples and cell lines and suggest evidence of the potential use of this subset of genes as a gene signature for diagnosing melanoma.

  1. The VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine alters effort-related decision making as measured by the T-maze barrier choice task: reversal with the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 and the catecholamine uptake blocker bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohn, Samantha E; Thompson, Christian; Randall, Patrick A; Lee, Christie A; Müller, Christa E; Baqi, Younis; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2015-04-01

    Depressed people show effort-related motivational symptoms, such as anergia, retardation, lassitude, and fatigue. Animal tests can model these motivational symptoms, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2) inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine produces depressive symptoms in humans and, at low doses, preferentially depletes dopamine. The current studies investigated the effects of tetrabenazine on effort-based decision making using the T-maze barrier task. Rats were tested in a T-maze in which the choice arms of the maze contain different reinforcement densities, and under some conditions, a vertical barrier was placed in the high-density arm to provide an effort-related challenge. The first experiment assessed the effects of tetrabenazine under different maze conditions: a barrier in the arm with 4 food pellets and 2 pellets in the no barrier arm (4-2 barrier), 4 pellets in one arm and 2 pellets in the other with no barrier in either arm (no barrier), and 4 pellets in the barrier arm with no pellets in the other (4-0 barrier). Tetrabenazine (0.25-0.75 mg/kg IP) decreased selection of the high cost/high reward arm when the barrier was present, but had no effect on choice under the no barrier and 4-0 barrier conditions. The effects of tetrabenazine on barrier climbing in the 4-2 condition were reversed by the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 and the catecholamine uptake inhibitor and antidepressant bupropion. These studies have implications for the development of animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression and other disorders.

  2. High Incidence of ACE/PAI-1 in Association to a Spectrum of Other Polymorphic Cardiovascular Genes Involving PBMCs Proinflammatory Cytokines in Hypertensive Hypercholesterolemic Patients: Reversibility with a Combination of ACE Inhibitor and Statin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBacha, Jeanne d'Arc; Khoury, Mira; Mouawad, Charbel; Haddad, Katia; Hamoui, Samar; Azar, Albert; Fajloun, Ziad; Makdissy, Nehman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are significantly high in the Lebanese population with the two most predominant forms being atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. The purpose of our study was to assess the association of a spectrum of CVD related genes and combined state of hypertension hypercholesterolemia (HH) in unrelated Lebanese. Twelve polymorphisms were studied by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization of DNA from 171 healthy individuals and 144 HH subjects. Two genes were significantly associated with HH: ACE (OR: 9.20, PACE activity and PAI-I increased significantly with Del/Del and 4G/5G genotypes. The co-expression of Del/4G(+/+) was detected in 113 out of 171 (66.0%) controls and 125 out of 144 (86.8%) HH subjects. Del/4G(-/-) was detected in only 6 (3.5%) controls and undetected in the HH group. Three venous thrombosis related genes [FV(Leiden), MTHFR(A1298C) and FXIII(V34L)] were significantly related to the prominence of the co-expression of Del/4G(+/+). A range of 2 to 8 combined polymorphisms co-expressed per subject where 5 mutations were the most detected. In Del/4G(+/+) subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced significant elevated levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α contrary to IL-10, and no variations occurred for IL-4. ACE inhibitor (ramipril) in combination with statin (atorvastatin) and not alone reversed significantly the situation. This first report from Lebanon sheds light on an additional genetic predisposition of a complex spectrum of genes involved in CVD and suggests that the most requested gene FVL by physicians may not be sufficient to diagnose eventual future problems that can occur in the cardiovascular system. Subjects expressing the double mutations (Del/4G) are at high risk for the onset of CVDs.

  3. Reverse Osmosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    many applications, one of which is desalination of seawater. The inaugural Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded in 1901 to van 't Hoff for his seminal work in this area. The present article explains the principle of osmosis and reverse osmosis. Osmosis and Reverse Osmosis. As the name suggests, reverse osmosis is the ...

  4. Parallel screening of drug-like natural compounds using Caco-2 cell permeability QSAR model with applicability domain, lipophilic ligand efficiency index and shape property: A case study of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rikin D.; Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Patel, Chirag N.; Shankar, Shetty Shilpa; Pandya, Himanshu A.; Solanki, Hitesh A.

    2017-10-01

    The traditional drug design strategy centrally focuses on optimizing binding affinity with the receptor target and evaluates pharmacokinetic properties at a later stage which causes high rate of attrition in clinical trials. Alternatively, parallel screening allows evaluation of these properties and affinity simultaneously. In a case study to identify leads from natural compounds with experimental HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition, we integrated various computational approaches including Caco-2 cell permeability QSAR model with applicability domain (AD) to recognize drug-like natural compounds, molecular docking to study HIV-1 RT interactions and shape similarity analysis with known crystal inhibitors having characteristic butterfly-like model. Further, the lipophilic properties of the compounds refined from the process with best scores were examined using lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) index. Seven natural compound hits viz. baicalien, (+)-calanolide A, mniopetal F, fagaronine chloride, 3,5,8-trihydroxy-4-quinolone methyl ether derivative, nitidine chloride and palmatine, were prioritized based on LLE score which demonstrated Caco-2 well absorption labeling, encompassment in AD structural coverage, better receptor affinity, shape adaptation and permissible AlogP value. We showed that this integrative approach is successful in lead exploration of natural compounds targeted against HIV-1 RT enzyme.

  5. Efavirenz or nevirapine in three-drug combination therapy with two nucleoside or nucleotide-reverse transcriptase inhibitors for initial treatment of HIV infection in antiretroviral-naïve individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Mursleen, Sara; Irlam, James H; Spaulding, Alicen B; Rutherford, George W; Siegfried, Nandi

    2016-12-10

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the morbidity and mortality due to HIV infection. The World Health Organization (WHO) ART guidelines focus on three classes of antiretroviral drugs, namely nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors. Two of the most common medications given as first-line treatment are the NNRTIs, efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP). It is unclear which NNRTI is more efficacious for initial therapy. This systematic review was first published in 2010. To determine which non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, either EFV or NVP, is more effective in suppressing viral load when given in combination with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors as part of initial antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and children. We attempted to identify all relevant studies, regardless of language or publication status, in electronic databases and conference proceedings up to 12 August 2016. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov to 12 August 2016. We searched LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and the Web of Science from 1996 to 12 August 2016. We checked the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Gateway from 1996 to 2009, as it was no longer available after 2009. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared EFV to NVP in people with HIV without prior exposure to ART, irrespective of the dosage or NRTI's given in combination.The primary outcome of interest was virological success. Other primary outcomes included mortality, clinical progression to AIDS, severe adverse events, and discontinuation of therapy for any reason. Secondary outcomes were change in CD4 count, treatment failure

  6. Chlorate: a reversible inhibitor of proteoglycan sulfation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, D.E.; Silbert, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aorta endothelial cells were cultured in medium containing [ 3 H]glucosamine, [ 35 S]sulfate, and various concentrations of chlorate. Cell growth was not affected by 10 mM chlorate, while 30 mM chlorate had a slight inhibitory effect. Chlorate concentrations greater than 10 mM resulted in significant undersulfation of chondroitin. With 30 mM chlorate, sulfation of chondroitin was reduced to 10% and heparan to 35% of controls, but [ 3 H]glucosamine incorporation on a per cell basis did not appear to be inhibited. Removal of chlorate from the culture medium of cells resulted in the rapid resumption of sulfation

  7. Determination of NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor, in human and mouse plasma and in mouse tissue homogenates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fan; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; de Gooijer, Mark C; Beijnen, Jos H; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2012-07-15

    NVP-BEZ235 is a novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR and currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials for advanced solid tumors. We developed a sensitive and selective reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay with fluorometric detection for quantification of NVP-BEZ235 in biological matrices. Liquid-liquid extraction with tert-butyl methyl ether was used for sample pre-treatment, yielding a recovery of >84%. Chromatographic separation of NVP-BEZ235 and the internal standard (IS) NVP-BBD130 was achieved on a GraceSmart C-18 column by isocratic elution with a mobile phase which consisted of acetonitrile, methanol, and milliQ water adjusted with acetic acid to pH 3.7 (20:36:44, v/v/v). Fluorescence detection using excitation and emission wavelengths of 270 and 425 nm, respectively, provided a selectivity and sensitivity allowing quantification down to 1 ng/ml in human plasma and linear calibration curves within a range of 1-1000 ng/ml. The assay was validated for human plasma, mouse plasma and a range of tissues. The accuracy, within-day and between-day precision for all matrices, was within the generally accepted 15% range. NVP-BEZ235 was stable for 72 h in pretreated samples in reconstitution mixture (acetonitrile-water (30:70, v/v)), but unstable in mouse tissue homogenates upon repeated freeze-thaw cycles or long term storage (≥24 h) at room temperature. A pilot pharmacokinetic study in mice demonstrated the applicability of this method for pharmacokinetic purposes. Overall, this assay is suitable for the pharmacokinetic studies of NVP-BEZ235 in mice and in human plasma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heat shock protein 70 inhibitors. 2. 2,5'-thiodipyrimidines, 5-(phenylthio)pyrimidines, 2-(pyridin-3-ylthio)pyrimidines, and 3-(phenylthio)pyridines as reversible binders to an allosteric site on heat shock protein 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taldone, Tony; Kang, Yanlong; Patel, Hardik J; Patel, Maulik R; Patel, Pallav D; Rodina, Anna; Patel, Yogita; Gozman, Alexander; Maharaj, Ronnie; Clement, Cristina C; Lu, Alvin; Young, Jason C; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-02-27

    The discovery and development of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) inhibitors is currently a hot topic in cancer. In the preceding paper in this issue ( 10.1021/jm401551n ), we have described structure-activity relationship studies in the first Hsp70 inhibitor class rationally designed to bind to a novel allosteric pocket located in the N-terminal domain of the protein. These ligands contained an acrylamide to take advantage of an active cysteine embedded in the allosteric pocket and acted as covalent protein modifiers upon binding. Here, we perform chemical modifications around the irreversible inhibitor scaffold to demonstrate that covalent modification is not a requirement for activity within this class of compounds. The study identifies derivative 27c, which mimics the biological effects of the irreversible inhibitors at comparable concentrations. Collectively, the back-to-back manuscripts describe the first pharmacophores that favorably and selectively interact with a never explored pocket in Hsp70 and provide a novel blueprint for a cancer-oriented development of Hsp70-directed ligands.

  9. Effects of novel tacrine-related cholinesterase inhibitors in the reversal of 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate-induced cognitive deficit in rats--Is there a potential for Alzheimer's disease treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misik, Jan; Korabecny, Jan; Nepovimova, Eugenie; Kracmarova, Alzbeta; Kassa, Jiri

    2016-01-26

    Inhibitors of cholinesterase are important drugs for therapy of Alzheimer's disease and the search for new modifications is extensive, including dual inhibitors or multi-target hybrid compounds. The aim of the present study was a preliminary evaluation of pro-cognitive effects of newly-developed 7-MEOTA-donepezil like hybrids (compounds no. 1 and 2) and N-alkylated tacrine derivatives (compounds no. 3 and 4) using an animal model of pharmacologically-induced cognitive deficit. Male Wistar rats were subjected to tests of learning and memory in a water maze and step-through passive avoidance task. Cognitive impairment was induced by 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB, 2mgkg(-1)), administered intraperitoneally 1h before training sessions. Cholinesterase inhibitors were administered as a single therapeutic dose following the QNB at 30min at the following dose rates; 1 (25.6mgkg(-1)), 2 (12.3mgkg(-1)), 3 (5.7mgkg(-1)), 4 (5.2mgkg(-1)). The decrease in total path within the 10-swim session (water maze), the preference for target quadrant (water maze) and the entrance latency (passive avoidance) were taken as indicators of learning ability in rats. The effects of novel compounds were compared to that of standards tacrine (5.2mgkg(-1)) and donepezil (2.65mgkg(-1)). QNB significantly impaired spatial navigation as well as fear learning. Generally, the performance of rats was improved when treated with novel inhibitors and this effect reached efficiency of standard donepezil at selected doses. There was a significant improvement in the groups treated with compounds 2 and 3 in all behavioral tasks. The rest of the novel compounds succeed in the passive avoidance test. In summary, the potential of novel inhibitors (especially compounds 2 and 3) was proved and further detailed evaluation of these compounds as potential drugs for Alzheimer's disease treatment is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  11. Indolyl aryl sulfones as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: role of two halogen atoms at the indole ring in developing new analogues with improved antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Giuseppe La; Coluccia, Antonio; Piscitelli, Francesco; Bergamini, Alberto; Sinistro, Anna; Cavazza, Antonella; Maga, Giovanni; Samuele, Alberta; Zanoli, Samantha; Novellino, Ettore; Artico, Marino; Silvestri, Romano

    2007-10-04

    Indolyl aryl sulfones bearing the 4,5-difluoro (10) or 5-chloro-4-fluoro (16) substitution pattern at the indole ring were potent inhibitors of HIV-1 WT and the NNRTI-resistant strains Y181C and K103N-Y181C. These compounds were highly effective against the 112 and the AB1 strains in lymphocytes and inhibited at nanomolar concentration the multiplication of the IIIBBa-L strain in macrophages. Compound 16 was exceptionally potent against RT WT and RTs carrying the K103N, Y181I, and L100I mutations.

  12. Body composition and metabolic outcomes after 96 weeks of treatment with ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus either nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors or raltegravir in patients with HIV with virological failure of a standard first-line antiretroviral therapy regimen: a substudy of the randomised, open-label, non-inferiority SECOND-LINE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Mark A; Amin, Janaki; Mallon, Patrick W G; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Lombaard, Johan; Wood, Robin; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Phanuphak, Praphan; Mohapi, Lerato; Azwa, Iskandar; Belloso, Waldo H; Molina, Jean-Michel; Hoy, Jennifer; Moore, Cecilia L; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A

    2017-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is one of the most feared complications associated with the use of nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (N[t]RTIs). We aimed to assess soft-tissue changes in participants with HIV who had virological failure of a first-line antiretroviral (ART) regimen containing a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor plus two N(t)RTIs and were randomly assigned to receive a second-line regimen containing a boosted protease inhibitor given with either N(t)RTIs or raltegravir. Of the 37 sites that participated in the randomised, open-label, non-inferiority SECOND-LINE study, eight sites from five countries (Argentina, India, Malaysia, South Africa, and Thailand) participated in the body composition substudy. All sites had a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner and all participants enrolled in SECOND-LINE were eligible for inclusion in the substudy. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1), via a computer-generated allocation schedule, to receive either ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus raltegravir (raltegravir group) or ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus two or three N(t)RTIs (N[t]RTI group). Randomisation was stratified by site and screening HIV-1 RNA. Participants and investigators were not masked to group assignment, but allocation was concealed until after interventions were assigned. DXA scans were done at weeks 0, 48, and 96. The primary endpoint was mean percentage and absolute change in peripheral limb fat from baseline to week 96. We did intention-to-treat analyses of available data. This substudy is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01513122. Between Aug 1, 2010, and July 10, 2011, we recruited 211 participants into the substudy. The intention-to-treat population comprised 102 participants in the N(t)RTI group and 108 participants in the raltegravir group, of whom 91 and 105 participants, respectively, reached 96 weeks. Mean percentage change in limb fat from baseline to week 96 was 16·8% (SD 32·6) in the N

  13. [Syk inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Takeuchi, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao

    2013-07-01

    Non-receptor type of protein-tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) was isolated in the University of Fukui in 1991. Syk is known to be essential for the various physiological functions, especially in hematopoietic lineage cells. Moreover, ectopic expression of Syk by epigenetic changes is reported to cause retinoblastoma. Recently, novel Syk inhibitors were developed and its usefulness has been evaluated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, we will summarize the history, structure, and function of Syk, and then describe the novel Syk inhibitors and their current status. Furthermore, we will introduce our findings of the adaptor protein 3BP2 (c-Abl SH3 domain-binding protein-2), as a novel target of Syk.

  14. Syk inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Kazuyasu; Kimura, Yukihiro; Honjo, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao

    2013-01-01

    Non-receptor type of protein-tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) was isolated in University of Fukui in 1991. Syk is most highly expressed by haemopoietic cells and known to play crucial roles in the signal transduction through various immunoreceptors of the adaptive immune response. However, recent reports demonstrate that Syk also mediates other biological functions, such as innate immune response, osteoclast maturation, platelet activation and cellular adhesion. Moreover, ectopic expression of Syk by epigenetic changes is reported to cause retinoblastoma. Because of its critical roles on the cellular functions, the development of Syk inhibitors for clinical use has been desired. Although many candidate compounds were produced, none of them had progressed to clinical trials. However, novel Syk inhibitors were finally developed and its usefulness has been evaluated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, we will summarize the history, structure and function of Syk, and then the novel Syk inhibitors and their current status. In addition, we will introduce our research focused on the functions of Syk on Dectin-1-mediated mast cell activation.

  15. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  16. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse logistics. The thesis brings insights on reverse logistics decision-making and it lays down theoretical principles for reverse logistics as a research field.In particular it puts together a framework ...

  17. Profits in reverse? An examination of the decisive factors for reverse supply chain profitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Samuel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although the concept of the reverse supply chain (RSC) is not unknown in industry, an inhibitor for its successful use is low (or no) profitability. A research challenge is investigating ways to establish the RSC as a profit-creating center in the organization. This paper contributes...

  18. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse

  19. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  20. Tubal Ligation Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seal off the fallopian tubes, such as the Essure or Adiana systems, generally aren't reversible. Why ... electrocautery). Some types of sterilization, such as the Essure or Adiana systems, aren't considered reversible. Risks ...

  1. Reverse logistics - a framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of

  2. Universal, class-specific and drug-specific reversal agents for the new oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, Jack E

    2016-02-01

    Although there is controversy about the absolute need for a reversal agent for the new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), the absence of such an agent is a barrier to more widespread use of these agents. For the management of major life-threatening bleeding with the DOACs, most authorities recommend the use of four factor prothrombin complex concentrates, although the evidence to support their use in terms of improving outcomes is meager. At the present time, there are three antidotes in development and poised to enter the market. Idarucizumab is a drug-specific antidote targeted to reverse the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a class-specific antidote targeted to reverse the oral direct factor Xa inhibitors as well as the indirect inhibitor, enoxaparin. Ciraparantag is a universal antidote targeted to reverse the direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors as well as the indirect inhibitor, enoxaparin.

  3. Reversible flowchart languages and the structured reversible program theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Many irreversible computation models have reversible counterparts, but these are poorly understood at present. We introduce reversible flowcharts with an assertion operator and show that any reversible flowchart can be simulated by a structured reversible flowchart using only three control flow...... operators. Reversible flowcharts are r- Turing-complete, meaning that they can simuluate reversible Turing machines without garbage data. We also demonstrate the injectivization of classical flowcharts into reversible flowcharts. The reversible flowchart computation model provides a theoretical...

  4. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Targeting noncatalytic cysteine residues with irreversible acrylamide-based inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity. Nevertheless, concerns about off-target modification motivate the development of reversible cysteine-targeting strategies. Here we...... of these electrophiles into a noncovalent kinase-recognition scaffold produced slowly dissociating, covalent inhibitors of the p90 ribosomal protein S6 kinase RSK2. A cocrystal structure revealed specific noncovalent interactions that stabilize the complex by positioning the electrophilic carbon near the targeted...

  5. Introduction to reversible computing

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Few books comprehensively cover the software and programming aspects of reversible computing. Filling this gap, Introduction to Reversible Computing offers an expanded view of the field that includes the traditional energy-motivated hardware viewpoint as well as the emerging application-motivated software approach. Collecting scattered knowledge into one coherent account, the book provides a compendium of both classical and recently developed results on reversible computing. It explores up-and-coming theories, techniques, and tools for the application of rever

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckschlager, Tomas; Plch, Johana; Stiborova, Marie; Hrabeta, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferases (HAT). HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eckschlager

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC and histone acetyltransferases (HAT. HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  8. Reversibility of female sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, A M; Hulka, J; Peretz, A

    1985-04-01

    The discussion considers the current status of reversibility of sterilization in the US and describes clinical and experimental efforts for developing techniques designed for reversibility. It focuses on regret following sterilization, reversal potential of current sterilization techniques, patient selection, current reversal techniques, results of sterilization procedures, experimental approaches to reversal of current techniques of sterilization, and sterilization procedures devised for reversibility, in humans and in animals. Request is the 1st stage of reversal, but a request for sterilization reversal (SR) does not always mean regret for a decision made at the time. Frequently it is a wish to restore fertility because life circumstances have changed after a sterilization that was ppropriate at the time it was performed. Schwyhart and Kutner reviewed 22 studies published between 1949-69 in which they found that the percentage of patients regretting the procedure ranged from 1.3-15%. Requests for reversal remain low in most countries, but if sterilization becomes a more popular method of contraception, requests will also increase. The ideal operation considered as a reversaible method of sterilization should include an easy, reliable outpatient method of tubal occlusion with miniml risk or patient discomfort that subsequently could be reversed without the need for a major surgical intervention. Endoscopic methods have progressed toward the 1st objective. A recent search of the literature uncovered few series of SR of more than 50 cases. The 767 operations found were analyzed with regard to pregnancy outcome. The precent of live births varied from 74-78.8%, and the occurance of tubal pregnancies ranged from 1.7-6.5%. All of the confounding variables in patient selection and small numbers of reported procedures preclude any conclusion about the different techniques or the number of operations that give a surgeon a level of expertise. Few authors classify their

  9. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubitt, Toby [Department of Computer Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom and Centre for Quantum Information and Foundations, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kastoryano, Michael [NBIA, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Montanaro, Ashley [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Temme, Kristan [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  10. Atrioventricular Pacemaker Lead Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet K Aktas, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During cardiac surgery temporary epicardial atrial and ventricular leads are placed in case cardiac pacing is required postoperatively. We present the first reported series of patients with reversal of atrioventricular electrodes in the temporary pacemaker without any consequent deleterious hemodynamic effect. We review the electrocardiographic findings and discuss the findings that lead to the discovery of atrioventricular lead reversal.

  11. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelis Leonidas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and

  12. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelis, Leonidas; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Souftas, Vasilios; Amarantidis, Kiriakos; Xenidis, Nikolaos; Chamalidou, Eleni; Dimopoulos, Prokopios; Michailidis, Prodromos; Christakidis, Evagelos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse effect, if untreated, that should

  13. Chemical encapsulation of rocuronium by synthetic cyclodextrin derivatives: reversal of neuromuscular block in anaesthetized Rhesus monkeys.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Pol, F. van de; Bom, A.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present, reversal of neuromuscular block induced by steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) is achieved by administration of cholinesterase inhibitors. Chemical encapsulation of steroidal NMBAs, such as rocuronium, by a cyclodextrin is a new concept in neuromuscular block

  14. Simulated Analysis of Linear Reversible Enzyme Inhibition with SCILAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuch, Manuel; Ramos, Yaquelin; Álvarez, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    SCILAB is a lesser-known program (than MATLAB) for numeric simulations and has the advantage of being free software. A challenging software-based activity to analyze the most common linear reversible inhibition types with SCILAB is described. Students establish typical values for the concentration of enzyme, substrate, and inhibitor to simulate…

  15. An algebra of reversible computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules: basic reversible processes algebra, algebra of reversible communicating processes, recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  16. Reversing the Effect of Oral Anticoagulant Drugs: Established and Newer Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, Jack E

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have been the standard (and only) oral anticoagulants used for the long-term treatment or prevention of venous thromboembolism or stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The coagulopathy induced by VKAs can be reversed with vitamin K, and in urgent situations, the vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors can be replaced by transfusion. In the last decade, a new class of oral anticoagulants has been developed, direct oral anticoagulants that bind to a specific coagulation factor and neutralize it. These compounds were shown to be effective and safe compared with the VKAs and were licensed for specific indications, but without a specific reversal agent. The absence of a reversal agent is a barrier to more widespread use of these agents. Currently, for the management of major life-threatening bleeding with the direct oral anticoagulants, most authorities recommend the use of four factor prothrombin complex concentrates. There are now three reversal agents in development and poised to enter the market. Idarucizumab is a specific antidote targeted to reverse the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, which was recently approved for use in the USA. Andexanet alfa is an antidote targeted to reverse the oral direct factor Xa inhibitors as well as the indirect inhibitor enoxaparin. Ciraparantag is an antidote targeted to reverse the direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors as well as the indirect inhibitor enoxaparin.

  17. Sex reversal in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This special topic issue of Sexual Development gives an overview of sex reversal in vertebrates, from fishes naturally changing their sex, to rodents escaping the mammalian SRY-determining system. It offers eight up-to-date reviews on specific subjects in sex reversal, considering fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, including humans. The broad scope of represented animals makes this ideal for students and researchers, especially those interested in the...

  18. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2011-01-01

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa

  19. [Insect cholinesterases and irreversible inhibitors. Statistical treatment of the data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralev, S N

    2010-01-01

    The data on sensitivity of cholinesterases (ChE) of different insects to reversible inhibitors, as well as the data on physico-chemical parameters of amino acids constituting their active centers, were treated by factor analysis and juxtaposed. It is shown that both these characteristics are related to taxonomical belonging of insects. It is revealed the "material substrate" of the factors determining inhibitor action specificity, which are specific sites in ChE active center.

  20. Reversible Communicating Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Brown

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reversible distributed programs have the ability to abort unproductive computation paths and backtrack, while unwinding communication that occurred in the aborted paths. While it is natural to assume that reversibility implies full state recovery (as with traditional roll-back recovery protocols, an interesting alternative is to separate backtracking from local state recovery. For example, such a model could be used to create complex transactions out of nested compensable transactions where a programmer-supplied compensation defines the work required to "unwind" a transaction. Reversible distributed computing has received considerable theoretical attention, but little reduction to practice; the few published implementations of languages supporting reversibility depend upon a high degree of central control. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a practical reversible distributed language can be efficiently implemented in a fully distributed manner. We discuss such a language, supporting CSP-style synchronous communication, embedded in Scala. While this language provided the motivation for the work described in this paper, our focus is upon the distributed implementation. In particular, we demonstrate that a "high-level" semantic model can be implemented using a simple point-to-point protocol.

