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Sample records for reverse shock emission

  1. Gamma Ray Burst reverse shock emission in early radio afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Resmi, Lekshmi

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shock (RS) emission from Gamma Ray Bursts is an important tool in investigating the nature of the ejecta from the central engine. If the ejecta magnetization is not high enough to suppress the RS, a strong RS emission component, usually peaking in the optical/IR band early on, would give important contribution to early afterglow light curves. In the radio band, synchrotron self-absorption may suppress early RS emission, and also delay the RS peak time. In this paper, we calculate the self-absorbed RS emission in the radio band for different dynamical conditions. In particular, we stress that the RS radio emission is subject to self-absorption in both reverse and forward shocks. We calculate the ratio between the reverse to forward shock flux at the RS peak time for different frequencies, which is a measure of the detectability of the RS emission component. We then constrain the range of physical parameters for a detectable RS, in particular the role of magnetization. We notice that unlike optical RS e...

  2. Reverse Shock Emission Driven By Post-Merger Millisecond Magnetar Winds: Effects of the Magnetization Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L D; Dai, Z G

    2016-01-01

    The study of short-duration gamma-ray bursts provides growing evidence that a good fraction of double neutron star mergers lead to the formation of stable millisecond magnetars. The launch of Poynting flux by the millisecond magnetars could leave distinct electromagnetic signatures that reveal the energy dissipation processes in the magnetar wind. In previous studies (Wang & Dai 2013b; Wang et al. 2015), we assume that the magnetar wind becomes completely lepton-dominated so that electrons/positrons in the magnetar wind are accelerated by a diffusive shock. However, theoretical modeling of pulsar wind nebulae shows that in many cases the magnetic field energy in the pulsar wind may be strong enough to suppress diffusive shock acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the reverse shock emission as well as the forward shock emission with an arbitrary magnetization parameter $\\sigma$ of a magnetar wind. We find that the reverse shock emission strongly depends on $\\sigma$, and in particular, $\\sigma \\sim 0....

  3. Evolution of the reverse shock emission from SNR 1987A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heng, K.; McCray, R.; Zhekov, A

    2006-01-01

    Stars: Circumstellar Matter, Shock Waves, ISM: Supernova Remnants, Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 1987A Udgivelsesdato: June 20......Stars: Circumstellar Matter, Shock Waves, ISM: Supernova Remnants, Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 1987A Udgivelsesdato: June 20...

  4. Reverse shock emission driven by post-merger millisecond magnetar winds: Effects of the magnetization parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. D.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.

    2016-08-01

    The study of short-duration gamma-ray bursts provides growing evidence that a good fraction of double neutron star mergers lead to the formation of stable millisecond magnetars. The launch of Poynting flux by the millisecond magnetars could leave distinct electromagnetic signatures that reveal the energy dissipation processes in the magnetar wind. In previous studies, we assume that the magnetar wind becomes completely lepton-dominated so that electrons/positrons in the magnetar wind are accelerated by a diffusive shock. However, theoretical modeling of pulsar wind nebulae shows that in many cases the magnetic field energy in the pulsar wind may be strong enough to suppress diffusive shock acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the reverse shock emission and the forward shock emission with an arbitrary magnetization parameter σ of a magnetar wind. We find that the reverse shock emission strongly depends on σ, and in particular that σ ~ 0.3 leads to the strongest reverse shock emission. Future observations would be helpful to diagnose the composition of the magnetar wind.

  5. Reverse and Forward Shock X-ray Emission in an Evolutionary Model of Supernova Remnants undergoing Efficient Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O

    2014-01-01

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) which include the efficient production of cosmic rays via non-linear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization (NEI), hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles which the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line em...

  6. Reverse and Forward Shock X-Ray Emission in an Evolutionary Model of Supernova Remnants Undergoing Efficient Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.

    2014-08-01

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  7. Reverse and forward shock X-ray emission in an evolutionary model of supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ellison, Donald C. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Nagataki, Shigehiro, E-mail: slee@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: shiu-hang.lee@riken.jp, E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-08-20

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  8. Very Bright Prompt and Reverse Shock Emission of GRB 140512A

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiao-Li; Yi, Shuang-Xi; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song; Wei, Jian-Yan; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report our observations of very bright prompt optical and reverse shock (RS) optical emission of GRB 140512A and analyze its multi-wavelength data observed with the {\\em Swift} and {\\em Fermi} missions. It is found that the joint optical-X-ray-gamma-ray spectrum with our first optical detection (R=13.09 mag) at $T_0+136$ seconds during the second episode of the prompt gamma-rays can be fit by a single power-law with index $-1.32\\pm 0.01$. Our empirical fit to the afterglow lightcurves indicates that the observed bright optical afterglow with R=13.00 mag at the peak time is consistent with predictions of the RS and forward shock (FS) emission of external shock models. Joint optical-X-ray afterglow spectrum is well fit with an absorbed single power-law, with an index evolving with time from $-1.86\\pm 0.01$ at the peak time to $-1.57\\pm 0.01$ at late epoch, which could be due to the evolution of the ratio of the RS to FS emission fluxes. We fit the lightcurves with standard external models, and derive the phy...

  9. Gamma-ray Burst Reverse Shock Emission in Early Radio Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmi, Lekshmi; Zhang, Bing

    2016-07-01

    Reverse shock (RS) emission from gamma-ray bursts is an important tool in investigating the nature of the ejecta from the central engine. If the magnetization of the ejecta is not high enough to suppress the RS, a strong RS emission component, usually peaking in the optical/IR band early on, would provide an important contribution to early afterglow light curve. In the radio band, synchrotron self-absorption may suppress early RS emission and also delay the RS peak time. In this paper, we calculate the self-absorbed RS emission in the radio band under different dynamical conditions. In particular, we stress that the RS radio emission is subject to self-absorption in both RSs and forward shocks (FSs). We calculate the ratio between the RS to FS flux at the RS peak time for different frequencies, which is a measure of the detectability of the RS emission component. We then constrain the range of physical parameters for a detectable RS, in particular the role of magnetization. We notice that unlike optical RS emission which is enhanced by moderate magnetization, moderately magnetized ejecta do not necessarily produce a brighter radio RS due to the self-absorption effect. For typical parameters, the RS emission component would not be detectable below 1 GHz unless the medium density is very low (e.g., n < 10-3 cm-3 for the interstellar medium and A * < 5 × 10-4 for wind). These predictions can be tested using the afterglow observations from current and upcoming radio facilities such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Low-Frequency Array, the Five Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, and the Square Kilometer Array.

  10. HST-COS Observations of Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    CERN Document Server

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V; Kirshner, Robert P; Challis, Peter; Laming, J Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter M; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S J; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (dv \\sim 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad (dv \\sim 10 -- 20 x 10^3 km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise (> 40 per resolution element) broad LyA emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at \\lambda > 1350A can be explained by HI 2-photon emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of NV \\lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and we present the first detections of broad HeII \\lambda1640, CIV \\lambda1550, and NIV] \\lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The NV/H-alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron e...

  11. PTF11agg AS THE FIRST EVIDENCE FOR REVERSE SHOCK EMISSION FROM A POST-MERGER MILLISECOND MAGNETAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lingjun; Dai Zigao, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-09-10

    Based on the stiff equations of state of neutron stars (NS) and the discovery of high-mass NSs, it is highly probable that a NS-NS merger will result in a rapidly rotating massive magnetar. The central magnetar will dissipate its rotational energy to the outflow by injecting Poynting flux, which will become lepton-dominated so that a long-lasting reverse shock (RS) develops. We calculate the emission of the RS as well as the emission of forward shock (FS) and find that, in most cases, the RS emission is stronger than FS emission. It is found that the recently discovered transient, PTF11agg, can be neatly accounted for by the RS emission powered by a millisecond magnetar. Other alternative models have been considered and cannot explain the observed light curves well. We therefore suggest that PTF11agg is the first evidence for RS emission from a post-merger millisecond magnetar.

  12. HST-COS OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN, HELIUM, CARBON, AND NITROGEN EMISSION FROM THE SN 1987A REVERSE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); McCray, Richard [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Laming, Martin J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7674L, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Bouchet, Patrice [Service d' Astrophysique DSM/IRFU/SAp CEA - Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chevalier, Roger [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Garnavich, Peter M. [225 Nieuwland Science, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Lundqvist, Peter; Sollerman, Jesper [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lawrence, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 (United States); Panagia, Nino [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pun, Chun S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong (China); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sonneborn, George [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sugerman, Ben, E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Goucher College, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Baltimore, MD 21204 (United States); and others

    2011-12-20

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow ({Delta}v {approx} 300 km s{sup -1}) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad ({Delta}v {approx} 10-20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly{alpha} emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at {lambda} > 1350 A can be explained by H I two-photon (2s {sup 2} S{sub 1/2}-1s {sup 2} S{sub 1/2}) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V {lambda}1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II {lambda}1640, C IV {lambda}1550, and N IV] {lambda}1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 {+-} 0.06. The N V/H{alpha} line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T{sub e} /T{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expulsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expulsion of the circumstellar ring.

  13. HST-COS Observations on Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon, and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Penton, Steven V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, J. Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987 A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (Delta v approximates 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad Delta v approximates 10-20 x 10(exp 3) km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly-alpha emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at lambda > 1350 A can be explained by H-I two-photon (2s(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)-l(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II lambda1640, C IV lambda 1550, and N IV ] lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The N V /H alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T(sub e)/T(sub p) approximately equal to 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expUlsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expUlsion of the circumstellar ring.

  14. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Shivvers, Isaac; Williams, Peter K G; Kopac, Drejc; Kobayashi, Shiho; Mundell, Carole; Gomboc, Andreja; Zheng, WeiKang; Menten, Karl M; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2016-01-01

    We present the second multi-frequency radio detection of a reverse shock in a $\\gamma$-ray burst. By combining our extensive radio observations of the Fermi-LAT GRB 160509A at $z = 1.17$ up to $20$ days after the burst with Swift X-ray observations and ground-based optical and near-infrared data, we show that the afterglow emission comprises distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions: the reverse shock emission dominates in the radio band at $\\lesssim10~$days, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-ray, optical, and near-infrared bands. Through multi-wavelength modeling, we determine a circumburst density of $n_0\\approx10^{-3}~$cm$^{-3}$, supporting our previous suggestion that a low-density circumburst environment is conducive to the production of long-lasting reverse shock radiation in the radio band. We infer the presence of a large excess X-ray absorption column, $N_{\\rm H} \\approx 1.5\\times10^{22}~$cm$^{-2}$, and a high rest-frame optical extinction, $A_{\\rm V}\\approx3.4~$mag. We...

  15. GRB 060117: Reverse + forward shock solution

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M F; Rídky, J; Grygar, J; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin F.; Ridky, Jan; Grygar, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +/- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. We interpret the shape of the lightcurve as a transition between reverse and forward shock emission.

  16. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Alexander, Kate D.; Berger, Edo; Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Shivvers, Isaac; Williams, Peter K. G.; Kopač, Drejc; Kobayashi, Shiho; Mundell, Carole; Gomboc, Andreja; Zheng, WeiKang; Menten, Karl M.; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2016-12-01

    We present the second multi-frequency radio detection of a reverse shock in a γ-ray burst. By combining our extensive radio observations of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope γ-ray burst 160509A at z = 1.17 up to 20 days after the burst with Swift X-ray observations and ground-based optical and near-infrared data, we show that the afterglow emission comprises distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions: the reverse shock emission dominates in the radio band at ≲10 days, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-ray, optical, and near-infrared bands. Through multi-wavelength modeling, we determine a circumburst density of {n}0≈ {10}-3 {{cm}}-3, supporting our previous suggestion that a low-density circumburst environment is conducive to the production of long-lasting reverse shock radiation in the radio band. We infer the presence of a large excess X-ray absorption column, N H ≈ 1.5 × 1022 {{cm}}-2, and a high rest-frame optical extinction, A V ≈ 3.4 mag. We identify a jet break in the X-ray light curve at {t}{jet}≈ 6 {days}, and thus derive a jet opening angle of {θ }{jet}≈ 4^\\circ , yielding a beaming-corrected kinetic energy and radiated γ-ray energy of {E}{{K}}≈ 4× {10}50 erg and {E}γ ≈ 1.3× {10}51 erg (1-104 keV, rest frame), respectively. Consistency arguments connecting the forward shocks and reverse shocks suggest a deceleration time of {t}{dec} ≈ 460 s ≈ T 90, a Lorentz factor of {{Γ }}({t}{dec})≈ 330, and a reverse-shock-to-forward-shock fractional magnetic energy density ratio of {R}{{B}}\\equiv {ɛ }{{B},{RS}}/{ɛ }{{B},{FS}}≈ 8. Our study highlights the power of rapid-response radio observations in the study of the properties and dynamics of γ-ray burst ejecta.

  17. A Reverse Shock in GRB 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, T; Zauderer, B A; Margutti, R; Soderberg, A M; Chakraborti, S; Lunnan, R; Chornock, R; Chandra, P; Ray, A

    2013-01-01

    We present extensive radio and millimeter observations of the unusually bright GRB 130427A at z=0.340, spanning 0.67 to 12 days after the burst. Taken in conjunction with detailed multi-band UV, optical, NIR, and X-ray observations we find that the broad-band afterglow emission is composed of distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions. The reverse shock emission dominates in the radio/millimeter and at 0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR. We further find that the optical and X-ray data require a Wind circumburst environment, pointing to a massive star progenitor. Using the combined forward and reverse shock emission we find that the parameters of the burst are an isotropic kinetic energy of E_Kiso~2e53 erg, a mass loss rate of Mdot~3e-8 Msun/yr (for a wind velocity of 1,000 km/s), and a Lorentz factor at the deceleration time of Gamma(200s)~130. Due to the low density and large isotropic energy, the absence of a jet break to ~15 days places only a weak constraint on the opening angle of theta_j>2.5 deg...

  18. Reverse-Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, F J; Zheng, S J; Zhang, S N; Long, X; Aschenbach, B

    2015-01-01

    Thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) is usually dominated by the emission lines of the supernova (SN) ejecta, which are widely believed being crossed and thus heated by the inwards propagating reverse shock (RS). Previous works using imaging X-ray data have shown that the ejecta are heated by the RS by locating the peak emission region of the most recently ionized matter, which is found well separated towards the inside from the outermost boundary. Here we report the discovery of a systematic increase of the Sulfur (S) to Silicon (Si) K$\\alpha$ line flux ratio with radius in Tycho's SNR. This allows us, for the first time, to present continuous radial profiles of the ionization age and, furthermore, the elapsed ionization time since the onset of the ionization, which tells the propagation history of the ionization front into the SNR ejecta.

  19. Effect of the reverse shock on the parameters of the observed X-Ray emission during the 1998 outburst of CI Cam

    CERN Document Server

    Filippova, E V; Lutovinov, A A

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model of interaction between spherically symmetrical expanding matter and the external medium, we have estimated the parameters of the matter heated by the shock that was produced in the envelope ejected by the explosion of a classical nova during its interaction with the stellar wind from the optical companion. Using this model, we have shown that the matter ejected during the outburst in the system CI Cam had no steep velocity gradients and that the reverse shock could heat the ejected matter only to a temperature of ~0.1 keV. Therefore, this matter did not contribute to the mean temperature and luminosity of the system observed in the energy range 3-20 keV.

  20. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  1. Shocks in nova outflows. I. Thermal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D; Vurm, Indrek; Beloborodov, Andrei M; Chomiuk, Laura; Sokoloski, J L; Nelson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for shocks in nova outflows include (1) multiple velocity components in the optical spectra; (2) keV X-ray emission weeks to months after the outburst; (3) early radio flare on timescales of months, in excess of that predicted from the freely expanding photo-ionized gas; and (4) ~ GeV gamma-rays. We present a 1D model for the shock interaction between the fast nova outflow and a dense external shell (DES) and its associated thermal X-ray, optical, and radio emission. The forward shock is radiative initially when the density of shocked gas is highest, at which times radio emission originates from the dense cooling layer immediately downstream of the shock. The radio light curve is characterized by sharper rises to maximum and later peak times at progressively lower frequencies, with a peak brightness temperature that is approximately independent of frequency. We apply our model to the recent gamma-ray classical nova V1324 Sco, obtaining an adequate fit to the early radio maximum for reasonable assumpt...

  2. The forward-reverse shock pair at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1984-01-01

    An unsteady one-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed in order to study the essential physical processes involved in the development of the forward-reverse shock pair in the heliosphere. In the model, MHD shocks are treated as boundary surfaces which divide the domain of interest in the r-t plane into several flow regions. The positions of the shock boundary surfaces between two neighboring flow regions are determined by shock speed. On the basis of integrations of the model, it is found that the strong MHD disturbances generated in a corotating interaction region (CIR) propagate at a fast speed relative to the moving material, and that the wave propagation speed is greater in CIR than in its surroundings. This causes disturbances in CIR to pile up and form a shock pair. The newly formed shock pair will in turn propagate outward from the leading edge to interact with ambient rarefaction regions. This interaction accounts for the double sawtooth configuration observed in velocity profiles of shock pairs. It is also demonstrated that the merging of two shocks produces a stronger shock and constant surface on its backside. Computer generated velocity profiles based on the model are presented.

  3. GRB 990123 Reverse and Internal Shock Flashes and Late Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    1999-01-01

    The prompt $(t \\siml 0.16$ days) light curve and initial 9-th magnitude optical flash from GRB 990123 can be attributed to a reverse external shock, or possibly to internal shocks. We discuss the time decay laws and spectral slopes expected under various dynamical regimes, and discuss the constraints imposed on the model by the observations, arguing that they provide strongly suggestive evidence for features beyond those in the simple standard model. The longer term afterglow behavior is discussed in the context of the forward shock, and it is argued that, if the steepening after three days is due to a jet geometry, this is likely to be due to jet-edge effects, rather than sideways expansion.

  4. New Evidence for Efficient Collisionless Heating of Electrons at the Reverse Shock of a Young Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Badenes, Carles; Hughes, John P.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Foster, Adam R.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Petre, Robert; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Although collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics, certain key aspects of them are not well understood. In particular, the process known as collisionless electron heating, whereby electrons are rapidly energized at the shock front, is one of the main open issues in shock physics. Here, we present the first clear evidence for efficient collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR), revealed by Fe K diagnostics using high-quality X-ray data obtained by the Suzaku satellite. We detect K beta (3p yields 1s) fluorescence emission from low-ionization Fe ejecta excited by energetic thermal electrons at the reverse shock front, which peaks at a smaller radius than Fe K alpha (2p yields 1s) emission dominated by a relatively highly ionized component. Comparisons with our hydrodynamical simulations imply instantaneous electron heating to a temperature 1000 times higher than expected from Coulomb collisions alone. The unique environment of the reverse shock, which is propagating with a high Mach number into rarefied ejecta with a low magnetic field strength, puts strong constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for this heating and favors a cross-shock potential created by charge deflection at the shock front. Our sensitive observation also reveals that the reverse shock radius of this SNR is about 10% smaller than the previous measurement using the Fe K alpha morphology from the Chandra observations. Since strong Fe K beta fluorescence is expected only from low-ionization plasma where Fe ions still have many 3p electrons, this feature is key to diagnosing the plasma state and distribution of the immediate postshock ejecta in a young SNR.

  5. New Evidence for Efficient Collisionless Heating of Electrons at the Reverse Shock of a Young Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Badenes, Carles; Hughes, John P; Brickhouse, Nancy S; Foster, Adam R; Patnaude, Daniel J; Petre, Robert; Slane, Patrick O; Smith, Randall K

    2013-01-01

    Although collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics, certain key aspects of them are not well understood. In particular, the process known as collisionless electron heating, whereby electrons are rapidly energized at the shock front, is one of the main open issues in shock physics. Here we present the first clear evidence for efficient collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR), revealed by Fe-K diagnostics using high-quality X-ray data obtained by the Suzaku satellite. We detect K-beta (3p->1s) fluorescence emission from low-ionization Fe ejecta excited by energetic thermal electrons at the reverse shock front, which peaks at a smaller radius than Fe K-alpha (2p->1s) emission dominated by a relatively highly-ionized component. Comparison with our hydrodynamical simulations implies instantaneous electron heating to a temperature 1000 times higher than expected from Coulomb collisions alone. The unique environment of the reverse shock, which is propagating w...

  6. Shock Wave Emissions of a Sonoluminescing Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Holzfuss, J; Billó, M; Holzfuss, Joachim; Ruggeberg, Matthias; Billo, Andreas

    1998-01-01

    A single bubble in water is excited by a standing ultrasound wave. At high intensity the bubble starts to emit light. Together with the emitted light pulse, a shock wave is generated in the liquid at collapse time. The time-dependent velocity of the outward-travelling shock is measured with an imaging technique. The pressure in the shock and in the bubble is shown to have a lower limit of 5500 bars. Visualization of the shock and the bubble at different phases of the acoustic cycle reveals previously unobserved dynamics during stable and unstable sonoluminescence.

  7. Sub-photospheric, radiation mediated shocks in GRBs: Multiple shock emission and the Band spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Keren, Shai

    2014-01-01

    We compute the time integrated, thermal emission produced by a series of radiation mediated shocks that emerge from the photosphere of a GRB outflow. We show that for a sufficiently broad distribution of shock strengths, the overall shape of the time integrated spectral energy distribution below the peak is a power law, $\

  8. Collisionless shock in a partially ionized medium. II. Balmer emission

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Blasi, P; Amato, E

    2012-01-01

    Strong shocks propagating into a partially ionized medium are often associated with optical Balmer lines. This emission is due to impact excitation of neutral hydrogen by hot protons and electrons in the shocked gas. The structure of such Balmer-dominated shocks has been computed in a previous paper (Blasi et al. 2012), where the distribution function of neutral particles was derived from the appropriate Boltzmann equation including coupling with ions and electrons through charge exchange and ionization. This calculation showed how the presence of neutrals can significantly modify the shock structure through the formation of a "neutral-induced" precursor ahead of the shock. Here we follow up on our previous work and investigate the properties of the resulting Balmer emission, with the aim of using the observed radiation as a diagnostic tool for shock parameters. Our main focus is on Supernova Remnant shocks, and we find that, for typical parameters, the H{\\alpha} emission typically has a three-component spect...

  9. Shocked plagioclase signatures in Thermal Emission Spectrometer data of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Titus, T.N.; Becker, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extensive impact cratering record on Mars combined with evidence from SNC meteorites suggests that a significant fraction of the surface is composed of materials subjected to variable shock pressures. Pressure-induced structural changes in minerals during high-pressure shock events alter their thermal infrared spectral emission features, particularly for feldspars, in a predictable fashion. To understand the degree to which the distribution and magnitude of shock effects influence martian surface mineralogy, we used standard spectral mineral libraries supplemented by laboratory spectra of experimentally shocked bytownite feldspar [Johnson, J.R., Ho??rz, F., Christensen, P., Lucey, P.G., 2002b. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (E10), doi:10.1029/2001JE001517] to deconvolve Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data from six relatively large (>50 km) impact craters on Mars. We used both TES orbital data and TES mosaics (emission phase function sequences) to study local and regional areas near the craters, and compared the differences between models using single TES detector data and 3 ?? 2 detector-averaged data. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the deconvolution models consistently improved the rms errors compared to models in which the spectra were not used, and resulted in modeled shocked feldspar abundances of >15% in some regions. However, the magnitudes of model rms error improvements were within the noise equivalent rms errors for the TES instrument [Hamilton V., personal communication]. This suggests that while shocked feldspars may be a component of the regions studied, their presence cannot be conclusively demonstrated in the TES data analyzed here. If the distributions of shocked feldspars suggested by the models are real, the lack of spatial correlation to crater materials may reflect extensive aeolian mixing of martian regolith materials composed of variably shocked impact ejecta from both local and distant sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Shocks in nova outflows. II. Synchrotron radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Vlasov, Andrey Dmitrievich; Metzger, Brian David

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of GeV gamma-rays from classical novae indicates that shocks and relativistic particle acceleration are energetically key in these events. Further evidence for shocks comes from thermal keV X-ray emission and an early peak in the radio light curve on a timescale of months with a brightness temperature which is too high to result from freely expanding photo-ionized gas. Paper I developed a one dimensional model for the thermal emission from nova shocks. This work concluded that the shock-powered radio peak cannot be thermal if line cooling operates in the post-shock gas at the rate determined by collisional ionization equilibrium. Here we extend this calculation to include non-thermal synchrotron emission. Applying our model to three classical novae, we constrain the amplification of the magnetic field $\\epsilon_B$ and the efficiency $\\epsilon_e$ of accelerating relativistic electrons of characteristic Lorentz factor $\\gamma \\sim 100$. If the shocks are radiative (low velocity $v_{\\rm sh} \\lesssi...

  11. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR), and they are important diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by Raymond (1979) with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive [Fe II] line fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled the available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-infrared lines, e.g., [Fe II] 35.35 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, and [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 17.94 um, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss ...

  12. Dynamics and Afterglow Light Curves of GRB Blast Waves with a Long-lived Reverse Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Uhm, Z Lucas; Hascoet, Romain; Daigne, Frederic; Mochkovitch, Robert; Park, Il H

    2012-01-01

    We perform a detailed study on the dynamics of a relativistic blast wave with the presence of a long-lived reverse shock (RS). Although a short-lived RS has been widely considered, the RS is believed to be long-lived as a consequence of a stratification expected on the ejecta Lorentz factors. The existence of a long-lived RS makes the forward shock (FS) dynamics to deviate from a self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. Employing the "mechanical model" that correctly incorporates the energy conservation for such blast waves with a long-lived RS, we present an accurate solution for both the FS and RS dynamics. We conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. Adopting a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we keep track of an adiabatic evolution of numerous shells between the FS and RS. An evolution of the electron spectrum is also followed individually for every shell. We then find the FS and RS light curves by integrating over the entire FS and RS shocked regions, respectively. In particul...

  13. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  14. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. II. BALMER EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Blasi, P.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Strong shocks propagating into a partially ionized medium are often associated with optical Balmer lines. This emission is due to impact excitation of neutral hydrogen by hot protons and electrons in the shocked gas. The structure of such Balmer-dominated shocks has been computed in a previous paper, where the distribution function of neutral particles was derived from the appropriate Boltzmann equation including coupling with ions and electrons through charge exchange and ionization. This calculation showed how the presence of neutrals can significantly modify the shock structure through the formation of a neutral-induced precursor ahead of the shock. Here we follow up on our previous work and investigate the properties of the resulting Balmer emission, with the aim of using the observed radiation as a diagnostic tool for shock parameters. Our main focus is on supernova remnant shocks, and we find that, for typical parameters, the H{alpha} emission typically has a three-component spectral profile, where (1) a narrow component originates from upstream cold hydrogen atoms, (2) a broad component comes from hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with shocked protons downstream of the shock, and (3) an intermediate component is due to hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with warm protons in the neutral-induced precursor. The relative importance of these three components depends on the shock velocity, on the original degree of ionization, and on the electron-ion temperature equilibration level. The intermediate component, which is the main signature of the presence of a neutral-induced precursor, becomes negligible for shock velocities {approx}< 1500 km s{sup -1}. The width of the intermediate line reflects the temperature in the precursor, while the width of the narrow one is left unaltered by the precursor. In addition, we show that the profiles of both the intermediate and broad components generally depart from a thermal distribution, as a

  15. GRB 060218/SN 2006aj: Prompt Emission from Inverse-Compton Scattering of Shock Breakout Thermal Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Z G; Liang, E W; Zhang, Bing

    2006-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218/SN 2006aj is a peculiar event, with the second lowest redshift, low luminosity, long duration, chromatic lightcurve features, and in particular, the presence of a thermal component in the X-ray and UV-optical spectra. Thanks to detailed temporal and spectral coverage of the {\\em Swift} observatory, the abundant data allow the GRB prompt emission to be modelled in great detail for the first time. The low flux of prompt UV/optical emission disfavors the conventional internal shock/synchrotron radiation models, which generally predict strong UV/optical emission. Here we show that the unusual prompt emission of GRB 060218 can be produced by inverse-Compton scattering of shock-accelerated relativistic electrons off the detected thermal photons. A pair of (forward plus reverse) shocks form when a relativistic outflow interacts with a preexisting slower shell. The observed gamma-ray emission and X-ray emission arise from the reverse-shocked and forward-shocked regions, respectively. ...

  16. Modeling non-thermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, V; Miceli, M; Bonito, R; de Castro, E

    2016-01-01

    Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing throughout the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. We apply our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life.From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high energy fl...

  17. Particle Acceleration and Nonthermal Emission in Relativistic Astrophysical Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    numerical technique that I have developed in order to extract ab initio photon spectra from PIC simulations of shocks. With this technique, I have modeled the emission from GRB jets, ruling out a class of models that relied on the so-called jitter radiation. This reinforces the idea that a detailed understanding of the micro-physics of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks is required in order to correctly interpret the emission signatures of astrophysical nonthermal sources.

  18. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui; Stone, James M.

    2017-08-01

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ, of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  19. Thermal Radio Emission from Radiative Shocks in Colliding Stellar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Gabriela; González, Ricardo F.; Cantó, Jorge; Pérez-Torres, Miguel A.; Alberdi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We present a semi-analytic model for computing the thermal radio continuum emission from radiative shocks within colliding wind binaries. Assuming a thin shell approximation, we determine the contribution of the wind collision region (WCR) to the total thermal emission for close binaries. We investigate the effect of the binary separation and the stellar wind parameters on the total spectrum. In addition, we point out the relevance of taking into account this contribution for the correct interpretation of the observations, and the accuracy of the stellar wind parameters derived from them.

  20. Thermal Radio Emission from Radiative Shocks in Colliding Wind Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, G.; González, R. F.; Cantó, J.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.

    2011-10-01

    We present a semi-analytic model for computing the thermal radio continuum emission from radiative shocks within colliding wind binaries. Assuming a thin shell approximation, we calculate the contribution of the wind collision region (WCR) to the total thermal emission for close binaries. We investigate the effect of the binary separation on the total spectrum. In addition, we point out the relevance of taking into account this contribution for the correct interpretation of the observations, and the accuracy of parameters derived from them.

  1. Kinematics of ICMEs/shocks: blast wave reconstruction using type II emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Corona-Romero, P; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E; de-la-Luz, V; Mejia-Ambriz, J C

    2015-01-01

    We present a physical methodology to reconstruct the trajectory of interplanetary shocks using type II radio emission data. This technique calculates the shock trajectory assuming that the disturbance propagates as a blast wave in the interplanetary medium. We applied this Blast Wave Reconstruction (BWR) technique to analyze eight fast Earth-directed ICMEs/shocks associated with type II emissions. The technique deduces a shock trajectory that reproduces the type II frequency drifts, and calculates shock onset speed, shock transit time and shock speed at 1~AU. There were good agreements comparing the BWR results with the type II spectra, with data from coronagraph images, {\\it in situ} measurements, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations. Perturbations on the type II data affect the accuracy of the BWR technique. This methodology could be applied to track interplanetary shocks causing TII emissions in real-time, to predict the shock arrival time and shock speed at 1~AU.

  2. Reverse Undercompressive Shock Structures in Wetting Films Driven by a Marangoni Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Jeanman; Bertozzi, Andrea; Behringer, Robert

    2002-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the pinch-off transition in thin liquid films driven by a thermally induced Marangoni force against the gravity. In the experiments, a partially immersed non-isothermal solid substrate is pulled out from a liquid bath and allowed to drain. A uniform temperature gradient drives the film up the substrate. The film just above the meniscus becomes thin and pinches off from the bulk fluid. This pinch-off transition was first observed by Ludviksson and Lightfoot [AIChE J. 17, 1166(1971)] and recently analyzed by Andrea Muench [preprint]. Muench predicts that the pinch-off transition gives rise to a leading undercompressive shock, followed by a reverse undercompressive shock and a trailing rarefaction wave. Our experiments confirm his prediction and show that the reverse undercompressive shock is unstable to transverse perturbations while the leading undercompressive shock is stable. Depending on the pinch-off film thickness, as controlled by the meniscus, either a trailing rarefaction wave or a compressive shock separates from the reverse undercompressive shock. This is the first experimental evidence of a scalar shock structure involving two undercompressive waves.

  3. Reversible cardiogenic shock caused by atrioventricular junctional rhythm after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wang; Qi-Gao Zhang; Xiao-Min Cai; Li-Jun Wang; Jian-Bin Gong; Shi-Sen Jiang

    2012-01-01

    An 82-year-old female patient undergoing cardiogenic shock caused by atrioventricular junctional rhythm immediately after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is described. Pharmacotherapy was invalid, and subsequent application of atrial pacing reversed the cardiogenic shock. PCI-related injury of sinuatrial nodal artery leading to acute atrial contractility loss, accompanied by atrioventricular junctional arrhythmia, was diagnosed. We recommend that preoperative risk evaluation be required for multi-risk patients. Likewise, emergent measures should to be established in advance. This case reminds us that atrial pacing can be an optimal management technique once cardiogenic shock has occurred.

  4. Shocked POststarbust Galaxy Survey I: Candidate Poststarbust Galaxies with Emission Line Ratios Consistent with Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Alatalo, Katherine; Rich, Jeffrey A; Appleton, Philip N; Kewley, Lisa J; Lacy, Mark; Lanz, Lauranne; Medling, Anne M; Nyland, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] There are many mechanisms by which galaxies can transform from blue, star-forming spirals to red, quiescent early-type galaxies, but our current census of them does not form a complete picture. Recent studies of nearby case studies seem to have identified a population of galaxies that quench "quietly." Traditional poststarburst searches seem to catch galaxies only after they have quenched and transformed, and thus miss any objects with additional ionization mechanisms exciting the remaining gas. The Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey (SPOGS) aims to identify galaxies in an earlier phase of transformation, in which the nebular lines are excited via shocks instead of through star formation processes. Utilizing the OSSY measurements on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 catalog, we applied Balmer absorption and shock boundary criteria to identify 1,067 SPOG candidates (SPOGs*) within z = 0.2. SPOGs* represent 0.7% of emission line galaxies (and 0.2% of OSSY). SPOGs* colors suggest that they ...

  5. Absorption/emission spectroscopy and applications using shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1988-09-01

    A historical overview is presented about the important contributions made by Penner, his co-workers, and his students to the application of shock-tube techniques for quantitative emission and absorption spectroscopy and its applications to chemical kinetics studies in high-temperature gases. The discussions address critical aspects related to valid determinations of quantitative spectroscopic data and chemical rate parameters and stress the requirements for uniformly heated gas samples, temperature determinations, gas-mixture preparations, selection of useful spectral intervals, verification of LTE conditions, time resolutions for concentration histories, uniqueness of kinetic measurements, as well as accuracies and reproducibilities of measurement results.The potential of absorption spectroscopy by molecule and/or radical resonance radiation and by laser transmission techniques is highlighted for kinetic studies in mixtures with very small reactant concentrations.Besides the work by the honoree and his school, the references include books, monographs and key articles related to the subjects discussed.

  6. Positive and negative sudden impulses caused by fast forward and reverse interplanetary shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrioli, Vania Fatima; Savian, Jairo Francisco, E-mail: vaniafatima@gmail.com, E-mail: savian@lacesm.ufsm.br [Space Science Laboratory of Santa Maria - LACESM/CT - UFSM, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Centro Tecnologico, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Echer, Ezequiel, E-mail: eecher@dge.inpe.br [National Institute for Space Research - INPE - MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, Nelson Jorge, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br [Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRSPE/INPE - MCT, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Fast forward interplanetary shocks (FFS) are characterized by positive jump in all interplanetary plasma parameters (solar wind speed, temperature and density) and interplanetary magnetic field. However the fast reverse interplanetary shocks (FRS) are characterized by negative jump in all mentioned parameters except solar wind speed. Observations show that FFS cause positive sudden impulses (SI) while FRS cause negative SI in the H-component of the geomagnetic field. In this work we investigate the SI caused by interplanetary shocks. We use the observed plasma parameters, upstream and downstream, to calculate the variation of dynamic pressure. We observe that the SI amplitude is larger for positive SI than for negative ones, as a consequence of the fact that FFS have larger dynamic pressure variations as compared to FRS. (author)

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Effects in Propagating Relativistic Ejecta: Reverse Shock and Magnetic Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.I.; Zhang, B.; Giacomazzo, B.; Hardee, P.E.; Nagataki, S.; Hartmann, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    We solve the Riemann problem for the deceleration of arbitrarily magnetized relativistic ejecta injected into a static unmagnetized medium. We find that for the same initial Lorentz factor, the reverse shock becomes progressively weaker with increasing magnetization s (the Poynting-to-kinetic energy flux ratio), and the shock becomes a rarefaction wave when s exceeds a critical value, sc, defined by the balance between the magnetic pressure in the ejecta and the thermal pressure in the forward shock. In the rarefaction wave regime, we find that the rarefied region is accelerated to a Lorentz factor that is significantly larger than the initial value. This acceleration mechanism is due to the strong magnetic pressure in the ejecta.

  8. Post-partum hemorrhage complicated by reverse-Takotsubo cardiogenic shock; a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, John; Makris, Demosthenes; Tsolaki, Vasiliki; Spathoulas, Konstantinos; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2017-06-01

    Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a type of transient, yet severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, rarely complicating extreme emotional stress ("primary" TTC) or critical medical/surgical illness ("secondary" TTC forms). Although usually reversible, TTC may result in cardiogenic shock with dismal prognosis. "Secondary" TTC forms are particularly in danger for this complication, bearing significantly worse short and long-term prognosis. Herein, we report a rare case of a life-threatening "secondary" TTC in a patient with post-cesarean section severe hemorrhage, and we point out that early co-administration of esmolol and levosimendan might be an effective and safe therapeutic approach in "reversing" TTC-induced cardiogenic shock, especially when invasive therapeutic strategies are practically unfeasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radio emission from weak spherical shocks in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2015-01-01

    In Kang (2015) we calculated the acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons and the ensuing radio synchrotron emission at weak spherical shocks that are expected to form in the outskirts of galaxy clusters.There we demonstrated that, at decelerating spherical shocks, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws predicted for constant planar shocks, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons decrease in time. In this study, we consider spherical blast waves propagating into a constant density core surrounded by an isothermal halo with a decreasing density profile in order to explore how the deceleration rate of the shock speed affects the radio emission from accelerated electrons. The surface brightness profile and the volume-integrated radio spectrum of the model shocks are calculated by assuming a ribbon-like shock surface on a spherical shell and the associated downstream region of relativistic electrons. If the p...

  10. Dust Destruction by the Reverse Shock in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R; Slavin, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing one solar mass of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our aim is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. We use analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, with special application to the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A. We assume that the dust resides in cool oxygen-rich clumps that are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma, and that the dust consists of silic...

  11. A Unified Model of the Fermi Bubbles, Microwave Haze, and Polarized Radio Lobes: Reverse Shocks in the Galactic Center’s Giant Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Roland M.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Carretti, Ettore

    2015-08-01

    The Galactic center’s giant outflows are manifest in three different, nonthermal phenomena: (1) the hard-spectrum, γ-ray “Fermi bubbles” emanating from the nucleus and extending to | b| ˜ 50^\\circ ; (2) the hard-spectrum, total-intensity microwave (˜20-40 GHz) “haze” extending to | b| ˜ 35^\\circ in the lower reaches of the Fermi bubbles; and (3) the steep-spectrum, polarized, “S-PASS” radio (˜2-20 GHz) lobes that envelop the bubbles and extend to | b| ˜ 60^\\circ . We find that the nuclear outflows inflate a genuine bubble in each Galactic hemisphere that has the classical structure, working outward, of reverse shock, contact discontinuity (CD), and forward shock. Expanding into the finite pressure of the halo and given appreciable cooling and gravitational losses, the CD of each bubble is now expanding only very slowly. We find observational signatures in both hemispheres of giant, reverse shocks at heights of ˜1 kpc above the nucleus; their presence ultimately explains all three of the nonthermal phenomena mentioned above. Synchrotron emission from shock-reaccelerated cosmic-ray electrons explains the spectrum, morphology, and vertical extent of the microwave haze and the polarized radio lobes. Collisions between shock-reaccelerated hadrons and denser gas in cooling condensations that form inside the CD account for most of the bubbles’ γ-ray emissivity. Inverse Compton emission from primary electrons contributes at the 10%-30% level. Our model suggests that the bubbles are signatures of a comparatively weak but sustained nuclear outflow driven by Galactic center star formation over ≳few × 108 yr.

  12. Prompt high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Bosnjak, Z; Dubus, G

    2008-01-01

    The prompt GRB emission is thought to arise from electrons accelerated in internal shocks propagating within a highly relativistic outflow. The launch of Fermi offers the prospect of observations with unprecedented sensitivity in high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays. The aim is to explore the predictions for HE emission from internal shocks, taking into account both dynamical and radiative aspects, and to deduce how HE observations constrain the properties of the relativistic outflow. The emission is modeled by combining a time-dependent radiative code with a dynamical code giving the evolution of the physical conditions in the shocked regions.Synthetic lightcurves and spectra are compared to observations. The HE emission deviates significantly from analytical estimates, which tend to overpredict the IC component, when the time dependence and full cross-sections are included. The exploration of the parameter space favors the case where the dominant process in the BATSE range is synchrotron emission. The HE compo...

  13. Stability of the Forward/Reverse Shock System Formed by the Impact of a Relativistic Fireball on an Ambient Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X; Waxman, E; Wang, Xiaohu; Loeb, Abraham; Waxman, Eli

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the stability of a relativistic double (forward/reverse) shock system which forms when the fireball of a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) impacts on the surrounding medium. We find this shock system to be stable to linear global perturbations for either a uniform or a wind (r^{-2}) density profile of the ambient medium. For the wind case, we calculate analytically the frequencies of the normal modes which could modulate the early short-term variability of GRB afterglows. We find that perturbations in the double shock system could induce oscillatory fluctuations in the observed flux on short (down to seconds) time scales during the early phase of an afterglow.

  14. CO (v = 1-0) emission in the molecular shock regions of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Hackwell, John A.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.

    1992-01-01

    Using the new Aerospace spectrometer on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, we have obtained observations of the molecular shocks associated with OMC-1. Unexpectedly these observations reveal (b = 1-0) emission from CO at 4.6 microns superposed on a strong continuum. Our observations strongly suggest that both the emission feature and the continuum are produced in molecular shocks. Since the (v = 1-0) band of CO is only excited in high-velocity shocks, we may be observing for the first time the primary driving mechanism in these regions. Even if these features are produced by scattering, the characteristics will provide new constraints on the conditions in and the geometry of the shock regions.

  15. Photoacoustic shock wave emission and cavitation from structured optical fiber tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, M.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.; Ohl, C. D., E-mail: cdohl@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Wan, Y. C.; Wang, X.; Zheng, H. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore)

    2016-01-11

    Photoacoustic waves generated at the tip of an optical fiber consist of a compressive shock wave followed by tensile diffraction waves. These tensile waves overlap along the fiber axis and form a cloud of cavitation bubbles. We demonstrate that shaping the fiber tip through micromachining alters the number and direction of the emitted waves and cavitation clouds. Shock wave emission and cavitation patterns from five distinctively shaped fiber tips have been studied experimentally and compared to a linear wave propagation model. In particular, multiple shock wave emission and generation of strong tension away from the fiber axis have been realized using modified fiber tips. These altered waveforms may be applied for novel microsurgery protocols, such as fiber-based histotripsy, by utilizing bubble-shock wave interaction.

  16. CO (v = 1-0) emission in the molecular shock regions of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Hackwell, John A.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.

