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Sample records for reveals individual intermediates

  1. Do observations reveal accretion discs in intermediate polars

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    Hellier, C. (University Coll., London (UK). Mullard Space Science Lab.)

    1991-08-15

    It has been proposed that intermediate polars do not accrete through discs and that they may not possess discs. Observations of eclipses and emission lines provide strong evidence that discs are present in many intermediate polars, although it is less clear whether the accretion flows through these discs. An analysis of the EXOSAT database shows that many systems have orbital and beat period modulations which are small compared to the spin-pulses, suggesting disc accretion. There are, though, exceptions, notably TX Col where dominant orbital and beat period modulations indicate discless accretion. (author).

  2. Reactive intermediates revealed in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Jason D.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Chan, ManNin; Loza, Christine L.; Kwan, Alan J.; Hersey, Scott P.; Flagan, Richard C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Isoprene is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosol; however, the oxidation pathways that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have remained elusive. Here, we identify the role of two key reactive intermediates, epoxydiols of isoprene (IEPOX = β-IEPOX + δ-IEPOX) and methacryloylperoxynitrate (MPAN), which are formed during isoprene oxidation under low- and high-NOx conditions, respectively. Isoprene low-NOx SOA is enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol (mass yield 28.6%) over that in the presence of neutral aerosol (mass yield 1.3%). Increased uptake of IEPOX by acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions is shown to explain this enhancement. Under high-NOx conditions, isoprene SOA formation occurs through oxidation of its second-generation product, MPAN. The similarity of the composition of SOA formed from the photooxidation of MPAN to that formed from isoprene and methacrolein demonstrates the role of MPAN in the formation of isoprene high-NOx SOA. Reactions of IEPOX and MPAN in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants (i.e., acidic aerosol produced from the oxidation of SO2 and NO2, respectively) could be a substantial source of “missing urban SOA” not included in current atmospheric models. PMID:20080572

  3. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

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    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  4. Mechanical disassembly of single virus particles reveals kinetic intermediates predicted by theory.

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    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrillo, Pablo J P; de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2012-06-06

    New experimental approaches are required to detect the elusive transient intermediates predicted by simulations of virus assembly or disassembly. Here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to mechanically induce partial disassembly of single icosahedral T=1 capsids and virions of the minute virus of mice. The kinetic intermediates formed were imaged by AFM. The results revealed that induced disassembly of single minute-virus-of-mice particles is frequently initiated by loss of one of the 20 equivalent capsomers (trimers of capsid protein subunits) leading to a stable, nearly complete particle that does not readily lose further capsomers. With lower frequency, a fairly stable, three-fourths-complete capsid lacking one pentamer of capsomers and a free, stable pentamer were obtained. The intermediates most frequently identified (capsids missing one capsomer, capsids missing one pentamer of capsomers, and free pentamers of capsomers) had been predicted in theoretical studies of reversible capsid assembly based on thermodynamic-kinetic models, molecular dynamics, or oligomerization energies. We conclude that mechanical manipulation and imaging of simple virus particles by AFM can be used to experimentally identify kinetic intermediates predicted by simulations of assembly or disassembly. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative genomics reveals adaptive evolution of Asian tapeworm in switching to a new intermediate host

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    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Sen; Luo, Yingfeng; Xiao, Lihua; Luo, Xuenong; Gao, Shenghan; Dou, Yongxi; Zhang, Huangkai; Guo, Aijiang; Meng, Qingshu; Hou, Junling; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Shaohua; Yang, Meng; Meng, Xuelian; Mei, Hailiang; Li, Hui; He, Zilong; Zhu, Xueliang; Tan, Xinyu; Zhu, Xing-quan; Yu, Jun; Cai, Jianping; Zhu, Guan; Hu, Songnian; Cai, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Taenia saginata, Taenia solium and Taenia asiatica (beef, pork and Asian tapeworms, respectively) are parasitic flatworms of major public health and food safety importance. Among them, T. asiatica is a newly recognized species that split from T. saginata via an intermediate host switch ∼1.14 Myr ago. Here we report the 169- and 168-Mb draft genomes of T. saginata and T. asiatica. Comparative analysis reveals that high rates of gene duplications and functional diversifications might have partially driven the divergence between T. asiatica and T. saginata. We observe accelerated evolutionary rates, adaptive evolutions in homeostasis regulation, tegument maintenance and lipid uptakes, and differential/specialized gene family expansions in T. asiatica that may favour its hepatotropism in the new intermediate host. We also identify potential targets for developing diagnostic or intervention tools against human tapeworms. These data provide new insights into the evolution of Taenia parasites, particularly the recent speciation of T. asiatica. PMID:27653464

  6. Individual foraging strategies reveal niche overlap between endangered galapagos pinnipeds.

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    Stella Villegas-Amtmann

    Full Text Available Most competition studies between species are conducted from a population-level approach. Few studies have examined inter-specific competition in conjunction with intra-specific competition, with an individual-based approach. To our knowledge, none has been conducted on marine top predators. Sympatric Galapagos fur seals (Arctocephalus galapagoensis and sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki share similar geographic habitats and potentially compete. We studied their foraging niche overlap at Cabo Douglas, Fernandina Island from simultaneously collected dive and movement data to examine spatial and temporal inter- and intra-specific competition. Sea lions exhibited 3 foraging strategies (shallow, intermediate and deep indicating intra-specific competition. Fur seals exhibited one foraging strategy, diving predominantly at night, between 0-80 m depth and mostly at 19-22 h. Most sea lion dives also occurred at night (63%, between 0-40 m, within fur seals' diving depth range. 34% of sea lions night dives occurred at 19-22 h, when fur seals dived the most, but most of them occurred at dawn and dusk, when fur seals exhibited the least amount of dives. Fur seals and sea lions foraging behavior overlapped at 19 and 21 h between 0-30 m depths. Sea lions from the deep diving strategy exhibited the greatest foraging overlap with fur seals, in time (19 h, depth during overlapping time (21-24 m, and foraging range (37.7%. Fur seals foraging range was larger. Cabo Douglas northwest coastal area, region of highest diving density, is a foraging "hot spot" for both species. Fur seals and sea lions foraging niche overlap occurred, but segregation also occurred; fur seals primarily dived at night, while sea lions exhibited night and day diving. Both species exploited depths and areas exclusive to their species. Niche breadth generally increases with environmental uncertainty and decreased productivity. Potential competition between these species could be greater during

  7. X-ray structures of the signal recognition particle receptor reveal targeting cycle intermediates.

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    Christopher L Reyes

    Full Text Available The signal recognition particle (SRP and its conjugate receptor (SR mediate cotranslational targeting of a subclass of proteins destined for secretion to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in eukaryotes or to the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. Conserved active site residues in the GTPase domains of both SRP and SR mediate discrete conformational changes during formation and dissociation of the SRP.SR complex. Here, we describe structures of the prokaryotic SR, FtsY, as an apo protein and in two different complexes with a non-hydrolysable GTP analog (GMPPNP. These structures reveal intermediate conformations of FtsY containing GMPPNP and explain how the conserved active site residues position the nucleotide into a non-catalytic conformation. The basis for the lower specificity of binding of nucleotide in FtsY prior to heterodimerization with the SRP conjugate Ffh is also shown. We propose that these structural changes represent discrete conformational states assumed by FtsY during targeting complex formation and dissociation.

  8. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Reveals Structural Fluidity of a Phage T3 DNA Packaging Intermediate

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    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T.

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (1) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for stabilization of structure and then (2) determining of effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2d-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2d-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. PMID:22222979

  9. A priori resolution of the intermediate spectra in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle: the time evolution of the L spectrum revealed.

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    Zimányi, László; Saltiel, Jack; Brown, Leonid S; Lanyi, Janos K

    2006-02-23

    Resolution of the spectra of the intermediates in the photocycle of wild-type bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was achieved by singular value decomposition with exponential-fit-assisted self-modeling (SVD-EFASM) treatment of multichannel difference spectra measured at 5 degrees C during the course of the photocycle. New is the finding that two spectrally distinct L intermediates, L(1) and L(2), form sequentially. Our conclusion is that the photocycle is more complex than most published schemes. The dissection of the spectrally different L forms eliminates stoichiometric discrepancies usually appearing as systematically varying total intermediate concentrations before the onset of BR recovery. In addition, our analysis reveals that the red tails in the spectra of K and L(1) are more substantial than those of L(2) and BR. We suggest that these subtle differences in the shapes of the spectra reflect torsional and/or environmental differences in the retinyl chromophore.

  10. The white dwarf revealed in the intermediate polar V709 Cassiopeiae

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J M; De Martino, D; Matt, G; Motch, C

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented from the first detailed spectroscopic observations of the recently identified intermediate polar RXJ0028.8+5917/V709 Cas. The study of the emission line radial velocities allows us to remove the uncertainties on the different aliases of the orbital period and a best value is found at (0.2225 +/- 0.0002) day. It is also found that the system shows significant EW~ (2-4)A, broad absorptions affecting the Balmer lines from Hdelta to Hbeta. These broad absorptions are interpreted as the contribution of an underlying white dwarf atmosphere. The characteristics of the absorptions are found to be consistent with a DA log(g) = 8 white dwarf at a temperature of ~ 23 000 K, contributing ~ 17 % (at 4500 A) to the overall flux. This is the first direct detection of a white dwarf in an intermediate polar system. The absence of significant Zeeman splitting indicates a magnetic field lower than 10 MG, confirming that, at least in some cases, intermediate polars have weaker fields than polars. Different ...

  11. Iron isotopes reveal distinct dissolved iron sources and pathways in the intermediate versus deep Southern Ocean.

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    Abadie, Cyril; Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Pradoux, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck

    2017-01-31

    As an essential micronutrient, iron plays a key role in oceanic biogeochemistry. It is therefore linked to the global carbon cycle and climate. Here, we report a dissolved iron (DFe) isotope section in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Throughout the section, a striking DFe isotope minimum (light iron) is observed at intermediate depths (200-1,300 m), contrasting with heavier isotopic composition in deep waters. This unambiguously demonstrates distinct DFe sources and processes dominating the iron cycle in the intermediate and deep layers, a feature impossible to see with only iron concentration data largely used thus far in chemical oceanography. At intermediate depths, the data suggest that the dominant DFe sources are linked to organic matter remineralization, either in the water column or at continental margins. In deeper layers, however, abiotic non-reductive release of Fe (desorption, dissolution) from particulate iron-notably lithogenic-likely dominates. These results go against the common but oversimplified view that remineralization of organic matter is the major pathway releasing DFe throughout the water column in the open ocean. They suggest that the oceanic iron cycle, and therefore oceanic primary production and climate, could be more sensitive than previously thought to continental erosion (providing lithogenic particles to the ocean), particle transport within the ocean, dissolved/particle interactions, and deep water upwelling. These processes could also impact the cycles of other elements, including nutrients.

  12. Iron isotopes reveal distinct dissolved iron sources and pathways in the intermediate versus deep Southern Ocean

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    Abadie, Cyril; Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Pradoux, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck

    2017-01-01

    As an essential micronutrient, iron plays a key role in oceanic biogeochemistry. It is therefore linked to the global carbon cycle and climate. Here, we report a dissolved iron (DFe) isotope section in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Throughout the section, a striking DFe isotope minimum (light iron) is observed at intermediate depths (200–1,300 m), contrasting with heavier isotopic composition in deep waters. This unambiguously demonstrates distinct DFe sources and processes dominating the iron cycle in the intermediate and deep layers, a feature impossible to see with only iron concentration data largely used thus far in chemical oceanography. At intermediate depths, the data suggest that the dominant DFe sources are linked to organic matter remineralization, either in the water column or at continental margins. In deeper layers, however, abiotic non-reductive release of Fe (desorption, dissolution) from particulate iron—notably lithogenic—likely dominates. These results go against the common but oversimplified view that remineralization of organic matter is the major pathway releasing DFe throughout the water column in the open ocean. They suggest that the oceanic iron cycle, and therefore oceanic primary production and climate, could be more sensitive than previously thought to continental erosion (providing lithogenic particles to the ocean), particle transport within the ocean, dissolved/particle interactions, and deep water upwelling. These processes could also impact the cycles of other elements, including nutrients.

  13. Single-molecule force spectroscopy reveals the individual mechanical unfolding pathways of a surface layer protein.

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    Horejs, Christine; Ristl, Robin; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Sleytr, Uwe B; Pum, Dietmar

    2011-08-05

    Surface layers (S-layers) represent an almost universal feature of archaeal cell envelopes and are probably the most abundant bacterial cell proteins. S-layers are monomolecular crystalline structures of single protein or glycoprotein monomers that completely cover the cell surface during all stages of the cell growth cycle, thereby performing their intrinsic function under a constant intra- and intermolecular mechanical stress. In gram-positive bacteria, the individual S-layer proteins are anchored by a specific binding mechanism to polysaccharides (secondary cell wall polymers) that are linked to the underlying peptidoglycan layer. In this work, atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and a polyprotein approach are used to study the individual mechanical unfolding pathways of an S-layer protein. We uncover complex unfolding pathways involving the consecutive unfolding of structural intermediates, where a mechanical stability of 87 pN is revealed. Different initial extensibilities allow the hypothesis that S-layer proteins adapt highly stable, mechanically resilient conformations that are not extensible under the presence of a pulling force. Interestingly, a change of the unfolding pathway is observed when individual S-layer proteins interact with secondary cell wall polymers, which is a direct signature of a conformational change induced by the ligand. Moreover, the mechanical stability increases up to 110 pN. This work demonstrates that single-molecule force spectroscopy offers a powerful tool to detect subtle changes in the structure of an individual protein upon binding of a ligand and constitutes the first conformational study of surface layer proteins at the single-molecule level.

  14. Metabolite Profiling for Leaf Senescence in Barley Reveals Decreases in Amino Acids and Glycolysis Intermediates

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    Liliana Avila-Ospina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is a long developmental phase important for plant performance and nutrient management. Cell constituents are recycled in old leaves to provide nutrients that are redistributed to the sink organs. Up to now, metabolomic changes during leaf senescence have been mainly studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.. The metabolite profiling conducted in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. during primary leaf senescence under two nitrate regimes and in flag leaf shows that amino acids, hexose, sucrose and glycolysis intermediates decrease during senescence, while minor carbohydrates accumulate. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA compounds changed with senescence only in primary leaves. The senescence-related metabolite changes in the flag leaf were globally similar to those observed in primary leaves. The effect of senescence on the metabolite changes of barley leaves was similar to that previously described in Arabidopsis except for sugars and glycolysis compounds. This suggests a different role of sugars in the control of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis and in barley.

  15. Revealing the active intermediates in the oxidation of formic acid on Au and Pt(111).

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    Gao, Wang; Song, Er Hong; Jiang, Qing; Jacob, Timo

    2014-08-25

    The mechanisms of formic acid (HCOOH) oxidation on Au(111) under gas-phase and electrochemical conditions was studied by using density functional theory and then compared with the analogous processes on Pt(111). Our results demonstrate that a mechanism involving a single intermediate molecule is preferred on both Au and Pt(111). Furthermore, under gas-phase conditions, HCOOH oxidation proceeds through the same mechanism (formate pathway) on Au and Pt(111), whereas under electrochemical conditions, it can take place through significantly different mechanisms (formate and/or direct pathways), depending on the applied electrode potential. Our calculations help to rationalize conflicting experimental explanations and are crucial for understanding the mechanism of this fundamental (electro-)catalytic process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  17. Simulating fiction: individual differences in literature comprehension revealed with FMRI.

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    Annabel D Nijhof

    Full Text Available When we read literary fiction, we are transported to fictional places, and we feel and think along with the characters. Despite the importance of narrative in adult life and during development, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying fiction comprehension are unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate how individuals differently employ neural networks important for understanding others' beliefs and intentions (mentalizing, and for sensori-motor simulation while listening to excerpts from literary novels. Localizer tasks were used to localize both the cortical motor network and the mentalizing network in participants after they listened to excerpts from literary novels. Results show that participants who had high activation in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC; part of the mentalizing network when listening to mentalizing content of literary fiction, had lower motor cortex activity when they listened to action-related content of the story, and vice versa. This qualifies how people differ in their engagement with fiction: some people are mostly drawn into a story by mentalizing about the thoughts and beliefs of others, whereas others engage in literature by simulating more concrete events such as actions. This study provides on-line neural evidence for the existence of qualitatively different styles of moving into literary worlds, and adds to a growing body of literature showing the potential to study narrative comprehension with neuroimaging methods.

  18. Simulating fiction: individual differences in literature comprehension revealed with FMRI.

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    Nijhof, Annabel D; Willems, Roel M

    2015-01-01

    When we read literary fiction, we are transported to fictional places, and we feel and think along with the characters. Despite the importance of narrative in adult life and during development, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying fiction comprehension are unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how individuals differently employ neural networks important for understanding others' beliefs and intentions (mentalizing), and for sensori-motor simulation while listening to excerpts from literary novels. Localizer tasks were used to localize both the cortical motor network and the mentalizing network in participants after they listened to excerpts from literary novels. Results show that participants who had high activation in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC; part of the mentalizing network) when listening to mentalizing content of literary fiction, had lower motor cortex activity when they listened to action-related content of the story, and vice versa. This qualifies how people differ in their engagement with fiction: some people are mostly drawn into a story by mentalizing about the thoughts and beliefs of others, whereas others engage in literature by simulating more concrete events such as actions. This study provides on-line neural evidence for the existence of qualitatively different styles of moving into literary worlds, and adds to a growing body of literature showing the potential to study narrative comprehension with neuroimaging methods.

  19. A tear in the subducting Nazca slab at 21 S revealed from accurate locations of intermediate depth seismicity

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    Rietbrock, A.; Haberland, C.; Nippress, S.

    2006-12-01

    The South American subduction zone in Northern Chile is known for its abundant intermediate depth seismicity. Some of these events have magnitudes greater 7 and therefore imposing a significant seismic hazard to regions, which are generally not affected by large mega-thrust earthquakes. The two most prominent intermediate depth earthquakes in Northern Chile are the 9 December 1950 Antofagasta (Ms 8) and the 13 June 2005 Tarapaca (Mw 7.7) earthquake which both occured at ~100km depth. Both events show a predominantly slab-pull down dip extension mechanism and in the case of the Tarapaca earthquake the rupture occurred on a sub-horizontal plane. While its is widely accepted that dehydration processes are responsible for intermediate depth earthquakes the occurrence of such large intermediate depth earthquakes is still not very well explained. Using data from several temporal seismic arrays in the Central Andes between 1994 and 1997 we obtained a detailed imaged of the topographyof the subducting Nazca plate based on hypocenter locations and P-wave velocities, which may shed light into the processes involved for the Tarapaca earthquake. We find evidence for a trench-perpendicular tear in the slab of the subducting Nazca plate at 21° S. Tomographic velocity images show a north-south step of the slab-related high velocity zone. High precision location of local seismicity reveal a thin southward dipping earthquake cluster terminated at 21° S by a 10 km north-south step of the Wadati-Benioff zone at a depth of ~100 km. These observations suggest a sagging or downward-pushed segment of the Nazca plate north of a hinge fault at 21° S. This observation is further supported by a systematic change in fault plane solutions indicating north-south extension in this depth range. We interpret the evidences for a torn, crunched, and maybe partly overthrusted oceanic plate in terms of north-south confinement. The hinge fault in the slab could be accommodated by some zones of

  20. The structures of pyruvate oxidase from Aerococcus viridans with cofactors and with a reaction intermediate reveal the flexibility of the active-site tunnel for catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Hoque, Md Mominul; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Takénaka, Akio

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of pyruvate oxidase from A. viridans in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide, thiamine diphosphate and the reaction intermediate 2-acetyl-thiamine diphosphate reveal details of substrate recognition and catalysis.

  1. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

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    Becker Heinz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3, treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0 total mesorectal excision (TME in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS and overall survival (OS. Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3 did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively. Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2 turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively. Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3 and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0 resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters.

  2. Distinct genetic diversity of Oncomelania hupensis, intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in mainland China as revealed by ITS sequences.

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    Qin Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, which causes schistosomiasis endemic in the Far East, and especially in mainland China. O. hupensis largely determines the parasite's geographical range. How O. hupensis's genetic diversity is distributed geographically in mainland China has never been well examined with DNA sequence data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigate the genetic variation among O. hupensis from different geographical origins using the combined complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. 165 O. hupensis isolates were obtained in 29 localities from 7 provinces across mainland China: lake/marshland and hill regions in Anhui, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Jiangsu provinces, located along the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, and mountainous regions in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. Phylogenetic and haplotype network analyses showed distinct genetic diversity and no shared haplotypes between populations from lake/marshland regions of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and populations from mountainous regions of Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. The genetic distance between these two groups is up to 0.81 based on Fst, and branch time was estimated as 2-6 Ma. As revealed in the phylogenetic tree, snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces were also clustered separately. Geographical separation appears to be an important factor accounting for the diversification of the two groups of O. hupensis in mainland China, and probably for the separate clades between snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. In lake/marshland and hill regions along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, three clades were identified in the phylogenetic tree, but without any obvious clustering of snails from different provinces. CONCLUSIONS: O. hupensis in mainland China may have considerable genetic diversity, and a more

  3. An experiment on individual ‘parochial altruism’ revealing no connection between individual ‘altruism’ and individual ‘parochialism’

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    Shaun eHargreaves Heap

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Is parochial altruism an attribute of individual behaviour? This is the question we address with an experiment. We examine whether the individual pro-sociality that is revealed in the public goods and trust games when interacting with fellow group members helps predict individual parochialism, as measured by the in-group bias (i.e., the difference in these games in pro-sociality when interacting with own group members as compared with members of another group. We find that it is not. An examination of the Big 5 personality predictors of each behaviour reinforces this result: they are different. In short, knowing how ‘nice’ individuals are with respect to fellow group members does not help predict their parochialism.

  4. Trunk Muscle EMG During Intermediate Pilates Mat Exercises in Beginner Healthy and Chronic Low Back Pain Individuals.

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    Pereira, Ivye L R; Queiroz, Bergson; Loss, Jefferson; Amorim, César; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the electromyographic pattern of core muscles during intermediate Pilates mat exercises between healthy people and those with low back pain. We evaluated healthy participants (n = 19; mean ± standard deviation [SD]: age 28 ± 8 years, body mass 65 ± 10 kg, height 160.0 ± 9.1 cm) and a low back pain group (n = 13; mean ± SD: age 30 ± 9 years, body mass 67 ± 12 kg, height 170.0 ± 6.6 cm). Electromyographic analysis assessed the multifidus, external oblique, internal oblique, and rectus abdominis muscles during classical Pilates exercises (single leg stretch, criss-cross, and dead bug). We calculated the root mean square normalized by maximum voluntary contraction, and the time of peak activation was provided by a linear envelope and normalized by the total movement cycle. The criss-cross exercise presented the highest values of root mean square for trunk flexors (rectus abdominis and oblique) compared with the other exercises, followed by the single leg stretch and the dead bug, which had similar muscle activation. The single leg stretch presented more activation of the rectus abdominis and oblique, whereas the criss-cross and dead bug created more activation of the oblique compared with the multifidus and rectus. The Pilates exercises presented different muscle recruitment patterns, and allowed the activation of the lumbopelvic stabilizing muscles even in the first session for healthy individuals and those with chronic low back pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Genome evolution of intermediate wheatgrass as revealed by EST-SSR markers developed from its three progenitor diploid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Richard R-C; Larson, Steve R; Jensen, Kevin B; Bushman, B Shaun; DeHaan, Lee R; Wang, Shuwen; Yan, Xuebing

    2015-02-01

    Intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium (Host) Barkworth & D.R. Dewey), a segmental autoallohexaploid (2n = 6x = 42), is not only an important forage crop but also a valuable gene reservoir for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) improvement. Throughout the scientific literature, there continues to be disagreement as to the origin of the different genomes in intermediate wheatgrass. Genotypic data obtained from newly developed EST-SSR primers derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Á. Löve (St genome), Thinopyrum bessarabicum (Savul. & Rayss) Á. Löve (J = J(b) = E(b)), and Thinopyrum elongatum (Host) D. Dewey (E = J(e) = E(e)) indicate that the V genome of Dasypyrum (Coss. & Durieu) T. Durand is not one of the three genomes in intermediate wheatgrass. Based on all available information in the literature and findings in this study, the genomic designation of intermediate wheatgrass should be changed to J(vs)J(r)St, where J(vs) and J(r) represent ancestral genomes of present-day J(b) of Th. bessarabicum and J(e) of Th. elongatum, with J(vs) being more ancient. Furthermore, the information suggests that the St genome in intermediate wheatgrass is most similar to the present-day St found in diploid species of Pseudoroegneria from Eurasia.

  6. Analysis of the E. coli NifS CsdB protein at 2.0 A reveals the structural basis for perselenide and persulfide intermediate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Christopher D

    2002-02-01

    The Escherichia coli NifS CsdB protein is a member of the homodimeric pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent family of enzymes. These enzymes are capable of decomposing cysteine or selenocysteine into L-alanine and sulfur or selenium, respectively. E. coli NifS CsdB has a high specificity for L-selenocysteine in comparison to l-cysteine, suggesting a role for this enzyme is selenium metabolism. The 2.0 A crystal structure of E. coli NifS CsdB reveals a high-resolution view of the active site of this enzyme in apo-, persulfide, perselenide, and selenocysteine-bound intermediates, suggesting a mechanism for the stabilization of the enzyme persulfide and perselenide intermediates during catalysis, a necessary intermediate in the formation of sulfur and selenium containing metabolites.

  7. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  8. Correlated Electrochemical and Optical Detection Reveals the Chemical Reactivity of Individual Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasiliense, Vitor; Patel, Anisha N; Martinez-Marrades, Ariadna; Shi, Jian; Chen, Yong; Combellas, Catherine; Tessier, Gilles; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2016-03-16

    Electrochemical (EC) impacts of single nanoparticles (NPs) on an ultramicroelectrode are coupled with optics to identify chemical processes at the level of individual NPs. While the EC signals characterize the charge transfer process, the optical monitoring gives a complementary picture of the transport and chemical transformation of the NPs. This is illustrated in the case of electrodissolution of Ag NPs. In the simplest case, the optically monitored dissolution of individual NPs is synchronized with individual EC spikes. Optics then validates in situ the concept of EC nanoimpacts for sizing and counting of NPs. Chemical complexity is introduced by using a precipitating agent, SCN(-), which tunes the overall electrodissolution kinetics. Particularly, the charge transfer and dissolution steps occur sequentially as the synchronicity between the EC and optical signals is lost. This demonstrates the level of complexity that can be revealed from such electrochemistry/optics coupling.

  9. Preserved local but disrupted contextual figure-ground influences in an individual with abnormal function of intermediate visual areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Joseph L; Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Rees, Geraint; Bentin, Shlomo; Driver, Jon

    2012-06-01

    Visual perception depends not only on local stimulus features but also on their relationship to the surrounding stimulus context, as evident in both local and contextual influences on figure-ground segmentation. Intermediate visual areas may play a role in such contextual influences, as we tested here by examining LG, a rare case of developmental visual agnosia. LG has no evident abnormality of brain structure and functional neuroimaging showed relatively normal V1 function, but his intermediate visual areas (V2/V3) function abnormally. We found that contextual influences on figure-ground organization were selectively disrupted in LG, while local sources of figure-ground influences were preserved. Effects of object knowledge and familiarity on figure-ground organization were also significantly diminished. Our results suggest that the mechanisms mediating contextual and familiarity influences on figure-ground organization are dissociable from those mediating local influences on figure-ground assignment. The disruption of contextual processing in intermediate visual areas may play a role in the substantial object recognition difficulties experienced by LG.

  10. A systems-level model reveals that 1,2-Propanediol utilization microcompartments enhance pathway flux through intermediate sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Slininger, Marilyn F; Mangan, Niall M

    2017-05-01

    The spatial organization of metabolism is common to all domains of life. Enteric and other bacteria use subcellular organelles known as bacterial microcompartments to spatially organize the metabolism of pathogenicity-relevant carbon sources, such as 1,2-propanediol. The organelles are thought to sequester a private cofactor pool, minimize the effects of toxic intermediates, and enhance flux through the encapsulated metabolic pathways. We develop a mathematical model of the function of the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment of Salmonella enterica and use it to analyze the function of the microcompartment organelles in detail. Our model makes accurate estimates of doubling times based on an optimized compartment shell permeability determined by maximizing metabolic flux in the model. The compartments function primarily to decouple cytosolic intermediate concentrations from the concentrations in the microcompartment, allowing significant enhancement in pathway flux by the generation of large concentration gradients across the microcompartment shell. We find that selective permeability of the microcompartment shell is not absolutely necessary, but is often beneficial in establishing this intermediate-trapping function. Our findings also implicate active transport of the 1,2-propanediol substrate under conditions of low external substrate concentration, and we present a mathematical bound, in terms of external 1,2-propanediol substrate concentration and diffusive rates, on when active transport of the substrate is advantageous. By allowing us to predict experimentally inaccessible aspects of microcompartment function, such as intra-microcompartment metabolite concentrations, our model presents avenues for future research and underscores the importance of carefully considering changes in external metabolite concentrations and other conditions during batch cultures. Our results also suggest that the encapsulation of heterologous pathways in bacterial

  11. Probabilistic inference: Task dependency and individual differences of probability weighting revealed by hierarchical Bayesian modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eBoos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive determinants of probabilistic inference were examined using hierarchical Bayesian modelling techniques. A classic urn-ball paradigm served as experimental strategy, involving a factorial two (prior probabilities by two (likelihoods design. Five computational models of cognitive processes were compared with the observed behaviour. Parameter-free Bayesian posterior probabilities and parameter-free base rate neglect provided inadequate models of probabilistic inference. The introduction of distorted subjective probabilities yielded more robust and generalizable results. A general class of (inverted S-shaped probability weighting functions had been proposed; however, the possibility of large differences in probability distortions not only across experimental conditions, but also across individuals, seems critical for the model’s success. It also seems advantageous to consider individual differences in parameters of probability weighting as being sampled from weakly informative prior distributions of individual parameter values. Thus, the results from hierarchical Bayesian modelling converge with previous results in revealing that probability weighting parameters show considerable task dependency and individual differences. Methodologically, this work exemplifies the usefulness of hierarchical Bayesian modelling techniques for cognitive psychology. Theoretically, human probabilistic inference might be best described as the application of individualized strategic policies for Bayesian belief revision.

  12. Probabilistic Inference: Task Dependency and Individual Differences of Probability Weighting Revealed by Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Moritz; Seer, Caroline; Lange, Florian; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive determinants of probabilistic inference were examined using hierarchical Bayesian modeling techniques. A classic urn-ball paradigm served as experimental strategy, involving a factorial two (prior probabilities) by two (likelihoods) design. Five computational models of cognitive processes were compared with the observed behavior. Parameter-free Bayesian posterior probabilities and parameter-free base rate neglect provided inadequate models of probabilistic inference. The introduction of distorted subjective probabilities yielded more robust and generalizable results. A general class of (inverted) S-shaped probability weighting functions had been proposed; however, the possibility of large differences in probability distortions not only across experimental conditions, but also across individuals, seems critical for the model's success. It also seems advantageous to consider individual differences in parameters of probability weighting as being sampled from weakly informative prior distributions of individual parameter values. Thus, the results from hierarchical Bayesian modeling converge with previous results in revealing that probability weighting parameters show considerable task dependency and individual differences. Methodologically, this work exemplifies the usefulness of hierarchical Bayesian modeling techniques for cognitive psychology. Theoretically, human probabilistic inference might be best described as the application of individualized strategic policies for Bayesian belief revision.

  13. Is it cost-effective to use a test to decide which individuals with an intermediate cardiovascular disease risk would benefit from statin treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, L T; Nauta, S T; Deckers, J W; Severens, J L; Redekop, W K

    2014-10-20

    The 2012 European guidelines recommend statins for intermediate-risk individuals with elevated cholesterol levels. Improved discrimination of intermediate-risk individuals is needed to prevent both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and statin side-effects (e.g. myopathy) efficiently since only 3-15 in every 100 individuals actually experience a cardiovascular event in the next 10 years. We estimated the potential cost-effectiveness of a hypothetical test which helps to determine which individuals will benefit from statins. Prognosis of different age- and gender-specific cohorts with an intermediate risk was simulated with a Markov model to estimate the potential costs and quality-adjusted life-years for four strategies: treat all with statins, treat none with statins, treat according to the European guidelines, or use a test to select individuals for statin treatment. The test-first strategy dominated the other strategies if the hypothetical test was 100% accurate and cost no more than €237. This strategy and the treat-all strategy were equally effective but the test generated lower costs by reducing statin usage and side-effects. The treat-none strategy was the least effective strategy. Threshold analyses show that the test must be highly accurate (especially sensitive) and inexpensive to be the most cost-effective strategy, since myopathy has a negligible impact on cost-effectiveness and statin costs are low. Use of a highly accurate prognostic test could reduce overall CVD risk, frequency of drug side-effects and lifetime costs. However, no additional test would add usefully to risk prediction over SCORE when it does not satisfy the costs and accuracy requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Individual Movement Strategies Revealed through Novel Clustering of Emergent Movement Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Denis; Cvetojevic, Sreten; Robertson, Ellen P.; Reichert, Brian E.; Hochmair, Hartwig H.; Fletcher, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding movement is critical in several disciplines but analysis methods often neglect key information by adopting each location as sampling unit, rather than each individual. We introduce a novel statistical method that, by focusing on individuals, enables better identification of temporal dynamics of connectivity, traits of individuals that explain emergent movement patterns, and sites that play a critical role in connecting subpopulations. We apply this method to two examples that span movement networks that vary considerably in size and questions: movements of an endangered raptor, the snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus), and human movement in Florida inferred from Twitter. For snail kites, our method reveals substantial differences in movement strategies for different bird cohorts and temporal changes in connectivity driven by the invasion of an exotic food resource, illustrating the challenge of identifying critical connectivity sites for conservation in the presence of global change. For human movement, our method is able to reliably determine the origin of Florida visitors and identify distinct movement patterns within Florida for visitors from different places, providing near real-time information on the spatial and temporal patterns of tourists. These results emphasize the need to integrate individual variation to generate new insights when modeling movement data.

  15. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  16. Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals differences between early and late M intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödig, C; Chizhov, I; Weidlich, O; Siebert, F

    1999-01-01

    In this report, from time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared investigations from 15 ns to 160 ms, we provide evidence for the subsequent rise of three different M states that differ in their structures. The first state rises with approximately 3 microseconds to only a small percentage. Its structure as judged from amide I/II bands differs in small but well-defined aspects from the L state. The next M state, which appears in approximately 40 microseconds, has almost all of the characteristics of the "late" M state, i.e., it differs considerably from the first one. Here, the L left arrow over right arrow M equilibrium is shifted toward M, although some percentage of L still persists. In the last M state (rise time approximately 130 microseconds), the equilibrium is shifted toward full deprotonation of the Schiff base, and only small additional structural changes take place. In addition to these results obtained for unbuffered conditions or at pH 7, experiments performed at lower and higher pH are presented. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular changes postulated to occur in the M intermediate to allow the shift of the L/M equilibrium toward M and possibly to regulate the change of the accessibility of the Schiff base necessary for effective proton pumping. PMID:10233083

  17. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C. Robert; Lane, T. J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. Here, we report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. This prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. Using these results, we then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments as a means of model validation. This study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments.

  18. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C. Robert; Lane, T. J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. Here, we report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. This prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. Using these results, we then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments as a means of model validation. This study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments. PMID:28272524

  19. Capture of micrococcin biosynthetic intermediates reveals C-terminal processing as an obligatory step for in vivo maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Kathryn D.; Bennallack, Philip R.; Burlingame, Mark A.; Robison, Richard A.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Thiopeptides, including micrococcins, are a growing family of bioactive natural products that are ribosomally synthesized and heavily modified. Here we use a refactored, modular in vivo system containing the micrococcin P1 (MP1) biosynthetic genes (TclIJKLMNPS) from Macrococcus caseolyticus str 115 in a genetically tractable Bacillus subtilis strain to parse the processing steps of this pathway. By fusing the micrococcin precursor peptide to an affinity tag and coupling it with catalytically defective enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates were easily captured for analysis. We found that two major phases of molecular maturation are separated by a key C-terminal processing step. Phase-I conversion of six Cys residues to thiazoles (TclIJN) is followed by C-terminal oxidative decarboxylation (TclP). This TclP-mediated oxidative decarboxylation is a required step for the peptide to progress to phase II. In phase II, Ser/Thr dehydration (TclKL) and peptide macrocycle formation (TclM) occurs. A C-terminal reductase, TclS, can optionally act on the substrate peptide, yielding MP1, and is shown to act late in the pathway. This comprehensive characterization of the MP1 pathway prepares the way for future engineering efforts. PMID:27791142

  20. Intermediate expression of CCRL1 reveals novel subpopulations of medullary thymic epithelial cells that emerge in the postnatal thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Meireles, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Alves, Nuno L

    2014-10-01

    Cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs and mTECs, respectively) provide inductive microenvironments for T-cell development and selection. The differentiation pathway of cTEC/mTEC lineages downstream of common bipotent progenitors at discrete stages of development remains unresolved. Using IL-7/CCRL1 dual reporter mice that identify specialized TEC subsets, we show that the stepwise acquisition of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) is a late determinant of cTEC differentiation. Although cTECs expressing high CCRL1 levels (CCRL1(hi) ) develop normally in immunocompetent and Rag2(-/-) thymi, their differentiation is partially blocked in Rag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) counterparts. These results unravel a novel checkpoint in cTEC maturation that is regulated by the cross-talk between TECs and immature thymocytes. Additionally, we identify new Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 (UEA)(+) mTEC subtypes expressing intermediate CCRL1 levels (CCRL1(int) ) that conspicuously emerge in the postnatal thymus and differentially express Tnfrsf11a, Ccl21, and Aire. While rare in fetal and in Rag2(-/-) thymi, CCRL1(int) mTECs are restored in Rag2(-/-) Marilyn TCR-Tg mice, indicating that the appearance of postnatal-restricted mTECs is closely linked with T-cell selection. Our findings suggest that alternative temporally restricted routes of new mTEC differentiation contribute to the establishment of the medullary niche in the postnatal thymus.

  1. β-Thalassemia Patients Revealed a Significant Change of Untargeted Metabolites in Comparison to Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Iqbal, Ayesha; Ansari, Saqib Hussain; Parveen, Sadia; Khan, Ishtiaq Ahmad; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar

    2017-01-01

    β-Thalassemia is one of the most prevalent forms of congenital blood disorders characterized by reduced hemoglobin levels with severe complications, affecting all dimensions of life. The mechanisms underlying the phenotypic heterogeneity of β-thalassemia are still poorly understood. We aimed to work over metabolite biomarkers to improve mechanistic understanding of phenotypic heterogeneity and hence better management of disorder at different levels. Untargeted serum metabolites were analyzed after protein precipitation and SPE (solid phase extraction) from 100 β-thalassemia patients and 61 healthy controls using GC-MS. 40 metabolites were identified having a significance difference between these two groups at probability of 0.05 and fold change >1.5. Out of these 40 metabolites, 17 were up-regulated while 23 were down-regulated. PCA and PLS-DA model was also created that revealed a fine separation with a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 100% on external validation of samples. Metabolic pathway analysis revealed alteration in multiple pathways including glycolysis, pyruvate, propanoate, glycerophospholipid, galactose, fatty acid, starch and sucrose metabolism along with fatty acid elongation in mitochondria, glycerolipid, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism pointing towards the shift of metabolism in β-thalassemia patients in comparison to healthy individuals. PMID:28198811

  2. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  3. Spectral interferometric microscopy reveals absorption by individual optical nanoantennas from extinction phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2014-04-30

    Optical antennas transform light from freely propagating waves into highly localized excitations that interact strongly with matter. Unlike their radio frequency counterparts, optical antennas are nanoscopic and high frequency, making amplitude and phase measurements challenging and leaving some information hidden. Here we report a novel spectral interferometric microscopy technique to expose the amplitude and phase response of individual optical antennas across an octave of the visible to near-infrared spectrum. Although it is a far-field technique, we show that knowledge of the extinction phase allows quantitative estimation of nanoantenna absorption, which is a near-field quantity. To verify our method we characterize gold ring-disk dimers exhibiting Fano interference. Our results reveal that Fano interference only cancels a bright mode's scattering, leaving residual extinction dominated by absorption. Spectral interference microscopy has the potential for real-time and single-shot phase and amplitude investigations of isolated quantum and classical antennas with applications across the physical and life sciences.

  4. The culturome of the human nose habitats reveals individual bacterial fingerprint patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Ursula; Kriegeskorte, André; Schubert, Tanja; Peters, Georg; Rudack, Claudia; Pieper, Dietmar H; Wos-Oxley, Melissa; Becker, Karsten

    2016-07-01

    The complex anatomy of the human nose might offer distinct microbial niches. Microbiota composition may affect nose inflammatory diseases and Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Considering different nasal cavity locations, microbial colonization was analysed across individuals exhibiting chronic nasal inflammatory diseases (n = 18) and those without local inflammation signs (n = 16). Samples were collected systematically during surgery and examined by an extensive culture-based approach and, for a subset, by 16S rRNA gene community profiling. Cultivation yielded 141 taxa with members of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium as most common isolates comprising the nasal core culturome together with Finegoldia magna. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently found in association with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, and the posterior vestibules were redefined as S. aureus' principle habitat. Culturome analysis revealed host-specific bacterial 'fingerprints' irrespective of host-driven factors or intranasal sites. Comparisons between cultivable and molecular fingerprints demonstrated that only a small fraction of phylotypes (6.2%) was correlated. While the total number of different phylotypes was higher in the molecular dataset, the total number of identifications down to the species level was higher in the culturomic approach. To determine host-specific microbiomes, the advantages of molecular approaches should be combined with the resolution and reliability of species identification by culturomic analyses.

  5. Chromosome-specific segmentation revealed by structural analysis of individually isolated chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Kunio; Taima, Akira; Ogasawara, Kiyomoto; Metsugi, Shouichi; Aikawa, Satoko

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of structural rearrangements at the individual chromosomal level is still technologically challenging. Here we optimized a chromosome isolation method using fluorescent marker-assisted laser-capture and laser-beam microdissection and applied it to structural analysis of two aberrant chromosomes found in a lung cancer cell line. A high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis of DNA samples prepared from each of the chromosomes revealed that these two chromosomes contained 296 and 263 segments, respectively, ranging from 1.5 kb to 784.3 kb in size, derived from different portions of chromosome 8. Among these segments, 242 were common in both aberrant chromosomes, but 75 were found to be chromosome-specific. Sequences of 263 junction sites connecting the ends of segments were determined using a PCR/Sanger-sequencing procedure. Overlapping microhomologies were found at 169 junction sites. Junction partners came from various portions of chromosome 8 and no biased pattern in the positional distribution of junction partners was detected. These structural characteristics suggested the occurrence of random fragmentation of the entire chromosome 8 followed by random rejoining of these fragments. Based on that, we proposed a model to explain how these aberrant chromosomes are formed. Through these structural analyses, it was demonstrated that the optimized chromosome isolation method described here can provide high-quality chromosomal DNA for high resolution array-CGH analysis and probably for massively parallel sequencing analysis.

  6. Genetic variation of human papillomavirus type 16 in individual clinical specimens revealed by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Kukimoto

    Full Text Available Viral genetic diversity within infected cells or tissues, called viral quasispecies, has been mostly studied for RNA viruses, but has also been described among DNA viruses, including human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 present in cervical precancerous lesions. However, the extent of HPV genetic variation in cervical specimens, and its involvement in HPV-induced carcinogenesis, remains unclear. Here, we employ deep sequencing to comprehensively analyze genetic variation in the HPV16 genome isolated from individual clinical specimens. Through overlapping full-circle PCR, approximately 8-kb DNA fragments covering the whole HPV16 genome were amplified from HPV16-positive cervical exfoliated cells collected from patients with either low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL or invasive cervical cancer (ICC. Deep sequencing of the amplified HPV16 DNA enabled de novo assembly of the full-length HPV16 genome sequence for each of 7 specimens (5 LSIL and 2 ICC samples. Subsequent alignment of read sequences to the assembled HPV16 sequence revealed that 2 LSILs and 1 ICC contained nucleotide variations within E6, E1 and the non-coding region between E5 and L2 with mutation frequencies of 0.60% to 5.42%. In transient replication assays, a novel E1 mutant found in ICC, E1 Q381E, showed reduced ability to support HPV16 origin-dependent replication. In addition, partially deleted E2 genes were detected in 1 LSIL sample in a mixed state with the intact E2 gene. Thus, the methods used in this study provide a fundamental framework for investigating the influence of HPV somatic genetic variation on cervical carcinogenesis.

  7. Combined bio-logging and stable isotopes reveal individual specialisations in a benthic coastal seabird, the Kerguelen shag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camprasse, Elodie C M; Cherel, Yves; Arnould, John P Y; Hoskins, Andrew J; Bost, Charles-André

    2017-01-01

    Individual specialisations, which involve the repetition of specific behaviours or dietary choices over time, have been suggested to benefit animals by avoiding competition with conspecifics and increasing individual foraging efficiency. Among seabirds, resident and benthic species are thought to be good models to study inter-individual variation as they repetitively exploit the same environment. We investigated foraging behaviour, isotopic niche and diet in the Kerguelen shag Phalacrocorax verrucosus during both the incubation and chick-rearing periods for the same individuals to determine the effect of sex, breeding stage, body mass and morphometrics on mean foraging metrics and their consistency. There were large differences between individuals in foraging behaviour and consistency, with strong individual specialisations in dive depths and heading from the colony. Stable isotopes revealed specialisations in feeding strategies, across multiple temporal scales. Specifically, individuals showed medium term specialisations in feeding strategies during the breeding season, as well as long-term consistency. A clustering analysis revealed 4 different foraging strategies displaying significantly different δ15N values and body masses. There were no sex or stage biases to clusters and individuals in different clusters did not differ in their morphology. Importantly, the results suggest that the different strategies emphasized were related to individual prey preferences rather than intrinsic characteristics.

  8. Combined bio-logging and stable isotopes reveal individual specialisations in a benthic coastal seabird, the Kerguelen shag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherel, Yves; Hoskins, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Individual specialisations, which involve the repetition of specific behaviours or dietary choices over time, have been suggested to benefit animals by avoiding competition with conspecifics and increasing individual foraging efficiency. Among seabirds, resident and benthic species are thought to be good models to study inter-individual variation as they repetitively exploit the same environment. We investigated foraging behaviour, isotopic niche and diet in the Kerguelen shag Phalacrocorax verrucosus during both the incubation and chick-rearing periods for the same individuals to determine the effect of sex, breeding stage, body mass and morphometrics on mean foraging metrics and their consistency. There were large differences between individuals in foraging behaviour and consistency, with strong individual specialisations in dive depths and heading from the colony. Stable isotopes revealed specialisations in feeding strategies, across multiple temporal scales. Specifically, individuals showed medium term specialisations in feeding strategies during the breeding season, as well as long-term consistency. A clustering analysis revealed 4 different foraging strategies displaying significantly different δ15N values and body masses. There were no sex or stage biases to clusters and individuals in different clusters did not differ in their morphology. Importantly, the results suggest that the different strategies emphasized were related to individual prey preferences rather than intrinsic characteristics. PMID:28264057

  9. A mechanism for TCR sharing between T cell subsets and individuals revealed by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Vanessa; Quigley, Máire F; Greenaway, Hui Yee; Ng, Pauline C; Ende, Zachary S; McIntosh, Tina; Asher, Tedi E; Almeida, Jorge R; Levy, Samuel; Price, David A; Davenport, Miles P; Douek, Daniel C

    2011-04-01

    The human naive T cell repertoire is the repository of a vast array of TCRs. However, the factors that shape their hierarchical distribution and relationship with the memory repertoire remain poorly understood. In this study, we used polychromatic flow cytometry to isolate highly pure memory and naive CD8(+) T cells, stringently defined with multiple phenotypic markers, and used deep sequencing to characterize corresponding portions of their respective TCR repertoires from four individuals. The extent of interindividual TCR sharing and the overlap between the memory and naive compartments within individuals were determined by TCR clonotype frequencies, such that higher-frequency clonotypes were more commonly shared between compartments and individuals. TCR clonotype frequencies were, in turn, predicted by the efficiency of their production during V(D)J recombination. Thus, convergent recombination shapes the TCR repertoire of the memory and naive T cell pools, as well as their interrelationship within and between individuals.