  1. Economic impact of reversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Estimations of the Norwegian hydropower production and various reversion models' market value have been made. The value of the Norwegian hydropower production until 01.01.2007 is estimated to about Nok 289 billion after taxes, or about 2,42 Nok/kWh medium production, given an expected future electricity price of around 0,25 Nok/kWh and a discount rate at 6,5 percent in nominal terms after taxes. The estimate is slightly above the level of prices for Norwegian hydropower plants in the last 8-10 years. The value of reversion in private plants which today have a limited licence time is estimated to Nok 5,5 billion. The value of reversion in public-owned Norwegian hydropower plants are about Nok 21 billion with a 60 year licence period from 01.01.2007, and about 12 billion for 75 years (ml)

  2. Reversible deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    This presentation, given by the national agency of radioactive waste management (ANDRA) at the meeting of October 8, 2009 of the high committee for the nuclear safety transparency and information (HCTISN), describes the concept of deep reversible disposal for high level/long living radioactive wastes, as considered by the ANDRA in the framework of the program law of June 28, 2006 about the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. The document presents the social and political reasons of reversibility, the technical means considered (containers, disposal cavities, monitoring system, test facilities and industrial prototypes), the decisional process (progressive development and blocked off of the facility, public information and debate). (J.S.)

  3. Janus kinase inhibitors: jackpot or potluck?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran Keechilat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The reports of a unique mutation in the Janus kinase-2 gene (JAK2 in polycythemia vera by several independent groups in 2005 quickly spurred the development of the Janus kinase inhibitors. In one of the great victories of translational research in recent times, the first smallmolecule Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib entered a phase I trial in 2007. With the approval of ruxolitinib by the US Federal Drug Administration in November 2011 for high-risk and intermediate-2 risk myelofibrosis, a change in paradigm has occurred in the management of a subset of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN: primary myelofibrosis, post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, and post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis. Whereas the current evidence for ruxolitinib only covers high-risk and intermediate-2 risk myelofibrosis, inhibitors with greater potency are likely to offer better disease control and survival advantage in patients belonging to these categories, and possibly to the low-risk and intermediate-1 risk categories of MPN as well. But use of the Janus kinase inhibitors also probably has certain disadvantages, such as toxicity, resistance, withdrawal phenomenon, non-reversal of histology, and an implausible goal of disease clone eradication, some of which could offset the gains. In spite of this, Janus kinase inhibitors are here to stay, and for use in more than just myeloproliferative neoplasms.

  4. Thermosensory reversal effect quantified

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2008-01-01

    At room temperature, some materials feel colder than others due to differences in thermal conductivity, heat capacity and geometry. When the ambient temperature is well above skin temperature, the roles of 'cold' and 'warm' materials are reversed. In this paper, this effect is quantified by

  5. Thermosensory reversal effect quantified

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2008-01-01

    At room temperature, some materials feel colder than others due to differences in thermal conductivity, heat capacity and geometry. When the ambient temperature is well above skin temperature, the roles of ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ materials are reversed. In this paper, this effect is quantified by

  6. Time reversal communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  7. Engineering Encounters: Reverse Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Veronica Cassone; Ventura, Marcia; Bell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information on how students' everyday experiences can support science learning through engineering design. In this article, the authors outline a reverse-engineering model of instruction and describe one example of how it looked in our fifth-grade…

  8. Sex Reversal in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Andrew T; Smith, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in birds is controlled genetically as in mammals, although the sex chromosomes are different. Males have a ZZ sex chromosome constitution, while females are ZW. Gene(s) on the sex chromosomes must initiate gonadal sex differentiation during embryonic life, inducing paired testes in ZZ individuals and unilateral ovaries in ZW individuals. The traditional view of avian sexual differentiation aligns with that expounded for other vertebrates; upon sexual differentiation, the gonads secrete sex steroid hormones that masculinise or feminise the rest of the body. However, recent studies on naturally occurring or experimentally induced avian sex reversal suggest a significant role for direct genetic factors, in addition to sex hormones, in regulating sexual differentiation of the soma in birds. This review will provide an overview of sex determination in birds and both naturally and experimentally induced sex reversal, with emphasis on the key role of oestrogen. We then consider how recent studies on sex reversal and gynandromorphic birds (half male:half female) are shaping our understanding of sexual differentiation in avians and in vertebrates more broadly. Current evidence shows that sexual differentiation in birds is a mix of direct genetic and hormonal mechanisms. Perturbation of either of these components may lead to sex reversal. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Elastomers with Reversible Nanoporosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szewczykowski, Piotr Przemyslaw; Andersen, K.; Schulte, Lars

    2009-01-01

    nanostructure and displays liquid-filled cavities. Upon several cycles of swelling and drying the cavities open and close in a reversible fashion. When exposed to a nonsolvent, the material remains collapsed. This discriminating behavior of liquid-material interaction holds potential for the use...

  10. Memory formation in reversal learning of the honeybee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravit Hadar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In reversal learning animals are first trained with a differential learning protocol, where they learn to respond to a reinforced odor (CS+ and not to respond to a nonreinforced odor (CS-. Once they respond correctly to this rule, the contingencies of the conditioned stimuli are reversed, and animals learn to adjust their response to the new rule. This study investigated the effect of a protein synthesis inhibitor (emetine on the memory formed after reversal learning in the honeybee Apis mellifera. Two groups of bees were studied: summer bees and winter bees, each yielded different results. Blocking protein synthesis in summer bees inhibits consolidation of the excitatory learning following reversal learning whereas it blocked the consolidation of the inhibitory learning in winter bees. These findings suggest that excitatory and inhibitory learning may involve different molecular processes in bees, which are seasonally dependent.

  11. Zymography and reverse zymography for detecting MMPs and TIMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Susan P; Li, Hongxia; Taniguchi, Gary T

    2010-01-01

    Zymography is the electrophoretic separation of proteins through a polyacrylamide gel containing a proteolytic substrate. After denaturing (but nonreducing) electrophoresis, proteins are renatured and incubated in an appropriate buffer for proteolytic activity. Clear zones of lysis in the stained gel indicated active proteinases. Reverse zymography is a similar technique to detect proteinase inhibitors. After renaturing of proteins, the gel is incubated with metalloproteinases which digest the substrate incorporated into the gel. Inhibitors are shown as dark zones of inhibition against a clear background upon staining.

  12. Treating ER+ Breast Cancer with CDK4/6 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Data from the MONARCH2, PALOMA-1, and TREnd trials strongly support using CDK4/6 inhibitors alongside standard endocrine therapy for advanced ER-positive breast cancer. Including these targeted agents not only improves progression-free survival but may reverse acquired resistance to hormone treatment. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP

  14. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy (PRES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron E, Fanny E; Diaz Marchan, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinical Syndrome composed of cephalea, alteration in vision and convulsions, usually observed in patients with sudden elevation of arterial pressure. The imagenologic evidence shows reversible vasogenic brain edema without stroke. Its location is predominantly posterior; it affects the cortex and the subcortical white matter of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. The treatment with antihypertensive drugs and the removing of immunosupressor medication are generally associated with complete neurological recovery; this is reflected also in the images which return to their basal condition. The untreated hypertension, on the other side, can result in a progressive defect of the autoregulation system of the central nervous system with cerebral hemorrhage, irreversible brain stroke, coma and death

  15. Reversible infantile mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Bansagi, Boglarka; Horvath, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are usually severe and progressive conditions; however, there are rare forms that show remarkable spontaneous recoveries. Two homoplasmic mitochondrial tRNA mutations (m.14674T>C/G in mt-tRNA(Glu)) have been reported to cause severe infantile mitochondrial myopathy in the first months of life. If these patients survive the first year of life by extensive life-sustaining measures they usually recover and develop normally. Another mitochondrial disease due to deficiency of the 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase (TRMU) causes severe liver failure in infancy, but similar to the reversible mitochondrial myopathy, within the first year of life these infants may also recover completely. Partial recovery has been noted in some other rare forms of mitochondrial disease due to deficiency of mitochondrial tRNA synthetases and mitochondrial tRNA modifying enzymes. Here we summarize the clinical presentation of these unique reversible mitochondrial diseases and discuss potential molecular mechanisms behind the reversibility. Understanding these mechanisms may provide the key to treatments of potential broader relevance in mitochondrial disease, where for the majority of the patients no effective treatment is currently available.

  16. Positioning paper on reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having recalled the legal framework adopted in 2006 for the deep geological storage of radioactive wastes, and briefly introduced the concept of reversibility, this publication presents the principle of geological storage, presents high and medium level and long life wastes, highlights the ethical necessity to deal with these radioactive wastes, outlines that geological storage is the generally admitted and adopted solution at the international level, and presents additional means implemented for radioactive waste management. It presents the Cigeo project as the technical answer to the issue of radioactive waste storage, describes the Cigeo development process, its current status and its development planning, and justifies the choice of this technical solution, notably from an ethical point of view. It addresses the issue of reversibility and proposes an overview of the various tools and means which aim at guaranteeing this reversibility. Appendices propose figures illustrating the Cigeo project and its development process, and a rather detailed Power Point presentation of the project by the ANDRA (history, object, planning, installations, and so on)

  17. Status of time reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Time Reversal Invariance is introduced, and theories for its violation are reviewed. The present experimental and theoretical status of Time Reversal Invariance and tests thereof will be presented. Possible future tests will be discussed. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Introduction to time reversal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theory and reaction mechanisms relevant to time reversal invariance are reviewed. Consequences of time reversal invariance are presented under the headings of CP tests, electromagnetic moments, weak emissions or absorptions, and scattering reactions. 8 refs., 4 figs

  19. The Causes of Preference Reversal.

    OpenAIRE

    Tversky, Amos; Slovic, Paul; Kahneman, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Observed preference reversal cannot be adequately explained by violations of independence, the reduction axiom, or transitivity. The primary cause of preference reversal is the failure of procedure invariance, especially the overpricing of low-probability, high-payoff bets. This result violates regret theory and generalized (nonindependent) utility models. Preference reversal and a new reversal involving time preferences are explained by scale compatibility, which implies that payoffs are wei...

  20. Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirtzler, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    It has frequently been suggested that only the geomagnetic dipole, rather than higher order poles, reverse during a geomagnetic field reversal. Under this assumption the geomagnetic field strength has been calculated for the surface of the Earth for various steps of the reversal process. Even without an eminent a reversal of the field, extrapolation of the present secular change (although problematic) shows that the field strength may become zero in some geographic areas within a few hundred years.

  1. A Study on Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Dhananjaya

    2011-01-01

    In the competitive world of manufacturing, companies are often searching for new ways to improve their process, customer satisfaction and stay ahead in the game with their competitors. Reverse logistics has been considered a strategy to bring these things to life for the past decade or so. This thesis work tries to shed some light on the basics of reverse logistics and how reverse logistics can be used as a management strategy. This paper points out the fundamentals of reverse logistics and l...

  2. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-09

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency.

  3. Reversal Strategies for NOACs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Steen; Verheugt, Freek; Comuth, Willemijn

    2015-01-01

    , coagulation factor concentrates or NOAC-specific antidotes could be used. Coagulation factor concentrates can be used in patients with haemophilia and to reverse the effect of VKAs but, in NOAC-treated patients, results are inconsistent and these agents could potentially have pro-thrombotic effects. Specific...... antidotes for NOACs are expected to be on the market soon. Phase III clinical trials with a humanized antibody fragment directed against dabigatran (idarucizumab) and recombinant, modified factor Xa (andexanet alfa) are ongoing. A molecule (aripazine) with broad activity against various anticoagulants...

  4. Reversible brazing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-medications/index.shtml. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Discontinuing antidepressant medications in adults. ...

  6. Reversibly Bistable Flexible Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-05-01

    Introducing the notion of transformational silicon electronics has paved the way for integrating various applications with silicon-based, modern, high-performance electronic circuits that are mechanically flexible and optically semitransparent. While maintaining large-scale production and prototyping rapidity, this flexible and translucent scheme demonstrates the potential to transform conventionally stiff electronic devices into thin and foldable ones without compromising long-term performance and reliability. In this work, we report on the fabrication and characterization of reversibly bistable flexible electronic switches that utilize flexible n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The transistors are fabricated initially on rigid (100) silicon substrates before they are peeled off. They can be used to control flexible batches of light-emitting diodes, demonstrating both the relative ease of scaling at minimum cost and maximum reliability and the feasibility of integration. The peeled-off silicon fabric is about 25 µm thick. The fabricated devices are transferred to a reversibly bistable flexible platform through which, for example, a flexible smartphone can be wrapped around a user’s wrist and can also be set back to its original mechanical position. Buckling and cyclic bending of such host platforms brings a completely new dimension to the development of flexible electronics, especially rollable displays.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of the novel glutamate transporter inhibitor (-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid, which preferentially inhibits reverse transport (glutamate release) compared with glutamate reuptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Simona; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Landucci, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    on the three hEAAT subtypes. (-)-HIP-A maintained the remarkable property, previously reported with the racemates, of inhibiting synaptosomal glutamate-induced [3H]D-aspartate release (reverse transport) at concentrations significantly lower than those inhibiting [3H]L-glutamate uptake. New data suggest...

  8. Sugammadex to reverse neuromuscular blockade in a child with a past history of cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Miller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugammadex is a novel agent for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade. The speed and efficacy of reversal with sugammadex are significantly faster than acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as neostigmine. Sugammadex also has a limited adverse profile when compared with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, specifically in regard to the incidence of bradycardia. This adverse effect may be particularly relevant in the setting of a heart transplant recipient with a denervated heart. The authors present a case of an 8-year-old child, status postcardiac transplantation, who required anesthetic care for laparoscopy and lysis of intra-abdominal adhesions. Sugammadex was used to reverse neuromuscular blockade and avoid the potential adverse effects of neostigmine. The unique mechanism of action of sugammadex is discussed, previous reports of its use in this unique patient population are reviewed, and its potential benefits compared to traditional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are presented.

  9. Sugammadex to reverse neuromuscular blockade in a child with a past history of cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen; Hall, Brian; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-01-01

    Sugammadex is a novel agent for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade. The speed and efficacy of reversal with sugammadex are significantly faster than acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as neostigmine. Sugammadex also has a limited adverse profile when compared with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, specifically in regard to the incidence of bradycardia. This adverse effect may be particularly relevant in the setting of a heart transplant recipient with a denervated heart. The authors present a case of an 8-year-old child, status postcardiac transplantation, who required anesthetic care for laparoscopy and lysis of intra-abdominal adhesions. Sugammadex was used to reverse neuromuscular blockade and avoid the potential adverse effects of neostigmine. The unique mechanism of action of sugammadex is discussed, previous reports of its use in this unique patient population are reviewed, and its potential benefits compared to traditional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are presented.

  10. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won; Song, Chang Joon; Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong; Kim, Man Deuk

    2001-01-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  11. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Joon [Chungnam National Univ. School of Medicine, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong [Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Myungji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Deuk [College of Medicine Pochon CHA Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  12. Reverse osmosis application studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golomb, A.

    1982-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of applying reverse osmosis (RO) and ultrafiltration (UF) for effective treatment of process and waste streams from operations at Ontario Hydro's thermal and nuclear stations, an extensive literature survey has been carried out. It is concluded that RO is not at present economic for pretreatment of Great Lakes water prior to ion exchange demineralization for boiler makeup. Using both conventional and novel commercial membrane modules, RO pilot studies are recommended for treatment of boiler cleaning wastes, fly ash leachates, and flue gas desulphurization scrubber discharges for removal of heavy metals. Volume reduction and decontamination of nuclear station low-level active liquid waste streams by RO/UF also appear promising. Research programmes are proposed

  13. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Senesac, Lawrence R [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  14. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  15. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  16. Sex Reversal in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have been widely used to study developmental biology due to the fact that embryo development takes place independently of the maternal organism and that observations and experimental approaches are easy. Some amphibians like Xenopus became model organisms in this field. In the first part of this article, the differentiation of the gonads in amphibians and the mechanisms governing this process are reviewed. In the second part, the state of the art about sex reversal, which can be induced by steroid hormones in general and by temperature in some species, is presented. Also information about pollutants found in the environment that could interfere with the development of the amphibian reproductive apparatus or with their reproductive physiology is given. Such compounds could play a part in the amphibian decline, since in the wild, many amphibians are endangered species. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Systemic Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke after Dabigatran Etexilate Reversal with Idarucizumab—A Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Derya; He, Jun; Nordling, Mette Maria

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for dabigatran etexilate. By reversing the anticoagulating effect of dabigatran etexilate with idarucizumab (Praxbind), patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke can now be eligible for thrombolysis. Patient We describe our experience with ida......Introduction Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for dabigatran etexilate. By reversing the anticoagulating effect of dabigatran etexilate with idarucizumab (Praxbind), patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke can now be eligible for thrombolysis. Patient We describe our experience...... of embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran etexilate is an oral thrombin inhibitor that can be reversed by idarucizumab. Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, directly binds dabigatran etexilate and neutralizes its activity. Conclusion Reversal of dabigatran etexilate using...

  18. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aromatase inhibitors in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, Jan M; Hero, Matti; Nunez, Susan B

    2011-10-25

    Aromatase, an enzyme located in the endoplasmic reticulum of estrogen-producing cells, catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many tissues. The clinical features of patients with defects in CYP19A1, the gene encoding aromatase, have revealed a major role for this enzyme in epiphyseal plate closure, which has promoted interest in the use of inhibitors of aromatase to improve adult height. The availability of the selective aromatase inhibitors letrozole and anastrozole--currently approved as adjuvant therapy for breast cancer--have stimulated off-label use of aromatase inhibitors in pediatrics for the following conditions: hyperestrogenism, such as aromatase excess syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, McCune-Albright syndrome and functional follicular ovarian cysts; hyperandrogenism, for example, testotoxicosis (also known as familial male-limited precocious puberty) and congenital adrenal hyperplasia; pubertal gynecomastia; and short stature and/or pubertal delay in boys. Current data suggest that aromatase inhibitors are probably effective in the treatment of patients with aromatase excess syndrome or testotoxicosis, partially effective in Peutz-Jeghers and McCune-Albright syndrome, but probably ineffective in gynecomastia. Insufficient data are available in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia or functional ovarian cysts. Although aromatase inhibitors appear effective in increasing adult height of boys with short stature and/or pubertal delay, safety concerns, including vertebral deformities, a decrease in serum HDL cholesterol levels and increase of erythrocytosis, are reasons for caution.

  20. AZT as a telomerase inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel E.; Armando, Romina G.; Alonso, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase is a highly specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) and the maintenance of telomeric length is determined by this specific enzyme. The human holoenzyme telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed by a catalytic subunit, hTERT, an RNA component, hTR, and a group of associated proteins. Telomerase is normally expressed in embryonic cells and is repressed during adulthood. The enzyme is reexpressed in around 85% of solid tumors. This observation makes it a potential target for developing drugs that could be developed for therapeutic purposes. The identification of the hTERT as a functional catalytic RT prompted studies of inhibiting telomerase with the HIV RT inhibitor azidothymidine (AZT). Previously, we have demonstrated that AZT binds preferentially to telomeres, inhibits telomerase and enhances tumor cell senescence, and apoptosis after AZT treatment in breast mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Since then, several studies have considered AZT for telomerase inhibition and have led to potential clinical strategies for anticancer therapy. This review covers present thinking of the inhibition of telomerase by AZT and future treatment protocols using the drug.

  1. Ebselen Reversibly Inhibits Human Glutamate Dehydrogenase at the Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yanhong; Li, Di; Lu, Shiying; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zhao; Hou, Wei; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays an important role in neurological diseases, tumor metabolism, and hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS). However, there are very few inhibitors known for human GDH. Recently, Ebselen was reported to crosslink with Escherichia coli GDH at the active site cysteine residue (Cys321), but the sequence alignment showed that the corresponding residue is Ala329 in human GDH. To investigate whether Ebselen could be an inhibitor for human GDH, we cloned and expressed an N-terminal His-tagged human GDH in E. coli. The recombinant human GDH enzyme showed expected properties such as adenosine diphosphate activation and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dual recognition. Further, we developed a 2-(3-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-tetrazol-3-ium-5-yl) benzenesulfonate sodium salt (EZMTT)-based assay for human GDH, which was highly sensitive and is suitable for high-throughput screening for potent GDH inhibitors. In addition, ForteBio binding assays demonstrated that Ebselen is a reversible active site inhibitor for human GDH. Since Ebselen is a multifunctional organoselenium compound in Phase III clinical trials for inflammation, an Ebselen-based GDH inhibitor might be valuable for future drug discovery for HHS patients.

  2. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse gear...

  3. Novel ROCK inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Duncan; Hollingworth, Greg; Soldermann, Nicolas; Sprague, Elizabeth; Schuler, Walter; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Duggan, Nicholas; Thomas, Matthew; Kosaka, Takatoshi; Waters, Nigel; van Eis, Maurice J. (Novartis)

    2014-10-01

    A novel class of selective inhibitors of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has been identified by structural based drug design. PK/PD experiments using a set of highly selective Rho kinase inhibitors suggest that systemic Rho kinase inhibition is linked to a reversible reduction in lymphocyte counts. These results led to the consideration of topical delivery of these molecules, and to the identification of a lead molecule 7 which shows promising PK and PD in a murine model of pulmonary hypertension after intra-tracheal dosing.

  4. JAK inhibitors in autoinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hal M; Broderick, Lori

    2018-06-11

    Interferonopathies are a subset of autoinflammatory disorders with a prominent type I IFN gene signature. Treatment of these patients has been challenging, given the lack of response to common autoinflammatory therapeutics including IL-1 and TNF blockade. JAK inhibitors (Jakinibs) are a family of small-molecule inhibitors that target the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and have shown clinical efficacy, with FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA) approval for arthritic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Sanchez and colleagues repurposed baricitinib to establish a significant role for JAK inhibition as a novel therapy for patients with interferonopathies, demonstrating the power of translational rare disease research with lifesaving effects.

  5. Cathepsin D inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gacko

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of cathepsin D belong to chemical compounds that estrify carboxyl groups of the Asp33 and Asp231residues of its catalytic site, penta-peptides containing statin, i.e. the amino acid similar in structure to the tetraedric indirectproduct, and polypeptides found in the spare organs of many plants and forming permanent noncovalent complexes withcathepsin. Cathepsin D activity is also inhibited by alpha2-macroglobulin and antibodies directed against this enzyme.Methods used to determine the activity and concentration of these inhibitors and their analytical, preparative and therapeuticapplications are discussed.

  6. Field reversal experiments (FRX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Armstrong, W.T.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    The equilibrium, confinement, and stability properties of the reversed-field configuration (RFC) are being studied in two theta-pinch facilities. The RFC is an elongated toroidal plasma confined in a purely poloidal field geometry. The open field lines of the linear theta pinch support the closed-field RFC much like the vertical field centers the toroidal plasma in a tokamak. Depending on stability and confinement properties, the RFC might be used to greatly reduce the axial losses in linear fusion devices such as mirrors, theta pinches, and liners. The FRX systems produce RFC's with a major radius R = 2-6 cm, minor radius a approximately 2 cm, and a total length l approximately 35 cm. The observed temperatures are T/sub e/ approximately 100 eV and T/sub i/ = 150-350 eV with a peak density n approximately 2 x 10 15 cm -3 . After the plasma reaches equilibrium, the RFC remains stable for up to 30 μs followed by the rapid growth of the rotational m = 2 instability, which terminates the confinement. During the stable equilibrium, the particle and energy confinement times are more than 10 times longer than in an open-field system. The behavior of the m = 2 mode qualitatively agrees with the theoretically predicted instability for rotational velocities exceeding some critical value

  7. Field reversal experiments (FRX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Armstrong, W.T.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium, confinement, and stability properties of the reversed-field configuration (RFC) are being studied in two theta-pinch facilities. The RFC is an elongated toroidal plasma confined in a purely poloidal field geometry. The open field lines of the linear theta pinch support the closed-field RFC much like the vertical field centres the toroidal plasma in a tokamak. Depending on stability and confinement properties, the RFC might be used to greatly reduce the axial losses in linear fusion devices such as mirrors, theta pinches, and liners. The FRX systems produce RFCs with a major radius R=2-6cm, a minor radius a approximately 2cm, and a total length l approximately 35cm. The observed temperatures are Tsub(e) approximately 100eV and Tsub(i)=150-350eV with a peak density n approximately 2x10 15 cm -3 . After the plasma has reached equilibrium, the RFC remains stable for up to 30μs, followed by the rapid growth of the rotational m=2 instability, which terminates the confinement. During the stable equilibrium, the particle and energy confinement times are more than 10 times longer than in an open-field system. The behaviour of the m=2 mode agrees qualitatively with the theoretically predicted instability for rotational velocities exceeding some critical value. (author)

  8. Transglutaminase inhibitor from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.A.H. de; Wijngaards, G.; Koppelman, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cross-linking experiments of skimmed bovine milk with bacterial transglutaminase isolated from Streptoverticillium mobaraense showed only some degree of formation of high-molecular-weight casein polymers. Studies on the nature of this phenomenon revealed that bovine milk contains an inhibitor of

  9. Inhibitors of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Brian; Kristensen, Jesper L; Kristensen, Line H

    2011-01-01

    Methylated lysines are important epigenetic marks. The enzymes involved in demethylation have recently been discovered and found to be involved in cancer development and progression. Despite the relative recent discovery of these enzymes a number of inhibitors have already appeared. Most of the i...

  10. Towards a reversible functional language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2012-01-01

    /equality operator also simplifies inverse computation and program inversion. We discuss the advantages of a reversible functional language using example programs, including run-length encoding. Program inversion is seen to be as lightweight as for imperative reversible languages and realized by recursive descent...