    1992-01-01

    Using the new Aerospace spectrometer on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, we have obtained observations of the molecular shocks associated with OMC-1. Unexpectedly these observations reveal (b = 1-0) emission from CO at 4.6 microns superposed on a strong continuum. Our observations strongly suggest that both the emission feature and the continuum are produced in molecular shocks. Since the (v = 1-0) band of CO is only excited in high-velocity shocks, we may be observing for the first time the primary driving mechanism in these regions. Even if these features are produced by scattering, the characteristics will provide new constraints on the conditions in and the geometry of the shock regions.

  17. Evaluation of acoustic shock induced early hearing loss with audiometer and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acoustic shock injury has been described as a permanent injury to the auditory system either due to daily noise dose of in excess of 85 decibels or very loud impulse sound reputed to be in excess of 120 decibels and acoustic incidents. This study was performed to compare the results of audiogram and the newer diagnostic method distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) parameters due to acoustic shock injury in call center professionals working in a noisy environment and pr...

  18. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  19. Reversible cardiogenic shock due to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy: a variant of takotsubo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Catherine; Khaliq, Asma; Guglin, Maya

    2013-11-01

    Catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, including takotsubo, neurogenic stunned myocardium, and pheochromocytoma-related cardiomyopathy, is a reversible and generally benign condition. We are reporting a case series of young women who had cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema due to severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which completely recovered in the course of 2 to 3 weeks. Both patients had high catecholamine levels, due to pheochromocytoma in the first case and due to intravenous high-dose catecholamines in the second case. We suggest that screening for pheochromocytoma should be considered in patients who present with takotsubo cardiomyopathy without obvious cause. Most importantly, widely used intravenous catecholamines may cause severe transient left ventricular dysfunction, and consideration should be given to noncatecholamine vasopressors.

  20. FUSE Observations of the Cygnus Loop OVI Emission from a Nonradiative Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Sankrit, R; Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.

    2001-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of a Balmer filament in the northeast region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. The data consist of one spectrum obtained through the 30"x30" (LWRS) aperture and three spectra at adjacent positions obtained through the 4"x20" (MDRS) aperture. The nonradiative shocks in the region giving rise to these faint optical filaments produce strong OVI 1032,1038 emission, which is detected in all the spectra. The OVI emission is resolved by FUSE into a strong component centered at 0 km/s, and weaker components centered at +/- 140 km/s. The MDRS spectra allow us to study the variation of OVI emission in the post-shock structure. We find that the zero velocity emission is associated directly with the Balmer filament shock, while the high velocity emission comes from a more uniformly distributed component elsewhere along the line of sight. We also find that the shocks producing the emission at +/- 140 km/s have velocities between 180 km/s and 220 km/...

  1. Relationship of shock-associated kilometric radio emission with metric type II bursts and energetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S.W.; Cliver, E.W.; Cane, H.V.

    1986-01-01

    Shock-associated (SA) events are a class of kilometric-wavelength solar radio bursts first observed with the ISEE-3 Radio Astronomy Experiment. These fast-drift events are typically associated with metric type II bursts and hypothesized that the SA events were due to electrons accelerated by coronal shocks. Compare SA events from 1978 to 1982 with metric type II bursts and solar energetic particle (SEP) events. Most metric type II bursts are not obviously associated with SA events at 1980 kHz. Metric type II bursts associated with magnetically well connected flares and SA emission are well correlated with SEP events; those without SA emission are poorly correlated with SEP events. The largest SEP events from flares at any longitude are well correlated with SAs. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the escaping electrons giving rise to SA emission are accelerated in coronal shocks.

  2. X-ray Emission Line Profiles from Wind Clump Bow Shocks in Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ignace, R; Cassinelli, J P

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two component flow structure of wind and clumps using two "beta" velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the...

  3. A model for the thermal radio-continuum emission from radiative shocks in colliding stellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, G.; González, R. F.; Cantó, J.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.

    2011-07-01

    Context. In massive-star binary systems, the interaction of the strong stellar winds results in a wind collision region (WCR) between the stars, which is limited by two shock fronts. Besides the nonthermal emission resulting from the shock acceleration, these shocks emit thermal (free-free) radiation detectable at radio frequencies that increase the expected emission from the stellar winds. Observations and theoretical studies of these sources show that the shocked gas is an important, but not dominant, contributor to the total emission in wide binary systems, while it plays a very substantial role in close binaries. Aims: The interaction of two isotropic stellar winds is studied in order to calculate the free-free emission from the WCR. The effects of the binary separation and the wind momentum ratio on the emission from the wind-wind interaction region are investigated. Methods: We developed a semi-analytical model for calculating the thermal emission from colliding stellar winds. Assuming radiative shocks for the compressed layer, which are expected in close binaries, we obtained the emission measure of the thin shell. Then, we computed the total optical depth along each line of sight to obtain the emission from the whole configuration. Results: Here, we present predictions of the free-free emission at radio frequencies from analytic, radiative shock models in colliding wind binaries. It is shown that the emission from the WCR mainly arises from the optically thick region of the compressed layer and scales as ~D4/5, where D is the binary separation. The predicted flux density Sν from the WCR becomes more important as the frequency ν increases, showing higher spectral indices than the expected 0.6 value (Sν ∝ να, where α = 0.6) from the unshocked winds. We also investigate the emission from short-period WR+O systems calculated with our analytic formulation. In particular, we apply the model to the binary systems WR 98 and WR 113 and compare our results

  4. Non-relativistic perpendicular shocks modeling young supernova remnants: nonstationary dynamics and particle acceleration at forward and reverse shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wieland, Volkmar; Niemiec, Jacek; Rafighi, Iman; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    For parameters that are applicable to the conditions at young supernova remnants, we present results of 2D3V particle-in-cell simulations of a non-relativistic plasma shock with a large-scale perpendicular magnetic field inclined at 45-deg angle to the simulation plane to approximate 3D physics. We developed an improved clean setup that uses the collision of two plasma slabs with different density and velocity, leading to the development of two distinctive shocks and a contact discontinuity. The shock formation is mediated by Weibel-type filamentation instabilities that generate magnetic turbulence. Cyclic reformation is observed in both shocks with similar period, for which we note global variations on account of shock rippling and local variations arising from turbulent current filaments. The shock rippling occurs on spatial and temporal scales given by gyro-motions of shock-reflected ions. The drift motion of electrons and ions is not a gradient drift, but commensurates with E x B drift. We observe a stabl...

  5. Shock-powered radio emission from V5589 Sagittarii (Nova Sgr 2012 #1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Chomiuk, Laura; Linford, Justin D.; Nelson, Thomas; Mukai, Koji; Finzell, Tom; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael P.; Walter, Frederick M.

    2016-08-01

    Since the Fermi discovery of γ-rays from novae, one of the biggest questions in the field has been how novae generate such high-energy emission. Shocks must be a fundamental ingredient. Six months of radio observations of the 2012 Nova V5589 Sgr with the VLA and 15 weeks of X-ray observations with Swift/XRT show that the radio emission consisted of: (1) a shock-powered, non-thermal flare; and (2) weak thermal emission from 10-5 M⊙ of freely expanding, photoionized ejecta. Absorption features in the optical spectrum and the peak optical brightness suggest that V5589 Sgr lies 4 kpc away (3.2-4.6 kpc). The shock-powered flare dominated the radio light curve at low frequencies before day 100. The spectral evolution of the radio flare, its high radio brightness temperature, the presence of unusually hard (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays, and the ratio of radio to X-ray flux near radio maximum all support the conclusions that the flare was shock-powered and non-thermal. Unlike most other novae with strong shock-powered radio emission, V5589 Sgr is not embedded in the wind of a red-giant companion. Based on the similar inclinations and optical line profiles of V5589 Sgr and V959 Mon, we propose that shocks in V5589 Sgr formed from collisions between a slow flow with an equatorial density enhancement and a subsequent faster flow. We speculate that the relatively high speed and low mass of the ejecta led to the unusual radio emission from V5589 Sgr, and perhaps also to the non-detection of γ-rays.

  6. Hard X-ray emission from accretion shocks around galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kushnir, Doron

    2009-01-01

    We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed from several galaxy clusters is naturally explained by a simple model, in which the nonthermal emission is produced by inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons by electrons accelerated in cluster accretion shocks: The dependence of HXR surface brightness on cluster temperature is consistent with that predicted by the model, and the observed HXR luminosity is consistent with the fraction of shock thermal energy deposited in relativistic electrons being \\lesssim 0.1. Alternative models, where the HXR emission is predicted to be correlated with the cluster thermal emission, are disfavored by the data. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) gamma-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed.

  7. Nonrelativistic Perpendicular Shocks Modeling Young Supernova Remnants: Nonstationary Dynamics and Particle Acceleration at Forward and Reverse Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Volkmar; Pohl, Martin; Niemiec, Jacek; Rafighi, Iman; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    For parameters that are applicable to the conditions at young supernova remnants, we present results of two-dimensional, three-vector (2D3V) particle-in-cell simulations of a non-relativistic plasma shock with a large-scale perpendicular magnetic field inclined at a 45^\\circ angle to the simulation plane to approximate three-dimensional (3D) physics. We developed an improved clean setup that uses the collision of two plasma slabs with different densities and velocities, leading to the development of two distinctive shocks and a contact discontinuity. The shock formation is mediated by Weibel-type filamentation instabilities that generate magnetic turbulence. Cyclic reformation is observed in both shocks with similar period, for which we note global variations due to shock rippling and local variations arising from turbulent current filaments. The shock rippling occurs on spatial and temporal scales produced by the gyro-motions of shock-reflected ions. The drift motion of electrons and ions is not a gradient drift, but is commensurate with {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}} drift. We observe a stable supra-thermal tail in the ion spectra, but no electron acceleration because the amplitude of the Buneman modes in the shock foot is insufficient for trapping relativistic electrons. We see no evidence of turbulent reconnection. A comparison with other two-dimensional (2D) simulation results suggests that the plasma beta and the ion-to-electron mass ratio are not decisive for efficient electron acceleration, but the pre-acceleration efficacy might be reduced with respect to the 2D results once 3D effects are fully accounted for. Other microphysical factors may also play a part in limiting the amplitude of the Buneman waves or preventing the return of electrons to the foot region.

  8. Conical Emission from Shock Waves in Ne(1-20 AGeV)+U Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Philip; Betz, Barbara; Petersen, Hannah; Bleicher, Marcus; Stöcker, Horst

    2010-01-01

    The formation and propagation of high-density compression waves, e.g. Mach shock waves, in cold nuclear matter is studied by simulating high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions of Ne with U in the energy range from E_lab = 0.5 AGeV to 20 AGeV. In an ideal hydrodynamic approach, the high-density shock wave created by the small Ne nucleus passing through the heavy U nucleus is followed by a slower and more dilute Mach shock wave which causes conical emission of particles at the Mach cone angle. The conical emission originates from low-density regions with a small flow velocity comparable to the speed of sound. Moreover, it is shown that the angular distributions of emitted baryons clearly distinguish between a hydrodynamic approach and binary cascade processes used in the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport model.

  9. Emission of Whistler-mode waves and diffusion of electrons around interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, F.; Solomon, J.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Canu, P.; Scime, E. E.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1995-01-01

    Whistler-mode wave emissions are frequently observed at and downstream of interplanetary shocks. Using electron distribution functions measured onboard Ulysses in the energy range 1.6 to 862 eV, we calculate the temperature anisotropy and the wave growth rate of the electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability, Results of the calculations are compared to the whistler wave spectra observed simultaneously. For the studied events there is a good correlation between the wave growth rates and the wave spectra. Particularly, upstream of the shock front where no wave emissions are observed, the anisotropy lies below the wave instability threshold, i.e. the critical anisotropy Ac; on the contrary, downstream of the shock, the anisotropy exceeds Ac in some frequency range. Moreover. the tact that the anisotropy is close to Ac in a large frequency range gives prominence to the effect of velocity space diffusion of the electrons by the waves.

  10. X-ray emission from protostellar jet HH 154: the first evidence of a diamond shock?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, R; Miceli, M; Peres, G; Micela, G; Favata, F

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission from about ten protostellar jets has been discovered and it appears as a feature common to the most energetic jets. Although X-ray emission seems to originate from shocks internal to jets, the mechanism forming these shocks remains controversial. One of the best studied X-ray jet is HH 154 that has been observed by Chandra over a time base of about 10 years. We analyze the Chandra observations of HH 154 by investigating the evolution of its X-ray source. We show that the X-ray emission consists of a bright stationary component and a faint elongated component. We interpret the observations by developing a hydrodynamic model describing a protostellar jet originating from a nozzle and compare the X-ray emission synthesized from the model with the X-ray observations. The model takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses and shows that the jet/nozzle leads to the formation of a diamond shock at the nozzle exit. The shock is stationary over the period covered by our simulations and...

  11. Broadband Electromagnetic Emission from PZT Ferroelectric Ceramics after Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiodoras ANISIMOVAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally registered pulsed electromagnetic (EM radiation in frequency range higher than television one using wideband horns with coaxial and waveguide outputs. The EM radiation was received during shock loading of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics cylinders in conventional piezoelectric ignition mechanisms. Digital oscilloscope allows registering whole series of EM pulses and each pulse from the series transmitted from horn antenna of (1 – 18 GHz operating band frequencies. There is (1 – 4 ms delay between the shock and the first pulse of the series. Duration of the series is about (3 – 4 ms. The PZT cylinders were cleaved along their axes and the surfaces formed in the process were investigated by scanning electron microscope. It was concluded that from electrical point of view PZT ceramics contain interacting subsystems. It was found that EM radiation spectrum of pulse detected by waveguide detector heads has harmonics reaching 80 GHz. Presence of harmonics higher than 20 GHz indicates on radiation due to deceleration of electrons emitted during the switching. The EM pulses in the series appear randomly and have different amplitudes which partly confirmed thesis on independent switching dynamics of small volumes governed by a local electric field.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.3137

  12. Broadband Electromagnetic Emission from PZT Ferroelectric Ceramics after Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiodoras ANISIMOVAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally registered pulsed electromagnetic (EM radiation in frequency range higher than television one using wideband horns with coaxial and waveguide outputs. The EM radiation was received during shock loading of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics cylinders in conventional piezoelectric ignition mechanisms. Digital oscilloscope allows registering whole series of EM pulses and each pulse from the series transmitted from horn antenna of (1 – 18 GHz operating band frequencies. There is (1 – 4 ms delay between the shock and the first pulse of the series. Duration of the series is about (3 – 4 ms. The PZT cylinders were cleaved along their axes and the surfaces formed in the process were investigated by scanning electron microscope. It was concluded that from electrical point of view PZT ceramics contain interacting subsystems. It was found that EM radiation spectrum of pulse detected by waveguide detector heads has harmonics reaching 80 GHz. Presence of harmonics higher than 20 GHz indicates on radiation due to deceleration of electrons emitted during the switching. The EM pulses in the series appear randomly and have different amplitudes which partly confirmed thesis on independent switching dynamics of small volumes governed by a local electric field.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.3137

  13. Inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 reverses sensory hypoalgesia in diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S J Blagg

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the expression of Hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70 can inhibit sensory neuron degeneration after axotomy. Since the onset of DPN (diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with the gradual decline of sensory neuron function, we evaluated whether increasing Hsp70 was sufficient to improve several indices of neuronal function. Hsp90 is the master regulator of the heat-shock response and its inhibition can up-regulate Hsp70. KU-32 (N-{7-[(2R,3R,4S,5R-3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-6,6-dimethyl-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yloxy]-8-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl}acetamide was developed as a novel, novobiocin-based, C-terminal inhibitor of Hsp90 whose ability to increase Hsp70 expression is linked to the presence of an acetamide substitution of the prenylated benzamide moiety of novobiocin. KU-32 protected against glucose-induced death of embryonic DRG (dorsal root ganglia neurons cultured for 3 days in vitro. Similarly, KU-32 significantly decreased neuregulin 1-induced degeneration of myelinated Schwann cell DRG neuron co-cultures prepared from WT (wild-type mice. This protection was lost if the co-cultures were prepared from Hsp70.1 and Hsp70.3 KO (knockout mice. KU-32 is readily bioavailable and was administered once a week for 6 weeks at a dose of 20 mg/kg to WT and Hsp70 KO mice that had been rendered diabetic with streptozotocin for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of diabetes, both WT and Hsp70 KO mice developed deficits in NCV (nerve conduction velocity and a sensory hypoalgesia. Although KU-32 did not improve glucose levels, HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin or insulin levels, it reversed the NCV and sensory deficits in WT but not Hsp70 KO mice. These studies provide the first evidence that targeting molecular chaperones reverses the sensory hypoalgesia associated with DPN.

  14. Inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 reverses sensory hypoalgesia in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J; Li, Chengyuan; Yu, Cuijuan; Lu, Yuanming; Krise, Joanna M; McIntosh, Michelle P; Rajewski, Roger A; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2010-08-11

    Increasing the expression of Hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) can inhibit sensory neuron degeneration after axotomy. Since the onset of DPN (diabetic peripheral neuropathy) is associated with the gradual decline of sensory neuron function, we evaluated whether increasing Hsp70 was sufficient to improve several indices of neuronal function. Hsp90 is the master regulator of the heat-shock response and its inhibition can up-regulate Hsp70. KU-32 (N-{7-[(2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-6,6-dimethyl-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yloxy]-8-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl}acetamide) was developed as a novel, novobiocin-based, C-terminal inhibitor of Hsp90 whose ability to increase Hsp70 expression is linked to the presence of an acetamide substitution of the prenylated benzamide moiety of novobiocin. KU-32 protected against glucose-induced death of embryonic DRG (dorsal root ganglia) neurons cultured for 3 days in vitro. Similarly, KU-32 significantly decreased neuregulin 1-induced degeneration of myelinated Schwann cell DRG neuron co-cultures prepared from WT (wild-type) mice. This protection was lost if the co-cultures were prepared from Hsp70.1 and Hsp70.3 KO (knockout) mice. KU-32 is readily bioavailable and was administered once a week for 6 weeks at a dose of 20 mg/kg to WT and Hsp70 KO mice that had been rendered diabetic with streptozotocin for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of diabetes, both WT and Hsp70 KO mice developed deficits in NCV (nerve conduction velocity) and a sensory hypoalgesia. Although KU-32 did not improve glucose levels, HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) or insulin levels, it reversed the NCV and sensory deficits in WT but not Hsp70 KO mice. These studies provide the first evidence that targeting molecular chaperones reverses the sensory hypoalgesia associated with DPN.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of stone fragments in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy using a time reversal operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used widely in the noninvasive treatment of kidney calculi. The fine fragments less than 2 mm in size can be discharged by urination, which determines the success of ESWL. Although ultrasonic and fluorescent imaging are used to localize the calculi, it's challenging to monitor the stone comminution progress, especially at the late stage of ESWL when fragments spread out as a cloud. The lack of real-time and quantitative evaluation makes this procedure semi-blind, resulting in either under- or over-treatment after the legal number of pulses required by FDA. The time reversal operator (TRO) method has the ability to detect point-like scatterers, and the number of non-zero eigenvalues of TRO is equal to that of the scatterers. In this study, the validation of TRO method to identify stones was illustrated from both numerical and experimental results for one to two stones with various sizes and locations. Furthermore, the parameters affecting the performance of TRO method has also been investigated. Overall, TRO method is effective in identifying the fragments in a stone cluster in real-time. Further development of a detection system and evaluation of its performance both in vitro and in vivo during ESWL is necessary for application.

  16. Shock-powered radio emission from V5589 Sagittarii (Nova Sgr 2012 #1)

    CERN Document Server

    Weston, Jennifer H S; Chomiuk, Laura; Linford, Justin D; Nelson, Thomas; Mukai, Koji; Finzell, Tom; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael P; Walter, Frederick M

    2015-01-01

    Since the Fermi discovery of $\\gamma$-rays from novae, one of the biggest questions in the field has been how novae generate such high-energy emission. Shocks must be a fundamental ingredient. Six months of radio observations of the 2012 nova V5589 Sgr with the VLA and 15 weeks of X-ray observations with Swift/XRT show that the radio emission consisted of: 1) a shock-powered, non-thermal flare; and 2) weak thermal emission from $10^{-5}$ M$_\\odot$ of freely expanding, photoionized ejecta. Absorption features in the optical spectrum and the peak optical brightness suggest that V5589 Sgr lies at 4 kpc (3.2-4.6 kpc). The shock-powered flare was the dominant component in the radio light curve at low frequencies before day 100. The spectral evolution of the flare, its high radio brightness temperature, the presence of unusually hard ($kT_x > 33$ keV) X-rays, and the ratio of radio to X-ray flux near the peak of the flare all support the conclusions that the flare is shock-powered and non-thermal. Unlike other nova...

  17. Evaluation of acoustic shock induced early hearing loss with audiometer and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Vinodh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acoustic shock injury has been described as a permanent injury to the auditory system either due to daily noise dose of in excess of 85 decibels or very loud impulse sound reputed to be in excess of 120 decibels and acoustic incidents. This study was performed to compare the results of audiogram and the newer diagnostic method distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs parameters due to acoustic shock injury in call center professionals working in a noisy environment and prone to acoustic injury. Materials and Methods: Hearing functions of 340 subjects were first assessed with pure tone audiometry and then DPOAEs results were compared among acoustic shock exposed subjects with normal audiogram and those with abnormal audiogram. Results: Out of 340 acoustic shock exposed subjects 304 were normal on audiometric testing and 34 had abnormal audiograms. Subsequently on DPOAE testing out of 304 acoustic shock exposed subjects with normal audiogram 125 failed and 181 passed. Conclusions: This study showed that DPOAEs are more sensitive than audiometry to detect pre-symptomatic inner ear damage. It may play a role as screening and monitoring test for acoustic shock-exposed workers.

  18. A model for the thermal radio-continuum emission from radiative shocks in colliding stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, G; Canto, J; Perez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The interaction of two isotropic stellar winds is studied in order to calculate the free-free emission from the wind collision region. The effects of the binary separation and the wind momentum ratio on the emission from the wind-wind interaction region are investigated. Methods. We developed a semi-analytical model for calculating the thermal emission from colliding stellar winds. Assuming radiative shocks for the compressed layer, which are expected in close binaries, we obtained the emission measure of the thin shell. Then, we computed the total optical depth along each line of sight to obtain the emission from the whole configuration. Results. Here, we present predictions of the free-free emission at radio frequencies from analytic, radiative shock models in colliding wind binaries. It is shown that the emission from the wind collision region mainly arises from the optically thick region of the compressed layer and scales as ~ D^{4/5}, where D is the binary separation. The predicted flux density fro...

  19. Reverse-flow strategy in biofilters treating CS₂ emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Naiara; Gallastegui, Gorka; Gurtubay, Luis; Barona, Astrid; Elías, Ana

    2013-04-01

    The bacteriostatic properties of carbon disulphide (CS₂) hamper its biodegradation in conventional biofilters. The response of four biofilters operating in downflow mode and reverse-flow mode was compared in a laboratory-scale plant treating CS₂ under sudden short-term changes in operating conditions. A process shutdown for 24 h, an inlet concentration increase and an interruption of the inlet air humidification for 48 h at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 240 s did not impact significantly on biodegradation performance, regardless of flow mode. Nevertheless, a reduction in the EBRT to 60 s resulted in a significant decrease in removal efficiency in all the biofilters. The CS₂ degradation profile showed that the reverse-flow mode strategy rendered a more homogenous distribution of biomass along the bed height. The benefits of the reverse-flow mode were demonstrated even when the unidirectional flow mode was re-established.

  20. Powerful GeV emission from a gamma-ray-burst shock wave scattering stellar photons

    CERN Document Server

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts of long duration are likely connected to the death of massive stars. The gamma-ray emission is believed to come from energy released internally in a flow that moves at ultrarelativistic speed. The fast flow drives a shock wave into the external medium leading to the afterglow emission. Most massive stars form in dense clusters, their high luminosity producing a very dense radiation field. Here, I explore the observational consequences of the interaction of the shocked external medium of the burst with the photon field of a nearby O star. I show that inverse Compton scattering of the stellar photons by electrons heated by the shock leads to powerful gamma-ray emission in the ~1-100 GeV range. This emission appears minutes to hours after the burst and can be easily detected by Cherenkov telescopes and likely with the GLAST satellite. This signal may have already been observed in GRB 940217 and can yield important information about the circumburst environment.

  1. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  2. Maxwell equation simulations of coherent optical photon emission from shock waves in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J D

    2007-05-01

    We have predicted that weak coherent radiation in the 1-100 THz frequency regime can be emitted under some circumstances when a shock wave propagates through a polarizable crystal, like NaCl [Reed, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 013904 (2006)]. In this work, we present and analyze a new model of a shocked polarizable crystal that is amenable to systematic analytical study and direct numerical solution of Maxwell's equations to predict emitted coherent field amplitudes and properties. Our simulations and analysis indicate that the field amplitude of the effect decreases rapidly with increasing shock front rise distance. These models establish a fundamental limit of the ratio of emitted terahertz amplitude to the static polarization of a material. While this effect is treated classically in our previous work, we present a quantum perturbation analysis showing that it can also occur in the low-amplitude emission quantum limit.

  3. High-energy emission from non-relativistic radiative shocks: application to gamma-ray novae

    CERN Document Server

    Vurm, Indrek

    2016-01-01

    Multiwavelength radiation from relativistic particles accelerated at shocks in novae and other astrophysical sources carries a wealth of information about the outflow properties and the microphysical processes at work near the shocks. The observation of GeV gamma-rays from novae by Fermi/LAT demonstrates that the shocks in these systems can accelerate particles to energies of at least $\\sim 10$ GeV. The low-energy extension of the same non-thermal particle distribution inevitably gives rise to emission extending into the X-ray band. Above $\\gtrsim 10$ keV this radiation can escape the system without significant absorption/attenuation, and can potentially be detected by NuSTAR. We present theoretical models for hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from radiative shocks in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios, accounting for the rapid evolution of the downstream properties due to the fast cooling of thermal plasma. Due to strong Coulomb cooling of the mildly relativistic electrons nominally responsible for produci...

  4. X-ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: a Search for Collisionless Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Fox, D.; Cenko, Stephen B.; Sullivan, M; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Fillippenko, A. V; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D.; Arcavi, I.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J..

    2013-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (Tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model.We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above

  5. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock can be caused by any condition that reduces blood flow, including: Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection ...

  6. Shocked POststarbust Galaxy Survey. I. Candidate Post-starbust Galaxies with Emission Line Ratios Consistent with Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Cales, Sabrina L.; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Appleton, Philip N.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Lanz, Lauranne; Medling, Anne M.; Nyland, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    There are many mechanisms by which galaxies can transform from blue, star-forming spirals, to red, quiescent early-type galaxies, but our current census of them does not form a complete picture. Recent observations of nearby case studies have identified a population of galaxies that quench “quietly.” Traditional poststarburst searches seem to catch galaxies only after they have quenched and transformed, and thus miss any objects with additional ionization mechanisms exciting the remaining gas. The Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey (SPOGS) aims to identify transforming galaxies, in which the nebular lines are excited via shocks instead of through star formation processes. Utilizing the Oh-Sarzi-Schawinski-Yi (OSSY) measurements on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 catalog, we applied Balmer absorption and shock boundary criteria to identify 1067 SPOG candidates (SPOGs*) within z = 0.2. SPOGs* represent 0.2% of the OSSY sample galaxies that exceed the continuum signal-to-noise cut (and 0.7% of the emission line galaxy sample). SPOGs* colors suggest that they are in an earlier phase of transition than OSSY galaxies that meet an “E+A” selection. SPOGs* have a 13% 1.4 GHz detection rate from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters Survey, higher than most other subsamples, and comparable only to low-ionization nuclear emission line region hosts, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SPOGs* also have stronger Na i D absorption than predicted from the stellar population, suggestive of cool gas being driven out in galactic winds. It appears that SPOGs* represent an earlier phase in galaxy transformation than traditionally selected poststarburst galaxies, and that a large proportion of SPOGs* also have properties consistent with disruption of their interstellar media, a key component to galaxy transformation. It is likely that many of the known pathways to transformation undergo a SPOG phase. Studying this sample of

  7. Broad Balmer line emission and cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in supernova remnant shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Bandiera, R; Amato, E

    2013-01-01

    Balmer emission may be a powerful diagnostic tool to test the paradigm of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in young supernova remnant (SNR) shocks. The width of the broad Balmer line is a direct indicator of the downstream plasma temperature. In case of efficient particle acceleration an appreciable fraction of the total kinetic energy of the plasma is channeled into CRs, therefore the downstream temperature decreases and so does the broad Balmer line width. This width also depends on the level of thermal equilibration between ions and neutral hydrogen atoms in the downstream. Since in general in young SNR shocks only a few charge exchange (CE) reactions occur before ionization, equilibration between ions and neutrals is not reached, and a kinetic description of the neutrals is required in order to properly compute Balmer emission. We provide a method for the calculation of Balmer emission using a self-consistent description of the shock structure in the presence of neutrals and CRs. We use a recently developed s...

  8. Observational constraints on the external shock prior emission hypothesis of GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Birnbaum, Tesla; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Liang, En-Wei

    2011-01-01

    An intriguing hypothesis, i.e. there exists a decaying X-ray emission component before the GRB trigger, has been suggested to interpret the shallow decay phase of the X-ray afterglow detected in many {\\em Swift} GRBs. If this "prior emission" is from an external shock, one would expect a corresponding optical emission component during the GRB prompt emission phase. In this paper we apply the available prompt optical emission data (both detections and upper limits) to constrain such a scenario. We fit the shallow and normal decay segments of the XRT light curves with a $T_0$-shifted single power law, and extrapolate the X-ray flux back to the time of the early optical observations. We then use the synchrotron spectrum predicted by the standard external shock model to extrapolate from the X-ray flux to the optical band, and obtain the possible range of the predicted optical flux. Finally, we compare the predictions with the observations. In the cases where later optical data are available, we also compare the s...

  9. Shock Induced Emission from Sapphire in High-Pressure Phase of Rh2O3 (Ⅱ) Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dai-Yu; LIU Fu-Sheng; HAO Gao-Yu; SUN Yu-Huai

    2007-01-01

    @@ A distinct optical emission from the Rh2 O3 (Ⅱ) structural sapphire is observed under shock compression of 125,132, and 143 Gpa. The emission intensity continuously increases with the thickness of shocked sapphire. The colour temperature is determined to be about 4000K, which is obviously smaller than the reported value of the alpha phase alumina at the pressures below 80 Gpa. The present results suggest that the structural transformation will cause an obvious change of optical property in sapphire.

  10. SiO line emission from C-type shock waves: interstellar jets and outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdorf, A.; Cabrit, S.; Flower, D. R.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.

    2008-05-01

    We study the production of SiO in the gas phase of molecular outflows, through the sputtering of Si-bearing material in refractory grain cores, which are taken to be olivine. We calculate also the rotational line spectrum of the SiO. The sputtering is driven by neutral particle impact on charged grains, in steady-state C-type shock waves, at the speed of ambipolar diffusion. The emission of the SiO molecule is calculated by means of an LVG code. A grid of models, with shock speeds in the range 20 Schilke et al. 1997). Improvements in the treatment of the coupling between the charged grains and the neutral fluid lead to narrower shock waves and lower fractions of Si (⪉10%) being released into the gas phase. Erosion of grain cores is significant (⪆1%) only for C-type shock speeds vs > 25 km s-1, given the adopted properties of olivine. More realistic assumptions concerning the initial fractional abundance of O2 lead to SiO formation being delayed, so that it occurs in the cool, dense postshock flow. Good agreement is obtained with recent observations of SiO line intensities in the L1157 and L1448 molecular outflows. The inferred temperature, opacity, and SiO column density in the emission region differ significantly from those estimated by means of LVG “slab” models. The fractional abundance of SiO is deduced and found to be in the range 4 × 10-8 ⪉ n(SiO)/nH ⪉ 3 × 10-7. Observed line profiles are wider than predicted and imply multiple, unresolved shock regions within the beam.

  11. Solar prominences with Na and Mg emissions and centrally reversed Balmer line

    CERN Document Server

    Stellmacher, G; 10.1051/0004-6361:20041550

    2012-01-01

    We study spectral lines in exceptionally bright solar limb prominences with pronounced sodium and magnesium emission. We find that most prominences with significant NaD2 and Mgb2 emission show centrally reversed profiles of H-alpha and occasionally even of H-beta, which are are well reproduced by semi-infinite models. The maximum H-alpha source function corresponds to an excitation temperature of 3950 K, for pronounced central reversions 4000 K; the related optical thickness exceeds 10.0. The narrow widths of the NaD2 and Mgb2 profiles yield a non-thermal broadening of 5 km/s.

  12. Time-Dependent MHD Shocks and Line Emission: The Case of the DG Tau Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Massaglia, S; Bodo, G

    2005-01-01

    The line emission from a growing number of Herbig-Haro jets can be observed and resolved at angular distances smaller than a few arcseconds from the central source. The interpretation of this emission is problematic, since the simplest model of a cooling jet cannot sustain it. It has been suggested that what one actually observes are shocked regions with a filling factor of $\\sim 1%$. In this framework, up to now, comparisons with observations have been based on stationary shock models. Here we introduce for the first time the self-consistent dynamics of such shocks and we show that considering their properties at different times, i.e. locations, we can reproduce observational data of the DG Tau microjet. In particular, we can interpret the spatial behavior of the [SII]6716/6731 and [NII]/[OI]6583/6300 line intensity ratios adopting a set of physical parameters that yield values of mass loss rates and magnetic fields consistent with previous estimates. We also obtain the values of the mean ionization fraction...

  13. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occuring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to devel...

  14. Can the forward-shock model account for the multiwavelength emission of GRB afterglow 090510 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Neamus, Ano

    2010-01-01

    GRB 090510 is the first burst whose afterglow emission above 100 MeV was measured by Fermi over two decades in time. Owing to its power-law temporal decay and power-law spectrum, it seems likely that the high-energy emission is from the forward-shock energizing the ambient medium (the standard blast-wave model for GRB afterglows), the GeV flux and its decay rate being consistent with that model's expectations. However, the synchrotron emission from a collimated outflow (the standard jet model) has difficulties in accounting for the lower-energy afterglow emission, where a simultaneous break occurs in the optical and X-ray light-curves at 2 ks, but with the optical flux decay (before and after the break) being much slower than in the X-rays (at same time). The measured X-ray and GeV fluxes are incompatible with the higher-energy afterglow emission being from same spectral component as the lower-energy afterglow emission, which suggests a synchrotron self-Compton model for this afterglow. Cessation of energy in...

  15. X-Ray Emission by A Shocked Fast Wind from the Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Akashi, M; Behar, E; Akashi, Muhammad; Soker, Noam; Behar, Ehud

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the X-ray emission from the shocked fast wind blown by the central stars of planetary nebulae (PNs) and compare with observations. Using spherically symmetric self similar solutions with radiative cooling, we calculate the flow structure and X-ray temperature for a fast wind slamming into a previously ejected slow wind. We find that the observed X-ray emission of six PNs can be accounted for by shocked wind segments that were expelled during the early PN phase, if the fast wind speed is moderate, ~400-600 km/sec, and the mass loss rate is a few times 10^{-7} Mo/year. We find, as proposed previously, that the morphology of the X-ray emission is in the form of a narrow ring inner to the optical bright part of the nebula. The bipolar X-ray morphology of several observed PNs, which indicates an important role of jets rather than a spherical fast wind, cannot be explained by the flow studied here.

  16. MODELING BRIGHT γ-RAY AND RADIO EMISSION AT FAST CLOUD SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5210 (Japan); Patnaude, Daniel J.; Raymond, John C.; Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Nagataki, Shigehiro [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory and Interdisciplinary Theoretical Science Research Group, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ellison, Donald C., E-mail: slee@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu, E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite have revealed bright γ-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenario can explain the observed broadband spectral properties. The NLDSA scenario also succeeds in explaining the γ-ray spectrum but fails to reproduce the radio spectral index. Efficient NLDSA also results in a significant post-shock non-thermal pressure that limits the compression during cooling and prevents the formation of a prominent dense shell. Some other interesting differences between the two models in hydrodynamical behavior and resulting spectral features are illustrated.

  17. GRB 091208B: FIRST DETECTION OF THE OPTICAL POLARIZATION IN EARLY FORWARD SHOCK EMISSION OF A GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, T.; Chiyonobu, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikejiri, Y.; Itoh, R.; Komatsu, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Tanaka, H.; Yamanaka, M. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Toma, K. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kawabata, K. S.; Mizuno, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Uemura, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Inoue, T.; Yamashita, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Nakaya, H., E-mail: uehara@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2012-06-10

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149-706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4( {+-} 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 {+-} 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al.). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emission region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as those amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.

  18. Herschel HIFI observations of O{sub 2} toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Black, John; Hjalmarson, Åke [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Caselli, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and École Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Goicoechea, Javier R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), E-28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O{sub 2} lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s{sup –1} with line widths ∼3 km s{sup –1}; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O{sub 2} emission is ≅9'' (6 × 10{sup 16} cm) in size, and is located close to the H {sub 2} Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H{sub 2} emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O{sub 2} column density is ≅1.1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O{sub 2} abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O{sub 2} can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is ≅10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O{sub 2} emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  19. Shock-Resistibility of MEMS-Based Inertial Microswitch under Reverse Directional Ultra-High g Acceleration for IoT Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu; Yang, Zhuoqing; Sun, Yunna; Lai, Liyan; Jin, Zhiyu; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yao, Jinyuan; Wang, Jing

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a novel MEMS-based inertial microswitch design with multi-directional compact constraint structures for improving the shock-resistibility. Its shock-resistibility in the reverse-sensitive direction to ultra-high g acceleration (~hunderds of thousands) is simulated and analyzed. The dynamic response process indicates that in the designed inertial microswitch the proof mass weight G, the whole system’s stiffness k and the gap x2 between the proof mass and reverse constraint blocks have significant effect on the shock-resistibility. The MEMS inertial microswitch micro-fabricated by surface micromachining has been evaluated using the drop hammer test. The maximum allowable reverse acceleration, which does not cause the spurious trigger, is defined as the reverse acceleration threshold (athr). Test results show that athr increases with the decrease of the gap x2, and the proposed microswitch tends to have a better shock-resistibility under smaller gap. The measured responses of the microswitches with and without constraint structure indicates that the device without constraint structure is prone to spurious trigger, while the designed constraint structures can effectively improve the shock-resistibility. In this paper, the method for improving the shock-resistibility and reducing the spurious trigger has been discussed.

  20. Shock-Resistibility of MEMS-Based Inertial Microswitch under Reverse Directional Ultra-High g Acceleration for IoT Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu; Yang, Zhuoqing; Sun, Yunna; Lai, Liyan; Jin, Zhiyu; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yao, Jinyuan; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel MEMS-based inertial microswitch design with multi-directional compact constraint structures for improving the shock-resistibility. Its shock-resistibility in the reverse-sensitive direction to ultra-high g acceleration (~hunderds of thousands) is simulated and analyzed. The dynamic response process indicates that in the designed inertial microswitch the proof mass weight G, the whole system’s stiffness k and the gap x2 between the proof mass and reverse constraint blocks have significant effect on the shock-resistibility. The MEMS inertial microswitch micro-fabricated by surface micromachining has been evaluated using the drop hammer test. The maximum allowable reverse acceleration, which does not cause the spurious trigger, is defined as the reverse acceleration threshold (athr). Test results show that athr increases with the decrease of the gap x2, and the proposed microswitch tends to have a better shock-resistibility under smaller gap. The measured responses of the microswitches with and without constraint structure indicates that the device without constraint structure is prone to spurious trigger, while the designed constraint structures can effectively improve the shock-resistibility. In this paper, the method for improving the shock-resistibility and reducing the spurious trigger has been discussed. PMID:28361893

  1. Research Spotlight: North and south components of Saturn's radio emissions reversed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-02-01

    Saturn is known to emit intense radio emissions at kilometer wavelengths from its auroral regions. Observations in recent years found that the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) emission from the northern auroral region has a clocklike modulation with a period of about 10.6 hours, while the SKR emission from the southern auroral region has a period of about 10.8 hours. Analyzing more recent observations from the Cassini spacecraft, Gurnett et al. have now found that the rotational modulation rates of the southern and northern components reversed shortly after Saturn’s equinox on 11 August 2009, so that the southern hemisphere SKR now has the shorter rotation period. They also analyzed data from the Ulysses spacecraft to show that a similar reversal occurred during the previous equinox, in November 1995. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045796, 2010)

  2. Multichannel emission spectrometer for high dynamic range optical pyrometry of shock-driven materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-10-01

    An emission spectrometer (450-850 nm) using a high-throughput, high numerical aperture (N.A. = 0.3) prism spectrograph with stepped fiberoptic coupling, 32 fast photomultipliers and thirty-two 1.25 GHz digitizers is described. The spectrometer can capture single-shot events with a high dynamic range in amplitude and time (nanoseconds to milliseconds or longer). Methods to calibrate the spectrometer and verify its performance and accuracy are described. When a reference thermal source is used for calibration, the spectrometer can function as a fast optical pyrometer. Applications of the spectrometer are illustrated by using it to capture single-shot emission transients from energetic materials or reactive materials initiated by kmṡs-1 impacts with laser-driven flyer plates. A log (time) data analysis method is used to visualize multiple kinetic processes resulting from impact initiation of HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) or a Zr/CuO nanolaminate thermite. Using a gray body algorithm to interpret the spectral radiance from shocked HMX, a time history of temperature and emissivity was obtained, which could be used to investigate HMX hot spot dynamics. Finally, two examples are presented showing how the spectrometer can avoid temperature determination errors in systems where thermal emission is accompanied by atomic or molecular emission lines.

  3. High Energy Neutrino Emission Induced by Ultrahigh Energy Nuclei in Cluster Accretion Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke; Olinto, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Accretion shocks in clusters of galaxies can potentially accelerate protons to above 1017 eV and nuclei to ultrahigh energies. High energy neutrinos are produced when these cosmic rays interact with baryons of the massive cluster, or with CMB photons during their extragalactic propagation. In light of the recent IceCube discovery of TeV-PeV neutrinos, we calculate the neutrino emissions from accretion shocks, using a complete numerical propagation method and calibrated based on precision ΛCDM simulation. We pin down the uncertainty and degeneracy in source parameters by taking into account the cosmological evolution of cluster mass, density profiles, velocity dispersions, along with the gravitational gas accretion rates. We find that the neutrino spectrum is distinct from E-2 after considering the cluster mass function which impact both maximum energy and luminosity of the accelerated cosmic rays. We compare the cumulative neutrino flux to sensitivities of the existing and future high energy neutrino observatories. We also discuss the implication of our results on the scenario of cluster accretion shocks being the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

  4. Studies of the Jet in BL Lacertae I. Recollimation Shock and Moving Emission Features

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, M H; Arshakian, T G; Homan, D C; Hovatta, T; Kovalev, Y Y; Lister, M L; Pushkarev, A B; Richards, J L; Savolainen, T

    2014-01-01

    Parsec-scale VLBA images of BL Lac at 15 GHz show that the jet contains a permanent quasi-stationary emission feature 0.26 mas (0.34 pc projected) from the core, along with numerous moving features. In projection, the tracks of the moving features cluster around an axis at position angle -166.6 deg that connects the core with the standing feature. The moving features appear to emanate from the standing feature in a manner strikingly similar to the results of numerical 2-D relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations in which moving shocks are generated at a recollimation shock. Because of this, and the close analogy to the jet feature HST-1 in M87, we identify the standing feature in BL Lac as a recollimation shock. We assume that the magnetic field dominates the dynamics in the jet, and that the field is predominantly toroidal. From this we suggest that the moving features are compressions established by slow and fast mode magneto-acoustic MHD waves. We illustrate the situation with a simple model in...