  10. Identifying Two Groups of Entitled Individuals: Cluster Analysis Reveals Emotional Stability and Self-Esteem Distinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Michael L; LoPilato, Alexander C; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    The present study hypothesized that there exist two distinct groups of entitled individuals: grandiose-entitled, and vulnerable-entitled. Self-report scores of entitlement were collected for 916 individuals using an online platform. Model-based cluster analyses were conducted on the individuals with scores one standard deviation above mean (n = 159) using the five-factor model dimensions as clustering variables. The results support the existence of two groups of entitled individuals categorized as emotionally stable and emotionally vulnerable. The emotionally stable cluster reported emotional stability, high self-esteem, more positive affect, and antisocial behavior. The emotionally vulnerable cluster reported low self-esteem and high levels of neuroticism, disinhibition, conventionality, psychopathy, negative affect, childhood abuse, intrusive parenting, and attachment difficulties. Compared to the control group, both clusters reported being more antagonistic, extraverted, Machiavellian, and narcissistic. These results suggest important differences are missed when simply examining the linear relationships between entitlement and various aspects of its nomological network.

  11. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (Pbody weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  12. Incorporation of {sup 13}C-labeled intermediates into developing lignin revealed by analytical pyrolysis and CuO oxidation in combination with IRM-GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglinton, T.I.; Goni, M.A. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Boon, J.J. [FOM Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Tissue samples from Ginkgo shoots (Ginkgo biloba L.) and Rice grass (Oryzasitiva sp.) incubated in the presence of {sup 13}C-labeled substrates such as coniferin (postulated to be biosynthetic intermediates in lignin biosynthesis) were studied using thermal and chemical dissociation methods in combination with molecular-level isotopic measurements. The aim of the study was (1) to investigate dissociation mechanisms, and (2) to examine and quantify the proportions of labeled material incorporated within each sample. Isotopic analysis of specific dissociation products revealed the presence of the label in its original positions, and only within lignin-derived (phenolic) products. Moreover, the distribution and isotopic composition of the dissociation products strongly suggest an origin from newly-formed lignin. These results clearly indicate that there is no {open_quotes}scrambling{close_quotes} of carbon atoms as a result of the dissociation process, thereby lending support to this analytical approach. In addition, the data provide confidence in the selective labeling approach for elucidation of the structure and biosynthesis of lignin.

  13. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  14. Urinary loss of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as revealed by metabolomics studies: an underlying mechanism to reduce lipid accretion by whey protein ingestion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillefosse, Haldis H; Clausen, Morten R; Yde, Christian C; Ditlev, Ditte B; Zhang, Xumin; Du, Zhen-Yu; Bertram, Hanne C; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2014-05-02

    Whey protein intake is associated with the modulation of energy metabolism and altered body composition both in human subjects and in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. We fed obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice high-fat diets with either casein (HF casein) or whey (HF whey) for 6 weeks. At equal energy intake and apparent fat and nitrogen digestibility, mice fed HF whey stored less energy as lipids, evident both as lower white adipose tissue mass and as reduced liver lipids, compared with HF-casein-fed mice. Explorative analyses of 48 h urine, both by (1)H NMR and LC-MS metabolomic platforms, demonstrated higher urinary excretion of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates citric acid and succinic acid (identified by both platforms), and cis-aconitic acid and isocitric acid (identified by LC-MS platform) in the HF whey, relative to in the HF-casein-fed mice. Targeted LC-MS analyses revealed higher citric acid and cis-aconitic acid concentrations in fed state plasma, but not in liver of HF-whey-fed mice. We propose that enhanced urinary loss of TCA cycle metabolites drain available substrates for anabolic processes, such as lipogenesis, thereby leading to reduced lipid accretion in HF-whey-fed compared to HF-casein-fed mice.

  15. Colony-specific investigations reveal highly variable responses among individual corals to ocean acidification and warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavousi, Javid; Reimer, James Davis; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    As anthropogenic climate change is an ongoing concern, scientific investigations on its impacts on coral reefs are increasing. Although impacts of combined ocean acidification (OA) and temperature stress (T) on reef-building scleractinian corals have been studied at the genus, species and population levels, there are little data available on how individual corals respond to combined OA and anomalous temperatures. In this study, we exposed individual colonies of Acropora digitifera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica to four pCO2-temperature treatments including 400 μatm-28 °C, 400 μatm-31 °C, 1000 μatm-28 °C and 1000 μatm-31 °C for 26 days. Physiological parameters including calcification, protein content, maximum photosynthetic efficiency, Symbiodinium density, and chlorophyll content along with Symbiodinium type of each colony were examined. Along with intercolonial responses, responses of individual colonies versus pooled data to the treatments were investigated. The main results were: 1) responses to either OA or T or their combination were different between individual colonies when considering physiological functions; 2) tolerance to either OA or T was not synonymous with tolerance to the other parameter; 3) tolerance to both OA and T did not necessarily lead to tolerance of OA and T combined (OAT) at the same time; 4) OAT had negative, positive or no impacts on physiological functions of coral colonies; and 5) pooled data were not representative of responses of all individual colonies. Indeed, the pooled data obscured actual responses of individual colonies or presented a response that was not observed in any individual. From the results of this study we recommend improving experimental designs of studies investigating physiological responses of corals to climate change by complementing them with colony-specific examinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fish habitat selection in a large hydropeaking river: Strong individual and temporal variations revealed by telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Hervé; Plichard, Laura; Bergé, Julien; Pella, Hervé; Ovidio, Michaël; McNeil, Eric; Lamouroux, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Modeling individual fish habitat selection in highly variable environments such as hydropeaking rivers is required for guiding efficient management decisions. We analyzed fish microhabitat selection in the heterogeneous hydraulic and thermal conditions (modeled in two-dimensions) of a reach of the large hydropeaking Rhône River locally warmed by the cooling system of a nuclear power plant. We used modern fixed acoustic telemetry techniques to survey 18 fish individuals (five barbels, six catfishes, seven chubs) signaling their position every 3s over a three-month period. Fish habitat selection depended on combinations of current microhabitat hydraulics (e.g. velocity, depth), past microhabitat hydraulics (e.g. dewatering risk or maximum velocities during the past 15days) and to a lesser extent substrate and temperature. Mixed-effects habitat selection models indicated that individual effects were often stronger than specific effects. In the Rhône, fish individuals appear to memorize spatial and temporal environmental changes and to adopt a "least constraining" habitat selection. Avoiding fast-flowing midstream habitats, fish generally live along the banks in areas where the dewatering risk is high. When discharge decreases, however, they select higher velocities but avoid both dewatering areas and very fast-flowing midstream habitats. Although consistent with the available knowledge on static fish habitat selection, our quantitative results demonstrate temporal variations in habitat selection, depending on individual behavior and environmental history. Their generality could be further tested using comparative experiments in different environmental configurations.

  17. Impact of high-performance work systems on individual- and branch-level performance: test of a multilevel model of intermediate linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryee, Samuel; Walumbwa, Fred O; Seidu, Emmanuel Y M; Otaye, Lilian E

    2012-03-01

    We proposed and tested a multilevel model, underpinned by empowerment theory, that examines the processes linking high-performance work systems (HPWS) and performance outcomes at the individual and organizational levels of analyses. Data were obtained from 37 branches of 2 banking institutions in Ghana. Results of hierarchical regression analysis revealed that branch-level HPWS relates to empowerment climate. Additionally, results of hierarchical linear modeling that examined the hypothesized cross-level relationships revealed 3 salient findings. First, experienced HPWS and empowerment climate partially mediate the influence of branch-level HPWS on psychological empowerment. Second, psychological empowerment partially mediates the influence of empowerment climate and experienced HPWS on service performance. Third, service orientation moderates the psychological empowerment-service performance relationship such that the relationship is stronger for those high rather than low in service orientation. Last, ordinary least squares regression results revealed that branch-level HPWS influences branch-level market performance through cross-level and individual-level influences on service performance that emerges at the branch level as aggregated service performance.

  18. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian'an; Maegi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segre, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpelaenen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tonu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proenca, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N. M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J. C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Graessler, Juergen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jorgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koenig, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimaeki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietilaeinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstrale, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Toenjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kaehoenen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Greonberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, Andre; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barroso, Ines; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and similar to 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of

  19. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian'an; Maegi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segre, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpelaenen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tonu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proenca, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N. M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J. C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Graessler, Juergen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jorgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koenig, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimaeki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietilaeinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstrale, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Toenjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kaehoenen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Greonberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, Andre; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barroso, Ines; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and similar to 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of

  20. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ~ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SN...

  1. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation.

  2. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); C.J. Willer (Cristen); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); K.L. Monda (Keri); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A.U. Jackson (Anne); H.L. Allen; C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); J. Luan; R. Mägi (Reedik); J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); L. Qi (Lu); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); I.M. Heid (Iris); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); H.M. Stringham (Heather); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Ferreira (Teresa); R.J. Weyant (Robert); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. Eestrada (Karol); L. Liang (Liming); J. Nemesh (James); J.H. Park; S. Gustafsson (Stefan); T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas); J. Yang (Joanna); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); T. Eesko (Tõnu); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); M. Mangino (Massimo); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); A. Scherag (Andre); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R.P. Welch (Ryan); J.H. Zhao; K.K.H. Aben (Katja); D. Absher (Devin); N. Amin (Najaf); A.L. Dixon (Anna); E. Fisher (Eeva); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); M.E. Goddard (Michael); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); V. Hoesel (Volker); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Ketkar (Shamika); C. Lamina (Claudia); S. Li (Shengxu); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); R.H. Myers (Richard); N. Narisu (Narisu); J.R.B. Perry (John); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); C. Sandholt (Camilla); L.J. Scott (Laura); N. Timpson (Nicholas); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); C.C. White (Charles); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); C. Barlassina (Christina); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); J.O. Jansson; R.W. Lawrence (Robert); N. Pellikka (Niina); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J. Shi (Jianxin); E. Thiering (Eelisabeth); H. Alavere (Helene); M.T.S. Alibrandi (Maria); P. Almgren (Peter); A.M. Arnold (Alice); T. Aspelund (Thor); L.D. Atwood (Larry); B. Balkau (Beverley); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); Y. Ben-Shlomo; R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Biebermann (Heike); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); T. Boes (Tanja); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); M.J. Brown (Morris); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); F. Busonero; H. Campbell (Harry); F.P. Cappuccio (Francesco); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); C.-M. Chen (Chih-Mei); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke; L. Coin (Lachlan); J. Connell (John); I.N.M. Day (Ian); M. den Heijer (Martin); J. Duan (Jubao); S. Eebrahim (Shah); P. Eelliott (Paul); R. Eelosua (Roberto); G. Eeiriksdottir (Gudny); M.R. Eerdos (Micheal); J.G. Eeriksson (Johan); M.F. Facheris (Maurizio); S.B. Felix (Stephan); P. Fischer-Posovszky (Pamela); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); N. Friedrich (Nele); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); M. Fu (Mao); S. Gaget (Stefan); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); E.J. Geus (Eeco); C. Gieger (Christian); A.P. Gjesing (Anette); A. Goel (Anuj); P. Goyette (Philippe); H. Grallert (Harald); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); D. Greenawalt (Danielle); C.J. Groves (Christopher); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.L. Hartikainen; N. Hassanali (Neelam); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hinney (Anke); A. Hofman (Albert); G. Homuth (Georg); J. Hui (Jennie); W. Igl (Wilmar); C. Iribarren (Carlos); B. Isomaa (Bo); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); I. Jarick (Ivonne); E. Jewell (Eelizabeth); U. John (Ulrich); T. Jørgensen (Torben); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kaakinen (Marika); E. Kajantie (Eero); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); J. Kettunen (Johannes); L. Kinnunen (Leena); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); I. Kolcic (Ivana); I.R. König (Inke); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); J. Kusisto (Johanna); P. Kraft (Peter); K. Kvaløy (Kirsti); J. Laitinen (Jaana); O. Lantieri (Olivier); C. Lanzani (Chiara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G. Lettre (Guillaume); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); R.N. Luben (Robert); B. Ludwig (Barbara); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); M. Marre (Michel); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); B. McKnight (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); D. Meyre (David); K. Midthjell (Kristian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.D. Morris (Andrew); R. Mulic (Rosanda); J.S. Ngwa; M. Nelis (Mari); M.J. Neville (Matthew); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); C.J. O'Ddonnell (Christopher); S. O'Rahilly (Stephen); K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); M. Perola (Markus); I. Pichler (Irene); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); C.P. Platou (Carl); O. Polasek (Ozren); A. Pouta (Anneli); S. Rafelt (Suzanne); O. Raitakari (Olli); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); M. Ridderstråle (Martin); W. Rief (Winfried); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); N.R. Robertson (Neil); P. Rzehak (Peter); V. Salomaa (Veikko); A.R. Sanders (Alan); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.J. Savolainen (Markku); S. Schipf (Sabine); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); K. Silander (Kaisa); J. Sinisalo (Juha); D.S. Siscovick (David); J.H. Smit (Jan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); U. Sovio (Ulla); J. Stephens (Jonathan); I. Surakka (Ida); A.J. Swift (Amy); M.L. Tammesoo; J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); M. Teder-Laving (Maris); T.M. Teslovich (Tanya); J.R. Thompson (John); B. Thomson (Brian); A. Tönjes (Anke); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); G.J. van OMen; V. Vatin (Vincent); J. Viikari (Jorma); S. Visvikis-Siest (Sophie); V. Vitart (Veronique); C.I. Vogel (Carla); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); L. Waite (Lindsay); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); G.B. Walters (Bragi); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S. Wiegand (Susanna); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); D.R. Witte (Deniel); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J. Xu (Jianfeng); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); L. Zgaga (Lina); A. Ziegler (Andreas); P. Zitting (Paavo); J.P. Beilby (John); I.S. FarOqi (Ssadaf); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); H.V. Huikuri (Heikki); A. James (Alan); M. Kähönen (Mika); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); C. Ohlsson (Claes); C. Palmer (Cameron); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); H. Boeing (Heiner); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); F.S. Collins (Francis); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J. Eerdmann (Jeanette); P. Frogue (Philippe); H. Grönberg (Henrik); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); T. Hansen (Torben); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); R.B. Hayes (Richard); J. Heinrich (Joachim); F.B. Hu (Frank); K. Hveem (Kristian); T. Illig (Thomas); M.R. Järvelin; J. Kaprio (Jaakko); F. Karpe (Fredrik); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); H. Krude; M. Laakso (Markku); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); A. Metspalu (Andres); P. Munroe (Patricia); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); O. Pedersen (Oluf); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T. Quertermous (Thomas); T. Reinehr (Thomas); A. Rissanen (Aila); I. Rudan (Igor); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uda (Manuela); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); T.T. Valle (Timo); M. Wabitsch (Martin); G. Waeber (Gérard); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); J.F. Wilson (James); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); N. ChatterjE (Nilanjan); S.A. McCarroll (Steve); S. Purcell (Shaun); E.E. Schadt (Eric); P.M. Visscher (Peter); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C.S. Fox (Caroline); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunians (Talin); D.J. Hunter (David); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O'ConneL (Jeffrey); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); D. SchleSinger (David); D.P. Strachan (David); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); M. Boehnke (Michael); K. StefanSon (Kari); K.E. North (Kari); M.I. McArthy (Mark); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); E. IngelSon (Erik); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M.N. Weedon (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObesity is globaLy prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined aSociations betwEn body maS index and ĝ̂1/42.8 miLion SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted foLow up of

  3. In God we trust? Neural measures reveal lower social conformity among non-religious individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchselvam, Ravi; Gopi, Yashoda; Kilekwang, Leonard; Harper, Jessica; Gross, James J

    2017-02-21

    Even in predominantly religious societies, there are substantial individual differences in religious commitment. Why is this? One possibility is that differences in social conformity (i.e., the tendency to think and behave as others do) underlie inclination towards religiosity. However, the link between religiosity and conformity has not yet been directly examined. In this study, we tested the notion that non-religious individuals show dampened social conformity, using both self-reported and neural (EEG-based ERPs) measures of sensitivity to others' influence. Non-religious versus religious undergraduate subjects completed an experimental task that assessed levels of conformity in a domain unrelated to religion (i.e., in judgments of facial attractiveness). Findings showed that, although both groups yielded to conformity pressures at the self-report level, non-religious individuals did not yield to such pressures in their neural responses. These findings highlight a novel link between religiosity and social conformity, and hold implications for prominent theories about the psychological functions of religion.

  4. The genome of a Mongolian individual reveals the genetic imprints of Mongolians on modern human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haihua; Guo, Xiaosen; Zhang, Dong; Narisu, Narisu; Bu, Junjie; Jirimutu, Jirimutu; Liang, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Xing, Yanping; Wang, Dingzhu; Li, Tongda; Zhang, Yanru; Guan, Baozhu; Yang, Xukui; Yang, Zili; Shuangshan, Shuangshan; Su, Zhe; Wu, Huiguang; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Shilin; Bayinnamula, Bayinnamula; Chang, Yuqi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Tianming; Suyalatu, Suyalatu; Huang, Hui; Su, Yan; Chen, Yujie; Li, Wenqi; Yang, Xu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Wu, Qizhu; Yin, Ye; Zhou, Huanmin

    2014-11-05

    Mongolians have played a significant role in modern human evolution, especially after the rise of Genghis Khan (1162[?]-1227). Although the social cultural impacts of Genghis Khan and the Mongolian population have been well documented, explorations of their genome structure and genetic imprints on other human populations have been lacking. We here present the genome of a Mongolian male individual. The genome was de novo assembled using a total of 130.8-fold genomic data produced from massively parallel whole-genome sequencing. We identified high-confidence variation sets, including 3.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 756,234 short insertions and deletions. Functional SNP analysis predicted that the individual has a pathogenic risk for carnitine deficiency. We located the patrilineal inheritance of the Mongolian genome to the lineage D3a through Y haplogroup analysis and inferred that the individual has a common patrilineal ancestor with Tibeto-Burman populations and is likely to be the progeny of the earliest settlers in East Asia. We finally investigated the genetic imprints of Mongolians on other human populations using different approaches. We found varying degrees of gene flows between Mongolians and populations living in Europe, South/Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. The analyses demonstrate that the genetic impacts of Mongolians likely resulted from the expansion of the Mongolian Empire in the 13th century. The genome will be of great help in further explorations of modern human evolution and genetic causes of diseases/traits specific to Mongolians.

  5. Three-dimensional coordinates of individual atoms in materials revealed by electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Wu, Li; Scott, M C; Theis, W; Ophus, Colin; Bartels, Matthias; Yang, Yongsoo; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Sawaya, Michael R; Heinz, Hendrik; Marks, Laurence D; Ercius, Peter; Miao, Jianwei

    2015-11-01

    Crystallography, the primary method for determining the 3D atomic positions in crystals, has been fundamental to the development of many fields of science. However, the atomic positions obtained from crystallography represent a global average of many unit cells in a crystal. Here, we report, for the first time, the determination of the 3D coordinates of thousands of individual atoms and a point defect in a material by electron tomography with a precision of ∼19 pm, where the crystallinity of the material is not assumed. From the coordinates of these individual atoms, we measure the atomic displacement field and the full strain tensor with a 3D resolution of ∼1 nm(3) and a precision of ∼10(-3), which are further verified by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The ability to precisely localize the 3D coordinates of individual atoms in materials without assuming crystallinity is expected to find important applications in materials science, nanoscience, physics, chemistry and biology.

  6. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Chen

    Full Text Available Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications.

  7. Blood-gene expression reveals reduced circadian rhythmicity in individuals resistant to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnardottir, Erna S; Nikonova, Elena V; Shockley, Keith R; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A; Anafi, Ron C; Tanis, Keith Q; Maislin, Greg; Stone, David J; Renger, John J; Winrow, Christopher J; Pack, Allan I

    2014-10-01

    To address whether changes in gene expression in blood cells with sleep loss are different in individuals resistant and sensitive to sleep deprivation. Blood draws every 4 h during a 3-day study: 24-h normal baseline, 38 h of continuous wakefulness and subsequent recovery sleep, for a total of 19 time-points per subject, with every 2-h psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) assessment when awake. Sleep laboratory. Fourteen subjects who were previously identified as behaviorally resistant (n = 7) or sensitive (n = 7) to sleep deprivation by PVT. Thirty-eight hours of continuous wakefulness. We found 4,481 unique genes with a significant 24-h diurnal rhythm during a normal sleep-wake cycle in blood (false discovery rate [FDR] sleep. After accounting for circadian effects, two genes (SREBF1 and CPT1A, both involved in lipid metabolism) exhibited small, but significant, linear changes in expression with the duration of sleep deprivation (FDR sleep deprivation was a reduction in the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of expression of normally cycling probe sets. This reduction was noticeably higher in behaviorally resistant subjects than sensitive subjects, at any given P value. Furthermore, blood cell type enrichment analysis showed that the expression pattern difference between sensitive and resistant subjects is mainly found in cells of myeloid origin, such as monocytes. Individual differences in behavioral effects of sleep deprivation are associated with differences in diurnal amplitude of gene expression for genes that show circadian rhythmicity. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Individual somatotopy of primary sensorimotor cortex revealed by intermodal matching of MEG, PET, and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, H; Kristeva, R; Knorr, U; Schlaug, G; Huang, Y; Steinmetz, H; Nebeling, B; Herzog, H; Seitz, R J

    1992-01-01

    A method for comparing estimated magnetoencephalographic (MEG) dipole localizations with regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) activation areas is presented. This approach utilizes individual intermodal matching of MEG data, of rCBF measurements with [15O]-butanol and positron emission tomography (PET), and of anatomical information obtained from magnetic resonance (MR) images. The MEG data and the rCBF measurements were recorded in a healthy subject during right-sided simple voluntary movements of the foot, thumb, index finger, and mouth. High resolution 3D-FLASH MR images of the brain consisting of 128 contiguous sagittal slices of 1.17-mm thickness were used. MEG/MR integration was performed by superimposing the 3D head coordinate system constructed during the MEG measurement onto the MR image data using identical anatomical landmarks as references. PET/MR integration was achieved by a phantom-validated iterative front-to-back-projection algorithm resulting in one integrated MEG/PET/MR image. The estimated dipole locations followed the somatotopic organisation of the task-specific rCBF increases as evident from PET, although they did not match point-to-point. Our results demonstrate that intermodal matching of MEG, PET and MR data provides a tool for relating estimated neuromagnetic field locations to task-specific rCBF changes in individual subjects. Our method offers the perspective of refined dipole modelling.

  9. Multivariable Regression Analysis in Schistosoma mansoni-Infected Individuals in the Sudan Reveals Unique Immunoepidemiological Profiles in Uninfected, egg+ and Non-egg+ Infected Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayseer Elamin Mohamed Elfaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Sudan, Schistosoma mansoni infections are a major cause of morbidity in school-aged children and infection rates are associated with available clean water sources. During infection, immune responses pass through a Th1 followed by Th2 and Treg phases and patterns can relate to different stages of infection or immunity.This retrospective study evaluated immunoepidemiological aspects in 234 individuals (range 4-85 years old from Kassala and Khartoum states in 2011. Systemic immune profiles (cytokines and immunoglobulins and epidemiological parameters were surveyed in n = 110 persons presenting patent S. mansoni infections (egg+, n = 63 individuals positive for S. mansoni via PCR in sera but egg negative (SmPCR+ and n = 61 people who were infection-free (Sm uninf. Immunoepidemiological findings were further investigated using two binary multivariable regression analysis.Nearly all egg+ individuals had no access to latrines and over 90% obtained water via the canal stemming from the Atbara River. With regards to age, infection and an egg+ status was linked to young and adolescent groups. In terms of immunology, S. mansoni infection per se was strongly associated with increased SEA-specific IgG4 but not IgE levels. IL-6, IL-13 and IL-10 were significantly elevated in patently-infected individuals and positively correlated with egg load. In contrast, IL-2 and IL-1β were significantly lower in SmPCR+ individuals when compared to Sm uninf and egg+ groups which was further confirmed during multivariate regression analysis.Schistosomiasis remains an important public health problem in the Sudan with a high number of patent individuals. In addition, SmPCR diagnostics revealed another cohort of infected individuals with a unique immunological profile and provides an avenue for future studies on non-patent infection states. Future studies should investigate the downstream signalling pathways/mechanisms of IL-2 and IL-1β as potential diagnostic markers

  10. Web placement in sympatric linyphiid spiders ( Arachnida, Araneae): Individual foraging decisions reveal inter-specific competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberstein, Marie Elisabeth

    1998-02-01

    The distribution of two sympatric web spiders, Frontinellina frutetorum (C. L. Koch) and Neriene radiata (Walckenaer) (Araneae: Linyphiidae) was studied on an area of forest regrowth in eastern Austria. Both species utilised significantly different heights on young conifer trees to construct their webs. F. frutetorum selected higher vegetation layers, whereas N. radiata constructed its webs, closer to the ground. This distribution may either be evidence of competition for web space or it may reflect specific distribution patterns unrelated to spider density. An experiment showed that when spiders of either species were released onto vacant trees they selected similar vegetation heights for web construction. On trees already occupied by a heterospecific individual however, F. frutetorum placed its webs significantly higher and N. radiata significantly lower compared to web placement on vacant trees suggesting that F. frutetorum and N. radiata compete for web space.

  11. Individual and population variation in invertebrates revealed by Inter-simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Abbot

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based molecular markers are well suited for questions requiring large scale surveys of plant and animal populations. Inter-simple Sequence Repeats or ISSRs are analyzed by a recently developed technique based on the amplification of the regions between inverse-oriented microsatellite loci with oligonucleotides anchored in microsatellites themselves. ISSRs have shown much promise for the study of the population biology of plants, but have not yet been explored for similar studies of animals. The value of ISSRs is demonstrated for the study of animal species with low levels of within-population variation. Sets of primers are identified which reveal variation in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Pemphigus obesinymphae, in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and in a rotifer in the genus Philodina.

  12. Pattern recognition algorithm reveals how birds evolve individual egg pattern signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Kilner, Rebecca M; Town, Christopher

    2014-06-18

    Pattern-based identity signatures are commonplace in the animal kingdom, but how they are recognized is poorly understood. Here we develop a computer vision tool for analysing visual patterns, NATUREPATTERNMATCH, which breaks new ground by mimicking visual and cognitive processes known to be involved in recognition tasks. We apply this tool to a long-standing question about the evolution of recognizable signatures. The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) is a notorious cheat that sneaks its mimetic eggs into nests of other species. Can host birds fight back against cuckoo forgery by evolving highly recognizable signatures? Using NATUREPATTERNMATCH, we show that hosts subjected to the best cuckoo mimicry have evolved the most recognizable egg pattern signatures. Theory predicts that effective pattern signatures should be simultaneously replicable, distinctive and complex. However, our results reveal that recognizable signatures need not incorporate all three of these features. Moreover, different hosts have evolved effective signatures in diverse ways.

  13. Extended Lyman alpha haloes around individual high-redshift galaxies revealed by MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Wisotzki, L; Blaizot, J; Brinchmann, J; Herenz, E C; Schaye, J; Bouché, N; Cantalupo, S; Contini, T; Carollo, C M; Caruana, J; Courbot, J -B; Emsellem, E; Kamann, S; Kerutt, J; Leclercq, F; Lilly, S J; Patrício, V; Sandin, C; Steinmetz, M; Straka, L A; Urrutia, T; Verhamme, A; Weilbacher, P M; Wendt, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of extended Ly alpha emission around individual star-forming galaxies at redshifts z = 3-6 in an ultradeep exposure of the Hubble Deep Field South obtained with MUSE on the ESO-VLT. The data reach a limiting surface brightness (1sigma) of ~1 x 10^-19 erg s^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 in azimuthally averaged radial profiles, an order of magnitude improvement over previous narrowband imaging. Our sample consists of 26 spectroscopically confirmed Ly alpha-emitting, but mostly continuum-faint (m_AB >~ 27) galaxies. In most objects the Ly alpha emission is considerably more extended than the UV continuum light. While 5 of the faintest galaxies in the sample show no significantly detected Ly alpha haloes, the derived upper limits suggest that this is just due to insufficient S/N. Ly alpha haloes therefore appear to be (nearly) ubiquitous even for low-mass (~10^8-10^9 M_sun) star-forming galaxies at z>3. We decompose the Ly alpha emission of each object into a compact `continuum-like' and an extended ...

  14. Application of MCR-ALS to reveal intermediate conformations in the thermally induced α-β transition of poly-L-lysine monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaráz, Mirta R.; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    Temperature-induced conformational transitions of poly-L-lysine were monitored with Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy between 10 °C and 70 °C. Chemometric analysis of dynamic IR spectra was performed by multivariate curve analysis-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) of the amide I‧ and amide II‧ spectral region. With this approach, the pure spectral and concentration profiles of the conformational transition were obtained. Beside the initial α-helical, the intermediate random coil/extended helices and the final β-sheet structure, an additional intermediate PLL conformation was identified and attributed to a transient β-sheet structure.

  15. Unique fluorophores in the dimeric archaeal histones hMfB and hPyA1 reveal the impact of nonnative structure in a monomeric kinetic intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Matthew R; Gloss, Lisa M

    2008-02-01

    Homodimeric archaeal histones and heterodimeric eukaryotic histones share a conserved structure but fold through different kinetic mechanisms, with a correlation between faster folding/association rates and the population of kinetic intermediates. Wild-type hMfB (from Methanothermus fervidus) has no intrinsic fluorophores; Met35, which is Tyr in hyperthermophilic archaeal histones such as hPyA1 (from Pyrococcus strain GB-3A), was mutated to Tyr and Trp. Two Tyr-to-Trp mutants of hPyA1 were also characterized. All fluorophores were introduced into the long, central alpha-helix of the histone fold. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the fluorophores did not significantly alter the helical content of the histones. The equilibrium unfolding transitions of the histone variants were two-state, reversible processes, with DeltaG degrees (H2O) values within 1 kcal/mol of the wild-type dimers. The hPyA1 Trp variants fold by two-state kinetic mechanisms like wild-type hPyA1, but with increased folding and unfolding rates, suggesting that the mutated residues (Tyr-32 and Tyr-36) contribute to transition state structure. Like wild-type hMfB, M35Y and M35W hMfB fold by a three-state mechanism, with a stopped-flow CD burst-phase monomeric intermediate. The M35 mutants populate monomeric intermediates with increased secondary structure and stability but exhibit decreased folding rates; this suggests that nonnative interactions occur from burial of the hydrophobic Tyr and Trp residues in this kinetic intermediate. These results implicate the long central helix as a key component of the structure in the kinetic monomeric intermediates of hMfB as well as the dimerization transition state in the folding of hPyA1.

  16. RNA-Seq reveals infection-induced gene expression changes in the snail intermediate host of the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattrachai Prasopdee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the snail intermediate host of the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, the leading cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA in the Greater Mekong sub-region of Thailand. Despite the severe public health impact of Opisthorchis-induced CCA, knowledge of the molecular interactions occurring between the parasite and its snail intermediate host is scant. The examination of differences in gene expression profiling between uninfected and O. viverrini-infected B. siamensis goniomphalos could provide clues on fundamental pathways involved in the regulation of snail-parasite interplay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using high-throughput (Illumina sequencing and extensive bioinformatic analyses, we characterized the transcriptomes of uninfected and O. viverrini-infected B. siamensis goniomphalos. Comparative analyses of gene expression profiling allowed the identification of 7,655 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, associated to 43 distinct biological pathways, including pathways associated with immune defense mechanisms against parasites. Amongst the DEGs with immune functions, transcripts encoding distinct proteases displayed the highest down-regulation in Bithynia specimens infected by O. viverrini; conversely, transcription of genes encoding heat-shock proteins and actins was significantly up-regulated in parasite-infected snails when compared to the uninfected counterparts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study lays the foundation for functional studies of genes and gene products potentially involved in immune-molecular mechanisms implicated in the ability of the parasite to successfully colonize its snail intermediate host. The annotated dataset provided herein represents a ready-to-use molecular resource for the discovery of molecular pathways underlying susceptibility and resistance mechanisms of B. siamensis goniomphalos to O. viverrini and for comparative analyses with pulmonate snail

  17. The 1.6 A crystal structure of pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris rationalizes substrate specificity and reveals a flavin intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Chye Tan

    Full Text Available Pyranose dehydrogenases (PDHs are extracellular flavin-dependent oxidoreductases secreted by litter-decomposing fungi with a role in natural recycling of plant matter. All major monosaccharides in lignocellulose are oxidized by PDH at comparable yields and efficiencies. Oxidation takes place as single-oxidation or sequential double-oxidation reactions of the carbohydrates, resulting in sugar derivatives oxidized primarily at C2, C3 or C2/3 with the concomitant reduction of the flavin. A suitable electron acceptor then reoxidizes the reduced flavin. Whereas oxygen is a poor electron acceptor for PDH, several alternative acceptors, e.g., quinone compounds, naturally present during lignocellulose degradation, can be used. We have determined the 1.6-Å crystal structure of PDH from Agaricus meleagris. Interestingly, the flavin ring in PDH is modified by a covalent mono- or di-atomic species at the C(4a position. Under normal conditions, PDH is not oxidized by oxygen; however, the related enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O activates oxygen by a mechanism that proceeds via a covalent flavin C(4a-hydroperoxide intermediate. Although the flavin C(4a adduct is common in monooxygenases, it is unusual for flavoprotein oxidases, and it has been proposed that formation of the intermediate would be unfavorable in these oxidases. Thus, the flavin adduct in PDH not only shows that the adduct can be favorably accommodated in the active site, but also provides important details regarding the structural, spatial and physicochemical requirements for formation of this flavin intermediate in related oxidases. Extensive in silico modeling of carbohydrates in the PDH active site allowed us to rationalize the previously reported patterns of substrate specificity and regioselectivity. To evaluate the regioselectivity of D-glucose oxidation, reduction experiments were performed using fluorinated glucose. PDH was rapidly reduced by 3-fluorinated glucose, which has the C2

  18. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  19. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  20. In situ spectroscopy on intact Leptospirillum ferrooxidans reveals that reduced cytochrome 579 is an obligatory intermediate in the aerobic iron respiratory chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Blake

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer reactions among colored biomolecules in intact bacterial cells were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scatter light. The aerobic iron respiratory chain of Leptospirillum ferrooxidans was dominated by the redox status of an abundant cellular cytochrome that had an absorbance peak at 579 nanometers in the reduced state. Intracellular cytochrome 579 was reduced within the time that it took to mix a suspension of the bacteria with soluble ferrous iron at pH 1.7. Steady state turnover experiments were conducted where the initial concentrations of ferrous iron were less than or equal to that of the oxygen concentration. Under these conditions, the initial absorbance spectrum of the oxidized bacterium was always regenerated from that of the iron-reduced bacterium. The kinetics of aerobic respiration on soluble iron by intact L. ferrooxidans conformed to the Michaelis-Menten formalism, where the reduced intracellular cytochrome 579 represented the Michaelis complex whose subsequent oxidation appeared to be the rate-limiting step in the overall aerobic respiratory process. The velocity of formation of ferric iron at any time point was directly proportional to the concentration of the reduced cytochrome 579. Further, the integral over time of the concentraton of the reduced cytochrome was directly proportional to the total concentration of ferrous iron in each reaction mixture. These kinetic data obtained using whole cells were consistent with the hypothesis that reduced cytochrome 579 is an obligatory steady state intermediate in the iron respiratory chain of this bacterium. The capability of conducting visible spectroscopy in suspensions of intact cells comprises a powerful post-reductionist means to study cellular respiration in situ under physiological conditions for the organism.

  1. Estimating the Economic Value of Environmental Amenities of Isfahan Sofeh Highland Park (The Individual Revealed and Expressed Travel Cost Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Amirnejad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Natural resources and the environment, such as mountains are considered public goods. The main features of these public goods are lack of market and price for exchange. This issue leads to a worthless impression about these goods, lack of effort for their conservation and preventing resource degradation. One of the major benefits of environmental resources, such as mountains, is their function as environmental amenities (for leisure and recreation. The estimation of their recreational worth is important as a part of the total value of such resources. In this context, the aim of this study is to estimate the economic value of environmental amenities of Sofeh Highland Park in Isfahan by individual travel cost method. Materials and Methods: Travel cost method is used for the evaluation of public goods or environmental non-market commodities. It is applied to a wide range of areas, including tourism values of lakes and wetlands, coral reefs, biodiversity and national parks, recreational fishing and mountaineering. The travel cost approach does not ask willingness to pay directly, but imputes it from the observed behavior of other visitors through an estimated demand function, which relates the number of observed trips to the incurred travel cost. Underpinning the travel cost method is for the estimation of the recreational demand function, from which consumer surplus estimates can be derived. Consumer surplus -the measure of non-market benefits to the visitors- is the difference between what the visitor would be (theoretically willing to pay to go the intended recreational location, and what they are actually required to pay. In this research, the individual travel cost method was used. For this purpose, a 290 item questionnaire with simple random sampling was filled by travelers in the area in 2013. Then the demand function of environmental amenities (tourism demand was estimated in two scenarios by using negative binomial regression

  2. Boolean ErbB network reconstructions and perturbation simulations reveal individual drug response in different breast cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite promising progress in targeted breast cancer therapy, drug resistance remains challenging. The monoclonal antibody drugs trastuzumab and pertuzumab as well as the small molecule inhibitor erlotinib were designed to prevent ErbB-2 and ErbB-1 receptor induced deregulated protein signalling, contributing to tumour progression. The oncogenic potential of ErbB receptors unfolds in case of overexpression or mutations. Dimerisation with other receptors allows to bypass pathway blockades. Our intention is to reconstruct the ErbB network to reveal resistance mechanisms. We used longitudinal proteomic data of ErbB receptors and downstream targets in the ErbB-2 amplified breast cancer cell lines BT474, SKBR3 and HCC1954 treated with erlotinib, trastuzumab or pertuzumab, alone or combined, up to 60 minutes and 30 hours, respectively. In a Boolean modelling approach, signalling networks were reconstructed based on these data in a cell line and time course specific manner, including prior literature knowledge. Finally, we simulated network response to inhibitor combinations to detect signalling nodes reflecting growth inhibition. Results The networks pointed to cell line specific activation patterns of the MAPK and PI3K pathway. In BT474, the PI3K signal route was favoured, while in SKBR3, novel edges highlighted MAPK signalling. In HCC1954, the inferred edges stimulated both pathways. For example, we uncovered feedback loops amplifying PI3K signalling, in line with the known trastuzumab resistance of this cell line. In the perturbation simulations on the short-term networks, we analysed ERK1/2, AKT and p70S6K. The results indicated a pathway specific drug response, driven by the type of growth factor stimulus. HCC1954 revealed an edgetic type of PIK3CA-mutation, contributing to trastuzumab inefficacy. Drug impact on the AKT and ERK1/2 signalling axes is mirrored by effects on RB and RPS6, relating to phenotypic events like cell growth or proliferation

  3. Revealing a Cool Accretion Disk in the Ultraluminous X-ray Source M81 X-9 (Holmberg IX X-1): Evidence for an Intermediate Mass Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, J M; Miller, M C

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of an analysis of two XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn spectra of the bright ultraluminous X-ray source M81 X-9 (Holmberg IX X-1), obtained in snapshot observations. Soft thermal emission is clearly revealed in spectra dominated by hard power-law components. Depending on the model used, M81 X-9 was observed at a luminosity of L_X = 1.0-1.6 E+40 erg/s (0.3-10.0 keV). The variability previously observed in this source signals that it is an accreting source which likely harbors a black hole. Remarkably, accretion disk models for the soft thermal emission yield very low inner disk temperatures (kT = 0.17-0.29 keV, including 90 per cent confidence errors and variations between observations and disk models), and improve the fit statistic over any single-component continuum model at the 6 sigma level of confidence. This represents much stronger evidence for a cool disk than prior evidence which combined spectra from different observatories, and the strongest evidence of a cool disk in an ultraluminous X-ray ...

  4. Psychology of fragrance use: perception of individual odor and perfume blends reveals a mechanism for idiosyncratic effects on fragrance choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenochová, Pavlína; Vohnoutová, Pavla; Roberts, S Craig; Oberzaucher, Elisabeth; Grammer, Karl; Havlíček, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Cross-culturally, fragrances are used to modulate body odor, but the psychology of fragrance choice has been largely overlooked. The prevalent view is that fragrances mask an individual's body odor and improve its pleasantness. In two experiments, we found positive effects of perfume on body odor perception. Importantly, however, this was modulated by significant interactions with individual odor donors. Fragrances thus appear to interact with body odor, creating an individually-specific odor mixture. In a third experiment, the odor mixture of an individual's body odor and their preferred perfume was perceived as more pleasant than a blend of the same body odor with a randomly-allocated perfume, even when there was no difference in pleasantness between the perfumes. This indicates that fragrance use extends beyond simple masking effects and that people choose perfumes that interact well with their own odor. Our results provide an explanation for the highly individual nature of perfume choice.

  5. Long-term species, sexual and individual variations in foraging strategies of fur seals revealed by stable isotopes in whiskers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laëtitia Kernaléguen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individual variations in the use of the species niche are an important component of diversity in trophic interactions. A challenge in testing consistency of individual foraging strategy is the repeated collection of information on the same individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The foraging strategies of sympatric fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella and A. tropicalis were examined using the stable isotope signature of serially sampled whiskers. Most whiskers exhibited synchronous δ(13C and δ(15N oscillations that correspond to the seal annual movements over the long term (up to 8 years. δ(13C and δ(15N values were spread over large ranges, with differences between species, sexes and individuals. The main segregating mechanism operates at the spatial scale. Most seals favored foraging in subantarctic waters (where the Crozet Islands are located where they fed on myctophids. However, A. gazella dispersed in the Antarctic Zone and A. tropicalis more in the subtropics. Gender differences in annual time budget shape the seal movements. Males that do not perform any parental care exhibited large isotopic oscillations reflecting broad annual migrations, while isotopic values of females confined to a limited foraging range during lactation exhibited smaller changes. Limited inter-individual isotopic variations occurred in female seals and in male A. tropicalis. In contrast, male A. gazella showed large inter-individual variations, with some males migrating repeatedly to high-Antarctic waters where they fed on krill, thus meaning that individual specialization occurred over years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Whisker isotopic signature yields unique long-term information on individual behaviour that integrates the spatial, trophic and temporal dimensions of the ecological niche. The method allows depicting the entire realized niche of the species, including some of its less well-known components such as age-, sex-, individual- and

  6. Long-Term Species, Sexual and Individual Variations in Foraging Strategies of Fur Seals Revealed by Stable Isotopes in Whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernaléguen, Laëtitia; Cazelles, Bernard; Arnould, John P. Y.; Richard, Pierre; Guinet, Christophe; Cherel, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background Individual variations in the use of the species niche are an important component of diversity in trophic interactions. A challenge in testing consistency of individual foraging strategy is the repeated collection of information on the same individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings The foraging strategies of sympatric fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella and A. tropicalis) were examined using the stable isotope signature of serially sampled whiskers. Most whiskers exhibited synchronous δ13C and δ15N oscillations that correspond to the seal annual movements over the long term (up to 8 years). δ13C and δ15N values were spread over large ranges, with differences between species, sexes and individuals. The main segregating mechanism operates at the spatial scale. Most seals favored foraging in subantarctic waters (where the Crozet Islands are located) where they fed on myctophids. However, A. gazella dispersed in the Antarctic Zone and A. tropicalis more in the subtropics. Gender differences in annual time budget shape the seal movements. Males that do not perform any parental care exhibited large isotopic oscillations reflecting broad annual migrations, while isotopic values of females confined to a limited foraging range during lactation exhibited smaller changes. Limited inter-individual isotopic variations occurred in female seals and in male A. tropicalis. In contrast, male A. gazella showed large inter-individual variations, with some males migrating repeatedly to high-Antarctic waters where they fed on krill, thus meaning that individual specialization occurred over years. Conclusions/Significance Whisker isotopic signature yields unique long-term information on individual behaviour that integrates the spatial, trophic and temporal dimensions of the ecological niche. The method allows depicting the entire realized niche of the species, including some of its less well-known components such as age-, sex-, individual- and migration-related changes. It

  7. Neural decoding reveals impaired face configural processing in the right fusiform face area of individuals with developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiedong; Liu, Jia; Xu, Yaoda

    2015-01-28

    Most of human daily social interactions rely on the ability to successfully recognize faces. Yet ∼2% of the human population suffers from face blindness without any acquired brain damage [this is also known as developmental prosopagnosia (DP) or congenital prosopagnosia]). Despite the presence of severe behavioral face recognition deficits, surprisingly, a majority of DP individuals exhibit normal face selectivity in the right fusiform face area (FFA), a key brain region involved in face configural processing. This finding, together with evidence showing impairments downstream from the right FFA in DP individuals, has led some to argue that perhaps the right FFA is largely intact in DP individuals. Using fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis, here we report the discovery of a neural impairment in the right FFA of DP individuals that may play a critical role in mediating their face-processing deficits. In seven individuals with DP, we discovered that, despite the right FFA's preference for faces and it showing decoding for the different face parts, it exhibited impaired face configural decoding and did not contain distinct neural response patterns for the intact and the scrambled face configurations. This abnormality was not present throughout the ventral visual cortex, as normal neural decoding was found in an adjacent object-processing region. To our knowledge, this is the first direct neural evidence showing impaired face configural processing in the right FFA in individuals with DP. The discovery of this neural impairment provides a new clue to our understanding of the neural basis of DP.

  8. Raman spectroscopy of individual monocytes reveals that single-beam optical trapping of mononuclear cells occurs by their nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, Samantha; Chan, James; Taylor, Douglas; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We show that laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy of eukaryotic cells with a significantly larger diameter than the tight focus of a single beam laser trap leads to optical trapping of the cell by its optically densest part, i.e. typically the cell’s nucleus. Raman spectra of individual optically trapped monocytes are compared with location-specific Raman spectra of monocytes adhered to a substrate. When the cell’s nucleus is stained with a fluorescent live cell stain, the Raman spectrum of the DNA-specific stain is observed only in the nucleus of individual monocytes. Optically trapped monocytes display the same behavior. We also show that the Raman spectra of individual monocytes exhibit the characteristic Raman signature of cells that have not yet fully differentiated and that individual primary monocytes can be distinguished from transformed monocytes based on their Raman spectra. This work provides further evidence that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of individual cells provides meaningful biochemical information in an entirely nondestructive fashion that permits discerning differences between cell types and cellular activity. PMID:21984959

  9. Reinstatement of individual past events revealed by the similarity of distributed activation patterns during encoding and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Erik A; Ritchey, Maureen; Cabeza, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Neurobiological memory models assume memory traces are stored in neocortex, with pointers in the hippocampus, and are then reactivated during retrieval, yielding the experience of remembering. Whereas most prior neuroimaging studies on reactivation have focused on the reactivation of sets or categories of items, the current study sought to identify cortical patterns pertaining to memory for individual scenes. During encoding, participants viewed pictures of scenes paired with matching labels (e.g., "barn," "tunnel"), and, during retrieval, they recalled the scenes in response to the labels and rated the quality of their visual memories. Using representational similarity analyses, we interrogated the similarity between activation patterns during encoding and retrieval both at the item level (individual scenes) and the set level (all scenes). The study yielded four main findings. First, in occipitotemporal cortex, memory success increased with encoding-retrieval similarity (ERS) at the item level but not at the set level, indicating the reactivation of individual scenes. Second, in ventrolateral pFC, memory increased with ERS for both item and set levels, indicating the recapitulation of memory processes that benefit encoding and retrieval of all scenes. Third, in retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortex, ERS was sensitive to individual scene information irrespective of memory success, suggesting automatic activation of scene contexts. Finally, consistent with neurobiological models, hippocampal activity during encoding predicted the subsequent reactivation of individual items. These findings show the promise of studying memory with greater specificity by isolating individual mnemonic representations and determining their relationship to factors like the detail with which past events are remembered.