  11. Reverse engineering of RFID devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokslag, W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the relevance and potential impact of both RFID and reverse engineering of RFID technology, followed by a discussion of common protocols and internals of RFID technology. The focus of the paper is on providing an overview of the different approaches to reverse engineering RFID

  12. How decision reversibility affects motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullens, L.; van Harreveld, F.; Förster, J.; Higgins, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making,

  13. Enzymatic reactions in reversed micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    It has been recognised that enzymes in reversed micelles have potential for application in chemical synthesis. Before these expectations will be realised many problems must be overcome. This thesis deals with some of them.
    In Chapter 1 the present knowledge about reversed micelles and

  14. Reversible networks in supramolecular polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans - van Beek, D.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Non–covalent interactions between low molecular weight polymers form the basis of supramolecular polymers. The material properties of such polymers are determined by the strength and lifetime of the non–covalent reversible interactions. Due to the reversibility of the interactions between the low

  15. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  16. Improved Potency of Indole-Based NorA Efflux Pump Inhibitors: From Serendipity toward Rational Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonerba, Federica; Lepri, Susan; Goracci, Laura; Schindler, Bryan D; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2017-01-12

    The NorA efflux pump is a potential drug target for reversal of resistance to selected antibacterial agents, and recently we described indole-based inhibitor candidates. Herein we report a second class of inhibitors derived from them but with significant differences in shape and size. In particular, compounds 13 and 14 are very potent inhibitors in that they demonstrated the lowest IC 50 values (2 μM) ever observed among all indole-based compounds we have evaluated.

  17. MODELS OF PROJECT REVERSE ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віктор Володимирович ІВАНОВ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reverse engineering decided important scientific and technical problems of increasing the cost of the existing technical product by transforming it into a product with other features or design. Search ideas of the new application of existing products on the base of heuristic analysis were created. The concept of reverse engineering and its division into three types: conceptual, aggregate and complete was expanded. The use of heuristic methods for reverse engineering concept was showed. The modification model of Reverse engineering based on the model of РМВОК was developed. Our model includes two new phases: identification and transformation. At the identification phase, technical control is made. At the transformation phase, search heuristic idea of the new applied existing technical product was made. The model of execution phase that included heuristic methods, metrological equipment, and CAD/CAM/CAE program complex was created. The model that connected economic indicators of reverse engineering project was developed.

  18. What do reversible programs compute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Reversible computing is the study of computation models that exhibit both forward and backward determinism. Understanding the fundamental properties of such models is not only relevant for reversible programming, but has also been found important in other fields, e.g., bidirectional model...... transformation, program transformations such as inversion, and general static prediction of program properties. Historically, work on reversible computing has focussed on reversible simulations of irreversible computations. Here, we take the viewpoint that the property of reversibility itself should...... are not strictly classically universal, but that they support another notion of universality; we call this RTM-universality. Thus, even though the RTMs are sub-universal in the classical sense, they are powerful enough as to include a self-interpreter. Lifting this to other computation models, we propose r...

  19. Fundamentals of reversible flowchart languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the fundamentals of reversible flowcharts. They are intended to naturally represent the structure and control flow of reversible (imperative) programming languages in a simple computation model, in the same way classical flowcharts do for conventional languages......, structured reversible flowcharts are as expressive as unstructured ones, as shown by a reversible version of the classic Structured Program Theorem. We illustrate how reversible flowcharts can be concretized with two example programming languages, complete with syntax and semantics: a low-level unstructured...... language and a high-level structured language. We introduce concrete tools such as program inverters and translators for both languages, which follow the structure suggested by the flowchart model. To further illustrate the different concepts and tools brought together in this paper, we present two major...

  20. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  1. Idarucizumab for Reversing Dabigatran-Induced Anticoagulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nathan; Morrill, Amanda M; Willett, Kristine C

    The approval of the oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, gave patients an alternative to oral anticoagulation with warfarin. Like all anticoagulants, the primary adverse event (AE) associated with dabigatran is bleeding. Until the FDA approval of idarucizumab, there had been no reversal agent for dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients with life-threatening or uncontrollable bleeding, or those requiring emergent procedures. The primary purpose of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, and its use as a reversal agent for dabigatran. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1946 to November week 1 2015) and Embase (1980-2015 week 46) using the search term idarucizumab. Clinicaltrials.gov was consulted for a comprehensive list of ongoing and completed studies. Additional studies were identified through bibliographical citations. Clinical trials in animals and humans published in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab for reversal of anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran were included for review. Idarucizumab has been shown to significantly reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in both healthy volunteers and patients requiring a reversal agent because of either overt bleeding or an emergency surgery or invasive procedure. The most common AEs were headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, skin irritation, hypokalemia, delirium, constipation, pyrexia, and pneumonia. Deaths reported in idarucizumab studies were attributed to either the index event or a preexisting comorbidity. Most adverse effects were minor, but 21 serious AEs have been reported in the published data including thrombotic events. Given the increased use of direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, a need for specific reversal agents exists. Idarucizumab has been shown to be safe and effective in the reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients requiring emergent

  2. How decision reversibility affects motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullens, Lottie; van Harreveld, Frenk; Förster, Jens; Higgins, Tory E

    2014-04-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making, strengthening prevention-related motivation relatively more than promotion-related motivation. If so, then decision reversibility should have effects associated with the relative differences between prevention and promotion motivation. In 5 studies, we manipulated the reversibility of a decision and used different indicators of regulatory focus motivation to test these predictions. Specifically, Study 1 tested for differences in participants' preference for approach versus avoidance strategies toward a desired end state. In Study 2, we used speed and accuracy performance as indicators of participants' regulatory motivation, and in Study 3, we measured global versus local reaction time performance. In Study 4, we approached the research question in a different way, making use of the value-from-fit hypothesis (Higgins, 2000, 2002). We tested whether a fit between chronic regulatory focus and focus induced by the reversibility of the decision increased participants' subjective positive feelings about the decision outcome. Finally, in Study 5, we tested whether regulatory motivation, induced by decision reversibility, also influenced participants' preference in specific product features. The results generally support our hypothesis showing that, compared to irreversible decisions, reversible decisions strengthen a prevention focus more than a promotion focus. Implications for research on decision making are discussed.

  3. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  4. Reverse engineering for quality systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    When the age of software engineering began, many companies were faced with a problem of how to support the older, pre-software-engineering, programs. The techniques of reverse engineering and re-engineering were developed to bridge the gap between the past and the present. Although reverse engineering can be used for generating missing documentation, it can also be used as a means to demonstrate quality in these older programs. This paper presents, in the form of a case study, how Rolls-Royce and Associates Limited addressed the quality issues of reverse engineering and re-engineering. (author)

  5. Field reversal in mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, L.D.; Anderson, D.V.; Boozer, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    This report discusses some of the physics issues anticipated in field-reversed mirrors. The effect of current cancellation due to electrons is described. An estimate is made of the required impurity level to maintain a field-reversed configuration. The SUPERLAYER code is used to simulate the high-β 2XIIB results, and favorable comparisons require inclusion of quasilinear RF turbulence. Impact of a quadrupole field on field-line closure and resonant transport is discussed. A simple self-consistent model of ion currents is presented. Conditions for stability of field-reversed configurations to E x B driven rotations are determined

  6. Molecularly imprinted nanoparticles for inhibiting ribonuclease in reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Xiaotong; Ashley, Jon; Zhou, Tongchang

    2018-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) are synthesized via a solid-phase approach using RNase as the template. The feasibility of employing the nanoMIPs as RNase inhibitor is successfully demonstrated in reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, suggesting the tailor...

  7. Acid corrosion inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N G

    1964-04-28

    An acid corrosion inhibitor is prepared by a 2-stage vacuum evaporation of effluents obtained from the ammonia columns of the coking oven plant. The effluent, leaving a scrubber in which the phenols are removed at a temperature of 98$C, passes through a quartz filter and flows into a heated chamber in which it is used for preheating a solution circulating through a vacuum unit, maintaining the temperature of the solution at 55$ to 60$C. The effluent enters a large tank in which it is boiled at 55$ to 60$C under 635 to 640 mm Hg pressure. Double evaporation of this solution yields a very effective acid corrosion inhibitor. Its corrosion-preventing effect is 97.9% compared with 90.1% for thiourea and 88.5% for urotropin under identical conditions.

  8. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs.

  9. Zero field reversal probability in thermally assisted magnetization reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetya, E. B.; Utari; Purnama, B.

    2017-11-01

    This paper discussed about zero field reversal probability in thermally assisted magnetization reversal (TAMR). Appearance of reversal probability in zero field investigated through micromagnetic simulation by solving stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gibert (LLG). The perpendicularly anisotropy magnetic dot of 50×50×20 nm3 is considered as single cell magnetic storage of magnetic random acces memory (MRAM). Thermally assisted magnetization reversal was performed by cooling writing process from near/almost Curie point to room temperature on 20 times runs for different randomly magnetized state. The results show that the probability reversal under zero magnetic field decreased with the increase of the energy barrier. The zero-field probability switching of 55% attained for energy barrier of 60 k B T and the reversal probability become zero noted at energy barrier of 2348 k B T. The higest zero-field switching probability of 55% attained for energy barrier of 60 k B T which corespond to magnetif field of 150 Oe for switching.

  10. Effect of Inhibitors on Weld Corrosion under Sweet Conditions Using Flow Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Alawadhi; Abdulkareem Aloraier; Suraj Joshi; Jalal Alsarraf

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the effectiveness and electrochemical behavior of typical oilfield corrosion inhibitors with previous oilfield corrosion inhibitors under the same electrochemical techniques to control preferential weld corrosion of X65 pipeline steel in artificial seawater saturated with carbon dioxide at a pressure of one bar. A secondary aim is to investigate the conditions under which current reversal takes place. A flow channel apparatus was used in the laboratory to s...

  11. A Typology of Reverse Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Zedtwitz, Max; Corsi, Simone; Søberg, Peder Veng

    2015-01-01

    secondary market introduction, this study expands the espoused definition of reverse innovation beyond its market-introduction focus with reversals in the flow of innovation in the ideation and product development phases. Recognizing that each phase can take place in different geographical locations...... taking place in an emerging country. This analytical framework allows recasting of current research at the intersection between innovation and international business. Of the 10 reverse innovation flows, six are new and have not been covered in the literature to date. The study addresses questions......’s portfolio of global innovation competence and capability. The implications for management are concerned with internal and external resistance to reverse innovation. Most significantly, while greater recognition and power of innovation in formerly subordinate organizational units is inconvenient to some...

  12. Spontaneous direct and reverse osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valitov, N.Kh.

    1996-01-01

    It has been ascertained experimentally that in the course of separation of CsCl, KCl, NaCl aqueous solutions by semi-permeable membrane from distilled water the direct and then reverse osmosis are observed. The same sequence is observed in case of separation of CsCl aqueous solutions from NaCl of different concentrations. The reason for the direct and reverse osmosis has been explained. 5 refs.; 3 figs. 1 tab

  13. Mutation V111I in HIV-2 reverse transcriptase increases the fitness of the nucleoside analogue-resistant K65R and Q151M viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Deuzing (Ilona); C. Charpentier (Charlotte); D.J. Wright (David Justin); S. Matheron (Sophie); J. Paton (Jack); D. Frentz (Dineke); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); P.V. Coveney (Peter); D. Descamps (Diane); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); N. Beerens (Nancy)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractInfection with HIV-2 can ultimately lead to AIDS, although disease progression is much slower than with HIV-1. HIV-2 patients are mostly treated with a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors designed for HIV-1. Many studies have

  14. Garbage collection for reversible functional languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2015-01-01

    Reversible languages are programming languages where all programs can run both forwards and backwards. Reversible functional languages have been proposed that use symmetric pattern matching and data construction. To be reversible, these languages require linearity: Every variable must be used...

  15. Inhibition of bacterial multidrug resistance by celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Arunasree M; Rizvi, Arshad

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor celecoxib would not only inhibit COX-2 but also help in the reversal of drug resistance in cancers by inhibiting the MDR1 efflux pump. Here, we demonstrate that celecoxib increases the sensitivity of bacteria to the antibiotics ampicillin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin by accumulating the drugs inside the cell, thus reversing MDR in bacteria.

  16. Epithelial tissue hyperplasia induced by the RAF inhibitor PF-04880594 is attenuated by a clinically well-tolerated dose of the MEK inhibitor PD-0325901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torti, Vince R; Wojciechowicz, Donald; Hu, Wenyue; John-Baptiste, Annette; Evering, Winston; Troche, Gabriel; Marroquin, Lisa D; Smeal, Tod; Yamazaki, Shinji; Palmer, Cynthia L; Burns-Naas, Leigh Ann; Bagrodia, Shubha

    2012-10-01

    Clinical trials of selective RAF inhibitors in patients with melanoma tumors harboring activated BRAFV600E have produced very promising results, and a RAF inhibitor has been approved for treatment of advanced melanoma. However, about a third of patients developed resectable skin tumors during the course of trials. This is likely related to observations that RAF inhibitors activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, stimulate proliferation, and induce epithelial hyperplasia in preclinical models. Because these findings raise safety concerns about RAF inhibitor development, we further investigated the underlying mechanisms. We showed that the RAF inhibitor PF-04880594 induces ERK phosphorylation and RAF dimerization in those epithelial tissues that undergo hyperplasia. Hyperplasia and ERK hyperphosphorylation are prevented by treatment with the mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901 at exposures that extrapolate to clinically well-tolerated doses. To facilitate mechanistic and toxicologic studies, we developed a three-dimensional cell culture model of epithelial layering that recapitulated the RAF inhibitor-induced hyperplasia and reversal by MEK inhibitor in vitro. We also showed that PF-04880594 stimulates production of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin 8 in HL-60 cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the skin flushing observed in dogs. The complete inhibition of hyperplasia by MEK inhibitor in epithelial tissues does not seem to reduce RAF inhibitor efficacy and, in fact, allows doubling of the PF-04880594 dose without toxicity usually associated with such doses. These findings indicated that combination treatment with MEK inhibitors might greatly increase the safety and therapeutic index of RAF inhibitors for the treatment of melanoma and other cancers. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Treatment with a JNK inhibitor increases, whereas treatment with a p38 inhibitor decreases, H2O2-induced calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Oxidative stress induces apoptosis in endothelial cells (ECs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote cell death by regulating the activity of various mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in ECs. The present study investigated the effects of MAPK inhibitors on cell survival and glutathione (GSH) levels upon H 2 O 2 treatment in calf pulmonary artery ECs (CPAECs). H 2 O 2 treatment inhibited the growth and induced the death of CPAECs, as well as causing GSH depletion and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). While treatment with the MEK or JNK inhibitor impaired the growth of H 2 O 2 -treated CPAECs, treatment with the p38 inhibitor attenuated this inhibition of growth. Additionally, JNK inhibitor treatment increased the proportion of sub-G 1 phase cells in H 2 O 2 -treated CPAECs and further decreased the MMP. However, treatment with a p38 inhibitor reversed the effects of H 2 O 2 treatment on cell growth and the MMP. Similarly, JNK inhibitor treatment further increased, whereas p38 inhibitor treatment decreased, the proportion of GSH-depleted cells in H 2 O 2 -treated CPAECs. Each of the MAPK inhibitors affected cell survival, and ROS or GSH levels differently in H 2 O 2 -untreated, control CPAECs. The data suggest that the exposure of CPAECs to H 2 O 2 caused the cell growth inhibition and cell death through GSH depletion. Furthermore, JNK inhibitor treatment further enhanced, whereas p38 inhibitors attenuated, these effects. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a specific protective role for the p38 inhibitor, and not the JNK inhibitor, against H 2 O 2 -induced cell growth inhibition and cell death.

  18. SKLB060 Reversibly Binds to Colchicine Site of Tubulin and Possesses Efficacy in Multidrug-Resistant Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Yang, Tao; Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Taijin; Yu, Yamei; Wang, Yuxi; Chen, Qiang; Bai, Peng; Li, Dan; Ye, Haoyu; Qiu, Qiang; Zhou, Yongzhao; Hu, Yiguo; Yang, Shengyong; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2018-05-22

    Many tubulin inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer drugs. In our previous study, a novel series of 4-substituted coumarins derivatives were identified as novel tubulin inhibitors. Here, we report the anti-cancer activity and underlying mechanism of one of the 4-substituted coumarins derivatives (SKLB060). The anti-cancer activity of SKLB060 was tested on 13 different cancer cell lines and four xenograft cancer models. Immunofluorescence staining, cell cycle analysis, and tubulin polymerization assay were employed to study the inhibition of tubulin. N, N '-Ethylenebis(iodoacetamide) assay was used to measure binding to the colchicine site. Wound-healing migration and tube formation assays were performed on human umbilical vascular endothelial cells to study anti-vascular activity (the ability to inhibit blood vessel growth). Mitotic block reversibility and structural biology assays were used to investigate the SKLB060-tubulin bound model. SKLB060 inhibited tubulin polymerization and subsequently induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. SKLB060 bound to the colchicine site of β-tubulin and showed antivascular activity in vitro. Moreover, SKLB060 induced reversible cell cycle arrest and reversible inhibition of tubulin polymerization. A mitotic block reversibility assay showed that the effects of SKLB060 have greater reversibility than those of colcemid (a reversible tubulin inhibitor), indicating that SKLB060 binds to tubulin in a totally reversible manner. The crystal structures of SKLB060-tubulin complexes confirmed that SKLB060 binds to the colchicine site, and the natural coumarin ring in SKLB060 enables reversible binding. These results reveal that SKLB060 is a powerful and reversible microtubule inhibitor that binds to the colchicine site and is effective in multidrug-resistant cell lines. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. DGAT inhibitors for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Daisuke; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    Obesity is characterized by the accumulation of triacylglycerol in adipocytes. Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyzes the final reaction of triacylgycerol synthesis. Two isozymes of DGAT, DGAT1 and DGAT2, have been reported. Increased DGAT2 activity has a role in steatosis, while DGAT1 plays a role in very (V)LDL synthesis; increased plasma VLDL concentrations may promote obesity and thus DGAT1 is considered a potential therapeutic target of inhibition for obesity control. Several DGAT inhibitors of natural and synthetic origin have been reported, and their future prospect as anti-obesity drugs is discussed in this review.

  20. Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Pazopanib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Foerster

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old female patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma under third-line treatment with pazopanib for 8 weeks suddenly developed severe headaches, grand mal seizures and paresis of the left arm in combination with gait instability as well as nausea and vomiting during her vacation abroad. The emergency physician measured systolic blood pressure values over 300 mm Hg and suspected a stroke. The CT imaging without contrast agent in a local hospital did not show any pathologic findings despite bone metastases. The colleagues suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa and referred the patient to our department for further diagnostics and treatment planning. An MRI scan ruled out the suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa, but showed signs of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS in the form of band-like hyperintensities as a sign of cytotoxic edema in the gray and white matter of the left parietal lobe. The patient then reported that similar blood pressure values had been measured shortly after the start of a first-line therapy with sunitinib, so that we discontinued the current treatment with pazopanib. Within 6 days the neurologic symptoms vanished and the patient was discharged. An intermittent hypertension persisted. A follow-up MRI 3 weeks later showed an RPLS-typical cortical infarction in the affected area. RPLS should be considered as the actual reason for neurologic findings in hypertensive patients with known metastatic cancers under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

  1. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek P Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery.

  2. Flavonoids as Inhibitors of Human Butyrylcholinesterase Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Katalinić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8 appears to be of interest in treating diseases with symptoms of reduced neurotransmitter levels, such as Alzheimer’s disease. However, BCHE gene polymorphism should not be neglected in research since it could have an effect on the expected outcome. Several well-known cholinergic drugs (e.g. galantamine, huperzine and rivastigmine originating from plants, or synthesised as derivatives of plant compounds, have shown that herbs could serve as a source of novel target-directed compounds. We focused our research on flavonoids, biologically active polyphenolic compounds found in many plants and plant-derived products, as BChE inhibitors. All of the tested flavonoids: galangin, quercetin, fisetin and luteolin reversibly inhibited usual, atypical, and fluoride-resistant variants of human BChE. The inhibition potency increased in the following order, identically for all three BChE variants: luteolininhibitor dissociation constants (Ki ranged from 10 to 170 mmol/L. We showed that no significant change in the inhibition potency of selected flavonoids exists in view of BChE polymorphism. Our results suggested that flavonoids could assist the further development of new BChE-targeted drugs for treating symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases and dementia.

  3. Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B in Psychiatry and Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Maurice Finberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B are in clinical use for the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders respectively. Elucidation of the molecular structure of the active sites of the enzymes has enabled a precise determination of the way in which substrates and inhibitor molecules are metabolized, or inhibit metabolism of substrates, respectively. Despite the knowledge of the strong antidepressant efficacy of irreversible MAO inhibitors, their clinical use has been limited by their side effect of potentiation of the cardiovascular effects of dietary amines (cheese effect. A number of reversible MAO-A inhibitors which are devoid of cheese effect have been described in the literature, but only one, moclobemide, is currently in clinical use. The irreversible inhibitors of MAO-B, selegiline and rasagiline, are used clinically in treatment of Parkinson’s disease, and a recently introduced reversible MAO-B inhibitor, safinamide, has also been found efficacious. Modification of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of selegiline by transdermal administration has led to the development of a new drug form for treatment of depression. The clinical potential of MAO inhibitors together with detailed knowledge of the enzyme’s binding site structure should lead to future developments with these drugs.

  4. Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B in Psychiatry and Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finberg, John P M; Rabey, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B are in clinical use for the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders respectively. Elucidation of the molecular structure of the active sites of the enzymes has enabled a precise determination of the way in which substrates and inhibitor molecules are metabolized, or inhibit metabolism of substrates, respectively. Despite the knowledge of the strong antidepressant efficacy of irreversible MAO inhibitors, their clinical use has been limited by their side effect of potentiation of the cardiovascular effects of dietary amines ("cheese effect"). A number of reversible MAO-A inhibitors which are devoid of cheese effect have been described in the literature, but only one, moclobemide, is currently in clinical use. The irreversible inhibitors of MAO-B, selegiline and rasagiline, are used clinically in treatment of Parkinson's disease, and a recently introduced reversible MAO-B inhibitor, safinamide, has also been found efficacious. Modification of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of selegiline by transdermal administration has led to the development of a new drug form for treatment of depression. The clinical potential of MAO inhibitors together with detailed knowledge of the enzyme's binding site structure should lead to future developments with these drugs.

  5. Effect of wine inhibitors on free pineapple stem bromelain activity in a model wine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esti, Marco; Benucci, Ilaria; Liburdi, Katia; Garzillo, Anna Maria Vittoria

    2011-04-13

    The influence of potential inhibitors, naturally present in wine, on the activity of stem bromelain was investigated in order to evaluate the applicability of this enzyme for protein stabilization in white wine. Bromelain proteolytic activity was tested against a synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA) in a model wine system after adding ethanol, sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), skin, seed, and gallic and ellagic tannins at the average range of their concentration in wine. All the inhibitors of stem bromelain activity tested turned out to be reversible. Ethanol was a competitive inhibitor with a rather limited effect. Gallic and ellagic tannins have no inhibitory effect on stem bromelain activity, while both seed and skin tannins were uncompetitive inhibitors. The strongest inhibition effect was revealed for sulfur dioxide, which was a mixed-type inhibitor for the enzyme activity. This study provides useful information relative to a future biotechnological application of stem bromelain in winemaking.

  6. Reverse Knowledge Transfer in MNEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mudambi, Ram; Piscitello, Lucia; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    a positive correlation with the extent of reverse knowledge transfers to the parent MNE. Relying on the headquarters-subsidiary view of the MNE, we argue that, beyond a point, increasing subsidiary innovativeness will be associated with lower reverse knowledge transfers. Further, we argue......It is now well recognized that multinational enterprises (MNEs) are differentiated networks wherein subsidiaries vary in terms of their ability to create new knowledge and competencies for their parent groups. In much of this theory, it is taken for granted that subsidiary innovativeness has...... that this relationship is sensitive to the subsidiary entry mode. Using data from a sample of 293 Italian subsidiaries, we find strong support for our hypotheses. In particular, our results confirm that the effect of subsidiary innovativeness on reverse knowledge transfers displays an inverted-U shape...

  7. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  8. Reverse innovation in maternal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoz, Tabassum; Makanga, Prestige Tatenda; Nathan, Hannah L; Payne, Beth; Magee, Laura A

    2017-09-01

    Reverse innovation, defined as the flow of ideas from low- to high-income settings, is gaining traction in healthcare. With an increasing focus on value, investing in low-cost but effective and innovative solutions can be of mutual benefit to both high- and low-income countries. Reverse innovation has a role in addressing maternal health challenges in high-income countries by harnessing these innovative solutions for vulnerable populations especially in rural and remote regions. In this paper, we present three examples of 'reverse innovation' for maternal health: a low-cost, easy-to-use blood pressure device (CRADLE), a diagnostic algorithm (mini PIERS) and accompanying mobile app (PIERS on the Move), and a novel method for mapping maternal outcomes (MOM).

  9. Reverse Transfection Using Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Fujita, Satoshi; Uchimura, Eiichiro; Miyake, Masato; Miyake, Jun

    Reverse transfection from a solid surface has the potential to deliver genes into various types of cell and tissue more effectively than conventional methods of transfection. We present a method for reverse transfection using a gold colloid (GC) as a nanoscaffold by generating nanoclusters of the DNA/reagentcomplex on a glass surface, which could then be used for the regulation of the particle size of the complex and delivery of DNA into nuclei. With this method, we have found that the conjugation of gold nanoparticles (20 nm in particle size) to the pEGFP-N1/Jet-PEI complex resulted in an increase in the intensity of fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (based on the efficiency of transfection) from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), as compared with the control without GC. In this manner, we constructed a method for reverse transfection using GC to deliver genes into the cells effectively.

  10. Designing the Reverse Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobbi, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the product residual value (PRV) and the loss of value over time of returned products in the reverse supply chain configuration. It also examines whether or not the distinction of Fisher's functional and innovative products holds...... that allows for recapturing most of the PRV. These notions have then been tested by analyzing two reverse supply chains with a case study research methodology. Findings – The findings show that low PRV is associated with second-class recovery options (recycling and energy recovery) and that high PRV...... is associated with first-class recovery options (reconditioning and remarketing). When the recovery option is recycling, time is not relevant, the primary objective is cost reduction (efficiency), the chain is centralized, and actors and phases of the reverse chain are determined by the specificity...