  5. Polarization Signatures of Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in the Blazar Emission Region - I. Force-free Helical Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Böttcher, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The optical radiation and polarization signatures in blazars are known to be highly variable during flaring activities. It is frequently argued that shocks are the main driver of the flaring events. However, the spectral variability modelings generally lack detailed considerations of the self-consistent magnetic field evolution modeling, thus so far the associated optical polarization signatures are poorly understood. We present the first simultaneous modeling of the optical radiation and polarization signatures based on 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shocks in the blazar emission environment, with the simplest physical assumptions. By comparing the results with observations, we find that shocks in a weakly magnetized environment will largely lead to significant changes in the optical polarization signatures, which are seldom seen in observations. Hence an emission region with relatively strong magnetization is preferred. In such an environment, slow shocks may produce minor flares with ei...

  6. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons. [in interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength range of a previously constructed multichannel fast recording spectrometer was extended to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, light intensities were recorded simultaneously with a silicon-diode array simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with a 20-micron time resolution. For studies in the infrared, the silicon diodes were replaced by a 20-element PbSe array of similar dimensions, cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. It is proposed that infrared emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock-heated C2H2; no soot was generated. At low resolution, the profiles on the high-frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no conversion) and T5(eq).

  7. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images.

  8. EU emissions trading. The need for cap adjustment in response to external shocks and unexpected developments?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, Jochen [DIW, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper the advantages and disadvantages of the various adaptation options will be discussed from an economic perspective. Firstly, the criteria for identifying a need for potentially legitimate adaptation should be investigated. Furthermore, the issue of appropriate timely intervention points prior to or within the trading period will be discussed. In what periods and scenarios are adjustments to the cap worthwhile from an economic perspective? To what extent could minimum prices or price ranges make sense? What role could a strategic reserve play? By addressing these issues, it will be fundamentally discussed as to how the emissions trading scheme could be further developed and strengthened by greater flexibility. After a brief characterisation of emissions trading in theory and practice in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 will identify potential external shocks and unexpected developments which may impair the functioning of an emissions trading scheme. The current problems of cap setting for the third trading period of the EU ETS will be described in Chapter 4. Against this background, cap adjustments will be discussed in Chapter 5, minimum and maximum prices in Chapter 6 and strategic reserves in emissions trading in Chapter 7. The conclusions are summarised in Chapter 8.

  9. Reversible emission evolution from Ag activated zeolite Na-A upon dehydration/hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hui, E-mail: linh8112@163.com, E-mail: fujii@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp; Imakita, Kenji; Fujii, Minoru, E-mail: linh8112@163.com, E-mail: fujii@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-11-24

    Reversible emission evolution of thermally treated Ag activated zeolite Na-A upon dehydration/hydration in vacuum/water vapor was observed. The phenomenon was observed even for the sample with low Ag{sup +}-Na{sup +} exchanging (8.3%), indicating that the emission from Ag activated zeolites may not come from Ag clusters while from the surrounding coordinated Ag{sup +} ions or Ag{sup 0} atoms. It was disclosed that the characteristic yellow-green emission at ∼560 ± 15 nm is strongly associated with the coordinating water molecules to the Ag{sup +} ions or Ag{sup 0} atoms, which is clear evidence for that the efficient emission from Ag activated zeolites may not originate from the quantum confinement effect.

  10. A search for H2 emission in bipolar nebulae and regions of interstellar shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. P.; White, G. J.; Harten, R.

    1985-04-01

    A H2 emission survey of five bipolar outflow sources (NGC 1333, M2-9, As 353, S106, V645 Cyg), and one region of shock interaction between an H II region and molecular cloud (NGC 281) are presented. Two of the sources (M2-9, NGC 1333) were detected in the v = 1-0S(1), and Q-branch transitions of H2. A detailed analysis and modeling for these cases is provided. The probable mass of shocked H2 is shown to range between 1.4 x 10 to the -6th and 4.2 x 10 to the -8th solar masses for M2-9, and about 0.00025 and 0.00001910 solar masses in the case of NGC 1333, although the latter values may require increasing by a factor of a few when due allowance is made for extinction. A detailed analysis for the core of M2-9 indicates that the ionized zone is extremely compact, and that the Brackett line measures support other evidence in suggesting a high core extinction, large emission measure, and a projected angular radius of about 0.04 arcsec. Similarly, it is apparent from the H2S(1) line strength that the core expansion velocity must be low and less than about 1 km/s (a constraint which is also required on dynamical grounds). Finally, CO J = 3-2 observations of the source failed to detect emission above a 2-sigma limit of about 0.4 K, and this is shown to imply a probable expansion timescale of less than about 2000 yr.

  11. Shock breakout driven by the remnant of a neutron star binary merger: An X-ray precursor of mergernova emission

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shao-Ze

    2015-01-01

    A supra-massive neutron star (NS) spinning extremely rapidly could survive from a merger of NS-NS binary. The spin-down of this remnant NS that is highly magnetized would power the isotropic merger ejecta to produce a bright mergernova emission in ultraviolet/optical bands. Before the mergernova, the early interaction between the NS wind and the ejecta can drive a forward shock to propagate outwards into the ejecta. As a result, a remarkable amount of heat can be accumulated to be deposited behind the shock front, the final escaping of which can produce a shock breakout emission. We describe the dynamics and thermal emission of this shock with a semi-analytical model. It is found that a sharp and luminous breakout emission, which is mainly in soft X-rays with a luminosity of $\\sim10^{45}~\\rm erg~s^{-1}$, appears at a few hours after the merger, by leading the mergernova emission as a precursor. Therefore, detections of such X-ray precursors would provide a smoking-gun evidence for identifying NS-powered merge...

  12. Shock Breakout Driven by the Remnant of a Neutron Star Binary Merger: An X-Ray Precursor of Mergernova Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei

    2016-03-01

    A supra-massive neutron star (NS) spinning extremely rapidly could survive from a merger of an NS-NS binary. The spin-down of this remnant NS that is highly magnetized could power the isotropic merger ejecta to produce a bright mergernova emission in the ultraviolet/optical bands. Before the mergernova, the early interaction between the NS wind and the ejecta could drive a forward shock propagating outward into the ejecta. As a result, a remarkable amount of heat can be accumulated behind the shock front and the final escape of this heat could produce a shock breakout emission. We describe the dynamics and thermal emission of this shock with a semi-analytical model. It is found that a few hours after the merger, by leading the mergernova emission as a precursor, sharp and luminous breakout emission appears mainly in soft X-rays, with a luminosity of ∼ {10}45 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. Therefore, the detection of such an X-ray precursor could provide evidence for identifying NS-powered mergernovae and distinguishing them from radioactivity-powered novae (i.e., kilonovae or macronovae). The discovery of NS-powered mergernovae could finally help to confirm the gravitational wave signals due to the mergers and the existence of supra-massive NSs.

  13. Herschel HIFI observations of O$_2$ toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Viti, Serena; Snell, Ronald; Lis, Dariusz C; Benz, Arnold; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Caselli, Paola; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Goicoechea, Javier R; Hjalmarson, Ake; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Yildiz, Umut A

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velo...

  14. Investigation of a shock wave in an arcjet He plasma by using an electric probe and emission spectroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagawa, G.; Kozue, K.; Fujino, S.; Matsuoka, L.; Endo, T.; Namba, S. [Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Tamura, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    We developed an arcjet plasma device having a converging and diverging supersonic conical nozzle. Bright and dark emission structures were formed, depending on the gas pressure in the expansion section. In order to understand the mechanism for the formation of the structures, we evaluated the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature) by using a single probe and a visible emission spectroscope. The analysis of the probe measurements showed no temperature variation around the bright emission region. The plasma density increased significantly by a factor of two. Similar trends were also observed in the spectroscopic measurements. Moreover, the cell width (wavelength) of the shock wave calculated from the compressible fluid dynamics was in good agreement with the experimental value, indicating that this emission structure was caused by a shock cell that could be described by using compressible flow dynamics.

  15. SiO line emission from C-type shock waves : interstellar jets and outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Gusdorf, A; Flower, D R; Forets, G Pineau des

    2008-01-01

    We study the production of SiO in the gas phase of molecular outflows, through the sputtering of Si--bearing material in refractory grain cores, which are taken to be olivine; we calculate also the rotational line spectrum of the SiO. The sputtering is driven by neutral particle impact on charged grains, in steady--state C-type shock waves, at the speed of ambipolar diffusion. The emission of the SiO molecule is calculated by means of an LVG code. A grid of models has been generated. We compare our results with those of an earlier study (Schilke et al. 1997). Improvements in the treatment of the coupling between the charged grains and the neutral fluid lead to narrower shock waves and lower fractions of Si being released into the gas phase. More realistic assumptions concerning the initial fractional abundance of O2 lead to SiO formation being delayed, so that it occurs in the cool, dense postshock flow. Good agreement is obtained with recent observations of SiO line intensities in the L1157 and L1448 molecul...

  16. Nonlinear shock acceleration and gamma-ray emission from Tycho and Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G

    2012-01-01

    We apply the non-linear diffusive shock acceleration theory in order to describe the properties of two supernova remnants, SN 1572 (Tycho) and SN 1604 (Kepler). By analyzing the multi-wavelength spectra, we infer that both Tycho's and Kepler's forward shocks are accelerating protons up to ~500 TeV, channeling into cosmic rays more than 10 per cent of their kinetic energy. We find that the streaming instability induced by cosmic rays is consistent with the X-ray morphology of the remnants, indicating a very efficient magnetic field amplification (up to ~300 microG). In the case of Tycho we explain the gamma-ray spectrum from the GeV up to the TeV band as due to pion decay produced in nuclear collisions by accelerated nuclei scattering against the background gas. On the other hand, due to the larger distance, the gamma-ray emission from Kepler is not detected, being below the sensitivity of the present detectors, but it should be detectable by the Cerenkov Telescope Array.

  17. O2 Emission toward Orion H2 Peak 1 and the Role of FUV-illuminated C-shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Gary J.; Kaufman, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) has been the target of ground-based and space-borne searches for decades. Of the thousands of lines of sight surveyed, only those toward Rho Ophiuchus and Orion H2 Peak 1 have yielded detections of any statistical significance. The detection of the O2 NJ = 33-12 and 54-34 lines at 487.249 GHz and 773.840 GHz, respectively, toward Rho Ophiuchus has been attributed to a short-lived peak in the time-dependent, cold-cloud O2 abundance, while the detection of the O2 NJ = 33-12, 54-34 lines, plus the 76-56 line at 1120.715 GHz, toward Orion has been ascribed to time-dependent preshock physical and chemical evolution and low-velocity (12 km s-1) non-dissociative C-type shocks, both of which are fully shielded from far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation, plus a postshock region that is exposed to an FUV field. We report a re-interpretation of the Orion O2 detection based on new C-type shock models that fully incorporate the significant effects the presence of even a weak FUV field can have on the preshock gas, shock structure, and postshock chemistry. In particular, we show that a family of solutions exists, depending on the FUV intensity, that reproduces both the observed O2 intensities and O2 line ratios. The solution in closest agreement with the shock parameters inferred for H2 Peak 1 from other gas tracers assumes a 23 km s-1 shock impacting gas with a preshock density of 8 × 104 cm-3 and {G}{o} = 1, substantially different from that inferred for the fully shielded shock case. As pointed out previously, the similarity between the LSR velocity of all three O2 lines (≈ 11 km s-1) and recently measured H2O 532-441 maser emission at 620.701 GHz toward H2 Peak 1 suggests that the O2 emission arises behind the same shocks responsible for the maser emission, though the O2 emission is almost certainly more extended than the localized high-density maser spots. Since maser emission arises along lines of sight of low-velocity gradient, indicating shock motion

  18. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  19. Radio to $\\gamma$-Ray Emission from Shell-type Supernova Remnants Predictions from Non-linear Shock Acceleration Models

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Reynolds, S P; Grenier, I; Goret, P; Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Reynolds, Stephen P; Grenier, Isabelle; Goret, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are widely believed to be the principal source of galactic cosmic rays. Such energetic particles can produce gamma-rays and lower energy photons via interactions with the ambient plasma. In this paper, we present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of non-linear shock structure and acceleration coupled with photon emission in shell-like SNRs. These non-linearities are a by-product of the dynamical influence of the accelerated cosmic rays on the shocked plasma and result in distributions of cosmic rays which deviate from pure power-laws. Such deviations are crucial to acceleration efficiency and spectral considerations, producing GeV/TeV intensity ratios that are quite different from test particle predictions. The Sedov scaling solution for SNR expansions is used to estimate important shock parameters for input into the Monte Carlo simulation. We calculate ion and electron distributions that spawn neutral pion decay, bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton, and synchrotron emission, yieldin...

  20. Metal Emission Lines as Diagnostic Tools for Shock Waves in Outer Atmospheres of M-type Mira Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, He.; Sedlmayr, E.; Wood, P. R.

    One way to reveal the thermo- and hydrodynamical conditions in M-type Mira atmospheres is to study the various emission lines which are emitted behind a shock front and can be observed over a substantial portion of the pulsation period. Analysing a time-resolved series of these emission lines offers the possibility to determine these conditions in different atmospheric layers influenced by the passing shock wave. In particular, the metal emission lines are a diagnostic tool to probe the hydrodynamical conditions of the outer, dust-forming layers of the atmosphere, because they appear late in the pulsation cycle when the shock wave has reached these layers. We present quantitive data on radial velocities, shapes, widths and fluxes of metal emission lines obtained by spectral observations in the optical wavelength region for a sample of six M-type Miras (periods 281-389 days), namely R Aql, RR Sco, R Car, R Leo, S Scl and R Hya (cf. Richter & Wood 2001, A&A 369, 1027-1047). Because of the multiple phase coverage of our observations, the data shows the history of the shock as it emerges through the deep photosphere and then moves out through the atmosphere. The observations are analysed and discussed with regard to the atmospheric conditions.

  1. Tracing extended low-velocity shocks through SiO emission - Case study of the W43-MM1 ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Louvet, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Lesaffre, P; Duarte-Cabral, A; Maury, A; Schneider, N; Hill, T; Schilke, P; Gueth, F

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that the densest structures in the interstellar medium form through colliding flows but patent evidence of this process is still missing. Recent literature proposes using SiO line emission to trace low-velocity shocks associated with cloud formation through collision. In this paper we investigate the bright and extended SiO(2-1) emission observed along the $\\sim$5 pc-long W43-MM1 ridge to determine its origin. We use high-angular resolution images of the SiO(2-1) and HCN(1-0) emission lines obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and combined with data from the IRAM/30m radiotelescope. These data are complemented by an Herschel column density map of the region. We perform spectral analysis of SiO and HCN emission line profiles to identify protostellar outflows and spatially disentangle two velocity components associated with low- and high-velocity shocks. Then, we compare the low-velocity shock component to a dedicated grid of 1D radiative shock models. We find that ...

  2. Multiwavelength analysis of the intriguing GRB 061126: The reverse shock scenario and magnetization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Mangano, V.; Sbarufatti, B.; Mundell, C.G.; Schady, P.; Smith, R.J.; Updike, A.C.; Kann, D.A.; Misra, K.; Rol, E.; Pozanenko, A.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Anupama, G.C.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M.F.; Carter, D.; Curran, P.; Fruchter, A.; Graham, J.; Hartmann, D.H.; Ibrahimov, M.; Levan, A.; Monfardini, A.; Mottram, C.J.; O'Brien, P.T.; Prema, P.; Sahu, D.K.; Steele, I.A.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the prompt and afterglow emission from Swift GRB 061126 using BAT, XRT, UVOT data and multicolor optical imaging from 10 ground-based telescopes. GRB 061126 was a long burst (T90 = 191 s) with four overlapping peaks in its γ-ray light curve. The X-ray afterglow, observ

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Mnif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ, and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution.

  4. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Imen; Mouelhi, Meral; Hamrouni, Béchir

    2017-01-01

    Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL) and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG) depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI) from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI) water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ), and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps). The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution. PMID:28819360

  5. Deconvolution of acoustic emissions for source localization using time reverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocur, Georg Karl

    2017-01-01

    Impact experiments on small-scale slabs made of concrete and aluminum were carried out. Wave motion radiated from the epicenter of the impact was recorded as voltage signals by resonant piezoelectric transducers. Numerical simulations of the elastic wave propagation are performed to simulate the physical experiments. The Hertz theory of contact is applied to estimate the force impulse, which is subsequently used for the numerical simulation. Displacements at the transducer positions are calculated numerically. A deconvolution function is obtained by comparing the physical (voltage signal) and the numerical (calculated displacement) experiments. Acoustic emission signals due to pencil-lead breaks are recorded, deconvolved and applied for localization using time reverse modeling.

  6. LOCALIZED SiO EMISSION TRIGGERED BY THE PASSAGE OF THE W51C SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, G. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Vaupré, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Hily-Blant, P.; Dubus, G. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d" Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Montmerle, T. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institute d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Gabici, S. [APC, AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris, F-75205 Paris (France)

    2014-05-10

    The region toward W51C is a convincing example of interaction between a supernova remnant (SNR) and a surrounding molecular cloud. Large electron abundances have been reported toward the position W51C-E located in this interaction region, and it was proposed that the enhanced ionization fraction was due to cosmic ray particles freshly accelerated by the SNR shock. We present Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(1-0) and DCO{sup +}(2-1) emission lines centered at position W51C-E. These observations confirm the previous scenario of cosmic-ray-induced ionization at this location. In addition, SiO(2-1) emission has been successfully mapped in the close vicinity of W51C-E, with a spatial resolution of 7''. The morphology and kinematics of the SiO emission are analyzed and strongly suggest that this emission is produced by the passage of the SNR primary shock. Put in conjunction with the enhanced ionization fraction in this region, we give a consistent picture in which the W51C-E position is located downstream of the shock, where a large reservoir of freshly accelerated particles is available.

  7. Global reverse supply chain design for solid waste recycling under uncertainties and carbon emission constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhitao; Elomri, Adel; Pokharel, Shaligram; Zhang, Qin; Ming, X G; Liu, Wenjie

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of concerns over environmental protection, resource conservation as well as the development of logistics operations and manufacturing technology has led several countries to implement formal collection and recycling systems of solid waste. Such recycling system has the benefits of reducing environmental pollution, boosting the economy by creating new jobs, and generating income from trading the recyclable materials. This leads to the formation of a global reverse supply chain (GRSC) of solid waste. In this paper, we investigate the design of such a GRSC with a special emphasis on three aspects; (1) uncertainty of waste collection levels, (2) associated carbon emissions, and (3) challenges posed by the supply chain's global aspect, particularly the maritime transportation costs and currency exchange rates. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first attempt to integrate the three above-mentioned important aspects in the design of a GRSC. We have used mixed integer-linear programming method along with robust optimization to develop the model which is validated using a sample case study of e-waste management. Our results show that using a robust model by taking the complex interactions characterizing global reverse supply chain networks into account, we can create a better GRSC. The effect of uncertainties and carbon constraints on decisions to reduce costs and emissions are also shown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. BROAD N{sub 2}H{sup +} EMISSION TOWARD THE PROTOSTELLAR SHOCK L1157-B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codella, C.; Fontani, F.; Gómez-Ruiz, A.; Vasta, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Podio, L. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Caselli, P., E-mail: codella@rcetri.astro.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    We present the first detection of N{sub 2}H{sup +} toward a low-mass protostellar outflow, namely, the L1157-B1 shock, at ∼0.1 pc from the protostellar cocoon. The detection was obtained with the IRAM 30 m antenna. We observed emission at 93 GHz due to the J = 1-0 hyperfine lines. Analysis of this emission coupled with HIFI CHESS multiline CO observations leads to the conclusion that the observed N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) line originated from the dense (≥10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) gas associated with the large (20''-25'') cavities opened by the protostellar wind. We find an N{sub 2}H{sup +} column density of a few 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} corresponding to an abundance of (2-8) × 10{sup –9}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance can be matched by a model of quiescent gas evolved for more than 10{sup 4} yr, i.e., for more than the shock kinematical age (≅2000 yr). Modeling of C-shocks confirms that the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +} is not increased by the passage of the shock. In summary, N{sub 2}H{sup +} is a fossil record of the pre-shock gas, formed when the density of the gas was around 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and then further compressed and accelerated by the shock.

  9. Reversible Electroencephalographic and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography Abnormalities in Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Lin Chen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE is a well-established disease that occurs most commonly in patients with euthyroidism. We report 3 patients diagnosed with HE. Cases 1 and 2 were young females who had experienced intractable seizures and presented with cognitive impairment. Reversible slow waves on the electroencephalogram (EEG, and nearly complete recovery of cognition, were noted after steroid treatment. Case 3 was an elderly male who presented with a sudden onset of vertigo, diplopia, and recurrent gait ataxia. Reversible hypoperfusion in the upper portion of the left cerebellum, on 99mTc hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, was noted after steroid treatment. We also review 25 cases from the literature of patients diagnosed with HE. All patients had antithyroid antibodies. A reversible inflammatory process is supported by brain magnetic resonance imaging, SPECT, EEG and cerebrospinal fluid studies. Vasculitis is the most probable pathogenesis according to laboratory findings. Steroids are the treatment of choice, and result in a favorable outcome when administered early in the disease course.

  10. Laser-excited optical emission response of CdTe quantum dot/polymer nanocomposite under shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Kang, Zhitao; Summers, Christopher J. [Phosphor Technology Center of Excellence, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); Bansihev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Breidenich, Jennifer; Scripka, David A.; Thadhani, Naresh N. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Zhou, Min, E-mail: min.zhou@gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Laser-driven shock compression experiments and corresponding finite element method simulations are carried out to investigate the blueshift in the optical emission spectra under continuous laser excitation of a dilute composite consisting of 0.15% CdTe quantum dots by weight embedded in polyvinyl alcohol polymer. This material is a potential candidate for use as internal stress sensors. The analyses focus on the time histories of the wavelength blue-shift for shock loading with pressures up to 7.3 GPa. The combined measurements and calculations allow a relation between the wavelength blueshift and pressure for the loading conditions to be extracted. It is found that the blueshift first increases with pressure to a maximum and subsequently decreases with pressure. This trend is different from the monotonic increase of blueshift with pressure observed under conditions of quasistatic hydrostatic compression. Additionally, the blueshift in the shock experiments is much smaller than that in hydrostatic experiments at the same pressure levels. The differences in responses are attributed to the different stress states achieved in the shock and hydrostatic experiments and the time dependence of the mechanical response of the polymer in the composite. The findings offer a potential guide for the design and development of materials for internal stress sensors for shock conditions.

  11. C IV and He II line emission of Lyman α blobs: powered by shock-heated gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Samuel H. C.; Cen, Renyue; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing ab initio ultrahigh resolution hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the properties of the interstellar and circumgalactic medium of Lyα blobs (LABs) at z = 3, focusing on three important emission lines: Lyα 1216 Å, He II 1640 Å and C IV 1549 Å. Their relative strengths provide a powerful probe of the thermodynamic properties of the gas when confronted with observations. By adjusting the dust attenuation effect using one parameter and matching the observed size-luminosity relation of LABs using another parameter, we show that our simulations can reproduce the observed C IV/Lyα and He II/Lyα ratios adequately. This analysis provides the first successful physical model to account for simultaneously the LAB luminosity function, luminosity-size relation and the C IV/Lyα and He II/Lyα ratios, with only two parameters. The physical underpinning for this model is that, in addition to the stellar component for the Lyα emission, the Lyα and C IV emission lines due to shock-heated gas are primarily collisional excitation driven and the He II emission line collisional ionization driven. We find that the density, temperature and metallicity of the gas responsible for each emission line is significantly distinct, in a multiphase interstellar and circumgalactic medium that is shock heated primarily by supernovae and secondarily by gravitational accretion of gas.

  12. The structure and emission of a non-radiative shock. [from supernova remnants of Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Observational data and the capabilities of current models for observed filament and shock features of supernova remnants are considered. The filaments emit Balmer lines originating in nonthermal shocks. Models of the generation mechanisms must account for the shock structure and the possibilities of electron thermal precursors to the shock and plasma turbulence, as well as equilibration processes for electron and ion temperatures. It is not yet known if a Maxwellian velocity distribution fits the electrons and ions. An assumption of Coulombic equilibration of ions and electrons has agreed well with some observed forbidden line intensities in the Cygnus Loop, while other lines require detailed radiative transfer calculations.

  13. Molecules and dust in Cas A: I - Synthesis in the supernova phase and processing by the reverse shock in the clumpy remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Biscaro, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We study the chemistry of the Type IIb supernova ejecta that led to the Cas A supernova remnant to assess the chemical type and quantity of dust that forms and evolves in the remnant phase. We later model a dense oxygen-rich ejecta knot that is crossed by the reverse shock in Cas A to study the evolution of the clump gas phase and the possibility to reform dust clusters in the post-reverse shock gas. Methods: A chemical network including all processes efficient at high gas temperatures and densities is considered. The formation of key bimolecular species (CO, SiO) and dust clusters is described. Stiff, coupled, ordinary, differential equations are solved for the conditions pertaining to both the SN ejecta and the post-reverse shock gas. Results: We find that the ejecta of Type IIb SNe are unable to form large amounts of molecules and dust clusters as opposed to their Type II-P counterparts because of their diffuse ejecta. The gas density needs to be increased by several orders of magnitude to allow the ...

  14. Time reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Ben; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points - point-like polarisation singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs we consider, a modest group-velocity of $v_g \\approx c/10$ is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.

  15. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy reverses ischemia-related left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling: molecular-cellular and functional assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Fu

    Full Text Available An optimal treatment for patients with diffuse obstructive arterial disease unsuitable for catheter-based or surgical intervention is still pending. This study tested the hypothesis that extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW therapy may be a therapeutic alternative under such clinical situation. Myocardial ischemia was induced in male mini-pigs through applying an ameroid constrictor over mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD. Twelve mini-pigs were equally randomized into group 1 (Constrictor over LAD only and group 2 (Constrictor over LAD plus ECSW [800 impulses at 0.09 mJ/mm(2] once 3 months after the procedure. Results showed that the parameters measured by echocardiography did not differ between two groups on days 0 and 90. However, echocardiography and left ventricular (LV angiography showed higher LV ejection fraction and lower LV end-systolic dimension and volume in group 2 on day 180 (p<0.035. Besides, mRNA and protein expressions of CXCR4 and SDF-1α were increased in group 2 (p<0.04. Immunofluorescence staining also showed higher number of vWF-, CD31-, SDF-1α-, and CXCR4-positive cells in group 2 (all p<0.04. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining showed notably higher vessel density but lower mean fibrosis area, number of CD40-positive cells and apoptotic nuclei in group 2 (all p<0.045. Mitochondrial protein expression of oxidative stress was lower, whereas cytochrome-C was higher in group 2 (all p<0.03. Furthermore, mRNA expressions of MMP-9, Bax and caspase-3 were lower, whereas Bcl-2, eNOS, VEGF and PGC-1α were higher in group 2 (all p<0.01. In conclusion, ECSW therapy effectively reversed ischemia-elicited LV dysfunction and remodeling through enhancing angiogenesis and attenuating inflammation and oxidative stress.

  16. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters. Shock high energy emission from the Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63. Echoes in x-ray novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1995-01-01

    This grant covers work on the Compton phase 3 investigation, 'Shock High Energy Emission from the Be- Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63' and cycle 4 investigations 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' and 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae'. Work under the investigation 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' has lead to the publication of a paper (attached), describing gamma-ray emissivity variations in the northern galactic hemisphere. Using archival EGRET data, we have found a large irregular region of enhanced gamma-ray emissivity at energies greater 100 MeV. This is the first observation of local structure in the gamma-ray emissivity. Work under the investigation 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae' is proceeding with analysis of data from OSSE from the transient source GRO J1655-40. The outburst of this source last fall triggered this Target of Opportunity investigation. Preliminary spectral analysis shows emission out to 600 keV and a pure power low spectrum with no evidence of an exponential cutoff. Work is complete on the analysis of BATSE data from the Be-Star/Pulsar Sustem PSR 1259-63.

  17. An external-shock model for GRB afterglow 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Panaitescu, A; Wozniak, P

    2013-01-01

    The complex multiwavelength emission of GRB afterglow 130427A (monitored in the radio up to 10 days, in the optical and X-ray until 50 days, and at GeV energies until 1 day) can be accounted for by a hybrid reverse-forward shock synchrotron model, with inverse-Compton emerging only above a few GeV. The high ratio of the early optical to late radio flux requires that the ambient medium is a wind and that the forward-shock synchrotron spectrum peaks in the optical at about 10 ks. The latter has two consequences: the wind must be very tenuous and the optical emission before 10 ks must arise from the reverse-shock, as suggested also by the bright optical flash that Raptor has monitored during the prompt emission phase (<100 s). The VLA radio emission is from the reverse-shock, the Swift X-ray emission is mostly from the forward-shock, but the both shocks give comparable contributions to the Fermi GeV emission. The weak wind implies a large blast-wave radius (8 t_{day}^{1/2} pc), which requires a very tenuous c...

  18. Non-thermal emission from supernova shock breakout and the origin of the X-ray transient associated with SN2008D

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Waxman, Eli; Meszaros, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that non-thermal emission can be produced by multiple scatterings of the photons between the supernova ejecta and pre-shock material in supernova shock breakout. Such bulk-Comptonization process may significantly change the original thermal photon spectrum, forming a power-law non-thermal component at higher energies. We then show that the luminous X-ray outburst XRO081009 associated with SN2008D is likely to be such shock breakout emission from an ordinary type Ib/c supernova.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars: the role of local absorption on the X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, R; Argiroffi, C; Miceli, M; Peres, G; Matsakos, T; Stehle, C; Ibgui, L

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthe...

  20. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption of the emission due to the thick surrounding medium. Here we consider a 2D MHD model describing an accretion stream propagating through the atmosphere of a CTTS and impacting onto its chromosphere. The model includes all the relevant physics, namely the gravity, the thermal conduction, and the radiative cooling, and a realistic description of the unperturbed stellar atmosphere (from the chromosphere to the corona. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission emerging from the hot slab produced by the accretion shock, exploring different configurations and strengths of the stellar magnetic field. The synthesis includes the local absorption by the thick surrounding medium and the Doppler shift of lines due to the component of plasma velocity along the line-of-sight. We explore the effects of absorption on the emerging X-ray spectrum, considering different inclinations of the accretion stream with respect to the observer. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  1. Hard X-ray and Gamma-ray Emission Induced by Ultra-High Energy Protons in Cluster Accretion Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Sugiyama, N; Inoue, Susumu; Aharonian, Felix A.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2005-01-01

    All sufficiently massive clusters of galaxies are expected to be surrounded by strong accretion shocks, where protons can be accelerated to $\\sim 10^{18}$-$10^{19}$ eV under plausible conditions. Such protons interact with the cosmic microwave background and efficiently produce very high energy electron-positron pairs, which then radiate synchrotron and inverse Compton emission, peaking respectively at hard X-ray and TeV gamma-ray energies. Characterized by hard spectra (photon indices $\\sim 1.5$) and spatial distribution tracing the accretion shock, these can dominate over other nonthermal components depending on the shock magnetic field. HESS and other Cerenkov telescopes may detect the TeV emission from nearby clusters, notwithstanding its extended nature. The hard X-rays may be observable by future imaging facilities such as NeXT, and possibly also by ASTRO-E2/HXD. Such detections will not only provide a clear signature of ultra-high energy proton acceleration, but also an important probe of the accretion...

  2. Pyrometry temperature studies of shocked tin including investigations exploring surface defects, anvil diameter and the integration with emissivity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton-Taylor, Caroline; de'Ath, James; Ota, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Accurate temperature measurement of shock-loaded systems continues to present experimental challenges. With short measurable time durations diagnostic methods are almost exclusively restricted to optical techniques. By preventing full sample pressure unloading, through the use of an anvil, partial release temperature measurements can be deduced from multiple wavelength optical pyrometry. This paper presents our recent studies of tin shocked to 28GPa including investigations exploring surface defects, anvil dimensions and the integration with emissivity diagnostics. The results indicate that a ring groove, 5mm across and with a nominal machined depth of 50 microns, acts to enhance the measured temperature by approximately 150K. Additionally on reducing the LiF anvil diameter from 20mm to 15mm, comparable partial release temperatures were observed. With the anticipated development of multiple anvil target designs, the smaller anvil diameter is desirable. British Crown Copyright 2009/MOD.

  3. High dynamic range emission measurements of shocked energetic materials: Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    A new emission apparatus with high time resolution and high dynamic range was used to study shock-induced ignition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine in the form of ultrafine powder (4 ± 3 μm particle size), over a range of impact velocities (0.8-4.3 km s-1) and impact durations (2.5-16 ns). A graybody model was used to extract graybody emissivities and time-dependent temperatures from a few ns to 100 μs. The emission transients consisted of three parts: a 6700 K nanosecond burst during the shocks, a 4000-4500 K temperature spike near 0.3 μs followed by a ˜3300 K tail extending out to ˜100 μs. These temperatures varied remarkably little with impact velocity and duration, while the emission intensities and emissivities changed by over an order of magnitude. The emissivity changes were interpreted with a hot spot model, where hot spot temperatures reached a maximum of 6700 K and the hot spot volume fractions increased from 5% to 100% as impact velocity increased from 1 to 3 km s-1. Changing shock durations in the 2.5-16 ns range had noticeable effects on the microsecond emission. The 0.3 μs temperature spike was much smaller or absent with 2.5 ns shocks, but prominent with longer durations. An explanation for these effects was put forth that invoked the formation of carbon-rich clusters during the shock. In this view, cluster formation was minimal with 2.5 ns shocks, but longer-duration shocks produced increasingly larger clusters, and the 0.3 μs temperature spikes represented cluster ignition.

  4. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Xiao, Pan; Christensen, James; Zhou, Min; Summers, Christopher J.; Dlott, Dana D.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-07-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  5. AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-09-20

    Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

  6. Evidence for Decay of Turbulence by MHD Shocks in Molecular Clouds via CO Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Rebecca L; Green, Joel D; Yang, Yao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    We utilize observations of sub-millimeter rotational transitions of CO from a Herschel Cycle 2 open time program ("COPS", PI: J. Green) to identify previously predicted turbulent dissipation by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in molecular clouds. We find evidence of the shocks expected for dissipation of MHD turbulence in material not associated with any protostar. Two models fit about equally well: model 1 has a density of 10$^{3}$ cm$^{-3}$, a shock velocity of 3 km s$^{-1}$, and a magnetic field strength of 4 ${\\mu}$G; model 2 has a density of 10$^{3.5}$ cm$^{-3}$, a shock velocity of $2$ km s$^{-1}$, and a magnetic field strength of 8 $\\mu$G. Timescales for decay of turbulence in this region are comparable to crossing times. Transitions of CO up to $J$ of 8, observed close to active sites of star formation, but not within outflows, can trace turbulent dissipation of shocks stirred by formation processes. Although the transitions are difficult to detect at individual positions, our Herschel-SPIRE survey o...

  7. Time-reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ben; Beggs, Daryl M; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-08-28

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points-point-like polarization singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs, we consider a modest group velocity of vg≈c/10 is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  8. Opioid/NMDA receptors blockade reverses the depressant-like behavior of foot shock stress in the mouse forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2014-07-15

    Opioid and glutamatergic receptors have a key role in depression following stress. In this study, we assessed opioid and glutamatergic receptors interaction with the depressant-like behavior of acute foot-shock stress in the mouse forced swimming test. Stress was induced by intermittent foot shock stimulation during 30min and swim periods were afterwards conducted by placing mice in separated glass cylinders filled with water for 6min. The immobility time during the last 4min of the test was considered. Acute foot-shock stress significantly increased the immobility time of mice compared to non-stressed control group (P≤0.01). Administration of non-selective opioid receptors antagonist, naltrexone (1 and 2mg/kg, i.p.), and the selective non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.), and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5mg/kg), significantly reduced the immobility time in stressed animals (P≤0.01). Lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg), naltrexone (0.3mg/kg), NMDA (75mg/kg) and morphine(5mg/kg) had no effect on foot-shock stressed mice. Combined treatment of sub-effective doses of naltrexone and MK-801 significantly showed an antidepressant-like effect (P≤0.001). On the other hand, co-administration of non-effective doses of NMDA and morphine with effective doses of naltrexone and MK-801 reversed the anti-immobility effect of these drugs. Taken together, we have for the first time demonstrated the possible role of opioid/NMDA receptors signaling in the depressant-like effect of foot-shock stress, and proposed the use of drugs that act like standard anti-depressants in stress-induced depression.

  9. Preparation and thermal shock resistance of high emissivity molybdenum disilicide- aluminoborosilicate glass hybrid coating on fiber reinforced aerogel composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Gaofeng; Lu, Yucao; Wu, Xiaodong; Wu, Jun; Cui, Sheng; Jiao, Jian; Shen, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    To develop a flexible reusable surface insulation for thermal protection system, MoSi2-aluminoborosilicate glass hybrid coatings have been prepared on Al2O3 fiber reinforced Al2O3-SiO2 aerogel composite by slurry dipping and rapid sintering method. The effect of MoSi2 content on radiative property and thermal shock behavior was investigated. The total emissivity values of all the coatings exceeded 0.85 in the wavelength of 0.8-2.5 μm. The M10 and M50 coatings were up to 0.9, which was due to the highest amorphous glass content of the M10 coating and the largest surface roughness of the M50 coating. The M30 coated composite showed the best thermal shock resistance with only 0.023% weight loss after 20 thermal shock cycles between 1473 K and room temperature, which was attributed to the similar thermal expansion coefficients between the coating and the substrate and the appropriate viscosity of aluminoborosilicate glass at 1473 K. The cracks resulted from CTE mismatch stress with different sizes formed and grew on the surface of M10, M40 and M50 coated samples, leading to the failure of the composites.

  10. SN 1987 A: A Unique Laboratory for Shock Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George

    2012-01-01

    Supernova 1987 A has given us an unprecedented view of the evolution of the explosion debris and its interaction with circumstellar matter. The outer supernova debris, now expanding with velocities approx.8000 km/s, encountered the relatively dense circumstellar ring formed by presupernova mass loss in the early 1990s. The shock interaction is manifested by UV-optical "hotspots", an expanding X-ray ring, an expanding ring of knotty non-thermal radio emission, and a ring of thermal IR emission from silicate dust Recent ultraviolet observations of the emissions from the reverse shock and the ring with the HST/COS reveal new details about the shock interaction. Lyman alpha emission from the reverse shock is much stronger than H alpha and they have different emission morphologies, pointing to different emission mechanisms. The reverse shock was detected for the first time in C IV 1550. The N V to C IV brightness ratio indicates the N/C abundance ratio in the expanding debris is about 100X solar, about 3X N/C in the inner ring.

  11. Solar Flare Termination Shock and Synthetic Emission Line Profiles of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijia; Li, Gang; Reeves, Kathy; Raymond, John

    2017-09-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic phenomena that occur in the solar system. In the standard solar flare model, a fast mode shock, often referred to as the flare termination shock (TS), can exist above the loop-top source of hard X-ray emissions. The existence of the TS has been recently related to spectral hardening of a flare’s hard X-ray spectra at energies >300 keV. Observations of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line during solar flares by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spacecraft have found significant redshifts with >100 km s‑1, which is consistent with a reconnection downflow. The ability to detect such a redshift with IRIS suggests that one may be able to use IRIS observations to identify flare TSs. Using a magnetohydrodynamic simulation to model magnetic reconnection of a solar flare and assuming the existence of a TS in the downflow of the reconnection plasma, we model the synthetic emission of the Fe xxi 1354.08 line in this work. We show that the existence of the TS in the solar flare may manifest itself in the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line.

  12. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE ACCRETION SHOCKS IN CLASSICAL T TAURI STARS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL ABSORPTION IN THE X-RAY EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Peres, G. [Dip. di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, P.zza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Ibgui, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.zza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Matsakos, T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Stehle, C., E-mail: sbonito@astropa.unipa.it [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Cergy-Pontoise, CNRS, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues, we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthetic spectra, and we directly compare the results with observations. Our model shows that the X-ray fluxes inferred from the emerging spectra are lower than expected because of the complex local absorption by the optically thick material of the chromosphere and of the unperturbed stream. Moreover, our model, including the effects of local absorption, explains in a natural way the apparently puzzling pattern of density versus temperature observed in the X-ray emission from accretion shocks.

  13. Molecular Line Emission from Multifluid Shock Waves. I. Numerical Methods and Benchmark Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolek, Glenn E.; Roberge, Wayne G.

    2013-05-01

    We describe a numerical scheme for studying time-dependent, multifluid, magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in weakly ionized interstellar clouds and cores. Shocks are modeled as propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field and consist of a neutral molecular fluid plus a fluid of ions and electrons. The scheme is based on operator splitting, wherein time integration of the governing equations is split into separate parts. In one part, independent homogeneous Riemann problems for the two fluids are solved using Godunov's method. In the other, equations containing the source terms for transfer of mass, momentum, and energy between the fluids are integrated using standard numerical techniques. We show that, for the frequent case where the thermal pressures of the ions and electrons are Lt magnetic pressure, the Riemann problems for the neutral and ion-electron fluids have a similar mathematical structure which facilitates numerical coding. Implementation of the scheme is discussed and several benchmark tests confirming its accuracy are presented, including (1) MHD wave packets ranging over orders of magnitude in length- and timescales, (2) early evolution of multifluid shocks caused by two colliding clouds, and (3) a multifluid shock with mass transfer between the fluids by cosmic-ray ionization and ion-electron recombination, demonstrating the effect of ion mass loading on magnetic precursors of MHD shocks. An exact solution to an MHD Riemann problem forming the basis for an approximate numerical solver used in the homogeneous part of our scheme is presented, along with derivations of the analytic benchmark solutions and tests showing the convergence of the numerical algorithm.

  14. MOLECULAR LINE EMISSION FROM MULTIFLUID SHOCK WAVES. I. NUMERICAL METHODS AND BENCHMARK TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciolek, Glenn E.; Roberge, Wayne G., E-mail: cioleg@rpi.edu, E-mail: roberw@rpi.edu [New York Center for Astrobiology (United States); Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We describe a numerical scheme for studying time-dependent, multifluid, magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in weakly ionized interstellar clouds and cores. Shocks are modeled as propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field and consist of a neutral molecular fluid plus a fluid of ions and electrons. The scheme is based on operator splitting, wherein time integration of the governing equations is split into separate parts. In one part, independent homogeneous Riemann problems for the two fluids are solved using Godunov's method. In the other, equations containing the source terms for transfer of mass, momentum, and energy between the fluids are integrated using standard numerical techniques. We show that, for the frequent case where the thermal pressures of the ions and electrons are << magnetic pressure, the Riemann problems for the neutral and ion-electron fluids have a similar mathematical structure which facilitates numerical coding. Implementation of the scheme is discussed and several benchmark tests confirming its accuracy are presented, including (1) MHD wave packets ranging over orders of magnitude in length- and timescales, (2) early evolution of multifluid shocks caused by two colliding clouds, and (3) a multifluid shock with mass transfer between the fluids by cosmic-ray ionization and ion-electron recombination, demonstrating the effect of ion mass loading on magnetic precursors of MHD shocks. An exact solution to an MHD Riemann problem forming the basis for an approximate numerical solver used in the homogeneous part of our scheme is presented, along with derivations of the analytic benchmark solutions and tests showing the convergence of the numerical algorithm.