  10. Germline DNA copy number variation in individuals with Argyrophilic grain disease reveals CTNS as a plausible candidate gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darine Villela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Argyrophilic grain disease (AGD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the human brain that has never been associated to a particular gene locus. In the present study, we report the results of a CNV investigation in 29 individuals whose anatomopathologic investigation of the brain showed AGD. Rare CNVs were identified in six patients (21%, in particular a 40 kb deletion at 17p13.2 encompassing the CTNS gene. Homozygote mutations in CTNS are known to cause cystinosis, a disorder characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of cystine in all tissues. We present the first CNV results in individuals presenting AGD and a possible candidate gene implicated in the disorder.

  11. A new device for monitoring individual activity rhythms of honey bees reveals critical effects of the social environment on behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Katharina; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Härtel, Stephan; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    Chronobiological studies of individual activity rhythms in social insects can be constrained by the artificial isolation of individuals from their social context. We present a new experimental set-up that simultaneously measures the temperature rhythm in a queen-less but brood raising mini colony and the walking activity rhythms of singly kept honey bees that have indirect social contact with it. Our approach enables monitoring of individual bees in the social context of a mini colony under controlled laboratory conditions. In a pilot experiment, we show that social contact with the mini colony improves the survival of monitored young individuals and affects locomotor activity patterns of young and old bees. When exposed to conflicting Zeitgebers consisting of a light-dark (LD) cycle that is phase-delayed with respect to the mini colony rhythm, rhythms of young and old bees are socially synchronized with the mini colony rhythm, whereas isolated bees synchronize to the LD cycle. We conclude that the social environment is a stronger Zeitgeber than the LD cycle and that our new experimental set-up is well suited for studying the mechanisms of social entrainment in honey bees.

  12. Corona cell RNA sequencing from individual oocytes revealed transcripts and pathways linked to euploid oocyte competence and live birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jason C; Patton, Alyssa L; McCallie, Blair R; Griffin, Darren K; Schoolcraft, William B; Katz-Jaffe, Mandy G

    2016-05-01

    Corona cells surround the oocyte and maintain a close relationship through transzonal processes and gap junctions, and may be used to assess oocyte competence. In this study, the corona cell transcriptome of individual cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) was investigated. Isolated corona cells were collected from COCs that developed into euploid blastocysts and were transferred in a subsequent frozen embryo transfer. Ten corona cell samples underwent RNA-sequencing to generate unique gene expression profiles. Live birth was compared with negative implantation after the transfer of a euploid blastocyst using bioinformatics and statistical analysis. Individual corona cell samples produced a mean of 21.2 million sequence reads, and 307 differentially expressed transcrpits (P corona cell transcriptome was successfully generated using RNA-sequencing. Key genes and signalling pathways were identified in association with implantation outcome after the transfer of a euploid blastocyst in a frozen embryo transfer. These data could provide novel biomarkers for the non-invasive assessment of embryo viability.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Sunflower Genotypes with Contrasting Oxidative Stress Tolerance Reveals Individual- and Combined- Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Vemanna S; Paramanantham, Anjugam; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Mohan-Raju, Basavaiah; Udayakumar, Makarla; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2016-01-01

    In nature plants are often simultaneously challenged by different biotic and abiotic stresses. Although the mechanisms underlying plant responses against single stress have been studied considerably, plant tolerance mechanisms under combined stress is not understood. Also, the mechanism used to combat independently and sequentially occurring many number of biotic and abiotic stresses has also not systematically studied. From this context, in this study, we attempted to explore the shared response of sunflower plants to many independent stresses by using meta-analysis of publically available transcriptome data and transcript profiling by quantitative PCR. Further, we have also analyzed the possible role of the genes so identified in contributing to combined stress tolerance. Meta-analysis of transcriptomic data from many abiotic and biotic stresses indicated the common representation of oxidative stress responsive genes. Further, menadione-mediated oxidative stress in sunflower seedlings showed similar pattern of changes in the oxidative stress related genes. Based on this a large scale screening of 55 sunflower genotypes was performed under menadione stress and those contrasting in oxidative stress tolerance were identified. Further to confirm the role of genes identified in individual and combined stress tolerance the contrasting genotypes were individually and simultaneously challenged with few abiotic and biotic stresses. The tolerant hybrid showed reduced levels of stress damage both under combined stress and few independent stresses. Transcript profiling of the genes identified from meta-analysis in the tolerant hybrid also indicated that the selected genes were up-regulated under individual and combined stresses. Our results indicate that menadione-based screening can identify genotypes not only tolerant to multiple number of individual biotic and abiotic stresses, but also the combined stresses.

  14. Neural Decoding Reveals Impaired Face Configural Processing in the Right Fusiform Face Area of Individuals with Developmental Prosopagnosia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Most of human daily social interactions rely on the ability to successfully recognize faces. Yet ∼2% of the human population suffers from face blindness without any acquired brain damage [this is also known as developmental prosopagnosia (DP) or congenital prosopagnosia]). Despite the presence of severe behavioral face recognition deficits, surprisingly, a majority of DP individuals exhibit normal face selectivity in the right fusiform face area (FFA), a key brain region involved in face conf...

  15. Females do it better. Individual recognition experiments reveal sexual dimorphism in Lemur catta (Linnaeus 1758) olfactory motivation and territorial defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Dapporto, Leonardo

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we aim at demonstrating individual recognition of female genital marking in Lemur catta. By gas chromatography and behavioural trials we verified the occurrence of the three components of recognition systems. We showed that each female has a unique chemical signature (expression component), and males and females perceive female individuality (perception component). To verify the presence of the action component (the last component of recognition systems), we designed a bioassay based on territorial competition to verify the functional response to female odours. Only females identified other females on the basis of their scents. The lack of a territorial functional response by males to female secretions may not indicate a male inability to identify females by their scents. In fact, sexual dimorphism in motivation and territorial defence may explain the response by males in the functional experiment. Actually, game theory predicts that males defend their own territories more vigorously against males compared with females. Therefore, the result of individual recognition bioassays of female odours may open interesting scenarios in the evaluation of the territorial defence investment across the different sex combinations.

  16. Cortical and vestibular stimulation reveal preserved descending motor pathways in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squair, Jordan W; Bjerkefors, Anna; Inglis, J Timothy; Lam, Tania; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-07-18

    To use a combination of electrophysiological techniques to determine the extent of preserved muscle activity below the clinically-defined level of motor-complete spinal cord injury. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were used to investigate whether there was any preserved muscle activity in trunk, hip and leg muscles of 16 individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury (C4-T12) and 16 able-bodied matched controls. Most individuals (14/16) with motor-complete spinal cord injury were found to have transcranial magnetic stimulation evoked, and/or voluntary evoked muscle activity in muscles innervated below the clinically classified lesion level. In most cases voluntary muscle activation was accompanied by a present transcranial magnetic stimulation response. Furthermore, motor-evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation could be observed in muscles that could not be voluntarily activated. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials responses were also observed in a small number of subjects, indicating the potential preservation of other descending pathways. These results highlight the importance of using multiple electrophysiological techniques to assist in determining the potential preservation of muscle activity below the clinically-defined level of injury in individuals with a motor-complete spinal cord injury. These techniques may provide clinicians with more accurate information about the state of various motor pathways, and could offer a method to more accurately target rehabilitation.

  17. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate.

  18. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  19. Social network-based recruitment successfully reveals HIV-1 transmission networks among high-risk individuals in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Ann M; Murillo, Wendy; de Maria Hernandez, Flor; Guardado, Maria Elena; Nieto, Ana Isabel; Lorenzana de Rivera, Ivette; Eron, Joseph J; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2013-05-01

    HIV in Central America is concentrated among certain groups such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and female sex workers (FSWs). We compared social recruitment chains and HIV transmission clusters from 699 MSM and 787 FSWs to better understand factors contributing to ongoing HIV transmission in El Salvador. Phylogenies were reconstructed using pol sequences from 119 HIV-positive individuals recruited by respondent-driven sampling (RDS) and compared with RDS chains in 3 cities in El Salvador. Transmission clusters with a mean pairwise genetic distance ≤ 0.015 and Bayesian posterior probabilities =1 were identified. Factors associated with cluster membership were evaluated among MSM. Sequences from 34 (43%) MSM and 4 (10%) FSW grouped in 14 transmission clusters. Clusters were defined by risk group (12 MSM clusters) and geographic residence (only 1 spanned separate cities). In 4 MSM clusters (all n = 2), individuals were also members of the same RDS chain, but only 2 had members directly linked through recruitment. All large clusters (n ≥ 3) spanned >1 RDS chain. Among MSM, factors independently associated with cluster membership included recent infection by BED assay (P = 0.02), sex with stable male partners (P = 0.02), and sex with ≥ 3 male partners in the past year (P = 0.04). We found few HIV transmissions corresponding directly with the social recruitment. However, we identified clustering in nearly one-half of MSM suggesting that RDS recruitment was indirectly but successfully uncovering transmission networks, particularly among recent infections. Interrogating RDS chains with phylogenetic analyses may help refine methods for identifying transmission clusters.

  20. Social network based recruitment successfully reveals HIV-1 transmission networks among high risk individuals in El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Ann M.; Murillo, Wendy; de Maria Hernandez, Flor; Guardado, Maria Elena; Nieto, Ana Isabel; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Eron, Joseph J.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Objective HIV in Central America is concentrated among certain groups such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and female sex workers (FSW). We compared social recruitment chains and HIV transmission clusters from 699 MSM and 757 FSW to better understand factors contributing to ongoing HIV transmission in El Salvador. Methods Phylogenies were reconstructed using pol sequences from 119 HIV-positive individuals recruited by respondent driven sampling (RDS) and compared to RDS chains in three cities in El Salvador. Transmission clusters with a mean pairwise genetic distance ≤0.015 and Bayesian posterior probabilities=1 were identified. Factors associated with cluster membership were evaluated among MSM. Results Sequences from 34 (43%) MSM and 4 (10%) FSW grouped in 14 transmission clusters. Clusters were defined by risk group (12 MSM clusters) and geographic residence (only one spanned separate cities). In 4 MSM clusters (all n=2), individuals were also members of the same RDS chain but only 2 had members directly linked through recruitment. All large clusters (n≥3) spanned more than one RDS chain. Among MSM, factors independently associated with cluster membership included recent infection by BED assay (P=0.02), sex with stable male partners (P=0.02), and sex with ≥3 male partners in past year (P=0.04). Conclusions We found few HIV transmissions corresponding directly with the social recruitment. However, we identified clustering in nearly one half of MSM suggesting RDS recruitment was indirectly but successfully uncovering transmission networks, particularly among recent infections. Interrogating RDS chains with phylogenetic analyses may help refine methods for identifying transmission clusters. PMID:23364512

  1. Analysis of plant LTR-retrotransposons at the fine-scale family level reveals individual molecular patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Douglas S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane is an important crop worldwide for sugar production and increasingly, as a renewable energy source. Modern cultivars have polyploid, large complex genomes, with highly unequal contributions from ancestral genomes. Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs are the single largest components of most plant genomes and can substantially impact the genome in many ways. It is therefore crucial to understand their contribution to the genome and transcriptome, however a detailed study of LTR-RTs in sugarcane has not been previously carried out. Results Sixty complete LTR-RT elements were classified into 35 families within four Copia and three Gypsy lineages. Structurally, within lineages elements were similar, between lineages there were large size differences. FISH analysis resulted in the expected pattern of Gypsy/heterochromatin, Copia/euchromatin, but in two lineages there was localized clustering on some chromosomes. Analysis of related ESTs and RT-PCR showed transcriptional variation between tissues and families. Four distinct patterns were observed in sRNA mapping, the most unusual of which was that of Ale1, with very large numbers of 24nt sRNAs in the coding region. The results presented support the conclusion that distinct small RNA-regulated pathways in sugarcane target the lineages of LTR-RT elements. Conclusions Individual LTR-RT sugarcane families have distinct structures, and transcriptional and regulatory signatures. Our results indicate that in sugarcane individual LTR-RT families have distinct behaviors and can potentially impact the genome in diverse ways. For instance, these transposable elements may affect nearby genes by generating a diverse set of small RNA's that trigger gene silencing mechanisms. There is also some evidence that ancestral genomes contribute significantly different element numbers from particular LTR-RT lineages to the modern sugarcane cultivar genome.

  2. Protein profiling reveals inter-individual protein homogeneity of arachnoid cyst fluid and high qualitative similarity to cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berle Magnus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms behind formation and filling of intracranial arachnoid cysts (AC are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate AC fluid by proteomics to gain further knowledge about ACs. Two goals were set: 1 Comparison of AC fluid from individual patients to determine whether or not temporal AC is a homogenous condition; and 2 Evaluate the protein content of a pool of AC fluid from several patients and qualitatively compare this with published protein lists of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma. Methods AC fluid from 15 patients with temporal AC was included in this study. In the AC protein comparison experiment, AC fluid from 14 patients was digested, analyzed by LC-MS/MS using a semi-quantitative label-free approach and the data were compared by principal component analysis (PCA to gain knowledge of protein homogeneity of AC. In the AC proteome evaluation experiment, AC fluid from 11 patients was pooled, digested, and fractionated by SCX chromatography prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. Proteins identified were compared to published databases of proteins identified from CSF and plasma. AC fluid proteins not found in these two databases were experimentally searched for in lumbar CSF taken from neurologically-normal patients, by a targeted protein identification approach called MIDAS (Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM initiated detection and sequence analysis. Results We did not identify systematic trends or grouping of data in the AC protein comparison experiment, implying low variability between individual proteomic profiles of AC. In the AC proteome evaluation experiment, we identified 199 proteins. When compared to previously published lists of proteins identified from CSF and plasma, 15 of the AC proteins had not been reported in either of these datasets. By a targeted protein identification approach, we identified 11 of these 15 proteins in pooled CSF from neurologically-normal patients, demonstrating that

  3. Ecological niche of Neanderthals from Spy Cave revealed by nitrogen isotopes of individual amino acids in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuichi I; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Drucker, Dorothée G; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Semal, Patrick; Wißing, Christoph; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-04-01

    This study provides a refined view on the diet and ecological niche of Neanderthals. The traditional view is that Neanderthals obtained most of their dietary protein from terrestrial animals, especially from large herbivores that roamed the open landscapes. Evidence based on the conventional carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of bulk collagen has supported this view, although recent findings based on plant remains in the tooth calculus, microwear analyses, and small game and marine animal remains from archaeological sites have raised some questions regarding this assumption. However, the lack of a protein source other than meat in the Neanderthal diet may be due to methodological difficulties in defining the isotopic composition of plants. Based on the nitrogen isotopic composition of glutamic acid and phenylalanine in collagen for Neanderthals from Spy Cave (Belgium), we show that i) there was an inter-individual dietary heterogeneity even within one archaeological site that has not been evident in bulk collagen isotopic compositions, ii) they occupied an ecological niche different from those of hyenas, and iii) they could rely on plants for up to ∼20% of their protein source. These results are consistent with the evidence found of plant consumption by the Spy Neanderthals, suggesting a broader subsistence strategy than previously considered.

  4. Nanopore long-read RNAseq reveals widespread transcriptional variation among the surface receptors of individual B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Ashley; Beaudin, Anna E; Olsen, Hugh E; Jain, Miten; Cole, Charles; Palmer, Theron; DuBois, Rebecca M; Forsberg, E Camilla; Akeson, Mark; Vollmers, Christopher

    2017-07-19

    Understanding gene regulation and function requires a genome-wide method capable of capturing both gene expression levels and isoform diversity at the single-cell level. Short-read RNAseq is limited in its ability to resolve complex isoforms because it fails to sequence full-length cDNA copies of RNA molecules. Here, we investigate whether RNAseq using the long-read single-molecule Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencer is able to identify and quantify complex isoforms without sacrificing accurate gene expression quantification. After benchmarking our approach, we analyse individual murine B1a cells using a custom multiplexing strategy. We identify thousands of unannotated transcription start and end sites, as well as hundreds of alternative splicing events in these B1a cells. We also identify hundreds of genes expressed across B1a cells that display multiple complex isoforms, including several B cell-specific surface receptors. Our results show that we can identify and quantify complex isoforms at the single cell level.

  5. Individual differences in laughter perception reveal roles for mentalizing and sensorimotor systems in the evaluation of emotional authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, C; Walsh, E; Jessop, R; Agnew, Z K; Sauter, D A; Warren, J E; Scott, S K

    2015-01-01

    Humans express laughter differently depending on the context: polite titters of agreement are very different from explosions of mirth. Using functional MRI, we explored the neural responses during passive listening to authentic amusement laughter and controlled, voluntary laughter. We found greater activity in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC) to the deliberate, Emitted Laughs, suggesting an obligatory attempt to determine others' mental states when laughter is perceived as less genuine. In contrast, passive perception of authentic Evoked Laughs was associated with greater activity in bilateral superior temporal gyri. An individual differences analysis found that greater accuracy on a post hoc test of authenticity judgments of laughter predicted the magnitude of passive listening responses to laughter in amPFC, as well as several regions in sensorimotor cortex (in line with simulation accounts of emotion perception). These medial prefrontal and sensorimotor sites showed enhanced positive connectivity with cortical and subcortical regions during listening to involuntary laughter, indicating a complex set of interacting systems supporting the automatic emotional evaluation of heard vocalizations.

  6. Abnormal patterns of cerebral lateralisation as revealed by the Universal Chimeric Faces Task in individuals with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sandie; Workman, Lance; Yeomans, Heather

    2012-01-01

    A previous study by Workman, Chilvers, Yeomans, and Taylor (2006), using the "Universal" Chimeric Faces Task (UCFT) for six emotional expressions, demonstrated that an overall left hemispatial/right hemisphere (RH) advantage has begun to develop by the age of 7-8. Moreover, the development of this left hemispatial advantage was observed to correlate positively with the ability to read emotions in the faces of others. Adopting the UCFT, the current study compared autistic children (11-15) with unimpaired children of two age groups (5-6 and 7-8) from this previous study. The autistic children showed a left hemispatial/RH advantage only for the two emotional expressions of "happiness" and "anger". Results for the autistic children revealed a similar overall pattern of lateralisation to the 5-6-year-olds and one that is less lateralised than the pattern for the 7-8-year-olds. Autistic children appear to show a developmental deficit for left hemispatial/RH advantage for emotional expression with the exception of "happiness" and "anger." The findings are discussed in terms of role hemisphericity and an approach-avoidance model.

  7. Intestinal microbiota in healthy adults: temporal analysis reveals individual and common core and relation to intestinal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Jalanka-Tuovinen

    individual and common core microbiota in healthy adults. The findings provide new approaches to define intestinal health and to further characterize the microbial communities inhabiting the human gut.

  8. Human DNA contains sequences homologous to the 5'-non-coding region of hepatitis C virus: characterization with restriction endonucleases reveals individual varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reinhard H Dennin; Jianer Wo

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate a 272 base pair section of the 5'-non-coding region of genomic DNA from the peripheral blood monounuclear cells of healthy hepatitis virus C (HCV)-negative human subjects (not patients). Results The suspected HCV-specific sequence was found in the DNA of each subject tested. The pre-PCR digestion assay reveals individual differences in their pattern of methylation, which may be due to possible epigenetic phenomena.Conclusions The results provide formal proof that these HCV-specific sequences are contained in the genomic or extra chromosomal target DNA, and probably belong to a new class of endogenous sequences.

  9. Establishing the Intermediate Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg.

    The State of Pennsylvania Act 102 establishes a system of 29 intermediate units, creates intermediate unit boards of directors, spells out their duties and functions, and provides a system of financing their operations. This handbook has been prepared by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to provide intermediate unit boards of directors,…

  10. LMNA Sequences of 60,706 Unrelated Individuals Reveal 132 Novel Missense Variants in A-Type Lamins and Suggest a Link between Variant p.G602S and Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Florwick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LMNA, encoding nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A and C, cause multiple diseases (‘laminopathies’ including muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD2, insulin resistance syndrome and progeria. To assess the prevalence of LMNA missense mutations (‘variants’ in a broad, ethnically diverse population, we compared missense alleles found among 60,706 unrelated individuals in the ExAC cohort to those identified in 1,404 individuals in the laminopathy database (UMD-LMNA. We identified 169 variants in the ExAC cohort, of which 37 (∼22% are disease-associated including p.I299V (allele frequency 0.0402%, p.G602S (allele frequency 0.0262% and p.R644C (allele frequency 0.124%, suggesting certain LMNA mutations are more common than previously recognized. Independent analysis of LMNA variants via the type 2 diabetes (T2D Knowledge Portal showed that variant p.G602S associated significantly with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 4.58, and was more frequent in African Americans (allele frequency 0.297%. The FPLD2-associated variant I299V was most prevalent in Latinos (allele frequency 0.347%. The ExAC cohort also revealed 132 novel LMNA missense variants including p.K108E (limited to individuals with psychiatric disease; predicted to perturb coil-1B, p.R397C and p.R427C (predicted to perturb filament biogenesis, p.G638R and p.N660D (predicted to perturb prelamin A processing, and numerous Ig-fold variants predicted to perturb phenotypically characteristic protein–protein interactions. Overall, this two-pronged strategy— mining a large database for missense variants in a single gene (LMNA, coupled to knowledge about the structure, biogenesis and functions of A-type lamins— revealed an unexpected number of LMNA variants, including novel variants predicted to perturb lamin assembly or function. Interestingly, this study also correlated novel variant p.K108E with psychiatric

  11. Current clinical practice gaps in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) with emphasis on the use of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG): results of an international individual patient data survey (IPDS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Palou, J.; Soloway, M.; Lamm, D.; Kamat, A.M.; Brausi, M.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Colombel, M.; Bohle, A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the management of intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), particularly with regard to the use of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy, in North America and Europe. To compare NMIBC management practices to European Association of Urology (EAU)

  12. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation.

  13. 49 CFR 37.201 - Intermediate and rest stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intermediate and rest stops. 37.201 Section 37.201... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.201 Intermediate and rest stops. (a) Whenever an OTRB makes an intermediate or rest stop, a passenger with a disability, including an individual using a...

  14. Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweikert Hans-Udo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular programs of normal and abnormal genital development, clear-cut definition of androgen-dependent gene expression patterns, without the influence of genotype (46, XX vs. 46, XY, is warranted. Previously, we have identified global gene expression profiles in genital-derived fibroblasts that differ between 46, XY males and 46, XY females with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS due to inactivating mutations of the androgen receptor (AR. While these differences could be due to cell autonomous changes in gene expression induced by androgen programming, recent work suggests they could also be influenced by the location from which the fibroblasts were harvested (topology. To minimize the influence of topology, we compared gene expression patterns of fibroblasts derived from identical urogenital anlagen: the scrotum in normally virilized 46, XY males and the labia majora from completely feminized 46, XY individuals with CAIS. Results 612 transcripts representing 440 unique genes differed significantly in expression levels between scrotum and CAIS labia majora, suggesting the effects of androgen programming. While some genes coincided with those we had identified previously (TBX3, IGFBP5, EGFR, CSPG2, a significant number did not, implying that topology had influenced gene expression in our previous experiments. Supervised clustering of gene expression data derived from a large set of fibroblast cultures from individuals with partial AIS revealed that the new, topology controlled data set better classified the specimens. Conclusion Inactivating mutations of the AR, in themselves, appear to induce lasting changes in gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, independent of topology and genotype. Genes identified are likely to be relevant candidates to decipher androgen-dependent normal and abnormal genital development.

  15. Organophosphate poisoning: Diagnosis of intermediate syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojara L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate compound (OPC poisoning with suicidal intent is common in Indian ICUs. The effect of OPCs is to produce a persistent depolarization of the neuromuscular junction leading to muscle weakness. After initial recovery from cholinergic crisis, some patients have resurgence of respiratory muscle paralysis requiring continued ventilatory support. This is termed intermediate syndrome (IMS. This could be due to a change in the type of neuromuscular block to a non depolarisation block characterized by a fade on tetanic stimulation. However peripheral nerve stimulation using train-of-four ratio (TOF and/tetanus have failed to consistently show such a change. We elected to study whether electro physiological monitoring using repetitive nerve stimulation might show a decremental response during IMS. Material & Methods: This was a prospective blinded study done from April 2002 to March 2003 in our ICU. 45 consecutive patients of OPC poisoning admitted during this period were included in this study. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS using a train of ten at 3Hz 10Hz and 30Hz (slow , intermediate and fast speeds respectively at the median nerve was done on all patients on day 1, 4, 7 and every 4th day thereafter until discharge. Patients were ventilated until ready to wean as per our usual protocol. The results of the RNS study were not revealed to the intensivist. Results: 9 out of 45 patients required ventilation for more than 6 days and showed overt signs of intermediate syndrome - proximal muscle weakness, twitching and respiratory weakness. Only 2 patients out of the 9 had a decremental response on RNS at 3Hz indicating a post-junctional dysfunction at the motor end-plate, Both patients had consumed a very large quantity of OPC and were deeply comatose for >4 days and required ventilation for >12 days. All other patients with IMS showed no changes on RNS. The exact type of poison consumed varied with each individual patient. Conclusion: RNS

  16. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  17. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  18. Intermediate algebra a textworkbook

    CERN Document Server

    McKeague, Charles P

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra: A Text/Workbook, Second Edition focuses on the principles, operations, and approaches involved in intermediate algebra. The publication first takes a look at basic properties and definitions, first-degree equations and inequalities, and exponents and polynomials. Discussions focus on properties of exponents, polynomials, sums, and differences, multiplication of polynomials, inequalities involving absolute value, word problems, first-degree inequalities, real numbers, opposites, reciprocals, and absolute value, and addition and subtraction of real numbers. The text then ex

  19. Superposition of Individual Activities: Urea-Mediated Suppression of Nitrate Uptake in the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum Revealed at the Population and Single-Cell Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matantseva, Olga; Skarlato, Sergei; Vogts, Angela; Pozdnyakov, Ilya; Liskow, Iris; Schubert, Hendrik; Voss, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Dinoflagellates readily use diverse inorganic and organic compounds as nitrogen sources, which is advantageous in eutrophied coastal areas exposed to high loads of anthropogenic nutrients, e.g., urea, one of the most abundant organic nitrogen substrates in seawater. Cell-to-cell variability in nutritional physiology can further enhance the diversity of metabolic strategies among dinoflagellates of the same species, but it has not been studied in free-living microalgae. We applied stable isotope tracers, isotope ratio mass spectrometry and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to investigate the response of cultured nitrate-acclimated dinoflagellates Prorocentrum minimum to a sudden input of urea and the effect of urea on the concurrent nitrate uptake at the population and single-cell levels. We demonstrate that inputs of urea lead to suppression of nitrate uptake by P. minimum, and urea uptake exceeds the concurrent uptake of nitrate. Individual dinoflagellate cells within a population display significant heterogeneity in the rates of nutrient uptake and extent of the urea-mediated inhibition of the nitrate uptake, thus forming several groups characterized by different modes of nutrition. We conclude that urea originating from sporadic sources is rapidly utilized by dinoflagellates and can be used in biosynthesis or stored intracellularly depending on the nutrient status; therefore, sudden urea inputs can represent one of the factors triggering or supporting harmful algal blooms. Significant physiological heterogeneity revealed at the single-cell level is likely to play a role in alleviation of intra-population competition for resources and can affect the dynamics of phytoplankton populations and their maintenance in natural environments. PMID:27610101

  20. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...... communicative affordances of mobile devices in order to understand how people choose between them for different purposes. It is argued that mobile communication makes intermediality especially central, as the choice of medium is detached from the location of stationary media and begins to follow the user across...

  1. MATERIALS FOR INTERMEDIATE TELUGU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KELLEY, GERALD B.

    ONE OF THE FOUR DRAVIDIAN LANGUAGES RECOGNIZED BY THE INDIAN CONSTITUTION OF 1950 AS OFFICIAL LANGUAGES OF THE COUNTRY, TELUGU IS SPOKEN BY 42 MILLION PEOPLE IN ANDHRA PRADESH. THESE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ARE DESIGNED FOR THE INTERMEDIATE STUDENT OF TELUGU AND ARE DIVIDED INTO NEWSPAPER READINGS AND DIALOGUES OF EVERYDAY CONVERSATION. SUBJECTS…

  2. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  3. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  4. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  5. Why is seed production so variable among individuals? A ten-year study with oaks reveals the importance of soil environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio M Pérez-Ramos

    Full Text Available Mast-seeding species exhibit not only a large inter-annual variability in seed production but also considerable variability among individuals within the same year. However, very little is known about the causes and consequences for population dynamics of this potentially large between-individual variability. Here, we quantified seed production over ten consecutive years in two Mediterranean oak species - the deciduous Quercus canariensis and the evergreen Q. suber - that coexist in forests of southern Spain. First, we calibrated likelihood models to identify which abiotic and biotic variables best explain the magnitude (hereafter seed productivity and temporal variation of seed production at the individual level (hereafter CVi, and infer whether reproductive effort results from the available soil resources for the plant or is primarily determined by selectively favoured strategies. Second, we explored the contribution of between-individual variability in seed production as a potential mechanism of satiation for predispersal seed predators. We found that Q. canariensis trees inhabiting moister and more fertile soils were more productive than those growing in more resource-limited sites. Regarding temporal variation, individuals of the two studied oak species inhabiting these resource-rich environments also exhibited larger values of CVi. Interestingly, we detected a satiating effect on granivorous insects at the tree level in Q. suber, which was evident in those years where between-individual variability in acorn production was higher. These findings suggest that individual seed production (both in terms of seed productivity and inter-annual variability is strongly dependent on soil resource heterogeneity (at least for one of the two studied oak species with potential repercussions for recruitment and population dynamics. However, other external factors (such as soil heterogeneity in pathogen abundance or certain inherent characteristics of the

  6. Why is seed production so variable among individuals? A ten-year study with oaks reveals the importance of soil environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M; Aponte, Cristina; García, Luis V; Padilla-Díaz, Carmen M; Marañón, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Mast-seeding species exhibit not only a large inter-annual variability in seed production but also considerable variability among individuals within the same year. However, very little is known about the causes and consequences for population dynamics of this potentially large between-individual variability. Here, we quantified seed production over ten consecutive years in two Mediterranean oak species - the deciduous Quercus canariensis and the evergreen Q. suber - that coexist in forests of southern Spain. First, we calibrated likelihood models to identify which abiotic and biotic variables best explain the magnitude (hereafter seed productivity) and temporal variation of seed production at the individual level (hereafter CVi), and infer whether reproductive effort results from the available soil resources for the plant or is primarily determined by selectively favoured strategies. Second, we explored the contribution of between-individual variability in seed production as a potential mechanism of satiation for predispersal seed predators. We found that Q. canariensis trees inhabiting moister and more fertile soils were more productive than those growing in more resource-limited sites. Regarding temporal variation, individuals of the two studied oak species inhabiting these resource-rich environments also exhibited larger values of CVi. Interestingly, we detected a satiating effect on granivorous insects at the tree level in Q. suber, which was evident in those years where between-individual variability in acorn production was higher. These findings suggest that individual seed production (both in terms of seed productivity and inter-annual variability) is strongly dependent on soil resource heterogeneity (at least for one of the two studied oak species) with potential repercussions for recruitment and population dynamics. However, other external factors (such as soil heterogeneity in pathogen abundance) or certain inherent characteristics of the tree might be

  7. Delta Plots in the study of individual differences: New tools reveal response inhibition deficits in AD/HD That are eliminated by methylphenidate treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Ridderinkhof; A. Scheres; J. Oosterlaan; J.A. Sergeant

    2005-01-01

    The authors highlight the utility of distribution-analytical techniques in the study of individual differences and clinical disorders. Cognitive deficits associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) were examined by using delta-plot analyses of performance data (reaction time and

  8. Delta Plots in the Study of Individual Differences : New Tools Reveal Response Inhibition Deficits in AD-HD That Are Eliminated by Methylphenidate Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Scheres, A.P.J.; Oosterlaan, J.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors highlight the utility of distribution-analytical techniques in the study of individual differences and clinical disorders. Cognitive deficits associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) were examined by using delta-plot analyses of performance data (reaction time and

  9. Sight and sound persistently out of synch: stable individual differences in audiovisual synchronisation revealed by implicit measures of lip-voice integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipser, Alberta; Agolli, Vlera; Bajraktari, Anisa; Al-Alawi, Fatimah; Djaafara, Nurfitriani; Freeman, Elliot D

    2017-04-21

    Are sight and sound out of synch? Signs that they are have been dismissed for over two centuries as an artefact of attentional and response bias, to which traditional subjective methods are prone. To avoid such biases, we measured performance on objective tasks that depend implicitly on achieving good lip-synch. We measured the McGurk effect (in which incongruent lip-voice pairs evoke illusory phonemes), and also identification of degraded speech, while manipulating audiovisual asynchrony. Peak performance was found at an average auditory lag of ~100 ms, but this varied widely between individuals. Participants' individual optimal asynchronies showed trait-like stability when the same task was re-tested one week later, but measures based on different tasks did not correlate. This discounts the possible influence of common biasing factors, suggesting instead that our different tasks probe different brain networks, each subject to their own intrinsic auditory and visual processing latencies. Our findings call for renewed interest in the biological causes and cognitive consequences of individual sensory asynchronies, leading potentially to fresh insights into the neural representation of sensory timing. A concrete implication is that speech comprehension might be enhanced, by first measuring each individual's optimal asynchrony and then applying a compensatory auditory delay.

  10. HIV-1 DIS stem loop forms an obligatory bent kissing intermediate in the dimerization pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundigala, Hansini; Michaux, Jonathan B; Feig, Andrew L; Ennifar, Eric; Rueda, David

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 dimerization initiation sequence (DIS) is a conserved palindrome in the apical loop of a conserved hairpin motif in the 5'-untranslated region of its RNA genome. DIS hairpin plays an important role in genome dimerization by forming a 'kissing complex' between two complementary hairpins. Understanding the kinetics of this interaction is key to exploiting DIS as a possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug target. Here, we present a single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) study of the dimerization reaction kinetics. Our data show the real-time formation and dissociation dynamics of individual kissing complexes, as well as the formation of the mature extended duplex complex that is ultimately required for virion packaging. Interestingly, the single-molecule trajectories reveal the presence of a previously unobserved bent intermediate required for extended duplex formation. The universally conserved A272 is essential for the formation of this intermediate, which is stabilized by Mg(2+), but not by K(+) cations. We propose a 3D model of a possible bent intermediate and a minimal dimerization pathway consisting of three steps with two obligatory intermediates (kissing complex and bent intermediate) and driven by Mg(2+) ions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Ancient DNA analysis of mid-holocene individuals from the Northwest Coast of North America reveals different evolutionary paths for mitogenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinqiu Cui

    Full Text Available To gain a better understanding of North American population history, complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes were generated from four ancient and three living individuals of the northern Northwest Coast of North America, specifically the north coast of British Columbia, Canada, current home to the indigenous Tsimshian, Haida, and Nisga'a. The mitogenomes of all individuals were previously unknown and assigned to new sub-haplogroup designations D4h3a7, A2ag and A2ah. The analysis of mitogenomes allows for more detailed analyses of presumed ancestor-descendant relationships than sequencing only the HVSI region of the mitochondrial genome, a more traditional approach in local population studies. The results of this study provide contrasting examples of the evolution of Native American mitogenomes. Those belonging to sub-haplogroups A2ag and A2ah exhibit temporal continuity in this region for 5000 years up until the present day. Of possible associative significance is that archaeologically identified house structures in this region maintain similar characteristics for this same period of time, demonstrating cultural continuity in residence patterns. The individual dated to 6000 years before present (BP exhibited a mitogenome belonging to sub-haplogroup D4h3a. This sub-haplogroup was earlier identified in the same general area at 10300 years BP on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, and may have gone extinct, as it has not been observed in any living individuals of the Northwest Coast. The presented case studies demonstrate the different evolutionary paths of mitogenomes over time on the Northwest Coast.

  12. Ancient DNA Analysis of Mid-Holocene Individuals from the Northwest Coast of North America Reveals Different Evolutionary Paths for Mitogenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yinqiu; Lindo, John; Hughes, Cris E.; Johnson, Jesse W.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Kemp, Brian M.; Ma, Jian; Cunningham, Ryan; Petzelt, Barbara; Mitchell, Joycellyn; Archer, David; Cybulski, Jerome S.; Malhi, Ripan S.

    2013-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of North American population history, complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) were generated from four ancient and three living individuals of the northern Northwest Coast of North America, specifically the north coast of British Columbia, Canada, current home to the indigenous Tsimshian, Haida, and Nisga’a. The mitogenomes of all individuals were previously unknown and assigned to new sub-haplogroup designations D4h3a7, A2ag and A2ah. The analysis of mitogenomes allows for more detailed analyses of presumed ancestor–descendant relationships than sequencing only the HVSI region of the mitochondrial genome, a more traditional approach in local population studies. The results of this study provide contrasting examples of the evolution of Native American mitogenomes. Those belonging to sub-haplogroups A2ag and A2ah exhibit temporal continuity in this region for 5000 years up until the present day. Of possible associative significance is that archaeologically identified house structures in this region maintain similar characteristics for this same period of time, demonstrating cultural continuity in residence patterns. The individual dated to 6000 years before present (BP) exhibited a mitogenome belonging to sub-haplogroup D4h3a. This sub-haplogroup was earlier identified in the same general area at 10300 years BP on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, and may have gone extinct, as it has not been observed in any living individuals of the Northwest Coast. The presented case studies demonstrate the different evolutionary paths of mitogenomes over time on the Northwest Coast. PMID:23843972

  13. Catalytic mechanism of α-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the α-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue α,β-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme-product complex structure.

  14. Intra-individual gait patterns across different time-scales as revealed by means of a supervised learning model using kernel-based discriminant regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Fabian; Eekhoff, Alexander; Newell, Karl M; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, gait analysis has been centered on the idea of average behavior and normality. On one hand, clinical diagnoses and therapeutic interventions typically assume that average gait patterns remain constant over time. On the other hand, it is well known that all our movements are accompanied by a certain amount of variability, which does not allow us to make two identical steps. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the intra-individual gait patterns across different time-scales (i.e., tens-of-mins, tens-of-hours). Nine healthy subjects performed 15 gait trials at a self-selected speed on 6 sessions within one day (duration between two subsequent sessions from 10 to 90 mins). For each trial, time-continuous ground reaction forces and lower body joint angles were measured. A supervised learning model using a kernel-based discriminant regression was applied for classifying sessions within individual gait patterns. Discernable characteristics of intra-individual gait patterns could be distinguished between repeated sessions by classification rates of 67.8 ± 8.8% and 86.3 ± 7.9% for the six-session-classification of ground reaction forces and lower body joint angles, respectively. Furthermore, the one-on-one-classification showed that increasing classification rates go along with increasing time durations between two sessions and indicate that changes of gait patterns appear at different time-scales. Discernable characteristics between repeated sessions indicate continuous intrinsic changes in intra-individual gait patterns and suggest a predominant role of deterministic processes in human motor control and learning. Natural changes of gait patterns without any externally induced injury or intervention may reflect continuous adaptations of the motor system over several time-scales. Accordingly, the modelling of walking by means of average gait patterns that are assumed to be near constant over time needs to be reconsidered in the context of

  15. Analysis of multiple cytokine polymorphisms in individuals with untreated deep carious lesions reveals IL1B (rs1143643) as a susceptibility factor for periapical lesion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Alisa; Letra, Ariadne; Chaves de Souza, Letícia; Yadlapati, Mamatha; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Vieira, Alexandre R; Silva, Renato Menezes

    2015-02-01

    It has been proposed that individual genetic predisposition may contribute to persistent apical periodontitis. Cytokines are associated with levels of inflammation and are involved in caries, pulpal, and periapical tissue destruction. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in cytokine genes may contribute to an individual's increased susceptibility to apical tissue destruction in response to deep carious lesions. Subjects with deep carious lesions with or without periapical lesions (≥3 mm) were recruited at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, and the University of Texas at Houston, Houston, TX. Genomic DNA samples of 316 patients were sorted into 2 groups: 136 cases with deep carious lesions and periapical lesions (cases) and 180 cases with deep carious lesions but no periapical lesions (controls). Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms in IL1B, IL6, TNF, RANK, RANKL, and OPG genes were selected for genotyping. Genotypes were generated by end point analysis using TaqMan chemistry (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) in a real-time polymerase chain reaction instrument. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared among cases and controls using the PLINK program (http://pngu.mgh.harvard.edu/purcell/plink/). Ninety-three human periapical granulomas and 24 healthy periodontal ligament tissues collected postoperatively were used for messenger RNA expression analyses of IL1B. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in IL1B (rs1143643) showed allelic (P = .02) and genotypic (P = .004) association with cases of deep caries and periapical lesions. We also observed altered transmission of IL1B marker haplotypes (P = .02) in these individuals. IL1B was highly expressed in granulomas (P carious lesions. Future studies could help predict host susceptibility to developing periapical lesions. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biochemical and genome sequence analyses of Megasphaera sp. strain DISK18 from dental plaque of a healthy individual reveals commensal lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallabelli, Nayudu; Patil, Prashant P.; Pal, Vijay Kumar; Singh, Namrata; Jain, Ashish; Patil, Prabhu B.; Grover, Vishakha; Korpole, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Much of the work in periodontal microbiology in recent years has focused on identifying and understanding periodontal pathogens. As the majority of oral microbes have not yet been isolated in pure form, it is essential to understand the phenotypic characteristics of microbes to decipher their role in oral environment. In this study, strain DISK18 was isolated from gingival sulcus and identified as a Megasphaera species. Although metagenomics studies revealed Megasphaera species as a major group within the oral habitat, they have never been isolated in cultivable form to date. Therefore, we have characterized the DISK18 strain to better understand its role in the periodontal ecosystem. Strain Megasphaera sp. DISK18 displayed the ability to adhere and self-aggregate, which are essential requisite features for inhabiting and persisting in oral cavity. It also coaggregated with other pioneer oral colonizers like Streptococcus and Lactobacillus species but not with Veillonella. This behaviour points towards its role in the ecologic succession of a multispecies biofilm as an early colonizer. The absence of virulence determining genes as observed in whole genome sequence analysis coupled with an inability to degrade collagen reveals that Megasphaera sp. strain DISK18 is likely not a pathogenic species and emphasizes its commensal lifestyle. PMID:27651180

  17. Phenotypic overlap in the contribution of individual genes to CNV pathogenicity revealed by cross-species computational analysis of single-gene mutations in humans, mice and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelken, Sandra C; Köhler, Sebastian; Mungall, Christopher J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Ruef, Barbara J; Smith, Cynthia; Smedley, Damian; Bauer, Sebastian; Klopocki, Eva; Schofield, Paul N; Westerfield, Monte; Robinson, Peter N; Lewis, Suzanna E

    2013-03-01

    Numerous disease syndromes are associated with regions of copy number variation (CNV) in the human genome and, in most cases, the pathogenicity of the CNV is thought to be related to altered dosage of the genes contained within the affected segment. However, establishing the contribution of individual genes to the overall pathogenicity of CNV syndromes is difficult and often relies on the identification of potential candidates through manual searches of the literature and online resources. We describe here the development of a computational framework to comprehensively search phenotypic information from model organisms and single-gene human hereditary disorders, and thus speed the interpretation of the complex phenotypes of CNV disorders. There are currently more than 5000 human genes about which nothing is known phenotypically but for which detailed phenotypic information for the mouse and/or zebrafish orthologs is available. Here, we present an ontology-based approach to identify similarities between human disease manifestations and the mutational phenotypes in characterized model organism genes; this approach can therefore be used even in cases where there is little or no information about the function of the human genes. We applied this algorithm to detect candidate genes for 27 recurrent CNV disorders and identified 802 gene-phenotype associations, approximately half of which involved genes that were previously reported to be associated with individual phenotypic features and half of which were novel candidates. A total of 431 associations were made solely on the basis of model organism phenotype data. Additionally, we observed a striking, statistically significant tendency for individual disease phenotypes to be associated with multiple genes located within a single CNV region, a phenomenon that we denote as pheno-clustering. Many of the clusters also display statistically significant similarities in protein function or vicinity within the protein

  18. Event-related potentials reveal task-dependence and inter-individual differences in negation processing during silent listening and explicit truth-value evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, C; Kissler, J

    2014-09-26

    In sentences such as dogs cannot fly/bark, evaluation of the truth-value of the sentence is assumed to appear after the negation has been integrated into the sentence structure. Moreover negation processing and truth-value processing are considered effortful processes, whereas processing of the semantic relatedness of the words within sentences is thought to occur automatically. In the present study, modulation of event-related brain potentials (N400 and late positive potential, LPP) was investigated during an implicit task (silent listening) and active truth-value evaluation to test these theoretical assumptions and determine if truth-value evaluation will be modulated by the way participants processed the negated information implicitly prior to truth-value verification. Participants first listened to negated sentences and then evaluated these sentences for their truth-value in an active evaluation task. During passive listening, the LPP was generally more pronounced for targets in false negative (FN) than true negative (TN) sentences, indicating enhanced attention allocation to semantically-related but false targets. N400 modulation by truth-value (FN>TN) was observed in 11 out of 24 participants. However, during active evaluation, processing of semantically-unrelated but true targets (TN) elicited larger N400 and LPP amplitudes as well as a pronounced frontal negativity. This pattern was particularly prominent in those 11 individuals, whose N400 modulation during silent listening indicated that they were more sensitive to violations of the truth-value than to semantic priming effects. The results provide evidence for implicit truth-value processing during silent listening of negated sentences and for task dependence related to inter-individual differences in implicit negation processing. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Individualizing Services, Individualizing Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Hollertz, Katarina; Jacobsson, Kerstin

    and responsibilising the unemployed individual? The paper finds that the individualisation that is taking place occurs as an individualisation of responsibility, more than as an individualisation of interventions. A related finding is that the social rights perspective is becoming performance......-oriented, and the normative demands placed on individuals appear increasingly totalizing, concerning the whole individual rather than the job-related aspects only. The paper is based on 23 in-depth interviews with individual clients as well as individual caseworkers and other professionals engaged in client-related work...