  11. An Additional Method for Analyzing the Reversible Inhibition of an ?Enzyme Using Acid Phosphatase as a Model

    OpenAIRE

    Baumhardt, Jordan M.; Dorsey, Benjamin M.; McLauchlan, Craig C.; Jones, Marjorie A.

    2015-01-01

    Using wheat germ acid phosphatase and sodium orthovanadate as a competitive inhibitor, a novel method for analyzing reversible inhibition was carried out. Our alternative approach involves plotting the initial velocity at which product is formed as a function of the ratio of substrate concentration to inhibitor concentration at a constant enzyme concentration and constant assay conditions. The concept of initial concentrations driving equilibrium leads to the chosen axes. Three apparent const...

  12. Pulmonary Toxicity of Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilmas, Corey; Adler, Michael; Baskin, Steven I; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2006-01-01

    .... Whereas nerve agents were produced primarily for military deployment, other cholinesterase inhibitors were used for treating conditions such as myasthenia gravis and as pretreaunents for nerve agent exposure...

  13. An Additional Method for Analyzing the Reversible Inhibition of an 
Enzyme Using Acid Phosphatase as a Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhardt, Jordan M; Dorsey, Benjamin M; McLauchlan, Craig C; Jones, Marjorie A

    2015-08-01

    Using wheat germ acid phosphatase and sodium orthovanadate as a competitive inhibitor, a novel method for analyzing reversible inhibition was carried out. Our alternative approach involves plotting the initial velocity at which product is formed as a function of the ratio of substrate concentration to inhibitor concentration at a constant enzyme concentration and constant assay conditions. The concept of initial concentrations driving equilibrium leads to the chosen axes. Three apparent constants can be derived from this plot: K max , K min , and K inflect . K max and K min represent the substrate to inhibitor concentration ratio for complete inhibition and minimal inhibition, respectively. K inflect represents the substrate to inhibitor concentration ratio at which the enzyme-substrate complex is equal to the inhibitory complex. These constants can be interpolated from the graph or calculated using the first and second derivative of the plot. We conclude that a steeper slope and a shift of the line to the right (increased x-axis values) would indicate a better inhibitor. Since initial velocity is not a linear function of the substrate/inhibitor ratio, this means that inhibition changes more quickly with the change in the [S]/ [I] ratio. When preincubating the enzyme with substrate before the addition of inhibitor, preincubating the enzyme with inhibitor before the addition of substrate or with concurrent addition of both substrate and inhibitor, modest changes in the slopes and y-intercepts were obtained. This plot appears useful for known competitive and non-competitive inhibitors and may have general applicability.

  14. Reverse genetics with animal viruses. NSV reverse genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mebatsion, T.

    2005-01-01

    New strategies to genetically manipulate the genomes of several important animal pathogens have been established in recent years. This article focuses on the reverse genetics techniques, which enables genetic manipulation of the genomes of non-segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. Recovery of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA was first achieved for rabies virus in 1994. Since then, reverse genetic systems have been established for several pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. Based on the reverse genetics technique, it is now possible to design safe and more effective live attenuated vaccines against important viral agents. In addition, genetically tagged recombinant viruses can be designed to facilitate serological differentiation of vaccinated animals from infected animals. The approach of delivering protective immunogens of different pathogens using a single vector was made possible with the introduction of the reverse genetics system, and these novel broad-spectrum vaccine vectors have potential applications in improving animal health in developing countries. (author)

  15. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Maria Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  16. Reverse hybrid total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangen, Helge; Havelin, Leif I.; Fenstad, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - The use of a cemented cup together with an uncemented stem in total hip arthroplasty (THA) has become popular in Norway and Sweden during the last decade. The results of this prosthetic concept, reverse hybrid THA, have been sparsely described. The Nordic Arthroplasty....... Patients and methods - From the NARA, we extracted data on reverse hybrid THAs from January 1, 2000 until December 31, 2013. 38,415 such hips were studied and compared with cemented THAs. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the prosthesis survival and the relative risk...

  17. Reference counting for reversible languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2014-01-01

    inverses: Freeing a block of memory is done by running the allocation procedure backwards. Axelsen and Glück use this heap manager to sketch implementation of a simple reversible functional language where pattern matching a constructor is the inverse of construction, so pattern-matching implies......Modern programming languages and operating systems use heap memory that allows allocation and deallocation of memory to be decoupled, so they don't follow a stack discipline. Axelsen and Glück have presented a reversible heap manager where allocation and deallocation are each other's logical...

  18. A functional language for describing reversible logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal

    2012-01-01

    Reversible logic is a computational model where all gates are logically reversible and combined in circuits such that no values are lost or duplicated. This paper presents a novel functional language that is designed to describe only reversible logic circuits. The language includes high....... Reversibility of descriptions is guaranteed with a type system based on linear types. The language is applied to three examples of reversible computations (ALU, linear cosine transformation, and binary adder). The paper also outlines a design flow that ensures garbage- free translation to reversible logic...... circuits. The flow relies on a reversible combinator language as an intermediate language....

  19. [Reversible infertility from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomsvoll, Johan Fredrik; Rødevand, Erik; Koksvik, Hege Svean; Salvesen, Kjell Asmund; von Düring, Vidar; Rygnestad, Tarjei; Østensen, Monika

    2005-06-02

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may interfere with ovulation and the rupture of the follicle, causing reversible infertility. Literature review. Reversible infertility is shown both in animal and human studies of these drugs. As determined by ultrasound, the drugs may delay or inhibit ovulation. These findings are also confirmed by a few randomized controlled studies showing an increase in time from the luteinizing hormone surge to rupture of the follicle and an increased size of the unruptured follicle. Most of the hormone analyses show values in accordance with the ovulation/menstrual cycle. Also, two epidemiological studies have shown an association between NSAID use and spontaneous abortion. These studies have methodological weaknesses and their findings have to be elucidated in future studies. Women with fertility problems should avoid not only the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but also the traditional NSAIDs. However, women with rheumatic disease responding well to therapy should consult their physicians before stopping treatment. Reduced dose of a NSAID and temporary stop of drug treatment early in the menstrual cycle, or alternative drug treatment, may be a solution. NSAIDs should not be used in the last eight weeks of pregnancy.

  20. Fatal atypical reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golombeck Stefanie Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome – a reversible subacute global encephalopathy clinically presenting with headache, altered mental status, visual symptoms such as hemianopsia or cortical blindness, motor symptoms, and focal or generalized seizures – is characterized by a subcortical vasogenic edema symmetrically affecting posterior brain regions. Complete reversibility of both clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging lesions is regarded as a defining feature of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is almost exclusively seen in the setting of a predisposing clinical condition, such as pre-eclampsia, systemic infections, sepsis and shock, certain autoimmune diseases, various malignancies and cytotoxic chemotherapy, transplantation and concomitant immunosuppression (especially with calcineurin inhibitors as well as episodes of abrupt hypertension. We describe for the first time clinical, radiological and histological findings in a case of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome with an irreversible and fatal outcome occurring in the absence of any of the known predisposing clinical conditions except for a hypertensive episode. Case presentation A 58-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a two-week history of subacute and progressive occipital headache, blurred vision and imbalance of gait and with no evidence for raised arterial blood pressure during the two weeks previous to admission. Her past medical history was unremarkable except for controlled arterial hypertension. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated cortical and subcortical lesions with combined vasogenic and cytotoxic edema atypical for both venous congestion and arterial infarction. Routine laboratory and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were normal. The diagnosis of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome was established. Within hours after

  1. Replication-dependent 65R→K reversion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase double mutant K65R + L74V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prem L.; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Lee, Kimberly; Skaggs, Sara; Di San Filippo, Christina Amat; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of the mechanisms of interaction among nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-selected mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) coding sequence is essential for the design of newer drugs and for enhancing our vision of the structure function relationship among amino acids of the polymerase domain of HIV-1. Although several nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors select RT mutations K65R and L74V, the combination of 65R + 74V is rare in clinics. A novel NRTI (-)-β-D-dioxolane-guanosine (DXG) is known to select in vitro either the 65R or 74V mutant virus (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44 (2000) 1783). These mutations were not selected together during repeated passaging of the HIV-1 in the presence of this drug. To analyze the impact of these RT mutations on viral replication, a double mutant containing K65R + L74V was created by site-directed mutagenesis in a pNL4-3 background. Replication kinetic assays revealed that the mutant K65R + L74V is unstable, and 65R→K reversion occurs during replication of virus in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells in the absence of selection pressure. Replication kinetic assays in MT-2 cells demonstrated that double mutant 65R + 74V is highly attenuated for replication and the initiation of reversion is related to the increase in RT activity. Additionally, the suppression of viral replication in the presence of DXG or under suboptimal human recombinant interleukin-2 leads to minimal or no 65R→K reversion. These observations provide evidence that 65R→K reversion in the double mutant 65R + 74V is dependent on a specific rate of viral replication in a pNL4-3 background. A similar phenomenon may occur in vivo, which may have implications for treatment management strategies

  2. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyand, Mathias; Ryom, Lene; Shepherd, Leah

    2015-01-01

    -AIDS-defining cancers (NADC), AIDS-defining cancers (ADC), and the most frequently occurring ADC (Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma) and NADC (lung, invasive anal, head/neck cancers, and Hodgkin lymphoma). RESULTS: A total of 41,762 persons contributed 241,556 person-years (PY). A total of 1832 cancers were...

  3. CAPSULE REPORT: REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A failure analysis has been completed for the reverse osmosis (RO) process. The focus was on process failures that result in releases of liquids and vapors to the environment. The report includes the following: 1) A description of RO and coverage of the principles behind the proc...

  4. Time reversal and parity tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, K.

    1975-01-01

    A recent review by Henley discusses the present status of Time Reversal and Parity symmetry violations, and comments on the implications for high energy hadron scattering. This note will briefly summarize the situation with particular attention to the sizes of possible effects, relating them to experimental accuracy available or reasonably possible at the ZGS

  5. A Framework for Reverse Logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractReverse Logistics has been stretching out worldwide, involving all the layers of supply chains in various industry sectors. While some actors in the chain have been forced to take products back, others have pro-actively done so, attracted by the value in used products One way or the

  6. Reverse ventilation--perfusion mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmaz, J.C.; Barnett, C.A.; Reich, S.B.; Krumpe, P.E.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    Patients having lobar airway obstruction or consolidation usually have decreases of both ventilation and perfusion on lung scans. We report three patients in whom hypoxic vasoconstriction was apparently incomplete, resulting in a ''reversed'' ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Perfusion of the hypoxic lobe on the radionuclide scan was associated with metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary venous and pulmonary arterial hypertension in these patients

  7. Aminocarnitine and acylaminocarnitines: Carnitine acyltransferase inhibitors affecting long-chain fatty acid and glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine (DL-3-amino-4-trimethylaminobutyrate) and the acylaminocarnitines acetyl-, decanoyl- and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase and carnitine acetyltransferase in vitro and in vivo. Acetyl-DL-aaminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine acetyltransferase reported to date, and is competitive with respect to acetyl-L-carnitine. Mice given acetyl-DL-aminocarnitine metabolize [U- 14 C]acetyl-L-carnitine at about 60% of the rate of control mice. Palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase reported to date. Decanoyl-DL-aminocarnitine and DL-aminocarnitine are also very potent inhibitors; all compounds inhibit the catabolism of [ 14 C]palmitate to 14 CO 2 in intact mice by at least 50%. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase controls the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by aminocarnitine or acylaminocarnitines in vivo prevents or reverses ketogenesis in fasted mice, and causes the reversible accumulation of triglycerides in liver, kidney and plasma. Administration of DL-aminocarnitine to streptozotocindiabetic mice lowers plasma glucose levels and improves the glucose tolerance test

  8. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  9. Proteinaceous alpha-araylase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    -amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha...

  10. Corrosion inhibitors. Manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, M.W.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed information is presented relating to corrosion inhibitors. Areas covered include: cooling water, boilers and water supply plants; oil well and refinery operations; fuel and lubricant additives for automotive use; hydraulic fluids and machine tool lubes; grease compositions; metal surface treatments and coatings; and general processes for corrosion inhibitors

  11. Assessment and partial purification of serine protease inhibitors from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus annulatuslarvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Nabian

    Full Text Available Ticks are rich sources of serine protease inhibitors, particularly those that prevent blood clotting and inflammatory responses during blood feeding. The tick Rhipicephalus (Boophlus annulatusis an important ectoparasite of cattle. The aims of this study were to characterize and purify the serine protease inhibitors present in R. (B. annulatus larval extract. The inhibitors were characterized by means of one and two-dimensional reverse zymography, and purified using affinity chromatography on a trypsin-Sepharose column. The analysis on one and two-dimensional reverse zymography of the larval extract showed trypsin inhibitory activity at between 13 and 40 kDa. Through non-reducing SDS-PAGE and reverse zymography for proteins purified by trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography, some protein bands with molecular weights between 13 and 34 kDa were detected. Western blotting showed that five protein bands at 48, 70, 110, 130 and 250 kDa reacted positively with immune serum, whereas there was no positive reaction in the range of 13-40 kDa. Serine protease inhibitors from R. (B. annulatus have anti-trypsin activity similar to inhibitors belonging to several other hard tick species, thus suggesting that these proteins may be useful as targets in anti-tick vaccines.

  12. Reverse amblyopia with atropine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Bryan C; Sprunger, Derek C; Plager, David A; Neely, Daniel E; Guess, Matthew G

    2009-01-01

    Occlusion, pharmacologic pernalization and combined therapy have been documented in controlled studies to effectively treat amblyopia with few complications. However, there remain concerns about the effectiveness and complications when, as in this case, there are not standardized treatment protocols. A retrospective chart review of 133 consecutive patients in one community based ophthalmology practice treated for amblyopia was performed. Treatments evaluated were occlusion only, atropine penalization, and combination of occlusion and atropine. Reverse amblyopia was defined as having occured when the visual acuity of the sound eye was 3 LogMar units worse than visual acuity of the amblyopia eye after treatment. Improvement in vision after 6 months and 1 year of amblyopia therapy was similar among all three groups: 0.26 LogMar lines and 0.30 in the atropine group, 0.32 and 0.34 in the occlusion group, and 0.24 and 0.32 in the combined group. Eight (6%) patients demonstrated reverse amblyopia. The mean age of those who developed reverse amblyopia was 3.5 years, 1.5 years younger than the mean age of the study population, 7/8 had strabismic amblyopia, 6/8 were on daily atropine and had a mean refractive error of +4.77 diopters in the amblyopic eye and +5.06 diopters in the sound eye. Reverse amblyopia did not occur with occlusion only therapy. In this community based ophthalmology practice, atropine, patching, and combination therapy appear to be equally effective modalities to treat ambyopia. Highly hyperopic patients under 4 years of age with dense, strabismic amblyopia and on daily atropine appeared to be most at risk for development of reverse amblyopia.

  13. Ex vivo analysis identifies effective HIV-1 latency–reversing drug combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Gregory M.; Bullen, C. Korin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Martin, Alyssa R.; Hill, Alison L.; Durand, Christine M.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Reversal of HIV-1 latency by small molecules is a potential cure strategy. This approach will likely require effective drug combinations to achieve high levels of latency reversal. Using resting CD4+ T cells (rCD4s) from infected individuals, we developed an experimental and theoretical framework to identify effective latency-reversing agent (LRA) combinations. Utilizing ex vivo assays for intracellular HIV-1 mRNA and virion production, we compared 2-drug combinations of leading candidate LRAs and identified multiple combinations that effectively reverse latency. We showed that protein kinase C agonists in combination with bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 or histone deacetylase inhibitors robustly induce HIV-1 transcription and virus production when directly compared with maximum reactivation by T cell activation. Using the Bliss independence model to quantitate combined drug effects, we demonstrated that these combinations synergize to induce HIV-1 transcription. This robust latency reversal occurred without release of proinflammatory cytokines by rCD4s. To extend the clinical utility of our findings, we applied a mathematical model that estimates in vivo changes in plasma HIV-1 RNA from ex vivo measurements of virus production. Our study reconciles diverse findings from previous studies, establishes a quantitative experimental approach to evaluate combinatorial LRA efficacy, and presents a model to predict in vivo responses to LRAs. PMID:25822022

  14. Transcriptional changes associated with resistance to inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor revealed using metaanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, Sidra; Javed, Qamar; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    EGFR is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis in healthy cells, but in tumors it activates downstream signaling pathways, causing proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, EGFR is targeted in cancers using reversible, irreversible or antibody inhibitors. Unfortunately, tumors develop inhibitor resistance by mutations or overexpressing EGFR, or its ligand, or activating secondary, EGFR-independent pathways. Here we present a global metaanalysis comparing transcriptional profiles from matched pairs of EGFR inhibitor-sensitive vs. -resistant cell lines, using 15 datasets comprising 274 microarrays. We also analyzed separately pairs of cell lines derived using reversible, irreversible or antibody inhibitors. The metaanalysis identifies commonalities in cell lines resistant to EGFR inhibitors: in sensitive cell lines, the ontological categories involving the ErbB receptors pathways, cell adhesion and lipid metabolism are overexpressed; however, resistance to EGFR inhibitors is associated with overexpression of genes for ErbB receptors-independent oncogenic pathways, regulation of cell motility, energy metabolism, immunity especially inflammatory cytokines biosynthesis, cell cycle and responses to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. Specifically in Gefitinib-resistant cell lines, the immunity-associated genes are overexpressed, whereas in Erlotinib-resistant ones so are the mitochondrial genes and processes. Unexpectedly, lines selected using EGFR-targeting antibodies overexpress different gene ontologies from ones selected using kinase inhibitors. Specifically, they have reduced expression of genes for proliferation, chemotaxis, immunity and angiogenesis. This metaanalysis suggests that ‘combination therapies’ can improve cancer treatment outcomes. Potentially, use of mitochondrial blockers with Erlotinib, immunity blockers with Gefitinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors with antibody inhibitors, may have better chance of avoiding

  15. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Pani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice.

  16. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  17. Trend towards reverse leach process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The South African gold mining industry is making notable strides in improving recovery methods for both gold and uranium with significant additions to profits because of higher efficiencies and reductions in costs in the recovery processes. The most notable step on the gold side recently is the adoption of the reverse leach process at Buffelsfontein and Western Deep Levels. This process was pioneered at Hartebeesfontein as far back as 1975 and when introduced there resulted in a two and a half per cent improvement in recovery efficiencies. The essence of reverse leaching under which the uranium is recovered before the gold is the fact that the gold partly coated with iron oxide or locked in uranite, is exposed to be recovered later by cyanidation

  18. Reversible evolution of charged ergoregions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkotas, K.; Spyrou, N.

    1987-07-01

    The reversible evolution of a charged rotating ergoregion, due to the injection into it of particles with mass-energy and angular momentum, is studied systematically. As in the uncharged case, a bulge always forms on the outer boundary of the ergoregion due to the latter's angular momentum. The behavior of the bulge's position, relative to the black hole's rotation axis and equatorial plane, is studied, on the basis of the cosmic censorship hypothesis, during the ergoregion's reversible evolution. The range of the permitted values of the ergoregion's linear dimensions along the rotation axis and perpendicular to it is specified. Finally the differences with the evolution of an uncharged ergoregion are pointed out and discussed.

  19. Sugammadex to reverse neuromuscular blockade and provide optimal conditions for motor-evoked potential monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Trifa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugammadex is a novel pharmacologic agent, which reverses neuromuscular blockade (NMB via a mechanism that differs completely from acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. By encapsulating rocuronium, sugammadex can provide recovery of neuromuscular function even when there is a profound degree of NMB. We report anecdotal experience with the use of sugammadex to reverse NMB to facilitate intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (motor evoked potentials in an adolescent with scoliosis during posterior spinal fusion. Its potential application in this unique clinical scenario is discussed, and potential dosing schemes are reviewed.

  20. Malware analysis and reverse engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Šváb, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Focus of this thesis is reverse engineering in information technology closely linked with the malware analysis. It explains fundamentals of IA-32 processors architecture and basics of operating system Microsoft Windows. Main part of this thesis is dedicated to the malware analysis, including description of creating a tool for simplification of static part of the analysis. In Conclusion various approaches to the malware analysis, which were described in previous part of the thesis, are practic...

  1. How to play Reverse Hex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Bjarne; Hayward, Ryan B.; Henderson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    We present new results on how to play Reverse Hex, also known as Rex, or Misère Hex, on n × n boards. We give new proofs – and strengthened versions – of Lagarias and Sleator’s theorem (for n × n boards, each player can prolong the game until the board is full, so the first/second player can alwa...

  2. Theory of field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    This final report surveys the results of work conducted on the theory of field reversed configurations. This project has spanned ten years, beginning in early 1980. During this period, Spectra Technology was one of the leading contributors to the advances in understanding FRC. The report is organized into technical topic areas, FRC formation, equilibrium, stability, and transport. Included as an appendix are papers published in archival journals that were generated in the course of this report. 33 refs

  3. Reverse engineering of integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Gregory H.; Eckmann, Steven T.; Lain, Christopher M.; Veroff, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

  4. Risperidone-induced reversible neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattalai Kailasam, Vasanth; Chima, Victoria; Nnamdi, Uchechukwu; Sharma, Kavita; Shah, Kairav

    2017-01-01

    This case report presents a 44-year-old man with a history of schizophrenia who developed neutropenia on risperidone therapy. The patient's laboratory reports showed a gradual decline of leukocytes and neutrophils after resolution and rechallenging. This was reversed with the discontinuation of risperidone and by switching to olanzapine. In this case report, we also discuss the updated evidence base for management of risperidone-induced neutropenia.

  5. Aurintricarboxylic acid is a potent inhibitor of phosphofructokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, S A; Foe, L G; Kemp, R G; Jurin, R R

    1989-01-01

    Aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) was found to be a very potent inhibitor of purified rabbit liver phosphofructokinase (PFK), giving 50% inhibition at 0.2 microM. The inhibition was in a manner consistent with interaction at the citrate-inhibitory site of the enzyme. The data suggest that inhibition of PFK by ATA was not due to denaturation of the enzyme or the irreversible binding of inhibitor, since the inhibition could be reversed by addition of allosteric activators of PFK, i.e. fructose 2,6-bisphosphate or AMP. Two other tricarboxylic acids, agaric acid and (-)-hydroxycitrate, were found to inhibit PFK. ATA at much higher concentrations (500 microM) was shown to inhibit fatty acid synthesis from endogenous glycogen in rat hepatocytes; however, protein synthesis was not altered. PMID:2525029

  6. CONCEPTUAL ISSUES REGARDING REVERSE LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As the power of consumers is growing, the product return for customer service and customer retention has become a common practice in the competitive market, which propels the recent practice of reverse logistics in companies. Many firms attracted by the value available in the flow, have proactively participated in handling returned products at the end of their usefulness or from other parts of the product life cycle. Reverse logistics is the flow and management of products, packaging, components and information from the point of consumption to the point of origin. It is a collection of practices similar to those of supply chain management, but in the opposite direction, from downstream to upstream. It involves activities such as reuse, repair, remanufacture, refurbish, reclaim and recycle. For the conventional forward logistics systems, the flow starts upstream as raw materials, later as manufactured parts and components to be assembled and continues downstream to reach customers as final products to be disposed once they reach their economic or useful lives. In reverse logistics, the disposed products are pushed upstream to be repaired, remanufactured, refurbished, and disassembled into components to be reused or as raw material to be recycled for later use.

  7. SELECTED PROBLEMS OF REVERSE LOGISTICS IN POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Mesjasz-Lech

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the essence of reverse logistics and directions of physical and information flows between logistic network partners. It also analyses effects of implementation of the principles of reverse logistics in Poland in the years 2004-2007

  8. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  9. Periodicity and Immortality in Reversible Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Kari , Jarkko; Ollinger , Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Additional material available on the web at http://www.lif.univ-mrs.fr/~nollinge/rec/gnirut/; We investigate the decidability of the periodicity and the immortality problems in three models of reversible computation: reversible counter machines, reversible Turing machines and reversible one-dimensional cellular automata. Immortality and periodicity are properties that describe the behavior of the model starting from arbitrary initial configurations: immortality is the property of having at le...

  10. Andexanet alfa effectively reverses edoxaban anticoagulation effects and associated bleeding in a rabbit acute hemorrhage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Genmin; Pine, Polly; Leeds, Janet M.; DeGuzman, Francis; Pratikhya, Pratikhya; Lin, Joyce; Malinowski, John; Hollenbach, Stanley J.; Curnutte, John T.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors necessitates effective reversal agents to manage bleeding. Andexanet alfa, a novel modified recombinant human FXa, rapidly reverses the anticoagulation effects of direct and indirect FXa inhibitors. Objective To evaluate the ability of andexanet to reverse anticoagulation in vitro and reduce bleeding in rabbits administered edoxaban. Materials and methods In vitro studies characterized the interaction of andexanet with edoxaban and its ability to reverse edoxaban-mediated anti-FXa activity. In a rabbit model of surgically induced, acute hemorrhage, animals received edoxaban vehicle+andexanet vehicle (control), edoxaban (1 mg/kg)+andexanet vehicle, edoxaban+andexanet (75 mg, 5-minute infusion, 20 minutes after edoxaban), or edoxaban vehicle+andexanet prior to injury. Results Andexanet bound edoxaban with high affinity similar to FXa. Andexanet rapidly and dose-dependently reversed the effects of edoxaban on FXa activity and coagulation pharmacodynamic parameters in vitro. In edoxaban-anticoagulated rabbits, andexanet reduced anti-FXa activity by 82% (from 548±87 to 100±41 ng/ml; P<0.0001), mean unbound edoxaban plasma concentration by ~80% (from 100±10 to 21±6 ng/ml; P<0.0001), and blood loss by 80% vs. vehicle (adjusted for control, 2.6 vs. 12.9 g; P = 0.003). The reduction in blood loss correlated with the decrease in anti-FXa activity (r = 0.6993, P<0.0001) and unbound edoxaban (r = 0.5951, P = 0.0035). Conclusion These data demonstrate that andexanet rapidly reversed the anticoagulant effects of edoxaban, suggesting it could be clinically valuable for the management of acute and surgery-related bleeding. Correlation of blood loss with anti-FXa activity supports the use of anti-FXa activity as a biomarker for assessing anticoagulation reversal in clinical trials. PMID:29590221

  11. r-Universal reversible logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, A de; Storme, L

    2004-01-01

    Reversible logic plays a fundamental role both in ultra-low power electronics and in quantum computing. It is therefore important to know which reversible logic gates can be used as building block for the reversible implementation of an arbitrary boolean function and which cannot

  12. THEORETICAL FRAMES FOR DESIGNING REVERSE LOGISTICS PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Janusz K. Grabara; Sebastian Kot

    2009-01-01

    Logistics processes of return flow became more and more important in present business practice. Because of better customer satisfaction, environmental and financial aspects many enterprises deal with reverse logistics performance. The paper is a literature review focused on the design principles of reverse logistics processes Keywords: reverse logistics, designing.