  15. The Effect of Latency Reversal Agents on Primary CD8+ T Cells: Implications for Shock and Kill Strategies for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Walker-Sperling

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shock and kill strategies involving the use of small molecules to induce viral transcription in resting CD4+ T cells (shock followed by immune mediated clearance of the reactivated cells (kill, have been proposed as a method of eliminating latently infected CD4+ T cells. The combination of the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor romidepsin and protein kinase C (PKC agonist bryostatin-1 is very effective at reversing latency in vitro. However, we found that primary HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cells were not able to eliminate autologous resting CD4+ T cells that had been reactivated with these drugs. We tested the hypothesis that the drugs affected primary CD8+ T cell function and found that both agents had inhibitory effects on the suppressive capacity of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells from patients who control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy (elite suppressors/controllers. The inhibitory effect was additive and multi-factorial in nature. These inhibitory effects were not seen with prostratin, another PKC agonist, either alone or in combination with JQ1, a bromodomain-containing protein 4 inhibitor. Our results suggest that because of their adverse effects on primary CD8+ T cells, some LRAs may cause immune-suppression and therefore should be used with caution in shock and kill strategies.

  16. Molecular Line Emission from Multifluid Shock Waves. I. Numerical Methods and Benchmark Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Ciolek, Glenn E

    2013-01-01

    We describe a numerical scheme for studying time-dependent, multifluid, magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in weakly ionized interstellar clouds and cores. Shocks are modeled as propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field and consist of a neutral molecular fluid plus a fluid of ions and electrons. The scheme is based on operator splitting, wherein time integration of the governing equations is split into separate parts. In one part independent homogeneous Riemann problems for the two fluids are solved using Godunov's method. In the other equations containing the source terms for transfer of mass, momentum, and energy between the fluids are integrated using standard numerical techniques. We show that, for the frequent case where the thermal pressures of the ions and electrons are << magnetic pressure, the Riemann problems for the neutral and ion-electron fluids have a similar mathematical structure which facilitates numerical coding. Implementation of the scheme is discussed and several benchmark tests ...

  17. Prospects for detection of very high energy emission from GRB in the context of the External Shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Galli, A

    2008-01-01

    The detection of the 100 GeV-TeV emission by a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to enlighten the nature of the central engine and the interaction between the relativistic flow and the environment of the burst progenitor. In this paper we show that there are exciting prospects of detecting by MAGIC high energy (HE) emission from the burst during the "early" X-ray flaring activity and, later, during the "normal" afterglow phase. We also identify the best observational strategy (trigger conditions and time period of observation). We determine the expected HE emission from the flaring and afterglow phases of GRBs in the context of the External Shock scenario and compare them with the MAGIC threshold. We find that a X-ray flare with the average properties of the class, can be detected in the 100 GeV range by MAGIC provided that z a few cm^{-3}. In this case the MAGIC observation shall extend to about 10-20 ksec. We provide recipes to tailor this prediction to the observational proper...

  18. Speed evolution of fast CME/shocks with SOHO/LASCO, WIND/WAVES, IPS and in-situ WIND data: analysis of kilometric type-II emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gonzalez-Esparza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast CME/shocks propagating in the interplanetary medium can generate kilometric Type II (km-TII radio emissions at the local plasma frequency and/or its harmonic, so these radio emissions provide a means of remotely tracking CME/shocks. We apply a new analysis technique, using the frequency drift of km-TII spectrum obtained by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR of the WIND/WAVES experiment, to infer, at some adequate intervals, the propagation speed of six CME/shocks. We combine these results with previously reported speeds from coronagraph white light and interplanetary scintillation observations, and in-situ measurements, to study the temporal speed evolution of the six events. The speed values obtained by the km-TII analysis are in a reasonable agreement with the speed measurements obtained by other techniques at different heliocentric distance ranges. The combination of all the speed measurements show a gradual deceleration of the CME/shocks as they propagate to 1 AU. This new technique can be useful in studying the evolution of fast CME/shocks when adequate intervals of km-TII emissions are available.

  19. The Detection of Shocked Co/ Emission from G333.6-0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, J. W. V.

    This paper is published as a 38 stanza poem. The main results are:In 1980, from the plane, hefound it in Orion,but no more CO could he finddespite long hours of flyin'.And so, he searched for southern sourcesof this shocked H2and found it, in G 333point six, minus, nought point two.Intensity is really weak:it's two point nought by tento the minus eighteenth power(in watts per square cm).That's thirty times as weak as wedetected in Orion.No wonder it took several yearsof concentrated tryin'.

  20. Atmospheric NLTE-Models for the Spectroscopic Analysis of Blue Stars with Winds. III. X-ray emission from wind-embedded shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, Luiz P; Sundqvist, J O; Hoffmann, T L

    2016-01-01

    X-rays/EUV radiation emitted from wind-embedded shocks in hot, massive stars can affect the ionization balance in their outer atmospheres, and can be the mechanism responsible for the production of highly ionized species. To allow for these processes in the context of spectral analysis, we have implemented such emission into our unified, NLTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND. The shock structure and corresponding emission is calculated as a function of user-supplied parameters. We account for a temperature and density stratification inside the post-shock cooling zones, calculated for radiative and adiabatic cooling in the inner and outer wind, respectively. The high-energy absorption of the cool wind is considered by adding important K-shell opacities, and corresponding Auger ionization rates have been included into the NLTE network. We tested and verified our implementation carefully against corresponding results from various alternative model atmosphere codes, and studied the effects from s...

  1. Administration of colistin sulfate in endotoxic model at slow and sustained fashion may reverse shock without causing nephrotoxicity in its optimal concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Anwarul; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2017-07-31

    Despite of proven LPS neutralizing activity, intravenous polymyxin use was waned due to experience of associated nephrotoxicity. But, increasing resistance to all available antibiotics has necessitated their resurgence and the prodrug of colistin sulfate (CS), known as colistin-methanesulfonate (CMS), is increasingly used as the only therapeutic option in many infections. Currently available CMS employ very different dose definitions and thus because of complex pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics information and short half-life, this drug use remains confusing. We aimed to expose CS in endotoxic shock models by micro-osmotic pump and evaluated its effectiveness. We used micro-osmotic pumps to deliver either sterile saline or CS at different dosages ranging from 0.25mg/day to 7mg/day for consecutive 3days in LPS (8mg/kg body weight) induced endotoxic mice and observed their outcome twice daily for a week to determine the survival rate. Serum pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and apoptosis in renal tissues in these models were evaluated. We showed endotoxic shock was reversed and all mice survived with a CS administration at a dosage of 2mg/day for 3 days, in comparison to survival rate with saline administration (p=<0.0001) in endotoxic models. CS infusion in shock models using micro-osmotic pump ameliorated rising of serum TNF-α, IL-12p70 and IL-6 levels. Nephrotoxicity was evident only with a higher dosage, but not with a lower dosage which was optimum to control endotoxic shock in models. These results highlighted that an optimal dosage of CS effectively improved outcome in endotoxic shock models without causing nephrotoxicity when administered at a slow and sustained manner. And a higher CS dosage administration was nephrotoxic and fatal. Thus this study bought an opportunity to consider future investigations with CS administration in murine Gram-negative bacterial infections in a novel way. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and

  2. Reversal of hemorrhagic shock in rats using the metabolically stable thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog taltirelin hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Yumi; Yamauchi-Kohno, Rikako; Doi, Osamu

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effect of taltirelin hydrate ((−)-N-[(S)-hexahydro-1-methyl- 2,6-dioxo-4-pyrimidinyl-carbonyl]-L-histidyl-L-prolinamide tetrahydrate; taltirelin), a metabolically stable thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analog, on circulatory function, respiratory function, and viable time after bleeding in urethane-anesthetized rats. Massive volume-controlled bleeding caused marked reductions in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and respiratory rate (RR). The vital signs of control rats were lost within an average of 23 min after bleeding. Intravenous administration of taltirelin (0.03−0.3 mg/kg) and TRH (1 and 3 mg/kg) immediately after bleeding accelerated recovery of MAP and RR, and prolonged viable time in a dose-dependent manner. The potency of taltirelin in accelerating MAP and RR recovery and prolonging viable time was higher when compared with that of TRH. In addition, recovery of MAP and RR and the extension of viable time by taltirelin were inhibited by preintraperitoneal administration of atropine sulfate, which is a centrally acting muscarinic antagonist, but not by that of atropine methylbromide, which is a peripherally acting muscarinic antagonist. Taltirelin also recovered decreased arterial pH, bicarbonate ions, and base excess, and prevented a decrease in arterial oxygen saturation. In conclusion, the anti-shock effect of taltirelin was more potent than that of TRH. Taltirelin activity was mediated by the central muscarinic cholinergic system. In addition, taltirelin also corrected metabolic acidosis. These results suggest that taltirelin could be useful in the treatment of hypovolemic shock.

  3. New AIE-active pyrimidine-based boronfluoride complexes with high solid-state emission and reversible mechanochromism luminescence behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fen; Lin, Jianjian; Wang, Xiaoqing; Cui, Peng; Yan, Hui; Gong, Shuwen; Ma, Chunlin; Liu, Zhipeng; Huang, Wei

    2016-04-25

    A new family of pyrimidine-based BF2 complexes () with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and mechanochromic luminescence properties were developed. These compounds exhibit intense fluorescence in their aggregation/solid-state resulting from their large Stokes shift and AIE. X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that the weak intermolecular interactions by fixing the molecular conformations of are responsible for the intense fluorescence in solid-state. In addition to their pronounced AIE behaviour, also exhibits a reversible chromic response to grinding, and a distinct red-shift of emission is observed. The high solid-state luminescence and grinding-stimuli response properties of these compounds make them potential candidates for smart materials.

  4. Thermal Dust Emission from Proplyds, Unresolved Disks, and Shocks in the Orion Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, N; Shuping, R Y; Morris, M; Kassis, M; Smith, Nathan; Bally, John; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Morris, Mark; Kassis, Marc

    2005-01-01

    We present a new 11.7 micron mosaic image of the Orion nebula obtained with T-ReCS on Gemini South. The map includes the BN/KL region, the Trapezium, and OMC-1 South. Excluding BN/KL, we detect 91 point sources, with 27 known proplyds and over 30 ``naked'' stars showing no extended structure in HST images. Within the region we surveyed, 80 percent of known proplyds show detectable emission, almost 40 percent of naked stars are detected at 11.7 micron, and the fraction of all visible sources with IR excess emission is roughly 50 percent. Thermal dust emission from stars with no extended structure in HST images means that they have dust disks comparable to the size of our solar system. Proplyds and stars with IR excess show a clear anti-correlation in their spatial distribution, with proplyds clustered close to theta1C, and other infrared sources found farther away. We suspect that the clustered proplyds trace the youngest 0.5 Myr age group associated with the Trapezium, while the more uniformly-distributed sou...

  5. C IV and He II Line Emission of Lyman Alpha Blobs: Powered by Shock Heated Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Cabot, Samuel H C; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing {\\it ab initio} ultra-high resolution hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the properties of the interstellar and circum-galactic medium of Ly$\\alpha$ Blobs (LABs) at $z=3$, focusing on three important emission lines: Ly$\\alpha$ 1216\\AA, \\heii 1640\\AA\\ and \\civ 1449\\AA. Their relative strengths provide a powerful probe of the thermodynamic properties of the gas when confronted with observations. By adjusting the dust attenuation effect using one parameter and matching the observed size-luminosity relation of LABs using another parameter, we show that our simulations can reproduce the observed \\civ/\\lya\\ and \\heii/\\lya\\ ratios adequately. This analysis provides the first successful physical model to account for simultaneously the LAB luminosity function, luminosity-size relation, and the \\civ/Ly$\\alpha$ and \\heii/Ly$\\alpha$ ratios, with only two parameters. The physical underpinning for this model is that, in addition to the stellar component for the \\lya\\ emission, the \\lya\\ and \\civ\\ emission...

  6. Laboratory thermal emission spectroscopy of shocked basalt from Lonar Crater, India, and implications for Mars orbital and sample data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn P. Wright; Phil R. Christensen; Thomas G. Sharp

    2011-01-01

      TIR spectra of shocked basalt are shown Vibrations are affected by melting and solid state transformation due to shock TIR spectra of basaltic impactites have implications for Mars Whereas the thermal infrared (TIR...

  7. Global Reverse Supply Chain Redesign for Household Plastic Waste under the Emission Trading Scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bing, X.; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M.; Chabaane, A.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing global resource scarcity, waste becomes a resource that can be managed globally. A reverse supply chain network for waste recycling needs to process all the waste with minimum costs and environmental impact. As re-processing of waste is one of the major sources of pollution in the

  8. Global Reverse Supply Chain Redesign for Household Plastic Waste under the Emission Trading Scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bing, X.; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M.; Chabaane, A.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing global resource scarcity, waste becomes a resource that can be managed globally. A reverse supply chain network for waste recycling needs to process all the waste with minimum costs and environmental impact. As re-processing of waste is one of the major sources of pollution in the re

  9. Thermal X-Ray Emission from Shocked Ejecta in Type Ia Supernova Remnants II: Parameters Affecting the Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Bravo, E

    2005-01-01

    The supernova remnants left behind by Type Ia supernovae provide an excellent opportunity for the study of these enigmatic objects. In a previous work, we showed that it is possible to use the X-ray spectra of young Type Ia supernova remnants to explore the physics of Type Ia supernovae and identify the relevant mechanism underlying these explosions. Our simulation technique is based on hydrodynamic and nonequilibrium ionization calculations of the interaction of a grid of Type Ia explosion models with the surrounding ambient medium, coupled to an X-ray spectral code. In this work we explore the influence of two key parameters on the shape of the X-ray spectrum of the ejecta: the density of the ambient medium around the supernova progenitor and the efficiency of collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock. We also discuss the performance of recent 3D simulations of Type Ia SN explosions in the context of the X-ray spectra of young SNRs. We find a better agreement with the observations for Type Ia supe...

  10. Shock-ionization in the Extended Emission-Line Region of 3C~305. The last piece of the (optical) puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Reynaldi, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    We present new Gemini spectroscopical data of the Extended Emission-Line Region of 3C~305 radio galaxy in order to achieve the final answer of the long-standing question about the ionizing mechanism. The spectra show strong kinematic disturbances within the most intense line-emitting region. The relative intensities amongst the emission lines agree with the gas being shocked during the interaction of the powerful radio jets with the ambient medium. The emission from the recombination region acts as a very effective cooling mechanism, which is supported by the presence of a neutral outflow. However, the observed intensity is almost an order of magnitude lower than expected in a pure shock model. So auto-ionizing shock models, in low-density and low-abundance regime, are required in order to account for the observed emission within the region. This scenario also supports the hypothesis that the optical emitting gas and the X-ray plasma are in pressure balance.

  11. UNUSUAL SHOCK-EXCITED OH MASER EMISSION IN A YOUNG PLANETARY NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Rd, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Walsh, Andrew J. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia); Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Imai, Hiroshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Green, James A. [SKA Organisation, Jodrell Bank Observatory, Lower Withington, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK11 9DL (United Kingdom); Dawson, Joanne R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Ellingsen, Simon P. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001, TAS (Australia); Breen, Shari L. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jones, Paul A.; Cunningham, Maria R. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Gibson, Steven J., E-mail: haihua.qiao@curtin.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We report on OH maser emission toward G336.644−0.695 (IRAS 16333−4807), which is a H{sub 2}O maser-emitting Planetary Nebula (PN). We have detected 1612, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH masers at two epochs using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, hereby confirming it as the seventh known case of an OH-maser-emitting PN. This is only the second known PN showing 1720 MHz OH masers after K 3−35 and the only evolved stellar object with 1720 MHz OH masers as the strongest transition. This PN is one of a group of very young PNe. The 1612 MHz and 1667 MHz masers are at a similar velocity to the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers, whereas the 1720 MHz masers show a variable spectrum, with several components spread over a higher velocity range (up to 36 km s{sup −1}). We also detect Zeeman splitting in the 1720 MHz transition at two epochs (with field strengths of ∼2 to ∼10 mG), which suggests the OH emission at 1720 MHz is formed in a magnetized environment. These 1720 MHz OH masers may trace short-lived equatorial ejections during the formation of the PN.

  12. Unusual shock-excited OH maser emission in a young Planetary Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Gomez, Jose F; Imai, Hiroshi; Green, James A; Dawson, Joanne R; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Ellingsen, Simon P; Breen, Shari L; Jones, Paul A; Gibson, Steven J; Cunningham, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    We report on OH maser emission toward G336.644-0.695 (IRAS 16333-4807), which is a H2O maser-emitting Planetary Nebula (PN). We have detected 1612, 1667 and 1720 MHz OH masers at two epochs using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), hereby confirming it as the seventh known case of an OH-maser-emitting PN. This is only the second known PN showing 1720 MHz OH masers after K 3-35 and the only evolved stellar object with 1720 MHz OH masers as the strongest transition. This PN is one of a group of very young PNe. The 1612 MHz and 1667 MHz masers are at a similar velocity to the 22 GHz H2O masers, whereas the 1720 MHz masers show a variable spectrum, with several components spread over a higher velocity range (up to 36 km/s). We also detect Zeeman splitting in the 1720 MHz transition at two epochs (with field strengths of ~2 to ~10 mG), which suggests the OH emission at 1720 MHz is formed in a magnetized environment. These 1720 MHz OH masers may trace short-lived equatorial ejections during the formation ...

  13. Heat shock protein 70 is necessary to improve mitochondrial bioenergetics and reverse diabetic sensory neuropathy following KU-32 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiacheng; Farmer, Kevin L; Pan, Pan; Urban, Michael J; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2014-02-01

    Impaired neuronal mitochondrial bioenergetics contributes to the pathophysiologic progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and may be a focal point for disease management. We have demonstrated that modulating heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 with the small-molecule drug KU-32 ameliorates psychosensory, electrophysiologic, morphologic, and bioenergetic deficits of DPN in animal models of type 1 diabetes. The current study used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine the relationship of changes in sensory neuron mitochondrial bioenergetics to the onset of and recovery from DPN. The onset of DPN showed a tight temporal correlation with a decrease in mitochondrial bioenergetics in a genetic model of type 2 diabetes. In contrast, sensory hypoalgesia developed 10 weeks before the occurrence of significant declines in sensory neuron mitochondrial bioenergetics in the type 1 model. KU-32 therapy improved mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the type 1 and type 2 models, and this tightly correlated with a decrease in DPN. Mechanistically, improved mitochondrial function following KU-32 therapy required Hsp70, since the drug was ineffective in diabetic Hsp70 knockout mice. Our data indicate that changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics may rapidly contribute to nerve dysfunction in type 2 diabetes, but not type 1 diabetes, and that modulating Hsp70 offers an effective approach toward correcting sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits and DPN in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Simulation of a Reverse Flow Reactor for the Catalytic Combustion of Lean Methane Emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiajin Zhang; Zhigang Lei; Jianwei Li; Biaohua Chen

    2014-01-01

    This work is focused on the performance prediction of pilot scale catalytic reverse flow reactors used for combustion of lean methane-air mixtures. An unsteady one-dimensional heterogeneous model for the reactor was established to account for the influence of the reactor wal on the heat transfer. Results of the simulation indicate that feed concentration, switch time and compensatory temperature impose important influence on the performance of the reactor. The amount of the heat extracted from the mid-section of the reactor can be optimized via adjusting the parameters mentioned above. At the optimal operating conditions, i.e. switching time of 400 s, feed concentration of 1%(by volume), and insulation layer temperature of 343 K, the axial temperature of the reactor revealed a comparatively symmetrical“saddle”distribution, indicating a favorable operating status of the catalytic reverse flow reactor.

  15. X-ray emission from classical T Tauri stars: Accretion shocks and coronae?

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, H M; Robrade, J; Liefke, C

    2007-01-01

    Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) are surrounded by actively accreting disks. According to current models material falls along the magnetic field lines from the disk with more or less free-fall velocity onto the star, where the plasma heats up and generates X-rays. We want to quantitatively explain the observed high energy emission and measure the infall parameters from the data. Absolute flux measurements allow to calculate the filling factor and the mass accretion rate.We use a numerical model of the hot accretion spot and solve the conservation equations. A comparison to data from XMM-Newton and Chandra shows that our model reproduces the main features very well. It yields for TW Hya a filling factor of 0.3% and a mass accretion rate 2e-10 M_sun/yr.

  16. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  17. Shock-tube studies of atomic silicon emission in the spectral range 180 to 300 nm. [environment simulation for Jupiter probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, S. G.; Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy of shock-heated atomic silicon was performed in the spectral range 180 to 300 nm, in an environment simulating the ablation layer expected around a Jovian entry probe with a silica heat shield. From the spectra obtained at temperatures from 6000 to 10,000 K and electron number densities from 1 quadrillion to 100 quadrillion per cu cm, the Lorentzian line-widths were determined. The results showed that silicon lines are broadened significantly by both electrons (Stark broadening) and hydrogen atoms (Van der Waals broadening), and the combined line-widths are much larger than previously assumed. From the data, the Stark and the Van der Waals line-widths were determined for 34 silicon lines. Radiative transport through a typical shock layer was computed using the new line-width data. The computations showed that silicon emission in the hot region is large, but it is mostly absorbed in the colder region adjacent to the wall.

  18. A High-Resolution Very Large Array Observation of a Protostar in OMC-3: Shock-induced X-ray Emission by a Protostellar Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, M; Kobayashi, N; Saitó, M; Tsuboi, Y; Chandler, C J

    2004-01-01

    Using the Very Large Array (VLA) in the A-configuration, we have obtained a high-resolution 3.6 cm map of a hard X-ray source detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in a protostellar clump in Orion molecular cloud 3. Two radio continuum sources were detected in the vicinity of the X-ray source, both of which have NIR counterparts. We conclude that these VLA sources are free-free emission produced by shocks in protostellar jets from the NIR class I protostars. Using the centimeter data, we determined the power and orientation of the protostellar jets. The center position of the X-ray emission was found to be ~1--2" offset from the exciting sources of the jets, and the displacement is in the direction of the jets and molecular outflows. We discuss the nature of the X-ray emission as the shock-excited plasma at the shock front where the jet propagates through interstellar medium at a speed of ~1000 km/s.

  19. A detailed examination of a X-line region in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of jet flow and B{sub z} reversals and a pair of slow shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.M.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Smith, E.J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Feldman, W.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-15

    The authors report an observation of Petschek-type magnetic reconnection at a distant neutral line (X = {minus}230 R{sub e}, July 8, 1983) with a full set of signatures of the magnetic merging process. These features include a reversal of plasma flows from earthward to tailward, a pair of slow shocks and the magnetic field X-type line. These two slow shocks are shown to satisfy the shock criteria used by Feldman et al. The spacecraft first crosses a slow shock to enter the earthward flowing plasmasheet with velocity of about 440 km/s. The embedded magnetic field has a positive B{sub z} component. The spacecraft next enters a region of tailward plasma flow with speed {approximately} 670 km/s and an embedded negative B{sub z}, indicating entry into the plasmasheet tailward of the X-line. These observed velocities are comparable to calculated velocities based on Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relationships. The spacecraft subsequently returns into the south tail lobe by crossing another slow shock. Coplanarity analyses show that the two shocks have orientations consistent with that predicted by the Petschek reconnection model. The authors note that this event occurs during northward interplanetary magnetic fields. Thus, a magnetic stress built-up in the distant tail may be responsible for this reconnection process. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A detailed examination of a X-line region in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of jet flow and B(sub z) reversals and a pair of slow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report an observation of Petschek-type magnetic reconnection at a distant neutral line (X = -230 R(sub e)) with a full set of signatures of the magnetic merging process. These features include a reversal of plasma flows from earthward to tailward, a pair of slow shocks and the magnetic field X-type line. These two slow shocks are shown to satisfy the shock criteria used by Feldman et al. (1987). The spacecraft first crosses a slow shock to enter the earthward flowing plasmasheet with velocity of about 440 km/s. The embedded magnetic field has a positive B(sub z) component. The spacecraft next enters a region of tailward plasma flow with speed approximately 670 km/s and an embedded negative B(sub z), indicating entry into the plasmasheet tailward of the X-line. These observed velocities are comparable to calculated velocities based on Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relationships. The spacecraft subsequently returns into the south tail lobe by crossing another slow shock. Coplanarity analyses shows that the two slow shocks have orientations consistent with that predicted by the Petschek reconnection model. We note that this event occurs during northward interplanetary magnetic fields. Thus, a magnetic stress built-up in the distant tail may be responsible for this reconnection process.

  1. On the Possibility of Radio Emission from Quasi-parallel and Quasi-perpendicular Propagation of Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Shanmugaraju; S. Umapathy

    2000-09-01

    A set of 21 solar type II radio bursts observed using Hiraiso radio spectrograph have been analysed to study the direction of propagation of coronal shocks. Α simple analysis is carried out to find the approximate angle between the shock normal and magnetic field by solving the Rankine-Hugoniot MHD relation with assumption of Alfven speed and plasma beta. From this analysis, it is suggested that both quasi-parallel shocks (favourable) and quasi-perpendicular shocks can generate type II bursts depending upon the circumstances of the corona.

  2. Atmospheric NLTE models for the spectroscopic analysis of blue stars with winds. III. X-ray emission from wind-embedded shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, L. P.; Puls, J.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray radiation emitted from wind-embedded shocks in hot, massive stars can affect the ionization balance in their outer atmospheres and can be the mechanism responsible for producing highly ionized atomic species detected in stellar wind UV spectra. Aims: To allow for these processes in the context of spectral analysis, we have implemented the emission from wind-embedded shocks and related physics into our unified, NLTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND. Methods: The shock structure and corresponding emission is calculated as a function of user-supplied parameters (volume filling factor, radial stratification of shock strength, and radial onset of emission). We account for a temperature and density stratification inside the postshock cooling zones, calculated for radiative and adiabatic cooling in the inner and outer wind, respectively. The high-energy absorption of the cool wind is considered by adding important K-shell opacities, and corresponding Auger ionization rates have been included in the NLTE network. To test our implementation and to check the resulting effects, we calculated a comprehensive model grid with a variety of X-ray emission parameters. Results: We tested and verified our implementation carefully against corresponding results from various alternative model atmosphere codes, and studied the effects from shock emission for important ions from He, C, N, O, Si, and P. Surprisingly, dielectronic recombination turned out to play an essential role for the ionization balance of O iv/O v (particularly in dwarfs with Teff~ 45 000 K). Finally, we investigated the frequency dependence and radial behavior of the mass absorption coefficient, κν(r), which is important in the context of X-ray line formation in massive star winds. Conclusions: In almost all of the cases considered, direct ionization is of major influence because of the enhanced EUV radiation field, and Auger ionization only affects N vi

  3. THE CLOSE T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM V4046 Sgr: ROTATIONALLY MODULATED X-RAY EMISSION FROM ACCRETION SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argiroffi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Maggio, A.; Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Montmerle, T. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis bd Arago, FR-75014 Paris (France); Huenemoerder, D. P. [MIT, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Alecian, E. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Audard, M. [ISDC Data Center for Astrophysics, University of Geneva, Ch. d' Ecogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Bouvier, J. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041, Grenoble (France); Donati, J.-F. [IRAP-UMR 5277, CNRS and Universite de Toulouse, 14 Av. E. Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Gregory, S. G. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Trkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Hussain, G. A. J. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Kastner, J. H.; Sacco, G. G., E-mail: argi@astropa.unipa.it [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We report initial results from a quasi-simultaneous X-ray/optical observing campaign targeting V4046 Sgr, a close, synchronous-rotating classical T Tauri star (CTTS) binary in which both components are actively accreting. V4046 Sgr is a strong X-ray source, with the X-rays mainly arising from high-density (n{sub e}{approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}) plasma at temperatures of 3-4 MK. Our multi-wavelength campaign aims to simultaneously constrain the properties of this X-ray-emitting plasma, the large-scale magnetic field, and the accretion geometry. In this paper, we present key results obtained via time-resolved X-ray-grating spectra, gathered in a 360 ks XMM-Newton observation that covered 2.2 system rotations. We find that the emission lines produced by this high-density plasma display periodic flux variations with a measured period, 1.22 {+-} 0.01 d, that is precisely half that of the binary star system (2.42 d). The observed rotational modulation can be explained assuming that the high-density plasma occupies small portions of the stellar surfaces, corotating with the stars, and that the high-density plasma is not azimuthally symmetrically distributed with respect to the rotational axis of each star. These results strongly support models in which high-density, X-ray-emitting CTTS plasma is material heated in accretion shocks, located at the base of accretion flows tied to the system by magnetic field lines.

  4. Detection and Analysis of X Ray Emission from the Princeton-Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosh, Alexandra; Swanson, Charles; Jandovitz, Peter; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The PFRC is an odd-parity rotating-magnetic-field-driven field-reversed-configuration magnetic confinement experiment. Studying X rays produced via electron Bremsstrahlung with neutral particles is crucial to the further understanding of the energy and particle confinement of the PFRC. The data on the x rays are collected using a detector system comprised of two, spatially scannable Amptek XR-100 CR detectors and a Amptek XR-100 SDD detector that view the plasma column at two axial locations, one in the divertor and one near the axial midplane. These provide X-ray energy and arrival-time information. (Data analysis requires measurement of each detector's efficiency, a parameter that is modified by window transmission. Detector calibrations were performed with a custom-made X-ray tube that impinged 1-microamp 1-5 kV electron beams onto a carbon target.) From the analyzed data, the average electron energy, effective temperature, and electron density can be extracted. Spatial scans then allow the FRC's internal energy to be measured. We present recent measurements of the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 0.8 to 6 keV and the inferred electron temperature in the PFRC device as functions of heating power, magnetic field and fill gas pressure. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Fast and Furious: Shock Heated Gas as the Origin of Spatially Resolved Hard X-ray Emission in the Central 5 kpc of the Galaxy Merger NGC 6240

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Pellegrini, Silvia; Max, Claire; Risaliti, Guido; U, Vivian; Zezas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a deep, sub-arcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT~6 keV (~70 million K) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with velocity of ~2200 km/s. For the first time we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting FeXXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large scale morphology of H_2(1-0) S(1) line emission and H\\alpha filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originated in the starburst driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L(0.5-8 keV)=5.3E+41 erg/s, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is 100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its ...

  6. Using the Reverse Shock Index at the Injury Scene and in the Emergency Department to Identify High-Risk Patients: A Cross-Sectional Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hung Lai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ratio of systolic blood pressure (SBP to heart rate (HR, called the reverse shock index (RSI, is used to evaluate the hemodynamic stability of trauma patients. A SBP lower than the HR (RSI < 1 indicates the probability of hemodynamic shock. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the RSI as evaluated by emergency medical services (EMS personnel at the injury scene (EMS RSI and the physician in the emergency department (ED RSI could be used as an additional variable to identify patients who are at high risk of more severe injury. Methods: Data obtained from all 16,548 patients added to the trauma registry system at a Level I trauma center between January 2009 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Only patients transferred by EMS were included in this study. A total of 3715 trauma patients were enrolled and subsequently divided into four groups: group I patients had an EMS RSI ≥1 and an ED RSI ≥1 (n = 3485; group II an EMS RSI ≥ 1 and an ED RSI < 1 (n = 85; group III an EMS RSI < 1 and an ED RSI ≥ 1 (n = 98; and group IV an EMS RSI < 1 and a ED RSI < 1 (n = 47. A Pearson’s χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test, or independent Student’s t-test was conducted to compare trauma patients in groups II, III, and IV with those in group I. Results: Group II and IV patients had a higher injury severity score, a higher incidence of commonly associated injuries, and underwent more procedures (including intubation, chest tube insertion, and blood transfusion in the ED than patients in group I. Group II and IV patients were also more likely to receive a severe injury to the thoracoabdominal area. These patients also had worse outcomes regarding the length of stay in hospital and intensive care unit (ICU, the proportion of patients admitted to ICU, and in-hospital mortality. Group II patients had a higher adjusted odds ratio for mortality (5.8-times greater than group I patients. Conclusions: Using an RSI < 1 as a

  7. Reversible and irreversible impacts of greenhouse gas emissions in multi-century projections with the NCAR global coupled carbon cycle-climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelicher, Thomas L.; Joos, Fortunat [University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, Bern (Switzerland); University of Bern, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    The legacy of historical and the long-term impacts of 21st century greenhouse gas emissions on climate, ocean acidification, and carbon-climate feedbacks are investigated with a coupled carbon cycle-climate model. Emission commitment scenarios with zero emissions after year 2100 and 21st century emissions of 1,800, 900, and 0 gigatons of carbon are run up to year 2500. The reversibility and irreversibility of impacts is quantified by comparing anthropogenically-forced regional changes with internal, unforced climate variability. We show that the influence of historical emissions and of non-CO{sub 2} agents is largely reversible on the regional scale. Forced changes in surface temperature and precipitation become smaller than internal variability for most land and ocean grid cells in the absence of future carbon emissions. In contrast, continued carbon emissions over the 21st century cause irreversible climate change on centennial to millennial timescales in most regions and impacts related to ocean acidification and sea level rise continue to aggravate for centuries even if emissions are stopped in year 2100. Undersaturation of the Arctic surface ocean with respect to aragonite, a mineral form of calcium carbonate secreted by marine organisms, is imminent and remains widespread. The volume of supersaturated water providing habitat to calcifying organisms is reduced from preindustrial 40 to 25% in 2100 and to 10% in 2300 for the high emission case. We conclude that emission trading schemes, related to the Kyoto Process, should not permit trading between emissions of relatively short-lived agents and CO{sub 2} given the irreversible impacts of anthropogenic carbon emissions. (orig.)

  8. Ultralong Persistent Room Temperature Phosphorescence of Metal Coordination Polymers Exhibiting Reversible pH-Responsive Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ke-Zhi; Yan, Dongpeng

    2016-06-22

    Ultra-long-persistent room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials have attracted much attention and present various applications in illumination, displays, and the bioimaging field; however, the persistent RTP is generally from the inorganic phosphor materials to date. Herein, we show that the metal coordination polymers (CPs) could be new types of emerging long-lived RTP materials for potential sensor applications. First, two kinds of Cd-based CPs, Cd(m-BDC)(H2O) (1) and Cd(m-BDC)(BIM) (2) (m-BDC = 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid; BIM = benzimidazole), were obtained through a hydrothermal process, and the samples were found to exhibit two-dimensional layered structures, which are stabilized by interlayer C-H···π interaction and π···π interaction, respectively. The CPs show unexpected second-time-scale ultra-long-persistent RTP after the removal of UV excitation, and this persistent emission can be detected easily on a time scale of 0-10 s. The CPs also feature a tunable luminescence decay lifetime by adjusting their coordination situation and packing fashion of ligands. Theoretical calculation further indicates that the introduction of the second ligand could highly influence the electronic structure and intermolecular electron transfer toward tailoring the RTP of the CP materials. Moreover, CP 2 exhibits well-defined pH- and temperature-dependent phosphorescence responses. Therefore, this work provides a facile way to develop new type of CPs with steady-state and dynamic tuning of the RTP properties from both experimental and theoretical perspectives, which have potential applications in the areas of displays, pH/temperature sensors, and phosphorescence logic gates. On account of suitable incorporation of inorganic and organic building blocks, it can be expected that the ultra-long-persistent RTP CPs can be extended to other similar systems due to the highly tunable structures and facile synthesis routes.

  9. YSO accretion shocks: magnetic, chromospheric or stochastic flow effects can suppress fluctuations of X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Matsakos, T; Stehlé, C; González, M; Ibgui, L; de Sá, L; Lanz, T; Orlando, S; Bonito, R; Argiroffi, C; Reale, F; Peres, G

    2013-01-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments and numerical simulations of radiative shocks produced by the impact of the accreting gas onto young stars predict quasi-periodic oscillations in the emitted radiation. However, observational data do not show evidence of such periodicity. Aims. We investigate whether physically plausible perturbations in the accretion column or in the chromosphere could disrupt the shock structure influencing the observability of the oscillatory behavior. Methods. We performed local 2D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of an accretion shock impacting a chromosphere, taking optically thin radiation losses and thermal conduction into account. We investigated the effects of several perturbation types, such as clumps in the accretion stream or chromospheric fluctuations, and also explored a wide range of plasma-\\beta values. Results. In the case of a weak magnetic field, the post-shock region shows chaotic motion and mixing, smoothing out the perturbations and retaining a global periodic signature....

  10. Modeling the shock-cloud interaction in SN 1006: unveiling the origin of nonthermal X-ray and gamma-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, Marco; Pereira, Victor; Acero, Fabio; Katsuda, Satoru; Decourchelle, Anne; Winkler, Frank P; Bonito, Rosaria; Reale, Fabio; Peres, Giovanni; Li, Jiangtao; Dubner, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    The supernova remnant SN 1006 is a source of high-energy particles and its southwestern limb is interacting with a dense ambient cloud, thus being a promising region for gamma-ray hadronic emission. We aim at describing the physics and the nonthermal emission associated with the shock-cloud interaction to derive the physical parameters of the cloud (poorly constrained by the data analysis), to ascertain the origin of the observed spatial variations in the spectral properties of the X-ray synchrotron emission, and to predict spectral and morphological features of the resulting gamma-ray emission. We performed 3-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations modeling the evolution of SN 1006 and its interaction with the ambient cloud, and explored different model setups. By applying the REMLIGHT code on the model results, we synthesized the synchrotron X-ray emission, and compared it with actual observations, to constrain the parameters of the model. We also synthesized the leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray emission from the ...

  11. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    OpenAIRE

    Bonito; Orlando,; Argiroffi; Miceli; Reale,, S; Peres,, Marco A; Matsakos; Stehle; Ibgui

    2014-01-01

    Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption o...

  12. Self-sustained asymmetry of lepton-number emission: a new phenomenon during the supernova shock-accretion phase in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marek, Andreas [Rechenzentrum der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    During the stalled-shock phase of our three-dimensional, hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e}) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for 'Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry'. While the individual ν {sub e} and ν-bar {sub e} fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations. It exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more and persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e} flux asymmetry originates predominantly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux ( ν-bar {sub e} flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating due to 〈ϵ{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉>〈ϵ{sub ν{sub e}}〉. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of the LESA phenomenon form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be

  13. Mapping High-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    OpenAIRE

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of high-velocity H-$\\alpha$ and Lyman-$\\alpha$ emission in the outer debris of SN~1987A. The H-$\\alpha$ images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H$\\alpha$ imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms cr...

  14. Fast and Furious: Shock heated gas as the origin of spatially resolved hard X-ray emission in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy merger NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junfeng; Nardini, Emanuele; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Risaliti, Guido; Zezas, Andreas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pellegrini, Silvia [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universitá di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Max, Claire [Center for Adaptive Optics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); U, Vivian, E-mail: jfwang@northwestern.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We have obtained a deep, subarcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT ∼ 6 keV (∼70 MK) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with a velocity of ∼2200 km s{sup –1}. For the first time, we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting Fe XXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large-scale morphology of H{sub 2}(1-0) S(1) line emission and Hα filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originating in the starburst-driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L {sub 0.5-8} {sub keV} = 5.3 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is ∼100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its total mass (M {sub hot} = 1.8 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}) and thermal energy (E {sub th} = 6.5 × 10{sup 57} erg). The total iron mass in the highly ionized plasma is M {sub Fe} = 4.6 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. Both the energetics and the iron mass in the hot gas are consistent with the expected injection from the supernovae explosion during the starburst that is commensurate with its high star formation rate. No evidence for fluorescent Fe I emission is found in the CO filament connecting the two nuclei.

  15. Reversal of cerebral glucose hypometabolism on positron emission tomography with electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient with a psychotic episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassamal, Sameer; Jolles, Paul; Pandurangi, Ananda

    2016-11-01

    AB, a 74-year-old Caucasian woman, was admitted for acute onset of psychosis, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Pharmacotherapy was unsuccessful and the patient was referred for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Pre-ECT, (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography showed extensive frontal, parietal, and temporal cortical hypometabolism suggestive of a neurodegenerative disease. After eight ECT sessions, the psychotic and anxiety symptoms as well as the cognitive impairment resolved. The rapid improvement in symptoms was more suggestive of a psychotic episode rather than dementia. Two days after the ECT course, (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography showed improvements in cerebral cortical hypometabolism, especially in the left parietal cortex, left temporal/occipital cortex. and bifrontal regions. At a follow-up visit 2 months after the ECT course, the psychotic episode was still in remission, and (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography continued to show improved cerebral cortical hypometabolism in these areas. This case illustrated the effect of ECT in reversing cerebral glucose hypometabolism on PET. The improvement in cerebral glucose hypometabolism may represent the neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in the treatment of a psychotic episode. Improved cerebral glucose hypometabolism was present 2 months post-ECT, which suggests that ECT caused sustained functional neural changes. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  16. Anti-Shock Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  17. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  18. LOW-VELOCITY SHOCKS TRACED BY EXTENDED SiO EMISSION ALONG THE W43 RIDGES: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Martin, P. G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Motte, F.; Louvet, F.; Hill, T.; Hennemann, M.; Didelon, P. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU - CNRS/INSU - Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, Bât. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Carlhoff, P.; Schilke, P. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Lesaffre, P.; Gusdorf, A. [ENS, LERMA, UMR 8112, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond 75005 Paris, France LRA/ENS (France); Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Duarte-Cabral, A. [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, CNRS, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bendo, G. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Roussel, H. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014, Paris (France); Bernard, J.-P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, CESR, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bronfman, L., E-mail: qnguyen@cita.utoronto.ca [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2013-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is tightly linked to that of their parental clouds. Here, we focus on the high-density parts of W43, a molecular cloud undergoing an efficient event of star formation. Using a column density image derived from Herschel continuum maps, we identify two high-density filamentary clouds, called the W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges. Both have gas masses of 2.1 × 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} and 3.5 × 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} above >10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} and within areas of ∼6 and ∼14 pc{sup 2}, respectively. The W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges are structures that are coherent in velocity and gravitationally bound, despite their large velocity dispersion measured by the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) lines of the W43-HERO IRAM large program. Another intriguing result is that these ridges harbor widespread (∼10 pc{sup 2}) bright SiO (2-1) emission, which we interpret to be the result of low-velocity shocks (≤10 km s{sup –1}). We measure a significant relationship between the SiO (2-1) luminosity and velocity extent and show that it distinguishes our observations from the high-velocity shocks associated with outflows. We use state-of-the-art shock models to demonstrate that a small percentage (10%) of Si atoms in low-velocity shocks, observed initially in gas phase or in grain mantles, can explain the observed SiO column density in the W43 ridges. The spatial and velocity overlaps between the ridges of high-density gas and the shocked SiO gas suggest that ridges could be forming via colliding flows driven by gravity and accompanied by low-velocity shocks. This mechanism may be the initial conditions for the formation of young massive clusters.