  20. Meta-analysis of 49 549 individuals imputed with the 1000 Genomes Project reveals an exonic damaging variant in ANGPTL4 determining fasting TG levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Sabo, Aniko; Bis, Joshua C; Huffman, Jennifer E; Manichaikul, Ani; Smith, Albert V; Feitosa, Mary F; Demissie, Serkalem; Joshi, Peter K; Duan, Qing; Marten, Jonathan; van Klinken, Jan B; Surakka, Ida; Nolte, Ilja M; Zhang, Weihua; Mbarek, Hamdi; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Trompet, Stella; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Tayo, Bamidele O; Deelen, Joris; van der Most, Peter J; van der Laan, Sander W; Arking, Dan E; Morrison, Alanna; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Campbell, Archie; Hocking, Lynne J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Brody, Jennifer A; Rice, Kenneth M; White, Charles C; Harris, Tamara; Isaacs, Aaron; Campbell, Harry; Lange, Leslie A; Rudan, Igor; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Zemunik, Tatijana; Salomaa, Veikko; Kooner, Angad S; Kooner, Jaspal S; Lehne, Benjamin; Scott, William R; Tan, Sian-Tsung; de Geus, Eco J; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Mutsert, Renée; Ford, Ian; Gansevoort, Ron T; Segura-Lepe, Marcelo P; Raitakari, Olli T; Viikari, Jorma S; Nikus, Kjell; Forrester, Terrence; McKenzie, Colin A; de Craen, Anton J M; de Ruijter, Hester M; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Snieder, Harold; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Slagboom, P Eline; Cooper, Richard S; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Elliott, Paul; van der Harst, Pim; Jukema, J Wouter; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Chambers, John C; Swertz, Morris; Ripatti, Samuli; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Hayward, Caroline; Wilson, James G; Wilson, James F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rich, Stephen S; Psaty, Bruce M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rotter, Jerome I; Cupples, L Adrienne; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2016-01-01

    Background So far, more than 170 loci have been associated with circulating lipid levels through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These associations are largely driven by common variants, their function is often not known, and many are likely to be markers for the causal variants. In this study we aimed to identify more new rare and low-frequency functional variants associated with circulating lipid levels. Methods We used the 1000 Genomes Project as a reference panel for the imputations of GWAS data from ∼60 000 individuals in the discovery stage and ∼90 000 samples in the replication stage. Results Our study resulted in the identification of five new associations with circulating lipid levels at four loci. All four loci are within genes that can be linked biologically to lipid metabolism. One of the variants, rs116843064, is a damaging missense variant within the ANGPTL4 gene. Conclusions This study illustrates that GWAS with high-scale imputation may still help us unravel the biological mechanism behind circulating lipid levels. PMID:27036123

  1. Genome-wide association analysis of blood-pressure traits in African-ancestry individuals reveals common associated genes in African and non-African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Nora; Fox, Ervin; Zhang, Zhaogong; Edwards, Todd L; Nalls, Michael A; Sung, Yun Ju; Tayo, Bamidele O; Sun, Yan V; Gottesman, Omri; Adeyemo, Adebawole; Johnson, Andrew D; Young, J Hunter; Rice, Ken; Duan, Qing; Chen, Fang; Li, Yun; Tang, Hua; Fornage, Myriam; Keene, Keith L; Andrews, Jeanette S; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Guangfa, Zhang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yu; Murray, Sarah S; Musani, Solomon K; Srinivasan, Sathanur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Wang, Heming; Becker, Lewis C; Bovet, Pascal; Bochud, Murielle; Broeckel, Ulrich; Burnier, Michel; Carty, Cara; Chasman, Daniel I; Ehret, Georg; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei; Ding, Jingzhong; Dreisbach, Albert W; Evans, Michele K; Guo, Xiuqing; Garcia, Melissa E; Jensen, Rich; Keller, Margaux F; Lettre, Guillaume; Lotay, Vaneet; Martin, Lisa W; Moore, Jason H; Morrison, Alanna C; Mosley, Thomas H; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Palmas, Walter; Papanicolaou, George; Penman, Alan; Polak, Joseph F; Ridker, Paul M; Salako, Babatunde; Singleton, Andrew B; Shriner, Daniel; Taylor, Kent D; Vasan, Ramachandran; Wiggins, Kerri; Williams, Scott M; Yanek, Lisa R; Zhao, Wei; Zonderman, Alan B; Becker, Diane M; Berenson, Gerald; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin; Cushman, Mary; Eaton, Charles; Nyberg, Fredrik; Heiss, Gerardo; Hirschhron, Joel N; Howard, Virginia J; Karczewsk, Konrad J; Lanktree, Matthew B; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth; Margolis, Karen; Snyder, Michael; Psaty, Bruce M; Schork, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Harris, Tamara; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hunt, Steven C; Arnett, Donna; Redline, Susan; Cooper, Richard S; Risch, Neil J; Rao, D C; Rotter, Jerome I; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Reiner, Alex P; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is more prevalent and contributes to more severe manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in African Americans than in any other United States ethnic group. Several small African-ancestry (AA) BP genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been published, but their findings have failed to replicate to date. We report on a large AA BP GWAS meta-analysis that includes 29,378 individuals from 19 discovery cohorts and subsequent replication in additional samples of AA (n = 10,386), European ancestry (EA) (n = 69,395), and East Asian ancestry (n = 19,601). Five loci (EVX1-HOXA, ULK4, RSPO3, PLEKHG1, and SOX6) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.0 × 10(-8)) for either systolic or diastolic BP in a transethnic meta-analysis after correction for multiple testing. Three of these BP loci (EVX1-HOXA, RSPO3, and PLEKHG1) lack previous associations with BP. We also identified one independent signal in a known BP locus (SOX6) and provide evidence for fine mapping in four additional validated BP loci. We also demonstrate that validated EA BP GWAS loci, considered jointly, show significant effects in AA samples. Consequently, these findings suggest that BP loci might have universal effects across studied populations, demonstrating that multiethnic samples are an essential component in identifying, fine mapping, and understanding their trait variability.

  2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy Reveals that Individual Low-Light LH2 Complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6. Have a Heterogeneous Polypeptide Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotosudarmo, Tatas H.P.; Kunz, Ralf; Böhm, Paul; Gardiner, Alastair T.; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Cogdell, Richard J.; Köhler, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Rhodopseudomonas palustris belongs to the group of purple bacteria that have the ability to produce LH2 complexes with unusual absorption spectra when they are grown at low-light intensity. This ability is often related to the presence of multiple genes encoding the antenna apoproteins. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, direct evidence that individual low-light LH2 complexes have a heterogeneous αβ-apoprotein composition that modulates the site energies of Bchl a molecules, producing absorption bands at 800, 820, and 850 nm. The arrangement of the Bchl a molecules in the “tightly coupled ring” can be modeled by nine αβ-Bchls dimers, such that the Bchls bound to six αβ-pairs have B820-like site energies and the remaining Bchl a molecules have B850-like site energies. Furthermore, the experimental data can only be satisfactorily modeled when these six αβ-pairs with B820 Bchl a molecules are distributed such that the symmetry of the assembly is reduced to C3. It is also clear from the measured single-molecule spectra that the energies of the electronically excited states in the mixed B820/850 ring are mainly influenced by diagonal disorder. PMID:19720038

  3. Mitochondrial DNA haplotyping revealed the presence of mixed up benign and neoplastic tissue sections from two individuals on the same prostatic biopsy slide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, A; Alves, C; Suárez-Mier, M P; Albarrán, C; Pereira, L; Fernández de Simón, L; Martín, P; García, O; Gusmão, L; Sancho, M; Amorim, A

    2005-01-01

    DNA typing was requested to investigate a presumptive cancer diagnosis error by confirming whether benign and cancerous prostatic tissue in the same presurgical haematoxylin and eosin stained slide belonged to the same person. After independent histological re-examination of the slide by a pathologist, manual slide dissection was used to guarantee independent and high recovery DNA isolation from each tissue section, avoiding carryover and background contamination. Nuclear DNA quantification performed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed the absence of human DNA for short tandem repeat (STR) typing. Mitochondrial DNA was only obtained by performing PCR of very short fragments ( approximately 100 bp), indicating high DNA degradation. Different low frequency hypervariable region I haplotypes were obtained from each tissue section (normal tissue section haplotype: 16224C, 16234T, 16311C, 16356C; cancer tissue section haplotype: 16256T, 16270T, 16293G). Only the normal tissue section haplotype matched that obtained from the patient's blood sample, indicating that the cancer tissue section originated from an unknown patient. These results supported the hypothesis of sample mix up during block processing or slide preparation by a carryover mechanism. Mitochondrial genetic typing is recommended to exclude the possibility of carryover artefacts when low DNA content and high degradation compromise conventional STR typing.

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals the enhancement of human serum apolipoprotein A-1(APO A-1) in individuals infected with multiple dengue virus serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchala, Nageswar Reddy; Dungdung, Ranjeet; Pilankatta, Rajendra

    2017-10-01

    Human serum protein profiling of the individual infected with multiple dengue virus serotypes for identifying the potential biomarkers and to investigate the cause for the severity of dengue virus infection. Dengue virus NS1-positive serum samples were pooled into two groups (S2 and S3) based on the molecular serotyping and number of heterotypic infections. The pooled serum samples were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) to identify the differentially expressed proteins. The peptide masses of upregulated protein were detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and analysed by MASCOT search engine. The results were compared with the control group (S1). The commonly upregulated protein was validated by quantitative ELISA and compared with control as well as single serotypic infected samples. Based on 2DGE, total thirteen proteins were differentially upregulated in S2 and S3 groups as compared to control. Some of the upregulated proteins were involved in mediating the complement activation of immune response. The apolipoprotein A-1 (APO A-1) was upregulated in S2 and S3 groups. Upon validation, APO A-1 levels were increased in line with the number of heterotypic infection of dengue viruses. Heterotypic infection of dengue viruses upregulate the serum proteins involved in the complement pathway in the early phase of infection. There was a significant increase in the level of APO A-1 in three different serotypic infections of dengue virus as compared to control. Further, the role of APO-A1 can be explored in elucidating the mechanism of dengue pathogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Drosophila Dynein intermediate chain gene, Dic61B, is required for spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Fatima

    Full Text Available This study reports the identification and characterization of a novel gene, Dic61B, required for male fertility in Drosophila. Complementation mapping of a novel male sterile mutation, ms21, isolated in our lab revealed it to be allelic to CG7051 at 61B1 cytogenetic region, since two piggyBac insertion alleles, CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138 failed to complement. CG7051 putatively encodes a Dynein intermediate chain. All three mutants, ms21, CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138, exhibited absolute recessive male sterility with abnormally coiled sperm axonemes causing faulty sperm individualization as revealed by Phalloidin staining in Don Juan-GFP background. Sequencing of PCR amplicons uncovered two point mutations in ms21 allele and confirmed the piggyBac insertions in CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138 alleles to be in 5'UTR and 4(th exon of CG7051 respectively, excision of which reverted the male sterility. In situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes demonstrated CG7051 to be a single copy gene. RT-PCR of testis RNA revealed defective splicing of the CG7051 transcripts in mutants. Interestingly, expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain, α, β, γ tubulins and α-spectrin was normal in mutants while ultra structural studies revealed defects in the assembly of sperm axonemes. Bioinformatics further highlighted the homology of CG7051 to axonemal dynein intermediate chain of various organisms, including DNAI1 of humans, mutations in which lead to male sterility due to immotile sperms. Based on these observations we conclude that CG7051 encodes a novel axonemal dynein intermediate chain essential for male fertility in Drosophila and rename it as Dic61B. This is the first axonemal Dic gene of Drosophila to be characterized at molecular level and shown to be required for spermatogenesis.

  6. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  7. Long-Lived Intermediates in a Cooperative Two-State Folding Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Baba, Tarick J; Kim, Doyong; Rogers, Dylan B; Khan, Faizan A; Hales, David A; Russell, David H; Clemmer, David E

    2016-12-01

    Biomolecular folding often occurs through a cooperative two-state reactant ↔ product transition; the term cooperative does not convey that intermediate structures are nonexistent but rather that these states are not observable by existing experimental techniques. Because of this, few intermediates have been studied and characterized. Recently, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements revealed that the oligomer polyproline-13 (Pro13, which in propanol (PrOH) favors the right-handed helical PPI structure having adjacent pyrrolidine rings in a cis configuration) folds through six sequential long-lived intermediates as it converts to the all-trans-configured PPII structure that is favored in aqueous solutions. Here, we examine the PPIPrOH → PPIIaq folding transition for a HisPro13 sequence, i.e., Pro13 having a single histidine residue added to the N-terminus. Remarkably, the IMS measurements show that, upon addition of histidine, all of the IMS peaks associated with intermediate structures disappear. Instead, HisPro13 folds via a cooperative two-state transition, delayed by a significant induction period. The induction period is temperature dependent-shifting the transition to longer times at lower temperatures. Equilibrium studies show that the HisPro13 PPIPrOH → PPIIaq transition is endothermic but favored entropically. From these clues, we propose a sequential folding mechanism and develop a model that suggests that ∼13-17 long-lived intermediates are likely responsible for the induction period. In this model, intermediates are separated by average individual activation barriers of ∼90 kJ·mol(-1), and are entropically favorable.

  8. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  9. Dee-Mack Intermediate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Frank Reliford, the Principal at Dee-Mack Intermediate since 2005, is familiar to almost every child in the community. 260 Students attend Reliford's school, and their status is a point of pride: Dee-Mack Intermediate is consistently one of the highest performing schools in the state. The change in student performance correlates to the…

  10. Intermediate dosimetric quantities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, A M; Hahn, K; Rossi, H H

    1992-04-01

    The transfer of energy from ionizing radiation to matter involves a series of steps. In wide ranges of their energy spectra photons and neutrons transfer energy to an irradiated medium almost exclusively by the production of charged particles which ionize and thereby produce electrons that can ionize in turn. The examination of these processes leads to a series of intermediate quantities. One of these is kerma, which has long been employed as a measure of the energy imparted in the first of the interactions. It depends only on the fluence of uncharged particles and is therefore--unlike absorbed dose and electron fluence--insensitive to local differences of receptor geometry and composition. An analogous quantity for charged-particle fields, cema (converted energy per unit mass), is defined, which quantifies the energy imparted in terms of the interactions of charged particles, disregarding energy dissipation by secondary electrons. Cema can be expressed as an integral over the fluence of ions times their stopping power. However, complications arise when the charged particles are electrons, and when their fluence cannot be separated from that of the secondaries. The resulting difficulty can be circumvented by the definition of reduced cema. This quantity corresponds largely to the concept employed in the cavity theory of Spencer and Attix. In reduced cema not all secondary electrons but all electrons below a chosen cutoff energy, delta, are considered to be absorbed locally. When the cutoff energy is reduced, cema approaches absorbed dose and thereby becomes sensitive to highly local differences in geometry or composition. With larger values of delta, reduced cema is a useful parameter to specify the dose-generating potential of a charged-particle field 'free in air' or in vacuo. It is nearly equal to the mean absorbed dose in a sphere with radius equal to the range of electrons of energy delta. Reduced cema is a function of the fluence at the specified location at

  11. Evolutionary Characteristics of China's Intermediate Manufactures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minsung Kang; Jeong-Dong Lee

    2007-01-01

    China's economic development is characterized by progressive integration with international production chains as an assembly producer. Japan and South Korea are the major partners providing intermediate products to China. The present paper analyzes the Chinese intermediate sector's present condition and evolutionary characteristics revealed in bilateral trade with Japan and South Korea. The analysis uses the framework of new trade theory represented by "intra-industry trade". Trade statistics from 1997 to 2004 are analyzed using the database published by the OECD. Results show that China's inter-industrial evolution is characterized by its expanding positioning in the manner of the flying geese development paradigm of Asian countries. Furthermore, intra-industrial evolution is characterized by a concentration on price competitiveness. The framework and results of the industrial analysis presented in this paper assist in the understanding of China's manufacturing evolution and of the policy-making decisions taken in the process.

  12. Gulf of Maine intermediate water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, T.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY); Garfield, N. III

    1979-01-01

    The thermohaline dynamics of the Gulf of Maine are analyzed from the two year, eight cruise, data set of Colton, Marak, Nickerson, and Stoddard (1968). Six water masses are described: the Maine Surface Water, Maine Intermediate Water, and the Maine Bottom Water as interior water masses; and the Scotian Shelf Water, the Slope Water, and the Georges Bank Water as exterior water masses. Particular attention is given to the formation and disposition of the Maine Intermediate Water. Salt balance, T-S volume, and T-S drift analyses are used to provide transport and mixing estimates for the year 1966. The Slope Water entered at depth through the Northeast Channel at a rate of 2600 km/sup 3//yr; while the Scotian Shelf Water entered the surface and intermediate layers, mostly during winter intrusions, at a rate of 5200 km/sup 3//yr. The surface and intermediate layers exported a total of 7900 km/sup 3//yr in a 3:5 ratio, respectively. The Maine Intermediate Water tends to collect over the Wilkinson Basin during the stratified season, to exit via the Great South Channel during early spring, and to exit via the Northeast Channel during spring and summer. Comparisons are made between the estimated winter heat loss of 280 Ly/d and the observed heat losses of 230 Ly/d (surface layers) and 360 Ly/d (surface and intermediate layers). A limit for the Scotian Shelf Water contribution is about -70 Ly/d. It is concluded that the Maine Intermediate Water is produced locally and that it is exported in significant quantities.

  13. The adolescent and his experience during the intermediate stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophía González Zúñiga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adolescence is considered a vulnerable stage on all people’s life. Within the health system, this population is characterized by a low coverage exclusively aimed at finding the problems, which requires more specialization. This article aims to present the situational diagnosis of a group of teenagers in the intermediate stage in order to further develop a program of Pediatric Nursing care for the adolescent in the intermediate stage, in an institution of secondary education for the years 2013-2014.Method. The implemented methodology is qualitative with a constructivist epistemological approach; triangulating the information gathered performed data analysis.Results. Among the main findings of the diagnostic phase was obtained teenagers prioritized issues such as the phenomenon of drugs and situations related to sexuality; also describe their experience along this stage of life, the changes that occurred, and interaction with peers and family, information necessary for a pediatric nurse practitioner intervene appropriately. The main findings on the diagnose phase show that adolescents prioritized issues like drugs and situations related to sexuality. They also describe their experience through this life stage, all the changes occurred and the interaction with partners and family.Conclusion. The study reveals that it is essential to establish a first contact with the adolescent to identify all their needs in an integral form, and to give them the opportunity to propose possible solutions. Being continuously in contact stimulates the development of empathy in order to obtain a greater openness from the individual to the nurse-practitioner as an accompaniment figure throughout their adolescence.

  14. Organophosphate Poisoning and Intermediate Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yilmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects that occur after acute organophosphate poisoning (OP can manifest three phases, namely, acute cholinergic crisis, intermediate syndrome and delayed-type polyneuropathy. Clinical signs and symptoms of organophosphate poisoning depend on the accumulation of acetylcholine at the nerve junction. Organophosphate poisoning causes three main clinical findings; acute cholinergic crisis consisting of muscarinic, nicotinic and central nervous system symptoms, intermediate syndrome with recurrence of cholinergic symptoms or muscle weakness without fasciculation 24-96 hours after poisoning and delayed-type polyneuropathy that can usually occur several days or weeks after acute exposure to organic phosphorus compounds. In this article, intermediate syndrome, which is a late complication, has been reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(1.000: 70-83

  15. Picornavirus uncoating intermediate captured in atomic detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingshan; Wang, Xiangxi; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Yao; Li, Xuemei; Porta, Claudine; Walter, Thomas S.; Gilbert, Robert J.; Zhao, Yuguang; Axford, Danny; Williams, Mark; McAuley, Katherine; Rowlands, David J.; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Junzhi; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    It remains largely mysterious how the genomes of non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses are transferred across a membrane into the host cell. Picornaviruses are simple models for such viruses, and initiate this uncoating process through particle expansion, which reveals channels through which internal capsid proteins and the viral genome presumably exit the particle, although this has not been clearly seen until now. Here we present the atomic structure of an uncoating intermediate for the major human picornavirus pathogen CAV16, which reveals VP1 partly extruded from the capsid, poised to embed in the host membrane. Together with previous low-resolution results, we are able to propose a detailed hypothesis for the ordered egress of the internal proteins, using two distinct sets of channels through the capsid, and suggest a structural link to the condensed RNA within the particle, which may be involved in triggering RNA release. PMID:23728514

  16. Semiannually alternating exchange of intermediate waters east of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Song, Lina; Li, Yuanlong; Liu, Chuanyu; Wang, Jianing; Lin, Pengfei; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Jun; Diao, Xinyuan; Zhang, Dongxiao; Hu, Dunxin

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate water exchange in the northwest tropical Pacific is explored with the temperature, salinity, and current measurements of a mooring system deployed at 8°N, 127.05°E during 2010-2014. For the first time, prominent semiannual variability (SAV; with the maximum power at ~ 187 days) of subthermocline meridional flow along the Mindanao coast is revealed. A significant correlation between meridional flow and salinity is found at intermediate depths. This provides direct evidence for the alternating transports of South Pacific and North Pacific Intermediate Waters by northward and southward undercurrents, respectively. Further analysis with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model demonstrates that the SAV is generated locally near the western boundary, manifesting as large-scale subthermocline recirculation and leading to alternating northward and southward flows near the Mindanao coast, which plays an efficient role in the intermediate water exchange of the northwest tropical Pacific. Mechanisms underlying the observed SAV are discussed.

  17. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Radhey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5 to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  18. Cestina pro Pokrocile (Intermediate Czech).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Grazyna; And Others

    The textbook in intermediate Czech is designed for second-year students of the language and those who already have a basic knowledge of Czech grammar and vocabulary. It is appropriate for use in a traditional college language classroom, the business community, or a government language school. It can be covered in a year-long conventional…

  19. Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for…

  20. Learning through Literature: Geography, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Mary Ellen

    This resource book provides specific strategies and activities for integrating the intermediate geography curriculum with related children's literature selections. The book includes the following sections: (1) "World Geography Overview"; (2) "Oceans"; (3) "Polar Regions"; (4) "Islands"; (5) "Rain Forests"; (6) "Mountains"; (7) "Forests"; (8)…

  1. A Survey on Intermediation Architectures for Underwater Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a plethora of solutions regarding interconnectivity and interoperability for networked robots so that they will fulfill their purposes in a coordinated manner. In addition to that, middleware architectures are becoming increasingly popular due to the advantages that they are capable of guaranteeing (hardware abstraction, information homogenization, easy access for the applications above, etc.. However, there are still scarce contributions regarding the global state of the art in intermediation architectures for underwater robotics. As far as the area of robotics is concerned, this is a major issue that must be tackled in order to get a holistic view of the existing proposals. This challenge is addressed in this paper by studying the most compelling pieces of work for this kind of software development in the current literature. The studied works have been assessed according to their most prominent features and capabilities. Furthermore, by studying the individual pieces of work and classifying them several common weaknesses have been revealed and are highlighted. This provides a starting ground for the development of a middleware architecture for underwater robotics capable of dealing with these issues.

  2. A Survey on Intermediation Architectures for Underwater Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Martínez, José-Fernán; Rodríguez-Molina, Jesús; Martínez, Néstor Lucas

    2016-02-04

    Currently, there is a plethora of solutions regarding interconnectivity and interoperability for networked robots so that they will fulfill their purposes in a coordinated manner. In addition to that, middleware architectures are becoming increasingly popular due to the advantages that they are capable of guaranteeing (hardware abstraction, information homogenization, easy access for the applications above, etc.). However, there are still scarce contributions regarding the global state of the art in intermediation architectures for underwater robotics. As far as the area of robotics is concerned, this is a major issue that must be tackled in order to get a holistic view of the existing proposals. This challenge is addressed in this paper by studying the most compelling pieces of work for this kind of software development in the current literature. The studied works have been assessed according to their most prominent features and capabilities. Furthermore, by studying the individual pieces of work and classifying them several common weaknesses have been revealed and are highlighted. This provides a starting ground for the development of a middleware architecture for underwater robotics capable of dealing with these issues.

  3. Protein-Protein Interactions between Intermediate Chains and the Docking Complex of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Outer Arm Dynein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Takahiro; Owa, Mikito; King, Stephen M.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) is bound to specific loci on outer-doublet-microtubules by interactions at two sites: via intermediate chain 1 (IC1) and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC). Studies using Chlamydomonas mutants have suggested that the individual sites have rather weak affinities for microtubules, and therefore strong OAD attachment to microtubules is achieved by their cooperation. To test this idea, we examined interactions between IC1, IC2 (another intermediate chain) and ODA-DC using recombinant proteins. Recombinant IC1 and IC2 were found to form a 1:1 complex, and this complex associated with ODA-DC in vitro. Binding of IC1 to mutant axonemes revealed that there are specific binding sites for IC1. From these data, we propose a novel model of OAD-outer doublet association. PMID:23747306

  4. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    a reduction in size, caused by crowding, virtually nothing is known about longer-lasting effects after transmission to the definitive host. This study is the first to use in vitro cultivation with feeding of adult trematodes to investigate how numbers of parasites in the intermediate host affect the size......Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... and fecundity of adult parasites. For this purpose, we examined two different infracommunities of parasites in crustacean hosts. Firstly, we used experimental infections of Maritrema novaezealandensis in the amphipod, Paracalliope novizealandiae, to investigate potential density-dependent effects in single...

  5. PERIPHERAL RETINOSCHISIS IN INTERMEDIATE UVEITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Srivastava, Sunil K; Nucci, Paolo; Baynes, Kimberly; Neri, Piergiorgio; Lowder, Careen Y

    2017-01-11

    To examine cases of intermediate uveitis complicated by retinoschisis and review the pathogenetic hypothesis. A retrospective chart review of patients with intermediate uveitis. Data were collected at three uveitis referral centers on sex, age, best-corrected visual acuity, degree of vitritis, extent and location of snowbanking, presence of hard exudates, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, and extent and nature of retinal elevations. A series of 23 eyes of 20 patients were examined; patient's age ranged from 10 years to 70 years and follow-up period from 8 months to 6 years. Twenty-two eyes had retinoschisis (95.6%), and 1 had retinoschisis associated with serous retinal detachment (4.3%). Extensive inferior pars plana exudates with snowbanking were present in 12 eyes (52.2%), whereas 3 eyes had inferior snowballs over the elevated retina. Neovascularization of the vitreous base accompanied by vitreous hemorrhage occurred in one eye. There was no coexisting macular pathology in 16 eyes, whereas 4 eyes had cystoid macular edema. The appearance of peripheral retinoschisis in this series of uncontrolled intermediate uveitis patients seems to be secondary to a complex balance between the persistent fluorescein leakage, a subclinical peripheral ischemia, and the constant low-grade vitreous inflammation that causes vitreous shrinkage and traction. The results of this study suggest that the absence of macroscopic changes in the retina does not preclude ischemic peripheral abnormalities, and the detection of a peripheral retinoschisis in an intermediate uveitis patient with active fluorescein leakage must suggest the need for a more aggressive form of treatment despite the good visual acuity.

  6. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  7. Isomerization Intermediates In Solution Phase Photochemistry Of Stilbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doany, F. E.; Hochstrasser, R. M.; Greene, B. I.

    1985-04-01

    Picosecond and subpicosecond spectroscopic studies have revealed evidence for an isomerization intermediate between cis and trans in the photoinduced isomerism of both stilbene and biindanyledene ("stiff" stilbene). In stiff stilbene, a transient absorption at 351 nm displays time evolution and viscosity dependence consistent with absorption by a twisted intermediate ("phantom" state) with a lOps lifetime. An analagous bottleneck state with a life-time of 4ps is also consistent with the ground state recovery dynamics of t-stilbene following excitation of c-stilbene when monitored with 0.1ps resolution.

  8. Methanogenic toluene metabolism: community structure and intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, S Jane; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Suflita, Joseph M; Gieg, Lisa M

    2012-03-01

    Toluene is a model compound used to study the anaerobic biotransformation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Reports indicate that toluene is transformed via fumarate addition to form benzylsuccinate or by unknown mechanisms to form hydroxylated intermediates under methanogenic conditions. We investigated the mechanism(s) of syntrophic toluene metabolism by a newly described methanogenic enrichment from a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer. Pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA revealed that the culture was comprised mainly of Clostridiales. The predominant methanogens affiliated with the Methanomicrobiales. Methane production from toluene ranged from 72% to 79% of that stoichiometrically predicted. Isotope studies using (13)C(7) toluene showed that benzylsuccinate and benzoate transiently accumulated revealing that members of this consortium can catalyse fumarate addition and subsequent reactions. Detection of a BssA gene fragment in this culture further supported fumarate addition as a mechanism of toluene activation. Transient formation of cresols, benzylalcohol, hydroquinone and methylhydroquinone suggested alternative mechanism(s) for toluene metabolism. However, incubations of the consortium with (18)O-H(2)O showed that the hydroxyl group in these metabolites did not originate from water and abiotic control experiments revealed abiotic formation of hydroxylated species due to reactions of toluene with sulfide and oxygen. Our results suggest that toluene is activated by fumarate addition, presumably by the dominant Clostridiales. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services for individuals age 65 or older in institutions...

  10. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  11. Intermedial Strategies of Memory in Contemporary Novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In her article "Intermedial Strategies and Memory in Contemporary Novels" Sara Tanderup discusses a tendency in contemporary literature towards combining intermedial experiments with a thematic preoccupation with memory and trauma. Analyzing selected works by Steven Hall, Jonathan Safran Foer...

  12. Longitudinal testing of hippocampal plasticity reveals the onset and maintenance of endogenous human Aß-induced synaptic dysfunction in individual freely behaving pre-plaque transgenic rats: rapid reversal by anti-Aß agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yingjie; Klyubin, Igor; Harney, Sarah C; Hu, NengWei; Cullen, William K; Grant, Marianne K; Steffen, Julia; Wilson, Edward N; Do Carmo, Sonia; Remy, Stefan; Fuhrmann, Martin; Ashe, Karen H; Cuello, A Claudio; Rowan, Michael J

    2014-12-24

    Long before synaptic loss occurs in Alzheimer's disease significant harbingers of disease may be detected at the functional level. Here we examined if synaptic long-term potentiation is selectively disrupted prior to extracellular deposition of Aß in a very complete model of Alzheimer's disease amyloidosis, the McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rat. Longitudinal studies in freely behaving animals revealed an age-dependent, relatively rapid-onset and persistent inhibition of long-term potentiation without a change in baseline synaptic transmission in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Thus the ability of a standard 200 Hz conditioning protocol to induce significant NMDA receptor-dependent short- and long-term potentiation was lost at about 3.5 months of age and this deficit persisted for at least another 2-3 months, when plaques start to appear. Consistent with in vitro evidence for a causal role of a selective reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, the deficit in synaptic plasticity in vivo was associated with a reduction in the synaptic burst response to the conditioning stimulation and was overcome using stronger 400 Hz stimulation. Moreover, intracerebroventricular treatment for 3 days with an N-terminally directed monoclonal anti- human Aß antibody, McSA1, transiently reversed the impairment of synaptic plasticity. Similar brief treatment with the BACE1 inhibitor LY2886721 or the γ-secretase inhibitor MRK-560 was found to have a comparable short-lived ameliorative effect when tracked in individual rats. These findings provide strong evidence that endogenously generated human Aß selectively disrupts the induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that enables potential therapeutic options to be assessed longitudinally at the pre-plaque stage of Alzheimer's disease amyloidosis.

  13. Pelamis WEC - intermediate scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yemm, R.

    2003-07-01

    This report describes the successful building and commissioning of an intermediate 1/7th scale model of the Pelamis Wave Energy Converter (WEC) and its testing in the wave climate of the Firth of Forth. Details are given of the design of the semi-submerged articulated structure of cylindrical elements linked by hinged joints. The specific programme objectives and conclusions, development issues addressed, and key remaining risks are discussed along with development milestones to be passed before the Pelamis WEC is ready for full-scale prototype testing.

  14. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  15. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses.

  16. A Research on English Educational Problems among Intermediates in Middle School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰凤英

    2015-01-01

    This paper mainly centers on the neglecting parts of English intermediates in middle school and presents their existing study problems. According to intermediates' characters and learning motivation, I will reveal reasons of these problems and come up with effective strategies from two aspects of English teachers and students.

  17. Trapping Reactive Intermediates by Mechanochemistry: Elusive Aryl N-Thiocarbamoylbenzotriazoles as Bench-Stable Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Gracin, Davor; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-07-13

    Monitoring of mechanochemical thiocarbamoylation by in situ Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of aryl N-thiocarbamoylbenzotriazoles, reactive intermediates deemed unisolable in solution. The first-time isolation and structural characterization of these elusive molecules demonstrates the ability of mechanochemistry to access otherwise unobtainable intermediates and offers a new range of masked isothiocyanate reagents.

  18. Deglacial intermediate water reorganization: new evidence from the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Romahn

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of intermediate water masses in climate change and ocean circulation has been emphasized recently. In particular, Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW is thought to have acted as an active interhemispheric transmitter of climate anomalies. Here we reconstruct changes in AAIW signature and spatial and temporal evolution based on a 40 kyr time series of oxygen and carbon isotopes as well as planktic Mg/Ca based thermometry from a site in the western Indian Ocean. Our data suggest that AAIW transmitted Antarctic temperature trends to the equatorial Indian Ocean via the "oceanic tunnel" mechanism. Moreover, our results reveal that deglacial AAIW carried a signature of aged Southern Ocean deep water. We find no evidence of increased formation of intermediate waters during the deglaciation.

  19. Intermediate distance correlators in hot Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, M; Vuorinen, A

    2010-01-01

    Lattice measurements of spatial correlation functions of the operators FF and FF-dual in thermal SU(3) gauge theory have revealed a clear difference between the two channels at "intermediate" distances, x ~ 1/(pi T). This is at odds with the AdS/CFT limit which predicts the results to coincide. On the other hand, an OPE analysis at short distances (x 1/(pi T)) as well as effective theory methods at long distances (x 1/(pi T)) suggest differences. Here we study the situation at intermediate distances by determining the time-averaged spatial correlators through a 2-loop computation. We do find unequal results, however the numerical disparity is small. Apart from theoretical issues, a future comparison of our results with time-averaged lattice measurements might also be of phenomenological interest in that understanding the convergence of the weak-coupling series at intermediate distances may bear on studies of the thermal broadening of heavy quarkonium resonances.

  20. 34 CFR 200.17 - Intermediate goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate goals. 200.17 Section 200.17 Education... Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.17 Intermediate goals. Each State must establish intermediate goals that increase in equal increments over the period...

  1. Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M C

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical simplicity of black holes, combined with their links to some of the most energetic events in the universe, means that black holes are key objects for fundamental physics and astrophysics. Until recently, it was generally believed that black holes in nature appear in two broad mass ranges: stellar-mass (roughly 3-20 solar masses), which are produced by the core collapse of massive stars, and supermassive (millions to billions of solar masses), which are found in the centers of galaxies and are produced by a still uncertain combination of processes. In the last few years, however, evidence has accumulated for an intermediate-mass class of black holes, with hundreds to thousands of solar masses. If such objects exist they have important implications for the dynamics of stellar clusters, the formation of supermassive black holes, and the production and detection of gravitational waves. We review the evidence for intermediate-mass black holes and discuss future observational and theoretical work t...

  2. Intermediate view synthesis from stereoscopic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Chaohui; An Ping; Zhang Zhaoyang

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for synthesizing intermediate views from a pair of stereoscopic images. In order to synthesize high-quality intermediate views, the block matching method together with a simplified multi-window technique and dynamic programming is used in the process of disparity estimation. Then occlusion detection is performed to locate occluded regions and their disparities are compensated. After the projecton of the left-to-right and right-to-left disparities onto the intermediate image, intermediate view is synthesized considering occluded regions. Experimental results show that our synthesis method can obtain intermediate views with higher quality.

  3. Displays for future intermediate UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Daniel; Metzler, James; Blakesley, David; Rister, Courtney; Nuhu, Abdul-Razak

    2008-04-01

    The Dedicated Autonomous Extended Duration Airborne Long-range Utility System (DAEDALUS) is a prototype Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that won the 2007 AFRL Commander's Challenge. The purpose of the Commander's Challenge was to find an innovative solution to urgent warfighter needs by designing a UAV with increased persistence for tactical employment of sensors and communication systems. DAEDALUS was chosen as a winning prototype by AFRL, AFMC and SECAF. Follow-on units are intended to fill an intermediate role between currently fielded Tier I and Tier II UAV's. The UAV design discussed in this paper, including sensors and displays, will enter Phase II for Rapid Prototype Development with the intent of developing the design for eventual production. This paper will discuss the DAEDALUS UAV prototype system, with particular focus on its communications, to include the infrared sensor and electro-optical camera, but also displays, specifically man-portable.

  4. Intermediate Jacobians of moduli spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Arapura, D; Arapura, Donu; Sastry, Pramathanath

    1996-01-01

    Let $SU_X(n,L)$ be the moduli space of rank n semistable vector bundles with fixed determinant L on a smooth projective genus g curve X. Let $SU_X^s(n,L)$ denote the open subset parametrizing stable bundles. We show that if g>3 and n > 1, then the mixed Hodge structure on $H^3(SU_X^s(n, L))$ is pure of type ${(1,2),(2,1)}$ and it carries a natural polarization such that the associated polarized intermediate Jacobian is isomorphic J(X). This is new when deg L and n are not coprime. As a corollary, we obtain a Torelli theorem that says roughly that $SU_X^s(n,L)$ (or $SU_X(n,L)$) determines X. This complements or refines earlier results of Balaji, Kouvidakis-Pantev, Mumford-Newstead, Narasimhan-Ramanan, and Tyurin.

  5. Intermediate inflation from rainbow gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2013-01-01

    It is possible to dualize theories based on deformed dispersion relations and Einstein gravity so as to map them into theories with trivial dispersion relations and rainbow gravity. This often leads to "dual inflation" without the usual breaking of the strong energy condition. We identify the dispersion relations in the original frame which map into "intermediate" inflationary models. These turn out to be particularly simple: power-laws modulated by powers of a logarithm. The fluctuations predicted by these scenarios are near, but not exactly scale-invariant, with a red running spectral index. These dispersion relations deserve further study within the context of quantum gravity and the phenomenon of dimensional reduction in the ultraviolet.

  6. Probing intermediates of the induction period prior to nucleation and growth of semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyang; Wang, Kun; Wang, Linxi; Han, Shuo; Fan, Hongsong; Rowell, Nelson; Ripmeester, John A.; Renoud, Romain; Bian, Fenggang; Zeng, Jianrong; Yu, Kui

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the induction period before the nucleation and growth of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we introduce an approach that allows us to probe intermediates present in the induction period. We show that this induction period itself exhibits distinct stages with the evolution of the intermediates, first without and then with the formation of covalent bonds between metal cations and chalcogenide anions. The intermediates are optically invisible in toluene, while the covalent-bonded intermediates become visible as magic-size clusters when a primary amine is added. Such evolution of magic-size clusters provides indirect but compelling evidence for the presence of the intermediates in the induction period and supports the multi-step nucleation model. Our study reveals that magic-size clusters could be readily engineered in a single-size form, and suggests that the existence of the intermediates during the growth of conventional quantum dots results in low product yield.

  7. Individual Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  8. Individual Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  9. Primary and secondary fragmentation of crystal-bearing intermediate magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas J.; McNamara, Keri; Eychenne, Julia; Rust, Alison C.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Scheu, Bettina; Edwards, Robyn

    2016-11-01

    Crystal-rich intermediate magmas are subjected to both primary and secondary fragmentation processes, each of which may produce texturally distinct tephra. Of particular interest for volcanic hazards is the extent to which each process contributes ash to volcanic plumes. One way to address this question is by fragmenting pyroclasts under controlled conditions. We fragmented pumice samples from Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat, by three methods: rapid decompression in a shock tube-like apparatus, impact by a falling piston, and milling in a ball mill. Grain size distributions of the products reveal that all three mechanisms produce fractal breakage patterns, and that the fractal dimension increases from a minimum of 2.1 for decompression fragmentation (primary fragmentation) to a maximum of 2.7 by repeated impact (secondary fragmentation). To assess the details of the fragmentation process, we quantified the shape, texture and components of constituent ash particles. Ash shape analysis shows that the axial ratio increases during milling and that particle convexity increases with repeated impacts. We also quantify the extent to which the matrix is separated from the crystals, which shows that secondary processes efficiently remove adhering matrix from crystals, particularly during milling (abrasion). Furthermore, measurements of crystal size distributions before (using x-ray computed tomography) and after (by componentry of individual grain size classes) decompression-driven fragmentation show not only that crystals influence particular size fractions across the total grain size distribution, but also that free crystals are smaller in the fragmented material than in the original pumice clast. Taken together, our results confirm previous work showing both the control of initial texture on the primary fragmentation process and the contributions of secondary processes to ash formation. Critically, however, our extension of previous analyses to characterisation

  10. A New Vaccinia Virus Intermediate Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Patrick; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome is mediated by a virus-encoded multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in conjunction with early-, intermediate-, and late-stage-specific factors. Previous studies indicated that two virus-encoded proteins (capping enzyme and VITF-1) and one unidentified cellular protein (VITF-2) are required for specific transcription of an intermediate promoter template in vitro. We have now extensively purified an additional virus-induced intermediate transcript...

  11. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Elisabeth E; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament (IF) proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filaments form viscoelastic gels. The cross-links holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking nonlinear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large strains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual IFs can be stretched to more than two or three times their resting length without breaking. At least 10 different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of cytoplasmic IFs on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations.

  13. Is T Leonis a superoutbursting intermediate polar?

    CERN Document Server

    Vrielmann, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton analysis of the cataclysmic variable T Leo. The X-ray light curve shows sinusoidal variation on a period P_x equal to 0.89^{+0.14}_{-0.10} times the previously spectroscopically determined orbital period. Furthermore, we find a signal in the power spectrum at 414 sec that could be attributed to the spin period of the white dwarf. If true, T Leo would be the first confirmed superoutbursting intermediate polar IP). The spin profile is double-peaked with a peak separation of about 1/3 spin phases. This appears to be a typical feature for IPs with a small magnetic field and fast white dwarf rotation. An alternative explanation is that the 414 sec signal is a Quasi-periodic Oscillation (QPO) that is caused by mass transfer variation from the secondary, a bright region (``blob'') rotating in the disc at a radius of approximately ~9 Rwd or - more likely - a travelling wave close to the inner disc edge of a dwarf nova with a low field white dwarf. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra reveal double peak...

  14. The critical iron-oxygen intermediate in human aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Stephanie L; Denisov, Ilia G; Grinkova, Yelena V; Sligar, Stephen G

    2009-09-11

    Aromatase (CYP19) is the target of several therapeutics used for breast cancer treatment and catalyzes the three-step conversion of androgens to estrogens, with an unusual C-C cleavage reaction in the third step. To better understand the CYP19 reaction, the oxy-ferrous complex of CYP19 with androstenedione substrate was cryotrapped, characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, and cryoreduced to generate the next reaction cycle intermediate. EPR analysis revealed that the initial intermediate observed following cryoreduction is the unprotonated g(1)=2.254 peroxo-ferric intermediate, which is stable up to 180K. Upon gradual cryoannealing, the low-spin (g(1)=2.39) product complex is formed, with no evidence for accumulation of the g(1)=2.30 hydroperoxo-ferric intermediate. The relative stabilization of the peroxo-ferric heme and the lack of observed hydroperoxo-ferric heme distinguish CYP19 from other P450s, suggesting that the proton delivery pathway is more hindered in CYP19 than in most other P450s.

  15. Ambiguity Revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Subir Bose; Matthew Polisson; Ludovic Renou

    2012-01-01

    We derive necessary and suffcient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under ambiguity: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for the maxmin expected utility and subjective expected utility models are characterized as special cases.

  16. Ambiguity revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Ralph-C; Bose, Subir; Polisson, Matthew; Renou, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under uncertainty: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for subjective expected utility, maxmin expected utility, and multiplier preferences are characterised as special cases. We implement our tests on data from a portfolio choice experiment.

  17. Some Intermediate-Level Violin Concertos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Contends that many violin students attempt difficult concertos before they are technically or musically prepared. Identifies a variety of concertos at the intermediate and advanced intermediate-level for students to study and master before attempting the advanced works by Bach and Mozart. Includes concertos by Vivaldi, Leclair, Viotti, Haydn,…

  18. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the:...

  19. Air Conditioning. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, William

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of seven terminal objectives for an intermediate air conditioning course. The titles of the seven terminal objectives are Refrigeration Cycle, Job Requirement Skills, Air Conditioning, Trouble Shooting, Performance Test, Shop Management, and S.I.E.…

  20. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour…

  1. Air Conditioning. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, William

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of seven terminal objectives for an intermediate air conditioning course. The titles of the seven terminal objectives are Refrigeration Cycle, Job Requirement Skills, Air Conditioning, Trouble Shooting, Performance Test, Shop Management, and S.I.E.…

  2. The collapse of the tyrosine Z*-Mn spin-spin interaction above approximately 100 K reveals the spectrum of tyrosine Z*. An application of rapid-scan EPR to the study of intermediates of the water splitting mechanism of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariou, Georgia; Ioannidis, Nikolaos; Sioros, George; Petrouleas, Vasili

    2007-12-18

    Tyr Z of photosystem II mediates electron transfer from the water splitting site, a Mn4Ca cluster, to the specialized chlorophyll assembly P680. Due to its proton-limited redox properties and the proximity to the Mn cluster, it is thought to play a critical role in the proton-coupled electron transfer reactions that constitute the four-step oxidation mechanism (so-called S-state transitions) of water to molecular oxygen. Spectroscopic evidence for the Tyr Z radical has been scarce in intact preparations (it is difficult to probe it optically, and too short-lived for EPR characterization) until recently. Advances in recent years have allowed the trapping at liquid helium temperatures and EPR characterization of metalloradical intermediates, attributed to tyrosyl Z* magnetically interacting with the Mn cluster. We have extended these studies and examined the evolution of the spectra of five intermediates: S0YZ*, S0YZ* (with 5% MeOH), S1YZ*, S2YZ*, and S2YZ* (with 5% MeOH) in the temperature range of 11-230 K. A rapid-scan EPR method has been applied at elevated temperatures. The tyrosyl radical decouples progressively from Mn, as the Mn relaxation rate increases with an increase in temperature. Above approximately 100 K, the spectra collapse to the unperturbed spectrum of Tyr Z*, which is found to be somewhat broader than that of the stable Tyr D* radical. This study provides a simple means for recording the spectrum of Tyr Z* and extends earlier observations that link the photochemistry at liquid helium temperatures to the photochemistry at temperatures that support S-state transitions.

  3. Role of Coronary Calcium Scoring in the Assessment of Physiological Ischemia in Patients with Intermediate Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Kazunori; Kikuchi, Yuichi; Takizawa, Kaname; Inoue, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Although coronary artery calcium (CAC) is an established marker of coronary atherosclerosis, whether it also reflects the physiological significance is unknown. This study aims to evaluate if CAC could indicate physiological ischemia in intermediate stenosis defined by an invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). CAC score (CACS) derived from either whole coronary arteries or individual arteries was measured by computed tomography among patients with intermediate de novo lesions (percent diameter stenosis from 30% to less than 70%). All stenoses were evaluated by invasive FFR; lesions with an FFR ≤ 0.80 were considered significant. We enrolled 119 patients with 143 lesions. Of these, 42 lesions (29.4%) demonstrated significant ischemia by FFR measurement. FFR values had modest but significant correlations with CACS in individual arteries with intermediate stenosis (r = − 0.290; p stenosis had 71.4% sensitivity and 67.3% specificity as a predictor of significant ischemia at a cut off value of 145.9. Multivariable analysis showed that percent diameter stenosis and CACS in individual arteries with intermediate stenosis were independent predictors for significant ischemia. By net reclassification improvement analysis, CACS in individual arteries with intermediate stenosis provided incremental prediction for significant ischemia over minimum lumen diameter, percent diameter stenosis, and lesion length. CACS measured in each artery, but not the total CACS, provides additional information as to whether an angiographically intermediate stenosis within the artery is significant enough to cause myocardial ischemia. PMID:26648671

  4. Individualizing Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds.

  5. Mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1979-01-01

    Mathematics Revealed focuses on the principles, processes, operations, and exercises in mathematics.The book first offers information on whole numbers, fractions, and decimals and percents. Discussions focus on measuring length, percent, decimals, numbers as products, addition and subtraction of fractions, mixed numbers and ratios, division of fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The text then examines positive and negative numbers and powers and computation. Topics include division and averages, multiplication, ratios, and measurements, scientific notation and estim

  6. Effect of Intermediate Hosts on Emerging Zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-An; Chen, Fangyuan; Fan, Shengjie

    2017-08-01

    Most emerging zoonotic pathogens originate from animals. They can directly infect humans through natural reservoirs or indirectly through intermediate hosts. As a bridge, an intermediate host plays different roles in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. In this study, we present three types of pathogen transmission to evaluate the effect of intermediate hosts on emerging zoonotic diseases in human epidemics. These types are identified as follows: TYPE 1, pathogen transmission without an intermediate host for comparison; TYPE 2, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as an amplifier; and TYPE 3, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as a vessel for genetic variation. In addition, we established three mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying zoonotic disease transmission according to these three types. Stability analysis indicated that the existence of intermediate hosts increased the difficulty of controlling zoonotic diseases because of more difficult conditions to satisfy for the disease to die out. The human epidemic would die out under the following conditions: TYPE 1: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]; TYPE 2: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]; and TYPE 3: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] Simulation with similar parameters demonstrated that intermediate hosts could change the peak time and number of infected humans during a human epidemic; intermediate hosts also exerted different effects on controlling the prevalence of a human epidemic with natural reservoirs in different periods, which is important in addressing problems in public health. Monitoring and controlling the number of natural reservoirs and intermediate hosts at the right time would successfully manage and prevent the prevalence of emerging zoonoses in humans.

  7. INTERMEDIATE-ENERGY LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, William

    2002-11-25

    from each port can be subdivided into several separate beams, each of which can serve an independent experimental station. All told, 50 or more scientific teams can simultaneously and independently conduct research using intense photon beams from a single intermediate-energy synchrotron radiation facility.

  8. Management of intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism: uncertainties and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Frederikus Albertus; Meyer, Guy; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2015-12-01

    Current guidelines on the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) recommend stratification of hemodynamically stable patients in 'low risk' and 'intermediate risk'. Validated risk scores, cardiac biomarkers, and imaging of the right ventricle all help in distinguishing both patient categories. The relevance of this risk stratification lies in the determination of the most optimal treatment for the individual patient. In this clinical review, we will discuss how patients with 'intermediate-risk' PE can be identified as well as recent advances in their therapeutic management. Based on a clinical case, we will highlight the indications for reperfusion therapy and the current experience with non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulant (NOACs) in this specific patient's category.