  13. Prefix reversals on binary and ternary strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkens, C.A.J.; van Iersel, L.J.J.; Keijsper, J.C.M.; Kelk, S.M.; Stougie, L.; Tromp, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Given a permutation $\\pi$, the application of prefix reversal $f^{(i)}$ to $\\pi$ reverses the order of the first $i$ elements of $\\pi$. The problem of sorting by prefix reversals (also known as pancake flipping), made famous by Gates and Papadimitriou (Discrete Math., 27 (1979), pp. 47–57), asks

  14. Prefix reversals on binary and ternary strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkens, C.A.J.; Iersel, van L.J.J.; Keijsper, J.C.M.; Kelk, S.M.; Stougie, L.; Tromp, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Given a permutation $\\pi$, the application of prefix reversal $f^{(i)}$ to $\\pi$ reverses the order of the first $i$ elements of $\\pi$. The problem of sorting by prefix reversals (also known as pancake flipping), made famous by Gates and Papadimitriou (Discrete Math., 27 (1979), pp. 47–57), asks for

  15. A new protein inhibitor of trypsin and activated Hageman factor from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Gong, Y X; Richardson, M

    1990-10-29

    A protein inhibitor (CMTI-V; Mr 7106) of trypsin and activated Hageman factor (Factor XIIa), a serine protease involved in blood coagulation, has been isolated for the first time from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seeds by means of trypsin-affinity chromatography and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The dissociation constants of the inhibitor complexes with trypsin and Factor XIIa have been determined to be 1.6 x 10(-8) and 4.1 x 10(-8) M, respectively. The primary structure of CMTI-V is reported. The protein has 68 amino acid residues and one disulfide bridge and shows a high level of sequence homology to the Potato I inhibitor family. Furthermore, its amino terminus consists of an N-acetylates Ser. The reactive site has been established to be the peptide bond between Lys44-Asp45. The modified inhibitor which has the reactive site peptide bond hydrolyzed inhibits trypsin but not the Hageman factor.

  16. Endoperoxidation, hyperprostaglandinemia, and hyperlipidemia in a case of erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Reversal with VP-16 and indomethacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R E; Bowman, W P; D'Cruz, C A; Pick, T E; Champion, J E

    1987-11-15

    Clinicopathologic and histopathologic evidence of both endoperoxidation with hyperprostaglandinemia and hyperlipidemia in a 5-week-old infant with a hemophagocytic syndrome is reported. Institution of histiocytolytic (VP-16) and cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) therapies returned the prostaglandin levels and lipid profile to a nearly normal state coincidental with clinical recovery. It appears that by reducing the cell mass of histiocytes and controlling the over-production of prostaglandins, some types of hemophagocytic syndrome can be reversed.

  17. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  18. Repeatable Reverse Engineering with PANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-08

    necessary layout information for the Android 2.3 and 4.2 SDK kernels. See Section IV-C for an example of the kind of deep reverse engineering of Android apps ...code re-use and simplifying complex analysis development. We demonstrate PANDA’s effectiveness via a number of use cases, including enabling an old but...continue to function. 2) Identify critical vulnerabilities . 3) Understand the true purpose and actions of code. It is common for legacy code to stop

  19. Corrosion protected reversing heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawierucha, R.

    1984-01-01

    A reversing heat exchanger of the plate and fin type having multiple aluminum parting sheets in a stacked arrangement with corrugated fins separating the sheets to form multiple flow paths, means for closing the ends of the sheets, an input manifold arrangement of headers for the warm end of of the exchanger and an output manifold arrangement for the cold end of the exchanger with the input air feed stream header and the waste gas exhaust header having an alloy of zinc and aluminum coated on the inside surface for providing corrosion protection to the stack

  20. Presbycusis: reversible with anesthesia drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Carl A

    2009-02-01

    Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is a degenerative condition not currently treatable by medication. It is therefore significant that the author, as a patient, experienced a reversal of high-frequency hearing loss during a 2-day period following abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. This report documents the surgery and the subsequent restoration of hearing, which was bilateral and is estimated to have exceeded 50dB at 4kHz. A possible role is noted for anesthetic agents such as lidocaine, propofol, or fentanyl. This experience may hold a clue for research toward the development of medical treatments for presbycusis.

  1. Field-reversed mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor design is a multicell arrangement wherein a series of field-reversed plasma layers are arranged along the axis of a long superconducting solenoid which provides the background magnetic field. Normal copper mirror coils and Ioffe bars placed at the first wall radius provide shallow axial and radial magnetic wells for each plasma layer. Each of 11 plasma layers requires the injection of 3.6 MW of 200 keV deuterium and tritium and produces 20 MW of fusion power. The reactor has a net electric output of 74 MWe and an estimated direct capital cost of $1200/kWe

  2. Kinematic reversal schemes for the geomagnetic dipole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in the distribution of cyclonic convective cells, in the earth's core, can reverse the sign of the geomagnetic field. Two kinematic reversal schemes are discussed. In the first scheme, a field maintained by cyclones concentrated at low latitude is reversed by a burst of cyclones at high latitude. Conversely, in the second scheme, a field maintained predominantly by cyclones in high latitudes is reversed by a fluctuation consisting of a burst of cyclonic convection at low latitude. The precise fluid motions which produce the geomagnetic field are not known. However, it appears that, whatever the details are, a fluctuation in the distribution of cyclonic cells over latitude can cause a geomagnetic reversal.

  3. Theta, time reversal and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotto, Davide [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Kapustin, Anton [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Komargodski, Zohar [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Seiberg, Nathan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-05-17

    SU(N) gauge theory is time reversal invariant at θ=0 and θ=π. We show that at θ=π there is a discrete ’t Hooft anomaly involving time reversal and the center symmetry. This anomaly leads to constraints on the vacua of the theory. It follows that at θ=π the vacuum cannot be a trivial non-degenerate gapped state. (By contrast, the vacuum at θ=0 is gapped, non-degenerate, and trivial.) Due to the anomaly, the theory admits nontrivial domain walls supporting lower-dimensional theories. Depending on the nature of the vacuum at θ=π, several phase diagrams are possible. Assuming area law for space-like loops, one arrives at an inequality involving the temperatures at which CP and the center symmetry are restored. We also analyze alternative scenarios for SU(2) gauge theory. The underlying symmetry at θ=π is the dihedral group of 8 elements. If deconfined loops are allowed, one can have two O(2)-symmetric fixed points. It may also be that the four-dimensional theory around θ=π is gapless, e.g. a Coulomb phase could match the underlying anomalies.

  4. Exercise prescription to reverse frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Nick W; Smart, Rowan R; Jakobi, Jennifer M; Jones, Gareth R

    2016-10-01

    Frailty is a clinical geriatric syndrome caused by physiological deficits across multiple systems. These deficits make it challenging to sustain homeostasis required for the demands of everyday life. Exercise is likely the best therapy to reverse frailty status. Literature to date suggests that pre-frail older adults, those with 1-2 deficits on the Cardiovascular Health Study-Frailty Phenotype (CHS-frailty phenotype), should exercise 2-3 times a week, for 45-60 min. Aerobic, resistance, flexibility, and balance training components should be incorporated but resistance and balance activities should be emphasized. On the other hand, frail (CHS-frailty phenotype ≥ 3 physical deficits) older adults should exercise 3 times per week, for 30-45 min for each session with an emphasis on aerobic training. During aerobic, balance, and flexibility training, both frail and pre-frail older adults should work at an intensity equivalent to a rating of perceived exertion of 3-4 ("somewhat hard") on the Borg CR10 scale. Resistance-training intensity should be based on a percentage of 1-repetition estimated maximum (1RM). Program onset should occur at 55% of 1RM (endurance) and progress to higher intensities of 80% of 1RM (strength) to maximize functional gains. Exercise is the medicine to reverse or mitigate frailty, preserve quality of life, and restore independent functioning in older adults at risk of frailty.

  5. Theta, time reversal and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiotto, Davide; Kapustin, Anton; Komargodski, Zohar; Seiberg, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    SU(N) gauge theory is time reversal invariant at θ=0 and θ=π. We show that at θ=π there is a discrete ’t Hooft anomaly involving time reversal and the center symmetry. This anomaly leads to constraints on the vacua of the theory. It follows that at θ=π the vacuum cannot be a trivial non-degenerate gapped state. (By contrast, the vacuum at θ=0 is gapped, non-degenerate, and trivial.) Due to the anomaly, the theory admits nontrivial domain walls supporting lower-dimensional theories. Depending on the nature of the vacuum at θ=π, several phase diagrams are possible. Assuming area law for space-like loops, one arrives at an inequality involving the temperatures at which CP and the center symmetry are restored. We also analyze alternative scenarios for SU(2) gauge theory. The underlying symmetry at θ=π is the dihedral group of 8 elements. If deconfined loops are allowed, one can have two O(2)-symmetric fixed points. It may also be that the four-dimensional theory around θ=π is gapless, e.g. a Coulomb phase could match the underlying anomalies.

  6. Optimized reversible binary-coded decimal adders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Babu and Chowdhury [H.M.H. Babu, A.R. Chowdhury, Design of a compact reversible binary coded decimal adder circuit, Journal of Systems Architecture 52 (5) (2006) 272-282] recently proposed, in this journal, a reversible adder for binary-coded decimals. This paper corrects and optimizes...... their design. The optimized 1-decimal BCD full-adder, a 13 × 13 reversible logic circuit, is faster, and has lower circuit cost and less garbage bits. It can be used to build a fast reversible m-decimal BCD full-adder that has a delay of only m + 17 low-power reversible CMOS gates. For a 32-decimal (128-bit....... Keywords: Reversible logic circuit; Full-adder; Half-adder; Parallel adder; Binary-coded decimal; Application of reversible logic synthesis...

  7. Kinetic Line Voronoi Operations and Their Reversibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Gold, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In Geographic Information Systems the reversibility of map update operations has not been explored yet. In this paper we are using the Voronoi based Quad-edge data structure to define reversible map update operations. The reversibility of the map operations has been formalised at the lowest level...... mechanisms and dynamic map visualisations. In order to use the reversibility within the kinetic Voronoi diagram of points and open oriented line segments, we need to assure that reversing the map commands will produce exactly the changes in the map equivalent to the previous map states. To prove...... that reversing the map update operations produces the exact reverse changes, we show an isomorphism between the set of complex operations on the kinetic Voronoi diagram of points and open oriented line segments and the sets of numbers of new / deleted Voronoi regions induced by these operations, and its...

  8. 3, 4-methylenedioximethamphetamin reverses anxiety induced by chronic mild stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Andrea León A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the effects of subchronic 3, 4 methylenedioximethamphetamine (MDMA on the elevated plusmaze, a widely used animal model of anxiety. Rats exposed to a mild chronic stress (MCS protocol received intracerebroventricular microinjections of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI – fluoxetine (2.0 ug/ul or MDMA, (2.0 ug/ul for seven days. On the eighth day rats were tested in the elevated plus-maze. Our results showed that sub chronic MDMA interacted with MCS leading to a decrease in anxiety related behaviors including: percentage of open arms entries (F [2, 26] = 4.00; p = 0.031, time spent in the open arms (F [2, 26] = 3.656; p = 0.040 and time spent in the open arms extremities (F [2, 26] = 5.842; p = 0.008. These results suggest a potential effect of MDMA in the reversion of the emotional significance of aversive stimuli.

  9. Selective reversal of muscle relaxation in general anesthesia: focus on sugammadex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin J Brull

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sorin J Brull1, Mohamed Naguib21Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Jacksonville, FL, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center,  Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Despite the significant improvements in the pharmacology of muscle relaxants in the past six decades, the search for the ideal muscle relaxant continues, mainly because of the incomplete efficacy and persistent side effects associated with their antagonism. Clinical concerns remain about the residual paralysis and hemodynamic side effects associated with the classic pharmacologic reversal agents, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Although the development of the “ideal muscle relaxant” remains illusory, pharmacologic advancements hold promise for improved clinical care and patient safety. Recent clinical advances include the development of short-acting nondepolarizing muscle relaxant agents that have fast onset and a very rapid metabolism that allows reliable and complete recovery; and the development of selective, “designer” reversal agents that are specific for a single drug or class of drugs. This article reviews recent developments in the pharmacology of these selective reversal agents: plasma cholinesterases, cysteine, and sugammadex. Although each of the selective reversal agents is specific in its substrate, the clinical use of the combination of muscle relaxant with its specific reversal agent will allow much greater intraoperative titrating ability, decreased side effect profile, and may result in a decreased incidence of postoperative residual paralysis and improved patient safety.Keywords: selective reversal agents, cysteine, plasma cholinesterases, sugammadex

  10. Metal corrosion inhibitors and ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasts, H.; Svarce, J.; Berge, B.

    1999-01-01

    The use of metal corrosion inhibitors in water is one of the cheapest method to protect metals against corrosion. However, the used inhibitors can come to surface water in the course of time and can become as source of environmental pollution. It is important to co-ordinate amount of substances in the elaborated inhibitors not only with demands for metal protection, but also with demands for quality of surface water and drinking water according to normative statements: 3.5 mg/l (as PO 4 ) for hexametaphosphate, tripolyphosphate and phosphonate; 40 mg/l (as SiO 2 for silicate, up to 1 mg/l for CU 2+ ; up to 5 mg/l for Zn 2+ ; up to 1 mg/l for B; up to 0.5 mg/l for Mo 2+ . The examples of the elaborated inhibitors are given. Many organic substances can be used as corrosion inhibitors, but there is shortage of standard methods for their analysis in water in Latvia. Removing of salt's deposits from boilers needs elaboration of a separate normative statement for dispersing waste water which content chloride at high concentration and heavy metals. (authors)

  11. SGLT2 Inhibitors in Diabetes Mellitus Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Guzman, Juan; Rosas-Saucedo, Juan; Romero-Garcia, Alma R J

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic illness with high prevalence in Mexico, Latin- America, and the world and is associated to high morbidity, disability, and mortality rate, especially in developing countries. T2DM physiopathology is very complex; insulin resistance in the muscle, liver, and adipose tissue, a reduction in the production of incretins (mainly GLP-1) in the intestine, increased glucagon synthesis, an insufficient response of insulin generation, and increased glucose reabsorption in the kidney lead all together to an hyperglycemic state, which has been closely associated with the development of micro and macrovascular complications. Sodium Glucose Linked Transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) are the most recent therapeutic class available for treating T2DM. SGLT2i central effect is a glycosuric action, and they can reverse the deleterious effect of tubular reabsorption of glucose in the diabetic patient resulting in greater hyperglycemia. Because their mechanism of action is completely different to current drugs, they can be considered as monotherapy or in combination with any other oral or parenteral medication, including different types of insulin or its analogues. This therapeutic synergy accomplishes a greater percentage of patients achieving glycemic control goals. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Interpreting clinical assays for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinet, Nadine; Bertrand, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    As opposed to genetics, dealing with gene expressions by direct DNA sequence modifications, the term epigenetics applies to all the external influences that target the chromatin structure of cells with impact on gene expression unrelated to the sequence coding of DNA itself. In normal cells, epigenetics modulates gene expression through all development steps. When “imprinted” early by the environment, epigenetic changes influence the organism at an early stage and can be transmitted to the progeny. Together with DNA sequence alterations, DNA aberrant cytosine methylation and microRNA deregulation, epigenetic modifications participate in the malignant transformation of cells. Their reversible nature has led to the emergence of the promising field of epigenetic therapy. The efforts made to inhibit in particular the epigenetic enzyme family called histone deacetylases (HDACs) are described. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been proposed as a viable clinical therapeutic approach for the treatment of leukemia and solid tumors, but also to a lesser degree for noncancerous diseases. Three epigenetic drugs are already arriving at the patient’s bedside, and more than 100 clinical assays for HDACi are registered on the National Cancer Institute website. They explore the eventual additive benefits of combined therapies. In the context of the pleiotropic effects of HDAC isoforms, more specific HDACi and more informative screening tests are being developed for the benefit of the patients

  13. Effects of SGLT2 inhibitors on weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribola, F A; Cançado, F B; Schoueri, J H M; De Toni, V F; Medeiros, V H R; Feder, D

    2017-01-01

    SGLT2 (sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2) inhibitors are a new class of drugs which reversibly block the glucose reabsorption that occurs in the kidneys. Since their mechanisms of action do not rely on insulin secretion, they constitute a complementary alternative to the classic treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A glycemic level reduction in patients who used SGLT2 inhibitors due to the reversible block of their transporters could be observed. Associated with this, there was a reduction in body weight and blood pressure (BP) caused by osmotic diuresis. Few adverse effects and low drug interaction combined with antihyperglycemic effects are some of the benefits of these inhibitors widely discussed in clinical trials. Patients with history of urogenital infections or those on diuretics must be carefully evaluated before the administration of these drugs. While a promising class of drugs indicated as a treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, SGLT2 inhibitors should not be prescribed for individuals with severe renal or hepatic impairment. Therefore, as there are only a few situations in which they should not be indicated, the efficacy, safety and tolerability of these inhibitors allow them to be used in a wide range of patients. Nevertheless, further researches are required so that the possible long-term risks can be studied and the benefits associated with their use can be more objectively elucidated.

  14. Pathophysiology of visual disorders induced by phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschos MM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marilita M Moschos, Eirini Nitoda 1st Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece Aim: The aim of this review was to summarize the ocular action of the most common phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitors used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and the subsequent visual disorders.Method: This is a literature review of several important articles focusing on the pathophysiology of visual disorders induced by PDE inhibitors.Results: PDE inhibitors have been associated with ocular side effects, including changes in color vision and light perception, blurred vision, transient alterations in electroretinogram (ERG, conjunctival hyperemia, ocular pain, and photophobia. Sildenafil and tadalafil may induce reversible increase in intraocular pressure and be involved in the development of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. Reversible idiopathic serous macular detachment, central serous chorioretinopathy, and ERG disturbances have been related to the significant impact of sildenafil and tadalafil on retinal perfusion.Discussion: So far, PDE inhibitors do not seem to cause permanent toxic effects on chorioretinal tissue and photoreceptors. However, physicians should write down any visual symptom observed during PDE treatment and refer the patients to ophthalmologists. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, pathophysiological mechanisms, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, PDE5, visual disorders

  15. Reversal of androgen inhibition of estrogen-activated sexual behavior by cholinergic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohanich, G P; Cada, D A

    1989-12-01

    Androgens have been found to inhibit lordosis activated by estrogen treatment of ovariectomized female rats. In the present experiments, dihydrotestosterone propionate (200 micrograms for 3 days) inhibited the incidence of lordosis in ovariectomized females treated with estradiol benzoate (1 microgram for 3 days). This inhibition of lordosis was reversed 15 min after bilateral intraventricular infusion of physostigmine (10 micrograms/cannula), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, or carbachol (0.5 microgram/cannula), a cholinergic receptor agonist. This reversal of inhibition appears to be mediated by cholinergic muscarinic receptors since pretreatment with scopolamine (4 mg/kg, ip), a muscarinic receptor blocker, prevented the reversal of androgen inhibition by physostigmine. These results indicate that androgens may inhibit estrogen-activated lordosis through interference with central cholinergic muscarinic mechanisms.

  16. In vitro HIV-1 evolution in response to triple reverse transcriptase inhibitors & in silico phenotypic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Rath

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of ART regimens strongly depends upon complex interactions between the selective pressure of drugs and the evolution of mutations that allow or restrict drug resistance.Four clinical isolates from NRTI-exposed, NNRTI-naive subjects were passaged in increasing concentrations of NVP in combination with 1 µM 3 TC and 2 µM ADV to assess selective pressures of multi-drug treatment. A novel parameter inference procedure, based on a stochastic viral growth model, was used to estimate phenotypic resistance and fitness from in vitro combination passage experiments.Newly developed mathematical methods estimated key phenotypic parameters of mutations arising through selective pressure exerted by 3 TC and NVP. Concentrations of 1 µM 3 TC maintained the M184V mutation, which was associated with intrinsic fitness deficits. Increasing NVP concentrations selected major NNRTI resistance mutations. The evolutionary pathway of NVP resistance was highly dependent on the viral genetic background, epistasis as well as stochasticity. Parameter estimation indicated that the previously unrecognized mutation L228Q was associated with NVP resistance in some isolates.Serial passage of viruses in the presence of multiple drugs may resemble the selection of mutations observed among treated individuals and populations in vivo and indicate evolutionary preferences and restrictions. Phenotypic resistance estimated here "in silico" from in vitro passage experiments agreed well with previous knowledge, suggesting that the unique combination of "wet-" and "dry-lab" experimentation may improve our understanding of HIV-1 resistance evolution in the future.

  17. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patel, Rahul V.; Park, S.W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 17 (2015), s. 5247-5263 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Pyrrole * Arylthiopyrrole * Triciribine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.923, year: 2015

  18. An Analysis of Enzyme Kinetics Data for Mitochondrial DNA Strand Termination by Nucleoside Reverse Transcription Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine V.; Song, Zhuo; Cao, Yang; Samuels, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs used in antiretroviral treatment have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity. The polymerase-γ hypothesis states that this toxicity stems from the analogs' inhibition of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase (polymerase-γ) leading to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. We have constructed a computational model of the interaction of polymerase-γ with activated nucleoside and nucleotide analog drugs, based on experimentally measured reaction rates and base excision rates, together with the mtDNA genome size, the human mtDNA sequence, and mitochondrial dNTP concentrations. The model predicts an approximately 1000-fold difference in the activated drug concentration required for a 50% probability of mtDNA strand termination between the activated di-deoxy analogs d4T, ddC, and ddI (activated to ddA) and the activated forms of the analogs 3TC, TDF, AZT, FTC, and ABC. These predictions are supported by experimental and clinical data showing significantly greater mtDNA depletion in cell culture and patient samples caused by the di-deoxy analog drugs. For zidovudine (AZT) we calculated a very low mtDNA replication termination probability, in contrast to its reported mitochondrial toxicity in vitro and clinically. Therefore AZT mitochondrial toxicity is likely due to a mechanism that does not involve strand termination of mtDNA replication. PMID:19132079

  19. Suicide Inhibitors of Reverse Transcriptase in the Therapy of AIDS and Other Retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    are shown below. One of the first, [N-(L-3-tran carboxyxiran-2-carbonyl)-L-leucyl]-amido (4-guanido) butane was isolated from Asperg /II japonicus and...using uridine nucleosides to enhance the antiviral selectivity. j, Synthesis of Uridine 2’ and 3*-Ribosoiroxr’es 3*-uridine spiroxirane was...system used (Figure 2). Also shown in this figure is the enhanced sensitivity of the vaccif recombinant HIV-RT to Foscarnet when expressed in monkey kidney

  20. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  1. ROCK inhibitors in ocular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Halasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rho kinases (ROCKs have a crucial role in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization and thus are involved in broad aspects of cell motility, from smooth muscle contraction to neurite outgrowth. The first marketed ROCK inhibitor, called fasudil, has been used safely for treatment of cerebral vasospasm since 1995 in Japan. During the succeeding decades ROCK inhibitors have been applied in many pathological conditions from central nervous system disorders to cardiovascular disease as potential therapeutic agents or experimental tools to help understand the underlying (pathomechanisms. In 2014, a fasudil derivate named ripasudil was accepted for clinical use in glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Since ROCK kinases are widely expressed in ocular tissues, they have been implicated in the pathology of many ocular conditions such as corneal dysfunction, glaucoma, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal detachment. This paper aims to provide an overview of the most recent status/application of ROCK inhibitors in the field of eye disease.