  19. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  20. Molecular shock tracers in NGC 1068: SiO and HNCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, G.; Viti, S.; García-Burillo, S.; Fuente, A.; Usero, A.; Krips, M.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present and compare the distribution of two shock tracers, SiO and HNCO, in the circumnuclear disk (CND) of NGC 1068. We aim to determine the causes of the variation in emission across the CND. Methods: SiO(3-2) and HNCO(6-5) emission has been imaged in NGC 1068 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). We perform an LTE and RADEX analysis to determine the column densities and physical characteristics of the gas emitting these two lines. We then use a chemical model to determine the origin of the emission. Results: There is a strong SiO peak to the east of the AGN, with weak detections to the west. This distribution contrasts that of HNCO, which is detected more strongly to the west. The SiO emission peak in the east is similar to the peak of the molecular gas mass traced by CO. HNCO emission is offset from this peak by as much as 80 pc (≤slant1''). We compare velocity integrated line ratios in the east and west. We confirm that SiO emission strongly dominates in the east, while the reverse is true in the west. We use RADEX to analyse the possible gas conditions that could produce such emission. We find that, in both east and west, we cannot constrain a single temperature for the gas. We run a grid of chemical models of potential shock processes in the CND and find that SiO is significantly enhanced during a fast (60 km s-1) shock but not during a slow (20 km s-1) shock, nor in a gas not subjected to shocks at all. We find the inverse for HNCO, whose abundance increases during slow shocks and in warm non-shocked gas. Conclusions: High SiO and low HNCO indicated a fast shock, while high HNCO and low SiO indicates either a slow shock or warm, dense, non-shocked gas. The East Knot is therefore likely to contain gas that is heavily shocked. From chemical modelling, gas in the West Knot may be non-shocked, or maybe undergoing a much milder shock event. When taking into account RADEX results, the milder shock event is the more likely of the two scenarios

  1. Resolving shocked and UV excited components of H2 emission in planetary nebulae with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) form when low and intermediate-mass stars eject their outer layers into the ISM at the end of the AGB phase. Many PNe exhibit near-infrared (NIR) emission from molecular hydrogen (H2). This NIR emission arises from radiative decay out of excited rotation-vibration (rovibrational) states. The rovibrational states can be populated by excitation to higher electronic states through absorption of a far-UV photon followed by a radiative cascade to the electronic ground state, or by collisions (e.g., in a hot gas). The two processes populate the rovibrational levels of H2 differently, so the observed emergent emission spectrum provides an effective probe of the mechanisms that excite the H2. Many PNe display line intensity ratios that are intermediate between these two processes (Otsuka et al. 2013). With the advantages of the high spectral resolution (R~40000), broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), and high spatial resolution of the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, Park et al. 2014), we are able to differentiate components in position-velocity space: we see a slowly expanding UV-excited H2 shell in the PN M 1-11 and two faster moving “bullets” of thermalized H2 that we interpret as shocked gas from a bipolar outflow. We also present observations of several other PNe that exhibit similar morphologies of thermalized and UV-excited H2 components.

  2. Resolving the Bright HCN(1-0) Emission toward the Seyfert 2 Nucleus of M51: Shock Enhancement by Radio Jets and Weak Masing by Infrared Pumping?

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Satoki; Boone, Frédéric; Krips, Melanie; Lim, Jeremy; Muller, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    We present high angular resolution observations of the HCN(1-0) emission (at ~1" or ~34 pc), together with CO J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 observations, toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 (NGC 5194). The overall HCN(1-0) distribution and kinematics are very similar to that of the CO lines, which have been indicated as the jet-entrained molecular gas in our past observations. In addition, high HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio of about unity is observed along the jets, similar to that observed at the shocked molecular gas in our Galaxy. These results strongly indicate that both diffuse and dense gases are entrained by the jets and outflowing from the AGN. The channel map of HCN(1-0) at the systemic velocity shows a strong emission right at the nucleus, where no obvious emission has been detected in the CO lines. The HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio at this region reaches >2, a value that cannot be explained considering standard physical/chemical conditions. Based on our calculations, we sugg...

  3. Measurements of neutral hydrogen profiles on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch from time-resolved ? line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Källne, E.

    1998-09-01

    The investigations of the radial distributions of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission from the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma show that the emission profile varies a lot, even during one plasma discharge. At central electron temperatures of about 150 eV it was expected that the 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission should emerge from the plasma centre. In comparison, 0953-4075/31/17/015/img4 is always observed to radiate from the centre. Our measurements of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission have, however, shown that this is not always the case, the emission often comes from the plasma edge. The analysis of the measurements has led us to conclude that the edge emission comes from charge-exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen near the carbon first wall. These observations provide a way to estimate the change in neutral hydrogen density during local plasma-wall interaction.

  4. O$_2$ Emission Toward Orion H$_2$ Peak 1 and the Role of FUV-Illuminated C-Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Melnick, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen, O_2, has been the target of ground-based and space-borne searches for decades. Of the thousands of lines of sight surveyed, only those toward Rho Oph and Orion H_2 Peak 1 have yielded detections of any statistical significance. The detection of the O_2 N_J =3_3 -1_2 and 5_4 - 3_4 lines at 487.249 GHz and 773.840 GHz, respectively, toward Rho Ophiuchus has been attributed to a short-lived peak in the time-dependent, cold-cloud O_2 abundance, while the detection of the O_2 N_J =3_3 - 1_2, 5_4 - 3_4 lines, plus the 7_6 - 5_6 line at 1120.715 GHz, toward Orion has been ascribed to time-dependent preshock physical and chemical evolution and low-velocity (12 km/s) non-dissociative C-type shocks, both of which are fully shielded from far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation, plus a postshock region that is exposed to a FUV field. We report a re-interpretation of the Orion O_2 detection based on new C-type shock models that fully incorporate the significant effects the presence of even a weak FUV field can h...

  5. Molecular gas chemistry in AGN. II. High-resolution imaging of SiO emission in NGC 1068: shocks or XDR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Burillo, S.; Usero, A.; Fuente, A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Boone, F.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Neri, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Tacconi, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    Context. This paper is part of a multi-species survey of line emission from the molecular gas in the circum-nuclear disk (CND) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. Unlike in other active galaxies, the intensely star-forming regions in NGC 1068 and the CND can be resolved with current instrumentation. This makes this galaxy an optimal test-bed to probe the effects of AGN on the molecular medium at ~100 pc scales. Aims: Single-dish observations have provided evidence that the abundance of silicon monoxide (SiO) in the CND of NGC 1068 is enhanced by 3-4 orders of magnitude with respect to the values typically measured in quiescent molecular gas in the Galaxy. We aim at unveiling the mechanism(s) underlying the SiO enhancement. Methods: We have imaged the emission of the SiO(2-1) (86.8 GHz) and CN(2-1) (226.8 GHz) lines in NGC 1068 at ~150 pc and 60 pc spatial resolution with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI). We have also obtained complementary IRAM 30 m observations of HNCO and methanol (CH3OH) lines. These species are known as tracers of shocks in the Galaxy. Results: SiO is detected in a disk of ~400 pc size around the AGN. SiO abundances in the CND of ~(1-5) × 10-9 are about 1-2 orders of magnitude above those measured in the starburst ring. The overall abundance of CN in the CND is high: ~(0.2-1) × 10-7. The abundances of SiO and CN are enhanced at the extreme velocities of gas associated with non-circular motions close to the AGN (r CND are similar to those measured in prototypical shocked regions in our Galaxy. Yet the strength and abundance of CN in NGC 1068 can be explained neither by shocks nor by photon-dominated region (PDR) chemistry. Abundances measured for CN and SiO and the correlation of CN/CO and SiO/CO ratios with hard X-ray irradiation suggest that the CND of NGC 1068 has become a giant X-ray-dominated region (XDR). Conclusions: The extreme properties of molecular gas in the circum-nuclear molecular disk of NGC 1068 result from the

  6. Thermal X-ray emission from shocked ejecta in Type Ia Supernova Remnants. Prospects for explosion mechanism identification

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Borkowski, K J; Dominguez, I; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Dominguez, Inmaculada

    2003-01-01

    The explosion mechanism behind Type Ia supernovae is a matter of continuing debate. The diverse attempts to identify or at least constrain the physical processes involved in the explosion have been only partially successful so far. In this paper we propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants originated in Type Ia events to extract relevant information concerning the explosions themselves. We have produced a grid of thermonuclear supernova models representative of the paradigms currently under debate: pure deflagrations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and sub-Chandrasekhar explosions, using their density and chemical composition profiles to simulate the interaction with the surrounding ambient medium and the ensuing plasma heating, non-equilibrium ionization and thermal X-ray emission of the ejecta. Key observational parameters such as electron temperatures, emission measures and ionization time scales are presented and discussed. We find that not only is it poss...

  7. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  8. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  9. GRB 140606B / iPTF14bfu: Detection of shock-breakout emission from a cosmological gamma-ray burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Z; Perley, D; Kruhler, T; Margutti, R; Friis, M; Malesani, D; Jakobsson, P; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Hjorth, J; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Schulze, S; Tanvir, N R; Thone, C C; Xu, D

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140606B ($z=0.384$), and optical photometry and spectroscopy of its associated supernova (SN). The bolometric properties of the SN are: a nickel mass of M$_{\\rm Ni}$=0.4$\\pm$0.2 M$_{\\odot}$, an ejecta mass of M$_{\\rm ej}$=5$\\pm$2 M$_{\\odot}$, and a kinetic energy of E$_{\\rm K}$=2$\\pm1\\times10^{52}$ erg. The uncertain value of M$_{\\rm Ni}$ is primarily due to the poorly constrained rest-frame extinction ($E(B-V)_{\\rm rest}$=0.16$\\pm$0.14 mag). The photospheric velocity of the SN near maximum light is $v_{\\rm ph}\\approx$20,000 km/s. The photospheric velocity and bolometric properties are fully consistent with the statistical averages determined for other GRB-SNe. However, in terms of its $\\gamma$-ray emission, GRB 140606B is an outlier of the Amati relation, and occupies the same region as low-luminosity ($ll$) and short GRBs. The $\\gamma$-ray emission in $ll$GRBs is thought to arise, at least in some events, from a shock-breakout (SBO), rather than from a ...

  10. Ferrites based infrared radiation coatings with high emissivity and high thermal shock resistance and their application on energy-saving kettle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianyi [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081 (China); Fan, Xi’an, E-mail: groupfxa@163.com [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081 (China); Lu, Lei [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081 (China); Hu, Xiaoming [Suzhou Sagreon New Materials Co., Ltd, Zhangjiagang 215625 (China); Li, Guangqiang [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • The ferrites based infrared radiation coating was prepared by HVOF for the first time. • The infrared radiation coatings were applied firstly on the household kettle. • The bonding strength between the coating and substrate could reach 30.7 MPa. • The coating kept intact when cycle reached 27 by quenching from 1000 °C using water. • The energy-saving efficiency of the kettle with coating could reach 30.5%. - Abstract: Starting from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO{sub 2}, Co{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO powders, the ferrites based infrared radiation coatings with high emissivity and high thermal shock resistance were successfully prepared on the surface of carbon steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF). The coating thickness was about 120–150 μm and presented a typical flat lamellar structure. The coating surface was rough and some submicron grade grains distributed on it. The infrared emissivity of the ferrites based coating by HVOF was over 0.74 in 3–20 μm waveband at 800 °C, which was obviously higher than that of the coating by brushing process in the short waveband. The bonding strength was 30.7 MPa between the coating and substrate, which was five times more than that of conventional coatings by brushing process. The combined effect of the superior bonding strength, typical lamellar structure, pre-existing microcracks and newly generated pores made the cycle times reach 27 when the coating samples were quenched from 1000 °C using water. Lastly, the infrared radiation coatings were applied on the underside of household kettle, and the energy-saving efficiency could reach 30.5%. The ferrites based infrared radiation coatings obtained in this work are good candidates for saving energy in the field of cookware and industrial high temperature furnace.

  11. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  12. Early Optical Polarization of Forward Shock Afterglow of GRB 091208B

    CERN Document Server

    Uehara, T; Kawabata, K S; Chiyonobu, S; Fukazawa, Y; Ikejiri, Y; Inoue, T; Itoh, R; Komatsu, T; Miyamoto, H; Mizuno, T; Nagae, O; Nakaya, H; Ohsugi, T; Sakimoto, K; Sasada, M; Tanaka, H; Uemura, M; Yamanaka, M; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, R; Yoshida, M

    2012-01-01

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149 - 706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4% +/- 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 +/- 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al. (2009). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emission region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.

  13. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  14. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thready Tests that may be done include: Blood chemistry, including kidney function tests and those tests looking ... severe shock. Severe hypovolemic shock may lead to death, even with immediate medical attention. Older adults are ...

  15. Generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    Full Text Available It is well known that most MHD shocks observed within 1 AU are MHD fast shocks. Only a very limited number of MHD slow shocks are observed within 1 AU. In order to understand why there are only a few MHD slow shocks observed within 1 AU, we use a one-dimensional, time-dependent MHD code with an adaptive grid to study the generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS in the solar wind. Results show that a negative, nearly square-wave perturbation will generate a pair of slow shocks (a forward and a reverse slow shock. In addition, the forward and the reverse slow shocks can pass through each other without destroying their characteristics, but the propagating speeds for both shocks are decreased. A positive, square-wave perturbation will generate both slow and fast shocks. When a forward slow shock (FSS propagates behind a forward fast shock (FFS, the former experiences a decreasing Mach number. In addition, the FSS always disappears within a distance of 150R (where R is one solar radius from the Sun when there is a forward fast shock (with Mach number ≥1.7 propagating in front of the FSS. In all tests that we have performed, we have not discovered that the FSS (or reverse slow shock evolves into a FFS (or reverse fast shock. Thus, we do not confirm the FSS-FFS evolution as suggested by Whang (1987.

  16. pH-Regulated Reversible Transition Between Polyion Complexes (PIC) and Hydrogen-Bonding Complexes (HBC) with Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sidan; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoying; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-02-17

    The mimicking of biological supramolecular interactions and their mutual transitions to fabricate intelligent artificial systems has been of increasing interest. Herein, we report the fabrication of supramolecular micellar nanoparticles consisting of quaternized poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PQDMA) and tetrakis(4-carboxylmethoxyphenyl)ethene (TPE-4COOH), which was capable of reversible transition between polyion complexes (PIC) and hydrogen bonding complexes (HBC) with tunable aggregation-induced emission (AIE) mediated by solution pH. At pH 8, TPE-4COOH chromophores can be directly dissolved in aqueous milieu without evident fluorescence emission. However, upon mixing with PEO-b-PQDMA, polyion complexes were formed by taking advantage of electrostatic interaction between carboxylate anions and quaternary ammonium cations and the most compact PIC micelles were achieved at the isoelectric point (i.e., [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] = 1), as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Simultaneously, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed an evident emission turn-on and the maximum fluorescence intensity was observed near the isoelectric point due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE moieties within the PIC cores. The kinetic study supported a micelle fusion/fission mechanism on the formation of PIC micelles at varying charge ratios, exhibiting a quick time constant (τ1) relating to the formation of quasi-equilibrium micelles and a slow time constant (τ2) corresponding to the formation of final equilibrium micelles. Upon deceasing the pH of PIC micelles from 8 to 2 at the [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] molar ratio of 1, TPE-4COOH chromophores became gradually protonated and hydrophobic. The size of micellar nanoparticles underwent a remarkable decrease, whereas the fluorescence intensity exhibited a further increase by approximately 7.35-fold, presumably because of the formation of HBC micelles comprising cationic PQDMA

  17. SHOCKS-``COMPLICATEDNESS'' Impulse-Jerk (I-J): [a(t)];[m(t)] DEVIATIONS FROM/VS. ''(so MIScalled) `Complexity' as UTTER-SIMPLICITY!!!''(``SMCIUS!!!''): SHOCKS Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``COMPLICATED-NESS''-MEASURE(S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Frederick; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    (so MIScalled) ''complexity'' associated BOTH [SCALE-Invarience Symmetry-RESTORING] AND X(w) (F-D-thm.) P(ω) ``1''/ ω ``1''/ω 1 . 000 ... ''pink'' Zipf-law Archimedes-HYPERBOLICITY INEVITABILITY BAE power-spectrum power-law decay algebraicity (or at least ``red'' Pareto-law X(ω) (F.-D.-thm.) P(ω) 1/ω (0 Brain/Mind, G. Stamov ed.(94)]; experimental-psychology!!!], i.e. ``SMCIUS!!!'' VS. SHOCKS-''COMPLICATEDNESS'' NON: ``1''/ ω Zipf/(Pareto?); power-law; algebraicity; universality power-spectrum inverse-transform of time-series of shock's impulse-jerk(I-J)

  18. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  19. [Cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  20. Mapping High-Velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha emission in the outer debris of SN 1987A. The H-alpha images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H-alpha imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals (-7,500 < V(sub obs) < -2,800 km/s) and (1,000 < V(sub obs) < 7,500 km/s), ?M(sub H) = 1.2 × 10(exp -3) M/ y. We also present the first Lyman-alpha imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-alpha emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-alpha/H-alpha photon ratio, R(L-alpha/H-alpha) approx. = 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of approx. = 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-alpha emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-alpha production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.

  1. The Radio to Infrared Emission of Very High Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts: Probing Early Star Formation through Molecular and Atomic Absorption Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Ciardi, B; Inoue, Susumu; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Ciardi, Benedetta

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the broadband afterglow emission of very high redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using standard relativistic blastwave models with both forward and reverse shock components. For a broad range of parameters, a generic property for GRBs at redshifts $z \\sim$ 5--30 is that the emission peaks in the millimeter to far-infrared bands with milli-Jansky flux levels, first at a few hours after the burst due to the reverse shock, and then again for several days afterwards with somewhat lower flux due to the forward shock. The radio, submillimeter and infrared continuum emission should be readily detectable out to $z \\ga 30$ by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Extended Very Large Array (EVLA), Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and other facilities. For relatively bright bursts, spectroscopic measurements of molecular and atomic absorption lines due to ambient protostellar gas may be possible. Utilizing models of primordial protostellar clouds, we show that under certain conditions, appreciable absorption ...

  2. Dissecting a Molecular Shock: Spatially Resolved H2 Line Ratios Across the HH7 Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Rosemary E.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Burton, Michael G.; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Brand, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of the physics of molecular shocks using Gemini NIFS (Near-Infrared Field Spectrometer) K-band spectra of a 3.'2 x 2.'9 region near the tip of the HH7 bow shock. The IFU data have an angular resolution of 0.3", much higher resolution then in any previous study of a molecular shock, and a velocity resolution of 60 km/s. We have detected 20 H2 emission lines with upper state energies as high as 28,000 K, and 6 additional unidentified lines which share the same bow shock morphology as the H2. We use excitation temperatures derived from line pairs measured in 0.15' x 0.15' bins to attempt to constrain the shock type and distinguish between low velocity jump shocks, continuous shocks, and dissociative shocks in which the H2 line emission arises from newly reformed H2.

  3. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  4. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Damiano [Princeton University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  5. Shock breakout theory

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) ejected from the progenitor star prior to the explosion is larger than c/v, the breakout will take place at larger radii, within the CSM, extending its duration to days time scale. The properties of the early, breakout and cooling, emission carry unique signatures of the structure of the progenitor star (e.g. its radius and surface composition) and of its mass-loss history. The recent progress of wide-field transient surveys enable SN detections on a day time scale, and are being used to set unique constraints on the proge...

  6. Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jessica S.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Ghavamian, Parviz; McKee, Christopher F.; Moffett, David; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Rakowski, Cara; Reynoso, Estela; Slane, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    We present evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic-ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Kα emission from the Tycho ejecta, imply that the RS is not accelerating cosmic rays. We also extract radial profiles from ~34% of the rim of Tycho and compare them to models of surface brightness profiles behind the BW for a purely thermal plasma with an adiabatic shock. The observed morphology of the rim is much more strongly peaked than predicted by the model, indicating that such thermal emission is implausible here. Spectral analysis also implies that the rim emission is nonthermal in nature, lending further support to the idea that Tycho's forward shock is accelerating cosmic rays.

  7. Are gauge shocks really shocks?

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M

    2005-01-01

    The existence of gauge pathologies associated with the Bona-Masso family of generalized harmonic slicing conditions is proven for the case of simple 1+1 relativity. It is shown that these gauge pathologies are true shocks in the sense that the characteristic lines associated with the propagation of the gauge cross, which implies that the name ``gauge shock'' usually given to such pathologies is indeed correct. These gauge shocks are associated with places where the spatial hypersurfaces that determine the foliation of spacetime become non-smooth.

  8. Culture shock and travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    compounds. This readjustment back to their own culture after a period of time abroad has been termed "reverse culture shock, a condition which has been studied in both corporate managers and Peace Corps volunteers. With culture shock and many other processes of psychological adjustment, people tend to suffer alone, thinking that they are the only ones not coping well with their new circumstance. The objective of this paper was to bring the phenomenon of culture shock to the awareness of travel health advisors, who can in turn advise travelers, especially longer term travelers, about having realistic expectations of their travel and life in new cultures.

  9. Sub-photospheric shocks in relativistic explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of shocks in opaque outflows from astrophysical explosions, in particular in cosmological gamma-ray bursts. Sub-photospheric shocks can produce neutrino emission and affect the observed photospheric radiation from the explosion. Shocks develop from internal compressive waves and can be of different types depending on the composition of the flow: (1) Shocks in `photon gas' with small plasma inertial mass have a unique structure determined by the `force-free' condition -- zero radiation flux in the plasma rest frame. Radiation dominance over plasma inertia suppresses formation of collisionless shocks mediated by collective electromagnetic fields. (2) Strong collisionless subshocks develop in the opaque flow if it is sufficiently magnetized. We evaluate the critical magnetization for this to happen. The collisionless subshock is embedded in a thicker radiation-mediated shock structure. (3) Shocks in outflows carrying a free neutron component involve dissipation through nuclear c...

  10. GRB060218: A Relativistic Supernova Shock Breakout

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E; Campana, S

    2007-01-01

    We show that the prompt and afterglow X-ray emission of GRB060218, as well as its early (t<=1 d) optical-UV emission, can be explained by a model in which a radiation- mediated shock propagates through a compact progenitor star into a dense wind. The prompt thermal X-ray emission is produced in this model as the mildly relativistic shock, v/c=0.85 carrying few x 10^49 erg, reaches the wind (Thomson) photosphere, where the post-shock thermal radiation is released and the shock becomes collisionless. Adopting this interpretation of the thermal X-ray emission, a subsequent X-ray afterglow is predicted, due to synchrotron emission and inverse-Compton scattering of SN UV photons by electrons accelerated in the collisionless shock. Early optical-UV emission is also predicted, due to the cooling of the outer \\delta M ~10^{-3} M_sun envelope of the star, which was heated to high temperature during shock passage. The observed X-ray afterglow and the early optical-UV emission are both consistent with those expected ...

  11. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  12. Continuous optical monitoring during the prompt emission of GRB 060111B

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, A; Stratta, G; Atteia, J L; Boër, M; Malacrino, F; Damerdji, Y; Behrend, R; Klotz, Alain; Gendre, Bruce; Stratta, Giulia; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Boer, Michel; Malacrino, Frederic; Damerdji, Yassine; Behrend, Raoul

    2006-01-01

    We present the time-resolved optical emission of GRB 060111B during its prompt phase, measured with the TAROT robotic observatory. This is the first time that the optical emission from a gamma-ray burst has been continuously monitored with a temporal resolution of a few seconds during the prompt gamma-ray phase. The temporal evolution of the prompt optical emission at the level of several seconds is used to provide a clue to the origin of this emission. The optical emission was found to decay steadily from our first measure, 28s after the trigger, in contrast to the gamma-ray emission, which exhibits strong variability at the same time. This behaviour strongly suggests that the optical emission is due to the reverse shock.

  13. Shock Heated Dust in Young Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R.; Strom, R. G.; van der Laan, H.; Greidanus, H.

    Infrared emission in young supernova remnants is interpreted as coming from shock-heated dust. Using models and data from other wavelength regimes, many physical parameters of the remnants can accurately be derived.

  14. Particle acceleration around SNR shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G., E-mail: morlino@arcetri.astro.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    We review the basic features of particle acceleration theory around collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs). We show how non-linear effects induced by the back reaction of accelerated particles onto the shock dynamics are of paramount importance to support the hipotesys that SNRs are the factories of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of magnetic field amplification and the presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. Special attention will be devoted to observational consequences of non-linear effects on the multi-wavelength spectrum of SNRs, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Finally we also discuss how Balmer lines, detected from several young SNRs, can be used to estimate the shock dynamical properties and the efficiency of CR acceleration.

  15. Particle acceleration around SNR shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic features of particle acceleration theory around collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs). We show how non linear effects induced by the back reaction of accelerated particles onto the shock dynamics are of paramount importance to support the hipotesys that SNRs are the factories of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of magnetic field amplification and the presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. Special attention will be devoted to observational consequences of non linear effects on the multi-wavelength spectrum of SNRs, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Finally we also discuss how Balmer lines, detected from several young SNRs, can be used to estimate the shock dynamical properties and the efficiency of CR acceleration.

  16. Nonthermal radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks with low Mach numbers and the ensuing spectral signatures imprinted in radio synchrotron emission. Time-dependent simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of electrons in the test-particle limit have been performed for spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for typical shocks in the intracluster medium. The electron and radiation spectra at the shock location can be described properly by the test-particle DSA predictions with the instantaneous shock parameters. However, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons at the shock gradually decrease as the shock slows down in time. So one needs to be cautious about interpreting observed radio spectra of evolving shocks by simple DSA models in the test-particle regime.

  17. Bow shock data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Edward C.; Erdman, Peeter W.

    1994-08-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Space Physics Group in collaboration with the Army Research Office (ARO) modeling team has completed a systematic organization of the shock and plume spectral data and the electron temperature and density measurements obtained during the BowShock I and II rocket flights which have been submitted to the AEDC Data Center, has verified the presence of CO Cameron band emission during the Antares engine burn and for an extended period of time in the post-burn plume, and have adapted 3-D radiation entrapment codes developed by the University of Pittsburgh to study aurora and other atmospheric phenomena that involve significant spatial effects to investigate the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) envelope surrounding the re-entry that create an extensive plasma cloud by photoionization.

  18. [Neurogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury.

  19. Cooling of Dense Gas by H2O Line Emission and an Assessment of its Effects in Chondrule-Forming Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, M A; Ciesla, F J

    2008-01-01

    We consider gas at densities appropriate to protoplanetary disks and calculate its ability to cool due to line radiation emitted by H2O molecules within the gas. Our work follows that of Neufeld & Kaufman (1993; ApJ, 418, 263), expanding on their work in several key aspects, including use of a much expanded line database, an improved escape probability formulism, and the inclusion of dust grains, which can absorb line photons. Although the escape probabilities formally depend on a complicated combination of optical depth in the lines and in the dust grains, we show that the cooling rate including dust is well approximated by the dust-free cooling rate multiplied by a simple function of the dust optical depth. We apply the resultant cooling rate of a dust-gas mixture to the case of a solar nebula shock pertinent to the formation of chondrules, millimeter-sized melt droplets found in meteorites. Our aim is to assess whether line cooling can be neglected in chondrule-forming shocks or if it must be included....

  20. Cosmic Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, J S; Badenes, C; Ghavamian, P; McKee, C F; Moffett, D; Plucinsky, P P; Rakowski, C; Reynoso, E; Slane, P O

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence for cosmic ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamical models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Ka emission from the T...

  1. Walkable dual emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Hai-Bing; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Kang, Bin; Deng, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Walkable dual emissions, in which the emission bands of the walker reversibly cross or leave those of the stationary ones depending on temperature and concentration, have been demonstrated in cyclic...

  2. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  3. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 15-56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temim, Tea [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Slane, Patrick; Plucinsky, Paul P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Castro, Daniel [MIT-Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gelfand, Joseph [New York University Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Dickel, John R., E-mail: tea.temim@nasa.gov [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of New Mexico, MSC 07-4220, Alburquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the {gamma}-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  4. Unveiling shocks in planetary nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, M A; Medina, J J; Luridiana, V; Miranda, L F; Riera, A; Velázquez, P F

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of a shock wave into a medium is expected to heat the material beyond the shock, producing noticeable effects in intensity line ratios such as [O III]/Halpha. To investigate the occurrence of shocks in planetary nebulae (PNe), we have used all narrowband [O III] and Halpha images of PNe available in the HST archive to build their [O III]/Halpha ratio maps and to search for regions where this ratio is enhanced. Regions with enhanced [O III]/Halpha emission ratio can be ascribed to two different types of morphological structures: bow-shock structures produced by fast collimated outflows and thin skins enveloping expanding nebular shells. Both collimated outflows and expanding shells are therefore confirmed to generate shocks in PNe. We also find regions with depressed values of the [O III]/Halpha ratio which are found mostly around density bounded PNe, where the local contribution of [N II] emission into the F656N Halpha filter cannot be neglected.

  5. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  6. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  7. Study of Thermal Endurance and Thermal Shock Resistance of High-emissivity Coating on Metal Substrate%金属基高发射率涂层耐热性及热震性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李泉灵; 徐国跃; 陈砚朋; 徐飞凤; 蒋勇

    2011-01-01

    High-emissivity coatings on metal substrate were prepared with silicate inorganic and transitional metal oxides series as adhesive and fillers, respectively.The thermal endurance and thermal shock resistance were investigated.The emissivity in 3~5 μm waveband of the coating was measured by IR-2.The structure and surface morphology of the coatings were characterized by X-ray (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM).The results of experimental investigation indicated that the coatings were greatly improved in resistance to thermal shock which was attributed to the milling and surface modification of the fillers.And the emissivity in 3~5 μm of the coatings was increased to 0.9 and could bear temperature of 1200 ℃.With the warming rate, curing temperature and curing time of the coating was ste to 5 ℃/min, 600℃and 2 h, respectively, the coating kept intact after more than 10 times of altemate heating and cooling.%以无机硅酸盐为粘合剂,过渡金属氧化物系列粉体为颜填料,制备出了金属基板上的高发射率涂层,并对其耐温性及抗热震性能进行研究.通过IR-2型发射率测量仪器测试了涂层在3~5 μm波段的发射率,并分别采用XRD和SEM表征了涂层的物相和微观形貌.结果表明:通过对颜填料的球磨和表面改性,涂层可以耐受1200℃高温,3~5μm波段的发射率在0.9以上,并且热震性能也有了显著的提高,升温速度为5℃/min,固化温度为600℃,固化时间为2h时,抗热震性能达到了10次.

  8. Simulations of shock wave propagation in heterogeneous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzsch, Jan-Martin; Ivanov, Boris A.; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Studies of shock wave propagation in heterogeneous materials are important for the interpretation of impact deformation and impact metamorphism of natural rocks. Reflection, refraction, and interference of shock waves caused by inhomogeneities lead to localised concentrations of pressure, temperature, and deformation rate, and in some cases to phase transitions. We have simulated numerically the shock compression of complex media in selected geometries with the aim of modelling shock recovery experiments and have observed reversible phase transitions in the target, shock heating alone may not be sufficient for the formation of impact melt, but localised shear at material boundaries results in considerable temperature increase which makes partial melting possible.

  9. [Definition of shock types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles.

  10. Localized shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, $W_{x_{n}}(t_{n}) ... W_{x_1}(t_1)$, where $W_x(t) = e^{-iHt} W_x e^{iHt}$. Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in $t$. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  11. Reverse logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); S.D.P. Flapper; R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper gives an overview of scientific literature that describes and discusses cases of reverse logistics activities in practice. Over sixty case studies are considered. Based on these studies we are able to indicate critical factors for the practice of reverse logistics. In addi

  12. Complete in vivo reversal of P-glycoprotein pump function in the blood-brain barrier visualized with positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, NH; Schinkel, AH; De Vries, EGE; Fluks, E; Van der Graaf, WTA; Willemsen, ATM; Vaalburg, W; Franssen, EJF

    1998-01-01

    1 Homozygously mdr1a gene disrupted mice (mdr1a(-/-) mice) and wild type mice (mdr1a(+/+) mice) were used to develop a method for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function imaging non-invasively and to study the effect of a P-gp reversal agent on its function in vivo. 2 [C-11]verapamil (0.1 mg/kg) was administ

  13. Fast radiation mediated shocks and supernova shock breakouts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple analytic model for the structure of non-relativistic and relativistic radiation mediated shocks. At shock velocities \\beta_s\\equiv v_s/c\\gtrsim 0.1, the shock transition region is far from thermal equilibrium, since the transition crossing time is too short for the production of a black-body photon density (by Bremsstrahlung emission). In this region, electrons and photons (and positrons) are in Compton (pair) equilibrium at temperatures T_s significantly exceeding the far downstream temperature, T_s\\gg T_d\\approx 2(\\varepsilon n_u \\hbar^3c^3)^{1/4}. T_s\\gtrsim 10 keV is reached at shock velocities \\beta_s\\approx 0.2. At higher velocities, \\beta_s\\gtrsim0.6, the plasma is dominated in the transition region by e^\\pm pairs and 60 keV\\lesssim T_s \\lesssim 200 keV. We argue that the spectrum emitted during the breaking out of supernova shocks from the stellar envelopes (or the surrounding winds) of Blue Super Giants and Wolf-Rayet stars, which reach \\beta_s>0.1 for reasonable stellar parameter...

  14. The Very Early Light Curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442: A Possible Detection of Shock-Heated Cooling Emission and Constraints on SN Ia Progenitor System

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Myungshin; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat A; Monard, Libert A G; Sung, Hyun-Il

    2015-01-01

    The main progenitor candidate of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is white dwarfs in binary systems where the companion star is another white dwarf (double degenerate system) or a less evolved non-degenerate star with R* >~ 0.1 Rsun (single degenerate system), but no direct observational evidence exists that tells which progenitor system is more common. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion can be used to set a limit on the progenitor size, R*. Here, we report a high cadence monitoring observation of SN 2015F, a normal SN Ia, in the galaxy NGC 2442 starting about 84 days before the first light time. With our daily cadence data, we catch the emergence of the radioactively powered light curve, but more importantly detect with a > 97.4% confidence a possible dim precursor emission that appears at roughly 1.5 days before the rise of the radioactively powered emission. The signal is consistent with theoretical expectations for a progenitor system involving a companion st...

  15. Molecular gas chemistry in AGN. II. High-resolution imaging of SiO emission in NGC1068: shocks or XDR?

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Burillo, S; Fuente, A; Martin-Pintado, J; Boone, F; Aalto, S; Krips, M; Neri, R; Schinnerer, E; Tacconi, L J

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of a multi-species survey of line emission from the molecular gas in the circum-nuclear disk (CND) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC1068. Single-dish observations have provided evidence that the abundance of silicon monoxide(SiO) in the CND of NGC1068 is enhanced by 3-4 orders of magnitude with respect to the values typically measured in quiescent molecular gas in the Galaxy. We aim at unveiling the mechanism(s) underlying the SiO enhancement. We have imaged with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer the emission of the SiO(2-1) and CN(2--1) lines in NGC1068 at 150pc and 60pc spatial resolution, respectively. We have also obtained complementary IRAM 30m observations of HNCO and methanol (CH3OH) lines. SiO is detected in a disk of 400pc size around the AGN. SiO abundances in the CND of (1-5)xE-09 are about 1-2 orders of magnitude above those measured in the starburst ring. The overall abundance of CN in the CND is high: (0.2-1)xE-07. The abundances of SiO and CN are enhanced at the extreme veloc...

  16. Diffusive shock acceleration at laser driven shocks: studying cosmic-ray accelerators in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Reville, B; Gregori, G

    2012-01-01

    The non-thermal particle spectra responsible for the emission from many astrophysical systems are thought to originate from shocks via a first order Fermi process otherwise known as diffusive shock acceleration. The same mechanism is also widely believed to be responsible for the production of high energy cosmic rays. With the growing interest in collisionless shock physics in laser produced plasmas, the possibility of reproducing and detecting shock acceleration in controlled laboratory experiments should be considered. The various experimental constraints that must be satisfied are reviewed. It is demonstrated that several currently operating laser facilities may fulfil the necessary criteria to confirm the occurrence of diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at laser produced shocks. Successful reproduction of Fermi acceleration in the laboratory could open a range of possibilities, providing insight into the complex plasma processes that occur near astrophysical sources of cosmic rays.

  17. Global CO{sub 2} emissions 2015. Trend reversion is still waiting, despite hopeful approaches; Weltweite CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2015. Trendwende laesst trotz hoffnungsvoller Ansaetze nach wie vor auf sich warten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziesing, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-15

    By 2015, global CO{sub 2} emissions were virtually unchanged from 2014 according to provisional calculations. On the whole, a slight increase may have resulted, which has slowed the growth of the past few years. In the previous year alone, the weakest growth since the beginning of the century had been recorded, with only 0.7% of the upturn (with the exception of the crises in 2008/2009). As a result, CO{sub 2} emissions in 2015 were only slightly higher than in the previous year, at 33.1 billion tonnes. A global trend reversal is still likely, but the CO{sub 2} emissions have declined in many countries, particularly in some industrialized countries. [German] Im Jahr 2015 haben sich die weltweiten CO{sub 2}-Emissionen nach vorlaeufigen Berechnungen gegenueber 2014 praktisch nicht veraendert. Insgesamt duerfte sich allenfalls ein leichtes Plus ergeben haben, womit der Zuwachs der vergangenen Jahre erneut gebremst wurde. Schon im Vorjahr war mit einem Plus von nur 0,7 % der bis dahin (mit Ausnahme der Krisenjahre 2008/2009) schwaechste Anstieg seit Beginn des Jahrhunderts zu verzeichnen gewesen. Im Ergebnis blieben die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2015 mit reichlich 33,1 Mrd. t nur geringfuegig ueber dem Niveau des Vorjahres. Eine weltweite Trendwende steht wohl noch nach wie vor aus, doch sind immerhin die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in zahlreichen Laendern, insbesondere in etlichen Industrielaendern, gesunken.

  18. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2015-01-01

    We explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud of fossil relativistic electrons in the cluster periphery. Such a scenario could explain uniformity of the surface brightness and spectral curvature in the integrated spectra of thin arc-like radio relics. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. The surface brightness profile of radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated as well. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed $u_s \\sim 3,000 \\kms$ and sonic Mach number $M_s \\sim 3$. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over $(0.1-10) \

  19. Characteristics of Spherical Shock Wave and Circular Pulse Jet Generated by Discharge of Propagating Shock Wave at Open End of Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsukasa Irie; Tsuyoshi Yasunobu; Hideo Kashimura; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    When the shock wave propagating in the straight circular tube reaches at the open end, the impulsive wave is generated by the emission of a shock wave from an open end, and unsteady pulse jet is formed near the open end behind the impulsive wave under the specific condition. The pulse jet transits to spherical shock wave with the increase in the strength of shock wave. The strength is dependent on the Mach number of shock wave, which attenuates by propagation distance from the open end. In this study, the mechanism of generating the unsteady pulse jet, the characteristics of the pressure distribution in the flow field and the emission of shock wave from straight circular tube which has the infinite flange at open end are analyzed numerically by the TVD method. Strength of spherical shock wave, relation of shock wave Mach number, distance decay of spherical shock wave and directional characteristics are clarified.

  20. Giant Shocks in the Fermi Bubbles and the Origin of the Microwave Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Roland M.; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Taylor, Andrew; Carretti, Ettore

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of γ-ray data provided by the Fermi-LAT has revealed giant, hard-spectrum γ-ray lobes emanating from the Galactic nucleus (and extending to |b| ˜ 50°). These `Fermi Bubbles' have hard-spectrum, total-intensity microwave (˜20-40 GHz) counterparts in their lower reaches (the microwave `Haze' extending to |b| ˜ 35°) and, on large scales, are subsumed by steep spectrum, polarised radio (2-20 GHz) structures (the `S-PASS Lobes' extending to |b| ˜ 60°). We present a unified model for these disparate, non-thermal phenomena in which the Bubbles are inflated by a wind driven by star formation in the central molecular zone of the Galactic Center. Giant reverse shocks located ~1 kpc above and below the nucleus in the interior of the Bubbles accelerate relativistic electrons, accounting for the microwave haze associated with them. The γ-rays are produced by hadronic emission through shock accelerated relativistic protons interacting with dense, thermally unstable clouds within the Bubbles but concentrated near their edges. The Bubbles are currently slowly expanding, with ages of a few x 100 Myr. Lower energy, non-thermal electrons accelerated at the shocks reach the edges of the Bubbles and escape from their upper regions accounting for the steep spectrum, polarized radio emission covering the Bubbles and extending beyond them at high Galactic latitudes.

  1. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities.

  2. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  3. Non-thermal emission from Massive Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R; Hoare, M G

    2009-01-01

    In the young stellar object (YSO) phase of their lives, massive stars drive bi-polar molecular outflows. These outflows produce beautiful, often hourglass shaped, cavities. The central star possesses a powerful stellar wind (v ~ 2000 km s^-1), and possibly a dense equatorial disk wind (v ~ 400 km s^-1), which collide with the inner surface of the bi-polar cavity and produces hot (T ~ 10^5 - 10^8 K) shocked plasma. A reverse shock is formed at the point where the ram pressure between the preshock flow balances the thermal pressure of the postshock flow and provides a site for the acceleration of non-thermal particles to relativistic energies. Hydrodynamical models of the wind interaction, coupled with calculations of the non-thermal energy spectrum, are used to explore the observable synchrotron and gamma-ray emission from these objects.

  4. Shocked and Scorched: A GREAT Investigation of [CII] and [OI] emission from free-floating Evaporating Gas Globules in Massive Star Formation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    We propose to use GREAT in order to observe [CII]158 micron and [OI]63 micron emission towards 3 select members of a new class of tadpole-shaped free-floating evaporating gas globules (frEGGs) in two massive star-formation regions. Since discovering the most prominent member of this class in an HST imaging survey, we have now identified substantial populations of such objects in several massive star-forming regions using Spitzer IRAC 8 micron images. By virtue of their distinct, isolated morphologies, frEGGs are ideal astrophysical laboratories for probing star formation in irradiated environments. Our molecular-line observations (CO, 13CO J=2-1 & HCO+ J=3-2) reveal the presence of dense molecular cores associated with these objects, with total masses of cool ( 15 K) molecular gas exceeding 0.5-3 Msun, and our radio continuum imaging reveals bright photo-ionized peripheries around these objects. This pilot study will allow us to determine the mass of warm (few 100 K) atomic gas which must exist in photodissociation regions surrounding the molecular gas in frEGGs. The line profiles will be used to probe the photoevaporative flow that is expected to drive the evolution of these objects. We will use sophisticated 3-D numerical simulations of dynamical and chemical evolution of dense, irradiated globules to reproduce our SOFIA data and additional existing multiwavelength data on frEGGs. Our proposed study will pave the way for a larger [CII] survey of frEGGs that will lead to new insights into the complex star formation process under the influence of the harsh ionizing radiation from massive stars.

  5. Gamow Vectors Explain the Shock "Batman" Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Conti, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The description of shock waves beyond the shock point is a challenge in nonlinear physics. Finding solutions to the global dynamics of dispersive shock waves is not always possible due to the lack of integrability. Here we propose a new method based on the eigenstates (Gamow vectors) of a reversed harmonic oscillator in a rigged Hilbert space. These vectors allow analytical formulation for the development of undular bores of shock waves in a nonlinear nonlocal medium. Experiments by a photothermal induced nonlinearity confirm theoretical predictions: as the undulation period as a function of power and the characteristic quantized decays of Gamow vectors. Our results demonstrate that Gamow vector are a novel and effective paradigm for describing extreme nonlinear phenomena.

  6. Gamow vectors explain the shock profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Conti, Claudio

    2016-09-19

    The description of shock waves beyond the shock point is a challenge in nonlinear physics and optics. Finding solutions to the global dynamics of dispersive shock waves is not always possible due to the lack of integrability. Here we propose a new method based on the eigenstates (Gamow vectors) of a reversed harmonic oscillator in a rigged Hilbert space. These vectors allow analytical formulation for the development of undular bores of shock waves in a nonlinear nonlocal medium. Experiments by a photothermal induced nonlinearity confirm theoretical predictions: the undulation period as a function of power and the characteristic quantized decays of Gamow vectors. Our results demonstrate that Gamow vectors are a novel and effective paradigm for describing extreme nonlinear phenomena.

  7. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  8. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  9. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Raymond, John C; Williams, Brian J; Blair, William P; Borkowski, Kazimierz J; Gaetz, Terrance J; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV $\\lambda$1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10" behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25" behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  10. Reversible Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  11. Internal shock model for Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Spruit, H C; Kaiser, Christian R.; Sunyaev, Rashid; Spruit, Henk C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for the radio outbursts of microquasars based on the assumption of quasi-continuous jet ejection. The jets are `lit up' by shock fronts traveling along the jets during outbursts. The observed comparatively flat decay light curves combined with gradually steepening spectral slopes are explained by a superposition of the radiation of the aging relativistic particle population left behind by the shocks. This scenario is the low energy, time-resolved equivalent to the internal shock model for GRBs. We show that this model predicts energy contents of the radiating plasma similar to the plasmon model. At the same time, the jet model relaxes the severe requirements on the central source in terms of the rate at which this energy must be supplied to the jet. Observations of `mini-bursts' with flat spectral slopes and of infrared emission far from the source centre suggest two different states of jet ejections: (i) A `mini-burst' mode with relatively stable jet production and weak radio emission with...