  9. Intermediate nerve neuralgia can be diagnosed and cured by microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yili; Song, Zhengfei; Wan, Yingfeng; Lin, Wei; Hu, Xingyue; Wang, Yirong; Imai, Hideaki

    2014-07-01

    Here, we present a case of a 55-year-old woman with a 10-year history of hemifacial spasm accompanied by 1-month ipsilateral paroxysmal otalgia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of vessels around the facial nerve root. Surgical exploration via suboccipital retromastoid craniotomy showed converging compression of the facial nerve root and intermediate nerve from both sides by an anterior inferior cerebellar artery loop. The patient's hemifacial spasm and ipsilateral otalgia were completely relieved after microvascular decompression of the facial nerve root and intermediate nerve. Intraoperative findings and the postoperative result of this case confirmed that vascular compression of the intermediate nerve was the exclusive cause of paroxysmal otalgia. The presence of ipsilateral hemifacial spasm, combined with preoperative neuroimaging studies, contributed to the diagnosis of intermediate nerve neuralgia. Microvascular decompression should be considered for the management of patients with intermediate nerve neuralgia.

  10. Collective individualism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baarts, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Safety knowledge appears to be ‘a doing’. In construction work safety is practised in the complex interrelationship between the individual, pair and gang. Thus the aim is to explore the nature and scope of individualist and collectivist preferences pertaining to the practice of safety at a constr...

  11. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandan eRamakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HMAX model and Bag of Words (BoW model from computer vision. Both these computational models use visual dictionaries, candidate features of intermediate complexity, to represent visual scenes, and the models have been proven effective in automatic object and scene recognition. These models however differ in the computation of visual dictionaries and pooling techniques. We investigated where in the brain and to what extent human fMRI responses to short video can be accounted for by multiple hierarchical levels of the HMAX and BoW models. Brain activity of 20 subjects obtained while viewing a short video clip was analyzed voxel-wise using a distance-based variation partitioning method. Results revealed that both HMAX and BoW explain a significant amount of brain activity in early visual regions V1, V2 and V3. However BoW exhibits more consistency across subjects in accounting for brain activity compared to HMAX. Furthermore, visual dictionary representations by HMAX and BoW explain significantly some brain activity in higher areas which are believed to process intermediate features. Overall our results indicate that, although both HMAX and BoW account for activity in the human visual system, the BoW seems to more faithfully represent neural responses in low and intermediate level visual areas of the brain.

  12. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Kandan; Scholte, H Steven; Groen, Iris I A; Smeulders, Arnold W M; Ghebreab, Sennay

    2014-01-01

    The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HMAX model and Bag of Words (BoW) model from computer vision. Both these computational models use visual dictionaries, candidate features of intermediate complexity, to represent visual scenes, and the models have been proven effective in automatic object and scene recognition. These models however differ in the computation of visual dictionaries and pooling techniques. We investigated where in the brain and to what extent human fMRI responses to short video can be accounted for by multiple hierarchical levels of the HMAX and BoW models. Brain activity of 20 subjects obtained while viewing a short video clip was analyzed voxel-wise using a distance-based variation partitioning method. Results revealed that both HMAX and BoW explain a significant amount of brain activity in early visual regions V1, V2, and V3. However, BoW exhibits more consistency across subjects in accounting for brain activity compared to HMAX. Furthermore, visual dictionary representations by HMAX and BoW explain significantly some brain activity in higher areas which are believed to process intermediate features. Overall our results indicate that, although both HMAX and BoW account for activity in the human visual system, the BoW seems to more faithfully represent neural responses in low and intermediate level visual areas of the brain.

  13. REVEALED ALTRUISM

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, James C; Friedman, Daniel; Sadiraj, Vjollca

    2009-01-01

    This pap er develops a theory of revealed preferences over oneís own and othersímonetary payo§s. We intro duce ìmore altruistic thanî(MAT), a partial ordering over preferences, and interpret it with known parametric mo dels. We also intro duce and illustrate ìmore generous thanî (MGT), a partial ordering over opp ortunity sets. Several recent discussions of altruism fo cus on two player extensive form games of complete information in which the Örst mover (FM) cho oses a more or less gen...

  14. Language in use intermediate : classroom book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    ach of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  15. Language in use intermediate : teacher's book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  16. Biocatalysis: synthesis of chiral intermediates for drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ramesh N

    2006-11-01

    Chirality is a key factor in the safety and efficacy of many drug products and thus the production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Chiral intermediates and fine chemicals are in high demand for the bulk preparation of drug substances and agricultural products. There has been an increasing awareness of the enormous potential of the use of microorganisms and microorganism-derived enzymes for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivities. In this article, biocatalytic processes are described for the synthesis of chiral intermediates for drugs.

  17. In vivo detection of brain Krebs cycle intermediate by hyperpolarized magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Mishkovsky, Mor; Comment, Arnaud; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The Krebs (or tricarboxylic acid (TCA)) cycle has a central role in the regulation of brain energy regulation and metabolism, yet brain TCA cycle intermediates have never been directly detected in vivo. This study reports the first direct in vivo observation of a TCA cycle intermediate in intact brain, namely, 2-oxoglutarate, a key biomolecule connecting metabolism to neuronal activity. Our observation reveals important information about in vivo biochemical processes hitherto considered undet...

  18. In vivo detection of brain Krebs cycle intermediate by hyperpolarized magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Mishkovsky, Mor; Comment, Arnaud; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The Krebs (or tricarboxylic acid (TCA)) cycle has a central role in the regulation of brain energy regulation and metabolism, yet brain TCA cycle intermediates have never been directly detected in vivo. This study reports the first direct in vivo observation of a TCA cycle intermediate in intact brain, namely, 2-oxoglutarate, a key biomolecule connecting metabolism to neuronal activity. Our observation reveals important information about in vivo biochemical processes hitherto considered undet...

  19. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  20. Simplifying biochemical models with intermediate species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    canonical model that characterizes crucial dynamical properties, such as mono- and multistationarity and stability of steady states, of all models in the class. We show that if the core model does not have conservation laws, then the introduction of intermediates does not change the steady...... techniques, we study systematically the effects of intermediate, or transient, species in biochemical systems and provide a simple, yet rigorous mathematical classification of all models obtained from a core model by including intermediates. Main examples include enzymatic and post-translational modification...... systems, where intermediates often are considered insignificant and neglected in a model, or they are not included because we are unaware of their existence. All possible models obtained from the core model are classified into a finite number of classes. Each class is defined by a mathematically simple...

  1. The second national audit of intermediate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Gladman, John R F; Forsyth, Duncan R; Holditch, Claire

    2015-03-01

    Intermediate care services have developed internationally to expedite discharge from hospital and to provide an alternative to an emergency hospital admission. Inconsistencies in the evidence base and under-developed governance structures led to concerns about the care quality, outcomes and provision of intermediate care in the NHS. The National Audit of Intermediate Care was therefore established by an interdisciplinary group. The second national audit reported in 2013 and included crisis response teams, home-based and bed-based services in approximately a half of the NHS. The main findings were evidence of weak local strategic planning, considerable under-provision, delays in accessing the services and lack of mental health involvement in care. There was a very high level of positive patient experience reported across all types of intermediate care, though reported involvement with care decisions was less satisfactory.

  2. A common intermediate for N2 formation in enzymes and zeolites: side-on Cu-nitrosyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H; Burton, Sarah D; Lipton, Andrew S; Peden, Charles H F; Szanyi, János

    2013-09-16

    Side on! Combined FTIR and NMR studies revealed the presence of a side-on nitrosyl species in the zeolite Cu-SSZ-13. This intermediate is very similar to those found in nitrite reductase enzyme systems. The identification of this intermediate led to the proposal of a reaction mechanism that is fully consistent with the results of both kinetic and spectroscopic studies.

  3. Elusive Terminal Copper Arylnitrene Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoda, Abolghasem Gus; Jiang, Quan; Bertke, Jeffery A; Cundari, Thomas R; Warren, Timothy H

    2017-06-01

    We report herein three new modes of reactivity between arylazides N3 Ar with a bulky copper(I) β-diketiminate. Addition of N3 Ar(X3) (Ar(X3) =2,4,6-X3 C6 H2 ; X=Cl or Me) to [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu(NCMe) results in triazenido complexes from azide attack on the β-diketiminato backbone. Reaction of [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu(NCMe) with bulkier azides N3 Ar leads to terminal nitrenes [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu]=NAr that dimerize via formation of a C-C bond at the arylnitrene p-position to give the dicopper(II) diketimide 4 (Ar=2,6-(i) Pr2 C6 H3 ) or undergo nitrile insertion to give diazametallocyclobutene 8 (Ar=4-Ph-2,6-iPr2 C6 H2 ). Importantly, reactivity studies reveal both 4 and 8 to be "masked" forms of the terminal nitrenes [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu=NAr that undergo nitrene group transfer to PMe3 , (t) BuNC, and even into a benzylic sp(3) C-H bond of ethylbenzene. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Individual Consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Walkinshaw

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to calls for research into measurable English language outcomes from individual language support consultations at universities, this study investigated the effect of individual consultations (ICs on the academic writing skills and lexico-grammatical competence of students who speak English as an additional language (EAL. Attendance by 31 EAL students at ICs was recorded, and samples of their academic writing texts before and after a 9-month interval were compared. Participants’ academic writing skills were rated, and lexico-grammatical irregularities were quantified. No statistically significant positive shifts manifested, due to the relatively short research period and limited participant uptake, but there were encouraging predictors of future shifts given continued utilization of the service. First, although a Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed no association between attendance at ICs and shifts in academic writing ability, a Spearman’s rho calculation suggested a tentative relationship to positive pre–post shifts in three academic writing sub-skills: Task Fulfillment, Grammar, and Vocabulary. Second, instances of four common lexico-grammatical irregularities (subject/verb, wrong word, plural/singular, and punctuation declined at post-testing. Although only regular, sustained attendance would produce statistically significant shifts, there is a potential association between participants’ use of ICs and improved academic writing skills/lexico-grammatical competence.

  5. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  6. Evolution of emission line activity in intermediate mass young stars

    CERN Document Server

    Manoj, P; Maheswar, G; Muneer, S

    2006-01-01

    We present optical spectra of 45 intermediate mass Herbig Ae/Be stars. Together with the multi-epoch spectroscopic and photometric data compiled for a large sample of these stars and ages estimated for individual stars by using pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks, we have studied the evolution of emission line activity in them. We find that, on average, the H_alpha emission line strength decreases with increasing stellar age in HAeBe stars, indicating that the accretion activity gradually declines during the PMS phase. This would hint at a relatively long-lived (a few Myr) process being responsible for the cessation of accretion in Herbig Ae/Be stars. We also find that the accretion activity in these stars drops substantially by ~ 3 Myr. This is comparable to the timescale in which most intermediate mass stars are thought to lose their inner disks, suggesting that inner disks in intermediate mass stars are dissipated rapidly after the accretion activity has fallen below a certain level. We, further find a r...

  7. Joint enterprise and the role of the intermediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Simonsen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Managing groupware technologies in global virtual teams is viewed as a process of integrating technology and collaboration. This involves a continual negotia-tion of the team’s goals, processes, and technology. We investigate organizational factors constraining this integration process......, by analyzing the failure of inte-grating groupware into two global virtual teams within industry. We present an empirically driven interpretive case study conducted in a large distributed global or-ganization. Based on the empirical observations, we reveal two organizational factors challenging the inte......-gration process: The importance of joint enterprise and the role of the intermediator....

  8. Are EeV cosmic rays isotropic at intermediate scales?

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, M Yu

    2014-01-01

    We study anisotropy of cosmic rays in the energy range 0.2-1.4 EeV at intermediate angular scales using the public data set of the Pierre Auger Observatory. At certain scales, the analysis reveals a number of deviations from the isotropic distribution with the statistical significance above three standard deviations. It also demonstrates that the anisotropy evolves with energy. If confirmed with the complete Auger or Telescope Array data sets, the result can shed new light on the structure of galactic magnetic fields and the problem of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays.

  9. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  10. Individualized approach to staff motivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elena Shirokova; Anastasiya Kalinichenko

    2016-01-01

    The article reveals the formation of a system of incentives for workers, allowing to identify the impact of the individual needs of the employee and the possibility of rational use of specific tools for labor motivation...

  11. Stingray-inspired robot with simply actuated intermediate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Lincoln; Gaiennie, Jack; Noble, Nick; Erickson, Jonathan C.

    2016-04-01

    Batoids, or rays, utilize unique forms of locomotion that may offer more efficient techniques of motorized propulsion in various marine environments. We present a novel biomimetic engineering design and assembly of a stingray-inspired robot swimmer. The robots locomotion mimics the Dasyatis americana, or southern stingray, whose distinction among rays is its intermediate motion, characterized by sweeping strokes that propagate between 1/2-1 wavelength of the fin profile in the posterior direction. Though oscillatory ( wavelengths) ray-based robots have been created, this project demonstrates new engineering possibilities in what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first intermediately propelled batoid-based robot. The robots fins were made of silicone rubber, cast in a 3-D printed mold, with wingspan of 42 cm (1/2 - 1/5 scale for males and females, respectively, scale of model organism). Two anteriorly placed servomotors per fin were used, all controlled by one wirelessly enabled Arduino microcontroller. Each servomotor oscillated a flexible rod with cylindrical joint, whose frequency, speed, and front-back phase delay were user-programmed over wireless connection. During free-swimming tests, the fin profile developed about 0.8 wavelength, qualifying for successful mimicry of its biological inspiration. The robot satisfactorily maintained straight-line motion, reaching average peak velocity of 9.4+/-1.0 cm/s (0.27-0.03 body lengths/second) at its optimum flapping frequency of 1.4 Hz. This is in the same order of magnitude of speed normalized to body length achieved by others in two recent batoid-based projects. In summary, our robot performed intermediate stingray locomotion with relatively fewer components, which reveals robust potential for innovation of the simple intermediate batoid-based robot swimmer.

  12. Genetic variability of Brazilian populations of Lymnaea columella (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae), an intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda: Digenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Paula Cristina Marques; Caldeira, Roberta Lima; Lovato, Maria Bernadete; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Müller, Gertrud; Carvalho, Omar dos Santos

    2006-03-01

    In Brazil, Lymnaea columella is the most important intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, the etiological agent of fasciolosis, which is a parasitic disease of veterinarian and human importance. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to investigate the genetic variability within and among nine Brazilian populations of L. columella comprising 205 individuals. A number of four primers were used for analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Out of 83 RAPD markers, 63 (76%) were polymorphic and revealed 119 unique RAPD profiles. The levels of genetic variability found in the populations were low and most of the genetic variation was interpopulational (81.6%) when compared to intrapopulational variability (18.4%). These results are in accordance with the dynamics and distribution of the populations analyzed.

  13. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  14. Rhetoric, Possessive Individualism, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, C. Mark

    1988-01-01

    Traces the influence of late-capitalist political ideology on the rhetoric which formed the process/product distinction; notes their sharing of an ideology of "possessive individualism." Reveals "social individualism" as an emerging ideology which may adjudicate the disparity between the ideals of process pedagogy and its…

  15. Clinical, neurophysiological and morphological study of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth type C neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Florian P; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Gondim, Francisco A A; Tournev, Ivailo; Rao, Chitharanjan V; Ishpekova, Boryana; Kinsella, Laurence J; Pan, Yi; Geller, Thomas J; Litvinenko, Ivan; De Jonghe, Peter; Scherer, Steven S; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-03-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy subtype C (DI-CMTC) was associated with mutations in the YARS gene, encoding tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, in two large unrelated Bulgarian and US pedigrees and one sporadic case. Here for the first time we describe the clinical, neurophysiological and histopathological features, and phenotypic differences between these two DI-CMTC families. Twenty-one affected individuals from the US family and 27 from the Bulgarian family were evaluated. The mean age of onset in US subjects was 10.7 years in men and 7.3 years in women, while in the Bulgarian participants it was 18.2 years in men and 33.7 years in women. The course was slowly progressive. Extensor digitorum brevis atrophy was uniform. Atrophy and/or weakness of upper and lower limb muscles were found in over 50 % of the subjects. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were abnormal in all US adults and five of six children and all Bulgarian patients except one asymptomatic 25-year-old man. Median motor NCS were in the range of 29.5-45.6 m/s in the US family and 24.7-57.8 m/s in the Bulgarian family. Sural sensory nerve action potentials were absent in 14/21 and 4/12 NCS from adult US and Bulgarian participants, respectively. Analysis of sural nerve biopsies from US patients revealed age-dependent morphological changes of axonal degeneration, absence of onion bulbs, and <10 % fibers with segmental remyelination. Our findings provide further insights into the diagnosis and pathology of intermediate CMT. They also extend the phenotypic spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase mutations.

  16. Outflow forces in intermediate mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    van Kempen, T A; van Dishoeck, E F; Kristensen, L E; Belloche, A; Klaassen, P D; Leurini, S; Jose-Garcia, I San; Aykutalp, A; Choi, Y; Endo, A; Frieswijk, W; Harsono, D; Karska, A; Koumpia, E; van der Marel, N; Nagy, Z; Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Risacher, C; van Weeren, R J; Wyrowski, F; Yildiz, U A; Guesten, R; Boland, W; Baryshev, A

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate mass protostarsprovide a bridge between theories of low- and high-mass star formation. Emerging molecular outflows can be used to determine the influence of fragmentation and multiplicity on protostellar evolution through the correlation of outflow forces of intermediate mass protostars with the luminosity. The aim of this paper is to derive outflow forces from outflows of six intermediate mass protostellar regions and validate the apparent correlation between total luminosity and outflow force seen in earlier work, as well as remove uncertainties caused by different methodology. By comparing CO 6--5 observations obtained with APEX with non-LTE radiative transfer model predictions, optical depths, temperatures, densities of the gas of the molecular outflows are derived. Outflow forces, dynamical timescales and kinetic luminosities are subsequently calculated. Outflow parameters, including the forces, were derived for all sources. Temperatures in excess of 50 K were found for all flows, in line wi...

  17. The ARES High-level Intermediate Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Nicholas David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The LLVM intermediate representation (IR) lacks semantic constructs for depicting common high-performance operations such as parallel and concurrent execution, communication and synchronization. Currently, representing such semantics in LLVM requires either extending the intermediate form (a signi cant undertaking) or the use of ad hoc indirect means such as encoding them as intrinsics and/or the use of metadata constructs. In this paper we discuss a work in progress to explore the design and implementation of a new compilation stage and associated high-level intermediate form that is placed between the abstract syntax tree and when it is lowered to LLVM's IR. This highlevel representation is a superset of LLVM IR and supports the direct representation of these common parallel computing constructs along with the infrastructure for supporting analysis and transformation passes on this representation.

  18. Adaptive optics imaging of low and intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Márquez, I; Theodore, B; Bremer, M; Monnet, G; Beuzit, J L

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of adaptive-optics imaging in the H and K bands of 12 low and intermediate redshift (z15.0) themselves as reference for the correction, have typical spatial resolution of FWHM~0.3 arcsec before deconvolution. The deconvolved H-band image of PG1700+514 has a spatial resolution of 0.16 arcsec and reveals a wealth of details on the companion and the host-galaxy. Four out of the twelve quasars have close companions and obvious signs of interactions. The two-dimensional images of three of the host-galaxies unambiguously reveal bars and spiral arms. The morphology of the other objects are difficult to determine from one dimensional surface brightness profile and deeper images are needed. Analysis of mocked data shows that elliptical galaxies are always recognized as such, whereas disk hosts can be missed for small disk scale lengths and large QSO contributions.

  19. Recognition of intermediate functionality by acyl carrier protein over a complete cycle of fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płoskoń, Eliza; Arthur, Christopher J; Kanari, Amelia L P; Wattana-amorn, Pakorn; Williams, Christopher; Crosby, John; Simpson, Thomas J; Willis, Christine L; Crump, Matthew P

    2010-07-30

    It remains unclear whether in a bacterial fatty acid synthase (FAS) acyl chain transfer is a programmed or diffusion controlled and random action. Acyl carrier protein (ACP), which delivers all intermediates and interacts with all synthase enzymes, is the key player in this process. High-resolution structures of intermediates covalently bound to an ACP representing each step in fatty acid biosynthesis have been solved by solution NMR. These include hexanoyl-, 3-oxooctanyl-, 3R-hydroxyoctanoyl-, 2-octenoyl-, and octanoyl-ACP from Streptomyces coelicolor FAS. The high-resolution structures reveal that the ACP adopts a unique conformation for each intermediate driven by changes in the internal fatty acid binding pocket. The binding of each intermediate shows conserved structural features that may ensure effective molecular recognition over subsequent rounds of fatty acid biosynthesis. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Deconstruction of Vulnerability to Complex Diseases: Enhanced Effect Sizes and Power of Intermediate Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The deconstruction of vulnerability to complex disease with the help of intermediate phenotypes, including the heritable and disease-associated endophenotypes, is a legacy of Henri Begleiter. Systematic searches for genes influencing complex disorders, including bipolar disorder, have recently been completed using whole genome association (WGA, identifying a series of validated loci. Using this information, it is possible to compare effect sizes of disease loci discovered in very large samples to the effect sizes of replicated functional loci determining intermediate phenotypes that are of essential interest in psychiatric disorders. It is shown that the genes influencing intermediate phenotypes tend to have a larger effect size. Furthermore, the WGA results reveal that the number of loci of large effect size for complex diseases is limited, and yet multiple functional loci have already been identified for intermediate phenotypes relevant to psychiatric diseases, and without the benefit of WGA.

  1. Spin-resolved spectroscopy of the intermediate polar DQ Her

    CERN Document Server

    Bloemen, S; Steeghs, D; Østensen, R H

    2010-01-01

    We present high-speed spectroscopic observations of the intermediate polar DQ Herculis. Doppler tomography of two He I lines reveals a spiral density structure in the accretion disc around the white dwarf primary. The spirals look very similar to the spirals seen in dwarf novae during outburst. DQ Her is the first well established intermediate polar in which spirals are seen, that are in addition likely persistent because of the system's high mass transfer rate. Spiral structures give an alternative explanation for sidebands of the WD spin frequency that are found in IP light curves. The Doppler tomogram of He II 4686 indicates that a large part of the emission is not disc-like. Spin trails of spectra reveal a pulsation in the He II 4686 emission that is believed to result from reprocessing of X-rays from the white dwarf's magnetic poles in the accretion flow close to the WD. We confirm the previous finding that the pulsation is only visible in the red-shifted part of the line when the beam points to the back...

  2. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  3. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Stirpe, G M; Dultzin, D; Del Olmo, A; Martínez-Carballo, M A

    2015-01-01

    [Oiii]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 "blue outliers" -- that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars -- appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate-z sample of 52 sources qualify as blue outliers (i.e., quasars with [OIII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of blue outliers to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  4. Governance-Default Risk Relationship and the Demand for Intermediated and Non-Intermediated Debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam Aldamen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of corporate governance on the demand for intermediated debt (asset finance, bank debt, non-bank private debt and non-intermediated debt (public debt in the Australian debt market. Relative to other countries the Australian debt market is characterised by higher proportions of intermediated or private debt with a lower inherent level of information asymmetry in that private lenders have greater access to financial information (Gray, Koh & Tong 2009. Our firm level, cross-sectional evidence suggests that higher corporate governance impacts demand for debt via the mitigation of default risk. However, this relationship is not uniform across all debt types. Intermediated debt such as bank and asset finance debt are more responsive to changes in governance-default risk relationship than non-bank and non-intermediated debt. The implication is that a firm’s demand for different debt types will reflect its governance-default risk profile.

  5. Comamonas testosteroni uses a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to trigger chemotactic responses towards aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bin; Huang, Zhou; Fan, Zheng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds has been frequently observed; however, knowledge of how bacteria sense aromatic compounds is limited. Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 is able to grow on a range of aromatic compounds. This study investigated the chemotactic responses of CNB-1 to 10 aromatic compounds. We constructed a chemoreceptor-free, non-chemotactic mutant, CNB-1Δ20, by disruption of all 19 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and the atypical chemoreceptor in strain CNB-1. Individual complementation revealed that a putative MCP (tagged MCP2201) was involved in triggering chemotaxis towards all 10 aromatic compounds. The recombinant sensory domain of MCP2201 did not bind to 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, catechol, benzoate, vanillate and gentisate, but bound oxaloacetate, citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate and malate. The mutant CNB-1ΔpmdF that lost the ability to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate also lost its chemotactic response to these compounds, suggesting that taxis towards aromatic compounds is metabolism-dependent. Based on the ligand profile, we proposed that MCP2201 triggers taxis towards aromatic compounds by sensing TCA cycle intermediates. Our hypothesis was further supported by the finding that introduction of the previously characterized pseudomonad chemoreceptor (McpS) for TCA cycle intermediates into CNB-1Δ20 likewise triggered chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds.

  6. A high-resolution record of Southern Ocean intermediate water radiocarbon over the past 30,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Sophia K. V.; Southon, John R.; Adkins, Jess F.

    2015-12-01

    The circulation of intermediate waters plays an important role in global heat and carbon transport in the ocean and changes in their distribution are closely tied to glacial-interglacial climate change. Coupled radiocarbon and U/Th measurements on deep-sea Desmophyllum dianthus corals allow for the reconstruction of past intermediate water ventilation. We present a high-resolution time series of Antarctic Intermediate Water radiocarbon from 44 corals spanning 30 ka through the start of the Holocene, encompassing the transition into the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the last deglaciation. Corals were collected south of Tasmania from water depths between 1430 and 1950 m with 80% of them between 1500 and 1700 m, giving us a continuous record from a narrow depth range. The record shows three distinct periods of circulation: the MIS 3-2 transition, the LGM/Heinrich Stadial 1 (extending from ∼22 to 16 kyr BP), and the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR). The MIS 3-2 transition and the ACR are characterized by abrupt changes in intermediate water radiocarbon while the LGM time period generally follows the atmosphere at a constant offset, in support of the idea that the LGM ocean was at steady state for its 14C distribution. Closer inspection of the LGM time period reveals a 40‰ jump at ∼19 ka from an atmospheric offset of roughly 230‰ to 190‰, coincident with an observed 10-15 m rise in sea level and a southward shift of the Subantarctic and Polar Fronts, an abrupt change not seen in deeper records. During the ACR time period intermediate water radiocarbon is on average less offset from the atmosphere (∼ 110 ‰) and much more variable. This variability has been captured within the lifetimes of three individual corals with changes of up to 35‰ over ∼40 yr, likely caused by the movement of Southern Ocean fronts. This surprising result of relatively young and variable intermediate water radiocarbon during the ACR seems to go against the canonical idea of reduced

  7. A New Brachylophosaurin Hadrosaur (Dinosauria: Ornithischia with an Intermediate Nasal Crest from the Campanian Judith River Formation of Northcentral Montana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Freedman Fowler

    Full Text Available Brachylophosaurini is a clade of hadrosaurine dinosaurs currently known from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous of North America. Its members include: Acristavus gagslarsoni, which lacks a nasal crest; Brachylophosaurus canadensis, which possesses a flat paddle-shaped nasal crest projecting posteriorly over the dorsal skull roof; and Maiasaura peeblesorum, which possesses a dorsally-projecting nasofrontal crest. Acristavus, from the lower Two Medicine Formation of Montana (~81-80 Ma, is hypothesized to be the ancestral member of the clade. Brachylophosaurus specimens are from the middle Oldman Formation of Alberta and equivalent beds in the Judith River Formation of Montana; the upper Oldman Formation is dated 77.8 Ma.A new brachylophosaurin hadrosaur, Probrachylophosaurus bergei (gen. et sp. nov. is described and phylogenetically analyzed based on the skull and postcranium of a large individual from the Judith River Formation of northcentral Montana (79.8-79.5 Ma; the horizon is equivalent to the lower Oldman Formation of Alberta. Cranial morphology of Probrachylophosaurus, most notably the nasal crest, is intermediate between Acristavus and Brachylophosaurus. In Brachylophosaurus, the nasal crest lengthens and flattens ontogenetically, covering the supratemporal fenestrae in large adults. The smaller nasal crest of Probrachylophosaurus is strongly triangular in cross section and only minimally overhangs the supratemporal fenestrae, similar to an ontogenetically earlier stage of Brachylophosaurus. Sutural fusion and tibial osteohistology reveal that the holotype of Probrachylophosaurus was relatively more mature than a similarly large Brachylophosaurus specimen; thus, Probrachylophosaurus is not simply an immature Brachylophosaurus.The small triangular posteriorly oriented nasal crest of Probrachylophosaurus is proposed to represent a transitional nasal morphology between that of a non-crested ancestor such as Acristavus and the large flat

  8. Interactions of short-acting, intermediate-acting and pre-mixed human insulins with free radicals--Comparative EPR examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczyk, Paweł; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Ramos, Paweł; Mencner, Łukasz; Olczyk, Krystyna; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-07-25

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine insulins interactions with free radicals. Human recombinant DNA insulins of three groups were studied: short-acting insulin (Insuman Rapid); intermediate-acting insulins (Humulin N, Insuman Basal), and pre-mixed insulins (Humulin M3, Gensulin M50, Gensulin M40, Gensulin M30). The aim of an X-band (9.3GHz) study was comparative analysis of antioxidative properties of the three groups of human insulins. DPPH was used as a stable free radical model. Amplitudes of EPR lines of DPPH as the paramagnetic free radical reference, and DPPH interacting with the individual tested insulins were compared. For all the examined insulins kinetics of their interactions with free radicals up to 60 min were obtained. The strongest interactions with free radicals were observed for the short-acting insulin - Insuman Rapid. The lowest interactions with free radicals were characteristic for intermediate-acting insulin - Insuman Basal. The pre-mixed insulins i.e. Humulin M3 and Gensulin M50 revealed the fastest interactions with free radicals. The short acting, intermediate acting and premixed insulins have been found to be effective agents in reducing free radical formation in vitro and should be further considered as potential useful tools in attenuation of oxidative stress in diabetic patients.

  9. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  10. The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mawji, Edward; Schlitzer, Reiner; Dodas, Elena Masferrer; Abadie, Cyril; Abouchami, Wafa; Anderson, Robert F.; Baars, Oliver; Bakker, Karel; Baskaran, Mark; Bates, Nicholas R.; Bluhm, Katrin; Bowie, Andrew; Bown, Johann; Boye, Marie; Boyle, Edward A.; Branellec, Pierre; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Bucciarelli, Eva; Buesseler, Ken; Butler, Edward; Cai, Pinghe; Cardinal, Damien; Casciotti, Karen; Chaves, Joaquin; Cheng, Hai; Chever, Fanny; Church, Thomas M.; Colman, Albert S.; Conway, Tim M.; Croot, Peter L.; Cutter, Gregory A.; de Souza, Gregory F.; Dehairs, Frank; Deng, Feifei; Huong Thi Dieu, [Unknown; Dulaquais, Gabriel; Echegoyen-Sanz, Yolanda; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Fahrbach, Eberhard; Fitzsimmons, Jessica; Fleisher, Martin; Frank, Martin; Friedrich, Jana; Fripiat, Francois; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Gamo, Toshitaka; Solsona, Ester Garcia; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Godoy, Jose Marcus; Gonzalez, Santiago; Grossteffan, Emilie; Hatta, Mariko; Hayes, Christopher T.; Heller, Maija Iris; Henderson, Gideon; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Jeandel, Catherine; Jenkins, William J.; John, Seth; Kenna, Timothy C.; Klunder, Maarten; Kretschmer, Sven; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Laan, Patrick; Labatut, Marie; Lacan, Francois; Lam, Phoebe J.; Lannuzel, Delphine; le Moigne, Frederique; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Lu, Yanbin; Masque, Pere; McClain, Charles R.; Measures, Christopher; Middag, Rob; Moffett, James; Navidad, Alicia; Nishioka, Jun; Noble, Abigail; Obata, Hajime; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Owens, Stephanie; Planchon, Frederic; Pradoux, Catherine; Puigcorbe, Viena; Quay, Paul; Radic, Amandine; Rehkaemper, Mark; Remenyi, Tomas; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Rintoul, Stephen; Robinson, Laura F.; Roeske, Tobias; Rosenberg, Mark; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Saito, Mak A.; Roshan, Saeed; Salt, Lesley; Sarthou, Geraldine; Schauer, Ursula; Scott, Peter; Sedwick, Peter N.; Sha, Lijuan; Shiller, Alan M.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Smethie, William; Smith, Geoffrey J.; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Speich, Sabrina; Stichel, Torben; Stutsman, Johnny; Swift, James H.; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Thomas, Alexander; Tsunogai, Urumu; Twining, Benjamin S.; van Aken, Hendrik M.; van Heuven, Steven; van Ooijen, Jan; van Weerlee, Evaline; Venchiarutti, Celia; Voelker, Antje H. L.; Wake, Bronwyn; Warner, Mark J.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Wu, Jingfeng; Wyatt, Neil; Yoshikawa, Hisayuki; Zheng, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Zichen; Zieringer, Moritz; Zimmer, Louise A.; de Baar, Henricus

    2015-01-01

    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014 (IDP2014) is the first publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2013. It consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 200 trace

  11. Intermediate Amharic Cultural Reader. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslau, Wolf

    This reader is intended to provide material for the intermediate-level student of Amharic, as well as to introduce the student to the cultural and social life of Ethiopia. The 39 texts were each prepared by a different student at Haile Selassie I University, thus providing the reader with a variety of language styles. The Amharic texts are…

  12. Bismuth phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Christensen, Erik; Shuai, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Proton conducting electrolyte materials operational in the intermediate temperature range of 200-400 °C are of special interest for applications in fuel cells and water electrolysers. Bismuth phosphates in forms of polycrystalline powders and amorphous glasses are synthesized and investigated...

  13. Modern Persian: Intermediate Level, Vol. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfuhr, Gernot; And Others

    The second of three volumes of an intergrated course in intermediate Persian is presented. This volume encompasses material appropriate for students entering the second year of Persian studies who have strong preparation in elementary Persian. Verbal skills should be on a level which will allow comprehensive discussion of a topic using simple,…

  14. Multiphase Gas in Intermediate Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Charlton, J; Januzzi, B; Churchill, Chris; Mellon, Rick; Charlton, Jane

    2000-01-01

    We present 40 quasar absorption line systems at intermediate redshifts (z~1), with focus on one of the most kinematically complex known, as examples of how the unique capabilities of space-based and ground-based facilities can be combined to glean much broader insights into astrophysical systems.

  15. Intermediality and politics in theatre and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapp, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation applies the concepts of intermediality and politics to five performances by Rimini Protokoll, Christoph Schlingensief, and Igneous, and analyzes the implications that emerge on both a significational and a theoretical level. Based on the specific mediality involved, it argues that

  16. Trusted intermediating agents in electronic trade networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. Klos (Tomas); F. Alkemade (Floortje)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstract Electronic commerce and trading of information goods significantly impact the role of intermediaries: consumers can bypass intermediating agents by forming direct links to producers. One reason that traditional intermediaries can still make a profit, is that they have more knowledge of

  17. Teaching Vocabulary and Morphology in Intermediate Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Anthony; Kramer-Vida, Louisa; Hunt, Carolyn V.

    2015-01-01

    Direct vocabulary instruction of Tier 2 and Tier 3 words in intermediate-grade curricula is an important tool of literacy instruction because English is a language grafted from many roots and has not developed a one-to-one phoneme-grapheme correspondence. In addition to knowing graphemes and phonemes, students must formally learn words that cross…

  18. On financial equilibrium with intermediation costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium correspond...

  19. Essays in corporate finance and financial intermediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters in corporate finance and financial intermediation. The first two chapters explore sources of incentives and learning for finance professionals. Specifically, the first chapter studies how the option to go work for an investment bank affects the incentives of cr

  20. Korean Intermediate Course. Selected Newspaper Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this material is to provide reading matter for the last phase of the Defense Language Institute's extended and intermediate courses in Korean. (See ED 024 943 for the Korean Basic Course, Lesson Units 1-112.) The content of this volume is current, introduces important vocabulary not encountered elsewhere in the courses, and calls…

  1. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  2. Intermediate Tamil: A Self-Instructional Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Harold

    This self-instructional method for learning an intermediate level of Tamil is designed to follow an elementary level such as "Conversational Tamil." The material in this text concentrates on grammatical constructions not covered in that elementary text, particularly negatives of all kinds; in addition, this text uses the same transcription and the…

  3. Changes to the Intermediate Accounting Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lesley H.; Francisco, William H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ever-growing amount of information that must be covered in Intermediate Accounting courses. Due to recent accounting standards and the implementation of IFRS this trend is likely to continue. This report incorporates the results of a recent survey to examine the trend of spending more course time to cover this additional material.…

  4. Synthesis of the key intermediate of ramelteon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Bao Yu; Hao Min Liu; Yu Luo; Wei Lu

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric conjugated addition of allylcopper reagents derived from an allyl Grignard reagent and CuBr·Me2S to chiral α,β-unsaturated N-acyl oxazolidinones has been achieved. The synthetic procedure was applied to the preparation of the key intermediate of the novel nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic drug, ramelteon.

  5. C and C* among intermediate rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Sack; S. Watson

    2013-01-01

    Given a completely regular Hausdorff space X, an intermediate ring A(X) is a ring of real valued continuous functions between C*(X) and C(X). We discuss two correspondences between ideals in A(X) and z-filters on X, both reviewing old results and introducing new results. One correspondence, ZA, exte

  6. C and C* among intermediate rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sack, J.; Watson, S.

    2014-01-01

    Given a completely regular Hausdorff space X, an intermediate ring A(X) is a ring of real valued continuous functions between C*(X) and C(X). We discuss two correspondences between ideals in A(X) and z-filters on X, both reviewing old results and introducing new results. One correspondence, ZA, exte

  7. MNE Entrepreneurial Capabilities at Intermediate Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoenen, Anne K.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Ambos, Björn

    2014-01-01

    and on the heterogeneous information that is generated through dissimilar markets within the region. Our study opens up for an interesting discussion of the independence of these mechanisms. In sum, we contribute to the understanding of the entrepreneurial role of intermediate units in general and RHQs in particular....

  8. Software Testing An ISEB Intermediate Certificate

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Covering testing fundamentals, reviews, testing and risk, test management and test analysis, this book helps newly qualified software testers to learn the skills and techniques to take them to the next level. Written by leading authors in the field, this is the only official textbook of the ISEB Intermediate Certificate in Software Testing.

  9. Intermediates and Generic Convergence to Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freitas, Michael Marcondes de; Wiuf, Carsten; Feliu, Elisenda

    2016-01-01

    Known graphical conditions for the generic or global convergence to equilibria of the dynamical system arising from a reaction network are shown to be invariant under the so-called successive removal of intermediates, a systematic procedure to simplify the network, making the graphical conditions...

  10. Bridge: Intelligent Tutoring with Intermediate Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Research and Development Center and Psychology Department University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA. 15260 The Artificial Intelligence and Psychology...problem never introduces more than one unfamiliar plan. Inteligent Tutoring With Intermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunniigbam 4 You must have a... Inteligent Tutoring With ntermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunningham 7 The requirements are specified at four differcnt levels, corresponding to

  11. Trusted intermediating agents in electronic trade networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klos, T.B.; Alkemade, F.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic commerce and trading of information goods significantly impact the role of intermediaries: consumers can bypass intermediating agents by forming direct links to producers. One reason that traditional intermediaries can still make a profit, is that they have more knowledge of the market, s

  12. 45 CFR 234.130 - Assistance in the form of institutional services in intermediate care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO INDIVIDUALS § 234.130 Assistance... distinct parts. In a facility having distinct parts devoted to skilled nursing home care and intermediate... of care and treatment which a hospital or skilled nursing home (as that term is employed in title XIX...

  13. Ecologia: Spanish Ecology Packet Resource Units and Materials for Intermediate and Advanced Spanish Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mozelle Sawyer; Arribas, E. Jaime

    This Spanish ecology packet contains resource units and materials for intermediate and advanced Spanish classes. It is designed to be used for individual and small-group instruction in the senior high school to supplement the Spanish language curriculum. Included are articles, pictures, and cartoons from Spanish-language newspapers and magazines…

  14. One-pot conversion reactions of glycosyl boranophosphates into glycosyl phosphate derivatives via acyl phosphite intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuki; Wada, Takeshi

    2016-11-29

    A one-pot synthesis of glycosyl phosphates and their P-modified analogs from glycosyl boranophosphates under mild basic conditions has been conducted. (31)P NMR monitoring of the reaction mixture revealed that the key intermediates of these reactions were acyl phosphites, which could not be formed from the corresponding H-phosphonate diesters.

  15. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  16. In vitro insulin refolding: Characterization of the intermediates and the putative folding pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro refolding process of the double-chain insulin was studied based on the investigation of in vitro single-chain insulin refolding. Six major folding intermediates, named P1A, P2B, P3A, P4B, P5B, and P6B, were captured during the folding process. The refolding experiments indicate that all of these intermediates are on-pathway. Based on these intermediates and the formation of hypothetic transients, we propose a two-stage folding pathway of insulin. (1) At the early stage of the folding process, the reduced A chain and B chain individually formed the intermediates: two A chain intermediates (P1A and P3A), and four B chain intermediates (P2B, P4B, P5B, and P6B). (2) In the subsequent folding process, transient Ⅰ was formed from P3A through thiol/disulfide exchange reaction; then, transients Ⅱ and Ⅲ, each containing two native disulfides, were formed through the recognition and interaction of transient Ⅰ with P4B or P6B and the thiol group's oxidation reaction mainly using GSSG as oxidative reagent; finally, transients Ⅱ and Ⅲ, through thiol/mixture disulfide exchange reaction, formed the third native disulfide of insulin to complete the folding.

  17. Genetic variability and identification of the intermediate snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofânia HDA Vidigal

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies based on shell or reproductive organ morphology and genetic considerations suggest extensive intraspecific variation in Biomphalaria snails. The high variability at the morphological and genetic levels, as well as the small size of some specimens and similarities between species complicate the correct identification of these snails. Here we review our work using methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification for analysis of genetic variation and identification of Biomphalaria snails from Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. Arbitrarily primed-PCR revealed that the genome of B. glabrata exihibits a remarkable degree of intraespecific polymorphism. Low stringency-PCR using primers for 18S rRNA permited the identification of B. glabrata, B. tenagophila and B. occidentalis. The study of individuals obtained from geographically distinct populations exhibits significant intraspecific DNA polymorphism, however specimens from the same species, exhibit some species specific LSPs. We also showed that PCR-restriction fragment of length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of Biomphalaria rDNA, using DdeI permits the differentiation of the three intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni. The molecular biological techniques used in our studies are very useful for the generation of new knowledge concerning the systematics and population genetics of Biomphalaria snails.

  18. Evaluation of Transportation Options for Intermediate Non-destructive Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, Susan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hoggard, Gary [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non-destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.” This evaluation includes transportation options for intermediate NDE using the GE 2000 cask, BEA Research Reactor (BRR) package, Dry Transfer Cubicle (DTC) insert, and the General Electric Model 100 (GE 100) cask. The GE 2000 cask is the only Type B shipping container currently in use for shipments of irradiated material (exceeding Type A quantities) from ATR to HFEF; therefore it is included as one of the four shipping options in this evaluation. Cost and schedule estimates are provided for performing neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of a five-capsule drop-in-type ATR experiment for each transportation option. All costs provided in this evaluation are rough order-of-magnitude costs based on input from knowledgeable vendor employees and individuals at INL facilities.

  19. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...... functional ability permanently’. Key words: intermediate care, older people, discharge, interview, phenomenology...

  20. Is TW Pictoris really an intermediate polar?

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, A J

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a long ROSAT HRI observation of the candidate intermediate polar TW Pic. The power spectrum shows no sign of either the previously proposed white dwarf spin period or the proposed binary orbital period (1.996 hr and 6.06 hr respectively). The limits to the X-ray modulation are less than 0.3% in each case. In the absence of a coherent X-ray pulsation, the credentials of TW Pic for membership of the intermediate polar subclass must be suspect. We further suggest that the true orbital period of the binary may be the shorter of the two previously suggested, and that the longer period may represent a quasi-periodic phenomenon associated with the accretion disc.

  1. Folding of apomyoglobin: Analysis of transient intermediate structure during refolding using quick hydrogen deuterium exchange and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Chiaki

    2017-01-01

    The structures of apomyoglobin folding intermediates have been widely analyzed using physical chemistry methods including fluorescence, circular dichroism, small angle X-ray scattering, NMR, mass spectrometry, and rapid mixing. So far, at least two intermediates (on sub-millisecond- and millisecond-scales) have been demonstrated for apomyoglobin folding. The combination of pH-pulse labeling and NMR is a useful tool for analyzing the kinetic intermediates at the atomic level. Its use has revealed that the latter-phase kinetic intermediate of apomyoglobin (6 ms) was composed of helices A, B, G and H, whereas the equilibrium intermediate, called the pH 4 molten-globule intermediate, was composed mainly of helices A, G and H. The improved strategy for the analysis of the kinetic intermediate was developed to include (1) the dimethyl sulfoxide method, (2) data processing with the various labeling times, and (3) a new in-house mixer. Particularly, the rapid mixing revealed that helices A and G were significantly more protected at the earlier stage (400 µs) of the intermediate (former-phase intermediate) than the other helices. Mutation studies, where each hydrophobic residue was replaced with an alanine in helices A, B, E, F, G and H, indicated that both non-native and native-like structures exist in the latter-phase folding intermediate. The N-terminal part of helix B is a weak point in the intermediate, and the docking of helix E residues to the core of the A, B, G and H helices was interrupted by a premature helix B, resulting in the accumulation of the intermediate composed of helices A, B, G and H. The prediction-based protein engineering produced important mutants: Helix F in a P88K/A90L/S92K/A94L mutant folded in the latter-phase intermediate, although helix F in the wild type does not fold even at the native state. Furthermore, in the L11G/W14G/A70L/G73W mutant, helix A did not fold but helix E did, which is similar to what was observed in the kinetic

  2. Emission of intermediate mass fragments during fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; de Souza, R. T.; Cornell, E.; Davin, B.; Hamilton, T. M.; Hulbert, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lou, Y.; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.; Wile, J. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ternary fission in the reaction 4He + 232Th at Elab=200 MeV has been observed. Intermediate mass fragments (IMF: 3fission. The widths of the energy spectra are relatively constant for neck fragments with Z>=4, suggesting little variability in the scission configurations. A linear dependence of on Z is observed for the neck IMFs. The observed trend is compared with a Coulomb trajectory model.

  3. Intermedial Strategies of Memory in Contemporary Novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sara

    2014-01-01

    , and Judd Morrissey and drawing on the theoretical perspectives of N. Katherine Hayles (media studies) and Andreas Huyssen (cultural memory studies), Tanderup argues that recent intermedial novels reflect a certain nostalgia celebrating and remembering the book as a visual and material object in the age...... of digital media while also highlighting the influence of new media on our cultural understanding and representation of memory and the past....

  4. Essays in corporate finance and financial intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters in corporate finance and financial intermediation. The first two chapters explore sources of incentives and learning for finance professionals. Specifically, the first chapter studies how the option to go work for an investment bank affects the incentives of credit rating analysts, and shows that this "revolving door" strengthens analysts' incentives to issue accurate ratings. The second chapter analyzes the value of experience for mutual fund managers a...

  5. International express student's book : pre-intermediate

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Liz

    1996-01-01

    The New Edition of International Express Pre-Intermediate retains all the keys features of this popular and successel four-level course. It combines engaging, up-to-date topics with a time-efficient and student-centred approach to language work, and clearly focused activities that reflect learner's real communicative needs - the ideal course for professional adults who use English for work, travel, and socializing.

  6. Discovery of the intermediate W boson

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Press conference on 25 January 1983 when the announcement was made of the discovery of the intermediate W boson at CERN. From right to left: Carlo Rubbia, spokesman of the UA1 experiment; Simon van der Meer, responsible for developing the stochastic cooling technique; Herwig Schopper, Director- General of CERN; Erwin Gabathuler, Research Director at CERN, and Pierre Darriulat, spokesman of the UA2 experiment, whose results confirmed those from Carlo Rubbia's experiment.