  2. Reversal of diaschisis by zolpidem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, R.P.; Nel, H.W.; Sathekge, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Recent literature has reported on clinical improvement after zolpidem, a GABAergic anti insomnia drug, in brain injury and stroke patients. In this study, the effect of zolpidem on crossed cerebellar diaschisis was investigated in such patients. Method: Four patients with crossed cerebellar diaschisis after brain injury or stroke were investigated before and after application of 10 mg zolpidem by 99mTc HMPAO brain SPECT. Result: Apart from clinical improvements, 99mTc HMPAO brain SPECT studies showed reversal of the crossed cerebellar diaschisis and improvement of perfusion defects after zolpidem. Conclusion: 99mTc HMPAO brain SPECT may have a role to pre-select brain injury and stroke patients who will benefit clinically from zolpidem therapy. (author)

  3. Model of reverse steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malasek, V.; Manek, O.; Masek, V.; Riman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The claim of Czechoslovak discovery no. 239272 is a model designed for the verification of the properties of a reverse steam generator during the penetration of water, steam-water mixture or steam into liquid metal flowing inside the heat exchange tubes. The design may primarily be used for steam generators with a built-in inter-tube structure. The model is provided with several injection devices configured in different heat exchange tubes, spaced at different distances along the model axis. The design consists in that between the pressure and the circumferential casings there are transverse partitions and that in one chamber consisting of the circumferential casings, pressure casing and two adjoining partitions there is only one passage of the injection device through the inter-tube space. (Z.M.). 1 fig

  4. HIV transmitted drug resistance in adult and pediatric populations in Panama Farmacorresistencia transmitida del VIH en poblaciones adultas y pediátricas en Panamá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Castillo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant HIV among adults in Panama by using a modified World Health Organization Threshold Survey (WHO-TS and to investigate rates of initial resistance among HIV-positive infants in Panama. METHODS: At the Gorgas Memorial Institute, 47 HIV-positive adults were genotyped for mutations associated with transmitted drug resistance (TDR in the reverse transcriptase and protease genes of HIV-1, according to WHO-TS guidelines, modified to include patients ≤ 26 years old. Prevalence rates for drug-resistance mutations against three classes of antiretroviral drugs-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, and protease inhibitors-were calculated as low ( 15.0%. Twenty-five infant patients were also geno-typed and prevalence rates for drug-resistance mutations were calculated. RESULTS: TDR among Panamanian adults was moderate: 6 of 47 HIV-positive adults showed one or more mutations associated with TDR. Horizontal TDR mutations were moderate for NRTIs and NNRTIs and low for protease inhibitors. Vertical transmission of HIV in Panama has decreased for 2002-2007, but vertical HIV TDR prevalence is moderate (12.0% and is emerging as a problem due to incomplete antiretroviral coverage in pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HIV TDR indicated by this study, combined with known rates of HIV infection in Panama, suggests more extensive surveys are needed to identify risk factors associated with transmission of HIV drug resistance. Specific WHO-TS guidelines for monitoring vertical transmission of drug-resistant HIV should be established.OBJETIVO: Investigar la prevalencia de farmacorresistencia transmitida del VIH en adultos en Panamá mediante un estudio del umbral modificado de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS e investigar las tasas de resistencia inicial en lactantes seropositivos para el VIH en Panamá. M

  5. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  6. Reversible arithmetic logic unit for quantum arithmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Glück, Robert; Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2010-01-01

    This communication presents the complete design of a reversible arithmetic logic unit (ALU) that can be part of a programmable reversible computing device such as a quantum computer. The presented ALU is garbage free and uses reversible updates to combine the standard reversible arithmetic...... and logical operations in one unit. Combined with a suitable control unit, the ALU permits the construction of an r-Turing complete computing device. The garbage-free ALU developed in this communication requires only 6n elementary reversible gates for five basic arithmetic-logical operations on two n......-bit operands and does not use ancillae. This remarkable low resource consumption was achieved by generalizing the V-shape design first introduced for quantum ripple-carry adders and nesting multiple V-shapes in a novel integrated design. This communication shows that the realization of an efficient reversible...

  7. Principles of a reversible programming language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The principles of reversible programming languages are explicated and illustrated with reference to the design of a high-level imperative language, Janus. The fundamental properties for such languages include backward as well as forward determinism and reversible updates of data. The unique design...... languages, and demonstrate this for Janus. We show the practicality of the language by implementation of a reversible fast Fourier transform. Our results indicate that the reversible programming paradigm has fundamental properties that are relevant to many different areas of computer science....... features of the language include explicit post-condition assertions, direct access to an inverse semantics and the possibility of clean (i.e., garbage-free) computation of injective functions. We suggest the clean simulation of reversible Turing machines as a criterion for computing strength of reversible...

  8. Acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors: mechanisms and prevention strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viloria-Petit, Alicia M.; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Potent and specific, or relatively specific, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecular weight compounds, have been successfully developed. Both types of agent have been found to have significant antitumor activity, especially when used in combination with radio- hormone- and chemotherapy in preclinical studies. Because of the potentiation of the conventional drug activity in these combination settings, inhibitors of EGFR signaling have often been referred to as sensitizers for chemotherapy or radiation, as well as drug resistance reversal agents. Phase II clinical trials in head-and-neck as well as lung cancer suggested this concept of chemosensitization might translate into the clinic, but this remains to be definitively proven in randomized, double-blind Phase III trials. Given the extensive preclinical literature on EGFR blocking drugs and the advanced clinical development of such agents, it is surprising that the possibility of development of acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitors themselves, a common clinical problem with virtually all other currently used anticancer drugs, remains a largely unexplored subject of investigation. Here we summarize some of the possible mechanisms that can result in acquired resistance to EGFR-targeting drugs. Alternative combination therapies to circumvent and delay this problem are suggested

  9. Securing Biometric Images using Reversible Watermarking

    OpenAIRE

    Thampi, Sabu M.; Jacob, Ann Jisma

    2011-01-01

    Biometric security is a fast growing area. Protecting biometric data is very important since it can be misused by attackers. In order to increase security of biometric data there are different methods in which watermarking is widely accepted. A more acceptable, new important development in this area is reversible watermarking in which the original image can be completely restored and the watermark can be retrieved. But reversible watermarking in biometrics is an understudied area. Reversible ...

  10. Combining or Separating Forward and Reverse Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Larsen, Samuel; Nielsen, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – While forward logistics handles and manages the flow of goods downstream in the supply chain from suppliers to customers, reverse logistics (RL) manages the flow of returned goods upstream. A firm can combine reverse logistics with forward logistics, keep the flows separated, or choose......-research addresses intra-RL issues while the relationship between forward and reverse logistics is under-researched. This paper contributes to RL-theory by identifying the contextual factors that determine the most advantageous relationship between forward and reverse logistics, and proposes a novel decision making...

  11. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  12. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guangli; Ximenes, Eduardo; Nichols, Nancy N; Zhang, Leyu; Ladisch, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Removal of enzyme inhibitors released during lignocellulose pretreatment is essential for economically feasible biofuel production. We tested bio-abatement to mitigate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in corn stover liquors after pretreatment with either dilute acid or liquid hot water at 10% (w/v) solids. Bio-abatement of liquors was followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. To distinguish between inhibitor effects on enzymes and recalcitrance of the substrate, pretreated corn stover solids were removed and replaced with 1% (w/v) Solka Floc. Cellulose conversion in the presence of bio-abated liquors from dilute acid pretreatment was 8.6% (0.1x enzyme) and 16% (1x enzyme) higher than control (non-abated) samples. In the presence of bio-abated liquor from liquid hot water pretreated corn stover, 10% (0.1x enzyme) and 13% (1x enzyme) higher cellulose conversion was obtained compared to control. Bio-abatement yielded improved enzyme hydrolysis in the same range as that obtained using a chemical (overliming) method for mitigating inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors in clinical urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ückert, Stefan; Kuczyk, Markus A; Oelke, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    To date, benign diseases of the male and female lower urinary and genital tract, such as erectile dysfunction, bladder overactivity, lower urinary tract symptomatology secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia and symptoms of female sexual dysfunction (including arousal and orgasmic disorders), can be therapeutically approached by influencing the function of the smooth musculature of the respective tissues. The use of isoenzyme-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors is considered a great opportunity to treat various diseases of the human urogenital tract. PDE inhibitors, in particular the PDE5 (cyclic GMP PDE) inhibitors avanafil, lodenafil, sildenafil, tadalafil, udenafil and vardenafil, are regarded as efficacious, having a fast onset of drug action and an improved effect-to-adverse event ratio, combining a high response rate with the advantage of an on-demand intake. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent as well as potential future indications, namely, erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease, overactive bladder, urinary stone disease, lower urinary tract symptomatology secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia and premature ejaculation, for the use of PDE inhibitors in clinical urology.

  14. Inhibitors of mTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Beijnen, Jos H.; Gurney, Howard; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and appear to have a role in the treatment of other malignancies. The primary objective of this drug review is to provide pharmacokinetic and dynamic properties of the commonly used drugs

  15. Retroviral proteinases and their inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, Juraj

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 3, 3,4 (2000), s. 23-24 [ Proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors in physiology and pathogenesis. 14.09.2000, Plzen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Reversal of Stress-Induced Social Interaction Deficits by Buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2018-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating post-traumatic stress disorder. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of chronic social defeat stress to prospective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/d) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by chronic social defeat stress were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/d), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/d), and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/d). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by chronic social defeat stress following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 hours, also reinstated social interaction behavior in mice that were susceptible to chronic social defeat. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis found: (1) Oprm1 mRNA expression was reduced in the hippocampus and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice and (2) Oprk1 mRNA expression was reduced in the amygdala and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice compared to non-stressed controls and stress-resilient mice. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine

  17. Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, FL; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL; 3DBS Labs Inc, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Disagreement exists regarding the etiology of cessation of the observed clinical results with administration of reuptake inhibitors. Traditionally, when drug effects wane, it is known as tachyphylaxis. With reuptake inhibitors, the placebo effect is significantly greater than the drug effect in the treatment of depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, leading some to assert that waning of drug effects is placebo relapse, not tachyphylaxis.Methods: Two groups were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 was composed of subjects with depression and Group 2 was composed of bariatric subjects treated with reuptake inhibitors for appetite suppression.Results: In Group 1, 200 subjects with depression were treated with citalopram 20 mg per day. A total of 46.5% (n = 93 achieved relief of symptoms (Hamilton-D rating score ≤ 7, of whom 37 (39.8% of whom experienced recurrence of depression symptoms, at which point an amino acid precursor formula was started. Within 1–5 days, 97.3% (n = 36 experienced relief of depression symptoms. In Group 2, 220 subjects were treated with phentermine 30 mg in the morning and citalopram 20 mg at 4 pm. In this group, 90.0% (n = 198 achieved adequate appetite suppression. The appetite suppression ceased in all 198 subjects within 4–48 days. Administration of an amino acid precursor formula restored appetite suppression in 98.5% (n = 195 of subjects within 1–5 days.Conclusion: Reuptake inhibitors do not increase the total number of monoamine molecules in the central nervous system. Their mechanism of action facilitates redistribution of monoamines from one place to another. In the process, conditions are induced that facilitate depletion of monoamines. The "reuptake inhibitor monoamine depletion theory" of this paper

  18. Time reversal and the neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupp, T. E.; Cooper, R. L.; Coulter, K. P.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Jones, G. L.; Garcia, A.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the triple correlation D n >/J n ·(β e x p-hat ν ) with a polarized cold-neutron beam (Mumm et al., Phys Rev Lett 107:102301, 2011; Chupp et al., Phys Rev C 86:035505, 2012). A non-zero value of D can arise due to parity-even-time-reversal-odd interactions that imply CP violation. Final-state effects also contribute to D at the level of 10  − 5 and can be calculated with precision of 1 % or better. The D coefficient is uniquely sensitive to the imaginary part of the ratio of axial-vector and vector beta-decay amplitudes as well as to scalar and tensor interactions that could arise due to beyond-Standard-Model physics. Over 300 million proton-electron coincidence events were used in a blind analysis with the result D = [ − 0.94±1.89 (stat)±0.97(sys)]×10  − 4 . Assuming only vector and axial vector interactions in beta decay, our result can be interpreted as a measure of the phase of the axial-vector coupling relative to the vector coupling, φ AV = 180.012 ° ± 0.028 °. This result also improves constrains on certain non-VA interactions.

  19. Reversible hypothyroidism and Whipple's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Huy A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major cause of primary hypothyroidism is autoimmune mediated with progressive and permanent destruction of the thyroid gland resulting in life-long replacement therapy. Treatable and reversible hypothyroidism is unusual and here forth is such a case due to infection of the thyroid gland with Tropheryma whippleii, Whipple disease. Case presentation A 45 year-old female presented with symptoms and signs consistent with primary hypothyroidism, which was also confirmed biochemically. Her response to thyroxine replacement therapy was poor however, requiring a significantly elevated amount. Further investigation revealed the presence of Whipple's disease involving the gastrointestinal trace and possibly the thyroid gland. Her thyroxine requirement decreased drastically following appropriate antimicrobial therapy for Whipple's disease to the extent that it was ceased. Thyrotropin releasing hormone testing in the steady state suggested there was diminished thyroid reserve due to Whipple's disease. Conclusion This is the first ante-mortem case report studying the possible involvement of the thyroid gland by Whipple's disease. Despite the normalization of her thyroid function test biochemically after antibiotic therapy, there is diminished thyroid reserve thus requiring close and regular monitoring.

  20. Time reversal and the neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chupp, T. E., E-mail: chupp@umich.edu; Cooper, R. L.; Coulter, K. P. [Univeristy of Michigan (United States); Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K. [University of California and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (United States); Jones, G. L. [Hamilton College (United States); Garcia, A. [University of Washington (United States); Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E. [Tulane University (United States); Wilkerson, J. F. [University of North Carolina (United States); Collaboration: emiT II Collaboration

    2013-03-15

    We have measured the triple correlation D/J{sub n}{center_dot}({beta}{sub e} x p-hat{sub {nu}}) with a polarized cold-neutron beam (Mumm et al., Phys Rev Lett 107:102301, 2011; Chupp et al., Phys Rev C 86:035505, 2012). A non-zero value of D can arise due to parity-even-time-reversal-odd interactions that imply CP violation. Final-state effects also contribute to D at the level of 10{sup - 5} and can be calculated with precision of 1 % or better. The D coefficient is uniquely sensitive to the imaginary part of the ratio of axial-vector and vector beta-decay amplitudes as well as to scalar and tensor interactions that could arise due to beyond-Standard-Model physics. Over 300 million proton-electron coincidence events were used in a blind analysis with the result D = [ - 0.94{+-}1.89 (stat){+-}0.97(sys)] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup - 4}. Assuming only vector and axial vector interactions in beta decay, our result can be interpreted as a measure of the phase of the axial-vector coupling relative to the vector coupling, {phi}{sub AV} = 180.012 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.028 Degree-Sign . This result also improves constrains on certain non-VA interactions.

  1. Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) Antidepressant SNRIs help relieve depression symptoms, such as irritability and sadness, ... effects they may cause. By Mayo Clinic Staff Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are a class ...

  2. Contemporary protease inhibitors and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the evidence linking use of HIV protease inhibitors with excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV+ populations. RECENT FINDINGS: For the two contemporary most frequently used protease inhibitors, darunavir and atazanavir [both pharmacologically boosted...

  3. Protease inhibitors and indoleamines selectively inhibit cholinesterases in the histopathologic structures of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C I; Guela, C; Mesulam, M M

    1993-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques express acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in Alzheimer disease. We previously reported that traditional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as BW284C51, tacrine, and physostigmine were more potent inhibitors of the acetylcholinesterase in normal axons and cell bodies than of the acetylcholinesterase in plaques and tangles. We now report that the reverse pattern is seen with indoleamines (such as serotonin and its precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan), carboxypeptidase inhibitor, and the nonspecific protease inhibitor bacitracin. These substances are more potent inhibitors of the cholinesterases in plaques and tangles than of those in normal axons and cell bodies. These results show that the enzymatic properties of plaque and tangle-associated cholinesterases diverge from those of normal axons and cell bodies. The selective susceptibility to bacitracin and carboxypeptidase inhibitor indicates that the catalytic sites of plaque and tangle-bound cholinesterases are more closely associated with peptidase or protease-like properties than the catalytic sites of cholinesterases in normal axons and cell bodies. This shift in enzymatic affinity may lead to the abnormal protein processing that is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The availability of pharmacological and dietary means for altering brain indoleamines raises therapeutic possibilities for inhibiting the abnormal cholinesterase activity associated with Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:8421706

  4. Multiple reversal olfactory learning in honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Mota

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In multiple reversal learning, animals trained to discriminate a reinforced from a non-reinforced stimulus are subjected to various, successive reversals of stimulus contingencies (e.g. A+ vs. B-, A- vs. B+, A+ vs. B-. This protocol is useful to determine whether or not animals learn to learn and solve successive discriminations faster (or with fewer errors with increasing reversal experience. Here we used the olfactory conditioning of proboscis extension reflex to study how honeybees Apis mellifera perform in a multiple reversal task. Our experiment contemplated four consecutive differential conditioning phases involving the same odors (A+ vs. B- to A- vs. B+ to A+ vs. B- to A- vs. B+. We show that bees in which the weight of reinforced or non-reinforced stimuli was similar mastered the multiple olfactory reversals. Bees which failed the task exhibited asymmetric responses to reinforced and non-reinforced stimuli, thus being unable to rapidly reverse stimulus contingencies. Efficient reversers did not improve their successive discriminations but rather tended to generalize their choice to both odors at the end of conditioning. As a consequence, both discrimination and reversal efficiency decreasedalong experimental phases. This result invalidates a learning-to-learn effect and indicates that bees do not only respond to the actual stimulus contingencies but rather combine these with an average of past experiences with the same stimuli.  

  5. Online Reverse Auctions for Procurement of Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U.L. Radkevitch (Uladzimir)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOnline reverse auctions, in which a buyer seeks to select a supplier and suppliers compete for contracts by bidding online, revolutionized corporate procurement early this century. Shortly after they had been pioneered by General Electric, many companies rushed to adopt reverse auctions

  6. Vibrational dynamics of ice in reverse micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, A.M.; Petersen, C.; Woutersen, S.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    he ultrafast vibrational dynamics of HDO:D2O ice at 180 K in anionic reverse micelles is studied by midinfrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Solutions containing reverse micelles are cooled to low temperatures by a fast-freezing procedure. The heating dynamics of the micellar solutions is

  7. Reversible logic gates on Physarum Polycephalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider possibilities how to implement asynchronous sequential logic gates and quantum-style reversible logic gates on Physarum polycephalum motions. We show that in asynchronous sequential logic gates we can erase information because of uncertainty in the direction of plasmodium propagation. Therefore quantum-style reversible logic gates are more preferable for designing logic circuits on Physarum polycephalum

  8. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Christopher C; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-11-24

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number (the ratio of advection to Coriolis force). Instead, stretching of the magnetic field by a strong shear in the east-west flow near the imaginary cylinder just touching the inner core and parallel to the axis of rotation is crucial to the reversal mechanism in our models, which involves a process akin to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.

  9. Reverse engineering of the robot base platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar A Rahman; Azizul Rahman A Aziz; Mohd Arif Hamzah; Muhd Nor Atan; Fadil Ismail; Rosli Darmawan

    2009-01-01

    The robot base platform used to place the robotic arm version 2 was imported through a local company. The robot base platform is used as a reference for reverse egineering development for a smaller size robot. The paper will discuss the reverse engineering design process and parameters involved in the development of the robot base platform. (Author)

  10. Reverse logistics: A review of case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito, de M.P.; Dekker, Rommert; Flapper, S.D.P.; Fleischmann, B.; Klose, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of scientific literature that describes and discusses cases of reverse logistics activities in practice. Over sixty case studies are considered. Based on these studies we are able to indicate critical factors for the practice of reverse logistics. In addition we compare

  11. Reversal of laryngotracheal separation in paediatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, Orla

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Laryngotracheal separation (LTS) is an effective and reliable definitive treatment for intractable aspiration. A major advantage of this treatment for intractable aspiration is its\\' potential reversibility. Should the underlying disorder improve, a reversal of the procedure may be attempted. This has been successfully achieved in the adult population. To our knowledge, no previous cases have been reported of successful reversal of LTS in children. METHODS: A retrospective review from 2003 to 2010 identified four cases of intractable aspiration treated with LTS in our department. Two of these patients displayed objective evidence of sufficient recovery of their underlying aspiration to consider reversal. Patient selection for reversal was dependent upon successful oral intake for 9 months along with videofluoroscopic evidence of normal or minimally impaired swallow. RESULTS: Two children who were successfully treated for intractable aspiration with LTS demonstrated objective evidence of recovery sufficient to attempt reversal. Both children underwent successful surgical reversal of LTS using a cricotracheal resection with end-to-end anastamosis, similar to that used in treatment of subglottic stenosis. Both children can now tolerate oral diet and their speech and language development is in line with their overall developmental level. CONCLUSIONS: Laryngotracheal separation is an effective and reliable definitive treatment for intractable aspiration facilitating protection of the airway and allowing safe swallowing with unimpeded respiration, but with the major drawback of loss of phonation. To our knowledge, we document the first two cases of successful LTS reversal in children.

  12. Observation of the reversed current effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I.R.; Silawatshananai, C.

    1979-05-01

    The paper describes an observation of the reversed current effect, and its consequences, in a 'stabilized' Z-pinch. Magnetic probe measurements and holographic interferometry were used to follow the development of a reversed current layer and to pinpoint its location in the outer region of the pinched plasma column. The subsequent ejection of the outer plasma layer was observed using fast photography

  13. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Chris; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes ...... to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.......A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes...... place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines...

  14. Kronisk ileus efter iatrogen reversering af tyndtarmen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mark Ellebaek; Rahr, Hans B; Mahdi, Bassam

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of inadvertent reversal of the entire small intestine leading to severe complications and long-standing ileus. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and laparotomy. The patient was cured by surgical re-reversal of the bowel. Care should be taken to ma...... the bowel ends when multiple simultaneous bowel resections are performed....

  15. Probabilistic Reversible Automata and Quantum Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Golovkins, Marats; Kravtsev, Maksim

    2002-01-01

    To study relationship between quantum finite automata and probabilistic finite automata, we introduce a notion of probabilistic reversible automata (PRA, or doubly stochastic automata). We find that there is a strong relationship between different possible models of PRA and corresponding models of quantum finite automata. We also propose a classification of reversible finite 1-way automata.

  16. Reduction rules for reset/inhibitor nets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, H.M.W.; Wynn, M.T.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Reset/inhibitor nets are Petri nets extended with reset arcs and inhibitor arcs. These extensions can be used to model cancellation and blocking. A reset arc allows a transition to remove all tokens from a certain place when the transition fires. An inhibitor arc can stop a transition from being

  17. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    current barriers of kinase inhibitors, including poor selectivity and emergence of drug resistance. In spite of the small number of identified allosteric inhibitors in comparison with that of inhibitors targeting the ATP pocket, encouraging results, such as the FDA-approval of the first small...

  18. Designing Novel Quaternary Quantum Reversible Subtractor Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Majid; Monfared, Asma Taheri

    2018-01-01

    Reversible logic synthesis is an important area of current research because of its ability to reduce energy dissipation. In recent years, multiple valued logic has received great attention due to its ability to reduce the width of the reversible circuit which is a main requirement in quantum technology. Subtractor circuits are between major components used in quantum computers. In this paper, we will discuss the design of a quaternary quantum reversible half subtractor circuit using quaternary 1-qudit, 2-qudit Muthukrishnan-Stroud and 3-qudit controlled gates and a 2-qudit Generalized quaternary gate. Then a design of a quaternary quantum reversible full subtractor circuit based on the quaternary half subtractor will be presenting. The designs shall then be evaluated in terms of quantum cost, constant input, garbage output, and hardware complexity. The proposed quaternary quantum reversible circuits are the first attempt in the designing of the aforementioned subtractor.

  19. Parkinson’s disease managing reversible neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient’s PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  20. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-07

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software--http://pyemma.org--as of version 2.0.

  1. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.

    2002-10-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  2. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakajima, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Rewoldt, G.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  3. Reversed field pinch ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma models are described and used to calculated numerically the transport confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady state operation points for both the reversed field pinch (RFP) and the tokamak. The models are used to examine the CIT tokamak ignition conditions and the RFP experimental and ignition conditions. Physics differences between RFPs and tokamaks and their consequences for a D-T ignition machine are discussed. Compared with a tokamak, the ignition RFP has many physics advantages, including Ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, lower ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits) and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic field, larger aspect ratios and smaller plasma cross-sections, translate to significant cost reductions for both ignition and reactor applications. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. Devices that are under construction should go a long way toward resolving this scaling uncertainty. The 4 MA ZTH is expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data by three orders of magnitude above the results of ZT-40M, and, if the present scaling holds, ZTH is expected to achieve a D-T equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q = 1. A base case RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. (author). 19 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Condensed Tannins from Longan Bark as Inhibitor of Tyrosinase: Structure, Activity, and Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wei-Ming; Huang, Qian; Lin, Mei-Zhen; Ou-Yang, Chong; Huang, Wen-Yang; Wang, Ying-Xia; Xu, Kai-Li; Feng, Hui-Ling

    2018-01-31

    In this study, the content, structure, antityrosinase activity, and mechanism of longan bark condensed tannins were evaluated. The findings obtained from mass spectrometry demonstrated that longan bark condensed tannins were mixtures of procyanidins, propelargonidins, prodelphinidins, and their acyl derivatives (galloyl and p-hydroxybenzoate). The enzyme analysis indicated that these mixtures were efficient, reversible, and mixed (competitive is dominant) inhibitor of tyrosinase. What's more, the mixtures showed good inhibitions on proliferation, intracellular enzyme activity and melanogenesis of mouse melanoma cells (B 16 ). From molecular docking, the results showed the interactions between inhibitors and tyrosinase were driven by hydrogen bond, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, high levels of total phenolic and extractable condensed tannins suggested that longan bark might be a good source of tyrosinase inhibitor. This study would offer theoretical basis for the development of longan bark condensed tannins as novel food preservatives and medicines of skin diseases.

  5. Discovery of a Parenteral Small Molecule Coagulation Factor XIa Inhibitor Clinical Candidate (BMS-962212).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Smith, Leon M; Quan, Mimi L; Lam, Patrick Y S; Rossi, Karen A; Apedo, Atsu; Bozarth, Jeffrey M; Wu, Yiming; Zheng, Joanna J; Xin, Baomin; Toussaint, Nathalie; Stetsko, Paul; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Maxwell, Brad; Crain, Earl J; Wong, Pancras C; Lou, Zhen; Harper, Timothy W; Chacko, Silvi A; Myers, Joseph E; Sheriff, Steven; Zhang, Huiping; Hou, Xiaoping; Mathur, Arvind; Seiffert, Dietmar A; Wexler, Ruth R; Luettgen, Joseph M; Ewing, William R

    2017-12-14

    Factor XIa (FXIa) is a blood coagulation enzyme that is involved in the amplification of thrombin generation. Mounting evidence suggests that direct inhibition of FXIa can block pathologic thrombus formation while preserving normal hemostasis. Preclinical studies using a variety of approaches to reduce FXIa activity, including direct inhibitors of FXIa, have demonstrated good antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding. On the basis of this potential, we targeted our efforts at identifying potent inhibitors of FXIa with a focus on discovering an acute antithrombotic agent for use in a hospital setting. Herein we describe the discovery of a potent FXIa clinical candidate, 55 (FXIa K i = 0.7 nM), with excellent preclinical efficacy in thrombosis models and aqueous solubility suitable for intravenous administration. BMS-962212 is a reversible, direct, and highly selective small molecule inhibitor of FXIa.