  12. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-10

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large-scale structure of the universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfvenic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model, the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number M{sub s} , while the MFA factor depends on the Alfvenic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at {approx}20% of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with M{sub s} {approx}> 10. In the test-particle regime (M{sub s} {approx}< 3), it is expected that the magnetic field is not amplified and the Alfvenic drift effects are insignificant, although relevant plasma physical processes at low Mach number shocks remain largely uncertain.

  13. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of shock-wave induced decomposition in cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystals: anisotropic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Nhan C; Dreger, Zbigniew A; Gupta, Yogendra M; Hooks, Daniel E

    2010-11-04

    Plate impact experiments on the (210), (100), and (111) planes were performed to examine the role of crystalline anisotropy on the shock-induced decomposition of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystals. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy was used to probe the decomposition of single crystals shocked to peak stresses ranging between 7 and 20 GPa. Emission produced by decomposition intermediates was analyzed in terms of induction time to emission, emission intensity, and the emission spectra shapes as a function of stress and time. Utilizing these features, we found that the shock-induced decomposition of RDX crystals exhibits considerable anisotropy. Crystals shocked on the (210) and (100) planes were more sensitive to decomposition than crystals shocked on the (111) plane. The possible sources of the observed anisotropy are discussed with regard to the inelastic deformation mechanisms of shocked RDX. Our results suggest that, despite the anisotropy observed for shock initiation, decomposition pathways for all three orientations are similar.

  14. Evidence for a thermally unstable shock wave in the VELA supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Wallerstein, George; Balick, Bruce

    1991-12-01

    The emission and absorption line signatures of supernova remnant shock waves provide complementary diagnostic capabilities. This paper presents IUE spectra of the nebulosity and new spectra of HD 72088. Models of the emission and absorption lines from shocked gas are used to derive a shock velocity and elemental depletions. There is evidence from the absorption-line strengths and widths for thermally unstable cooling behind a 150 km/s shock. The shock velocity and swept-up column density estimates of Wallerstein and Balick (1990) are confirmed, and evidence is found for a nonthermal contribution to the pressure.

  15. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  16. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  17. X-Ray and Radio Emission from the Luminous Supernova 2005kd

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V; Reddy, R; Bauer, F E

    2016-01-01

    SN 2005kd is among the most luminous supernovae (SNe) to be discovered at X-ray wavelengths. We have re-analysed all good angular resolution (better than $20"$ FWHM PSF) archival X-ray data for SN 2005kd. The data reveal an X-ray light curve that decreases as t$^{-1.62 \\pm 0.06}$. Our modelling of the data suggests that the early evolution is dominated by emission from the forward shock in a high-density medium. Emission from the radiative reverse shock is absorbed by the cold dense shell formed behind the reverse shock. Our results suggest a progenitor with a mass-loss rate towards the end of its evolution of $\\ge$ 4.3 $\\times$ 10$^{-4} M_{\\odot} \\,{\\rm yr}^{-1}$, for a wind velocity of 10 km s$^{-1}$, at 4.0 $\\times$ 10$^{16}$ cm. This mass-loss rate is too high for most known stars, except perhaps hypergiant stars. A higher wind velocity would lead to a correspondingly higher mass-loss rate. A Luminous Blue Variable star undergoing a giant eruption could potentially fulfill this requirement, but would need...

  18. Differences between left and right ventricular anatomy determine the types of reentrant circuits induced by an external electric shock. A rabbit heart simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Blanca; Eason, James C; Trayanova, Natalia

    2006-01-01

    Despite the fact that elucidating the mechanisms of cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks is crucial to understanding why defibrillation shocks fail, important aspects of cardiac vulnerability remain unknown. This research utilizes a novel anatomically based bidomain finite-element model of the rabbit ventricles to investigate the effect of shock polarity reversal on the reentrant activity induced by an external defibrillation-strength shock in the paced ventricles. The specific goal of the study is to examine how differences between left and right ventricular chamber anatomy result in differences in the types of reentrant circuits established by the shock. Truncated exponential monophasic shocks of duration 8 ms were delivered via two external electrodes at various timings. Vulnerability grids were constructed for shocks of reversed polarity (referred to as RV- or LV- when either the RV or the LV electrode is a cathode). Our results demonstrate that reversing electrode polarity from RV- to LV- changes the dominant type of post-shock reentry: it is figure-of-eight for RV- and quatrefoil for LV- shocks. Differences in secondary types of post-shock arrhythmia also occur following shock polarity reversal. These effects of polarity reversal are primarily due to the fact that the LV wall is thicker than the RV, resulting in a post-shock excitable gap that is predominantly within the LV wall for RV- shocks and in the septum for LV- shocks.

  19. Numerical simulations of Mach stem formation via intersecting bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E. C.; Frank, A.; Hartigan, P.; Yirak, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of Hα emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter Hα emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic "bullets" or "clumps". Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index γ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and observational consequences of bow shock intersections including the formation of Mach stems.

  20. Heat shock factor 1 prevents the reduction in thrashing due to heat shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2015-07-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) is activated by heat stress and induces the expression of heat shock proteins. However, the role of HSF-1 in thermotolerance remains unclear. We previously reported that heat stress reversibly reduces thrashing movement in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we analyzed the function of HSF-1 on thermotolerance by monitoring thrashing movement. hsf-1 RNAi suppressed the restoration of thrashing reduced by heat stress. In contrast, hsf-1 knockdown cancelled prevention of movement reduction in insulin/IGF-1-like growth factor 1 receptor (daf-2) mutant, but didn't suppress thrashing restoration in daf-2 mutant. In addition, hsf-1 RNAi accelerated the reduction of thrashing in heat-shocked wild-type C. elegans. And, daf-16 KO didn't accelerate the reduction of thrashing by heat stress. Taken together, these results suggest that HSF-1 prevents the reduction of thrashing caused by heat shock.

  1. Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks in X-rays - a Review

    CERN Document Server

    ud-Doula, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  2. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pon, A; Kaufman, M J

    2012-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence and simulations of MHD turbulence show that these supersonic motions decay in roughly a crossing time, which is less than the estimated lifetimes of molecular clouds. Such a situation requires a significant release of energy. We run models of C-type shocks propagating into gas with densities around 10^3 cm^(-3) at velocities of a few km / s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with shock cooling of turbulent molecular clouds. We find that these shocks dissipate their energy primarily through CO rotational transitions and by compressing pre-existing magnetic fields. We present model spectra for these shocks and by combining these models with estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation, we show that shock emission should dominate over emission from unshocked gas for mid to high rotational transitions (J >5) of CO. ...

  3. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  4. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  5. Time-dependent pressure distribution in microstructured shocked materials using fluorescent dye probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We have used fluorescent probes for time-resolved microscopy of shocked particulate media. By embedding rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in silica nano- and micro-particles, we have created superemissive ultrafast pressure probes. We used silica-embedded dye particles to obtain stroboscopic fluorescence images of shocked sand-like media. Shock effects on microstructured media and micropressure distributions can be determined from shock-induced emission intensity loss, with high time and space resolution.

  6. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2006-01-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from few GeV to >10^{20} eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) "afterglows" provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars, and their "afterglows," delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of gamma-rays, are produced by relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Some of the striking characteristics of these shocks include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ...

  7. The Maximum Energy of Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Arons, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock, that propagates with relativistic velocities into the magnetized interstellar medium. By means of multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the acceleration performance of weakly magnetized relativistic shocks, in the magnetization range 0shock magnetic field is orthogonal to the flow, as generically expected for relativistic shocks. We find that relativistic perpendicular shocks propagating in electron-positron plasmas are efficient particle accelerators if the magnetization is sigma<1e-3. For electron-ion plasmas, the transition to efficient acceleration occurs for sigma<3e-5. Here, the acceleration process proceeds similarly for the two species, since the electrons enter the shock nearly in equipartition with the ions, as a result of strong pre-heating in the self-generated upstream turbulence. In both...

  8. XMM-Newtonlarge programme on SN1006 - II. Thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Decourchelle, Anne; Miceli, Marco; Vink, Jacco; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Based on the XMM-Newton large programme on SN1006 and our newly developed tools for spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis as described in Li et al. (Paper I), we study the thermal emission from interstellar medium (ISM) and ejecta of SN1006 by analysing the spectra extracted from 583 tessellated regions dominated by thermal emission. With some key improvements in spectral analysis as compared to Paper I, we obtain much better spectral fitting results with significantly less residuals. The spatial distributions of the thermal and ionization states of the ISM and ejecta show significantly different features, which are in general consistent with a scenario that the ISM (ejecta) is heated and ionized by the forward (reverse) shock propagating outward (inward). Different heavy elements show different spatial distributions so different origins, with Ne mostly from the ISM, Si and S mostly from the ejecta, and O and Mg from both the ISM and ejecta. Fe L-shell line emissions are only detected in a small shell-like region south-east (SE) to the centre of SN1006, indicating that most of the Fe-rich ejecta has not yet or just recently been reached by the reverse shock. The overall abundance patterns of the ejecta for most of the heavy elements, except for Fe and sometimes for S, are consistent with typical Type Ia SN products. The north-west (NW) half of the supernova remnant interior between the NW shell and the soft X-ray brighter SE half probably represents a region with turbulently mixed ISM and ejecta, so has enhanced emission from O, Mg, Si, and S, lower ejecta temperature, and a large diversity of ionization age. In addition to the asymmetric ISM distribution, an asymmetric explosion of the progenitor star is also needed to explain the asymmetric ejecta distribution.

  9. MODELING THE EARLY MULTIWAVELENGTH EMISSION IN GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, DF 04510, México (Mexico); Veres, P., E-mail: nifraija@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: wlee@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: pv0004@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV γ-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hr. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of 7.03 ± 0.03 in the time interval from 9.31 to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r band. We study the origin of the GeV γ-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray, and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation, and the 95 GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the high-altitude water Cerenkov observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT peak and the bright optical flash are explained through synchrotron self-Compton and synchrotron emission from the reverse shock, respectively, when the ejecta evolves in the thick-shell regime and carries a significant magnetic field.

  10. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  11. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  12. X-rays from Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks: Effect of Cooling-Regulated Shock Retreat

    CERN Document Server

    ud-Doula, Asif; Townsend, Richard; Petit, Veronique; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    We use 2D MHD simulations to examine the effects of radiative cooling and inverse Compton (IC) cooling on X-ray emission from magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS) in magnetic massive stars with radiatively driven stellar winds. For the standard dependence of mass loss rate on luminosity $\\Mdot \\sim L^{1.7} $, the scaling of IC cooling with $L$ and radiative cooling with $\\Mdot$ means that IC cooling become formally more important for lower luminosity stars. However, because the sense of the trends is similar, we find the overall effect of including IC cooling is quite modest. More significantly, for stars with high enough mass loss to keep the shocks radiative, the MHD simulations indicate a linear scaling of X-ray luminosity with mass loss rate; but for lower luminosity stars with weak winds, X-ray emission is reduced and softened by a {\\em shock retreat} resulting from the larger post-shock cooling length, which within the fixed length of a closed magnetic loop forces the shock back to lower pre-shock w...

  13. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M = 3.0 ± 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M ≈ 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 ± 0.7) × 103 km s-1. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  14. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    CERN Document Server

    Dasadia, Sarthak; Sarazin, Craig; Morandi, Andrea; Markevitch, Maxim; Wik, Daniel; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele; Govoni, Federica; Vacca, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) \\chandra\\ observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of $M$ = 3.0 $\\pm$ 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell~665 the second cluster where a strong merger shock of $M \\approx$ 3 has been detected, after the Bullet cluster. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 $\\pm$ 0.7) $\\times$ 10$^3$ km sec$^{-1}$. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front, with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  15. Ambient magnetic field amplification in shock fronts of relativistic jets: an application to GRB afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, G Rocha; Kowal, G; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2014-01-01

    Strong downstream magnetic fields of order of $\\sim 1$G, with large correlation lengths, are believed to cause the large synchrotron emission at the afterglow phase of gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Despite of the recent theoretical efforts, models have failed to fully explain the amplification of the magnetic field, particularly in a matter dominated scenario. We revisit the problem by considering the synchrotron emission to occur at the expanding shock front of a weakly magnetized relativistic jet over a magnetized surrounding medium. Analytical estimates and a number of high resolution 2D relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (RMHD) simulations are provided. Jet opening angles of $\\theta = 0^{\\circ} - 20^{\\circ}$, and ambient to jet density ratios of $10^{-4} - 10^2$ were considered. We found that most of the amplification is due to compression of the ambient magnetic field at the contact discontinuity between the reverse and forward shocks at the jet head, with substantial pile-up of the magnetic field lines as t...

  16. Pioneer 10 studies of interplanetary shocks at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Pioneer 10 Ames plasma analyzer data collected in the 6.1 to 12.6 AU range of heliocentric distances (November 1974 to April 1977) have been examined for interplanetary shock waves. Eighteen shock signatures have been identified, with four of these being of the reverse type and the remainder the forward type. Sonic Mach numbers in the range from 3 to 10 are estimated for these events.

  17. Swift Observations of Shock Evolution in RS Ophiuchi

    CERN Document Server

    Bode, M F; Page, K L; Beardmore, A P; O'Brien, T J; Ness, J -U; Starrfield, S; Skinner, G K; Darnley, M J; Drake, J J; Evans, A; Eyres, S P S; Krautter, J; Schwarz, G

    2008-01-01

    Our \\textit{Swift} observations of RS Oph form an unprecedented X-ray dataset to undertake investigations of both the central source and the interaction of the outburst ejecta with the circumstellar environment. Over the first month, the XRT data are dominated by emission from rapidly evolving shocks. We discuss the differences in derived parameters from those found for \\textit{RXTE} at early times and the evolution of the X-ray emission to much later times. It is apparent that at late times several emission components are present. We find no strong evidence of the proposed shock break-out in our data.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Mach Stem Formation via Intersecting Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Edward C; Hartigan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of H$\\alpha$ emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter H$\\alpha$ emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic "bullets" or "clumps". Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index $\\gamma$ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and obse...

  19. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... en español Síndrome de shock tóxico About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious ...

  20. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  1. Chiral Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Srimoyee

    2016-01-01

    We study shock waves in relativistic chiral matter. We argue that the conventional Rankine- Hugoinot relations are modified due to the presence of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the entropy discontinuity in a weak shock wave is linearly proportional to the pressure discontinuity when the effect of chiral transport becomes sufficiently large. We also show that rarefaction shock waves, which do not exist in usual nonchiral fluids, can appear in chiral matter. These features are exemplified by shock propagation in dense neutrino matter in the hydrodynamic regime.

  2. Study of astrophysical collisionless shocks at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Higginson, D. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Swadling, G. F.; Wilks, S. C.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Petrasso, R.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lamb, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Manuel, M.; Froula, D.; Fiuza, F.

    2016-10-01

    High Mach number astrophysical plasmas can create collisionless shocks via plasma instabilities and turbulence that are responsible for magnetic field generations and cosmic ray acceleration. Recently, many laboratory experiments were successful to observe the Weibel instabilities and self-generated magnetic fields using high-power lasers that generated interpenetrating plasma flows. In order to create a fully formed shock, a series of NIF experiments have begun. The characteristics of flow interaction have been diagnosed by the neutrons and protons generated via beam-beam deuteron interactions, the x-ray emission from the hot plasmas and proton probe generated by imploding DHe3 capsules. This paper will present the latest results from the NIF collisionless shock experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number Ms, while the MFA factor depends on the Alfv'enic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfv'en speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock C...

  4. Observations of X-rays and Thermal Dust Emission from the Supernova Remnant Kes 75

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, T D; Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P; Helfand, D J; Gaensler, B M; Hughes, J P

    2007-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the composite Galactic supernova remnant Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). We use the detected flux at 24 microns and hot gas parameters from fitting spectra from new, deep X-ray observations to constrain models of dust emission, obtaining a dust-to-gas mass ratio M_dust/M_gas ~0.001. We find that a two-component thermal model, nominally representing shocked swept-up interstellar or circumstellar material and reverse-shocked ejecta, adequately fits the X-ray spectrum, albeit with somewhat high implied densities for both components. We surmise that this model implies a Wolf-Rayet progenitor for the remnant. We also present infrared flux upper limits for the central pulsar wind nebula.

  5. Shocked molecular hydrogen in the bipolar outflow NGC 2071

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, M.G. (Edinburgh Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astronomy; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Moffett Field, CA (USA). Ames Research Center); Geballe, T.R. (Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, Hawaii (USA); Foundation for Astronomical Research in the Netherlands (ASTRON)); Brand, P.W.J.L. (Edinburgh Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astronomy)

    1989-06-15

    Emission from the 4u = 1 - 0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen has been mapped in the bipolar outflow NGC 2071. The line emission peaks at six positions distributed irregularly along the two lobes, which extend over a distance of {similar to} 1 pc. These lobes are parallel to, but offset {similar to} 20 arcsec from, the lobes of high-velocity CO line emission. Spectra from 2.1 to 2.45 {mu}m of the H{sub 2} emission lines are typical of shock-excited emission. The total H{sub 2} line luminosity is estimated to be {similar to} 4.5 time the solar luminosity. Profiles of the 1-0 S(1) line are relatively narrow (< 30 km s{sup -1} FWHM) for shocked gas. The peak velocity varies systematically across the source, in a manner consistent with the observed bipolarity of the millimetre-wave CO line emission. (author).

  6. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  7. The MAPPINGS III Library of Fast Radiative Shock Models

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Mark G; Dopita, Michael A; Sutherland, Ralph S; Kewley, Lisa J

    2008-01-01

    We present a new library of fully-radiative shock models calculated with the MAPPINGS III shock and photoionization code. The library consists of grids of models with shock velocities in the range v=100-1000 km/s and magnetic parameters B/sqrt(n) of 10^-4 - 10 muG cm^(3/2) for five different atomic abundance sets, and for a pre-shock density of 1.0 cm^(-3). Additionally, Solar abundance model grids have been calculated for densities of 0.01, 0.1, 10, 100, and 1000 cm^(-3) with the same range in v and B/sqrt(n). Each model includes components of both the radiative shock and its photoionized precursor, ionized by the EUV and soft X-ray radiation generated in the radiative gas. We present the details of the ionization structure, the column densities, and the luminosities of the shock and its precursor. Emission line ratio predictions are separately given for the shock and its precursor as well as for the composite shock+precursor structure to facilitate comparison with observations in cases where the shock and i...

  8. Reversed Doppler effect in photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D

    2003-09-26

    Nonrelativistic reversed Doppler shifts have never been observed in nature and have only been speculated to occur in pathological systems with simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability. This Letter presents a different, new physical phenomenon that leads to a nonrelativistic reversed Doppler shift in light. It arises when light is reflected from a moving shock wave propagating through a photonic crystal. In addition to reflection of a single frequency, multiple discrete reflected frequencies or a 10 GHz periodic modulation can also be observed when a single carrier frequency of wavelength 1 microm is incident.

  9. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  10. [Historical vision of shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock.

  11. [Shock waves in orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, G

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have revolutionized urological stone treatment. Nowadays shock waves are widely used in orthopedics, too. This article reviews the applications of extracorporeal shock waves on bone and adjacent soft tissue. The osteoneogenetic effect of extracorporeal shock waves has been proven and can be used to treat pseudarthrosis with a success rate of around 75%. Shock waves have a positive effect in tennis and golfer's elbow, calcaneal spur, and the complex called "periarthritis humero-scapularis." The mechanism for this is not yet known, and results from large prospective and randomized studies are still lacking. However, the treatment has been performed many thousands of times. In patients in whom conservative treatment has failed surgery used to be the only choice, but its success rate barely exceeds that of shock wave therapy and surgery can still be done if shock wave therapy fails. Extracorporeal shock waves will have an impact on orthopedics comparable to its effect in urology. Scientific evaluations, professional certifications, quality assurance and reimbursement issues present great challenges.

  12. The Shock Routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hooren, Franca; Kaasch, Alexandra; Starke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden over the course of four global economic shocks, we ask whether the notion of critical junctures is useful in understanding the nature of change triggered by crisis. The main empirical finding is that fundamental change in the aftermath of an exogenous shock...

  13. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    2014-01-01

    shocks? In this text we exchange personal experiences of cinematic shocks and ponder over these questions as related to wider theories on human trauma, emancipation, and enlightenment. In conclusion we argue for a revision of anthropological notions of validity in terms of the efficacy of the cinematic...

  14. Spectral and Polarization Signatures of Relativistic Shocks in Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic shocks are one of the most plausible sites of the emission of strongly variable, polarized multi-wavelength emission from relativistic jet sources such as blazars, via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of relativistic particles. This paper summarizes recent results on a self-consistent coupling of diffusive shock acceleration and radiation transfer in blazar jets. We demonstrate that the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars strongly constrain the nature of hydromagnetic turbulence responsible for pitch-angle scattering by requiring a strongly energy-dependent pitch-angle mean free path. The prominent soft X-ray excess ("Big Blue Bump") in the SED of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 can be modelled as the signature of bulk Compton scattering of external radiation fields by the thermal electron population, which places additional constraints on the level of hydromagnetic turbulence. It has further been demonstrated that internal shocks propagating in a jet pervaded by a helical ma...

  15. Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Shocked Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Ellison, D C; Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    There has recently been interest in the role of inverse bremsstrahlung, the emission of photons by fast suprathermal ions in collisions with ambient electrons possessing relatively low velocities, in tenuous plasmas in various astrophysical contexts. This follows a long hiatus in the application of suprathermal ion bremsstrahlung to astrophysical models since the early 1970s. The potential importance of inverse bremsstrahlung relative to normal bremsstrahlung, i.e. where ions are at rest, hinges upon the underlying velocity distributions of the interacting species. In this paper, we identify the conditions under which the inverse bremsstrahlung emissivity is significant relative to that for normal bremsstrahlung in shocked astrophysical plasmas. We determine that, since both observational and theoretical evidence favors electron temperatures almost comparable to, and certainly not very deficient relative to proton temperatures in shocked plasmas, these environments generally render inverse bremsstrahlung at b...

  16. Standing Shocks in Trans-Magnetosonic Accretion Flows onto a Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, M; Fukumura, K; Rilett, D; Tsuruta, S

    2005-01-01

    Fast and slow magnetosonic shock formation is presented for stationary and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) accretion flows onto a black hole. The shocked black hole accretion solution must pass through magnetosonic points at some locations outside and inside the shock location. We analyze critical conditions at the magnetosonic points and the shock conditions. Then, we show the restrictions on the flow parameters for strong shocks. We also show that a very hot shocked plasma is obtained for a very high-energy inflow with small number density. Such a MHD shock can appear very close to the event horizon, and can be expected as a source of high-energy emissions. Examples of these magnetosonic shocks are presented.

  17. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  18. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  19. Disclosure and the Cost of Capital: Evidence from Firms' Responses to the Enron Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Leuz; Catherine Schrand

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the link between disclosure and the cost of capital. We exploit an exogenous cost of capital shock created by the Enron scandal in Fall 2001 and analyze firms' disclosure responses to this shock. These tests are opposite to the typical research design that analyzes cost of capital responses to disclosure changes. In reversing the tests and using an exogenous shock, we mitigate concerns about omitted variables in traditional cross-sectional disclosure studies. We estimate s...

  20. Photon Acceleration at Shock Breakout of Trans-Relativistic Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhuo; Waxman, Eli; Meszaros, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The predicted thermal flash from SN shock breakout might have been detected for the first time by Swift in GRB 060218/SN 2006aj. The detected thermal X-ray emission in this event implies emergence of a trans-relativistic (TR) SN shock with kinetic energy of E_k>1E49 erg. During TRSN shock breakout, the thermal photons could be "accelerated" by the shock through repeated bulk Compton scattering, forming a nonthermal gamma/X-ray component with dominant energy over thermal one. This mechanism of "photon acceleration" at TRSN shock breakout might also account for gamma-rays in the other similar low-luminosity GRBs, implying that they are atypical GRBs with only TR outflows. TRSNe form a peculiar type of SNe with large kinetic energy, >1E49 erg, in TR ejecta, \\Gamma\\beta ~2.

  1. Desorption of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on extracellular polymeric substances: effects of pH, EDTA, Ca(II) and temperature shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoyong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) existed ubiquitously in biological systems affect the mobility and availability of heavy metals in the environments. The adsorption-desorption behaviors of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on EPS were investigated. The sorption rates follow Sb(V) > Hg(II), and the desorption rates follow reverse order. Applications of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), Ca(II) and pH shocks affect desorption rates and desorbed quantities of Hg(II) from EPS-Hg complex. Temperature shock minimally affects the desorption rate of Hg(II). Conversely, the EPS-Sb complex is stable subjected to EDTA, Ca(II), temperature or pH shocks. The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and fast-Fourier (FT-IR) analysis showed that Hg(II) and Sb(V) principally interacted with polysaccharides and protein-like compounds in the EPS, respectively. The EPS-Hg complex presents a time bomb that may release high levels of Hg(II) in short time period under environmental shocks.

  2. Shock Structure and Shock Heating in the Galactic Central Molecular Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Juergen; Jones, Paul; Meier, David S

    2014-01-01

    We present maps of a large number of dense molecular gas tracers across the Central Molecular Zone of our Galaxy. The data were taken with the CSIRO/CASS Mopra telescope in Large Projects in the 1.3cm, 7mm, and 3mm wavelength regimes. Here, we focus on the brightness of the shock tracers SiO and HNCO, molecules that are liberated from dust grains under strong (SiO) and weak (HNCO) shocks. The shocks may have occurred when the gas enters the bar regions and the shock differences could be due to differences in the moving cloud mass. Based on tracers of ionizing photons, it is unlikely that the morphological differences are due to selective photo-dissociation of the molecules. We also observe direct heating of molecular gas in strongly shocked zones, with a high SiO/HNCO ratios, where temperatures are determined from the transitions of ammonia. Strong shocks appear to be the most efficient heating source of molecular gas, apart from high energy emission emitted by the central supermassive black hole Sgr A* and t...

  3. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  4. Thermospheric Nitric Oxide Response to Shock-led Storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipp, D J; Pette, D V; Kilcommons, L M; Isaacs, T L; Cruz, A A; Mlynczak, M G; Hunt, L A; Lin, C Y

    2017-02-01

    We present a multi-year superposed epoch study of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry nitric oxide (NO) emission data. NO is a trace constituent in the thermosphere that acts as cooling agent via infrared (IR) emissions. The NO cooling competes with storm time thermospheric heating resulting in a thermostat effect. Our study of nearly 200 events reveals that shock-led interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are prone to early and excessive thermospheric NO production and IR emissions. Excess NO emissions can arrest thermospheric expansion by cooling the thermosphere during intense storms. The strongest events curtail the interval of neutral density increase and produce a phenomenon known as thermospheric 'overcooling'. We use Defense Meteorological Satellite Program particle precipitation data to show that interplanetary shocks and their ICME drivers can more than double the fluxes of precipitating particles that are known to trigger the production of thermospheric NO. Coincident increases in Joule heating likely amplify the effect. In turn, NO emissions more than double. We discuss the roles and features of shock/sheath structures that allow the thermosphere to temper the effects of extreme storm time energy input and explore the implication these structures may have on mesospheric NO. Shock-driven thermospheric NO IR cooling likely plays an important role in satellite drag forecasting challenges during extreme events.

  5. Impacts of fragmented accretion streams onto classical T Tauri stars: UV and X-ray emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, S.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The accretion process in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) can be studied through the analysis of some UV and X-ray emission lines which trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the post-shock downfalling plasma. In the UV-band, where higher spectral resolution is available, these lines are characterized by rather complex profiles whose origin is still not clear. Aims: We investigate the origin of UV and X-ray emission at impact regions of density structured (fragmented) accretion streams. We study if and how the stream fragmentation and the resulting structure of the post-shock region determine the observed profiles of UV and X-ray emission lines. Methods: We modeled the impact of an accretion stream consisting of a series of dense blobs onto the chromosphere of a CTTS through two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We explored different levels of stream fragmentation and accretion rates. From the model results, we synthesize C IV (1550 Å) and O VIII (18.97 Å) line profiles. Results: The impacts of accreting blobs onto the stellar chromosphere produce reverse shocks propagating through the blobs and shocked upflows. These upflows, in turn, hit and shock the subsequent downfalling fragments. As a result, several plasma components differing for the downfalling velocity, density, and temperature are present altoghether. The profiles of C IV doublet are characterized by two main components: one narrow and redshifted to speed ≈ 50 km s-1 and the other broader and consisting of subcomponents with redshift to speed in the range 200-400 km s-1. The profiles of O VIII lines appear more symmetric than C IV and are redshifted to speed ≈ 150 km s-1. Conclusions: Our model predicts profiles of C IV line remarkably similar to those observed and explains their origin in a natural way as due to stream fragmentation. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  7. MeV Ion Anisotropies in the Vicinity of Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2007-05-01

    The anticipated signatures of interplanetary shock acceleration to be found in energetic ion anisotropies in the vicinity of interplanetary shocks include near-isotropic particle distributions consistent with of diffusive shock acceleration, "pancake" distributions indicative of shock drift acceleration, and flow reversals suggestive of a particle acceleration region passing by the observing spacecraft. In practice, while clear examples of these phenomena exist, more typically, particle anisotropies near interplanetary shocks show considerable variation in time and space, both in individual events and from event to event. We investigate the properties of MeV/n ions in the vicinity of a number of interplanetary shocks associated with the largest energetic particle events of solar cycle 23, and previous cycles, including their intensity-time profiles, anisotropies, and relationship with local solar wind structures, using observations from the IMP 8, ISEE-3, Helios 1 and 3 spacecraft. The aim is to help to understand the role of shocks in major solar energetic particle events.

  8. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  9. A cylindrical converging shock tube for shock-interface studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Si, Ting; Yang, Jiming; Zhai, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    A shock tube facility for generating a cylindrical converging shock wave is developed in this work. Based on the shock dynamics theory, a specific wall profile is designed for the test section of the shock tube to transfer a planar shock into a cylindrical one. The shock front in the converging part obtained from experiment presents a perfect circular shape, which proves the feasibility and reliability of the method. The time variations of the shock strength obtained from numerical simulation, experiment, and theoretical estimation show the desired converging effect in the shock tube test section. Particular emphasis is then placed on the problem of shock-interface interaction induced by cylindrical converging shock waves. For this purpose, membrane-less gas cylinder is adopted to form the interface between two different fluids while the laser sheet technique to visualize the flow field. The result shows that it is convenient to perform such experiments in this facility.

  10. CONSTRAINING GAMMA-RAY BURST EMISSION PHYSICS WITH EXTENSIVE EARLY-TIME, MULTIBAND FOLLOW-UP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucchiara, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Morgan, A.; Perley, D. A.; Li, W.; Butler, N. R.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Melandri, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomicodi Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Saint Lucia) (Italy); Kobayashi, S.; Smith, R. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Steele, I. A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead, CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Hora, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Da Silva, R. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Worseck, G.; Fumagalli, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Milne, P. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Cobb, B., E-mail: acucchia@ucolick.org [Department of Physics, George Washington University, Corcoran 105, 725 21st St, NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); and others

    2011-12-20

    Understanding the origin and diversity of emission processes responsible for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains a pressing challenge. While prompt and contemporaneous panchromatic observations have the potential to test predictions of the internal-external shock model, extensive multiband imaging has been conducted for only a few GRBs. We present rich, early-time, multiband data sets for two Swift events, GRB 110205A and GRB 110213A. The former shows optical emission since the early stages of the prompt phase, followed by the steep rising in flux up to {approx}1000 s after the burst (t{sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} = -6.13 {+-} 0.75). We discuss this feature in the context of the reverse-shock scenario and interpret the following single power-law decay as being forward-shock dominated. Polarization measurements, obtained with the RINGO2 instrument mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, also provide hints on the nature of the emitting ejecta. The latter event, instead, displays a very peculiar optical to near-infrared light curve, with two achromatic peaks. In this case, while the first peak is probably due to the onset of the afterglow, we interpret the second peak to be produced by newly injected material, signifying a late-time activity of the central engine.

  11. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  12. The use of SVAR analysis in determining the effects of fiscal shocks in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafel Ravnik

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use multivariate Blanchard-Perotti SVAR methodology to analyze disaggregated short-term effects of fiscal policy on economic activity, inflation and short-term interest rates. The results suggest that the effects of government expenditure shocks and the shock of government revenues are relatively the highest on interest rates and the lowest on inflation. A tax shock in the short term increases the inflation rate and also decreases the short-term interest rate, and after one year stabilization occurs at the initial level, while spending shock leads to a reverse effect. The effects of fiscal policies on the proxy variable of output, i.e. industrial production, are less economically intuitive, because the shock of expenditure decreases and revenue shock permanently increases industrial production. The empirical result shows that a tax shock has a permanent effect on future taxes; while future levels of government spending are not related to current expenditure shocks. Interactions between the components of fiscal policy are also examined and it is concluded that a tax shock increases expenditures permanently, while an expenditure shock does not significantly affect government revenues, which is consistent with the tendency of growth in public debt. Furthermore, it was found that government revenue and expenditure shocks do not have a mirror effect, which justifies disaggregated analysis of fiscal policy shocks.

  13. Collisionless Weibel shocks and electron acceleration in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lembége, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    A study of collisionless external shocks in gamma-ray bursts is presented. The shock structure, electromagnetic fields, and process of electron acceleration are assessed by using a self-consistent 3D particle-in-cell simulation. In accordance with hydrodynamic shock systems, the formed shock is composed of a forward and reverse shock separated by a contact discontinuity. The establishment of the shock transitions is controlled by the ion Weibel instability. The ion filaments are sources the strong transversal electromagnetic fields at the two sides of the double shock structure with a length about 30-100 ion skin depths. In regard to the electrons, they are heated up to a maximum energy $\\epsilon_{ele}\\approx \\sqrt{\\epsilon_b}$ (normalized to the total incoming energy). Moreover, the jet electrons behind the reverse shock are trapped due to the presence of an ambipolar electric field accompanying with reflection by the strong transversal magnetic fields in the shocked region. In a similar process to the shock...

  14. Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia and Cardiogenic Shock due to Scorpion Envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of severe scorpion envenomation in an adult patient, with the presence of very rapid sustained ventricular tachycardia followed by cardiogenic shock, which was reversed by scorpion antivenom administration. Scorpion venom causes cardiac changes that can lead to an environment favoring arrhythmogenesis.

  15. Collisionless parallel shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

  16. Shock structures of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Kleimann, Jens; Wiengarten, Tobias; Bomans, Dominik J; Weis, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytic...

  17. Counseling For Future Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lewis B.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the author looks at some of the searing prophecies made by Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock and relates them to the world of the professional counselor and the clientele the counselor attempts to serve. (Author)

  18. Diagnosing radiative shocks from deuterium and tritium implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, A; Divol, L; Weber, S; Döppner, T; Kyrala, G A; Kilne, J; Izumi, N; Glenn, S; Ma, T; Town, R P; Bradley, D K; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    During the recent ignition tuning campaign at the National Ignition Facility, layered cryogenic deuterium and tritium capsules were imploded via x-ray driven ablation. The hardened gated x-ray imager diagnostic temporally and spatially resolves the x-ray emission from the core of the capsule implosion at energies above ~8 keV. On multiple implosions, ~200-400 ps after peak compression a spherically expanding radiative shock has been observed. This paper describes the methods used to characterize the radial profile and rate of expansion of the shock induced x-ray emission.

  19. Electrochromic Variable-Emissivity Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David; Cogan, Stuart F.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature controlled by altering infrared radiative properties. Infrared emissivity of electrochromically active layer changed by applying voltage to insert or remove Li atoms electrochemically. Change reversible and continuously variable between specified limits of layered structure.

  20. [Pathophysiology of hemorragic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copotoiu, R; Cinca, E; Collange, O; Levy, F; Mertes, P-M

    2016-11-01

    This review addresses the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock, a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume, which may lead to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion, cellular hypoxia, organ damage, and death. The initial neuroendocrine response is mainly a sympathetic activation. Haemorrhagic shock is associated altered microcirculatory permeability and visceral injury. It is also responsible for a complex inflammatory response associated with hemostasis alteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  2. Interplanetary double-shock ensembles with anomalous electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Similarity theory is applied to the case of constant velocity, piston-driven, shock waves. This family of solutions, incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field for the case of infinite electric conductivity, represents one class of experimentally observed, flare-generated shock waves. This paper discusses the theoretical extension to flows with finite conductivity (presumably caused by unspecified modes of wave-particle interactions). Solutions, including reverse shocks, are found for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers from one to infinity. Consideration of a zero and nonzero ambient flowing solar wind (together with removal of magnetic considerations) enables the recovery of earlier similarity solutions as well as numerical simulations. A limited comparison with observations suggests that flare energetics can be reasonably estimated once the shock velocity, ambient solar wind velocity and density, and ambient azimuthal Alfven Mach number are known.

  3. Nonrelativistic parallel shocks in unmagnetized and weakly magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Niemiec, Jacek; Bret, Antoine; Wieland, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    We present results of 2D3V particle-in-cell simulations of non-relativistic plasma collisions with absent or parallel large-scale magnetic field for parameters applicable to the conditions at young supernova remnants. We study the collision of plasma slabs of different density, leading to two different shocks and a contact discontinuity. Electron dynamics play an important role in the development of the system. While non-relativistic shocks in both unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas can be mediated by Weibel-type instabilities, the efficiency of shock-formation processes is higher when a large-scale magnetic field is present. The electron distributions downstream of the forward and reverse shocks are generally isotropic, whereas that is not always the case for the ions. We do not see any significant evidence of pre-acceleration, neither in the electron population nor in the ion distribution.

  4. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse logistics. The thesis brings insights on reverse logistics decision-making and it lays down theoretical principles for reverse logistics as a research field.In particular it puts together a framework ...

  5. Kelvin-Helmholtz turbulence associated with collisionless shocks in laser produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Y; Sakawa, Y; Dono, S; Gregory, C D; Pikuz, S A; Loupias, B; Koenig, M; Waugh, J N; Woolsey, N; Morita, T; Moritaka, T; Sano, T; Matsumoto, Y; Mizuta, A; Ohnishi, N; Takabe, H

    2012-05-11

    We report the experimental results of a turbulent electric field driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with laser produced collisionless shock waves. By irradiating an aluminum double plane target with a high-power laser, counterstreaming plasma flows are generated. As the consequence of the two plasma interactions, two shock waves and the contact surface are excited. The shock electric field and transverse modulation of the contact surface are observed by proton radiography. Performing hydrodynamic simulations, we reproduce the time evolutions of the reverse shocks and the transverse modulation driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  6. Jet dynamics. Recollimation shocks and helical patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of extragalactic jets may be strongly influenced by small (and probable) differences in pressure between the jet and the ambient and within the jet itself. The former give rise to expansion and recollimation of the jet. This occurs in the form of conical shocks, or Mach disks, if the pressure difference is large enough. Pressure asymmetries within the jet may trigger the development of helical patterns via coupling to kink current-driven instability, or to helical Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, depending on the physical conditions in the jet. I summarize here the evidence collected during the last years on the presence of recollimation shocks and waves in jets. In the jet of CTA 102 evidence has been found for (traveling)shock-(standing)shock interaction in the core-region (0.1 mas from the core), using information from the light-curve of the source combined with VLBI data. The conclusions derived have been confirmed by numerical simulations combined with emission calculations that h...

  7. GRB 090727 and gamma-ray bursts with early time optical emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Gomboc, A; Japelj, J; Mundell, C G; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Bersier, D; Cano, Z; Smith, R J; Steele, I A; Virgili, F J

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2-m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation processes. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early time optical emission shows sharp and steep beha...

  8. GeV emission from short Gamma-Ray Bursts: the case of GRB 081024B

    CERN Document Server

    Corsi, Alessandra; Piro, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the high energy tail detected by Fermi/LAT in the short GRB 081024B through synchrotron and self-Compton emission in either the internal or external shock models. In the internal shock scenario, we explore the possibility of generating the high energy photons directly through synchrotron process, or through inverse Compton emission in which target photons are synchrotron photons produced in internal shocks taking place either in the short prompt phase, or in a lately emitted shell (delayed internal shocks). In the external shock scenario, we consider the possibility of the high energy tail being the extension of the afterglow synchrotron emission, or alternatively the inverse Compton component associated to the afterglow synchrotron photons. For the internal shock scenario we conclude that, given the constraints set by the observations on the prompt emission spectrum, only an inverse Compton component from delayed internal shocks can accommodate the presence of a high energy tail ...

  9. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse

  10. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse log

  11. EU emission trading. Requirement of adaptation of the Cap as a consequence of external shocks and unexpected developments?; EU-Emissionshandel. Anpassungsbedarf des Caps als Reaktion auf externe Schocks und unerwartete Entwicklungen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, Jochen [DIW, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    The effectivity of the European emission trading system (EU-ETS) with respect to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions based essentially on the quantity of the emission caps. The regional, sectorial and temporal boundaries of this system as well as the regulations covering international flexible mechanisms and banking have to be considered in the evaluation of the effectivity of the EU-ETS. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different variants of adjustment. First of all, the criteria for an identification of a possible justified needs of adaptation are investigated. Furthermore, the authors discuss the question about suitable points in time for an intervention.

  12. Relativistic Radiation Mediated Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Budnik, Ran; Sagiv, Amir; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The structure of relativistic radiation mediated shocks (RRMS) propagating into a cold electron-proton plasma is calculated and analyzed. A qualitative discussion of the physics of relativistic and non relativistic shocks, including order of magnitude estimates for the relevant temperature and length scales, is presented. Detailed numerical solutions are derived for shock Lorentz factors $\\Gamma_u$ in the range $6\\le\\Gamma_u\\le30$, using a novel iteration technique solving the hydrodynamics and radiation transport equations (the protons, electrons and positrons are argued to be coupled by collective plasma processes and are treated as a fluid). The shock transition (deceleration) region, where the Lorentz factor $ \\Gamma $ drops from $ \\Gamma_u $ to $ \\sim 1 $, is characterized by high plasma temperatures $ T\\sim \\Gamma m_ec^2 $ and highly anisotropic radiation, with characteristic shock-frame energy of upstream and downstream going photons of a few~$\\times\\, m_ec^2$ and $\\sim \\Gamma^2 m_ec^2$, respectively.P...

  13. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  14. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  15. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  16. NON-Shock-Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``1''/f -``Noise'' Power-Spectrum(PS) Power-Law UNIVERSALITY is Merely F =ma Time-Series Integral-Transform, aka ``Bak'' -``SOC'' REdiscovery'' PRE(1687)-``Bak'' (1988)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward

    2015-06-01

    NON-shock plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71); PSS:(a)5,601/607(71); Xl.-Latt.Defects 5,277(74); Scripta Met.:6,785(72); 8,587/617(74); 3rd Tokyo AE Symp.(76); Acta Met. 5,383(77); JMMM 7,312(78)] ``1''/ ω-``noise'' power-spectrum ``pink''-Zipf(NOT ``red'' =Pareto) power-law UNIVERSALITY is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but Newton 3rd Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery!!! (aka ``Bak''(1988)-``SOC'':1687 0a<0) PS P(ω) = 1/ω 1 . 000 ... pink/flicker/HYPERBOLICITY.