  7. Effects of intermediate load on performance limitations in excitation control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichai Aree

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The stability of excitation control systems is of great concern in power system operations. In this paper, the effects of intermediate load on performance limitation in excitation control are studied. The results reveal that the open-loop characteristic of synchronous machine’s flux linkage can be changed from minimum to non-minimum phase at a high level of intermediate load. This change leads to instability of synchronous machines under manual excitation control. A particular emphasis is also given to investigate the fundamental limitations in excitation control, imposed by non-minimum phases with regard to the open-loop right-half-plane (ORHP pole. The study demonstrates the difficulties of excitation control tuning to achieve the desired performance and robustness under the ORHP pole occurrence. Moreover, this paper shows the conditional stability in excitation control loop, where either an increase or decrease of the exciter gain causes a destabilization of the system’s stability. Frequency response techniques are used for these investigations.

  8. Spectral Mapping of the Intermediate Polar DQ Herculis

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Roberto K; Horne, Keith; Martell, Phillip; 10.1088/0004-6256/139/6/2542

    2010-01-01

    We report an eclipse mapping study of the intermediate polar DQ Her based on time-resolved optical spectroscopy (~3800-5000A) covering 4 eclipses. Eclipse maps of the HeII 4686 line indicate that an azimuthally-and vertically-extended bright spot at disk rim is important source of reprocessing of x-rays from the magnetic poles. The disk spectrum is flat with no Balmer or Helium lines in the inner regions, and shows double-peaked emission lines in the intermediate and outer disk regions while the slope of the continuum becomes progressively redder with increasing radius. The inferred disk temperatures are in the range T~13500-5000K and can be reasonably well described by a steady-state disk with mass accretion rate of dM/dt=(2.7+/-1.0)x10^-9 Msun/yr. A comparison of the radial intensity distribution for the Balmer lines reveals a linear correlation between the slope of the distribution and the transition energy. The spectrum of the uneclipsed light is dominated by Balmer and HeI lines in emission with narrow a...

  9. Element Yields of Intermediate-Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C

    2003-01-01

    Intermediate mass stars occupy the mass range between 0.8-8 solar masses. In this review, evolutionary models of these stars from numerous sources are compared in terms of their input physics and predicted yields. In particular, the results of Renzini & Voli, van den Hoek & Groenewegen, and Marigo are discussed. Generally speaking, it is shown that yields of He-4, C-12, and N-14 decrease with increasing metallicity, reduced mass loss rate, and increased rotation rate. Integrated yields and recently published chemical evolution model studies are used to assess the relative importance of intermediate mass and massive stars in terms of their contributions to universal element buildup. Intermediate mass stars appear to play a major role in the chemical evolution of N-14, a modest role in the case of C-12, and a small role for He-4. Furthermore, the time delay in their release of nuclear products appears to play an important part in explaining the apparent bimodality in the distribution of damped Lyman alp...

  10. Capturing a flavivirus pre-fusion intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Kaufmann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available During cell entry of flaviviruses, low endosomal pH triggers the rearrangement of the viral surface glycoproteins to a fusion-active state that allows the release of the infectious RNA into the cytoplasm. In this work, West Nile virus was complexed with Fab fragments of the neutralizing mAb E16 and was subsequently exposed to low pH, trapping the virions in a pre-fusion intermediate state. The structure of the complex was studied by cryo-electron microscopy and provides the first structural glimpse of a flavivirus fusion intermediate near physiological conditions. A radial expansion of the outer protein layer of the virion was observed compared to the structure at pH 8. The resulting approximately 60 A-wide shell of low density between lipid bilayer and outer protein layer is likely traversed by the stem region of the E glycoprotein. By using antibody fragments, we have captured a structural intermediate of a virus that likely occurs during cell entry. The trapping of structural transition states by antibody fragments will be applicable for other processes in the flavivirus life cycle and delineating other cellular events that involve conformational rearrangements.

  11. Critical kinetic control of non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transformation for efficient perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yaoguang; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Guo, Rui; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Li, Wenzhi; Fan, Zhiyong; Yao, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3+) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition pathways as a function of annealing conditions. The interdiffusion of MAI and DMSO varies strongly with the annealing temperature and time, thus determining the final film composition and morphology. A surprising finding reveals that the best performing cells contain ~18% of the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase, instead of pure phase OTP. The presence of such an intermediate phase enables smooth surface morphology and enhances the charge carrier lifetime. Our results highlight the importance of the intermediate phase growth kinetics that could lead to large-scale production of efficient solution processed perovskite solar cells.Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3+) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition

  12. Biomarkers of intermediate endpoints in environmental and occupational health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Hansen, Ase M

    2007-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in environmental and occupational health is increasing due to increasing demands on information about health risks from unfavourable exposures. Biomarkers provide information about individual loads. Biomarkers of intermediate endpoints benefit in comparison with biomarkers...... of exposure from the fact that they are closer to the adverse outcome in the pathway from exposure to health effects and may provide powerful information for intervention. Some biomarkers are specific, e.g., DNA and protein adducts, while others are unspecific like the cytogenetic biomarkers of chromosomal...... health effect from the result of the measurement has been performed for the cytogenetic biomarkers showing a predictive value of high levels of CA and increased risk of cancer. The use of CA in future studies is, however, limited by the laborious and sensitive procedure of the test and lack of trained...

  13. Emergence and transmission of arbovirus evolutionary intermediates with epidemic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleford, Kenneth A; Coffey, Lark L; Lay, Sreyrath; Bordería, Antonio V; Duong, Veasna; Isakov, Ofer; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Arias-Goeta, Camilo; Blanc, Hervé; Beaucourt, Stéphanie; Haliloğlu, Türkan; Schmitt, Christine; Bonne, Isabelle; Ben-Tal, Nir; Shomron, Noam; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Buchy, Philippe; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2014-06-11

    The high replication and mutation rates of RNA viruses can result in the emergence of new epidemic variants. Thus, the ability to follow host-specific evolutionary trajectories of viruses is essential to predict and prevent epidemics. By studying the spatial and temporal evolution of chikungunya virus during natural transmission between mosquitoes and mammals, we have identified viral evolutionary intermediates prior to emergence. Analysis of virus populations at anatomical barriers revealed that the mosquito midgut and salivary gland pose population bottlenecks. By focusing on virus subpopulations in the saliva of multiple mosquito strains, we recapitulated the emergence of a recent epidemic strain of chikungunya and identified E1 glycoprotein mutations with potential to emerge in the future. These mutations confer fitness advantages in mosquito and mammalian hosts by altering virion stability and fusogenic activity. Thus, virus evolutionary trajectories can be predicted and studied in the short term before new variants displace currently circulating strains.

  14. An absence of fast radio bursts at intermediate galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Johnston, S; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Coster, P; Flynn, C; Keane, E F; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Tiburzi, C; Thornton, D

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. (2013) has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes ($-15^{\\circ}$ $< b <$ 15$^{\\circ}$) in data taken as part of the HTRU survey. No FRBs were discovered in this region. Several effects such as dispersion, scattering, sky temperature and scintillation decrease the sensitivity by more than 3$\\sigma$ in $\\sim$20\\% of survey pointings. Including all of these effects, we exclude the hypothesis that FRBs are uniformly distributed on the sky with 99\\% confidence. This low probability implies that additional factors -- not accounted for by standard Galactic models -- must be included to eas...

  15. MATERIALS SYSTEM FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2004-02-15

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted on symmetrical cells of the type [gas, electrode/LSGM electrolyte/electrode, gas]. The electrode materials were slurry-coated on both sides of the LSGM electrolyte support. The electrodes selected for this investigation are candidate materials for SOFC electrodes. Cathode materials include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM + doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF + LSGM. Pt metal electrodes were also used for the purpose of comparison. Anode material investigated was the Ni + GDC composite. The study revealed important details pertaining to the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrodes. The information obtained can be used to design electrodes for intermediate temperature SOFCs based on LSGM electrolyte.

  16. The folding energy landscape of apoflavodoxin is rugged. hydrogen exchange reveals non-productive misfolded intermediates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, Y.J.M.; Kamphuis, M.B.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Many native proteins occasionally form partially unfolded forms (PUFs), which can be detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and NMR spectroscopy. Knowledge about these metastable states is required to better understand the onset of folding-related diseases. So far, not much is known about where PUF

  17. Mechanical Unfolding of an Autotransporter Passenger Protein Reveals the Secretion Starting Point and Processive Transport Intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, Marian; van Ulsen, Peter; Mouhib, Halima; Shabestari, Maryam Hashemi; Verzijden, Timo; Abeln, Sanne; Roos, Wouter H; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2016-01-01

    The backbone of secreted autotransporter passenger proteins generally attains a stable β-helical structure. The secretion of passengers across the outer membrane was proposed to be driven by sequential folding of this structure at the cell surface. This mechanism would require a relatively-stable in

  18. Revealed preference with limited consideration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demuynck, T.; Seel, C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive revealed preference tests for models where individuals use consideration sets to simplify their consumption problem. Our basic test provides necessary and sufficient conditions for consistency of observed choices with the existence of consideration set restrictions. The same conditions can

  19. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  20. Nitrene Radical Intermediates in Catalytic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Petrus; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Schneider, Sven; de Bruin, Bas

    2017-07-04

    Nitrene radical complexes are reactive intermediates with discrete spin density at the nitrogen-atom of the nitrene moiety. These species have become important intermediates for organic synthesis, being invoked in a broad range of C-H functionalization and aziridination reactions. Nitrene radical complexes have intriguing electronic structures, and are best described as one-electron reduced Fischer-type nitrenes. They can be generated by intramolecular single electron transfer to the 'redox non-innocent' nitrene moiety at the metal. Nitrene radicals generated at open-shell cobalt(II) have thus far received most attention in terms of spectroscopic characterization, reactivity screening, catalytic application and (computational and experimental) mechanistic studies, but some interesting iron and precious metal catalysts have also been employed in related reactions involving nitrene radicals. In some cases, redox-active ligands are used to facilitate intramolecular single electron transfer from the complex to the nitrene moiety. Organic azides are among the most attractive nitrene precursors in this field, typically requiring pre-activated organic azides (e.g. RSO2N3, (RO)2P(=O)N3, ROC(=O)N3 and alike) to achieve efficient and selective catalysis. Challenging, non-activated aliphatic organic azides were recently added to the palette of synthetically useful reactions proceeding via nitrene radical intermediates. This concept article describes the electronic structure of nitrene radical complexes, emphasizes on their usefulness in the catalytic synthesis of various organic products, and highlights the important developments in the field. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  2. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  3. Intermediate filaments: from cell architecture to nanomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Harald; Bär, Harald; Kreplak, Laurent; Strelkov, Sergei V; Aebi, Ueli

    2007-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a major structural element of animal cells. They build two distinct systems, one in the nucleus and one in the cytoplasm. In both cases, their major function is assumed to be that of a mechanical stress absorber and an integrating device for the entire cytoskeleton. In line with this, recent disease mutations in human IF proteins indicate that the nanomechanical properties of cell-type-specific IFs are central to the pathogenesis of diseases as diverse as muscular dystrophy and premature ageing. However, the analysis of these various diseases suggests that IFs also have an important role in cell-type-specific physiological functions.

  4. q-Gamow States for intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Plastino, A; Zamora, D J

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper [Nuc. Phys. A {\\bf 948}, (2016) 19] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit-Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized [Physica A {\\bf 388} (2009) 601] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously "detects" pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq.(3.30)

  5. The intermediate age open cluster NGC 2660

    CERN Document Server

    Sandrelli, S; Tosi, M P; Marconi, G

    1999-01-01

    We present CCD UBVI photometry of the intermediate old open cluster NGC2660, covering from the red giants region to about seven magnitudes below the main sequence turn-off. Using the synthetic Colour - Magnitude Diagram method, we estimate in a self-consistent way values for distance modulus ((m-M)0 ~= 12.2), reddening (E(B-V) ~= 0.40), metallicity ([Fe/H] about solar), and age (age ~ 1 Gyr). A 30% population of binary stars turns out to be probably present.

  6. Photofissility of heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppman, A.; Arruda Neto, J.D.T.; Likhachev, V.P. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Oliveira, E.C. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-10-01

    We use the recently developed MCMC/MCEF (Multi Collisional Monte Carlo plus Monte Carlo for Evaporation-Fission calculations) model to calculate the photo fissility and the photofission cross section at intermediate energies for the {sup 243} Am and for {sup 209} Bi, and compare them to results obtained for other actinides and to available experimental data. As expected, the results for {sup 243} Am are close to those for {sup 237} Np. The fissility for pre actinide nuclei is nearly one order of magnitude lower than that for the actinides. Both fissility and photofission cross section for {sup 209} Bi are in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  7. Observational constraints on dual intermediate inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2014-01-01

    We explore the observational implications of models of intermediate inflation driven by modified dispersion relations, specifically those representing the phenomenon of dimensional reduction in the ultraviolet limit. These models are distinct from the standard ones because they do not require violations of the strong energy condition, and this is reflected in their structure formation properties. We find that they can naturally accommodate deviations from exact scale-invariance. They also make clear predictions for the running of the spectral index and tensor modes, rendering the models straightforwardly falsifiable. We discuss the observational prospects for these models and the implications these may have for quantum gravity scenarios.

  8. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  9. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  10. Opening the Black Box of Intermediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowinska, Agnieszka

    ) and at the interfirm level (between partners and within alliances and associations).The tentative results show that both of these levels are important in defining the intermediating firms' business models and in answering their environmental threats and in building up competitive advantage. The paper ends with a short...... dynamics. This paper draws on qualitative data originating with interviews with industry representatives and can also be regarded as a preliminary approach to a broader project. The analysis distinguishes between relational capital at the intrafirm level (the network among the company's employees...

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis of polymer via bioplatform chemical intermediate derived from Jatropha deoiled seed cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Surendra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on a two-step catalytic process, where deoiled seed cake as a feed was rapidly depolymerized and converted to a chemical intermediate under mild conditions, and a polymer compound was subsequently synthesized in the presence of an initiator under microwave irradiation. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF is a significant chemical intermediate compound synthesized from a deoiled Jatropha seed cake under microwave irradiation in the presence of a heterogeneous acid activated Bentonite catalyst. This compound is suitable for the synthesis of polymers. Our study reveals that the synthesis process is an energy-efficient and cost-effective conversion of the deoiled seed cake into the polymer compound through the bioplatform chemical intermediate. The synthesized material was well characterized, confirming the formation and structures of the prepared catalysts.

  12. Bidirectional Interplay between Vimentin Intermediate Filaments and Contractile Actin Stress Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaming Jiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton and cytoplasmic intermediate filaments contribute to cell migration and morphogenesis, but the interplay between these two central cytoskeletal elements has remained elusive. Here, we find that specific actin stress fiber structures, transverse arcs, interact with vimentin intermediate filaments and promote their retrograde flow. Consequently, myosin-II-containing arcs are important for perinuclear localization of the vimentin network in cells. The vimentin network reciprocally restricts retrograde movement of arcs and hence controls the width of flat lamellum at the leading edge of the cell. Depletion of plectin recapitulates the vimentin organization phenotype of arc-deficient cells without affecting the integrity of vimentin filaments or stress fibers, demonstrating that this cytoskeletal cross-linker is required for productive interactions between vimentin and arcs. Collectively, our results reveal that plectin-mediated interplay between contractile actomyosin arcs and vimentin intermediate filaments controls the localization and dynamics of these two cytoskeletal systems and is consequently important for cell morphogenesis.

  13. Intermediate product selection and blending in the food processing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur A.; Akkerman, Renzo; van Donk, Dirk Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a capacitated intermediate product selection and blending problem typical for two-stage production systems in the food processing industry. The problem involves the selection of a set of intermediates and end-product recipes characterising how those selected intermediates...

  14. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  15. Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hernández

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins This paper studies a simple model of financial intermediation in order to understand how the lending-borrowing spread or interest margin charged by financial intermediaries is determined in equilibrium in a monetary economy. The main conclusion of the paper concerns the effect on the spread of changes in the distribution of monetary innovations. Thus, changes in the monetary-policy-rule followed by the Central Bank which alter the volatility of inflation will have important effects on the interest margin and also on the amount of credit available to investors. A crosssection empirical analysis strongly supports our hypothesis:

  16. Keto-Enol Thermodynamics of Breslow Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathias; Breugst, Martin; Neudörfl, Jörg-Martin; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Berkessel, Albrecht

    2016-04-20

    Breslow intermediates, first postulated in 1958, are pivotal intermediates in carbene-catalyzed umpolung. Attempts to isolate and characterize these fleeting amino enol species first met with success in 2012 when we found that saturated bis-Dipp/Mes imidazolidinylidenes readily form isolable, though reactive diamino enols with aldehydes and enals. In contrast, triazolylidenes, upon stoichiometric reaction with aldehydes, gave exclusively the keto tautomer, and no isolable enol. Herein, we present the synthesis of the "missing" keto tautomers of imidazolidinylidene-derived diamino enols, and computational thermodynamic data for 15 enol-ketone pairs derived from various carbenes/aldehydes. Electron-withdrawing substituents on the aldehyde favor enol formation, the same holds for N,N'-Dipp [2,6-di(2-propyl)phenyl] and N,N'-Mes [2,4,6-trimethylphenyl] substitution on the carbene component. The latter effect rests on stabilization of the diamino enol tautomer by Dipp substitution, and could be attributed to dispersive interaction of the 2-propyl groups with the enol moiety. For three enol-ketone pairs, equilibration of the thermodynamically disfavored tautomer was attempted with acids and bases but could not be effected, indicating kinetic inhibition of proton transfer.

  17. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F. (Argonne National Lab. (USA)); Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)); Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-10-09

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.).

  18. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, R M; Herleth, W H

    1990-01-01

    Several reactors in the United States are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, "ideal" beams of 1, 35, and 1000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive A1, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube.

  19. Multivariate approach to determination of intermediate target of monetary policy strategy in CEE countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pečarić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of Central and East European (CEE countries considering their choice of an intermediate target of the monetary policy strategy. A theoretical choice of the intermediate target of the monetary policy strategy refers to inflation targeting, exchange rate targeting and monetary targeting, with the latter not being a practical choice in these countries. This research tends to find out whether this choice means different economic characteristics considering macroeconomic and financial variables, and whether the choice of an individual intermediate target implies better overall economic performance. Eleven characteristics are classified for 14 chosen CEE countries, using the multivariate and multicriteria approaches. The research was conducted in four years (2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011 in order to see whether performance and ranking of countries change when taking into account the financial crisis. The results show that, when considering all 11 indicators, countries cannot be classified into two equal clusters considering the choice of the intermediate target. However, when clustering is done using foreign currency denominated loans and three forms of central bank independence, results show that countries are clustered according to our expectations, i.e., foreign currency denominated loans and two forms of central bank independence contribute to a difference between countries. Furthermore, countries were ranked considering overall economic performance, but no significant difference considering the choice of the intermediate target was found.

  20. Cryo-EM structures of two bovine adenovirus type 3 intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lingpeng; Huang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xiaomin [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xiong, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luo-jia-shan, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Sun, Wei; Yang, Chongwen; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ying [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Hongrong [College of Physics and Information Science, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Huang, Xiaojun; Ji, Gang; Sun, Fei [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zheng, Congyi, E-mail: cctcc202@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luo-jia-shan, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Zhu, Ping, E-mail: zhup@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Adenoviruses (Ads) infect hosts from all vertebrate species and have been investigated as vaccine vectors. We report here near-atomic structures of two bovine Ad type 3 (BAd3) intermediates obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. A comparison between the two intermediate structures reveals that the differences are localized in the fivefold vertex region, while their facet structures are identical. The overall facet structure of BAd3 exhibits a similar structure to human Ads; however, BAd3 protein IX has a unique conformation. Mass spectrometry and cryo-electron tomography analyses indicate that one intermediate structure represents the stage during DNA encapsidation, whilst the other intermediate structure represents a later stage. These results also suggest that cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during, rather than after, the DNA encapsidation process. Overall, our results provide insights into the mechanism of Ad assembly, and allow the first structural comparison between human and nonhuman Ads at backbone level. - Highlights: • First structure of bovine adenovirus type 3. • Some channels are located at the vertex of intermediate during DNA encapsidation. • Protein IX exhibits a unique conformation of trimeric coiled–coiled structure. • Cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during the DNA encapsidation process.

  1. Columnar structured FePt films epitaxially grown on large lattice mismatched intermediate layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, K. F.; Deng, J. Y.; Peng, Y. G.; Ju, G.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of the FePt films grown on large mismatched ZrN (15.7%) intermediate layer were investigated. With using ZrN intermediate layer, FePt 10 nm films exhibited (001) texture except for some weaker FePt (110) texture. Good epitaxial relationships of FePt (001) //ZrN (001) //TiN (001) among FePt and ZrN/TiN were revealed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. As compared with TiN intermediate layer, although FePt-SiO2-C films grown on ZrN/TiN intermediate layer showed isotropic magnetic properties, the large interfacial energy and lattice mismatch between FePt and ZrN would lead to form columnar structural FePt films with smaller grain size and improved isolation. By doping ZrN into the TiN layer, solid solution of ZrTiN was formed and the lattice constant is increased comparing with TiN and decreased comparing with ZrN. Moreover, FePt-SiO2-C films grown on TiN 2 nm-20 vol.% ZrN/TiN 3 nm intermediate layer showed an improved perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Simultaneously, columnar structure with smaller grain size retained.

  2. Early Events, Kinetic Intermediates and the Mechanism of Protein Folding in Cytochrome c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Kliger

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies of the early events in cytochrome c folding are reviewed with a focus on the evidence for folding intermediates on the submillisecond timescale. Evidence from time-resolved absorption, circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, fluorescence energy and electron transfer, small-angle X-ray scattering and amide hydrogen exchange studies on the t £ 1 ms timescale reveals a picture of cytochrome c folding that starts with the ~ 1-ms conformational diffusion dynamics of the unfolded chains. A fractional population of the unfolded chains collapses on the 1 – 100 ms timescale to a compact intermediate IC containing some native-like secondary structure. Although the existence and nature of IC as a discrete folding intermediate remains controversial, there is extensive high time-resolution kinetic evidence for the rapid formation of IC as a true intermediate, i.e., a metastable state separated from the unfolded state by a discrete free energy barrier. Final folding to the native state takes place on millisecond and longer timescales, depending on the presence of kinetic traps such as heme misligation and proline mis-isomerization. The high folding rates observed in equilibrium molten globule models suggest that IC may be a productive folding intermediate. Whether it is an obligatory step on the pathway to the high free energy barrier associated with millisecond timescale folding to the native state, however, remains to be determined.

  3. Maximum host survival at intermediate parasite infection intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Stjernman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although parasitism has been acknowledged as an important selective force in the evolution of host life histories, studies of fitness effects of parasites in wild populations have yielded mixed results. One reason for this may be that most studies only test for a linear relationship between infection intensity and host fitness. If resistance to parasites is costly, however, fitness may be reduced both for hosts with low infection intensities (cost of resistance and high infection intensities (cost of parasitism, such that individuals with intermediate infection intensities have highest fitness. Under this scenario one would expect a non-linear relationship between infection intensity and fitness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus in southern Sweden, we investigated the relationship between the intensity of infection of its blood parasite (Haemoproteus majoris and host survival to the following winter. Presence and intensity of parasite infections were determined by microscopy and confirmed using PCR of a 480 bp section of the cytochrome-b-gene. While a linear model suggested no relationship between parasite intensity and survival (F = 0.01, p = 0.94, a non-linear model showed a significant negative quadratic effect (quadratic parasite intensity: F = 4.65, p = 0.032; linear parasite intensity F = 4.47, p = 0.035. Visualization using the cubic spline technique showed maximum survival at intermediate parasite intensities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that failing to recognize the potential for a non-linear relationship between parasite infection intensity and host fitness may lead to the potentially erroneous conclusion that the parasite is harmless to its host. Here we show that high parasite intensities indeed reduced survival, but this effect was masked by reduced survival for birds heavily suppressing their parasite intensities. Reduced survival among hosts with low

  4. Intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Tenerife, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Alonso, Aarón; Abreu-Yanes, Estefanía; Feliu, Carlos; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores; Valladares, Basilio; Foronda, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of human angiostrongyliasis, the main clinical manifestation of which is eosinophilic meningitis. Although this parasite has been found recently in its definitive rat host in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), showing a widespread distribution over the north-east part of the island, there are no available data regarding which snail and/or slug species are acting as intermediate hosts on this island. Consequently, the objective of this work was to determine the possible role of three mollusc species, Plutonia lamarckii, Cornu aspersum and Theba pisana, as intermediate hosts of A. cantonensis in Tenerife. Between 2011 and 2014, 233 molluscs were collected from five biotopes where rats had been found previously to harbor either adult worms or antibodies against A. cantonensis, and the identification was carried out on the basis of morphological features and a LAMP technique. The prevalence of A. cantonensis larvae in the mollusc samples, based on morphological identification, was 19.3%, whereas 59 out of the 98 individuals (60.2%) analyzed by LAMP were positive. Positive results were obtained for the three mollusc species analyzed and two of the positive samples, both obtained from P. lamarckii, were confirmed as positive by 18S rRNA and ITS1 PCR. Sequence analysis of 18S rRNA PCR products showed 100% similarity with previously published A. cantonensis sequences. These results may be relevant from a public health point of view, since all the biotopes from which the samples were obtained were in inhabited areas or areas with human activity, but it is also important from the perspective of a possible transmission to other accidental hosts, such as dogs and horses, animals that are present in some of the areas analyzed.

  5. Thinking the individual as form of individuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mateus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will ponder the problem of the individualism through the individuation, pointing out the implications on the idea of “individual”. It attempts to find a theoretical way that allows a broader understanding of its role in human societies It will be suggested that the emphasis placed by modernity in the individual can be evaluated, not as a solipsist individualism, but as a figurational form specific of social contexts characterized by a wide objectivation of the social tissue. That means that beside individualism we can think individualizations through the seminal setting of individuation. This hypothesis is already insinuated in the German sociological thought, in particular, in the sociology of the social forms of Georg Simmel and in the process sociology of Norbert Elias.

  6. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Hallie E.; Ten Brink, Uri; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  7. Intermediate thinnings as a source of energywood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammallahti, K.; Laespae, O.; Nurmi, J. (Finnish Forest Research Inst., Kannus (Finland)), e-mail: kati.sammallahti@metla.fi, e-mail: otto.laspa@metla.fi, e-mail: juha.nurmi@metla.fi

    2010-07-01

    During 2008 and 2009 10 hectares of spruce stand was harvested with an energy wood method and 3,8 hectares with a conventional method. Average DBH was 21 cm, length 19 m and the number of stems per hectare was 674. The harvester productivity was in this study 10 % higher with the conventional method (36,2 m3 / ha) than with the energy wood method (32,6 m3 / ha). The second part of the study consisted baling with a Timberjack 1490D residue baler on an intermediate thinning. In 2008 residues were baled from a total area of 8,7 hectares. Total yield was 218 bales and yield per hectare was 26 bales. Yield per hour was 19,7 bales and the average time consumption per bale was 3,18 minutes. (orig.)

  8. Turned Back: Mad Men as Intermedial Melodrama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rooney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay draws on definitions of gesture (Giorgio Agamben and Peter Brooks and catachresis (Peter Brooks, Jacques Derrida to examine the primacy of non-verbal signifiers as communicators of meaning in AMC’s Mad Men. Beginning with an analysis of Mad Men’s credit sequence, it draws attention to Mad Men’s use of gesture and catachresis in relation to melodrama’s privileging of non-verbal and naturalistic expression and its persistence as an intermedial mode that has moved back and forth between various media (theatre, novel, cinema, television and now digital formats. It argues that Mad Men’s melodramatic aesthetic is one that obliquely, and via a gestural and rhetorical ‘turned back’, communicates its relation to the past and the present.

  9. Simulations of Oligomeric Intermediates in Prion Diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Kulkarni, R V; Slepoy, A; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.; Slepoy, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    We extend our previous stochastic cellular automata based model for areal aggregation of prion proteins on neuronal surfaces. The new anisotropic model allow us to simulate both strong beta-sheet and weaker attachment bonds between proteins. Constraining binding directions allows us to generate aggregate structures with the hexagonal lattice symmetry found in recently observed in vitro experiments. We argue that these constraints on rules may correspond to underlying steric constraints on the aggregation process. We find that monomer dominated growth of the areal aggregate is too slow to account for some observed doubling time-to-incubation time ratios inferred from data, and so consider aggregation dominated by relatively stable but non-infectious oligomeric intermediates. We compare a kinetic theory analysis of oligomeric aggregation to spatially explicit simulations of the process. We find that with suitable rules for misfolding of oligomers, possibly due to water exclusion by the surrounding aggregate, th...

  10. [The intermediate syndrome during organophosphorus pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benslama, A; Moutaouakkil, S; Charra, B; Menebhi, L

    2004-04-01

    Acute intoxication by organophosphate pesticides is frequent in Morocco. We report two cases of malathion poisoning complicated by intermediate syndrome. The purpose of this work is to describe distinctive features of this syndrome, it arises 48-96 h after the cholinergic crisis and it is characterized by respiratory paresis with difficulties of weaning from the assisted respiratory, deficit of proximal limbs, neck flexors, and cranial nerves. This syndrome coincides with the prolonged inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase, and is not due to the necrosis of muscular fiber's necrosis. Both clinical and electromyographic features are explained by a combined pre- and postsynaptic dysfunction of the neuromuscular transmission. The difficulty of this syndrome lies in its rarity and also its severity, because of the respiratory failure, which justifies medical supervision in intensive care unit, for at least 96 h, in expectation for the respiratory distress, all the more cholinergic syndrome is intense.

  11. Intermediate state trapping of a voltage sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Maragliano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) regulate ion channels and enzymes by undergoing conformational changes depending on membrane electrical signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying the VSD transitions are not fully understood. Here, we show that some mutations of I241 in the S1 segment of the Shaker...... Kv channel positively shift the voltage dependence of the VSD movement and alter the functional coupling between VSD and pore domains. Among the I241 mutants, I241W immobilized the VSD movement during activation and deactivation, approximately halfway between the resting and active states......, and drastically shifted the voltage activation of the ionic conductance. This phenotype, which is consistent with a stabilization of an intermediate VSD conformation by the I241W mutation, was diminished by the charge-conserving R2K mutation but not by the charge-neutralizing R2Q mutation. Interestingly, most...

  12. Intermediate Care Unit - defining substituyable admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Hanne; Ekmann, Anette Addy

    Background: Elderly patients have excess risk of functional decline and development of delirium. Studies have shown that 14-27 % of hospitalizations among elderly patients are substitutable. To lower the risk of unwanted consequences of hospitalizations, we implemented an Intermediate Care Unit...... (TUE). TUE was established in collaboration between Bispebjerg Hospital and the City of Copenhagen and took in patients whose hospitalization was regarded as substitutable. TUE offered a quick diagnostic assessment by a cross sectoral team of hospital doctors and community nurses. Home care was offered...... Care Unit.' Methods: From September 17, 2012 - June 24, 2014, 969 patients were treated at TUE. We registered both demographic-, treatment- and medical data and furthermore functional related variables. We used logistic regression to test the association between a combined graded variable of EWS...

  13. q-Gamow states for intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastino, A. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Rocca, M.C., E-mail: mariocarlosrocca@gmail.com [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ferri, G.L. [Fac. de C. Exactas, National University La Pampa, Peru y Uruguay, Santa Rosa, La Pampa (Argentina); Zamora, D.J. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    In a recent paper Plastino and Rocca (2016) [18] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit–Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized Vignat and Plastino (2009) [2] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously “detects” pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq. (3.4).

  14. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Vardaci; A Di Nitto; P N Nadtochy; A Brondi; G La Rana; R Moro; M Cinausero; G Prete; N Gelli; E M Kozulin; G N Knyazheva; I M Itkis

    2015-08-01

    A 4 light charged particle spectrometer, called 8 LP, is in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, for studying reaction mechanisms in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Besides about 300 telescopes to detect light charged particles, the spectrometer is also equipped with an anular PPAC system to detect evaporation residues and a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer to detect fission fragments. The spectrometer has been used in several fission dynamics studies using as a probe light charged particles in the fission and evaporation residues (ER) channels. This paper proposes a journey within some open questions about the fission dynamics and a review of the main results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular, the advantages of using systems of intermediate fissility will be discussed.

  15. On the Intermediate Line Region in AGNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tek P. Adhikari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the intermediate line region (ILR by using the photoionisation simulations of the gas clouds present at different radial distances from the center, corresponding to the locations from BLR out to NLR in four types of AGNs. We let for the presence of dust whenever conditions allow for dust existence. All spectral shapes are taken from the recent multi-wavelength campaigns. The cloud density decreases with distance as a power law. We found that the slope of the power law density profile does not affect the line emissivity radial profiles of major emission lines: Hβ, He II, Mg II, C III, and O III. When the density of the cloud at the sublimation radius is as high as 1011.5 cm−3, the ILR should clearly be seen in the observations independently of the shape of the illuminating radiation. Moreover, our result is valid for low ionization nuclear emission regions of active galaxies.

  16. [Intermediate care units and noninvasive ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heinrich F; Schönhofer, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate care units (IMC) have been introduced to provide optimal patient management according to disease severity and to bridge the gap between intensive care (ICU) and general wards. Most patients that are referred to an IMC need monitoring and intensive analgetic treatment. Over the past years noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and weaning have emerged as important new forms of active treatment in the IMC. Most studies that have been published so far demonstrate that an IMC improves patient outcome and lowers costs, although randomized controlled trials are missing. NIV reduces mortality, the need for intubation as well as ICU and hospital length of stay in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other disorders that cause respiratory failure. In many cases NIV can be performed in the IMC, a fact that reduces the number of ICU admissions, lowers costs and improves patient care. The high prevalence of pulmonary diseases and NIV emphasizes the importance of pneumologists as directors of both ICU and IMC.

  17. Precalibrating an intermediate complexity climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Neil R. [The Open University, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom); Cameron, David [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Rougier, Jonathan [University of Bristol, Department of Mathematics, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Credible climate predictions require a rational quantification of uncertainty, but full Bayesian calibration requires detailed estimates of prior probability distributions and covariances, which are difficult to obtain in practice. We describe a simplified procedure, termed precalibration, which provides an approximate quantification of uncertainty in climate prediction, and requires only that uncontroversially implausible values of certain inputs and outputs are identified. The method is applied to intermediate-complexity model simulations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and confirms the existence of a cliff-edge catastrophe in freshwater-forcing input space. When uncertainty in 14 further parameters is taken into account, an implausible, AMOC-off, region remains as a robust feature of the model dynamics, but its location is found to depend strongly on values of the other parameters. (orig.)

  18. A traditional intermediate moisture meat: Beef cecina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cano, R; Dorantes-Alvarez, L; Hernandez-Sanchez, H; Gutierrez-Lopez, G F

    1994-01-01

    Cecina is an intermediate moisture meat produced and consumed to a large extent in Mexico. Four samples of cecina coming from different States of this country, were tested for water activity, colour, texture, fat, protein, moisture and chloride content. Sensory and microbiological analyses were also performed. Different fabrication methods for producing cecina were identified, involving large variations in the formulation of the product. There was a significant difference (P < 0·05) among samples regarding fat and chloride content, colour and texture. Differences in colour and saltiness were recorded through sensory analysis. Microbiological analysis showed higher counts than those recommended in the Mexican Official Standard for chopped and raw meat, due to poor sanitary conditions during production and marketing.

  19. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  20. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  1. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of

  2. Covalent functionalization of graphene with reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyeung; Yan, Mingdi

    2013-01-15

    Graphene, a material made exclusively of sp(2) carbon atoms with its π electrons delocalized over the entire 2D network, is somewhat chemically inert. Covalent functionalization can enhance graphene's properties including opening its band gap, tuning conductivity, and improving solubility and stability. Covalent functionalization of pristine graphene typically requires reactive species that can form covalent adducts with the sp(2) carbon structures in graphene. In this Account, we describe graphene functionalization reactions using reactive intermediates of radicals, nitrenes, carbenes, and arynes. These reactive species covalently modify graphene through free radical addition, CH insertion, or cycloaddition reactions. Free radical additions are among the most common reaction, and these radicals can be generated from diazonium salts and benzoyl peroxide. Electron transfer from graphene to aryl diazonium ion or photoactivation of benzoyl peroxide yields aryl radicals that subsequently add to graphene to form covalent adducts. Nitrenes, electron-deficient species generated by thermal or photochemical activation of organic azides, can functionalize graphene very efficiently. Because perfluorophenyl nitrenes show enhanced bimolecular reactions compared with alkyl or phenyl nitrenes, perfluorophenyl azides are especially effective. Carbenes are used less frequently than nitrenes, but they undergo CH insertion and C═C cycloaddition reactions with graphene. In addition, arynes can serve as a dienophile in a Diels-Alder type reaction with graphene. Further study is needed to understand and exploit the chemistry of graphene. The generation of highly reactive intermediates in these reactions leads to side products that complicate the product composition and analysis. Fundamental questions remain about the reactivity and regioselectivity of graphene. The differences in the basal plane and the undercoordinated edges of graphene and the zigzag versus arm-chair configurations

  3. Effect of intermediate ceramics and firing temperature on bond strength between tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Yoshinari, Masao; Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of the intermediate ceramics and firing temperature on bond strength between tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) and its intermediate ceramics. Two types of intermediate ceramics, defined as a ceramics placed between the TZP and its veneering ceramics, were used; one including high-strength lithium-disilicate (EP) or feldspathic liner porcelain (SB). The firing temperature of the intermediate ceramics was set at 930°C, 945°C or 960°C. Shear bond strength showed values of 35.8 MPa in SB and 54.9 MPa in EP at a firing temperature of 960°C. Electron probe microanalysis revealed that components of the intermediate ceramics remained on the TZP surface after debonding, indicating that fractures occurred in the intermediate ceramics near the TZP. These results indicate that the bond strength between and a TZP framework and its veneering ceramics could be improved by using a high-strength intermediate ceramics and a comparatively high firing temperature.

  4. Enantioselective degradation and unidirectional chiral inversion of 2-phenylbutyric acid, an intermediate from linear alkylbenzene, by Xanthobacter flavus PA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yishan; Han, Ping [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Li, Xiao-yan; Shih, Kaimin [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hk [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); The Swire Institute of Marine Science, The University of Hong Kong, Shek O, Cape d' Aguilar, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} We isolated a Xanthobacter flavus strain PA1 utilizing the racemic 2-PBA and the single enantiomers as the sole source of carbon and energy. {yields} Both (R) and (S) forms of enantiomers can be degraded in a sequential manner in which the (S) disappeared before the (R) form. {yields} The biochemical degradation pathway involves an initial oxidation of the alkyl side chain before aromatic ring cleavage. - Abstract: Microbial degradation of the chiral 2-phenylbutyric acid (2-PBA), a metabolite of surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), was investigated using both racemic and enantiomer-pure compounds together with quantitative stereoselective analyses. A pure culture of bacteria, identified as Xanthobacter flavus strain PA1 isolated from the mangrove sediment of Hong Kong Mai Po Nature Reserve, was able to utilize the racemic 2-PBA as well as the single enantiomers as the sole source of carbon and energy. In the presence of the racemic compounds, X. flavus PA1 degraded both (R) and (S) forms of enantiomers to completion in a sequential manner in which the (S) enantiomer disappeared much faster than the (R) enantiomer. When the single pure enantiomer was supplied as the sole substrate, a unidirectional chiral inversion involving (S) enantiomer to (R) enantiomer was evident. No major difference was observed in the degradation intermediates with either of the individual enantiomers when used as the growth substrate. Two major degradation intermediates were detected and identified as 3-hydroxy-2-phenylbutanoic acid and 4-methyl-3-phenyloxetan-2-one, using a combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The biochemical degradation pathway follows an initial oxidation of the alkyl side chain before aromatic ring cleavage. This study reveals new evidence for enantiomeric inversion catalyzed by pure culture of environmental bacteria and emphasizes the

  5. Identification and characterization of the intermediate phase in hybrid organic-inorganic MAPbI3 perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; McCleese, Christopher; Kolodziej, Charles; Samia, Anna C S; Zhao, Yixin; Burda, Clemens

    2016-03-07

    Perovskite films were prepared using single step solution deposition at different annealing temperatures and annealing times. The crystal structure, phases and grain size were investigated with XRD, XPS and SEM/EDX. The prepared films show a typical orientation of tetragonal perovskite phase and a gradual transition at room temperature from the yellow intermediate phase to the black perovskite phase. Films with high purity were obtained by sintering at 100 °C. In addition, the chemical composition and crystal structure of intermediate phase were investigated in detail. FTIR, UV-vis and NMR spectra revealed the occurance of DMF complexes. Interestingly, the intermediate phase could be transformed to the black perovskite phase upon X-ray irradiation. In addition, the recovery of the aged perovskite films from a yellow intermediate phase back to the black perovskite was shown to be viable via heating and X-ray irradiation.

  6. Topological Hysteresis in the Intermediate State of Type-I Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Prozorov, Ruslan; Giannetta, Russell W.; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Perkins, Garry K.

    2004-01-01

    Magneto-optical imaging of thick stress-free lead samples reveals two distinct topologies of the intermediate state. Flux tubes are formed upon magnetic field penetration (closed topology) and laminar patterns appear upon flux exit (open topology). Two-dimensional distributions of shielding currents were obtained by applying an efficient inversion scheme. Quantitative analysis of the magnetic induction distribution and correlation with magnetization measurements indicate that observed topolog...

  7. An all-sky sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Alexander, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Kerton, Charles R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Arvidsson, Kim [Trull School of Sciences and Mathematics, Schreiner University, 2100 Memorial Boulevard, Kerrville, TX 78028 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We present an all-sky sample of 984 candidate intermediate-mass Galactic star-forming regions that are color selected from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog and morphologically classify each object using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) images. Of the 984 candidates, 616 are probable star-forming regions (62.6%), 128 are filamentary structures (13.0%), 39 are point-like objects of unknown nature (4.0%), and 201 are galaxies (20.4%). We conduct a study of four of these regions, IRAS 00259+5625, IRAS 00420+5530, IRAS 01080+5717, and IRAS 05380+2020, at Galactic latitudes |b| > 5° using optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory, along with near-infrared photometry from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, to investigate their stellar content. New optical spectra, color-magnitude diagrams, and color-color diagrams reveal their extinctions, spectrophotometric distances, and the presence of small stellar clusters containing 20-78 M {sub ☉} of stars. These low-mass diffuse star clusters contain ∼65-250 stars for a typical initial mass function, including one or more mid-B stars as their most massive constituents. Using infrared spectral energy distributions we identify young stellar objects near each region and assign probable masses and evolutionary stages to the protostars. The total infrared luminosity lies in the range 190-960 L {sub ☉}, consistent with the sum of the luminosities of the individually identified young stellar objects.

  8. Efficient short step synthesis of Corey's tamiflu intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipassa, Nsiama Tienabe; Okamura, Hiroaki; Kina, Kengo; Hamada, Toshiyuki; Iwagawa, Tetsuo

    2008-03-01

    Corey's tamiflu intermediate was synthesized from a bicyclolactam adduct obtained by base-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of N-nosyl-3-hydroxy-2-pyridone with ethyl acrylate. A compound that has the same array of functional groups with the Corey's intermediate was obtained in four steps from the DA adduct in 47% overall yield. The intermediate itself was also prepared efficiently by simply changing the protective group.

  9. Structure Characterization of the Folding Intermediates of Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Although the native state and the fully unfolded state of proteins have been extensively studied, the folding pathway and intermediates in the protein folding process have not been thoroughly investigated.To understand the mechanisms of protein folding, the early intermediates in the protein folding process must be clearly characterized.The present paper is a mini review containing 20 references involving studies on folding intermediates of several proteins.

  10. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  11. Community and Individuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How should lecturers teaching postgraduate creative writing in an online master of arts build and maintain e-community to support and socialize learners? The study proposes that such programs need to attend to writers’ investments in developing identities while promoting socialization and sense of belonging. Grounded in literature on communities of practice, imagined community, and identity, the study draws on social constructivist and poststructuralist insights and contributes to the relatively unexplored area of pedagogy for teaching writing online. The study uses qualitative descriptive analysis to narrate themes from two datasets in the form of a métissage. Data from lecturer-e-moderators and students indicate that strategic e-moderation encourages collaboration and maximizes pedagogical potential in forums. Strategic e-moderation builds a sense of community by fostering critical friendships. The study emphasizes the need for e-moderators to develop participants’ investments in working in communities. The study reveals that although postgraduate writing students come to value learning via critical friendships and communities, they also demand particularized feedback from e-moderators and peers. Findings suggest that students need to develop writing identities and voices can be met by a pedagogical approach that harnesses the potential of community while offering response to individual development. The study concludes that pedagogies of community in teaching writing online need to benefit both collectively and individually. This works when writers apply discipline-specific literacies and professional skills in critiquing peer texts, while responding to feedback from their community of practice, facilitated by e-moderators.

  12. Intergalactic stellar populations in intermediate redshift clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Melnick, J; Toledo, I; Selman, F J; Quintana, H

    2012-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the total stellar mass in rich clusters of galaxies resides in a diffuse intergalactic component usually referred to as the Intra-Cluster Light (ICL). Theoretical models indicate that these intergalactic stars originate mostly from the tidal interaction of the cluster galaxies during the assembly history of the cluster, and that a significant fraction of these stars could have formed in-situ from the late infall of cold metal-poor gas clouds onto the cluster. The models make predictions about the age distribution of the ICL stars, which may provide additional observational constraints. However, these models also over-predict the fraction of stellar mass in the ICL by a substantial margin. Here we present population synthesis models for the ICL of a dumb-bell dominated intermediate redshift (z=0.29) X-ray cluster for which we have deep MOS data obtained with the FORS2 instrument. In a previous paper we have proposed that the dumbell galaxy act as a grinding machine tearing to pieces t...

  13. La escritura intermedial en la escena actual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Thenon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Las escrituras artísticas actuales integran, en el marco determinado por las realidades intermediales de la escena tecnológica, el concepto de diseño como manipulación perceptiva del espacio, lo que constituye uno de los instrumentos determinantes en la puesta en marcha de un cuadro compositivo de resonancias transformacionales. Podríamos en este sentido hablar de una nueva ecología artística y en especial, teatral. En la renovación del pensamiento teatral actualizado, fuertemente influenciado por la estructura discursiva cinematográfica y por los universos sensoriales de la cultura tecnológica de la imagen y del sonido, está la base de la multiplicación diegética, de la superposición, de la fragmentación de los discursos y de la praxis inter-relacional en la que radica, en gran medida, la potencia intermedial de la escena actual.

  14. Corrosion inhibitors for intermediate cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, I.; Suhr, L.

    1985-04-01

    The selected inhibitors were tested for heat and radiation stability and corrosion protection on the bench scale. Based on the results from these tests two of the products were selected, Bycoguard 81 and Bycoguard MP4S for continuing corrosion tests in an autoclave loop at 90 degrees C and 120 degrees C. Oxygen saturated deionized water with an addition of 1 ppm chloride was recirculated in the loop. Samples of copper and carbon steel were exposed to the water in the autoclave for periods up to 10 weeks. The purpose of this project was to find a substitute for hydrazine and chromates. Besides good corrosion protection qualities the toxic and environmental effect of the inhibitors should be minimal. The investigation has shown that the copper inhibitor BTA (benzotriazole) loses its corrosion protection qualities at a water temperature of 120 degrees C. The protection effects at 90 degrees C were satisfactory for both of the materials. The corrosion rates measured were 0.01 mm/y or less for the copper and carbon steel samples. The environment in the autoclave during the testing was more corrosive than is to be found in intermediate cooling systems. Due to the low corrosion rates measured the two inhibitors are to be recommended as alternatives to hydrazine and chromates.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of metazoan intermediate filament proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erber, A; Riemer, D; Bovenschulte, M; Weber, K

    1998-12-01

    We have cloned cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins from a large number of invertebrate phyla using cDNA probes, the monoclonal antibody IFA, peptide sequence information, and various RT-PCR procedures. Novel IF protein sequences reported here include the urochordata and nine protostomic phyla, i.e., Annelida, Brachiopoda, Chaetognatha, Echiura, Nematomorpha, Nemertea, Platyhelminthes, Phoronida, and Sipuncula. Taken together with the wealth of data on IF proteins of vertebrates and the results on IF proteins of Cephalochordata, Mollusca, Annelida, and Nematoda, two IF prototypes emerge. The L-type, which includes 35 sequences from 11 protostomic phyla, shares with the nuclear lamins the long version of the coil 1b subdomain and, in most cases, a homology segment of some 120 residues in the carboxyterminal tail domain. The S-type, which includes all four subfamilies (types I to IV) of vertebrate IF proteins, lacks 42 residues in the coil 1b subdomain and the carboxyterminal lamin homology segment. Since IF proteins from all three phyla of the chordates have the 42-residue deletion, this deletion arose in a progenitor prior to the divergence of the chordates into the urochordate, cephalochordate, and vertebrate lineages, possibly already at the origin of the deuterostomic branch. Four phyla recently placed into the protostomia on grounds of their 18S rDNA sequences (Brachiopoda, Nemertea, Phoronida, and Platyhelminthes) show IF proteins of the L-type and fit by sequence identity criteria into the lophotrochozoic branch of the protostomia.