  6. Reversibility: An Engineer's Point of View

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berest, Pierre [LMS, ecole Polytechnique (France)

    2012-07-01

    Reversibility is the most consistent option in a democratic country. However reversibility may also have several drawbacks which must be identified and mitigated. Reversibility of a geological repository is a relatively new idea in France. The 1991 law dedicated to nuclear waste management considered reversibility as a possible option. Fifteen years later, the 2006 law mandated that a deep repository must be reversible and that the exact content of this notion should be defined by a new law to be discussed by the Parliament in 2015. Reversibility was not a concern put forward by engineers. It clearly originated from a societal demand sponsored and formulated by the Parliament. Since 1991, the exact meaning of this mandate progressively became more precise. In the early days, reversibility meant the technical and financial capability to retrieve the wastes from the repository, at least for some period of time after being emplaced. Progressively, a broader definition, suggested by Andra, was accepted: reversibility also means that a disposal facility should be operated in such a way that a stepwise decision-making process is possible. At each step, society must be able to decide to proceed to the next step, to pause or to reverse a step. Several benefits can be expected from a reversible repository. Some technical safety concerns may be only recognised after waste emplacement. Radioactive wastes may become a resource whose recoverability is desirable. Regulations may change, alternative waste treatment or better disposal techniques may be developed, or the need to modify a component of the facility may arise. Looking back at how chemical or domestic wastes were managed some 50 years ago easily underscores that it is not unreasonable to hope for significant advances in the future. For scientists and engineers, reversibility proves to have several other merits. To design and build a good repository, time is needed. The operator of a mine or of an oil field knows that

  7. Trade-off between synergy and efficacy in combinations of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M

    2018-02-01

    Eradicating HIV-1 infection is difficult because of the reservoir of latently infected cells that gets established soon after infection, remains hidden from antiretroviral drugs and host immune responses, and retains the capacity to reignite infection following the cessation of treatment. Drugs called latency-reversing agents (LRAs) are being developed to reactivate latently infected cells and render them susceptible to viral cytopathicity or immune killing. Whereas individual LRAs have failed to induce adequate reactivation, pairs of LRAs have been identified recently that act synergistically and hugely increase reactivation levels compared to individual LRAs. The maximum synergy achievable with LRA pairs is of clinical importance, as it would allow latency-reversal with minimal drug exposure. Here, we employed stochastic simulations of HIV-1 transcription and translation in latently infected cells to estimate this maximum synergy. We incorporated the predominant mechanisms of action of the two most promising classes of LRAs, namely, protein kinase C agonists and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and quantified the activity of individual LRAs in the two classes by mapping our simulations to corresponding in vitro experiments. Without any adjustable parameters, our simulations then quantitatively captured experimental observations of latency-reversal when the LRAs were used in pairs. Performing simulations representing a wide range of drug concentrations, we estimated the maximum synergy achievable with these LRA pairs. Importantly, we found with all the LRA pairs we considered that concentrations yielding the maximum synergy did not yield the maximum latency-reversal. Increasing concentrations to increase latency-reversal compromised synergy, unravelling a trade-off between synergy and efficacy in LRA combinations. The maximum synergy realizable with LRA pairs would thus be restricted by the desired level of latency-reversal, a constrained optimum we elucidated with

  8. Stabilization versus inhibition of TAFIa by competitive inhibitors in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, J.B.; Hughes, B.; James, I.; Haddock, P.; Kluft, C.; Bajzar, L.

    2003-01-01

    Two competitive inhibitors of TAFIa (activated thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor), 2-guanidinoethyl-mercaptosuccinic acid and potato tuber carboxypeptidase inhibitor, variably affect fibrinolysis of clotted human plasma. Depending on their concentration, the inhibitors shortened, prolonged,

  9. Molecular design and structure--activity relationships leading to the potent, selective, and orally active thrombin active site inhibitor BMS-189664.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jagabandhu; Kimball, S David; Hall, Steven E; Han, Wen Ching; Iwanowicz, Edwin; Lin, James; Moquin, Robert V; Reid, Joyce A; Sack, John S; Malley, Mary F; Chang, Chiehying Y; Chong, Saeho; Wang-Iverson, David B; Roberts, Daniel G M; Seiler, Steven M; Schumacher, William A; Ogletree, Martin L

    2002-01-07

    A series of structurally novel small molecule inhibitors of human alpha-thrombin was prepared to elucidate their structure-activity relationships (SARs), selectivity and activity in vivo. BMS-189664 (3) is identified as a potent, selective, and orally active reversible inhibitor of human alpha-thrombin which is efficacious in vivo in a mouse lethality model, and at inhibiting both arterial and venous thrombosis in cynomolgus monkey models.

  10. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  11. Reversible Lithium Neurotoxicity: Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Sources: A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. Study Selection: A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Extraction: The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Data Synthesis: Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Conclusions: Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate

  12. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity: review of the literatur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan; Phutane, Vivek H

    2012-01-01

    Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate preventive measures. This recognition will help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of

  13. Parallelization of Reversible Ripple-carry Adders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2009-01-01

    The design of fast arithmetic logic circuits is an important research topic for reversible and quantum computing. A special challenge in this setting is the computation of standard arithmetical functions without the generation of \\emph{garbage}. Here, we present a novel parallelization scheme...... wherein $m$ parallel $k$-bit reversible ripple-carry adders are combined to form a reversible $mk$-bit \\emph{ripple-block carry adder} with logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(m+k)$ for a \\emph{minimal} logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{mk})$, thus improving on the $mk$-bit ripple-carry adder logic depth $\\mathcal...

  14. Reverse logistics in the Brazilian construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, K R A; Mahler, C F; Valle, R A

    2009-09-01

    In Brazil most Construction and Demolition Waste (C&D waste) is not recycled. This situation is expected to change significantly, since new federal regulations oblige municipalities to create and implement sustainable C&D waste management plans which assign an important role to recycling activities. The recycling organizational network and its flows and components are fundamental to C&D waste recycling feasibility. Organizational networks, flows and components involve reverse logistics. The aim of this work is to introduce the concepts of reverse logistics and reverse distribution channel networks and to study the Brazilian C&D waste case.

  15. Reversible perspective and splitting in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Helen Schoenhals

    2012-01-01

    The element of time--the experience of it and the defensive use of it--is explored in conjunction with the use of reversible perspective as a psychotic defense. Clinical material from a long analysis illustrates how a psychotic patient used the reversible perspective, with its static splitting, to abolish the experience of time. When he improved and the reversible perspective became less effective for him, he replaced it with a more dynamic splitting mechanism using time gaps. With further improvement, the patient began to experience the passage of time, and along with it the excruciating pain of separation, envy, and loss.

  16. Performance of the reverse Helmbold universal portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choon Peng; Kuang, Kee Seng; Lee, Yap Jia

    2017-04-01

    The universal portfolio is an important investment strategy in a stock market where no stochastic model is assumed for the stock prices. The zero-gradient set of the objective function estimating the next-day portfolio which contains the reverse Kullback-Leibler order-alpha divergence is considered. From the zero-gradient set, the explicit, reverse Helmbold universal portfolio is obtained. The performance of the explicit, reverse Helmbold universal portfolio is studied by running them on some stock-price data sets from the local stock exchange. It is possible to increase the wealth of the investor by using these portfolios in investment.

  17. Time reversibility in the quantum frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masot-Conde, Fátima [Escuela Superior Ingenieros, Dpt. Física Aplicada III, Universidad de Sevilla Isla Mágica, 41092- Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-12-04

    Classic Mechanics and Electromagnetism, conventionally taken as time-reversible, share the same concept of motion (either of mass or charge) as the basis of the time reversibility in their own fields. This paper focuses on the relationship between mobile geometry and motion reversibility. The goal is to extrapolate the conclusions to the quantum frame, where matter and radiation behave just as elementary mobiles. The possibility that the asymmetry of Time (Time’s arrow) is an effect of a fundamental quantum asymmetry of elementary particles, turns out to be a consequence of the discussion.

  18. Refractory reverse amblyopia with atropine penalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Ajit Patil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological penalization with atropine has been shown to be equally effective as conventional occlusion therapy in the treatment of amblyopia in children. Reverse amblyopia of the sound eye with atropine penalization has been reported before, but is more common in cases where the effect is augmented with optical penalization and is mostly reversible. We report a case of reverse amblyopia with atropine penalization, in a 4-year-old girl, which was refractory to treatment. This report highlights the need for strict monitoring of the vision in the sound eye and regular follow-up in children undergoing amblyopia treatment.

  19. A376S in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers increased risk of virological failure to nevirapine therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredes, Roger; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Bannister, Wendy; Kisic, Mónica; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pou, Christian; Bellido, Rocío; Betancor, Gilberto; Bogner, Johannes; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Clotet, Bonaventura; Lundgren, Jens; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Poll, B.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Iacomi, F.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Finazzi, R.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; d'Arminio, A.; Rozentale, B.; Aldins, P.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Reiss, P.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Brunn, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Prokopowicz, D.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Valadas, E.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Vinogradova, E.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokrás, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Martin-Carbonero, L.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Karlsson, A.; Persson, P. O.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; Lundgren, J.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Kirk, O.; Mocroft, A.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Ellefson, M.; Podlekareva, D.; Kjaer, J.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Kowalska, J.; Tverland, J.; Fischer, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical relevance of mutations in the connection subdomain and the ribonuclease (RNase) H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is uncertain. The risk of virological failure to nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was evaluated in NNRTI-naive patients who

  20. Inhibitory effect of the reversal agents V-104, GF120918 and Pluronic L61 on MDR1 Pgp-, MRP1- and MRP2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, R.; Kool, M.; Smith, A. J.; van Deemter, L.; de Haas, M.; Borst, P.

    2000-01-01

    The human multidrug transporter MDR1 P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 transport a range of cytotoxic drugs, resulting in multidrug resistance in tumour cells. To overcome this form of drug resistance in patients, several inhibitors (reversal agents) of these

  1. Reversible machine code and its abstract processor architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert; Yokoyama, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    A reversible abstract machine architecture and its reversible machine code are presented and formalized. For machine code to be reversible, both the underlying control logic and each instruction must be reversible. A general class of machine instruction sets was proven to be reversible, building...

  2. Update on the pharmacology of selective inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B: focus on modulation of CNS monoamine neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finberg, John P M

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO) were initially used in medicine following the discovery of their antidepressant action. Subsequently their ability to potentiate the effects of an indirectly-acting sympathomimetic amine such as tyramine was discovered, leading to their limitation in clinical use, except for cases of treatment-resistant depression. More recently, the understanding that: a) potentiation of indirectly-acting sympathomimetic amines is caused by inhibitors of MAO-A but not by inhibitors of MAO-B, and b) that reversible inhibitors of MAO-A cause minimal tyramine potentiation, has led to their re-introduction to clinical use for treatment of depression (reversible MAO-A inhibitors and new dose form MAO-B inhibitor) and treatment of Parkinson's disease (MAO-B inhibitors). The profound neuroprotective properties of propargyl-based inhibitors of MAO-B in preclinical experiments have drawn attention to the possibility of employing these drugs for their neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases, and have raised the question of the involvement of the MAO-mediated reaction as a source of reactive free radicals. Despite the long-standing history of MAO inhibitors in medicine, the way in which they affect neuronal release of monoamine neurotransmitters is still poorly understood. In recent years, the detailed chemical structure of MAO-B and MAO-A has become available, providing new possibilities for synthesis of mechanism-based inhibitors. This review describes the latest advances in understanding the way in which MAO inhibitors affect the release of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin (5-HT) in the CNS, with an accent on the importance of these effects for the clinical actions of the drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Constraining the reversing and non-reversing modes of the geodynamo. New insights from magnetostratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V.; Shatsillo, A.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the evolution in the geomagnetic reversal frequency over hundreds of million years is not a trivial matter. Beyond the fact that there are long periods without reversals, known as superchrons, and periods with many reversals, the way the reversal frequency changes through time during reversing periods is still debated. A smooth evolution or a succession of stationary segments have both been suggested to account for the geomagnetic polarity time scale since the Middle-Late Jurassic. Sudden changes from a reversing mode to a non-reversing mode of the geodynamo may also well have happened, the switch between the two modes having then possibly been controlled by the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary. There is, nevertheless, a growing set of magnetostratigraphic data, which could help decipher a proper interpretation of the reversal history, in particular in the early Paleozoic and even during the Precambrian. Although yielding a fragmentary record, these data reveal the occurrence of both additional superchrons and periods characterized by extremely high, not to say extraordinary, magnetic reversal frequencies. In this talk, we will present a synthesis of these data, mainly obtained from Siberia, and discuss their implication for the magnetic reversal behavior over the past billion years.

  4. Neratinib Reverses ATP-Binding Cassette B1-Mediated Chemotherapeutic Drug Resistance In Vitro, In Vivo, and Ex Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiao-qin; Xie, Jing-dun; Chen, Xing-gui; Sim, Hong May; Zhang, Xu; Liang, Yong-ju; Singh, Satyakam; Talele, Tanaji T.; Sun, Yueli; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2012-01-01

    Neratinib, an irreversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, is in phase III clinical trials for patients with human epidermal receptor 2-positive, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. The objective of this study was to explore the ability of neratinib to reverse tumor multidrug resistance attributable to overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Our results showed that neratinib remarkably enhanced the sensitivity of ABCB1...

  5. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection by the Candidate Microbicide Dapivirine, a Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, P.; Harman, S.; Azijn, H.; Armanasco, N.; Manlow, P.; Perumal, D.; de Bethune, M.-P.; Nuttall, J.; Romano, J.; Shattock, R.

    2008-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains the major route of infection worldwide; thus, there is an urgent need for additional prevention strategies, particularly strategies that could be controlled by women, such as topical microbicides. Potential microbicide candidates must be both safe and effective. Using cellular and tissue explant models, we have evaluated the activity of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine as a vaginal micr...

  6. Long-acting reversible hormonal contraception

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Long-acting reversible hormonal contraceptives are effective methods of birth control that provide contraception for an extended ... The World Health Organization (WHO) has online tools available .... trials and marketing experience.

  7. Reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, D.M.; Cuker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) provide safe and effective anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis in a variety of clinical settings by interfering with the activity of thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). Although TSOACs have practical advantages over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), there are currently no antidotes to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Herein we summarize the available evidence for TSOAC reversal using nonspecific and specific reversal agents. We discuss important limitations of existing evidence, which is derived from studies in human volunteers, animal models and in vitro experiments. Studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of reversal agents on clinical outcomes such as bleeding and mortality in patients with TSOAC-associated bleeding are needed. PMID:24880102

  8. Magnetization reversal mechanisms under oblique magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntallis, N.; Efthimiadis, K.G., E-mail: kge@auth.gr

    2017-03-01

    In this work finite element micromagnetic simulations were performed in order to study the reversal mechanisms of spherical ferromagnetic particles with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, when they are magnetized along an oblique direction with respect to the anisotropy axis. Magnetization loops are taken in different directions of external magnetic field, at different anisotropy constants and particle sizes. In the simulation results, the three reversal mechanisms (coherent, curling and domains) are observed and new phenomena arise due to the action of oblique magnetic fields. Moreover, the dependence of the critical fields with respect to the angle of the external field is presented. - Highlights: • Finite element micromagnetic simulation of the three different reversal mechanisms. • For the curling mechanism, the new phenomenon is the rotation of the vortex. • In the domain reversal mechanism, the formed domain wall is smaller than 180°. • In soft ferromagnetic particles a rearrangement of the magnetic domains is observed.

  9. Medical abortion reversal: science and politics meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Khadijah Z; Nguyen, Antoinette T; Stuart, Gretchen S

    2018-03-01

    Medical abortion is a safe, effective, and acceptable option for patients seeking an early nonsurgical abortion. In 2014, medical abortion accounted for nearly one third (31%) of all abortions performed in the United States. State-level attempts to restrict reproductive and sexual health have recently included bills that require physicians to inform women that a medical abortion is reversible. In this commentary, we will review the history, current evidence-based regimen, and regulation of medical abortion. We will then examine current proposed and existing abortion reversal legislation. The objective of this commentary is to ensure physicians are armed with rigorous evidence to inform patients, communities, and policy makers about the safety of medical abortion. Furthermore, given the current paucity of evidence for medical abortion reversal, physicians and policy makers can dispel bad science and misinformation and advocate against medical abortion reversal legislation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stability of the field-reversed mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of a field reversed mirror plasma configuration is studied with an energy principle derived from the Vlasov equation. Because of finite orbit effects, the stability properties of a field-reversed mirror are different from the stability properties of similar magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. The Vlasov energy principle developed here is applied to a computer simulation of an axisymmetric field-reversed mirror state. It has been possible to prove that the l = 0 modes, called tearing modes, satisfy a sufficient condition for stability. Precessional modes, with l = 1, 2, are found to be unstable at low growth rate. This suggests possible turbulent behavior (Bohm confinement) in the experimental devices aiming at field reversal. Techniques for suppressing these instabilities are outlined, and the applicability of the Vlasov energy principle to more complicated equilibrium models is shown

  11. Modified and reverse radiometric flow injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myint, U; Ba, H; Khin, M M; Aung, K; Thida, [Yangon Univ. (Myanmar). Dept. of Chemistry; Toelgyessy, J [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Environmental Science

    1994-06-01

    Determination of [sup 137]Cs and [sup 60]Co by using modified and reverse radiometric flow injection analysis is described. Two component RFIA was also realized using [sup 60]Co and [sup 137]Cs radionuclides. (author) 2 refs.; 5 figs.

  12. Reverse-osmosis membranes by plasma polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Thin allyl amine polymer films were developed using plasma polymerization. Resulting dry composite membranes effectively reject sodium chloride during reverse osmosis. Films are 98% sodium chloride rejective, and 46% urea rejective.

  13. Reverse-symmetry waveguides: Theory and fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, R.; Lindvold, Lars René; Larsen, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    We present an extensive theoretical analysis of reverse-symmetry waveguides with special focus on their potential application as sensor components in aqueous media and demonstrate a novel method for fabrication of such waveguides. The principle of reverse symmetry is based on making the refractive...... index of the waveguide substrate less than the refractive index of the medium covering the waveguiding film (n(water) = 1.33). This is opposed to the conventional waveguide geometry, where the substrate is usually glass or polymers with refractive indices of approximate to1.5. The reverse configuration...... are combined with air-grooved polymer supports to form freestanding single-material polymer waveguides of reverse symmetry capable of guiding light....

  14. Time reversibility, computer simulation, algorithms, chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    2012-01-01

    A small army of physicists, chemists, mathematicians, and engineers has joined forces to attack a classic problem, the "reversibility paradox", with modern tools. This book describes their work from the perspective of computer simulation, emphasizing the author's approach to the problem of understanding the compatibility, and even inevitability, of the irreversible second law of thermodynamics with an underlying time-reversible mechanics. Computer simulation has made it possible to probe reversibility from a variety of directions and "chaos theory" or "nonlinear dynamics" has supplied a useful vocabulary and a set of concepts, which allow a fuller explanation of irreversibility than that available to Boltzmann or to Green, Kubo and Onsager. Clear illustration of concepts is emphasized throughout, and reinforced with a glossary of technical terms from the specialized fields which have been combined here to focus on a common theme. The book begins with a discussion, contrasting the idealized reversibility of ba...

  15. Optical reversible programmable Boolean logic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2012-07-20

    Computing with reversibility is the only way to avoid dissipation of energy associated with bit erase. So, a reversible microprocessor is required for future computing. In this paper, a design of a simple all-optical reversible programmable processor is proposed using a polarizing beam splitter, liquid crystal-phase spatial light modulators, a half-wave plate, and plane mirrors. This circuit can perform 16 logical operations according to three programming inputs. Also, inputs can be easily recovered from the outputs. It is named the "reversible programmable Boolean logic unit (RPBLU)." The logic unit is the basic building block of many complex computational operations. Hence the design is important in sense. Two orthogonally polarized lights are defined here as two logical states, respectively.

  16. Corrosion Inhibition of the Galvanic Couple Copper-Carbon Steel in Reverse Osmosis Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Carrillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the electrochemical behaviour of corrosion inhibition of the copper-carbon steel galvanic couple (Cu-CS, exposed to reverse osmosis water (RO used for rinsing of heat exchangers for heavy duty machinery, during manufacture. Molybdate and nitrite salts were utilized to evaluate the inhibition behaviour under galvanic couple conditions. Cu-CS couple was used as working electrodes to measure open circuit potential (OCP, potentiodynamic polarization (PP, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The surface conditions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The most effective concentration ratio between molybdate and nitrite corrosion inhibitors was determined. The morphological study indicated molybdate deposition on the anodic sites of the galvanic couple. The design of molybdate-based corrosion inhibitor developed in the present work should be applied to control galvanic corrosion of the Cu-CS couple during cleaning in the manufacture of heat exchangers.

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  18. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is used to invert synthetic particle-velocity data and crosswell pressure field data. The migration images consist of both the P- and Svelocity perturbation images. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrate the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM). In addition, elastic LSRTM images are better focused and have better reflector continuity than do the acoustic LSRTM images.

  19. SLE local martingales, reversibility and duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kytoelae, Kalle; Kemppainen, Antti [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, PO Box 68, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-11-17

    We study Schramm-Loewner evolutions (SLEs) reversibility and duality using the Virasoro structure of the space of local martingales. For both problems we formulate a setup where the questions boil down to comparing two processes at a stopping time. We state algebraic results showing that local martingales for the processes have enough in common. When one has in addition integrability, the method gives reversibility and duality for any polynomial expected value. (letter to the editor)

  20. SLE local martingales, reversibility and duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kytoelae, Kalle; Kemppainen, Antti

    2006-01-01

    We study Schramm-Loewner evolutions (SLEs) reversibility and duality using the Virasoro structure of the space of local martingales. For both problems we formulate a setup where the questions boil down to comparing two processes at a stopping time. We state algebraic results showing that local martingales for the processes have enough in common. When one has in addition integrability, the method gives reversibility and duality for any polynomial expected value. (letter to the editor)

  1. Geomagnetic reversal in brunhes normal polarity epoch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J D; Foster, J H

    1969-02-07

    The magnetic stratigraphly of seven cores of deep-sea sediment established the existence of a short interval of reversed polarity in the upper part of the Brunches epoch of normal polarity. The reversed zone in the cores correlates well with paleontological boundaries and is named the Blake event. Its boundaries are estimated to be 108,000 and 114,000 years ago +/- 10 percent.

  2. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Boosting reversible pushdown machines by preprocessing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Kutrib, Martin; Malcher, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    languages, whereas for reversible pushdown automata the accepted family of languages lies strictly in between the reversible deterministic context-free languages and the real-time deterministic context-free languages. Moreover, it is shown that the computational power of both types of machines...... is not changed by allowing the preprocessing sequential transducer to work irreversibly. Finally, we examine the closure properties of the family of languages accepted by such machines....

  4. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai

    2016-09-06

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is used to invert synthetic particle-velocity data and crosswell pressure field data. The migration images consist of both the P- and Svelocity perturbation images. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrate the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM). In addition, elastic LSRTM images are better focused and have better reflector continuity than do the acoustic LSRTM images.

  5. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Triveni; Salman Mohammed Sheikh; Deepak Shedde

    2014-01-01

    Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinicopathological syndrome associated with various clinical conditions presenting with headache, encephalopathy, seizure and cortical visual disturbances. Radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic edema predominantly in posterior cerebral hemispheres and are reversible with appropriate management. We present a case of post partum PRES,A 29 year old primigravida of 33 weeks 3 days period of gestation who prese...

  6. DIC-CAM recipe for reverse engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Carrillo, P.; Lopez-Alba, E.; Dorado, R.; Diaz-Garrido, F. A.

    2012-04-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) tries to model and manufacture an object from measurements one of a reference object. Modern optical measurement systems and computer aided engineering software have improved reverse engineering procedures. We detail the main RE steps from 3D digitalization by Digital Image Correlation to manufacturing. The previous description is complemented with an application example, which portrays the performance of RE. The differences between original and manufactured objects are less than 2 mm (close to the tool radius).

  7. Central structure preservation of the reversal sign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    We report serial changes of central structure preservation of the reversal sign in a case of child abuse. The serial CT images show that the relatively spared attenuation at the basal ganglia, thalami, and posterior fossa develops before the occurrence of transtentorial herniation. This finding makes the theory that central preservation of the reversal sign is due to pressure relief after transtentorial herniation less convincible. (orig.)

  8. Modified Borohydrides for Reversible Hydrogen Storage (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Au

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results in the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. A number of metals, metal hydrides, metal chlorides and complex hydrides were selected and evaluated as the destabilization agents for reducing de-hydriding temperature and generating de-hydriding-re-hydriding reversibility. It is found that some additives are effective. The Raman spectroscopic analysis shows the change of B-H binding nature. (authors)

  9. Central structure preservation of the reversal sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    1999-12-01

    We report serial changes of central structure preservation of the reversal sign in a case of child abuse. The serial CT images show that the relatively spared attenuation at the basal ganglia, thalami, and posterior fossa develops before the occurrence of transtentorial herniation. This finding makes the theory that central preservation of the reversal sign is due to pressure relief after transtentorial herniation less convincible. (orig.)

  10. Turbulent transport in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Roberts, K.V.

    1976-01-01

    MHD stability of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) relies on reversal of the toroidal field component in the outer plasma region. Interest in this configuration comes from its potential economic advantages as a thermonuclear reactor, since compared to a Tokamak the RFP supports a higher value of β, the ratio between plasma and total magnetic pressure. Results of computations on the time-evolution of the RFP using a 1D MHD model are reported. (orig./GG) [de

  11. Calcineurin-inhibitor pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Eric

    2012-07-01

    There has been increased recognition of calcineurin, a phosphoprotein serine/threonine phosphatase enzyme, in the regulation of many physiologic systems. Calcineurin mediates activation of lymphocytes, which play a role in immune response. Widely distributed in the central nervous system, calcinuerin also plays an important role in sensory neural function, via its role in the regulation of newly discovered 2-pore potassium channels, which greatly influence neuronal resting membrane potentials. Calcinuerin inhibition is the mechanism of action of immunomodulatory drugs such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, which are widely used in transplantation medicine to prevent rejection. While important for immunosuppression, the use of calcineurin inhibitors has been associated with the development of a new pain syndrome called the calcineurin pain syndrome, which appears to be an untoward complication of the interruption of the physiologic function of calcineurin. This is a narrative review focusing on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, characterization of a newly recognized pain syndrome associated with the use of calcineurin inhibitors. The use of immunosuppressants however is associated with several well-known toxicities to which the calcineurin pain syndrome can be added. The development of this syndrome most likely involves altered nociceptive processing due to the effect of calcineurin inhibition on neuronal firing, as well as effects of calcineurin on vascular tone. The most striking aspect of the treatment of this syndrome is the response to calcium channel blockers, which suggest that the effects of calcineurin inhibition on vascular tone play an important role in the development of the calcineurin pain syndrome. The calcineurin syndrome is a newly recognized complication associated with the use of calcineurin inhibitors. There is no standard therapy at this time but anecdotal reports suggest the effectiveness of calcium channel blockers.