  17. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  18. Coherent optical photons from shock waves in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J; Soljacić, Marin; Gee, Richard; Joannopoulos, J D

    2006-01-13

    We predict that coherent electromagnetic radiation in the 1-100 THz frequency range can be generated in crystalline materials when subject to a shock wave or soliton-like propagating excitation. To our knowledge, this phenomenon represents a fundamentally new form of coherent optical radiation source that is distinct from lasers and free-electron lasers. The radiation is generated by the synchronized motion of large numbers of atoms when a shock wave propagates through a crystal. General analytical theory and NaCl molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate coherence lengths on the order of mm (around 20 THz) and potentially greater. The emission frequencies are determined by the shock speed and the lattice constants of the crystal and can potentially be used to determine atomic-scale properties of the shocked material.

  19. Powerful H2 Line Cooling in Stephan’s Quintet. II. Group-wide Gas and Shock Modeling of the Warm H2 and a Comparison with [C II] 157.7 μm Emission and Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Togi, A.; Alatalo, K.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.; Xu, C. K.

    2017-02-01

    We map for the first time the two-dimensional H2 excitation of warm intergalactic gas in Stephan's Quintet on group-wide (50 × 35 kpc2) scales to quantify the temperature, mass, and warm H2 mass fraction as a function of position using Spitzer. Molecular gas temperatures are seen to rise (to T > 700 K) and the slope of the power-law density–temperature relation flattens along the main ridge of the filament, defining the region of maximum heating. We also performed MHD modeling of the excitation properties of the warm gas, to map the velocity structure and energy deposition rate of slow and fast molecular shocks. Slow magnetic shocks were required to explain the power radiated from the lowest-lying rotational states of H2, and strongly support the idea that energy cascades down to small scales and low velocities from the fast collision of NGC 7318b with group-wide gas. The highest levels of heating of the warm H2 are strongly correlated with the large-scale stirring of the medium as measured by [C ii] spectroscopy with Herschel. H2 is also seen associated with a separate bridge that extends toward the Seyfert nucleus in NGC 7319, from both Spitzer and CARMA CO observations. This opens up the possibility that both galaxy collisions and outflows from active galactic nuclei can turbulently heat gas on large scales in compact groups. The observations provide a laboratory for studying the effects of turbulent energy dissipation on group-wide scales, which may provide clues about the heating and cooling of gas at high z in early galaxy and protogalaxy formation.

  20. Shock wave reflection phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-dor, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive state-of-the-knowledge description of the shock wave reflection phenomena from a phenomenological point of view. The first part is a thorough introduction to oblique shock wave reflections, presenting the two major well-known reflection wave configurations, namely, regular (RR) and Mach (MR) reflections, the corresponding two- and three-shock theories, their analytical and graphical solution and the proposed transition boundaries between these two reflection-wave configurations. The second, third and fourth parts describe the reflection phenomena in steady, pseudo-steady and unsteady flows, respectively. Here, the possible specific types of reflection wave configurations are described, criteria for their formation and termination are presented and their governing equations are solved analytically and graphically and compared with experimental results. The resolution of the well-known von Neumann paradox and a detailed description of two new reflection-wave configurations - t...

  1. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Williams, Brian J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Borkowski, Kazimierz J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Sankrit, Ravi, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  2. Radiation from relativistic shocks with turbulent magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, K -I; Medvedev, M; Zhang, B; Hardee, P; Nordlund, A; Frederiksen, J; Mizuno, Y; Sol, H; Pohl, M; Hartmann, D H; Oka, M; Fishman, G J

    2009-01-01

    Using our new 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code parallelized with MPI, we investigated long-term particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet propagating in an unmagnetized ambient electron-positron plasma. The simulations were performed using a much longer simulation system than our previous simulations in order to investigate the full nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability and its particle acceleration mechanism. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and ambient electrons are accelerated in the resulting shocks. Acceleration of ambient electrons leads to a maximum ambient electron density three times larger than the original value. Behind the bow shock in the jet shock strong electromagnetic fields are generated. These fields may lead to time dependent afterglow emission. We calculated radiation from electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. We also used the new technique to calculate emission from electrons based on...

  3. Shock-induced mixing of nonhomogeneous density turbulent jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Cetegen, B. M.

    2000-05-01

    An experimental study of the mixing enhancement and changes in flow structure arising from the interaction of weak normal shock waves with turbulent jets was conducted. The experimental configuration was an axisymmetric jet processed by weak normal shock waves propagating in a shock tube along the jet axis. Experiments involved three different jet gases: helium, air, and carbon dioxide, each in a coflowing air stream, with nominal jet fluid to ambient density ratios of 0.14, 1.00, and 1.52, respectively. The jet local Reynolds number was Reδ≈25 000 and the nominal oncoming shock Mach numbers were 1.23 and 1.45. Planar laser Mie light scattering from mineral oil smoke was utilized for flow visualization and for obtaining jet fluid concentration distributions across diametric planes of jets. Analysis of the spatial probability density function (pdf) of jet fluid concentration indicates that the average helium jet fluid concentration levels decrease and become more uniform in the regions processed by the shock waves. The degree of mixing enhancement increases with increasing shock strength, and amounts to nearly 30% for the stronger shock (M=1.45). The passage of a shock through low-density (helium) jets induces the formation of a flow structure that resembles a large-scale, toroidal vortex. The air and carbon dioxide jets exhibit neither a vortex-like structure or a significant change in mixing upon shock passage, unlike the helium jets. A comparison of the results for the helium and carbon dioxide jets indicates that the reversal of the density ratio between the jet and the surroundings, and the consequent change in the sign of baroclinic vorticity does not yield similar effects in terms of flow structure or mixing enhancement. The average concentration behind the shock wave decreases for both air and helium jets with increasing distance behind the shock. These features are explained qualitatively in terms of a simple characteristic time scale argument. The

  4. [Traumatic neurogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, O; de Régloix, S; Caballé, D; Arvis, A-M; Perrochon, J-C; Tourtier, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic neurogenic shock is a rare but serious complication of spinal cord injury. It associates bradycardia and hypotension caused by a medullary trauma. It is life-threatening for the patient and it aggravates the neurological deficit. Strict immobilization and a quick assessment of the gravity of cord injury are necessary as soon as prehospital care has begun. Initial treatment requires vasopressors associated with fluid resuscitation. Steroids are not recommended. Early decompression is recommended for incomplete deficit seen in the first 6 hours. We relate the case of secondary spinal shock to a luxation C6/C7 treated in prehospital care.

  5. [Corticosteroids and septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P; Petit, P; Latarjet, J

    1976-01-01

    According to the data in the literature, the authors attempted to sum-up present attitudes on the value of corticoids in the treatment of septic shock. If their cardiovascular effects after a period of enthusiasm, are presently rather controversial, their cellular and sub-cellular actions, on the lysosomal membranes, capillary permeability and perhaps the intimate mechanisms of cellular oxygenation seem to be more real. However, the contra-indications which persist in the results of clinical works have resulted in the fact that the exact place of cortico-steroids in the therapeutic arsenal of septic shock still remains to be specified.

  6. Characteristics of Weak Interplanetary Shocks and Shock-like Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, A.; Gloag, J. M.

    The variation of magnetic and plasma parameters across the discontinuity of a colli- sionless shock wave are clearly understood and presented in MHD theory. The anal- ysis of 116 shock waves appearing on the Ulysses shock list in the period mid 1996 to the end of 1999 show that in the cases of the stronger shock waves, measured by the ratio of downstream to upstream magnetic field magnitudes, this MHD descrip- tion is adequate. However in the case of many of the weaker shocks there are events which are not clearly characterised in MHD terms and in these cases plasma param- eters are particularly difficult to interpret. To explore the issues associated with these very weak shocks further, a set of shock-like events is considered which have shock characteristics in the high frequency wave data measured by the plasma wave inves- tigation(URAP) but are not considered to be clearly shock waves purely considering magnetic and plasma data. These shock-like events are thought to extend the spectrum of interplanetary shocks at the very weakest end and possibly beyond what should be considered a collisionless shock wave.

  7. Designing eco-effective reverse logistics networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, De Vitor; Borsato, Milton; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Reverse Logistics Networks (RLNs) have grown in importance after return policies became compulsory. Lately, questions have been raised whether they are as helpful to the environment as possible. Efforts have been conducted to optimize RLNs in terms of their eco-efficiency, minimizing costs and emiss

  8. An External Shock Origin of GRB $\\textit{141028A}$

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael; Ryde, Felix; Omodei, Nicola; Pe'er, Asaf; Racusin, J L; Cucchiara, A

    2015-01-01

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB $\\textit{141028A}$, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the $\\gamma$-ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron $\

  9. Reverse logistics - a framework

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa; Dekker, Rommert

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of products, processes and actors. In addition we provide a decision framework for Reverse Logistics and we present it according to long, medium and short term decisions, i.e. strategic-tactic-operational decis...

  10. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  11. Flow behind concave shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  12. Flow behind concave shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  13. Detection of TeV emission from the intriguing composite SNR G327.1-1.1

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Förster, A; Gallant, Y; Renaud, M

    2012-01-01

    The shock wave of supernova remnants (SNRs) and the wind termination shock in pulsar wind nebula (PWNe) are considered as prime candidates to accelerate the bulk of Galactic cosmic ray (CR) ions and electrons. The SNRs hosting a PWN (known as composite SNRs) provide excellent laboratories to test these hypotheses. The SNR G327.1-1.1 belongs to this category and exhibits a shell and a bright central PWN, both seen in radio and X-rays. Interestingly, the radio observations of the PWN show an extended blob of emission and a curious narrow finger structure pointing towards the offset compact X-ray source indicating a possible fast moving pulsar in the SNR and/or an asymmetric passage of the reverse shock. We report here on the observations, for a total of 45 hours, of the SNR G327.1-1.1 with the H.E.S.S. telescope array which resulted in the detection of TeV gamma-ray emission in spatial coincidence with the PWN.

  14. Reverse logistics - a framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of product

  15. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  16. The special relativistic shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1986-01-01

    The shock-tube problem has served as a popular test for numerical hydrodynamics codes. The development of relativistic hydrodynamics codes has created a need for a similar test problem in relativistic hydrodynamics. The analytical solution to the special relativistic shock-tube problem is presented here. The relativistic shock-jump conditions and rarefaction solution which make up the shock tube are derived. The Newtonian limit of the calculations is given throughout.

  17. Shock conditions for hypoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renardy, Michael; Rogers, Robert C.

    1993-10-01

    The equations governing the motion of hypoelastic materials (and related models of non-Newtonian fluids) are not in conservation form. Hence there is no obvious formulation of Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions across a shock. In this paper we demonstrate that a viscosity criterion can be used to obtain meaningful shock conditions. In particular, we discuss shocks of small amplitude. The shock conditions obtained will in general depend on the form of the viscosity term.

  18. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  19. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  20. Early Treatment in Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    of L-arginine resuscitation in shock were carried out by An-1 gele , Chaudry, and co-workers. 6-10 They used the rat model, bleeding to 40 mm Hg in...17 14. Preissler G, Lothe F, Ebersberger U, Huff I, Bittmann I, Messmer K, Jauch KW, An-18 gele , MK. Recipient treatment with L-arginine

  1. A Shocking New Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  2. Planetary Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A

    2008-01-01

    Our present knowledge of the properties of the various planetary bow shocks is briefly reviewed. We do not follow the astronomical ordering of the planets. We rather distinguish between magnetised and unmagnetised planets which groups Mercury and Earth with the outer giant planets of the solar system, Mars and Moon in a separate group lacking magnetic fields and dense atmospheres, and Venus together with the comets as the atmospheric celestial objects exposed to the solar wind. Asteroids would, in this classification, fall into the group together with the Moon and should behave similarly though being much smaller. Extrasolar planets are not considered as we have only remote information about their behaviour. The presentation is brief in the sense that our in situ knowledge is rather sporadic yet, depending on just a countable number of bow shock crossings from which just some basic conclusions can be drawn about size, stationarity, shape and nature of the respective shock. The only bow shock of which we have ...

  3. Shock compression of nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake; Kondo, Ken-Ichi

    1999-06-01

    The Hugoniot (4 - 30 GPa) and the isotherm (1 - 7 GPa) of nitrobenzene have been investigated by shock and static compression experiments. Nitrobenzene has the most basic structure of nitro aromatic compounds, which are widely used as energetic materials, but nitrobenzene has been considered not to explode in spite of the fact its calculated heat of detonation is similar to TNT, about 1 kcal/g. Explosive plane-wave generators and diamond anvil cell were used for shock and static compression, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot consists of two linear lines, and the kink exists around 10 GPa. The upper line agrees well with the Hugoniot of detonation products calculated by KHT code, so it is expected that nitrobenzene detonates in that area. Nitrobenzene solidifies under 1 GPa of static compression, and the isotherm of solid nitrobenzene was obtained by X-ray diffraction technique. Comparing the Hugoniot and the isotherm, nitrobenzene is in liquid phase under experimented shock condition. From the expected phase diagram, shocked nitrobenzene seems to remain metastable liquid in solid phase region on that diagram.

  4. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 196. Read More Acute kidney failure Heart failure - overview Shock Review Date 4/12/2016 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department ...

  5. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is not strongly...

  6. Shockingly low water abundances in Herschel/PACS observations of low-mass protostars in Perseus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karska, A.; Kristensen, L. E.; Dishoeck, E. F. van

    2014-01-01

    Protostars interact with their surroundings through jets and winds impacting on the envelope and creating shocks, but the nature of these shocks is still poorly understood. Our aim is to survey far-infrared molecular line emission from a uniform and significant sample of deeply-embedded low......-mass young stellar objects in order to characterize shocks and the possible role of ultraviolet radiation in the immediate protostellar environment. Herschel/PACS spectral maps of 22 objects in the Perseus molecular cloud were obtained as part of the `William Herschel Line Legacy' survey. Line emission from...

  7. X-ray and radio emission from colliding stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M; Coker, R F; Corcoran, M F

    2004-01-01

    The collision of the hypersonic winds in early-type binaries produces shock heated gas, which radiates thermal X-ray emission, and relativistic electrons, which emit nonthermal radio emission. We review our current understanding of the emission in these spectral regions and discuss models which have been developed for the interpretation of this emission. Physical processes which affect the resulting emission are reviewed and ideas for the future are noted.

  8. Collisionless Weibel Shocks and Electron Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lembége, Bertrand

    2015-09-01

    A study of collisionless external shocks in gamma-ray bursts is presented. The shock structure, electromagnetic field, and process of electron acceleration are assessed by performing a self-consistent 3D particle-in-cell simulation. In accordance with hydrodynamic shock systems, the shock consists of a reverse shock (RS) and forward shock separated by a contact discontinuity. The development and structure are controlled by the ion Weibel instability. The ion filaments are sources of strong transverse electromagnetic fields at both sides of the double shock structure over a length of 30-100 ion skin depths. Electrons are heated up to a maximum energy {ɛ }{ele}≈ \\sqrt{{ɛ }{{b}}}, where ɛ is the energy normalized to the total incoming energy. Jet electrons are trapped in the RS transition region due to the presence of an ambipolar electric field and reflection by the strong transverse magnetic fields in the shocked region. In a process similar to shock surfing acceleration for ions, electrons experience drift motion and acceleration by ion filament transverse electric fields in the plane perpendicular to the shock propagation direction. Ultimately, accelerated jet electrons are convected back into the upstream.

  9. In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    Full Text Available A useful index for estimating the transit speeds was derived by analyzing interplanetary shock observations. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6–0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated for the results of the magnetohydrodynamic simulation show good agreement with the observations. The relation expressed by the index is well explained by a simplified propagation model assuming a blast wave. For several shocks the ratio is approximately 1.2, implying that these shocks accelerated during propagation in slow-speed solar wind. This ratio is similar to that for the background solar wind acceleration.

    Keywords. Interplanetary physics (Flare and stream dynamics; Interplanetary shocks; Solar wind plasma

  10. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2017-05-01

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  11. Fisiopatología del shock: Nuevas perspectivas Pathophysiology of shock: New perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La actividad metabólica puede modificarse mediante la regulación de la población mitocondrial en distintas enfermedades críticas. A través de observaciones y ensayos clínicos examinamos esta adaptación metabólica en el shock cardiogénico, hemorrágico y séptico. La caída de la disponibilidad de O2 (DO2 llevaría a una reducción de la población mitocondrial y consecuentemente a una disminución del consumo de O2 (VO2. Esta secuencia permite atenuar y aun evitar la adquisición de una deuda de O2, considerada hasta hoy base fundamental de la fisiopatología del shock. El costo de esta adaptación mitocondrial es menor energía disponible y el déficit energético resultante ha sido relacionado con la falla orgánica múltiple (FOM, importante complicación de diversos procesos inflamatorios agudos y estados de shock. La FOM es mejor tolerada que el metabolismo anaeróbico y es potencialmente reversible si se revierten las causas desencadenantes y se reestablece el nivel energético por medio de la biogénesis mitocondrial.El desacople de la fosforilación oxidativa mitocondrial ocurre tanto en diversos modelos experimentales de shock como así también en el shock séptico en el hombre. Esta alteración mitocondrial puede ser detectada por un aumento desmesurado del VO2 en respuesta al incremento terapéutico de la DO2. Este aumento de la actividad metabólica puede ser equívocamente interpretado como la fase de repago de una deuda de O2.Metabolic activity can be down-regulated throughout the reduction of mitochondrial population. Lowering O2 demand in cardiogenic, hemorrhagic and septic shock is here examined through clinical observations and trials. A decrease in the availability of O2 will be followed by reductions in mitochondrial population and, therefore, in a decrease in O2 demand. This response may lessen or prevent the acquisition of an O2 debt; until now, cornerstone in the pathophysiology of shock. The cost of this

  12. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  13. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  14. The Beneficial Effect of Direct Peritoneal Resuscitation on Septic Shock in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Luo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The high mortality associated with conventionally resuscitated septic shock and the subsequent multiple-organ failure remain a very significant and costly clinical problem. Conventional simple intravenous resuscitation (CR from septic shock often fails to restore the progressive splanchnic vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion, and fails to reverse gut-derived systemic inflammatory response and fluid sequestration. Numerous interventions have been used to protect organ systems and cellular viability from the lethal injury accompanying hypoperfusion and ischemia but none of these efforts have been sufficient to halt or reverse the main course of the pathophysiology noted with conventional resuscitated shock. Recently, some studies have found that in hemorrhagic shock, direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR not only produces sustained hyperperfusion in viscera but also has immunomodulatory and anti-fluid sequestration effects. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of septic shock and hemorrhagic shock differ, both kinds of shock result in hypoperfusion of the intestines and other internal organs. In this paper, we seek to determine whether DPR has a similar therapeutic effect on septic shock/resuscitation.

  15. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  16. Magnetar Driven Shock Breakout and Double Peaked Supernova Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kasen, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The light curves of some luminous supernovae are suspected to be powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly rotating magnetar. Here we describe a possible signature of the central engine: a burst of shock breakout emission occurring several days after the supernova explosion. The energy input from the magnetar inflates a high-pressure bubble that drives a shock through the pre-exploded supernova ejecta. If the magnetar is powerful enough, that shock will near the ejecta surface and become radiative. At the time of shock breakout, the ejecta will have expanded to a large radius (~10^{14} cm) so that the radiation released is at optical/ultraviolet wavelengths (T ~ 20,000 K) and lasts for several days. The luminosity and timescale of this magnetar driven shock breakout are similar to the first peak observed recently in the double-peaked light curve of SN-LSQ14BDQ. However, for a large region of model parameter space, the breakout emission is predicted to be dimmer than the diffusive luminosity from direct magn...

  17. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Derishev, Evgeny V

    2015-01-01

    What are the mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build up and decay in relativistic shocks are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current PIC simulation show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a short length scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplificaiton of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the s...

  18. Formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in magnetized protostellar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Ustamujic, S; Bonito, R; Miceli, M; de Castro, A I Gómez; López-Santiago, J

    2016-01-01

    X-ray observations of protostellar jets show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to temperatures of a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary. They are interpreted as shock diamonds. We aim at investigating the physics that guides the formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in protostellar jets, the role of the magnetic field in determining the location, stability, and detectability in X-rays of these shocks, and the physical properties of the shocked plasma. We performed a set of 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations modelling supersonic jets ramming into a magnetized medium and explored different configurations of the magnetic field. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. We compared the model results with observations, via the emission measure and the X-ray luminosity synthesized from the simulations. Our model explains the formation of X-ray emitting stat...

  19. NIF ReShock/Shear Photometrics Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, Kirk Adler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-12

    The design of the photometrics for the NIF Shock/Shear campaign was driven by three linked considerations: the backlighter (BL) material had to be chosen such that it’s He-α emission line gave high enough contrast to measure mix width and see the shock propagation in the target wall, the BL beam geometry had to give sufficient BL spot dimensions and intensity to produce a uniform He-α radiograph of the target, and the BL/pinhole system had to have a high enough resolution and signal to be able to measure the quantities of interest. The design considerations are linked such that the required contrast determines the BL material, the BL material determines what laser intensity range is need for He-α emission, and the resulting He-α emission intensity helps determine whether or not there will be sufficient signal for analysis.

  20. Mapping of 20 μm emission from the supernova remnant Cas A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, R. G.; Greidanus, H.

    A small region in the bright northern rim of the young supernova remnant Cas A has been mapped at 20 μm with UKIRT. The total flux density detected is 18 Jy, equivalent to 2x10-4Msun of dust radiating at 90K. Structure is detected down to the 5″resolution limit. Although this is a region rich in fast moving optical knots, X-ray structure and small scale radio emission, there is no correlation between any of these and the infrared features. In particular, the detailed correlation between hot (X-ray emitting) gas and shock-heated dust predicted by model calculations is totally absent. A possible anticorrelation between the two may be explained by small-scale pressure differences in the post-shock gas, or by variations in the gas-to-dust ratio. While the origin of the dust remains unclear in that it could be associated with either reverse-shocked ejecta or interstellar clouds, the authors argue that it is unlikely to coincide with the main supernova blast wave.

  1. Sheehan syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laway, Bashir A; Alai, Mohammad S; Gojwari, Tariq; Ganie, Mohd A; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in patients with Sheehan syndrome are uncommon. A case of Sheehan syndrome with dilated cardiomyopathy is presented in whom hormone replacement with levothyroxine and prednisolone resulted in complete recovery of cardiomyopathy. A 25-year-old woman presented with lactation failure, secondary amenorrhea, features of hypothyroidism and a hypocortisol state following severe postpartum hemorrhage after her last child birth. She also had smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. After starting antitubercular treatment, she developed shock, suggestive of hypocortisol crisis. Hormonal investigations revealed evidence of panhypopitutarism and magnetic resonance imaging revealed partial empty sella. Meanwhile echocardiography revealed evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The patient was given replacement therapy in the form of glucocorticoids and levothyroxine in addition to antitubercular treatment. She improved and on follow-up over a period of 7 months, the DCM completely reversed. To our knowledge this is the first report of reversible DCM in a patient with Sheehan syndrome.

  2. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  3. Searching for Intergalactic Shocks with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Keshet, U; Loeb, A; Keshet, Uri; Waxman, Eli; Loeb, Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Strong intergalactic shocks are a natural consequence of structure formation in the universe. These shocks are expected to deposit large fractions of their energy in relativistic electrons (xi_e~0.05 of the thermal energy according to supernova remnant observations) and magnetic fields (xi_B~0.01 according to cluster halo observations). We discuss the expected synchrotron emission from such shocks, and the observational consequences for next generation radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometer Array. We present an analytical model, calibrated and verified based on a hydrodynamical LCDM simulation. The resulting signal composes a large fraction (up to a few 10%) of the extragalactic radio background below 500 MHz. The associated angular fluctuations, e.g. delta T_l>260(xi_e*xi_B/5*10^-4)(nu/100 MHz)^-3 K for multipoles 4003*10^-4. The fluctuating signal is most pronounced for nu<500 MHz, dominating the sky there even for xi_e*xi_B=5*10^-5. We find that the signal is easily observable by next generation ...

  4. Shocking news outside of cluster cores

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon

    2011-01-01

    With magnetic fields below one microgauss, the minimum pressures of synchrotron plasmas start to approach those in the thermal gas in cluster outskirts and the more diffuse WHIM in large-scale structure filaments. We summarize some of our techniques to find the corresponding low surface brightness radio sources and what we have uncovered. We identify cluster-like sources in poor environments, likely requiring very efficient relativistic particle acceleration, as well as very diffuse radio galaxies with no indications of current activity. More detailed observations of Coma and a new radio-identified cluster highlight some emerging issues in cluster-related shocks: Coma has a shock on the border of its halo, suggesting a connection between the two; the Coma relic appears to be an "infall" shock, associated with a 500 km/s infalling column of galaxies; the new cluster has filamentary pieces in addition to its more classical halo and peripheral relics, suggesting that we are beginning to see relic emission face o...

  5. High-Energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, Tea; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R

    2013-01-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of...

  6. 3D numerical modeling of YSO accretion shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsakos T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of YSO accretion shocks is determined by radiative processes as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field. A quasi-periodic emission signature is theoretically expected to be observed, but observations do not confirm any such pattern. In this work, we assume a uniform background field, in the regime of optically thin energy losses, and we study the multi-dimensional shock evolution in the presence of perturbations, i.e. clumps in the stream and an acoustic energy flux flowing at the base of the chromosphere. We perform 3D MHD simulations using the PLUTO code, modelling locally the impact of the infalling gas onto the chromosphere. We find that the structure and dynamics of the post-shock region is strongly dependent on the plasma-beta (thermal over magnetic pressure, different values of which may give distinguishable emission signatures, relevant for observations. In particular, a strong magnetic field effectively confines the plasma inside its flux tubes and leads to the formation of quasi-independent fibrils. The fibrils may oscillate out of phase and hence the sum of their contributions in the emission results in a smooth overall profile. On the contrary, a weak magnetic field is not found to have any significant effect on the shocked plasma and the turbulent hot slab that forms is found to retain its periodic signature.

  7. NICMOS Observations of Shocked H_2 in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Colgan, Sean W J; Kaufman, M J; Erickson, E F; Hollenbach, D J

    2007-01-01

    HST NICMOS narrowband images of the shocked molecular hydrogen emission in OMC-1 are analyzed to reveal new information on the BN/KL outflow. The outstanding morphological feature of this region is the array of molecular hydrogen ``fingers'' emanating from the general vicinity of IRc2 and the presence of several Herbig-Haro objects. The NICMOS images appear to resolve individual shock fronts. This work is a more quantitative and detailed analysis of our data from a previous paper (Schultz etal. 1999). Line strengths for the H_2 1--0 S(4) plus 2--1 S(6) lines at 1.89 micron are estimated from measurements with the Paschen_alpha continuum filter F190N at 1.90 micron, and continuum measurements at 1.66 and 2.15 micron. We compare the observed H_2 line strengths and ratios of the 1.89 micron and 2.12 micron 1--0 S(1) lines with models for molecular cloud shock waves. Most of the data cannot be fit by J-shocks, but are well matched by C-shocks with shock velocities in the range of 20--45 km/s and preshock densitie...

  8. Shock front field structure in low-density systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Rui; Mucguffey, Christopher; Beg, Farhat; Sio, Hong; Ping, Yuan; Wilks, Scott; Heeter, Bob; Collins, Rip

    2016-10-01

    It is known that a shock front is not a simple discontinuity in density and temperature as depicted in commonly used hydro codes but also consists of self-generated fields associated with gradients in the electron pressure. A quasi-planar platform using broadband proton radiography has been developed to study this field structure at a shock front. The broad bandwidth offers energy-dependent measurements which quantitatively constrain both the potential and field width at the shock front. Experiments were conducted on the OMEGA EP, where three long pulse beams delivered 6 kJ in 2 ns for shock initiation in a tube filled with either pure Helium or mixture of Helium and Neon, and a short pulse of 850 J, 10 ps generated broadband protons for point-projection radiography. Simultaneous spatially resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy provided shock velocity, particle velocity and thermal emission measurements, constraining density and temperature for the field generation. The data and modeling indicate that a multi-KeV potential was present at the shock front where a strong electron pressure gradient existed. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program.

  9. SHOCK HEATING OF THE MERGING GALAXY CLUSTER A521

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Markevitch, M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Giacintucci, S. [Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Brunetti, G., E-mail: herve.bourdin@roma2.infn.it [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-02-10

    A521 is an interacting galaxy cluster located at z = 0.247, hosting a low-frequency radio halo connected to an eastern radio relic. Previous Chandra observations hinted at the presence of an X-ray brightness edge at the position of the relic, which may be a shock front. We analyze a deep observation of A521 recently performed with XMM-Newton in order to probe the cluster structure up to the outermost regions covered by the radio emission. The cluster atmosphere exhibits various brightness and temperature anisotropies. In particular, two cluster cores appear to be separated by two cold fronts. We find two shock fronts, one that was suggested by Chandra and that is propagating to the east, and another to the southwestern cluster outskirt. The two main interacting clusters appear to be separated by a shock-heated region, which exhibits a spatial correlation with the radio halo. The outer edge of the radio relic coincides spatially with a shock front, suggesting that this shock is responsible for the generation of cosmic-ray electrons in the relic. The propagation direction and Mach number of the shock front derived from the gas density jump, M = 2.4 {+-} 0.2, are consistent with expectations from the radio spectral index, under the assumption of Fermi I acceleration mechanism.

  10. Bow-shock Pulsar Wind Nebulae Passing Through Density Discontinuities

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Doosoo

    2016-01-01

    Bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae are a subset of pulsar wind nebulae that form when the pulsar has high velocity due to the natal kick during the supernova explosion. The interaction between the relativistic wind from the fast-moving pulsar and the interstellar medium produces a bow-shock and a trail, which are detectable in H$_{\\alpha}$ emission. Among such bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae, the Guitar Nebula stands out for its peculiar morphology, which consists of a prominent bow-shock head and a series of bubbles further behind. We present a scenario in which multiple bubbles can be produced when the pulsar encounters a series of density discontinuities in the ISM. We tested the scenario using 2-D and 3-D hydrodynamic simulations. The shape of the guitar nebula can be reproduced if the pulsar traversed a region of declining low density. We also show that if a pulsar encounters an inclined density discontinuity, it produces an asymmetric bow-shock head, consistent with observations of the bow-shock of the millise...

  11. Shock Heating of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A521

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Markevitch, M.; Giacintucci, S.; Brunetti, G.

    2013-01-01

    A521 is an interacting galaxy cluster located at z = 0.247, hosting a low-frequency radio halo connected to an eastern radio relic. Previous Chandra observations hinted at the presence of an X-ray brightness edge at the position of the relic, which may be a shock front. We analyze a deep observation of A521 recently performed with XMM-Newton in order to probe the cluster structure up to the outermost regions covered by the radio emission. The cluster atmosphere exhibits various brightness and temperature anisotropies. In particular, two cluster cores appear to be separated by two cold fronts. We find two shock fronts, one that was suggested by Chandra and that is propagating to the east, and another to the southwestern cluster outskirt. The two main interacting clusters appear to be separated by a shock-heated region, which exhibits a spatial correlation with the radio halo. The outer edge of the radio relic coincides spatially with a shock front, suggesting that this shock is responsible for the generation of cosmic-ray electrons in the relic. The propagation direction and Mach number of the shock front derived from the gas density jump, M = 2.4 +/- 0.2, are consistent with expectations from the radio spectral index, under the assumption of Fermi I acceleration mechanism.

  12. Desalination shocks in microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Mani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

  13. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  14. DO COROTATING INTERACTION REGION ASSOCIATED SHOCKS SURVIVE WHEN THEY PROPAGATE INTO THE HELIOSHEATH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provornikova, E.; Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Izmodenov, V. [Department of Air Mechanics and Gas Dynamics, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Toth, G., E-mail: eprovorn@bu.edu, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu, E-mail: izmod@iki.rssi.ru, E-mail: gtoth@umich.edu [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    During the solar minimum at the distance of 42-52 AU from the Sun, Voyager 2 observed recurrent sharp, shock-like increases in the solar wind speed that look very much like forward shocks (Lazarus et al.). The shocks were produced by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that originated near the Sun. After the termination shock (TS) crossing in 2007, Voyager 2 entered the heliosheath and has been observing the plasma emanated during the recent solar minima. Measurements show high variable flow, but there were no shocks detected in the heliosheath. When CIR-driven shocks propagate to the outer heliosphere, their structure changes due to collision and merging processes of CIRs. In this Letter, we explore an effect of the merging of CIRs on the structure of CIR-associated shocks. We use a three-dimensional MHD model to study the outward propagation of the shocks with characteristics similar to those observed by Voyager 2 at {approx}45 AU (Lazarus et al. 1999). We show that due to merging of CIRs (1) reverse shocks disappear, (2) forward shocks become weaker due to interaction with rarefaction regions from preceding CIRs, and (3) forward shocks significantly weaken in the heliosheath. Merged CIRs produce compression regions in the heliosheath with small fluctuations of plasma parameters. Amplitudes of the fluctuations diminish as they propagate deeper in the sheath. We conclude that interaction of shocks and rarefaction regions could be one of the explanations, why shocks produced by CIRs are not observed in the heliosheath by Voyager 2 while they were frequently observed upstream the TS.

  15. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  16. GeV photons from up-scattering of supernova shock breakout X-rays by an outside GRB jet

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X Y; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Meszaros, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Shock breakout X-ray emission has been reported for the first time from a supernova connected with a gamma-ray burst, namely GRB060218/SN2006aj. The gamma-ray emission and the power-law decaying X-ray afterglow are ascribed to a highly relativistic jet, while the thermal soft X-rays are thought to be produced when the radiation-dominated shock breaks from the optically thick stellar wind. We study the inverse Compton emission of the breakout thermal soft X-rays scattered by relativistic electrons in the jet forward shock, which is is expected to be at larger radii than the breakout shock. This IC emission produces sub-GeV to GeV photons, which may be detectable by GLAST. The detection of such GeV photons simultaneously with the supernova shock breakout emission would give evidence for the presence of a GRB jet ahead of the shock while the shock is breaking out. The anisotropic scattering between the X-rays and relativistic electrons may lead to large angle emission outside of the jet opening angle. This has i...

  17. A Shocking Surprise in Stephan's Quintet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This false-color composite image of the Stephan's Quintet galaxy cluster clearly shows one of the largest shock waves ever seen (green arc). The wave was produced by one galaxy falling toward another at speeds of more than one million miles per hour. The image is made up of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a ground-based telescope in Spain. Four of the five galaxies in this picture are involved in a violent collision, which has already stripped most of the hydrogen gas from the interiors of the galaxies. The centers of the galaxies appear as bright yellow-pink knots inside a blue haze of stars, and the galaxy producing all the turmoil, NGC7318b, is the left of two small bright regions in the middle right of the image. One galaxy, the large spiral at the bottom left of the image, is a foreground object and is not associated with the cluster. The titanic shock wave, larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, was detected by the ground-based telescope using visible-light wavelengths. It consists of hot hydrogen gas. As NGC7318b collides with gas spread throughout the cluster, atoms of hydrogen are heated in the shock wave, producing the green glow. Spitzer pointed its infrared spectrograph at the peak of this shock wave (middle of green glow) to learn more about its inner workings. This instrument breaks light apart into its basic components. Data from the instrument are referred to as spectra and are displayed as curving lines that indicate the amount of light coming at each specific wavelength. The Spitzer spectrum showed a strong infrared signature for incredibly turbulent gas made up of hydrogen molecules. This gas is caused when atoms of hydrogen rapidly pair-up to form molecules in the wake of the shock wave. Molecular hydrogen, unlike atomic hydrogen, gives off most of its energy through vibrations that emit in the infrared. This highly disturbed gas is the most turbulent molecular hydrogen ever seen. Astronomers were surprised not only by the turbulence

  18. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Invited Papers, Submarine Shock Testing, Shock Analysis, Shock Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    P. White, Jr., Rochester Applied Science Associates, Inc., Rochester, New York MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF A TYPICAL FLOATING SHOCK PLATFORM SUBJECTED TO...our offer. standardization projects as well as in the This asrect of cuantitive railroad technology various technical societies. This multi...Analysis of a Gravity phenomena which my education had kept care- Dam," using gelatin models . The stimulation fully hidden from me until that time. It’s

  19. Introduction to reversible computing

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Few books comprehensively cover the software and programming aspects of reversible computing. Filling this gap, Introduction to Reversible Computing offers an expanded view of the field that includes the traditional energy-motivated hardware viewpoint as well as the emerging application-motivated software approach. Collecting scattered knowledge into one coherent account, the book provides a compendium of both classical and recently developed results on reversible computing. It explores up-and-coming theories, techniques, and tools for the application of rever

  20. Dynamics of vapor emissions at wire explosion threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belony, Paul A; Kim, Yong W

    2010-10-01

    X-pinch plasmas have been actively studied in the recent years. Numerical simulation of the ramp-up of metallic vapor emissions from wire specimens shows that under impulsive Ohmic heating the wire core invariably reaches a supercritical state before explosion. The heating rate depends sensitively on the local wire resistance, leading to highly variable vapor emission flux along the wire. To examine the vapor emission process, we have visualized nickel wire explosions by means of shock formation in air. In a single explosion as captured by shadowgraphy, there usually appear several shocks with spherical or cylindrical wave front originating from different parts of the wire. Growth of various shock fronts in time is well characterized by a power-law scaling in one form or another. Continuum emission spectra are obtained and calibrated to measure temperature near the explosion threshold. Shock front structures and vapor plume temperature are examined.

  1. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  2. Shock acceleration and gamma radiation in the intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S

    2004-01-01

    Particle acceleration is expected to take place at shocks that form during the process of large scale structure formation. Electrons accelerated at such shocks can upscatter a small fraction of the photons in the cosmic microwave background up to the gamma ray band. Here we make predictions about the detectability of the $\\gamma$--ray emission from forming clusters of galaxies with future GeV and TeV gamma ray telescopes. We also estimate the contribution of these sources to the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background.

  3. Shock acceleration and gamma radiation in the intracluster medium

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Particle acceleration is expected to take place at shocks that form during the process of large scale structure formation. Electrons accelerated at such shocks can upscatter a small fraction of the photons in the cosmic microwave background up to the gamma ray band. Here we make predictions about the detectability of the $\\gamma$--ray emission from forming clusters of galaxies with future GeV and TeV gamma ray telescopes. We also estimate the contribution of these sources to the extragalactic...

  4. Reversible Logic Circuit Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Shende, V V; Markov, I L; Prasad, A K; Hayes, John P.; Markov, Igor L.; Prasad, Aditya K.; Shende, Vivek V.

    2002-01-01

    Reversible, or information-lossless, circuits have applications in digital signal processing, communication, computer graphics and cryptography. They are also a fundamental requirement for quantum computation. We investigate the synthesis of reversible circuits that employ a minimum number of gates and contain no redundant input-output line-pairs (temporary storage channels). We propose new constructions for reversible circuits composed of NOT, Controlled-NOT, and TOFFOLI gates (the CNT gate library) based on permutation theory. A new algorithm is given to synthesize optimal reversible circuits using an arbitrary gate library. We also describe much faster heuristic algorithms. We also pursue applications of the proposed techniques to the synthesis of quantum circuits.

  5. Radiative effects in radiative shocks in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. P.; Doss, F. W.; McClarren, R. G.; Adams, M. L.; Amato, N.; Bingham, D.; Chou, C. C.; DiStefano, C.; Fidkowski, K.; Fryxell, B.; Gombosi, T. I.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Holloway, J. P.; van der Holst, B.; Huntington, C. M.; Karni, S.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Larsen, E.; van Leer, B.; Mallick, B.; Marion, D.; Martin, W.; Morel, J. E.; Myra, E. S.; Nair, V.; Powell, K. G.; Rauchwerger, L.; Roe, P.; Rutter, E.; Sokolov, I. V.; Stout, Q.; Torralva, B. R.; Toth, G.; Thornton, K.; Visco, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    Using modern high-energy-density facilities it is straightforward to produce radiative shock waves in which the transfer of energy by radiation controls the hydrodynamic structure of the system. Some of these experiments use shock tubes. This paper discusses such experiments, with an emphasis on the simple physical relations that determine the primary features of such shocks and on the details and impact of radiative energy transfer in such systems. Notable aspects include the creation of high-density shocked layers, the flow of radiative energy toward regions of higher energy density, and the creation of secondary shocks by ablation of the tube walls ahead of the primary shock front. Simulations of one such experimental system are also shown.

  6. Fundamentals of collisionless shocks for astrophysical application, 2. Relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress on collisionless relativistic shocks. Kinetic instability theory is briefed including its predictions and limitations. The main focus is on numerical experiments in (i) pair and (ii) electron-nucleon plasmas. The main results are: (i) confirmation of shock evolution in non-magnetised relativistic plasma in 3D due to either the lepton-Weibel instability or the ion-Weibel instability; (ii) sensitive dependence on upstream magnetisation ; (iii) the sensitive dependence of particle dynamics on the upstream magnetic inclination angle $\\thetabn$, where particles of $\\thetabn>34^\\circ$ cannot escape upstream, leading to the distinction between `sub-luminal' and `super-luminal' shocks; (iv) particles in ultra-relativistic shocks can hardly overturn the shock and escape to upstream; they may oscillate around the shock ramp for a long time, so to speak `surfing it' and thereby becoming accelerated by a kind of SDA; (v) these particles form a power law tail on the downstream distribution; their...

  7. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. This is a completely different approach compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration.

  8. Reverse Core Engine with Thrust Reverser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An engine system has a gas generator, a bi-fi wall surrounding at least a portion of the gas generator, a casing surrounding a fan, and the casing having first and second thrust reverser doors which in a deployed position abut each other and the bi-fi wall.

  9. ALMA observations of the dense and shocked gas in the nuclear region of NGC 4038 (Antennae galaxies)

    CERN Document Server

    Ueda, Junko; Iono, Daisuke; Wilner, David J; Fazio, Giovanni G; Ohashi, Satoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Saito, Toshiki; Komugi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    We present 1" (20 %) suggested by the HCN (1-0)/CO (3-2) line ratio may signify a future burst of intense star formation there. The shocked gas traced in the CH3OH and HNCO emission indicates sub-kpc scale molecular shocks. We suggest that the molecular shocks may be driven by collisions between inflowing gas and the central massive molecular complex.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of particle energization via shock drift acceleration from low Mach number quasi-perpendicular shocks in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jaehong; Workman, Jared C; Blackman, Eric G

    2012-01-01

    Low Mach number, high beta fast mode shocks can occur in the magnetic reconnection outflows of solar flares. These shocks, which occur above flare loop tops, may provide the electron energization responsible for some of the observed hard X-rays and contemporaneous radio emission. Here we present new 2D particle-in-cell simulations of low Mach number/high beta quasi-perpendicular shocks. The simulations show that electrons above a certain energy threshold experience shock-drift-acceleration. The transition energy between the thermal and non-thermal spectrum and the spectral index from the simulations are consistent with some of the X-ray spectra from RHESSI in the energy regime, $E\\lesssim 40\\sim 100$ keV. Plasma instabilities associated with the shock structure such as the modified-two-stream and the electron whistler/mirror instabilities are examined and compared with the numerical solutions of the kinetic dispersion relations.

  11. Shock Acceleration Model for the Toothbrush Radio Relic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu; Jones, T. W.