  16. Fluorine production in intermediate-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mowlavi, N; Arnould, M

    1996-01-01

    The 19F production during the first dozen thermal pulses of AGB stars with (M=3,Z=0.02), (M=6,Z=0.02) and (M=3,Z=0.001) is investigated on grounds of detailed stellar models and of revised rates for 15N(a,g)19F and 18O(a,g)22Ne. These calculations confirm an early expectation that 19F {\\it is} produced in AGB thermal pulses. They also enlarge substantially these previous results by showing that the variations of the level of 19F production during the evolution is very sensitive to the maximum temperature reached at the base of the pulse. These variations are analyzed in detail, and are shown to result from a subtle balance between different nuclear effects (mainly 19F production or destruction in a pulse, and 15N synthesis during the interpulse), possibly super-imposed on dilution effects in more or less extended pulse convective tongues. Our calculations, as most others, do not predict the third dredge-up self- consistently. When parametrized, it appears that our models of intermediate-mass AGB stars are abl...

  17. Individuality and epigenetics in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campión, J; Milagro, F I; Martínez, J A

    2009-07-01

    Excessive weight gain arises from the interactions among environmental factors, genetic predisposition and the individual behavior. However, it is becoming evident that interindividual differences in obesity susceptibility depend also on epigenetic factors. Epigenetics studies the heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve changes to the underlying DNA sequence. These processes include DNA methylation, covalent histone modifications, chromatin folding and, more recently described, the regulatory action of miRNAs and polycomb group complexes. In this review, we focus on experimental evidences concerning dietary factors influencing obesity development by epigenetic mechanisms, reporting treatment doses and durations. Moreover, we present a bioinformatic analysis of promoter regions for the search of future epigenetic biomarkers of obesity, including methylation pattern analyses of several obesity-related genes (epiobesigenes), such as FGF2, PTEN, CDKN1A and ESR1, implicated in adipogenesis, SOCS1/SOCS3, in inflammation, and COX7A1 LPL, CAV1, and IGFBP3, in intermediate metabolism and insulin signalling. The identification of those individuals that at an early age could present changes in the methylation profiles of specific genes could help to predict their susceptibility to later develop obesity, which may allow to prevent and follow-up its progress, as well as to research and develop newer therapeutic approaches.

  18. Intermediate- and High-Velocity Ionized Gas toward zeta Orionis

    CERN Document Server

    Welty, D E; Raymond, J C; Mallouris, C; York, D G

    2002-01-01

    We combine UV spectra obtained with the HST/GHRS echelle, IMAPS, and Copernicus to study the abundances and physical conditions in the predominantly ionized gas seen at high (-105 to -65 km/s) and intermediate velocities (-60 to -10 km/s) toward zeta Ori. We have high resolution (FWHM ~ 3.3-4.5 km/s) and/or high S/N spectra for at least two significant ions of C, N, Al, Si, S, and Fe -- enabling accurate estimates for both the total N(H II) and the elemental depletions. C, N, and S have essentially solar relative abundances; Al, Si, and Fe appear to be depleted by about 0.8, 0.3-0.4, and 0.95 dex, respectively. While various ion ratios would be consistent with collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) for T ~ 25,000-80,000 K, the widths of individual high-velocity absorption components indicate that T ~ 9000 K -- so the gas is not in CIE. Analysis of the C II fine-structure excitation equilibrium yields estimated densities (n_e ~ n_H ~ 0.1-0.2 cm^{-3}), thermal pressures (2 n_H T ~ 2000-4000 cm^{-3}K), and thi...

  19. Tandem photovoltaic cells with a composite intermediate layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travkin, V. V., E-mail: trav@ipmras.ru; Pakhomov, G. L.; Luk’anov, A. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Stuzhin, P. A. [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    We have fabricated and tested tandem photovoltaic cells containing series-connected subcells of the “oxide–organic semiconductor–metal” type. The organic semiconductors were two phthalocyanine dyes (SubPc and PcVO); Al or Ag:Mg were used as capping metallic electrodes. A semitransparent composite metal–oxide layer formed by molybdenum oxide MoO{sub x} deposited over an ultrathin Al layer is used to join the subcells. Additionally, a MoO{sub x} layer deposited onto glass/ITO substrates serves as an anode buffer in the front subcell, and LiF deposited onto the dye layers serves as a cathode buffer in the front or rear subcells. Upon optimization of the thickness and composition of the intermediate layer, the open circuit voltage U{sub oc} amounts to 1.6 V reflecting total summation of the contributions from the each of the subcells at a wide spectral coating from 300–1000 nm. The fill factor in the tandem cell is not worse than in individually made single cells with the same scheme or in disconnected subcells.

  20. Intrapopulational distribution of Meiogymnophallus minutus (Digenea, Gymnophallidae) infections in its first and second intermediate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermer, Jan; Culloty, Sarah C; Kelly, Thomas C; O'Riordan, Ruth M

    2009-10-01

    Host size and age are generally assumed to play a pivotal role in digenean trematode infection patterns, accounting for much of the variation found within intermediate host populations. However, knowledge is based on a limited number of studied host-parasite systems. We investigated the shell length class distribution of Meiogymnophallus minutus infections within populations of the first intermediate host Scrobicularia plana and second intermediate host Cerastoderma edule. Infections occurred very early in the life of the two intermediate hosts. Both prevalence and intensity of infections increased with host shell length and displayed extremely high values amongst large individuals. Whilst metacercarial infection patterns in juvenile C. edule could be best explained by differences in host shell length, in adult cockles, the effect of host age on infection levels prevailed. The microsporidian hyperparasite Unikaryon legeri, occurring in the metacercarial stage of M. minutus, was particularly abundant in aged cockles, strongly influencing infection patterns of the gymnophallid. Our results are consistent with the intrapopulational distribution reported from other digenean trematode parasites. The relative influence of both host size and age and the underlying mechanisms as well as the impact of hyperparasitism on M. minutus infection patterns are discussed.

  1. Modulation of desmin intermediate filament assembly by a monoclonal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    We have used a monoclonal antibody against desmin to examine the assembly of intermediate filaments (IF) from their building blocks, the tetrameric protofilaments. The antibody, designated D76, does not cross react with any other IF proteins (Danto, S.I., and D.A. Fischman. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 98:2179-2191). It binds to a region amino-terminal to cys- 324 of avian desmin that is resistant to chymotrypsin and trypsin digestion, and in the electron microscope appears to bind to the ends of tetrameric protofilaments. In combination, these findings suggest that the epitope of the antibody resides at the amino-terminal end of the alpha-helical rod domain. Preincubation of desmin protofilaments with an excess of D76 antibodies blocks their subsequent assembly into IF. In the presence of sub-stoichiometric amounts of antibodies, IF are assembled from protofilaments but they are morphologically aberrant in that (a) they are capped by IgG molecules at one or both ends; (b) they are unraveled to varying degree, revealing a characteristic right- handed helical arrangement of sub-filamentous strands of different diameters. The antibody binds only to the ends but not along the length of desmin IF. The most straightforward explanation for this is that the epitope resides in a part of the desmin molecule that becomes buried within the core of the filament upon polymerization and is therefore inaccessible to the antibody. PMID:2450097

  2. Statistical and dynamical aspects of intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghetti, R.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of intermediate energy heavy ion reactions have revealed that the probability of emitting n-fragments is reducible to the probability of emitting a single fragment through the binomial distribution. The resulting one-fragment probability shows a dependence on the thermal energy that is characteristic of statistical decay. Similarly, the charge distributions associated with n-fragment emission are reducible to the one-fragment charge distribution, and thermal scaling is observed. The reducibility equation for the n-fragment charge distribution contains a quantity with a value that starts from zero, at low transverse energies, and saturates at high transverse energies. This evolution may signal a transition from a coexistence phase to a vapour phase. In the search for a signal of liquid-gas phase transition, the appearance of intermittency is reconsidered. Percolation calculations, as well as data analysis, indicate that an intermittent-like signal appears from classes of events that do not coincide with the critical one. 232 refs.

  3. A Catalog of Intermediate-luminosity X-ray Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, E

    2002-01-01

    ROSAT, and now Chandra, X-ray images allow studies of extranuclear X-ray point sources in galaxies other than our own. X-ray observations of normal galaxies with ROSAT and Chandra have revealed that off-nuclear, compact, Intermediate-luminosity (Lx 2-10 keV >= 1e39 erg/s) X-ray Objects (IXOs, a.k.a. ULXs) are quite common. Here we present a catalog and finding charts for 87 IXOs in 54 galaxies, derived from all of the ROSAT HRI imaging data for galaxies with cz <= 5000 km/s from the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies (RC3). We have defined the cutoff Lx for IXOs so that it is well above the Eddington luminosity of a 1.4 Msol black hole (10^{38.3} erg/s), so as not to confuse IXOs with ``normal'' black hole X-ray binaries. This catalog is intended to provide a baseline for follow-up work with Chandra, and with space- and ground-based survey work at wavelengths other than X-ray. We demonstrate that elliptical galaxies with IXOs have a larger number of IXOs per galaxy than non-elliptical galaxies with...

  4. Two-Step Amyloid Aggregation: Sequential Lag Phase Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Fabio; Paredes, Jose M.; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Martin, Miguel; Roldan, Mar; Casares, Salvador; Orte, Angel

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into fibrillar structures called amyloid fibrils underlies the onset and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. However, the molecular basis and mechanism of amyloid aggregation are not completely understood. For many amyloidogenic proteins, certain oligomeric intermediates that form in the early aggregation phase appear to be the principal cause of cellular toxicity. Recent computational studies have suggested the importance of nonspecific interactions for the initiation of the oligomerization process prior to the structural conversion steps and template seeding, particularly at low protein concentrations. Here, using advanced single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of a model SH3 domain, we obtained direct evidence that nonspecific aggregates are required in a two-step nucleation mechanism of amyloid aggregation. We identified three different oligomeric types according to their sizes and compactness and performed a full mechanistic study that revealed a mandatory rate-limiting conformational conversion step. We also identified the most cytotoxic species, which may be possible targets for inhibiting and preventing amyloid aggregation.

  5. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhat, N. D. R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Burke-Spolaor, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Champion, D.; Ng, C. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, L., E-mail: epetroff@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15°

  6. System Analysis on Absorption Chiller Utilizing Intermediate Wasted Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Miki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Usui, Hiromoto

    A system analysis has been performed for the multi-effect absorption chiller (MEAC) applied as a bottoming system of 30kW class hybrid system including micro gas turbine (MGT) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) hybrid system. In this paper, an intermediate wasted heat utilization (IWHU) system is suggested for lifting up the energy efficiency of the whole system and coefficient of performance (COP) of MEAC. From the results, the suggested IWHU system was found to show the very high energy efficiency compared with a terminal wasted heat utilization (TWHU) system that uses only the heat exhausted from the terminal of MGT/SOFC system. When TWHU system is applied for MEAC, the utilized heat from the MGT/SOFC system is found to remain low because the temperature difference between the high temperature generator and the wasted heat becomes small. Then, the energy efficiency does not become high in spite of high COP of MEAC. On the other hand, the IWHU system could increase the utilized heat for MEAC as performs effectively. The exergy efficiency of IWHU system is also revealed to be higher than that of a direct gas burning system of MEAC, because the wasted heat is effectively utilized in the IWHU system.

  7. Anyonic behavior of an intermediate-statistics fermion gas model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algin, Abdullah; Irk, Dursun; Topcu, Gozde

    2015-06-01

    We study the high-temperature behavior of an intermediate-statistics fermionic gas model whose quantum statistical properties enable us to effectively deduce the details about both the interaction among deformed (quasi)particles and their anyonic behavior. Starting with a deformed fermionic grand partition function, we calculate, in the thermodynamical limit, several thermostatistical functions of the model such as the internal energy and the entropy by means of a formalism of the fermionic q calculus. For high temperatures, a virial expansion of the equation of state for the system is obtained in two and three dimensions and the first five virial coefficients are derived in terms of the model deformation parameter q. From the results obtained by the effect of fermionic deformation, it is found that the model parameter q interpolates completely between bosonlike and fermionic systems via the behaviors of the third and fifth virial coefficients in both two and three spatial dimensions and in addition it characterizes effectively the interaction among quasifermions. Our results reveal that the present deformed (quasi)fermion model could be very efficient and effective in accounting for the nonlinear behaviors in interacting composite particle systems.

  8. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  9. Comparative cytogenetic studies of Bufo ictericus, B. paracnemis (Amphibia, Anura and an intermediate form in sympatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo MFC

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of Bufo ictericus, Bufo paracnemis and a third type, considered an intermediate subgroup between these species, were cytogenetically studied by conventional Giemsa staining, C-banding and staining of the nucleolus organizer region (NOR. The nuclear DNA content and seroproteins were also analyzed to characterize these species, and verify the possibility of hybridization between them. Karyotypes and cytogenetic markers were essentially equal on the basis of the methods used. The DNA nuclear content found was 6.25 ± 0.30 pg/DNA in Bufo ictericus; 7.57 ± 0.40 pg/DNA in Bufo paracnemis and 7.04 ± 0.29 pg/DNA in the intermediate subgroup. Eletrophoresis of total blood serum in Bufo ictericus, Bufo paracnemis and the intermediate specimens revealed a remarkable difference in the patterns of the protein bands whose molecular weight corresponded to that of albumin. While the parental species presented two different bands, the intermediate form presented 4. However, only three of these bands were seen in each specimen. The results obtained pointed to a high probability for natural hybridization between Bufo ictericus and Bufo paracnemis in the site and specimens studied.

  10. Communication: Real time observation of unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Barber, Victoria P.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; McCoy, Anne B.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-02-01

    In the atmosphere, a dominant loss process for carbonyl oxide intermediates produced from alkene ozonolysis is also an important source of hydroxyl radicals. The rate of appearance of OH radicals is revealed through direct time-domain measurements following vibrational activation of prototypical methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates under collision-free conditions. Complementary theoretical calculations predict the unimolecular decay rate for the Criegee intermediates in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen transfer that leads to OH products. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates of ca. 108 and 107 s-1 for syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO, respectively, at energies near the barrier. Tunneling through the barrier, computed from high level electronic structure theory and experimentally validated, makes a significant contribution to the decay rate. Extension to thermally averaged unimolecular decay of stabilized Criegee intermediates under atmospheric conditions yields rates that are six orders of magnitude slower than those evaluated directly in the barrier region.

  11. Intermediate frequency magnetic field and chick embryotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Izumi; Tanaka, Keiko; Negishi, Tadashi

    2013-09-01

    Intermediate frequency magnetic fields (MFs) have widely been used in industrial machines and home appliances, such as induction heating cookers, although toxicity studies to evaluate the potential health risks of such fields are insufficient. In induction heating cookers, the MF source (i.e. hobs), is located near the abdominal position of a person cooking. Hence, developmental effects on the fetus may be a concern in case the person is a pregnant woman. Fertile White Leghorn eggs (60/group) were either exposed to 20 kHz, 1.1 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.11 mT(rms) sinusoidal MFs for 19 days during embryogenesis. The same number of eggs served as a control group. In addition, a sham-sham experiment was conducted to validate the equality between exposure and control facilities. After exposure, embryos were examined for mortality rate and stage. Live embryos were evaluated for developmental stage and gross and skeletal anomalies. Length of upper beak and leg digits was also measured. Examinations were conducted in a blinded fashion to ensure quality assurance; experiments were triplicated for each frequency to confirm the outcome reproducibility. Mortality rate and stage, incidence of malformed embryos, and developmental variables in live embryos were found to be similar between the MF-exposed and corresponding control group. Incidence of gross anomalies such as mandibular edema and skeletal anomalies such as coccyx defects were low across the experiments, and no significant group differences were noted. In conclusion, exposure to 20 kHz or 60 kHz MF did not produce any significant teratogenic developmental effects in chick embryos.

  12. Individual Learning Accounts: Honourable Intentions, Ignoble Utility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursfield, Denise; Smith, Vikki; Holden, Rick; Hamblett, John

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the implementation of Individual Learning Accounts in Britain revealed five themes that may explain the program's lack of success: individualistic approach to adult education, conflict of individualism with partnership, ineffective targeting of low-skilled populations, lack of linkage with a lifelong commitment to learning, and…

  13. Intermediate MCAD Deficiency Associated with a Novel Mutation of the ACADM Gene: c.1052C>T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holli M. Drendel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD is an autosomal recessive disorder that leads to a defect in fatty acid oxidation. ACADM is the only candidate gene causing MCAD deficiency. A single nucleotide change, c.985A>G, occurring at exon 11 of the ACADM gene, is the most prevalent mutation. In this study, we report a Caucasian family with multiple MCADD individuals. DNA sequence analysis of the ACADM gene performed in this family revealed that two family members showing mild MCADD symptoms share the same novel change in exon 11, c.1052C>T, resulting in a threonine-to-isoleucine change. The replacement is a nonconservative amino acid change that occurs in the C-terminal all-alpha domain of the MCAD protein. Here we report the finding of a novel missense mutation, c.1052C>T (p.Thr326Ile, in the ACADM gene. To our knowledge, c.1052C>T has not been previously reported in the literature or in any of the current databases we utilize. We hypothesize that this particular mutation in combination with p.Lys304Glu results in an intermediate clinical phenotype of MCADD.

  14. "Affective Encounters": Live Intermedial Spaces in Sites of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses live intermediality as a tool for creative learning in the context of workshops carried out with young people in the town of Terezin, in the Czech Republic, site of the Nazi concentration camp, Theresienstadt. Live intermediality, as a mode of live media practice, involves the real time mixing and merging of sound, image,…

  15. Incoherence in the South African Labour Market for Intermediate Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, Andre

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the production and employment of technically skilled labour at the intermediate level in South Africa. Three differing labour market pathways to intermediate skilling are identified. These are: the traditional apprenticeship route, the new "Learnerships" pathway (similar to the "modern…

  16. 21 CFR 312.315 - Intermediate-size patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate-size patient populations. 312.315... for Treatment Use § 312.315 Intermediate-size patient populations. Under this section, FDA may permit an investigational drug to be used for the treatment of a patient population smaller than...

  17. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, K.; Scholte, H.S.; Groen, I.I.A.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Ghebreab, S.

    2015-01-01

    The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible

  18. An architecture for recycling intermediates in a column-store

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, M.G.; Kersten, M.L.; Nes, N.J.; Goncalves, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic recycling intermediate results to improve both query response time and throughput is a grand challenge for state-of-the-art databases. Tuples are loaded and streamed through a tuple-at-a-time processing pipeline, avoiding materialisation of intermediates as much as possible. This limits th

  19. Molecular diagnosis of intermediate and severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Nordestgaard, B G; Lange, P;

    2001-01-01

    We tested whether intermediate (MZ, SZ) and severe (ZZ) alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency affects lung function in the population at large.......We tested whether intermediate (MZ, SZ) and severe (ZZ) alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency affects lung function in the population at large....

  20. A highly efficient synthesis of itraconazole intermediates and their analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Chong Il; Myoung, Young Chan; Choi, Ha Young; Kim, Seung Jin [Agency for Technology and Standards, Gwacheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    Itraconazole is an important drug for oral treatment of histoplasmosis and blastomycosis. Itraconazole has been the targets of many synthetic efforts due to their diverse antifungal activities. In this study, an efficient synthetic route for Itraconazole intermediates has been developed using new procedures. Also, Itraconazole analogues introducing 2- and 3-methoxy group instead of Itraconazole intermediates with 4-methoxy group were synthesized.

  1. "Affective Encounters": Live Intermedial Spaces in Sites of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses live intermediality as a tool for creative learning in the context of workshops carried out with young people in the town of Terezin, in the Czech Republic, site of the Nazi concentration camp, Theresienstadt. Live intermediality, as a mode of live media practice, involves the real time mixing and merging of sound, image,…

  2. 29 CFR 452.81 - Rights in intermediate body elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rights in intermediate body elections. 452.81 Section 452... REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Campaign Safeguards § 452.81 Rights in intermediate body elections. While the literal language in section 401(c) relating to distribution of campaign literature and...

  3. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ramakrishnan; H.S. Scholte; I.I.A. Groen; A.W.M. Smeulders; S. Ghebreab

    2015-01-01

    The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HM

  4. Turtle isochore structure is intermediate between amphibians and other amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Jena L; Braun, Edward L

    2008-10-01

    Vertebrate genomes are comprised of isochores that are relatively long (>100 kb) regions with a relatively homogenous (either GC-rich or AT-rich) base composition and with rather sharp boundaries with neighboring isochores. Mammals and living archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) have heterogeneous genomes that include very GC-rich isochores. In sharp contrast, the genomes of amphibians and fishes are more homogeneous and they have a lower overall GC content. Because DNA with higher GC content is more thermostable, the elevated GC content of mammalian and archosaurian DNA has been hypothesized to be an adaptation to higher body temperatures. This hypothesis can be tested by examining structure of isochores across the reptilian clade, which includes the archosaurs, testudines (turtles), and lepidosaurs (lizards and snakes), because reptiles exhibit diverse body sizes, metabolic rates, and patterns of thermoregulation. This study focuses on a comparative analysis of a new set of expressed genes of the red-eared slider turtle and orthologs of the turtle genes in mammalian (human, mouse, dog, and opossum), archosaurian (chicken and alligator), and amphibian (western clawed frog) genomes. EST (expressed sequence tag) data from a turtle cDNA library enriched for genes that have specialized functions (developmental genes) revealed using the GC content of the third-codon-position to examine isochore structure requires careful consideration of the types of genes examined. The more highly expressed genes (e.g., housekeeping genes) are more likely to be GC-rich than are genes with specialized functions. However, the set of highly expressed turtle genes demonstrated that the turtle genome has a GC content that is intermediate between the GC-poor amphibians and the GC-rich mammals and archosaurs. There was a strong correlation between the GC content of all turtle genes and the GC content of other vertebrate genes, with the slope of the line describing this relationship also

  5. Wild Rodents as Experimental Intermediate Hosts of Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Machado Paçô

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 25 specimens of Cavia porcellus (guinea pig, 5 Dasyprocta agouti (agouti, and 22 Calomys callosus (vesper mice were inoculated with infective eggs of Lagochilascaris minor. The inoculum was prepared with embryonated eggs and orally administered to each individual animal through an esophagus probe. In parallel, 100 specimens of Felis catus domesticus were individually fed with 55-70 nodules containing 3rd-stage larvae encysted in tissues of infected rodents. Animals were examined and necropsied at different time intervals. The migration and encystment of L3 larva was observed in viscera, skeletal muscle, adipose and subcutaneous tissues from all rodents. Adult worms localized at abscesses in the cervical region, rhino, and oropharynx were recovered from domestic cats inoculated with infected rodent tissues. Through this study we can conclude that: (1 wild rodents act as intermediate hosts, characterizing this ascarid heteroxenic cycle; (2 in natural conditions rodents could possibly act as either intermediate hosts or paratenic hosts of Lagochilascaris minor; (3 despite the occurrence of an auto-infecting cycle, in prime-infection of felines (definite hosts the cycle is only completed when intermediate hosts are provided; and (4 in the wild, rodents could serve as a source of infection for humans as they are frequently used as food in regions with the highest incidence of human lagochilascariasis.

  6. Metamorphosis-like photochemical growth route for silver nanoprisms synthesis via the unrevealed key intermediates of nanorods and nanotrapezoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingming; Yang, Shaobo; Cai, Jinmeng; Yu, Yifu; Meng, Ming; Li, Xingfei

    2014-10-01

    Photochemical synthesis is a promising strategy for the control of both the size and shape of silver nanoprisms; however, the mechanism of nanoprism formation under irradiation still remains as a mystery. Intermediates, which often contain abundant information about the reaction process, are significant to the understanding of reaction mechanisms. Unfortunately, intermediates are usually hard to be acquired due to the fast reaction rate. Herein, we successfully slow down the conversion rate of the photochemical reactions by enlarging the solution volume and removing morphology-directing agent bis(p-sulfonatophe-nyl) phenylphosphine dihydrate dipotassium. Nanorods and nanotrapezoids were found to be the key intermediates for the photoinduced formation of silver nanoprisms with 100 nm edge length, especially the nanorods which have never identified as the intermediates for silver nanoprism formation. Characterization methods including time-dependent ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction were employed to characterize these intermediates. Based upon the revealed evidences, a plausible metamorphosis-like photochemical growth route for the formation of Ag nanoprisms via the intermediates of nanorods and nanotrapezoid is proposed.

  7. Regional boreal biodiversity peaks at intermediate human disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, S J; Cahill, J F; He, F; Sólymos, P; Boutin, S

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide biodiversity crisis has intensified the need to better understand how biodiversity and human disturbance are related. The 'intermediate disturbance hypothesis' suggests that disturbance regimes generate predictable non-linear patterns in species richness. Evidence often contradicts intermediate disturbance hypothesis at small scales, and is generally lacking at large regional scales. Here, we present the largest extent study of human impacts on boreal plant biodiversity to date. Disturbance extent ranged from 0 to 100% disturbed in vascular plant communities, varying from intact forest to agricultural fields, forestry cut blocks and oil sands. We show for the first time that across a broad region species richness peaked in communities with intermediate anthropogenic disturbance, as predicted by intermediate disturbance hypothesis, even when accounting for many environmental covariates. Intermediate disturbance hypothesis was consistently supported across trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses, with temporary and perpetual disturbances. However, only native species fit this pattern; exotic species richness increased linearly with disturbance.

  8. 42 CFR 456.380 - Individual written plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) The plan of care must include— (1) Diagnoses, symptoms, complaints, and complications indicating the... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.380 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Intermediate...

  9. Archery: A Planning Guide for Group and Individual Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This instructor's manual for group or individual instruction in archery includes line drawings as illustrations. The manual advances from facilities to beginning instruction and general instructional practices (safety tips, instructional aids, archery etiquette) to intermediate instruction (discussions of causes of faulty arrow flight, analysis of…

  10. The critical influence of the intermediate category on interpretation errors in revised EUCAST and CLSI antimicrobial susceptibility testing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, M; Böttger, E C; Roos, M

    2013-02-01

    Erroneous assignments of clinical isolates to the interpretative categories susceptible, intermediate and resistant can deprive a patient of successful antimicrobial therapy. The rate of major errors (ME) and very major errors (vME) is dependent on: (i) the precision/standard deviation (σ) of the antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) method, (ii) the diameter distributions, (iii) clinical breakpoints, and (iv) the width of the intermediate zone. The European Committee on AST (EUCAST) has abandoned or decreased the intermediate zone for several drug/species combinations. This study focused on the effects of discontinuing the intermediate category on the rate of interpretation errors. In total, 10,341 non-duplicate clinical isolates were included in the study. For susceptibility testing the disc diffusion method was used. Error probabilities were calculated separately for diameter values flanking the interpretative category borders. Error probabilities were then applied to the actual numbers of clinical isolates investigated and expected rates of ME and vME were calculated. Applying EUCAST AST guidelines, significant rates of ME/vME were demonstrated for all drug/species combinations without an intermediate range. Virtually all ME/vME expected were eliminated in CLSI guidelines that retained an intermediate zone. If wild-type and resistant isolates are not clearly separated in susceptibility distributions, the retaining of an intermediate zone will decrease the number of ME and vME. An intermediate zone of 2-3 mm avoids almost all ME/vME for most species/drug combinations depending on diameter distributions. Laboratories should know their epidemiology settings to be able to detect problems of individual species/drug/clinical breakpoint combinations and take measures to improve precision of diameter measurements.

  11. Insights into the Mechanism of Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases from Structures of Reaction Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon (NWU); (UIC)

    2012-02-27

    The biosynthetic shikimate pathway consists of seven enzymes that catalyze sequential reactions to generate chorismate, a critical branch point in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids. The third enzyme in the pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD), catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate to 3-dehydroshikimate. We present three crystal structures of the type I DHQD from the intestinal pathogens Clostridium difficile and Salmonella enterica. Structures of the enzyme with substrate and covalent pre- and post-dehydration reaction intermediates provide snapshots of successive steps along the type I DHQD-catalyzed reaction coordinate. These structures reveal that the position of the substrate within the active site does not appreciably change upon Schiff base formation. The intermediate state structures reveal a reaction state-dependent behavior of His-143 in which the residue adopts a conformation proximal to the site of catalytic dehydration only when the leaving group is present. We speculate that His-143 is likely to assume differing catalytic roles in each of its observed conformations. One conformation of His-143 positions the residue for the formation/hydrolysis of the covalent Schiff base intermediates, whereas the other conformation positions the residue for a role in the catalytic dehydration event. The fact that the shikimate pathway is absent from humans makes the enzymes of the pathway potential targets for the development of non-toxic antimicrobials. The structures and mechanistic insight presented here may inform the design of type I DHQD enzyme inhibitors.

  12. Structural intermediates in the fusion-associated transition of vesiculovirus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Eduard; Albertini, Aurélie A; Raux, Hélène; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Ouldali, Malika; Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K; Lepault, Jean; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Gaudin, Yves

    2017-03-01

    Vesiculoviruses enter cells by membrane fusion, driven by a large, low-pH-induced, conformational change in the fusion glycoprotein G that involves transition from a trimeric pre-fusion toward a trimeric post-fusion state via monomeric intermediates. Here, we present the structure of the G fusion protein at intermediate pH for two vesiculoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Chandipura virus (CHAV), which is responsible for deadly encephalopathies. First, a CHAV G crystal structure shows two intermediate conformations forming a flat dimer of heterodimers. On virions, electron microscopy (EM) and tomography reveal monomeric spikes similar to one of the crystal conformations. In solution, mass spectrometry shows dimers of G. Finally, mutations at a dimer interface, involving fusion domains associated in an antiparallel manner to form an intermolecular β-sheet, affect G fusion properties. The location of the compensatory mutations restoring fusion activity strongly suggests that this interface is functionally relevant. This work reveals the range of G structural changes and suggests that G monomers can re-associate, through antiparallel interactions between fusion domains, into dimers that play a role at some early stage of the fusion process.

  13. Physical Mechanisms for Earthquakes at Intermediate Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H. W.; Green, H. W.

    2001-12-01

    Conventional brittle shear failure it is strongly inhibited by pressure because it relies on local tensile failure. In contrast, plastic flow processes are thermally activated, making them sensitive functions of temperature, but their pressure dependence is only moderate. As a consequence, in Earth, faulting by unassisted brittle failure is probably restricted to depths less than ~ 30 km because the rocks flow at lower stresses than they fracture. To enable faulting at greater depths, mineral reactions must occur that generate a fluid or fluid-like solid that is much weaker than the parent assemblage. Although a variety of plastic instabilities have been and continue to be proposed to explain earthquakes at depth, dehydration embrittlement remains the only experimentally verified faulting mechanism consistent with the pressures and compositions existing at depths of 50-300km within subducting lithosphere. However, low pressure hydrous phases potentially abundant in subducting lithosphere (e.g. chlorite and antigorite) exhibit a temperature maximum in their stability, implying that the bulk volume change at depths of more than 70-100 km. becomes negative, thereby raising questions about mechanical instability upon dehydration. Further, it is now well-accepted that intermediate-depth earthquakes occur within the descending slab (double seismic zones present in several slabs dramatically demonstrate this fact), in conflict with the maximum depth of 10-12 km accepted for hydration of the lithosphere at oceanic spreading centers. Thus, on the one hand these earthquakes may be evidence that hydrous phases exist deep within subducting slabs but on the other hand, a mechanism for hydration to such depths is not known. One possibility is that large earthquakes outboard of trenches break the surface and allow hydration of the fault zone that can later dehydrate to yield earthquakes at depth, but no mechanism is known for pumping H2O into such fault zones to depths of tens of

  14. Sex differences in correlates of intermediate phenotypes and prevalent cardiovascular disease in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate B. Schnabel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background-There are marked sex differences in cardiovascular disease [CVD] manifestation. It is largely unknown how the distribution of CVD risk factors or intermediate phenotypes explain sex-specific differences.Methods and Results-In 5000 individuals of the population-based Gutenberg Health Study, mean age 55±11 years, 51% males, we examined sex-specific associations of classical CVD risk factors with intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, flow-mediated dilation, peripheral arterial tonometry, echocardiographic and electrocardiographic variables. Intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes were related to prevalent CVD (coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, lower extremity artery disease [LEAD] N=561.We observed differential distributions of CVD risk factors with a higher risk factor burden in men. Manifest coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and LEAD were more frequent in men; the proportion of heart failure was higher in women. Intermediate phenotypes showed clear sex differences with more beneficial values in women. Fairly linear changes towards less beneficial values with age were observed in both sexes. In multivariable-adjusted regression analyses age, systolic blood pressure and body mass index were consistently associated with intermediate phenotypes in both sexes with different ranking according to random forests, maximum model R² 0.43. Risk factor-adjusted associations with prevalent CVD showed some differences by sex. No interactions by menopausal status were observed. Conclusions-In a population-based cohort we observed sex differences in risk factors and a broad range of intermediate phenotypes of noninvasive cardiovascular structure and function. Their relation to prevalent CVD differed markedly. Our results indicate the need of future investigations to understand sex differences in CVD manifestation.

  15. Visualizing biological reaction intermediates with DNA curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yiling; Jiang, Yanzhou; Qi, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    Single-molecule approaches have tremendous potential analyzing dynamic biological reaction with heterogeneity that cannot be effectively accessed via traditional ensemble-level biochemical approaches. The approach of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) curtains developed by Dr Eric Greene and his research team at Columbia University is a high-throughput single-molecule technique that utilizes fluorescent imaging to visualize protein–DNA interactions directly and allows the acquisition of statistically relevant information from hundreds or even thousands of individual reactions. This review aims to summarize the past, present, and future of DNA curtains, with an emphasis on its applications to solve important biological questions.

  16. Talassemia β intermediária em gestante Intermediate β thalassemia in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana M. Sakamoto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A talassemia β é a forma considerada clinicamente a mais importante dentre as talassemias, em virtude do grau de morbidade e mortalidade, em consequência da anemia hemolítica. O presente relato de caso refere-se a uma gestante portadora da talassemia β intermediária, identificada em programa de rastreamento de anemia hemolítica e tem como objetivo demonstrar a importância do diagnóstico precoce e adequado de uma anemia hereditária, durante o pré-natal. Ressalta também a necessidade de orientação aos portadores em relação aos seus descendentes e a eficiência do acompanhamento por uma equipe multidisciplinar especializada.β-thalassemia is clinically the most important form of thalassemia due to its high level of morbidity and mortality as a result of intense hemolytic anemia. The present case report describes the case a pregnant woman who is an intermediate β-thalassemia carrier identified in a screening program for hemolytic anemia. This work aims at showing the importance of correct and early diagnosis of inherited anemia during pregnancy. It also stresses the need of guidance for carriers in respect to their progeny and discusses the efficiency of follow ups by a multidisciplinary team during pregnancy.

  17. Broadband Microwave Study of Reaction Intermediates and Products Through the Pyrolysis of Oxygenated Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Fritz, Sean; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    The rapidly growing list of potential plant-derived biofuels creates a challenge for the scientific community to provide a molecular-scale understanding of their combustion. Development of accurate combustion models rests on a foundation of experimental data on the kinetics and product branching ratios of their individual reaction steps. Therefore, new spectroscopic tools are necessary to selectively detect and characterize fuel components and reactive intermediates generated by pyrolysis and combustion. Substituted furans, including furanic ethers, are considered second-generation biofuel candidates. Following the work of the Ellison group, an 8-18 GHz microwave study was carried out on the unimolecular and bimolecular decomposition of the smallest furanic ether, 2-methoxy furan, and it`s pyrolysis intermediate, the 2-furanyloxy radical, formed in a high-temperature pyrolysis source coupled to a supersonic expansion. Details of the experimental setup and analysis of the spectrum of the radical will be discussed.

  18. Conditional limit theorems for intermediately subcritical branching processes in random environment

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasyev, Valeriy; Kersting, Götz; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    For a branching process in random environment it is assumed that the offspring distribution of the individuals varies in a random fashion, independently from one generation to the other. For the subcritical regime a kind of phase transition appears. In this paper we study the intermediately subcritical case, which constitutes the borderline within this phase transition. We study the asymptotic behavior of the survival probability. Next the size of the population and the shape of the random environment conditioned on non-extinction is examined. Finally we show that conditioned on non-extinction periods of small and large population sizes alternate. This kind of 'bottleneck' behavior appears under the annealed approach only in the intermediately subcritical case.

  19. Study on the Intermediate in the o-Phenylenediamine Oxidative Reaction Using Hemoglobin as A Mimetic Peroxidase in Aqueous-Organic Two Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hemoglobin was used as a mimetic enzyme for peroxidase to catalyze the oxidative reaction ofo-phenylenediamine with H2O2 which functioned as an oxidant. The relationship between physicochemicalproperties of the intermediate and enzymatic activity of hemoglobin was studied. Since the solubility of theintermediate in the reaction is higher in butanol phase than in water phase, the intermediate itself diffusedfrom the aqueous phase to the butanol phase. The experimental results showed that the rate of product andthe stability of intermediate were associated with the temperature and the pH value of the buffer. The for-mation rate of intermediate and half-life period reveal the maximal in pH7, nevertheless, the whole rate ofthe catalytic reaction is the greatest in pH5, which the ratio of the initial rate in final product formationcompared to that intermediate formation is the greatest.

  20. Rethinking evolutionary individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereshefsky, Marc; Pedroso, Makmiller

    2015-08-18

    This paper considers whether multispecies biofilms are evolutionary individuals. Numerous multispecies biofilms have characteristics associated with individuality, such as internal integrity, division of labor, coordination among parts, and heritable adaptive traits. However, such multispecies biofilms often fail standard reproductive criteria for individuality: they lack reproductive bottlenecks, are comprised of multiple species, do not form unified reproductive lineages, and fail to have a significant division of reproductive labor among their parts. If such biofilms are good candidates for evolutionary individuals, then evolutionary individuality is achieved through other means than frequently cited reproductive processes. The case of multispecies biofilms suggests that standard reproductive requirements placed on individuality should be reconsidered. More generally, the case of multispecies biofilms indicates that accounts of individuality that focus on single-species eukaryotes are too restrictive and that a pluralistic and open-ended account of evolutionary individuality is needed.

  1. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Frei, Heinz [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. In conclusion, combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  2. Upward and downward comparison in the intermediate-status group: the role of social stratification stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca

    2012-06-01

    This work analyses intergroup comparison choices made by intermediate-status group members. Seventy-six psychology students were categorized in an intermediate position with respect to other faculties. Stability was manipulated at three levels: stable, upwardly unstable, and downwardly unstable. Data on strength of comparison, comparison for enhancing, comparison for evaluation, and ingroup identification were collected. Results revealed that in the stable condition, participants were equally engaged in both upward and downward comparison. In the upwardly unstable condition, participants were more likely to compare themselves with the high-status group, whereas in the downwardly unstable condition, they were more likely to choose a downward comparison. In this latter condition, both downward comparison for enhancement and in-group identification were lower than in other conditions.

  3. RXTE confirmation of the intermediate polar status of IGR J15094-6649

    CERN Document Server

    Butters, O W; Mukai, K; Barlow, E J

    2009-01-01

    Aims. To establish the X-ray properties of the intermediate polar candidate IGR J15094-6649 and therefore confirm its inclusion into the class. Methods. 42 856 s of X-ray data from RXTE was analysed. Frequency analysis was used to constrain temporal variations and spectral analysis used to characterise the emission and absorption properties. Results. A spin period of 809.7+-0.6 s is present, revealed as a complex pulse profile whose modulation depth decreases with increasing X-ray energy. The spectrum is well fitted by either a 19+-4 keV Bremsstrahlung or Gamma=1.8+-0.1 power law, with an iron emission line feature and significant absorption in each case. Conclusions. IGR J15094-6649 is confirmed to be an intermediate polar.

  4. In vivo detection of brain Krebs cycle intermediate by hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkovsky, Mor; Comment, Arnaud; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-12-01

    The Krebs (or tricarboxylic acid (TCA)) cycle has a central role in the regulation of brain energy regulation and metabolism, yet brain TCA cycle intermediates have never been directly detected in vivo. This study reports the first direct in vivo observation of a TCA cycle intermediate in intact brain, namely, 2-oxoglutarate, a key biomolecule connecting metabolism to neuronal activity. Our observation reveals important information about in vivo biochemical processes hitherto considered undetectable. In particular, it provides direct evidence that transport across the inner mitochondria membrane is rate limiting in the brain. The hyperpolarized magnetic resonance protocol designed for this study opens the way to direct and real-time studies of TCA cycle kinetics.

  5. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F. [UCSC

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  6. Sleep is related to neuron numbers in the ventrolateral preoptic/intermediate nucleus in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Andrew S P; Ellison, Brian A; Wang, Joshua L; Yu, Lei; Schneider, Julie A; Buchman, Aron S; Bennett, David A; Saper, Clifford B

    2014-10-01

    Fragmented sleep is a common and troubling symptom in ageing and Alzheimer's disease; however, its neurobiological basis in many patients is unknown. In rodents, lesions of the hypothalamic ventrolateral preoptic nucleus cause fragmented sleep. We previously proposed that the intermediate nucleus in the human hypothalamus, which has a similar location and neurotransmitter profile, is the homologue of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, but physiological data in humans were lacking. We hypothesized that if the intermediate nucleus is important for human sleep, then intermediate nucleus cell loss may contribute to fragmentation and loss of sleep in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We studied 45 older adults (mean age at death 89.2 years; 71% female; 12 with Alzheimer's disease) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a community-based study of ageing and dementia, who had at least 1 week of wrist actigraphy proximate to death. Upon death a median of 15.5 months later, we used immunohistochemistry and stereology to quantify the number of galanin-immunoreactive intermediate nucleus neurons in each individual, and related this to ante-mortem sleep fragmentation. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease had fewer galaninergic intermediate nucleus neurons than those without (estimate -2872, standard error = 829, P = 0.001). Individuals with more galanin-immunoreactive intermediate nucleus neurons had less fragmented sleep, after adjusting for age and sex, and this association was strongest in those for whom the lag between actigraphy and death was Alzheimer's disease, and similar associations were not seen for two other cell populations near the intermediate nucleus. These data are consistent with the intermediate nucleus being the human homologue of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus. Moreover, they demonstrate that a paucity of galanin-immunoreactive intermediate nucleus neurons is accompanied by sleep fragmentation in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease.

  7. The neurobiology of individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Individuals often display conspicuously different patterns of behavior, even when they are very closely related genetically. These differences give rise to our sense of individuality, but what is their molecular and neurobiological basis? Individuals that are nominally genetically identical differ at various molecular and neurobiological levels: cell-to-cell variation in somatic genomes, cell-to-cell variation in expression patterns, individual-to-individual variation in neuronal morphology and physiology, and individual-to-individual variation in patterns of brain activity. It is unknown which of these levels is fundamentally causal of behavioral differences. To investigate this problem, we use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose genetic toolkit allows the manipulation of each of these mechanistic levels, and whose rapid lifecycle and small size allows for high-throughput automation of behavioral assays. This latter point is crucial; identifying inter-individual behavioral differences requires high sample sizes both within and across individual animals. Automated behavioral characterization is at the heart of our research strategy. In every behavior examined, individual flies have individual behavioral preferences, and we have begun to identify both neural genes and circuits that control the degree of behavioral variability between individuals.

  8. Status of art report on intermediate energy nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ouk; Chang, Jong Hwa

    1997-06-01

    Nuclear reaction data of intermediate energy ranging above 20 MeV upto a few GeV form an important ingredient of several nuclear energy application, such as medical research, astrophysics, transmutation of radioactive waste and accelerator-driven reactor. Current status of the intermediate energy nuclear data cannot satisfy the requirements of these applications. Despite the fact that theories and models with suitable parameterization and fitting to the experimental data can be used for filling gaps in the available experimental database, current theories and models for intermediate nuclear energy nuclear reaction are still under development. This report summarizes required intermediate energy nuclear data and their physical quantities for the relevant research fields. Theories/models and codes developed up to now for the intermediate nuclear reaction are also outlined and transport codes based on these models are briefly introduced in this report. Available experimental facilities and data libraries are filed and trend of activities in the foreign countries on intermediate energy nuclear data are summarized. It is hoped that this report provide a part of information for the research activity on intermediate energy nuclear data in Korea to establish its long-term plan. (author). 14 tabs., 6 figs

  9. Computational Investigation of InxGa1-xN/InN Quantum-Dot Intermediate-Band Solar Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Qing-Wen; WANG Zhan-Guo; HOU Xun; WANG Xiao-Liang; YANG Cui-Bai; XIAO Hong-Ling; WANG Cui-Mei; YIN Hai-Bo; HOU Qi-Feng; BI Yang; LI Jin-Min

    2011-01-01

    An InxGa1-xN/InN quantum-dot intermediate-band solar cell is calculated by means of solving the Schrodinger equation according to the Kronig-Penney model. Based on particular assumptions, the power conversion efficiency is worked out. The results reveal that the InxGa1-xN/InN quantum-dot intermediate-band solar cell manifests much larger power conversion efficiency than that of p-n junction solar cells, and the power conversion efficiency strongly depends on the size of the quantum dot and the interdot distance.

  10. Towards Musical Individuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Min Kim

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In Jungian theory, heavily influenced by Zen Buddhism, the developmental stages of human life are symbolized as a circle that represents the wholeness, and the open ended process towards the wholeness is called Individuation. Within the circle there are two stages; the Morning and the Afternoon of Life, and the latter begins at the age of 35, an age at which individuation begins and one that I have reached and passed. Thus, it seemed to be a perfect time for me to begin my own journey towards individuation, especially musical individuation since music had always been such a central part of my life. The first step of individuation is to be aware of one’s individual, social, cultural unconscious forces that affect conscious thoughts and behavior. Thus, my musical individuation began with my attempts to be aware of the unconscious forces beneath my conscious thoughts and behaviors.

  11. Language in use intermediate : self-study workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  12. Microbial/enzymatic synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ramesh N

    2003-11-01

    Chirality is a key factor in the efficacy of many drugs; thus, the production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Chiral intermediates and fine chemicals are in high demand from the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries for the preparation of bulk drug substances and agricultural products. There has been an increasing awareness of the enormous potential of microorganisms and enzymes for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity. In this article, biocatalytic processes for the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical intermediates are described.

  13. Parameters of the Disk Loaded Waveguide structure for intermediate particles acceleration in the intermediate energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Paramonov, V

    2013-01-01

    The Disk Loaded Waveguide (DLW) is the mostly used high frequency structure for acceleration of lightweight particles - electrons in the high energy range. In some physical experiments acceleration of more heavy particles - muons to medium energies is required. DLW parameters are considered for particle velocity 0.04 < \\beta < 1 both for the fundamental and the nearest backward spatial harmonics. Physical and technical restrictions for DLW application in the low \\beta range and lower frequency (the L-band range) are analyzed. Basing on particularities of acceleration with Traveling Wave (TW), deep optimization of DLW cells dimensions, the choice of optimal operating phase advance for each DLW section and combination of forward and backward TW modes, it is possible to create simple, cost effective acceleration system for acceleration in the velocity range 0.2 < \\beta < 1 intermediate particles, in some parameters overcoming accelerating system with RF cavities in Standing Wave (SW) mode. Design cri...