  12. Rotating Reverse-Osmosis for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, RIchard M.

    2004-01-01

    A new design for a water-filtering device combines rotating filtration with reverse osmosis to create a rotating reverse- osmosis system. Rotating filtration has been used for separating plasma from whole blood, while reverse osmosis has been used in purification of water and in some chemical processes. Reverse- osmosis membranes are vulnerable to concentration polarization a type of fouling in which the chemicals meant not to pass through the reverse-osmosis membranes accumulate very near the surfaces of the membranes. The combination of rotating filtration and reverse osmosis is intended to prevent concentration polarization and thereby increase the desired flux of filtered water while decreasing the likelihood of passage of undesired chemical species through the filter. Devices based on this concept could be useful in a variety of commercial applications, including purification and desalination of drinking water, purification of pharmaceutical process water, treatment of household and industrial wastewater, and treatment of industrial process water. A rotating filter consists of a cylindrical porous microfilter rotating within a stationary concentric cylindrical outer shell (see figure). The aqueous suspension enters one end of the annulus between the inner and outer cylinders. Filtrate passes through the rotating cylindrical microfilter and is removed via a hollow shaft. The concentrated suspension is removed at the end of the annulus opposite the end where the suspension entered.

  13. Ascorbyl radical disproportionation in reverse micellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gębicki, J. L.; Szymańska-Owczarek, M.; Pacholczyk-Sienicka, B.; Jankowski, S.

    2018-04-01

    Ascorbyl radical was generated by the pulse radiolysis method and observed with the fast kinetic spectrophotometry within reverse micelles stabilized by AOT in n-heptane or by Igepal CO-520 in cyclohexane at different water to surfactant molar ratio, w0. Rate constants for the disproportionation of the ascorbyl radicals were smaller than those for intermicellar exchange for both type of reverse micelles and slower than those in homogeneous aqueous solutions. However, they increased with increasing w0 for AOT/n-heptane system, while they decreased for Igepal CO-520 system. The absorption spectra of ascorbic acid AOT/n-heptane reverse micellar system showed that the "pH" sensed by this molecule is lower than that in respective homogeneous aqueous solutions. The obtained results were rationalized taking into account three main factors (i) preferential location of ascorbic acid molecules in the interfacial region of the both types of reverse micelles; (ii) postulate that the pH of the interface is lower than that of the water pool of reverse micelles and (iii) different structure of the interface of the reverse micelles made by AOT in n-heptane and those formed by Igepal CO-520 I cyclohexane. Some possible consequences of these findings are discussed.

  14. Reversal modes in asymmetric Ni nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leighton, B.; Pereira, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Escrig, J., E-mail: jescrigm@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile)

    2012-11-15

    We have investigated the evolution of the magnetization reversal mechanism in asymmetric Ni nanowires as a function of their geometry. Circular nanowires are found to reverse their magnetization by the propagation of a vortex domain wall, while in very asymmetric nanowires the reversal is driven by the propagation of a transverse domain wall. The effect of shape asymmetry of the wire on coercivity and remanence is also studied. Angular dependence of the remanence and coercivity is also addressed. Tailoring the magnetization reversal mechanism in asymmetric nanowires can be useful for magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls. Finally, an alternative method to detect the presence of magnetic drops is proposed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Asymmetry strongly modifies the magnetic behavior of a wire. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very asymmetric nanowires reverse their magnetization by a transverse domain wall. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alternative method to detect the presence of magnetic drops is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tailoring the reversal mode in asymmetric nanowires can be useful for potential applications.

  15. Crystallization inhibitors for amorphous oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznitskij, L.A.; Filippova, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Data for the last 10 years, in which experimental results of studying the temperature stabilization of x-ray amorphous oxides (including R 3 Fe 5 O 12 R-rare earths, ZrO 2 , In 2 O 3 , Sc 2 O 3 ) and their solid solution are presented, are generalized. Processes of amorphous oxide crystallization with the production of simple oxides, solid solutions and chemical compounds with different polyhedral structure, are investigated. Energy and crystallochemical criteria for selecting the doping inhibitor-components stabilizing the amorphous state are ascertained, temperatures and enthalpies of amorpous oxide crystallization are determined, examination of certain provisions of iso,orphous miscibility theory is conducted

  16. Inhibitors of plant hormone transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, Petr; Laňková, Martina; Zažímalová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 6 (2016), s. 1391-1404 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15088 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : polar auxin transport * acid-binding protein * gnom arf-gef * equilibrative nucleoside transporter * efflux carrier polarity * plasma-membrane-protein * cultured tobacco cells * arabidopsis-thaliana * gravitropic response * brefeldin-a * Plant hormones * Transport * Inhibitors * Auxin * Cytokinins * Strigolactones * Abscisic acid * Cell biology Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  17. Dabigatran and its reversal with recombinant factor VIIa and prothrombin complex concentrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølbeck, Sacha; Nilsson, Caroline U; Engström, Martin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dabigatran is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. No specific antidote exists in the event of hemorrhage, but prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) are suggested therapies. Sonoclot is a bedside viscoelastic instrument for monitoring...... different Sonoclot cuvettes: Glassbead, kaolin and tissue factor (diluted) activated. RESULTS: The Sonoclot detected in vitro-induced anticoagulation due to dabigatran with the glassbead- and kaolin-activated cuvettes. There was no reversing effect of PCC, probably due to the presence of heparin in the PCC...

  18. Sequence-specific inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robaczewska, Magdalena; Narayan, Ramamurthy; Seigneres, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) appear as promising new antisense agents, that have not yet been examined as hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors. Our aim was to study the ability of PNAs targeting the duck HBV (DHBV) encapsidation signal epsilon to inhibit reverse transcription (RT...... in primary duck hepatocytes (PDH). RESULTS: Both PNAs reproducibly inhibited DHBV RT in a dose-dependent manner with IC(50) of 10nM, whereas up to 600-fold higher concentration of S-ODNs was required for similar inhibition. The PNA targeting the bulge and upper stem of epsilon appeared as more efficient RT...

  19. Endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and Chromatin remodeling in normal and transformed cells and early embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadafora, C.; Sciamanna, I.; Misteli, T.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase (RT) is an enzyme encoded by two classes of genomic retro-elements: retro-transposons and endogenous retroviruses. Basal levels of RT are expressed in all non pathological, differentiated tissues while high RT expression levels characterize tumorigenic cells, germ cells and embryonic tissues. Preliminary studies carried out in our laboratory have shown that RT inhibition using pharmacological inhibitors (nevirapine and efavirenz, two drugs currently used in AIDS therapy) drastically reduces cell proliferation, promotes differentiation of tumorigenic cells in vitro, induces a reprogrammed gene expression and antagonizes tumor progression in nude mice inoculated with tumorigenic human cell lines, including melanoma, prostate and colon carcinoma and microcitoma

  20. Tadalafil reversal of sexual dysfunction caused by serotonin enhancing medications in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Adam Keller; Weinstein, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of many antidepressants, especially those that increase serotonin. Many strategies have been reported to assist patients in minimizing impairment, with variable degrees of success. One of the newer approaches is to augment with phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. Our report using the most recently released agent in this class, tadalafil is the first demonstrating potential benefit in women. We report here of three women who derived benefit from using 20 mg of tadalafil before anticipated sexual activity to reverse medication-induced sexual dysfunction. Tadalafil utility was maintained over time and was well tolerated.

  1. [Reversibility of the leukocyte activation state studied in a model of endogenous pyrogen formation by granulocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakina, E G; Sorokin, A V

    1980-08-01

    The pyrogen-releasing capacity of rabbit exudate granulocytes can be temporarily suppressed during incubation in the whole plasma and then recovered during cell transfer into 0.15 M NaCl or stimulation with the bacterial lipopolysaccharide, pyrogenal. The inhibitors of protein synthesis added to the granulocytes when they are being transferred from plasma to 0.15 M NaCl do not suppress the pyrogen release. The inhibitory action of the whole plasma on the pyrogen release is due to the presence in it of potassium and calcium ions. The inhibitory factors of plasma reversibly suppress the pyrogen release but do not eliminate the leukocyte activation.

  2. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo

  3. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-11-01

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  4. Improved Peak Capacity for Capillary Electrophoretic Separations of Enzyme Inhibitors with Activity-Based Detection Using Magnetic Bead Microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Gilman, S. Douglass

    2010-01-01

    A technique for separating and detecting enzyme inhibitors was developed using capillary electrophoresis with an enzyme microreactor. The on-column enzyme microreactor was constructed using NdFeB magnet(s) to immobilize alkaline phosphatase-coated superparamagnetic beads (2.8 μm diameter) inside a capillary before the detection window. Enzyme inhibition assays were performed by injecting a plug of inhibitor into a capillary filled with the substrate, AttoPhos. Product generated in the enzyme microreactor was detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Inhibitor zones electrophoresed through the capillary, passed through the enzyme microreactor, and were observed as negative peaks due to decreased product formation. The goal of this study was to improve peak capacities for inhibitor separations relative to previous work, which combined continuous engagement electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA) and transient engagement EMMA to study enzyme inhibition. The effects of electric field strength, bead injection time and inhibitor concentrations on peak capacity and peak width were investigated. Peak capacities were increased to ≥20 under optimal conditions of electric field strength and bead injection time for inhibition assays with arsenate and theophylline. Five reversible inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase (theophylline, vanadate, arsenate, L-tryptophan and tungstate) were separated and detected to demonstrate the ability of this technique to analyze complex inhibitor mixtures. PMID:20024913

  5. MEK inhibition potentiates the activity of Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG against pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zhu, Zhenkun; Gu, Mancang; Newman, Bryan; Sun, Duxin

    2010-10-04

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling has been implicated in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antitumor activity of MEK inhibitor U0126 in combination with Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting showed that 17-AAG caused a 2- to 3-fold transient activation of MEK/ERK signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. The activation sustained for 6 h before phospho-ERK (p-ERK) destabilization. The selective MEK inhibitor U0126 completely abolished 17-AAG induced ERK1/2 activation and resulted in more than 80% of phospho-ERK degradation after only 15 min treatment. Moreover, U0126 had complementary effect on 17-AAG regulated oncogenic and cell cycle related proteins. Although 17-AAG downregulated cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4 and CDK6, it led to cyclin A and CDK2 accumulation, which was reversed by the addition of U0126. Antiproliferation assay showed that combination of U0126 and 17-AAG resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effect. More importantly, 17-AAG alone only exhibited moderate inhibition of cell migration in vitro, while addition of U0126 dramatically enhanced the inhibitory effect by 2- to 5-fold. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MEK inhibitor U0126 potentiates the activity of Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG against pancreatic cancer cells. The combination of Hsp90 and MEK inhibition could provide a promising avenue for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Postexposure protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV infection by topical integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Parikh, Urvi M; West, Rolieria; Taylor, Andrew; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis; Hazuda, Daria; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2014-03-12

    Coitally delivered microbicide gels containing antiretroviral drugs are important for HIV prevention. However, to date, microbicides have contained entry or reverse transcriptase inhibitors that block early steps in virus infection and thus need to be given as a preexposure dose that interferes with sexual practices and may limit compliance. Integrase inhibitors block late steps after virus infection and therefore are more suitable for post-coital dosing. We first determined the kinetics of strand transfer in vitro and confirmed that integration begins about 6 hours after infection. We then used a repeat-challenge macaque model to assess efficacy of vaginal gels containing integrase strand transfer inhibitors when applied before or after simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We showed that gel containing the strand transfer inhibitor L-870812 protected two of three macaques when applied 30 min before SHIV challenge. We next evaluated the efficacy of 1% raltegravir gel and demonstrated its ability to protect macaques when applied 3 hours after SHIV exposure (five of six protected; P infections showed no evidence of drug resistance in plasma or vaginal secretions despite continued gel dosing after infection. We documented rapid vaginal absorption reflecting a short pharmacological lag time and noted that vaginal, but not plasma, virus load was substantially reduced in the breakthrough infection after raltegravir gel treatment. We provide a proof of concept that topically applied integrase inhibitors protect against vaginal SHIV infection when administered shortly before or 3 hours after virus exposure.

  7. The cannabinoid transporter inhibitor OMDM-2 reduces social interaction: Further evidence for transporter-mediated endocannabinoid release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Alexandre; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the transport of endocannabinoids might work bi-directionally. Accordingly, it is possible that pharmacological blockade of the latter affects not only the re-uptake, but also the release of endocannabinoids, thus preventing them from stimulating CB 1 receptors. We used biochemical, pharmacological, and behavioral approaches to investigate the effects of the transporter inhibitor OMDM-2 on social interaction, a behavioral assay that requires activation of CB 1 receptors. The underlying mechanisms of OMDM-2 were compared with those of the Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597. Systemic administration of OMDM-2 reduced social interaction, but in contrast to URB597-induced social deficit, this effect was not reversed by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. The CB 1 antagonist AM251, which did not affect URB597-induced social withdrawal, exacerbated OMDM-2 effect. In addition, the potent CB 1 agonist CP55,940 reversed OMDM-2-, but not URB597-, induced social withdrawal. Blockade of CB 1 receptor by AM251 reduced social interaction and the cholecystokinin CCK2 antagonist LY225910 reversed this effect. Similarly, OMDM-2-induced social withdrawal was reversed by LY225910, whereas URB597 effect was not. Elevation of endocannabinoid levels by URB597 or JZL184, an inhibitor of 2-AG degradation, failed to reverse OMDM-2-induced social withdrawal, and did not show additive effects on cannabinoid measurements when co-administered with OMDM-2. Taken together, these findings indicate that OMDM-2 impaired social interaction in a manner that is consistent with reduced activation of presynaptic CB 1 receptors. As cannabinoid reuptake inhibitors may impair endocannabinoid release, caution should be taken when using these drugs to enhance endocannabinoid tone in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resveratrol reverses morphine-induced neuroinflammation in morphine-tolerant rats by reversal HDAC1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-Yin Tsai

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Resveratrol restores the antinociceptive effect of morphine by reversing morphine infusion-induced spinal cord neuroinflammation and increase in TNFR1 expression. The reversal of the morphine-induced increase in TNFR1 expression by resveratrol is partially due to reversal of the morphine infusion-induced increase in HDAC1 expression. Resveratrol pretreatment can be used as an adjuvant in clinical pain management for patients who need long-term morphine treatment or with neuropathic pain.

  9. Nitrite and nitroso compounds can serve as specific catalase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Vladimir Yu; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2017-03-01

    We present evidence that nitrite and nitrosothiols, nitrosoamines and non-heme dinitrosyl iron complexes can reversibly inhibit catalase with equal effectiveness. Catalase activity was evaluated by the permanganatometric and calorimetric assays. This inhibition is not the result of chemical transformations of these compounds to a single inhibitor, as well as it is not the result of NO release from these substances (as NO traps have no effect on the extent of inhibition). It was found that chloride and bromide in concentration above 80 mM and thiocyanate in concentration above 20 μM enhance catalase inhibition by nitrite and the nitroso compounds more than 100 times. The inhibition degree in this case is comparable with that induced by azide. We propose that the direct catalase inhibitor is a positively charged NO-group. This group acquires a positive charge in the active center of enzyme by interaction of nitrite or nitroso compounds with some enzyme groups. Halides and thiocyanate protect the NO + group from hydration and thus increase its inhibition effect. It is probable that a comparatively low chloride concentration in many cells is the main factor to protect catalase from inhibition by nitrite and nitroso compounds.

  10. Laura: Soybean variety lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrić Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain of conventional soybean varieties requires heat processing to break down trypsin inhibitor's activity before using as food or animal feed. At the same time, protein denaturation and other qualitative changes occur in soybean grain, especially if the temperature of heating is not controlled. Two types of trypsin inhibitor were found in soybean grain the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor. Mature grain of soybean Laura is lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. Grain yield of variety Laura is equal to high yielding varieties from the maturity group I, where it belongs. Lacking of Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor makes soybean grain suitable for direct feeding in adult non ruminant animals without previous thermal processing. Grain of variety Laura can be processed for a shorter period of time than conventional soybeans. This way we save energy, and preserve valuable nutritional composition of soybean grain, which is of interest in industrial processing.

  11. Vanadium Compounds as PTP Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Irving

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphotyrosine signaling is regulated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs. Here we discuss the potential of vanadium derivatives as PTP enzyme inhibitors and metallotherapeutics. We describe how vanadate in the V oxidized state is thought to inhibit PTPs, thus acting as a pan-inhibitor of this enzyme superfamily. We discuss recent developments in the biological and biochemical actions of more complex vanadium derivatives, including decavanadate and in particular the growing number of oxidovanadium compounds with organic ligands. Pre-clinical studies involving these compounds are discussed in the anti-diabetic and anti-cancer contexts. Although in many cases PTP inhibition has been implicated, it is also clear that many such compounds have further biochemical effects in cells. There also remain concerns surrounding off-target toxicities and long-term use of vanadium compounds in vivo in humans, hindering their progress through clinical trials. Despite these current misgivings, interest in these chemicals continues and many believe they could still have therapeutic potential. If so, we argue that this field would benefit from greater focus on improving the delivery and tissue targeting of vanadium compounds in order to minimize off-target toxicities. This may then harness their full therapeutic potential.

  12. Proton pump inhibitors and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarne Nesgaard; Johansen, Per Birger; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months and a di......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months...... and a discussion of these findings and how this has influenced our understanding of this association, the clinical impact and the underlying pathophysiology. RECENT FINDINGS: New studies have further strengthened existing evidence linking use of PPIs to osteoporosis. Short-term use does not appear to pose a lower...... risk than long-term use. There is a continued lack of conclusive studies identifying the pathogenesis. Direct effects on calcium absorption or on osteoblast or osteoclast action cannot at present plausibly explain the mechanism. SUMMARY: The use of PPIs is a risk factor for development of osteoporosis...

  13. Profile of sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular blockade in the elderly: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Michele; Bertoncello, Francesco; Ieppariello, Giovanna

    2018-01-01

    The number of elderly patients is increasing worldwide. This will have a significant impact on the practice of anesthesia in future decades. Anesthesiologists must provide care for an increasing number of elderly patients, who have an elevated risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Complications related to postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade, such as muscle weakness, airway obstruction, hypoxemia, atelectasis, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure, are more frequent in older than in younger patients. Therefore, neuromuscular blockade in the elderly should be carefully monitored and completely reversed before awakening patients at the end of anesthesia. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are traditionally used for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Although the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade is reduced by reversal with neostigmine, it continues to complicate the postoperative course. Sugammadex represents an innovative approach to reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by aminosteroid neuromuscular-blocking agents, particularly rocuronium, with useful applications in clinical practice. However, aging is associated with certain changes in the pharmacokinetics of sugammadex, and to date there has been no thorough evaluation of the use of sugammadex in elderly patients. The aim of this review was to perform an analysis of the use of sugammadex in older adults based on the current literature. Major issues surrounding the physiologic and pharmacologic effects of aging in elderly patients and how these may impact the routine use of sugammadex in elderly patients are discussed.

  14. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine’s potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V. Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  15. Purification, characterization and cloning of an aspartic proteinase inhibitor from squash phloem exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeller, J T; Farley, P C; Ramsay, R J; Sullivan, P A; Laing, W A

    1998-05-15

    Phloem exudate from squash fruit contains heat-inactivated material which inhibits pepsin activity. This inhibitory activity was purified by mild acid treatment, chromatography on trypsin-agarose, Sephadex G-75 and reverse-phase HPLC, resulting in the elution of three peaks with pepsin-inhibitory activity. N-terminal sequencing indicated a common sequence of MGPGPAIGEVIG and the presence of minor species with seven- or two-amino-acid N-terminal extensions beyond this point. Microheterogeneity in this end sequence was exhibited within and between two preparations. Internal sequencing of a major peak after a trypsin digestion gave the sequence FYNVVVLEK. The common N-terminal sequence was used to design a degenerate primer for 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and cDNA clones encoding two isoforms of the inhibitor were obtained. The open reading frames of both cDNAs encoded proteins (96% identical) which contained the experimentally determined internal sequence. The amino acid content calculated from the predicted amino acid sequence was very similar to that measured by amino acid analysis of the purified inhibitor. The two predicted amino acid sequences (96 residues) had neither similarity to any other aspartic proteinase inhibitor nor similarity to any other protein. The inhibitors have a molecular mass of 10,552 Da, measured by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry and approximately 10,000 Da by SDS/PAGE, and behave as dimers of approximately 21,000 Da during chromatography on Superdex G-75 gel-filtration medium. The calculated molecular masses from the predicted amino acid sequences were 10,551 Da and 10,527 Da. The inhibitor was capable of inhibiting pepsin (Ki = 2 nM) and a secreted aspartic proteinase from the fungus Glomerella cingulata (Ki = 20 nM). The inhibitor, which is stable over acid and neutral pH, has been named squash aspartic proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI).

  16. Effects of tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, Ya A; Yemets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    To test whether reversible tubulin phosphorylation plays any role in the process of plant mitosis the effects of inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, herbimycin A, genistein and tyrphostin AG 18, and of an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, sodium orthovanadate, on microtubule organization and mitosis progression in a synchronized BY-2 culture has been investigated. It was found that treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine kinases of BY-2 cells at the G2/M transition did not lead to visible disturbances of mitotic microtubule structures, while it did reduce the frequency of their appearance. We assume that a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation level could alter the microtubule dynamic instability parameters during interphase/prophase transition. All types of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used caused a prophase delay: herbimycin A and genistein for 2 h, and tyrphostin AG18 for 1 h. Thereafter the peak of mitosis was displaced for 1 h by herbimycin A or genistein exposure, but after tyrphostin AG18 treatment the timing of the mitosis-peak was comparable to that in control cells. Enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation induced by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor resulted in the opposite effect on BY-2 mitosis transition. Culture treatment with sodium orthovanadate during 1 h resulted in an accelerated start of the prophase and did not lead to the alteration in time of the mitotic index peak formation, as compared to control cells. We suppose that the reversible tyrosine phosphorylation can be involved in the regulation of interphase to M phase transition possibly through regulation of microtubule dynamics in plant cells.

  17. The misconception of mean-reversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2012-01-01

    The notion of random motion in a potential well is elemental in the physical sciences and beyond. Quantitatively, this notion is described by reverting diffusions—asymptotically stationary diffusion processes which are simultaneously (i) driven toward a reversion level by a deterministic force, and (ii) perturbed off the reversion level by a random white noise. The archetypal example of reverting diffusions is the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process, which is mean-reverting. In this paper we analyze reverting diffusions and establish that: (i) if the magnitude of the perturbing noise is constant then the diffusion's stationary density is unimodal and the diffusion is mode-reverting; (ii) if the magnitude of the perturbing noise is non-constant then, in general, neither is the diffusion's stationary density unimodal, nor is the diffusion mode-reverting. In the latter case we further establish a result asserting when unimodality and mode-reversion do hold. In particular, we demonstrate that the notion of mean-reversion, which is fundamental in economics and finance, is a misconception—as mean-reversion is an exception rather than the norm. (fast track communication)

  18. Reverse logistics in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M Reza; Rameezdeen, Raufdeen; Chileshe, Nicholas; Lehmann, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Reverse logistics in construction refers to the movement of products and materials from salvaged buildings to a new construction site. While there is a plethora of studies looking at various aspects of the reverse logistics chain, there is no systematic review of literature on this important subject as applied to the construction industry. Therefore, the objective of this study is to integrate the fragmented body of knowledge on reverse logistics in construction, with the aim of promoting the concept among industry stakeholders and the wider construction community. Through a qualitative meta-analysis, the study synthesises the findings of previous studies and presents some actions needed by industry stakeholders to promote this concept within the real-life context. First, the trend of research and terminology related with reverse logistics is introduced. Second, it unearths the main advantages and barriers of reverse logistics in construction while providing some suggestions to harness the advantages and mitigate these barriers. Finally, it provides a future research direction based on the review. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Parkinson’s disease managing reversible neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz,1 Alvin Stein,2 Ted Cole,3 Beth McDougall,4 Mark Westaway5 1Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc., Cape Coral, FL, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3Cole Center for Healing, Cincinnati, OH, 4CLEARCenter of Health, Mill Valley, CA, USA; 5Four Pillars Health, Brendale, QLD, Australia Abstract: Traditionally, the Parkinson’s disease (PD symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient’s PD symptoms. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, L-dopa, carbidopa, B6, neurodegeneration

  20. AN OVERVIEW ON RETAIL REVERSE LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is a theoretical approach on retail reverse logistics. Environmental concern and the current marketing strategy have spurred retailers to implement strategies to facilitate product returns from end customers. Reverse logistics, indicating the process of this return flow, encompasses such activities as the movement of returned products, facilities to accommodate returned items, and overall remedy process for returned items. The retail industry, under great competitive pressure, has used return policies as a competitive weapon. Grocery retailers were the first to begin to focus serious attention on the problem of returns and to develop reverse logistics innovations. Grocery retailers first developed innovations such as reclamation centers. Reclamation centers, in turn, led to the establishment of centralized return centers. Centralizing returns has led to significant benefits for most firms that have implemented them. Over the last several years, retailers have consolidated. Now, more than ever, reverse logistics is seen as being important. This reverse distribution activity can be crucial to the survival of companies, because the permanent goodwill of the company is at stake. Businesses succeed because they respond to both external and internal changes and adjust in an effective manner to remain competitive.