    2017-05-01

    Although many of the observed properties of giant radio relics detected in the outskirts of galaxy clusters can be explained by relativistic electrons accelerated at merger-driven shocks, significant puzzles remain. In the case of the so-called Toothbrush relic, the shock Mach number estimated from X-ray observations ({M}{{X}}≈ 1.2{--}1.5) is substantially weaker than that inferred from the radio spectral index ({M}{rad}≈ 2.8). Toward understanding such a discrepancy, we here consider the following diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) models: (1) weak-shock models with {M}{{s}}≲ 2 and a preexisting population of cosmic-ray electrons (CRe) with a flat energy spectrum, and (2) strong-shock models with {M}{{s}}≈ 3 and either shock-generated suprathermal electrons or preexisting fossil CRe. We calculate the synchrotron emission from the accelerated CRe, following the time evolution of the electron DSA, and the subsequent radiative cooling and postshock turbulent acceleration (TA). We find that both models could reproduce reasonably well the observed integrated radio spectrum of the Toothbrush relic, but the observed broad transverse profile requires the stochastic acceleration by downstream turbulence, which we label “turbulent acceleration” or TA to distinguish it from DSA. Moreover, to account for the almost uniform radio spectral index profile along the length of the relic, the weak-shock models require a preshock region over 400 kpc with a uniform population of preexisting CRe with a high cutoff energy (≳ 40 {GeV}). Due to the short cooling time, it is challenging to explain the origin of such energetic electrons. Therefore, we suggest the strong-shock models with low-energy seed CRe (≲ 150 {MeV}) are preferred for the radio observations of this relic.

  12. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat histiocytoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kolla V, P Rasad; Aftab Taiyab; D Jyothi; Usha K Srinivas; Amere S Sreedhar

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock response is associated with the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsps) which is strictly regulated by different members of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs). We previously reported that a rat histiocytoma, BC-8 failed to synthesize Hsps when subjected to typical heat shock conditions (42°C, 60 min). The lack of Hsp synthesis in these cells was due to a failure in HSF1 DNA binding activity. In the present study we report that BC-8 tumor cells when subjected to heat shock at higher temperature (43°C, 60 min) or incubation for longer time at 42°C, exhibited necrosis characteristics; however, under mild heat shock (42°C, 30 min) conditions cells showed activation of autophagy. Mild heat shock treatment induced proteolysis of HSF1, and under similar conditions we observed an increase in HSF2 expression followed by its enhanced DNA binding activity. Inhibiting HSF1 proteolysis by reversible proteasome inhibition failed to inhibit heat shock induced autophagy. Compromising HSF2 expression but not HSF1 resulted in the inhibition of autophagy, suggesting HSF2 dependent activation of autophagy. We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat inducible and functions in heat shock induced autophagic cell death in BC-8 tumor cells.

  13. Emission Trading

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The work concerns Emission Trading Scheme from perspektive of taxes and accounting. I should show problems with emission trading. The work concerns practical example of trading with emission allowance.

  14. Origin of [OI] and [CII] emission in Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Goran

    Observations with Herschel/ PACS show that [OI] 63 micron is ubiquitous in young stellar objects (YSOs). In Class II sources the emission is mostly unresolved, whereas it can be quite extended in deeply embedded Class 0 sources powering highly collimated molecular outflows. Since [OI] can be excited in both photon dominated regions (PDRs) and in shocks, and because the Herschel/ PACS [OI] observations do not resolve the [OI] emission, it is uncertain what fraction of emission originates in PDRs (disks) versus shocks. [CII], when detected, is often spatially extended, and likely to originate from PDR emission in the surrounding cloud. Since extended [CII] emission seems to correlate with extended [OI] emission, it is often assumed that the emission originates from the same region. This assumption is almost certainly false. [CII] is not excited in shocks, nor does it seem to trace emission from disks.Here we will use GREAT in the L2/H configuration to obtain velocity resolved spectra of a small sample of YSOs from the Herschel GASPS and DIGIT sample to investigate whether [OI] is primarly is excited from dissociative J-shocks or irradiated J/C shocks and how [CII] relates to [OI].

  15. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  16. CMEs as a Shock Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Martínez, Guadalupe; Becerril, Carlos; Lopez-Lopez, Jose Luis

    Interplanetary shocks are associated to approximately one third of the CMEs detected in the interplanetary medium. Even though they have been associated to fast CMEs (V>1000 km/s) it has been shown that some slow ones (V 300 km/s) presented shocks at 1 AU. The structure of the features observed in coronograph images can be hardly compared to the ones detected beyond the coronograph field of view, where the shock is clearly identify. For a few cases, the shock in front of the CME has been distinguish in white light images, but, is there a real visual difference between the CME itself and the considered shock? In this work we compare the optical characteristics of CMEs and some hydrodynamic parameters of ICMEs to show that the feature observed in white light images can be considered as a shock structure.

  17. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubitt, Toby [Department of Computer Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom and Centre for Quantum Information and Foundations, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kastoryano, Michael [NBIA, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Montanaro, Ashley [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Temme, Kristan [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  18. Clocked Thrust Reversers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft includes a fuselage including a propulsion system supported within an aft portion. A thrust reverser is mounted proximate to the propulsion system for directing thrust in a direction to slow the aircraft. The thrust reverser directs thrust at an angle relative to a vertical plane to reduce interference on control surfaces and reduce generation of underbody lift.

  19. Atrioventricular Pacemaker Lead Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet K Aktas, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During cardiac surgery temporary epicardial atrial and ventricular leads are placed in case cardiac pacing is required postoperatively. We present the first reported series of patients with reversal of atrioventricular electrodes in the temporary pacemaker without any consequent deleterious hemodynamic effect. We review the electrocardiographic findings and discuss the findings that lead to the discovery of atrioventricular lead reversal.

  20. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  1. Timing, method and discontinuation of hydrocortisone administration for septic shock patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Estrada, Miguel A; Chávez-Peña, Quetzalcóatl; Reynoso-Estrella, Claudia I; Rios-Zermeño, Jorge; Aguilera-González, Pável E; García-Soto, Miguel A; Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    AIM To characterize the prescribing patterns for hydrocortisone for patients with septic shock and perform an exploratory analysis in order to identify the variables associated with better outcomes. METHODS This prospective cohort study included 59 patients with septic shock who received stress-dose hydrocortisone. It was performed at 2 critical care units in academic hospitals from June 1st, 2015, to July 31st, 2016. Demographic data, comorbidities, medical management details, adverse effects related to corticosteroids, and outcomes were collected after the critical care physician indicated initiation of hydrocortisone. Univariate comparison between continuous and bolus administration of hydrocortisone was performed, including multivariate analysis, as well as Kaplan-Meier analysis to compare the proportion of shock reversal at 7 d after presentation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determined the best cut-off criteria for initiation of hydrocortisone associated with the highest probability of shock reversal. We addressed the effects of the taper strategy for discontinuation of hydrocortisone, noting risk of shock relapse and adverse effects. RESULTS All-cause 30-d mortality was 42%. Hydrocortisone was administered as a continuous infusion in 54.2% of patients; time to reversal of shock was 49 h longer in patients who were given a bolus administration [59 h (range, 47.5-90.5) vs 108 h (range, 63.2-189); P = 0.001]. The maximal dose of norepinephrine after initiation of hydrocortisone was lower in patients on continuous infusion [0.19 μg/kg per minute (range, 0.11-0.28 μg)] compared with patients who were given bolus [0.34 μg/kg per minute (range, 0.16-0.49); P = 0.004]. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a higher proportion of shock reversal at 7 d in patients with continuous infusion compared to those given bolus (83% vs 63%; P = 0.004). There was a good correlation between time to initiation of hydrocortisone and time to reversal of shock (r = 0

  2. Physics of collisionless shocks - theory and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Novo, A Stockem; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    Collisionless shocks occur in various fields of physics. In the context of space and astrophysics they have been investigated for many decades. However, a thorough understanding of shock formation and particle acceleration is still missing. Collisionless shocks can be distinguished into electromagnetic and electrostatic shocks. Electromagnetic shocks are of importance mainly in astrophysical environments and they are mediated by the Weibel or filamentation instability. In such shocks, charged particles gain energy by diffusive shock acceleration. Electrostatic shocks are characterized by a strong electrostatic field, which leads to electron trapping. Ions are accelerated by reflection from the electrostatic potential. Shock formation and particle acceleration will be discussed in theory and simulations.

  3. Stability of oblique shock front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Shuxing(陈恕行)

    2002-01-01

    The stability of the weak planar oblique shock front with respect to the perturbation of the wall is discussed. By the analysis of the formation and the global construction of shock and its asymptotic behaviour for stationary supersonic flow along a smooth rigid wall we obtain the stability of the solution containing a weak planar shock front. The stability can be used to single out a physically reasonable solution together with the entropy condition.

  4. Towards Reversible Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tiezzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we incorporate reversibility into structured communication-based programming, to allow parties of a session to automatically undo, in a rollback fashion, the effect of previously executed interactions. This permits taking different computation paths along the same session, as well as reverting the whole session and starting a new one. Our aim is to define a theoretical basis for examining the interplay in concurrent systems between reversible computation and session-based interaction. We thus enrich a session-based variant of pi-calculus with memory devices, dedicated to keep track of the computation history of sessions in order to reverse it. We discuss our initial investigation concerning the definition of a session type discipline for the proposed reversible calculus, and its practical advantages for static verification of safe composition in communication-centric distributed software performing reversible computations.

  5. Hugoniot equation of state of rock materials under shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q B; Braithwaite, C H; Zhao, J

    2017-01-28

    Two sets of shock compression tests (i.e. conventional and reverse impact) were conducted to determine the shock response of two rock materials using a plate impact facility. Embedded manganin stress gauges were used for the measurements of longitudinal stress and shock velocity. Photon Doppler velocimetry was used to capture the free surface velocity of the target. Experimental data were obtained on a fine-grained marble and a coarse-grained gabbro over a shock pressure range of approximately 1.5-12 GPa. Gabbro exhibited a linear Hugoniot equation of state (EOS) in the pressure-particle velocity (P-up) plane, while for marble a nonlinear response was observed. The EOS relations between shock velocity (US) and particle velocity (up) are linearly fitted as US = 2.62 + 3.319up and US = 5.4 85 + 1.038up for marble and gabbro, respectively.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  6. A series of shocks and edges in Abell 2219

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, R E A; Applegate, D E; Kelly, P L; von der Linden, A; Mantz, A; Million, E; Morris, R G; Russell, H R

    2015-01-01

    We present deep, 170 ks, Chandra X-ray observations of Abell 2219 (z=0.23) one of the hottest and most X-ray luminous clusters known, and which is experiencing a major merger event. We discover a 'horseshoe' of high temperature gas surrounding the ram-pressure-stripped, bright, hot, X-ray cores. We confirm an X-ray shock front located north-west of the X-ray centroid and along the projected merger axis. We also find a second shock front to the south-east of the X-ray centroid making this only the second cluster where both the shock and reverse shock are confirmed with X-ray temperature measurements. We also present evidence for a sloshing cold front in the 'remnant tail' of one of the sub-cluster cores. The cold front and north-west shock front geometrically bound the radio halo and appear to be directly influencing the radio properties of the cluster.

  7. Grain Destruction in Interstellar Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar shock waves can erode and destroy grains present in the shocked gas, primarily as the result of sputtering and grain-grain collisions. Uncertainties in current estimates of sputtering yields are reviewed. Results are presented for the simple case of sputtering of fast grains being stopped in cold gas. An upper limit is derived for sputtering of refractory grains in C-type MHD shocks: shock speeds $v_s \\gtrsim 50 \\kms$ are required for return of more than 30\\% of the silicate to t...

  8. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  9. Management of refractory cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyentovich, Alex; Barghash, Maya H; Hochman, Judith S

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs in response to reduced cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume and results in tissue hypoxia. Cardiogenic shock has several underlying aetiologies, with the most common being acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Refractory cardiogenic shock presents as persistent tissue hypoperfusion despite administration of adequate doses of two vasoactive medications and treatment of the underlying aetiology. Investigators of the SHOCK trial reported a long-term mortality benefit of emergency revascularization for shock complicating AMI. Since the publication of the SHOCK trial and subsequent guideline recommendations, the increase in community-based use of percutaneous coronary intervention for this condition has resulted in a significant decline in mortality. Despite these successes in the past 15 years, mortality still remains exceptionally high, particularly in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock and summarize the data on the available therapeutics and their limitations. Although new mechanical circulatory support devices have been shown to improve haemodynamic variables in patients with shock complicating AMI, they did not improve clinical outcomes and are associated with high costs and complications.

  10. Observations of Bow Shocks of Runaway Stars with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, A; Klepser, S

    2016-01-01

    Runaway stars form bow shocks by sweeping up interstellar matter in their direction of motion. Theoretical models predict a spectrally wide non-thermal component reaching up to gamma-ray energies at a flux level detectable with current instruments. They were motivated by a detection of non-thermal radio emission from the bow shock of BD$+43^\\circ3654$ and a possible detection of non-thermal X-rays from AE Aurigae. A search in the high-energy regime using data from \\textit{Fermi}-LAT resulted in flux upper limits for 27 candidates listed in the first E-BOSS catalogue. We perform the first systematic search for TeV emission from bow shocks of runaway stars. Using all available archival H.E.S.S. I data we search for very-high-energy gamma-ray emission at the positions of bow shock candidates listed in the second E-BOSS catalogue. This catalogue comprises 73 bow shock candidates, 32 of which have been observed with the H.E.S.S. telescopes. None of the observed bow shock candidates shows significant emission in th...

  11. Jet or shock breakout? The low-luminosity GRB 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3 M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  12. Vibrational and rotational temperature measurements in a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    Vibrational and rotational temperatures in nitrogen test gas relaxing behind a normal shock are measured using the emission spectra of N2(+)(1-) and N2(2+) band systems in an electric-arc driven shock tube, at a shock velocity of 6.2 km/sec. The results are compared with similar data obtained by AVCO-Everett Research Laboratory during the 1960s. The vibrational and rotational temperatures in the equilibrium region obtained in the present experiment agreed with those of AVCO, but those in the nonequilibrium region are greatly different from the AVCO results. The measured rotational temperature seems to be in nonequilibrium with the translational temperature, contradicting the two-temperature model widely used in CFD. Also, the relaxation rates for both N2(+) and N2 molecules seem to be of the same order.

  13. Identification of Shocks in the Spectra from Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, S; Mandal, Samir; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2005-01-01

    We study the spectral properties of a low angular momentum flow as a function of the shock strength, compression ratio, accretion rate and flow geometry. In the absence of a satisfactory description of magnetic fields inside the advective disk, we consider the presence of only stochastic fields and use the ratio of the field energy to the gravitational energy density as a parameter. We not only include `conventional' synchrotron emission and Comptonization by Maxwell-Bolzmann electrons in the gas, but we also compute these effects due to power-law electrons. For strong shocks, a bump is produced due to the post-shock flow. A power-law spectral components due to the thermal and non-thermal electrons appear after this bump.

  14. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF A SODA LIME GLASS THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert FANTOZZI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparatively to the as received soda lime glass samples, the strength distribution after thermal shocks showed the appearance of a second branch in the Weibull curves. This branch is observed for temperature differences (ΔT equal or higher than the critical temperature difference (ΔTc for both water and motor oil cooling baths. The dispersion is more spread out in these two baths in comparison with the olive oil bath probably because of more pronounced slow crack growth effect. The Weibull modulus varies according to the used cooling bath and the considered temperature difference. In the case of thermal shock caused by air blast cooling at T = 20°C, a bimodal distribution is observed for only the critical state. The initial cracking time, obtained by acoustic emission, corresponds to the unstable propagation of the most critical defect. The number of cracks induced by thermal shock is proportional to the number of acoustic events.

  15. [Toxic shock syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyll, T; Bílková, M; Revinová, A; Müller, M; Čurdová, M; Zlámal, M; Holub, M

    2015-10-01

    The authors present an up-to-date review of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) - a life-threatening condition where toxins of the Gram-positive bacteria Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes play a key role in the pathogenesis. The authors provide insight into the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the disease and point out the relevant patient history data and clinical signs and symptoms that may indicate progression of TSS. Last but not least, the state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to early and full blown TSS are summarized. Case reports are presented to illustrate two different etiological forms of this relatively rare nosological entity.

  16. A shocking experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Berns

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We study whether probability weighting is observed when individuals are presented with a series of choices between lotteries consisting of real non-monetary adverse outcomes, electric shocks. Our estimation of the parameters of the probability weighting function proposed by Tversky and Kahneman (1992 are similar to those obtained in previous studies of lottery choice for negative monetary payoffs and negative hypothetical payoffs. In addition, common ratio violations in choice behavior are widespread. Our results provide evidence that probability weighting is a general phenomenon, independent of the source of disutility.

  17. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Chris D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Addessio, Francis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wynn, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  18. Hypovolemic shock resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Leslie; Costantini, Todd W; Coimbra, Raul

    2012-12-01

    Several changes in the way patients with hemorrhagic shock are resuscitated have occurred over the past decades, including permissive hypotension, minimal crystalloid resuscitation, earlier blood transfusion, and higher plasma and platelet-to-red cell ratios. Hemostatic adjuncts, such as tranexamic acid and prothrombin complex, and the use of new methods of assessing coagulopathy are also being incorporated into resuscitation of the bleeding patient. These ideas have been incorporated by many trauma centers into institutional massive transfusion protocols, and adoption of these protocols has resulted in improvements in mortality and morbidity. This article discusses each of these new resuscitation strategies and the evidence supporting their use.

  19. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  20. Magnetic field evolution and reversals in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Price, D. J.; Pettitt, A. R.; Bate, M. R.; Tricco, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the evolution of galactic magnetic fields using 3D smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of galaxies with an imposed spiral potential. We consider the appearance of reversals of the field, and amplification of the field. We find that magnetic field reversals occur when the velocity jump across the spiral shock is above ≈20 km s-1, occurring where the velocity change is highest, typically at the inner Lindblad resonance in our models. Reversals also occur at corotation, where the direction of the velocity field reverses in the corotating frame of a spiral arm. They occur earlier with a stronger amplitude spiral potential, and later or not at all with weaker or no spiral arms. The presence of a reversal at radii of around 4-6 kpc in our fiducial model is consistent with a reversal identified in the Milky Way, though we caution that alternative Galaxy models could give a similar reversal. We find that relatively high resolution, a few million particles in SPMHD, is required to produce consistent behaviour of the magnetic field. Amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the models, and while some may be genuinely attributable to differential rotation or spiral arms, some may be a numerical artefact. We check our results using ATHENA, finding reversals but less amplification of the field, suggesting that some of the amplification of the field with SPMHD is numerical.

  1. Particle Acceleration at Shocks: Insights from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. W. Jones

    2011-12-01

    I review some basic properties of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the context of young supernova remnants (SNRs). I also point out some key differences with cosmological, cluster-related shocks. DSA seems to be very efficient in strong, young SNR shocks. Provided the magnetic fields exceed some hundreds of Gauss (possibly amplified by CR related dynamics), these shocks can accelerate cosmic ray hadrons to PeV energies in the time available to them. Electron energies, limited by radiative losses, are likely limited to the TeV range. Injection of fresh particles at these shocks is poorly understood, but hadrons are much more easily injected than the more highly magnetized electrons. That seems supported by observational data, as well. So, while CR protons in young SNRs may play very major roles in the SNR evolution, the CR electron populations have minimal such impact, despite their observational importance.

  2. THE MAXIMUM ENERGY OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES IN RELATIVISTIC COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sironi, Lorenzo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Arons, Jonathan, E-mail: lsironi@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Department of Physics, and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock that propagates with relativistic velocities into the magnetized interstellar medium. By means of multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the acceleration performance of weakly magnetized relativistic shocks, in the magnetization range 0 {approx}< {sigma} {approx}< 10{sup -1}. The pre-shock magnetic field is orthogonal to the flow, as generically expected for relativistic shocks. We find that relativistic perpendicular shocks propagating in electron-positron plasmas are efficient particle accelerators if the magnetization is {sigma} {approx}< 10{sup -3}. For electron-ion plasmas, the transition to efficient acceleration occurs for {sigma} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. Here, the acceleration process proceeds similarly for the two species, since the electrons enter the shock nearly in equipartition with the ions, as a result of strong pre-heating in the self-generated upstream turbulence. In both electron-positron and electron-ion shocks, we find that the maximum energy of the accelerated particles scales in time as {epsilon}{sub max}{proportional_to}t {sup 1/2}. This scaling is shallower than the so-called (and commonly assumed) Bohm limit {epsilon}{sub max}{proportional_to}t, and it naturally results from the small-scale nature of the Weibel turbulence generated in the shock layer. In magnetized plasmas, the energy of the accelerated particles increases until it reaches a saturation value {epsilon}{sub sat}/{gamma}{sub 0} m{sub i}c {sup 2} {approx} {sigma}{sup -1/4}, where {gamma}{sub 0} m{sub i}c {sup 2} is the mean energy per particle in the upstream bulk flow. Further energization is prevented by the fact that the self-generated turbulence is confined within a finite region of thickness {proportional_to}{sigma}{sup -1/2} around the shock. Our results can provide physically

  3. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  4. Travelling interplanetary shocks: their local orientations and inference of their global characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Reames, D. V.; Lepping, R. P.; Schwenn, R.; Farrugia, C. J.; Wu, C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kaspers, J. C.

    2004-05-01

    The orientation of the evaluated normal direction to the interplanetary shock tells us of its local propagation in the interplanetary medium. It has recently been established for case studies like the Oct 19, 1995 and the July 15, 2000 (1) interplanetary magnetic clouds that the orientation of the respective shock normals appear consistent with their overall evolution, e.g., orientation and propagation of the driver. We test this result for a series of shocks observed simultaneously at widely extended locations. Preliminary single case studies (Jan 1978, Sept 1978, and Apr 1979) are used to infer the global geometry of the shock. We examine the relationship between the existence of a strong shock and the level of energization and intensity of the gradual solar energetic particle events. We will test hypotheses on the possible correlation between the extension of the strong shock and the level of energization and flux intensity observed for gradual solar energetic particle events. For selected cases, we also apply type II radio burst remote sensing using ISEE-3 radio data. Also we compare with some unusual shocks of the current solar cycle. For this purpose we will mainly use Wind magnetic field and plasma data from the MFI and SWE instruments, as well as radio emissions from its radio receiver WAVES. The shock normal will be tested against shock passage at other spacecraft (ACE, IMP-8). [(1) see e.g. Lepping et al, Sol Phys, 204, 287, 2001.

  5. Tandem shock waves in medicine and biology: a review of potential applications and successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, P.; Fernández, F.; Gutiérrez-Aceves, J.; Fernández, E.; Alvarez, U. M.; Sunka, P.; Loske, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock waves have been established as a safe and effective treatment for a wide range of diseases. Research groups worldwide are working on improving shock wave technology and developing new applications of shock waves to medicine and biology. The passage of a shock wave through soft tissue, fluids, and suspensions containing cells may result in acoustic cavitation i.e., the expansion and violent collapse of microbubbles, which generates secondary shock waves and the emission of microjets of fluid. Cavitation has been recognized as a significant phenomenon that produces both desirable and undesirable biomedical effects. Several studies have shown that cavitation can be controlled by emitting two shock waves that can be delayed by tenths or hundreds of microseconds. These dual-pulse pressure pulses, which are known as tandem shock waves, have been shown to enhance in vitro and in vivo urinary stone fragmentation, cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, delay tumor growth, enhance the bactericidal effect of shock waves and significantly increase the efficiency of genetic transformations in bacteria and fungi. This article provides an overview of the basic physical principles, methodologies, achievements and potential uses of tandem shock waves to improve biomedical applications.

  6. Nonstationarity of a two-dimensional perpendicular shock: Competing mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembège, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe; Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2009-03-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are used for analyzing in detail different nonstationary behaviors of a perpendicular supercritical shock. A recent study by Hellinger et al. (2007) has shown that the front of a supercritical shock can be dominated by the emission of large-amplitude whistler waves. These waves inhibit the self-reformation driven by the reflected ions; then, the shock front appears almost ``quasi-stationary.'' The present study stresses new complementary results. First, for a fixed β i value, the whistler waves emission (WWE) persists for high M A above a critical Mach number (i.e., M A >= M A WWE). The quasi-stationarity is only apparent and disappears when considering the full 3-D field profiles. Second, for lower M A , the self-reformation is retrieved and becomes dominant as the amplitude of the whistler waves becomes negligible. Third, there exists a transition regime in M A within which both processes compete each other. Fourth, these results are observed for a strictly perpendicular shock only as B 0 is within the simulation plane. When B 0 is out of the simulation plane, no whistler waves emission is evidenced and only self-reformation is recovered. Fifth, the occurrence and disappearance of the nonlinear whistler waves are well recovered in both 2-D PIC and 2-D hybrid simulations. The impacts on the results of the mass ratio (2-D PIC simulations), of the resistivity and spatial resolution (2-D hybrid simulations), and of the size of the simulation box along the shock front are analyzed in detail.

  7. An algebra of reversible computation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules, basic reversible processes algebra (BRPA), algebra of reversible communicating processes (ARCP), recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  8. An Algebra of Reversible Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Yong WANG

    2014-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules, basic reversible processes algebra (BRPA), algebra of reversible communicating processes (ARCP), recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  9. An algebra of reversible computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules: basic reversible processes algebra, algebra of reversible communicating processes, recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  10. Numerical study of emission and dynamics from a TDE-powered jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A transient event Swift J1644+57 is thought to be caused by the emission from a collimated relativistic jet. The jet, powered by the sudden onset of accretion onto a supermassive black hole following the tidal disruption of a star, collides with the gaseous circumnuclear medium and produces forward and reverse shocks which emit synchrotron radiation. We perform 1D and 2D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations using the MRGENESIS code. The aim of the simulations is to study the dynamics of a jet thought to exist in transient events such as Swift J1644+57, as discussed in recent literature. We discuss 1D and 2D jet evolution, on-axis radio light curves and differences between 1D and 2D jet dynamics.

  11. Molecular ions in the protostellar shock L1157-B1

    CERN Document Server

    Podio, L; Ceccarelli, C; Codella, C; Bachiller, R

    2014-01-01

    We perform a complete census of molecular ions with an abundance larger than 1e-10 in the protostellar shock L1157-B1 by means of an unbiased high-sensitivity survey obtained with the IRAM-30m and Herschel/HIFI. By means of an LVG radiative transfer code the gas physical conditions and fractional abundances of molecular ions are derived. The latter are compared with estimates of steady-state abundances in the cloud and their evolution in the shock calculated with the chemical model Astrochem. We detect emission from HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, HCS+, and, for the first time in a shock, from HOCO+, and SO+. The bulk of the emission peaks at blueshifted velocity, ~ 0.5-3 km/s with respect to systemic, has a width of ~ 4-8 km/s, and is associated with the outflow cavities (T_kin ~ 20-70 K, n(H2) ~ 1e5 cm-3). Observed HCO+ and N2H+ abundances are in agreement with steady-state abundances in the cloud and with their evolution in the compressed and heated gas in the shock for cosmic rays ionization rate Z = 3e-16 s-1. HOCO+...

  12. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  13. Reversible Data Hiding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Yadav

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reversible data hiding is a technique that is used to hide data inside an image. The data is hidden in such a way that the exact or original data is not visible. The hidden data can be retrieved as and when required. There are several methods that are used in reversible data hiding techniques like Watermarking, Lossless embedding and encryption. In this paper we present a review of reversible watermarking techniques and show different methods that are used to get reversible data hiding technique with higher embedding capacity and invisible objects. Watermark need not be hidden. Watermarking can be applied to 1. Images, 2. Text, 3. Audio/video, 4. Software.

  14. A Multi-wavelength Study of an Isolated MSP Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Slane, Patrick; Green, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    PSR J2124-3358 is the only single MSP known to sport an Halpha bow shock. This shock, now also seen in the UV, encloses an unusual X-ray pulsar wind nebula (PWN) with a long off-axis trail. Combining the X-ray and UV images with AAT/KOALA integral field spectroscopy of the Halpha emission, we have an unusually complete picture of the pulsar's (101 km/s transverse) motion and the latitudinal distribution of its wind flux. These images reveal the 3-D orientation of a hard-spectrum PWN jet and a softer equatorial outflow. Within the context of a thin shock model, we can constrain the total energy output of the pulsar and the neutron star moment of inertia. The IFU spectra show extreme Balmer dominance, which also constrains the nature of the UV shock emission.

  15. 32-channel pyrometer with high dynamic range for studies of shocked nanothermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    A 32-channel optical pyrometer has been developed for studying temperature dynamics of shock-initiated reactive materials with one nanosecond time resolution and high dynamic range. The pyrometer consists of a prism spectrograph which directs the spectrally-resolved emission to 32 fiber optics and 32 photomultiplier tubes and digitizers. Preliminary results show shock-initiated reactions of a nanothermite composite, nano CuO/Al in nitrocellulose binder, consists of three stages. The first stage occurred at 30 ns, right after the shock unloaded, the second stage at 100 ns and the third at 1 μs, and the temperatures ranged from 2100K to 3000K. Time-resolved emission spectra suggest hot spots formed during shock unloading, which initiated the bulk thermite/nitrocellulose reaction.

  16. Reversible flowchart languages and the structured reversible program theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Many irreversible computation models have reversible counterparts, but these are poorly understood at present. We introduce reversible flowcharts with an assertion operator and show that any reversible flowchart can be simulated by a structured reversible flowchart using only three control flow o...... justification for low-level machine code for reversible microprocessors as well as high-level block-structured reversible languages. We give examples for both such languages and illustrate them with a lossless encoder for permutations given by Dijkstra....

  17. Shock waves in polycrystalline iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C; Lomdahl, Peter S; Albers, Robert C; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew; Holian, Brad Lee

    2007-03-30

    The propagation of shock waves through polycrystalline iron is explored by large-scale atomistic simulations. For large enough shock strengths the passage of the wave causes the body-centered-cubic phase to transform into a close-packed phase with most structure being isotropic hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and, depending on shock strength and grain orientation, some fraction of face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. The simulated shock Hugoniot is compared to experiments. By calculating the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) directly from the atomic configurations, a comparison to experimental EXAFS measurements of nanosecond-laser shocks shows that the experimental data is consistent with such a phase transformation. However, the atomistically simulated EXAFS spectra also show that an experimental distinction between the hcp or fcc phase is not possible based on the spectra alone.

  18. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  19. Nonparametric Regression with Common Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Souza-Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a nonparametric regression model for cross-sectional data in the presence of common shocks. Common shocks are allowed to be very general in nature; they do not need to be finite dimensional with a known (small number of factors. I investigate the properties of the Nadaraya-Watson kernel estimator and determine how general the common shocks can be while still obtaining meaningful kernel estimates. Restrictions on the common shocks are necessary because kernel estimators typically manipulate conditional densities, and conditional densities do not necessarily exist in the present case. By appealing to disintegration theory, I provide sufficient conditions for the existence of such conditional densities and show that the estimator converges in probability to the Kolmogorov conditional expectation given the sigma-field generated by the common shocks. I also establish the rate of convergence and the asymptotic distribution of the kernel estimator.

  20. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  1. THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE OF A SODA LIME GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. MALOU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the thermal shock of a three millimeters thickness soda lime glass using the hot-cold thermal shock technique. The cooling was made by ambient air jet on previously warmed samples. The heat transfer coefficient was about 600 W/°C.m2 (Biot number β = 0.3. The thermal shock duration was fixed at 6 seconds. The hot temperature was taken between 100°C and 550°C while the cold temperature of the air flux was kept constant at 20°C. The acoustic emission technique was used for determining the failure time and the critical temperature difference (ΔTC. By referring to experimental results, thermal shock modelling computations are conducted. Our aim is especially focused on the fracture initiation moments during the cooling process and on the crack initiation sites. The used modeling is based on the local approach of the thermal shock during the experimental data treatment. For each test, the temperature profile and the transient stress state through the samples thickness are determined. By applying the linear superposition property of the stress intensity factors, evolution of the stress intensity factor KI in function of the pre-existing natural flaws in the glass surface is established. The size of the critical flaw is determined by the linear fracture mechanics laws. Computation results confirm the experimental values of the critical difference temperature obtained that is the source of the glass degradation.

  2. Shock heating of the merging galaxy cluster A521

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, H; Markevitch, M; Giacintucci,; Brunetti, G; 10.1088/0004-637X/764/1/82

    2013-01-01

    A521 is an interacting galaxy cluster located at z=0.247, hosting a low frequency radio halo connected to an eastern radio relic. Previous Chandra observations hinted at the presence of an X-ray brightness edge at the position of the relic, which may be a shock front. We analyze a deep observation of A521 recently performed with XMM-Newton in order to probe the cluster structure up to the outermost regions covered by the radio emission. The cluster atmosphere exhibits various brightness and temperature anisotropies. In particular, two cluster cores appear to be separated by two cold fronts. We find two shock fronts, one that was suggested by Chandra and that is propagating to the east, and another to the southwestern cluster outskirt. The two main interacting clusters appear to be separated by a shock heated region, which exhibits a spatial correlation with the radio halo. The outer edge of the radio relic coincides spatially with a shock front, suggesting this shock is responsible for the generation of cosmi...

  3. Plasma ion stratification by weak planar shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Andrei N.; Keenan, Brett D.; Taitano, William T.; Chacón, Luis

    2017-09-01

    We derive fluid equations for describing steady-state planar shocks of a moderate strength ( 0 shock Mach number) propagating through an unmagnetized quasineutral collisional plasma comprising two separate ion species. In addition to the standard fluid shock quantities, such as the total mass density, mass-flow velocity, and electron and average ion temperatures, the equations describe shock stratification in terms of variations in the relative concentrations and temperatures of the two ion species along the shock propagation direction. We have solved these equations analytically for weak shocks ( 0 shocks, and they have been used to verify kinetic simulations of shocks in multi-ion plasmas.

  4. Steady shocks around black holes produced by sub-keplerian flows with negative energy

    CERN Document Server

    Molteni, D; Teresi, V

    2006-01-01

    We discuss a special case of formation of axisymmetric shocks in the accretion flow of ideal gas onto a Schwarzschild black hole: when the total energy of the flow is negative. The result of our analysis enlarges the parameter space for which these steady shocks are exhibited in the accretion of gas rotating around relativistic stellar objects. Since keplerian disks have negative total energy, we guess that, in this energy range, the production of the shock phenomenon might be easier than in the case of positive energy. So our outcome reinforces the view that sub-keplerian flows of matter may significantly affect the physics of the high energy radiation emission from black hole candidates. We give a simple procedure to obtain analytically the position of the shocks. The comparison of the analytical results with the data of 1D and 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations confirms that the shocks form and are stable.

  5. Radiation from Particles Accelerated in Relativistic Jet Shocks and Shear-flows

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, K -I; Dutan, I; Zhang, B; Meli, A; Choi, E J; Min, K; Niemiec, J; Mizuno, Y; Medvedev, M; Nordlund, A; Frederiksen, J T; Sol, H; Pohl, M; Hartmann, D

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated particle acceleration and emission from shocks and shear flows associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet plasma propagating into an unmagnetized ambient plasma. Strong electro-magnetic fields are generated in the jet shock via the filamentation (Weibel) instability. Shock field strength and structure depend on plasma composition (($e^{\\pm}$ or $e^-$- $p^+$ plasmas) and Lorentz factor. In the velocity shear between jet and ambient plasmas, strong AC ($e^{\\pm}$ plasmas) or DC ($e^-$- $p^+$ plasmas) magnetic fields are generated via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI), and the magnetic field structure also depends on the jet Lorentz factor. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in shock generated magnetic fields. The spectra depend on the jet's initial Lorentz factor and temperature via the resulting particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. Our ongoing "Global" jet simulations containing shocks and velocity shears will ...

  6. XMM-Newton Large Program on SN1006 - II: Thermal Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Miceli, Marco; Vink, Jacco; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Based on the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006 and our newly developed spatially resolved spectroscopy tools (Paper~I), we study the thermal emission from ISM and ejecta of SN1006 by analyzing the spectra extracted from 583 tessellated regions dominated by thermal emission. With some key improvements in spectral analysis as compared to Paper~I, we obtain much better spectral fitting results with less residuals. The spatial distributions of the thermal and ionization states of the ISM and ejecta show different features, which are consistent with a scenario that the ISM (ejecta) is heated and ionized by the forward (reverse) shock propagating outward (inward). Different elements have different spatial distributions and origins, with Ne mostly from the ISM, Si and S from the ejecta, and O and Mg from both ISM and ejecta. Fe L-shell lines are only detected in a small shell-like region SE to the center of SN1006, indicating that most of the Fe-rich ejecta has not yet or just recently been reached by the reverse s...

  7. Non-relativistic radiation mediated shock breakouts: III. Spectral properties of SN shock breakout

    CERN Document Server

    Sapir, Nir; Waxman, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of radiation emitted following shock breakout from a star's surface with a power-law density profile $\\rho \\propto x^n$ is investigated. Assuming planar geometry, local Compton equilibrium and bremsstrahlung emission as the dominant photon production mechanism, numerical solutions are obtained for the photon number density and temperature profiles as a function of time, for hydrogen-helium envelopes. The temperature solutions are determined by the breakout shock velocity $v_0$ and the pre-shock breakout density $\\rho_0$, and depend weakly on the value of n. Fitting formulas for the peak surface temperature at breakout as a function of $v_0$ and $\\rho_0$ are provided, with $T_{peak}\\approx 9.44\\exp{[12.63(v_0/c)^{1/2}]}$ eV, and the time dependence of the surface temperature is tabulated. The time integrated emitted spectrum is a robust prediction of the model, determined by $\\mathcal{T}_{\\rm peak}$ and $v_0$ alone and insensitive to details of light travel time or slight deviations from spherical...

  8. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  9. Dengue shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Sepehrar, Mona; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Nataraju, Aravinda Settikere; Kumbhat, Mounica; Sathyanarayana, Deepak; Gummadi, Siddharth; Burra, Hemanth Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne arthropod-borne viral (arboviral) tropical disease in humans affecting 50–528 million people worldwide. The acute abdominal complications of dengue fever are acute appendicitis, acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis and non-specific peritonitis. Acute pancreatitis with new onset diabetes in dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is very rarely reported. We describe a case of 30-year-old man admitted in intensive care unit and was diagnosed with DSS with RT-PCR, NS1 antigen and dengue IgM antibody being positive. Abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography confirmed acute pancreatitis. Patient required insulin after recovery. Diabetes mellitus caused by DSS is under-reported and lack of awareness may increase mortality and morbidity. PMID:28031845

  10. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  11. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  12. Atomistic modeling of shock-induced void collapse in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila, L P; Erhart, P; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A; Lubarda, V A; Schneider, M S; Becker, R; Kumar, M

    2005-03-09

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that shock-induced void collapse in copper occurs by emission of shear loops. These loops carry away the vacancies which comprise the void. The growth of the loops continues even after they collide and form sessile junctions, creating a hardened region around the collapsing void. The scenario seen in our simulations differs from current models that assume that prismatic loop emission is responsible for void collapse. We propose a new dislocation-based model that gives excellent agreement with the stress threshold found in the MD simulations for void collapse as a function of void radius.

  13. Observation and Modeling of a Termination Shock in a Solar Eruption as a Possible Particle Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Dale E.; Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S.; Shen, Chengcai; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    Solar eruptions and their associated solar flares are the most energetic particle accelerators in our solar system. Yet the acceleration mechanism remains uncertain. A possible candidate often invoked in the standard picture of solar eruptions is a termination shock, produced by fast reconnection outflows impinging upon dense, closed loops in a helmet-type geometry. However, the importance of termination shocks in solar particle acceleration remains controversial, mainly because there has been no direct detection of such shocks. Here we report direct imaging of the location and evolution of a termination shock during the rise phase of a solar eruption. The shock appears at radio wavelengths as a narrow surface sandwiched between multitudes of downward-moving plasma blobs and the underlying, newly-reconnected flaring loops, and evolves coherently with a loop-top hard X-ray source in the shock downstream region. The shock produces many short-lived, point-like radio sources, each interpreted as emission from a turbulence cell interacting with fast (nonthermal) electrons. These point-like radio sources clearly outline the termination shock front and their positions change in reaction to the arrival of the fast plasma blobs, which are well-reproduced by our numerical simulations based on a resistive magnetohydrodynamics reconnection model in a standard two-ribbon flare geometry. We further show that a temporary disruption of the shock coincides with a reduction of radio and hard X-ray emission associated with the energetic electron population. Our observations strongly favor a scenario in which the termination shock is responsible for accelerating electrons to high energies.

  14. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O C; Lembege, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebul\\ae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in-situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasize is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in a...

  15. The ``Ghost Shell'': Discovery of the Forward Shock from Colliding Winds about Eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, B. N.; Currie, D. G.; Kaufer, A.; Bacciotti, F.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the newly discovered ``Ghost Shell'' around eta Carinae. We have detected a high-velocity ( ~ - 850 km /s), spatially extended, narrow emission feature lying in front of the southeast lobe of eta Carinae's homunculus. This feature has the speed of a high-velocity shock but the spectrum of a low-velocity shock. We propose that the Ghost Shell is the forward shock between the fast stellar wind of the great eruption of 1842 and the older, slow, massive wind. This discovery is described in more detail in Currie, Dorland, & Kaufer (2002).

  16. Fermi Acceleration in Plasmoids interacting with Fast Shocks of Reconnection via Fractal Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizuka, N

    2013-01-01

    We propose the particle acceleration model coupled with multiple plasmoid ejections in a solar flare. Unsteady reconnection produces plasmoids in a current sheet and ejects them out to the fast shocks, where particles in a plasmoid are reflected upstream the shock front by magnetic mirror effect. As the plasmoid passes through the shock front, the reflection distance becomes shorter and shorter driving Fermi acceleration, until it becomes proton Larmor radius. The fractal distribution of plasmoids may also have a role in naturally explaining the power-law spectrum in nonthermal emissions.

  17. Magnetic field evolution and reversals in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, C L; Pettitt, A R; Bate, M R; Tricco, T

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of galactic magnetic fields using 3D smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of galaxies with an imposed spiral potential. We consider the appearance of reversals of the field, and amplification of the field. We find magnetic field reversals occur when the velocity jump across the spiral shock is above $\\approx$20km s$^{-1}$, occurring where the velocity change is highest, typically at the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) in our models. Reversals also occur at corotation, where the direction of the velocity field reverses in the co-rotating frame of a spiral arm. They occur earlier with a stronger amplitude spiral potential, and later or not at all with weaker or no spiral arms. The presence of a reversal at a radii of around 4--6 kpc in our fiducial model is consistent with a reversal identified in the Milky Way, though we caution that alternative Galaxy models could give a similar reversal. We find that relatively high resolution, a few million particles in SPMHD, is ...

  18. Shock compression of polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl D.B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Several shock studies have been made on polyurethane materials, both fully dense and distended in the form of foams. However, there is a lack of shock data between the densities of 0.321 and 1.264g/cm3 (fully dense. We present here data obtained from two different types of shock experiments at densities of 0.35, 0.5, 0.68, 0.78, and 0.9g/cm3 in order to fill in the density deficiencies and make it easier to develop an unreacted equation of state (EOS for polyurethane as a function of density. A thermodynamically consistent EOS was developed, based on the Helmholtz free energy, and was used to predict the shock properties of polyurethane materials at densities from 1.264 to 0.348g/cm3. These estimates are compared to the available data. The data match quite close to the predictions and provide a basis for calculating polyurethane foam shock processes. Chemical reaction has been observed at relatively high pressure (21.7 GPa in fully dense polyurethane in an earlier study, and the equation of state presented here is representative of the unreacted polyurethane foam. Lowering the density is expected to drop the shock pressure for chemical reaction, yet there is not enough data to address the low density shock reaction thresholds in this study.

  19. Bridgman's concern (shock compression science)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    In 1956 P. W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson, and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman's static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman's concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman's 1956 concerns.

  20. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.