  14. THE CLOSE STELLAR COMPANIONS TO INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Trenti, Michele [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2016-03-01

    When embedded in dense cluster cores, intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) acquire close stellar or stellar-remnant companions. These companions are not only gravitationally bound, but also tend to hierarchically isolate from other cluster stars through series of multibody encounters. In this paper we study the demographics of IMBH companions in compact star clusters through direct N-body simulations. We study clusters initially composed of 10{sup 5} or 2 × 10{sup 5} stars with IMBHs of 75 and 150 solar masses, and we follow their evolution for 6–10 Gyr. A tight, innermost binary pair of IMBH and stellar object rapidly forms. The IMBH has a companion with an orbital semimajor axis at least three times tighter than the second-most-bound object over 90% of the time. These companionships have typical periods on the order of years and are subject to cycles of exchange and destruction. The most frequently observed, long-lived pairings persist for ∼10{sup 7} years. The demographics of IMBH companions in clusters are diverse: they include both main-sequence, giant stars and stellar remnants. Companion objects may reveal the presence of an IMBH in a cluster in one of several ways. The most-bound companion stars routinely suffer grazing tidal interactions with the IMBH, offering a dynamical mechanism to produce repeated flaring episodes like those seen in the IMBH candidate HLX-1. The stellar winds of companion stars provide a minimum quiescent accretion rate for IMBHs, with implications for radio searches for IMBH accretion in globular clusters. Finally, gravitational wave inspirals of compact objects occur with promising frequency.

  15. Intermediates and kinetics for phenol gasification in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsman, Chad M; Savage, Phillip E

    2012-02-28

    We processed phenol with supercritical water in a series of experiments, which systematically varied the temperature, water density, reactant concentration, and reaction time. Both the gas and liquid phases were analyzed post-reaction using gas chromatographic techniques, which identified and quantified the reaction intermediates and products, including H(2), CO, CH(4), and CO(2) in the gas phase and twenty different compounds--mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons--in the liquid phase. Many of these liquid phase compounds were identified for the first time and could pose environmental risks. Higher temperatures promoted gasification and resulted in a product gas rich in H(2) and CH(4) (33% and 29%, respectively, at 700 °C), but char yields increased as well. We implicated dibenzofuran and other identified phenolic dimers as precursor molecules for char formation pathways, which can be driven by free radical polymerization at high temperatures. Examination of the trends in conversion as a function of initial water and phenol concentrations revealed competing effects, and these informed the kinetic modeling of phenol disappearance. Two different reaction pathways emerged from the kinetic modeling: one in which rate ∝ [phenol](1.73)[water](-16.60) and the other in which rate ∝ [phenol](0.92)[water](1.39). These pathways may correspond to pyrolysis, which dominates when there is abundant phenol and little water, and hydrothermal reactions, which dominate in excess water. This result confirms that supercritical water gasification of phenol does not simply follow first-order kinetics, as previous efforts to model phenol disappearance had assumed.

  16. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  17. Neck Emission of Intermediate Mass Fragments During Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, R. T.; Chen, S. L.; Cornell, E. W.; Davin, B.; Hamilton, T. M.; Hulburt, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lou, Y.; Viola, V. E.; Wile, J. L.; Korteling, R.

    1996-05-01

    Ternary fission of heavy nuclei provides a unique opportunity to constrain models of the dissipative forces which occur during fission. We have measured neck emission of Intermediate mass fragments (IMF:3 model are made.

  18. Detection of low-populated reaction intermediates with hyperpolarized NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Pernille R; Meier, Sebastian; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Duus, Jens Ø; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H

    2009-09-14

    Hyperpolarized (13)C NMR spectroscopy can provide the sensitivity and spectral resolution to detect, identify and quantify low-populated reaction intermediates, thus yielding direct chemical information on reaction mechanisms in real-time assays.

  19. Functionalization of the corrole ring: the role of isocorrole intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Luca; Nardis, Sara; Fronczek, Frank R; Smith, Kevin M; Paolesse, Roberto

    2011-04-14

    Bromination of 3-nitro-5,10,15-triarylcorrole selectively provides two regioisomers, depending on the reaction pathway. An isocorrole species is the key intermediate to drive the reaction towards the 2-Br-17-nitro regioisomer.

  20. Improved enzymatic production of phenolated glycerides through alkyl phenolate intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Feddern, Vivian; Glasius, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This work reported a novel approach for synthesis of dihydrocaffoylated glycerides, consisting of 2 steps: enzymatic synthesis of octyl dihydrocaffeate (as a synthetic intermediate) from octanol and dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA), and enzymatic interesterification of triglycerides with octyl dihydroc...

  1. Proteomics characterization of intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium) flour proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinopyrum intermedium, commonly known as intermediate wheatgrass (IWG), is a perennial crop with favorable agronomic characteristics and nutritional benefits. IWG lines are deficient in high molecular weight glutenins (HMWG), responsible for dough strength. A detailed characterization of IWG flou...

  2. Intermediate product selection and blending in the food processing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur A.; Akkerman, Renzo; van Donk, Dirk Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a capacitated intermediate product selection and blending problem typical for two-stage production systems in the food processing industry. The problem involves the selection of a set of intermediates and end-product recipes characterising how those selected intermediates...... are blended into end products to minimise the total operational costs under production and storage capacity limitations. A comprehensive mixed-integer linear model is developed for the problem. The model is applied on a data set collected from a real-life case. The trade-offs between capacity limitations...... and operational costs are analysed, and the effects of different types of cost parameters and capacity limitations on the selection of intermediates and end-product recipes are investigated....

  3. Analysis of Preference Data Using Intermediate Test Statistic Abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-06-01

    Jun 1, 2013 ... Intermediate statistic is a link between Friedman test statistic and the multinomial statistic. The statistic is ... The null hypothesis Ho .... [7] Taplin, R.H., The Statistical Analysis of Preference Data, Applied Statistics, No. 4, pp.

  4. Banking on fewer children: financial intermediation, fertility and economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, C S

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the influence of financial intermediation on fertility rate and labor allocation decisions. A panel Vector Autoregression model using three variables of interest, specifically, financial intermediation, fertility, and industrial employment data in 87 countries, was estimated. This convenient methodology allows the relationship between the variables to change over time. Findings indicate that the increase in wages led some households to shift from traditional labor intensive methods of production to modern sector firms. Since it is optimal for households in the modern sector to have fewer children then the labor allocation decision leads to a lower national fertility. Furthermore, results imply that the emergence and development of the financial intermediation sector will enhance modern sector employment and lower total fertility rates. Thus, the financial intermediation process is an important part of the overall developmental process.

  5. Assembly characteristics of plant keratin intermediate filaments in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵光伟; 杨澄; 佟向军; 翟中和

    1999-01-01

    After selective extraction and purification, plant keratin intermediate filaments were reassembled in vitro. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs showed that acidic keratins and basic keratins can assemble into dimers and further into 10 nm filaments in vitro. In higher magnification images, it can be seen that fully assembled plant keratin intermediate filaments consist of several thinner filaments of 3 nm in diameter, which indicates the formation of protofilaments in the assembly processes. One of the explicit features of plant keratin intermediate filaments is a 24—25 nm periodic structural repeat alone the axis of beth the 10 nm filaments and protofilaments. The periodic repeat is one of the fundamental characteristic of all intermediate filaments, and demonstrates the half staggered arrangement of keratin molecules within the filaments.

  6. 22 CFR 140.10 - Intermediate credit institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... as a foreign government entity. Intermediate credit institutions (“ICIs”) shall be subject to either... included in agreements with all ICIs requiring that any loan greater than $1,000 provided by the ICI to...

  7. An intermediate distribution between Gaussian and Cauchy distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tong; Dai, Wu-Sheng; Xie, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we construct an intermediate distribution linking the Gaussian and the Cauchy distribution. We provide the probability density function and the corresponding characteristic function of the intermediate distribution. Because many kinds of distributions have no moment, we introduce weighted moments. Specifically, we consider weighted moments under two types of weighted functions: the cut-off function and the exponential function. Through these two types of weighted functions, we can obtain weighted moments for almost all distributions. We consider an application of the probability density function of the intermediate distribution on the spectral line broadening in laser theory. Moreover, we utilize the intermediate distribution to the problem of the stock market return in quantitative finance.

  8. The Intermediate Impossible: A Prewriting Activity for Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karloff, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    Adapts Edward de Bono's "Intermediate Impossible" strategy--for considering ideas that normally would be discarded as stepping-stones to new ideas--for use as a prewriting activity to enhance creative problem solving. (HTH)

  9. Control of nonenzymatic browning in intermediate-moisture foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, K. A.; Labruza, T. P.; Warmbier, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    Series of compounds called humectants were found to decrease rate of browning when added to intermediate-moisture foods. Twenty percent level of humectant can increase shelf life of foods by factor of 5 or 6.

  10. Neuroanatomy Predicts Individual Risk Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Tymula, Agnieszka; Cooper, Nicole; Kable, Joseph W.; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of the last decade a multitude of studies have investigated the relationship between neural activations and individual human decision-making. Here we asked whether the anatomical features of individual human brains could be used to predict the fundamental preferences of human choosers. To that end, we quantified the risk attitudes of human decision-makers using standard economic tools and quantified the gray matter cortical volume in all brain areas using standard neurobiological tools. Our whole-brain analysis revealed that the gray matter volume of a region in the right posterior parietal cortex was significantly predictive of individual risk attitudes. Participants with higher gray matter volume in this region exhibited less risk aversion. To test the robustness of this finding we examined a second group of participants and used econometric tools to test the ex ante hypothesis that gray matter volume in this area predicts individual risk attitudes. Our finding was confirmed in this second group. Our results, while being silent about causal relationships, identify what might be considered the first stable biomarker for financial risk-attitude. If these results, gathered in a population of midlife northeast American adults, hold in the general population, they will provide constraints on the possible neural mechanisms underlying risk attitudes. The results will also provide a simple measurement of risk attitudes that could be easily extracted from abundance of existing medical brain scans, and could potentially provide a characteristic distribution of these attitudes for policy makers. PMID:25209279

  11. On the Representation of Intermediate States in the Velocity Basis

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, B A

    2002-01-01

    We explore the implication of applying the "minimally complex" representation to study intermediate states. We propose an interpretation of the "velocity variables" used in the "minimally complex" representation so as to make the construction consistent with the kinematics of the underlying scattering process under consideration. We also show that this choice of representation advocates the use of velocity basis over momentum basis in studying intermediate states.

  12. Responding to diversity: workforce intermediation in a transitioning regional economy

    OpenAIRE

    Nichola J. Lowe

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I examine workforce intermediation as a tool for regional economic transition. While most studies of workforce intermediation in the United States focus on targeted programs that work with less-advantaged socioeconomic groups, I examine strategies adopted by state-funded community colleges that have a more encompassing or universalistic mandate. Through a case study of North Carolina’s BioWork initiative I examine college-level strategies for assisting two distinct groups of job...

  13. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...band solar cell incorporating low dimensional structures made with dilute nitrogen alloys of III-V semiconductors is investigated theoretically and

  14. Intermediate energy light sources and the SSRF project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Advances in insertion device technology, top-up operation and superconducting RF cavities make it possible to generate high brightness X-ray with intermediate energy light sources, which leads a new trend in designing and constructing third generation light sources around the world. The development status and the remarkable technical features of intermediate energy light sources are reviewed, and the main SSRF properties are described in this paper.

  15. Linguistic Focus of Language Related Episodes in Intermediate and Advanced EFL Learners’ Group-based Interactions: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhila Mohammadnia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated linguistic focus of language related episodes (LREs,in Iranian EFL classrooms. Eighteen male participants in the advanced and intermediate levels from Urmia branch of Academic Centre of Education, Culture and Research (ACECR participated in the study. They were assigned to intermediate and advanced levels with one class at each level, based on their results on a placement test. Then, the data were collected over five weeks, two one-hour sessions per week for each class during which the participants carried out some communicative tasks. Next, these interactions were analyzed to account for the types and contents of their LREs. The results revealed that L2 learners in both advanced and intermediate levels were primarily concerned with lexical LREs. Furthermore, based on the results it was found that incidental focus on form lended itself more easily to vocabulary teaching compared to other language components while grammar needs more explicit techniques of focus on form instruction.

  16. On Physical and Mechanical Behavior of Natural Marine Intermediate Deposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ming-lei; DENG Xue-jun

    2005-01-01

    Coastal structures may be built on natural sedimentary intermediate grounds, which mainly consist of silty soils and fine sandy soils. In this study, extensive field and laboratory tests were performed on the natural marine intermediate deposits to demonstrate the difference in behavior between natural marine clayey soils and natural marine intermediate deposits. The natural intermediate deposits have almost the same ratios of natural water content to liquid limit as those of the soft natural marine clays, but the former have much higher in-situ strength and sensitivity than the latter. The research results indicate that grain size distributions of soils affect significantly tip resistance obtained in field cone penetration tests. The mechanical parameters of natural marine intermediate deposits are also significantly affected by sample disturbance due to their high sensitivity and relatively large permeability. Unconfined compression shear tests largely underestimate the strength of natural marine intermediate soils. The triaxial consolidated compression shear tests with simulated in-situ confined pressure give results much better than those of uncomfined compression shear tests.

  17. [Individual biomass of natural Pinus densiflora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Jin, Y; Jin, C; Liu, J; Jin, Y

    2000-02-01

    The aboveground biomass of individuals with different growth potentials in natural Pinus densiflora forest with different stand densities was measured in Yanbian, Jilin Province. The variation of individual biomass affected by densities was in order of dominant tree branch > needle > bark. The biomass components of P. densifliora with different growth potentials varied markedly with the approaching of density class III, and the change of intermediate trees was similar to the whole stand. The vertical distributions of biomass of different trees were different from each other, but all showed that the biomass of trunks and barks was mainly distributed below 6 m high from ground, that of branches was within 6-10 m high, that of needles was uniform in the upper, middle and lower layers, and that of branches and needles in upper layer was least affected by density.

  18. Life cycle of Sarcocystis neurona in its natural intermediate host, the raccoon, Procyon lotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, J F; Dubey, J P; Oglesbee, M J; Reed, S M; Lindsay, D S; Capitini, L A; Njoku, C J; Vittitow, K L; Saville, W J A

    2002-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes encephalomyelitis in many species of mammals and is the most important cause of neurologic disease in the horse. Its complete life cycle is unknown, particularly its development and localization in the intermediate host. Recently, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) was recognized as a natural intermediate host of S. neurona. In the present study, migration and development of S. neurona was studied in 10 raccoons that were fed S. neurona sporocysts from experimentally infected opossums; 4 raccoons served as controls. Raccoons were examined at necropsy 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 15, 22, 37, and 77 days after feeding on sporocysts (DAFS). Tissue sections of most of the organs were studied histologically and reacted with anti-S. neurona-specific polyclonal rabbit serum in an immunohistochemical test. Parasitemia was demonstrated in peripheral blood of raccoons 3 and 5 DAFS. Individual zoites were seen in histologic sections of intestines of raccoons euthanized 1, 3, and 5 DAFS. Schizonts and merozoites were seen in many tissues 7 to 22 DAFS, particularly in the brain. Sarcocysts were seen in raccoons killed 22 DAFS. Sarcocysts at 22 DAFS were immature and seen only in skeletal muscle. Mature sarcocysts were seen in all skeletal samples, particularly in the tongue of the raccoon 77 DAFS; these sarcocysts were infective to laboratory-raised opossums. This is the first report of the complete development of S. neurona schizonts and sarcocysts in a natural intermediate host.

  19. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, S. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shimakura, H. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Ohara, K. [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, T. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S{sub AgAg}(Q) and S{sub RbRb}(Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S{sub AgRb}(Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM.

  20. Key Intermediates of Carbon Dioxide Reduction on Silver from Vibrational Nanospectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    The design of efficacious, selective heterogeneous catalysts relies on the knowledge of the nature of active sites and reactive intermediates involved in the catalytic transformation. This is also true in the case of carbon dioxide reduction, an important scientific and technological problem. With the goal of furthering mechanistic understanding of a complex transformation that yields multiple products, we are employing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to image carbon dioxide photoreduction on individual Ag nanoparticles within a heterogeneous dispersion. The lack of ensemble-averaging is allowing us to detect fleeting intermediates in the adsorption and catalytic photoreduction processes. In particular, we have detected on some sites physisorbed CO_{2} and at others chemisorbed CO_{2}^{-} anion radical, a critical intermediate in carbon dioxide reduction. The primary product formed also appears to vary from one catalytic nanoparticle to another: CO, formaldehyde, or formic acid. The origin of such heterogeneities in adsorption and photoreduction behavior are being traced to differences in nanoparticle structure or surface composition, from which structure/activity relationships will be established, with aid from electronic structure theory. This single-nanoparticle approach is providing molecular-level insights into a broad range of industrially and environmentally relevant catalytic transformations.

  1. Wide variation in anal sphincter muscles in cases of high- and intermediate-type male anorectal malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshio; Takasu, Hidemi; Sumida, Wataru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of sphincter muscle complex in anorectal malformation (ARM) needs to be investigated on a case-by-case basis. This study was undertaken to demonstrate the differences in the anal sphincter muscles between patients with the same type of ARM. Computed tomography (CT) data from cases of high- and intermediate-type male patients with ARM were reviewed using three-dimensional (3D) image analysis. Twenty-seven male patients with ARM (18 high and 9 intermediate) before anorectoplasty were assessed using multidetector-row helical CT (MRH-CT). A 3D reconstruction was made using volume rendering method. The multi-dimensional sections of the 3D reconstructed images of the pelvic muscles were then analyzed and compared with schematic drawings from the literature. The sphincters in the high and intermediate types of ARM could be divided into five groups. In 13 out of 18 cases in the high type and 7 out of 9 cases in the intermediate type, images of the sphincter muscles appeared different from schematic drawings appearing in the literature. In both high and intermediate types of ARM, more than 2/3 of cases demonstrated unexpectedly displaced and deformed hypoplastic sphincters. Therefore, we recommend that variations in anal sphincter should be investigated on an individual basis prior to surgery.

  2. Analysis of dynein intermediate chains, light intermediate chains and light chains in a cohort of hereditary peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Shelisa; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Drew, Alexander P; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2014-10-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) gene has been increasingly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), intellectual disability and malformations of cortical development. In addition, evidence from mouse models (Loa, catabolite repressor-activator (Cra) and Sprawling (Swl)) has shown that mutations in Dync1h1 cause a range of neurodegenerative phenotypes with motor and sensory neuron involvement. In this current study, we examined the possible contribution of other cytoplasmic dynein subunits that bind to DYNC1H1 as a cause of inherited peripheral neuropathy. We focused on screening the cytoplasmic dynein intermediate, light intermediate and light chain genes in a cohort of families with inherited peripheral neuropathies. Nine genes were screened and ten variants were detected, but none was identified as pathogenic, indicating that cytoplasmic dynein intermediate, light intermediate and light chains are not a cause of neuropathy in our cohort.

  3. Optimizing solid oxide fuel cell cathode processing route for intermediate temperature operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz-Vitoriano, N.; Bernuy-Lopez, Carlos; Ruiz de Larramendi, I.;

    2013-01-01

    -priced raw material and cost-effective production techniques.In this work the perovskite-type La0.6Ca0.4Fe0.8Ni0.2O3 (LCFN) oxide has been used in order to optimize intermediate temperature SOFC cathode processing route. The advantages this material presents arise from the low temperature powder calcination...... of temperatures (800-1000°C). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies revealed porous electrode microstructures, even when sintered at a temperature of just 800°C. The competitive performance of the electrodes sintered at low temperatures, combined with the low raw material cost, make these electrodes...

  4. Experimental evaluation of Odonata nymph in the biocontrol of schistosomiasis intermediate hosts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aly Younes; Hanaa El-Sherief; Fathia Gawish; Marwa Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the predatory potential of the Odonata nymph on freshwater snails that serve as intermediate hosts for Schistosoma species (Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria alexandrina). Methods: Observations on the searching, attacking and devouring of the two snail types with series of laboratory-based predation experiments, whose aims were to determine daily predation rate, differential predation, prey preference considering small-, medium-and large-sized snails were conducted. Results: Laboratory evaluation revealed that, the Odonata nymph could kill and consume the two intermediate hosts. The number of snails consumed differed according to the snail type, size and density. The times taken for searching and handling times were dependent on the snail size, type and satiation of the predator. The predation rate varied also with respect to snail type, size and density. This study also evaluated that Odonata nymphs consumed more Bulinus truncatus than Biomphalaria alexandrina per unit time, and that there may be a preference for smaller than larger snails. Conclusions: According to our observation, the predator, Hemianax ephippiger nymph may be a suitable biocontrol agent in connection with Schistosoma intermediate hosts.

  5. A hemi-fission intermediate links two mechanistically distinct stages of membrane fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Juha-Pekka; Shnyrova, Anna V; Sundborger, Anna C; Hortelano, Eva Rodriguez; Fuhrmans, Marc; Neumann, Sylvia; Müller, Marcus; Hinshaw, Jenny E; Schmid, Sandra L; Frolov, Vadim A

    2015-08-06

    Fusion and fission drive all vesicular transport. Although topologically opposite, these reactions pass through the same hemi-fusion/fission intermediate, characterized by a 'stalk' in which only the outer membrane monolayers of the two compartments have merged to form a localized non-bilayer connection. Formation of the hemi-fission intermediate requires energy input from proteins catalysing membrane remodelling; however, the relationship between protein conformational rearrangements and hemi-fusion/fission remains obscure. Here we analysed how the GTPase cycle of human dynamin 1, the prototypical membrane fission catalyst, is directly coupled to membrane remodelling. We used intramolecular chemical crosslinking to stabilize dynamin in its GDP·AlF4(-)-bound transition state. In the absence of GTP this conformer produced stable hemi-fission, but failed to progress to complete fission, even in the presence of GTP. Further analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain (PHD) locked in its membrane-inserted state facilitated hemi-fission. A second mode of dynamin activity, fuelled by GTP hydrolysis, couples dynamin disassembly with cooperative diminishing of the PHD wedging, thus destabilizing the hemi-fission intermediate to complete fission. Molecular simulations corroborate the bimodal character of dynamin action and indicate radial and axial forces as dominant, although not independent, drivers of hemi-fission and fission transformations, respectively. Mirrored in the fusion reaction, the force bimodality might constitute a general paradigm for leakage-free membrane remodelling.

  6. Listening strategy use, test anxiety and test performance of intermediate and advanced Iranian EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoof Hamzavi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning a foreign language has been related with some kind of strategic knowledge on the one hand, and some level of (test-taking apprehension or tension on the other hand, although a small amount of anxiety is normally expected as a natural warning symptom. The current study aimed at investigating the relationship between listening strategy use, test anxiety, and listening test performance of Iranian intermediate and advanced EFL learners. To this end, eighty (40 intermediate and 40 advanced Iranian EFL learners took part in the study by completing Lee’s (1997 Listening Comprehension Strategy Questionnaire, Sarason’s (1975 Test Anxiety Scale (TAS, and two monologues of Listening test performance selected from Listening part of TOEFL. The results of Pearson product moment correlation analyses revealed a significant negative correlation between test anxiety and listening test performance, but a significant positive association between listening strategy use and listening test performance. Furthermore, the results of multiple regression analyses indicated listening strategy use was a stronger predictor of listening test performance. Additionally, the results of independent samples t-test showed a significant difference between Iranian intermediate and advanced EFL learners regarding both their listening strategy use and level of test anxiety.

  7. Investigating the Relationship between Critical Thinking Skills and the Quality of Iranian Intermediate TEFL Students’ Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Rimani Nikou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study intended to find out the relationship between critical thinking skills and the quality of Iranian TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language students’ writing. One-hundred forty students who were homogeneous in their language proficiency were selected non-randomly. The researcher asked students to take part in a proficiency test named Nelson test (intermediate 200B and she chose students whose level was intermediate as participants of the study.  This study was an associational (correlational study. To achieve the goal of the study California Critical Thinking Test (form B was administered among intermediate students to measure students’ critical thinking skills (analysis, evaluation, inference. Then the researcher asked the participants to write on a given topic and their writings were rated by two language teachers by following the rules of scoring in Quellmaz's scale. The inter-rater correlation across all papers calculated in order to be sure about the objectivity and reliability of scores. The Pearson-Product Moment was used to examine the relationship between variables, furthermore multiple regressions was applied to predict the degree of their relationship. The results of the study revealed that there is a positive relationship between critical thing skills and writing quality. Furthermore, it was proved that evaluation has the strongest degree of relationship with the quality of writing. Keywords: Critical thinking, analysis, evaluation, inference, writing quality

  8. Decoding the folding of Burkholderia glumae lipase: folding intermediates en route to kinetic stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Pauwels

    Full Text Available The lipase produced by Burkholderia glumae folds spontaneously into an inactive near-native state and requires a periplasmic chaperone to reach its final active and secretion-competent fold. The B. glumae lipase-specific foldase (Lif is classified as a member of the steric-chaperone family of which the propeptides of α-lytic protease and subtilisin are the best known representatives. Steric chaperones play a key role in conferring kinetic stability to proteins. However, until present there was no solid experimental evidence that Lif-dependent lipases are kinetically trapped enzymes. By combining thermal denaturation studies with proteolytic resistance experiments and the description of distinct folding intermediates, we demonstrate that the native lipase has a kinetically stable conformation. We show that a newly discovered molten globule-like conformation has distinct properties that clearly differ from those of the near-native intermediate state. The folding fingerprint of Lif-dependent lipases is put in the context of the protease-prodomain system and the comparison reveals clear differences that render the lipase-Lif systems unique. Limited proteolysis unveils structural differences between the near-native intermediate and the native conformation and sets the stage to shed light onto the nature of the kinetic barrier.

  9. Structural intermediates and directionality of the swiveling motion of Pyruvate Phosphate Dikinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minges, Alexander; Ciupka, Daniel; Winkler, Christian; Höppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Groth, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a vital enzyme in cellular energy metabolism catalyzing the ATP- and Pi-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate from pyruvate in C4 -plants, but the reverse reaction forming ATP in bacteria and protozoa. The multi-domain enzyme is considered an efficient molecular machine that performs one of the largest single domain movements in proteins. However, a comprehensive understanding of the proposed swiveling domain motion has been limited by not knowing structural intermediates or molecular dynamics of the catalytic process. Here, we present crystal structures of PPDKs from Flaveria, a model genus for studying the evolution of C4 -enzymes from phylogenetic ancestors. These structures resolve yet unknown conformational intermediates and provide the first detailed view on the large conformational transitions of the protein in the catalytic cycle. Independently performed unrestrained MD simulations and configurational free energy calculations also identified these intermediates. In all, our experimental and computational data reveal strict coupling of the CD swiveling motion to the conformational state of the NBD. Moreover, structural asymmetries and nucleotide binding states in the PPDK dimer support an alternate binding change mechanism for this intriguing bioenergetic enzyme. PMID:28358005

  10. The effect of intermediate mass close binaries on the chemical evolution of Globular Clusters II

    CERN Document Server

    Mennekens, N; De Greve, J P

    2013-01-01

    The chemical processes during the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) evolution of intermediate mass single stars predict most of the observations of the different populations in Globular Clusters although some important issues still need to be further clarified. In particular, to reproduce the observed anticorrelations of Na-O and Al-Mg, chemically enriched gas lost during the AGB phase of intermediate mass single stars must be mixed with matter with a pristine chemical composition. The source of this matter is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, observations reveal that a significant fraction of the intermediate mass and massive stars are born as components of close binaries. We will investigate the effects of binaries on the chemical evolution of Globular Clusters and on the origin of matter with a pristine chemical composition that is needed for the single star AGB scenario to work. We use a population synthesis code that accounts for binary physics in order to estimate the amount and the composition of the ...

  11. Turbulence, aeration and bubble features of air-water flows over macro- and intermediate roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano PAGLIARA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Free surface flows in macro- and intermediate roughness conditions have a high aeration potential in which the flow characteristics vary with slopes and discharges. The underlying phenomenon of two phase flow characteristics in the macro and intermediate roughness conditions were analyzed in a setup assembled at the PITLAB center of the University of Pisa, Italy. Crushed angular rocks and hemispherical boulders were used to intensify the roughness nature of the bed. Flow discharges per unit width ranging between 0.03 m2/s and 0.09 m2/s and slopes between 0.26 and 0.46 were tested over different arrangements of rough bed. Analyses were mainly concentrated in the inner flow region which constitutes both bubbly and intermediate flow region. The findings revealed that two phase flow properties over rough bed were very much affected by the different rough bed arrangement. Turbulence features of two phase flows over rough beds were compared with that of the stepped chute data under similar flow conditions. Overall the results highlighted the flow features in the inner layers of the two phase flow.

  12. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) with Catalytic Intermediates and Substrate Analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopishetty, Bhaskar; Zhu, Jinge; Rajan, Rakhi; Sobczak, Adam J.; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Bell, Charles E.; Pei, Dehua; (OSU); (FIU)

    2009-05-12

    S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) cleaves the thioether bond in S-ribosylhomocysteine (SRH) to produce homocysteine (Hcys) and 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the precursor of the type II bacterial quorum sensing molecule (AI-2). The catalytic mechanism of LuxS comprises three distinct reaction steps. The first step involves carbonyl migration from the C1 carbon of ribose to C2 and the formation of a 2-ketone intermediate. The second step shifts the C=O group from the C2 to C3 position to produce a 3-ketone intermediate. In the final step, the 3-ketone intermediate undergoes a {beta}-elimination reaction resulting in the cleavage of the thioether bond. In this work, the 3-ketone intermediate was chemically synthesized and shown to be chemically and kinetically competent in the LuxS catalytic pathway. Substrate analogues halogenated at the C3 position of ribose were synthesized and reacted as time-dependent inhibitors of LuxS. The time dependence was caused by enzyme-catalyzed elimination of halide ions. Examination of the kinetics of halide release and decay of the 3-ketone intermediate catalyzed by wild-type and mutant LuxS enzymes revealed that Cys-84 is the general base responsible for proton abstraction in the three reaction steps, whereas Glu-57 likely facilitates substrate binding and proton transfer during catalysis.

  13. Social and Individual Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneiderman, Ben

    1989-01-01

    This reprint from "Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction" (Shneiderman) discusses the impact of computers on individuals and society. Highlights include individual opportunities for learning, entertainment, and cooperation through networking; problems with the use of computer systems; and the…

  14. Transcending Cognitive Individualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerubavel, Eviatar; Smith, Eliot R.

    2010-01-01

    Advancing knowledge in many areas of psychology and neuroscience, underlined by dazzling images of brain scans, appear to many professionals and to the public to show that people are on the way to explaining cognition purely in terms of processes within the individual's head. Yet while such cognitive individualism still dominates the popular…

  15. Individual Attitudes Towards Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäkel, Ina Charlotte; Smolka, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Using the 2007 wave of the Pew Global Attitudes Project, this paper finds statistically significant and economically large Stolper-Samuelson effects in individuals’ preference formation towards trade policy. High-skilled individuals are substantially more pro-trade than low-skilled individuals...

  16. Effects of departing individuals on collective behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yuta; Okuda, Shoma; Migita, Masao; Murakami, Hisashi; Tomaru, Takenori

    2017-07-01

    Utilizing living organisms' abilities is an effective approach to realize flexible and unconventional computing. One possible bio-inspired computer might be developed from animal collective research by clarifying collective behaviors. Therefore, it is important to reveal how collective animal behaviors emerge. In many studies, individuals departing from the other individualsare generally ignored. Is it not possible that such departing individuals contribute to the organization of such collectives? To investigate the effects of individuals departing from a collective against collective behaviors, we observed and analyzed the behaviors of 40 soldier crabs in four types of experimental arenas. The recorded behaviors demonstrate a temporally changing pattern and the existence of departing individuals. We analyzed the relationship between global activity and cohesion levels and verified the features of departing individuals. The results imply that departing individuals contribute to collective behaviors.

  17. Perspective: Spectroscopy and kinetics of small gaseous Criegee intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yuan-Pern, E-mail: yplee@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan and Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-14

    The Criegee intermediates, carbonyl oxides proposed by Criegee in 1949 as key intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, play important roles in many aspects of atmospheric chemistry. Because direct detection of these gaseous intermediates was unavailable until recently, previous understanding of their reactions, derived from indirect experimental evidence, had great uncertainties. Recent laboratory detection of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO and some larger members, produced from ultraviolet irradiation of corresponding diiodoalkanes in O{sub 2}, with various methods such as photoionization, ultraviolet absorption, infrared absorption, and microwave spectroscopy opens a new door to improved understanding of the roles of these Criegee intermediates. Their structures and spectral parameters have been characterized; their significant zwitterionic nature is hence confirmed. CH{sub 2}OO, along with other products, has also been detected directly with microwave spectroscopy in gaseous ozonolysis reactions of ethene. The detailed kinetics of the source reaction, CH{sub 2}I + O{sub 2}, which is critical to laboratory studies of CH{sub 2}OO, are now understood satisfactorily. The kinetic investigations using direct detection identified some important atmospheric reactions, including reactions with NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, water dimer, carboxylic acids, and carbonyl compounds. Efforts toward the characterization of larger Criegee intermediates and the investigation of related reactions are in progress. Some reactions of CH{sub 3}CHOO are found to depend on conformation. This perspective examines progress toward the direct spectral characterization of Criegee intermediates and investigations of the associated reaction kinetics, and indicates some unresolved problems and prospective challenges for this exciting field of research.

  18. Formation of a stalled early intermediate of pseudouridine synthesis monitored by real-time FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengesbach, Martin; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Hofmann, Benjamin; Helm, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Pseudouridine is the most abundant of more than 100 chemically distinct natural ribonucleotide modifications. Its synthesis consists of an isomerization reaction of a uridine residue in the RNA chain and is catalyzed by pseudouridine synthases. The unusual reaction mechanism has become the object of renewed research effort, frequently involving replacement of the substrate uridines with 5-fluorouracil (f(5)U). f(5)U is known to be a potent inhibitor of pseudouridine synthase activity, but the effect varies among the target pseudouridine synthases. Derivatives of f(5)U have previously been detected, which are thought to be either hydrolysis products of covalent enzyme-RNA adducts, or isomerization intermediates. Here we describe the interaction of pseudouridine synthase 1 (Pus1p) with f(5)U-containing tRNA. The interaction described is specific to Pus1p and position 27 in the tRNA anticodon stem, but the enzyme neither forms a covalent adduct nor stalls at a previously identified reaction intermediate of f(5)U. The f(5)U27 residue, as analyzed by a DNAzyme-based assay using TLC and mass spectrometry, displayed physicochemical properties unaltered by the reversible interaction with Pus1p. Thus, Pus1p binds an f(5)U-containing substrate, but, in contrast to other pseudouridine synthases, leaves the chemical structure of f(5)U unchanged. The specific, but nonproductive, interaction demonstrated here thus constitutes an intermediate of Pus turnover, stalled by the presence of f(5)U in an early state of catalysis. Observation of the interaction of Pus1p with fluorescence-labeled tRNA by a real-time readout of fluorescence anisotropy and FRET revealed significant structural distortion of f(5)U-tRNA structure in the stalled intermediate state of pseudouridine catalysis.

  19. Resolution of single and double Holliday junction recombination intermediates by GEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Punatar, Rajvee; Martin, Maria Jose; Wyatt, Haley D M; Chan, Ying Wai; West, Stephen C

    2017-01-17

    Genetic recombination provides an important mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Homologous pairing and strand exchange lead to the formation of DNA intermediates, in which sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes are covalently linked by four-way Holliday junctions (HJs). Depending on the type of recombination reaction that takes place, intermediates may have single or double HJs, and their resolution is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In mitotic cells, double HJs are primarily dissolved by the BLM helicase-TopoisomeraseIIIα-RMI1-RMI2 (BTR) complex, whereas single HJs (and double HJs that have escaped the attention of BTR) are resolved by structure-selective endonucleases known as HJ resolvases. These enzymes are ubiquitous in nature, because they are present in bacteriophage, bacteria, archaea, and simple and complex eukaryotes. The human HJ resolvase GEN1 is a member of the XPG/Rad2 family of 5'-flap endonucleases. Biochemical studies of GEN1 revealed that it cleaves synthetic DNA substrates containing a single HJ by a mechanism similar to that shown by the prototypic HJ resolvase, Escherichia coli RuvC protein, but it is unclear whether these substrates fully recapitulate the properties of recombination intermediates that arise within a physiological context. Here, we show that GEN1 efficiently cleaves both single and double HJs contained within large recombination intermediates. Moreover, we find that GEN1 exhibits a weak sequence preference for incision between two G residues that reside in a T-rich region of DNA. These results contrast with those obtained with RuvC, which exhibits a strict requirement for the consensus sequence 5'-(A)/TTT(G)/C-3'.

  20. Individual cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovel, R T; Sweet, R G

    1979-01-01

    Current cell sorting machines do not preserve the individual identity of processed cells; after analysis, the cells are assigned to a subpopulation where they are pooled with other similar cells. This paper reports progress on a system that sorts cells individually to precise locations on a microscope slide and preserves them for further observation with a light microscope while recording flow measurement data for each cell. Various electronic and mechanical modifications to an existing sorting machine are described that increase drop placement accuracy and permit individual cell sorting.

  1. Optimization of intermediate cooling and intermediate heating in the gas turbine process; Optimierung der Zwischenkuehlung und der Zwischenerhitzung beim Gasturbinenprozess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerrlein, K.

    1998-07-01

    The author investigated how the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine process can be improved by intermediate cooling, intermediate heating, or combined intermediate cooling and heating. The focus was on the pressure ratios of low-pressure compressors and high-pressure turbines. The numeric calculations were carried out using real gas characteristics. The findings suggest that intermediate coling inside the compressor has much more influence on the thermal efficiency than intermediate heating inside the turbine. However, the latter is advantageous in the case of gas turbines for combined cycle operation, as the off-gas temperatures required for steam generation are reached even at relatively low turbine inlet temperatures, so that NOx emissions of the gas turbine combustion chamber will be low. It is recommended that solitary gas turbines should be operated with intermediate cooling and gas turbines in combined cycle operation with intermediate heating. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit soll untersucht werden, in welcher Weise sich der thermische Wirkungsgrad des Gasturbinen-Prozesses durch Zwischenkuehlung, Zwischenerhitzung bzw. Zwischenkuehlung und Zwischenerhitzung verbessern laesst. Dabei sollen in erster Linie die Druckverhaeltnisse von ND-Verdichter bzw. HD-Turbine bestimmt werden, bei denen Zwischenkuehlung und Zwischenerhitzung vorgenommen werden sollen, um eine optimale Verbesserung des thermischen Wirkungsgrades zu erreichen. Die numerische Durchrechnung soll mit den Stoffwerten des realen Gases durchgefuehrt werden. Die numerischen Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Zwischenkuehlung im Verdichter einen weit groesseren Einfluss auf den thermischen Wirkungsgrad hat als die Zwischenerhitzung in der Turbine. Letztere ist aber bei Gasturbinen fuer den Kombibetrieb von Vorteil, erreicht man doch die fuer die Dampferzeugung notwendigen Abgastemperaturen der Gasturbine schon bei relativ niedrigen Turbineneintrittstemperaturen, so dass die NO{sub x}-Emission der

  2. Treating Children as Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... responsibilities, rewards, and punishment—parents must individualize their parenting while trying to remain fair to all. This ... esteem and behavioral style to life goals and career choices. Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Caring ...

  3. On American Individualism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李谷雨

    2016-01-01

    Among those American symbols like multiculturalism, hi-tech and its powerful status in the world, an important representative one is its individualism. This paper will briefly discuss it based on daily matters.

  4. Drought impact functions as intermediate step towards drought damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmair, Sophie; Svensson, Cecilia; Prosdocimi, Ilaria; Hannaford, Jamie; Helm Smith, Kelly; Svoboda, Mark; Stahl, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    While damage or vulnerability functions for floods and seismic hazards have gained considerable attention, there is comparably little knowledge on drought damage or loss. On the one hand this is due to the complexity of the drought hazard affecting different domains of the hydrological cycle and different sectors of human activity. Hence, a single hazard indicator is likely not able to fully capture this multifaceted hazard. On the other hand, drought impacts are often non-structural and hard to quantify or monetize. Examples are impaired navigability of streams, restrictions on domestic water use, reduced hydropower production, reduced tree growth, and irreversible deterioration/loss of wetlands. Apart from reduced crop yield, data about drought damage or loss with adequate spatial and temporal resolution is scarce, making the development of drought damage functions difficult. As an intermediate step towards drought damage functions we exploit text-based reports on drought impacts from the European Drought Impact report Inventory and the US Drought Impact Reporter to derive surrogate information for drought damage or loss. First, text-based information on drought impacts is converted into timeseries of absence versus presence of impacts, or number of impact occurrences. Second, meaningful hydro-meteorological indicators characterizing drought intensity are identified. Third, different statistical models are tested as link functions relating drought hazard indicators with drought impacts: 1) logistic regression for drought impacts coded as binary response variable; and 2) mixture/hurdle models (zero-inflated/zero-altered negative binomial regression) and an ensemble regression tree approach for modeling the number of drought impact occurrences. Testing the predictability of (number of) drought impact occurrences based on cross-validation revealed a good agreement between observed and modeled (number of) impacts for regions at the scale of federal states or

  5. Biological Individuality of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    RECIPIENT’S CAT * LOO NUMBER Biological Individuality of Man 5 TlrPE OF REPORT a PERIOD COVERED Technical « PERFORMING ORO REPORT...Variability 13 A. Background , 13 B. Slatistictl Approaches to Biological Variability 13 C. Genetic Aspects of Biological Variability . 14 III...ioiological determinants of individuality. Only recently, have genetic infaienccs been investigated and the potentialities for future control of bio

  6. Humor in kinderverhale in die tersiêre en intermediêre fases van taalonderwys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Niekerk

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Humour in children’s literature in the tertiary and intermediate phases of language education Humour is essential in the development of an individual and in the development of a healthy society in general, and research on humour is currently regarded as important in a variety of disciplines in the humanities. There are various ways in which an individual may be exposed to humour, and one of these is children’s stories. An instrument or model for studying humour in children’s stories is necessary and very useful: an instrument that takes into account developmental psychology, literary theory and the nature of humour. When these are combined, the nature, scope and effect of humour in children’s stories can be determined. This article explores ways in which such a model can be used at tertiary level in undergraduate and graduate studies, in teacher training and at the intermediate level when facilitating reading as one of the learning aims in language teaching to children from eight to twelve years (roughly Grades 4 to 6. Humour can be an instrument in the hands of authors and of adults as mediator or facilitator to sensitise young readers to humour in stories. As a consequence of this process of sensitising, readers’ reading and life skills are developed and their horizon of experience is broadened.

  7. Population genomics of divergence among extreme and intermediate color forms in a polymorphic insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jeffrey D; Jackson, Jason M; Dillon, Michael E; Strange, James P

    2016-02-01

    Geographic variation in insect coloration is among the most intriguing examples of rapid phenotypic evolution and provides opportunities to study mechanisms of phenotypic change and diversification in closely related lineages. The bumble bee Bombus bifarius comprises two geographically disparate color groups characterized by red-banded and black-banded abdominal pigmentation, but with a range of spatially and phenotypically intermediate populations across western North America. Microsatellite analyses have revealed that B. bifarius in the USA are structured into two major groups concordant with geography and color pattern, but also suggest ongoing gene flow among regional populations. In this study, we better resolve the relationships among major color groups to better understand evolutionary mechanisms promoting and maintaining such polymorphism. We analyze >90,000 and >25,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms derived from transcriptome (RNAseq) and double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD), respectively, in representative samples from spatial and color pattern extremes in B. bifarius as well as phenotypic and geographic intermediates. Both ddRAD and RNAseq data illustrate substantial genome-wide differentiation of the red-banded (eastern) color form from both black-banded (western) and intermediate (central) phenotypes and negligible differentiation among the latter populations, with no obvious admixture among bees from the two major lineages. Results thus indicate much stronger background differentiation among B. bifarius lineages than expected, highlighting potential challenges for revealing loci underlying color polymorphism from population genetic data alone. These findings will have significance for resolving taxonomic confusion in this species and in future efforts to investigate color-pattern evolution in B. bifarius and other polymorphic bumble bee species.

  8. Neutrino Oscillations in Intermediate States.II -- Wave Packets

    CERN Document Server

    Asahara, A; Shimomura, T; Yabuki, T

    2004-01-01

    We analyze oscillations of intermediate neutrinos in terms of scattering of particles described by Gaussian wave packets. We study a scalar model as in the previous paper (I) but in realistic situations, where two particles of the initial state and final state are wave packets and neutrinos are in the intermediate state. The oscillation of the intermediate neutrino is found from the time evolution of the total transition probability between the initial state and final state. The effect of a finite lifetime and a finite relaxation time $\\tau$ are also studied. We find that the oscillation pattern depends on the magnitude of wave packet sizes of particles in the initial state and final state and the lifetime of the initial particle. For $\\Delta m^2=10^{-2}$ eV$^2$, the oscillation probability deviates from the standard formula, if the wave packet sizes are around $10^{-13}$ m for 0.4 MeV neutrino.

  9. Intermediate electrostatic field for the generalized elongation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Korchowiec, Jacek; Aoki, Yuriko

    2015-05-18

    An intermediate electrostatic field is introduced to improve the accuracy of fragment-based quantum-chemical computational methods by including long-range polarizations of biomolecules. The point charge distribution of the intermediate field is generated by a charge sensitivity analysis that is parameterized for five different population analyses, namely, atoms-in-molecules, Hirshfeld, Mulliken, natural orbital, and Voronoi population analysis. Two model systems are chosen to demonstrate the performance of the generalized elongation method (ELG) combined with the intermediate electrostatic field. The calculations are performed for the STO-3G, 6-31G, and 6-31G(d) basis sets and compared with reference Hartree-Fock calculations. It is shown that the error in the total energy is reduced by one order of magnitude, independently of the population analyses used. This demonstrates the importance of long-range polarization in electronic-structure calculations by fragmentation techniques.

  10. Replicative intermediates of maize streak virus found during leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Julia B; Shepherd, Dionne N; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind; Rybicki, Edward P; Jeske, Holger

    2010-04-01

    Geminiviruses of the genera Begomovirus and Curtovirus utilize three replication modes: complementary-strand replication (CSR), rolling-circle replication (RCR) and recombination-dependent replication (RDR). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we now show for the first time that maize streak virus (MSV), the type member of the most divergent geminivirus genus, Mastrevirus, does the same. Although mastreviruses have fewer regulatory genes than other geminiviruses and uniquely express their replication-associated protein (Rep) from a spliced transcript, the replicative intermediates of CSR, RCR and RDR could be detected unequivocally within infected maize tissues. All replicative intermediates accumulated early and, to varying degrees, were already present in the shoot apex and leaves at different maturation stages. Relative to other replicative intermediates, those associated with RCR increased in prevalence during leaf maturation. Interestingly, in addition to RCR-associated DNA forms seen in other geminiviruses, MSV also apparently uses dimeric open circular DNA as a template for RCR.

  11. Intermediation in Open Development: A Knowledge Stewardship Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. A. Reilly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Open Development (OD is a subset of ICT4D that studies the potential of IT-enabled openness to support social change among poor or marginalized populations. Early OD work examined the potential of IT-enabled openness to decentralize power and enable public engagement by disintermediating knowledge production and dissemination. However, in practice, intermediaries have emerged to facilitate open data and related knowledge production activities in development processes. We identify five models of intermediation in OD work: decentralized, arterial, ecosystem, bridging, and communities of practice and examine the implications of each for stewardship of open processes. We conclude that studying OD through these five forms of intermediation is a productive way of understanding whether and how different patterns of knowledge stewardship influence development outcomes. We also offer suggestions for future research that can improve our understanding of how to sustain openness, facilitate public engagement, and ensure that intermediation contributes to open development.

  12. Characterization of the Partially Folded Monomeric Intermediate of Creatine Kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴龙斗; 周海梦

    2002-01-01

    The importance of understanding the protein folding pathway and intermediates is well recognized on the basis of extensive studies of protein folding in vitro and in vivo. Creatine kinase (CK) is a typical model for studying unfolding and refolding of proteins due to several interesting properties. Recent studies on the folding of CK show that its partially folded monomeric intermediate is present kinetically and is stable at equilibrium. The present paper contains 33 References as a mini review to characterize the properties of CK from studies on the CK folding pathway. Characterization of these intermediates is an essential step toward understanding the mechanism of protein folding. Some well-determined schemes are suggested as protein folding models.

  13. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middeldorp, Jinte; Kamphuis, Willem; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Achoui, Dalila; Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Tijn, Paula; Fischer, David F.; Berkers, Celia; Ovaa, Huib; Quinlan, Roy A.; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression of the astrocytic intermediate filament protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of astrogliosis. This process occurs in the brain during aging and neurodegeneration and coincides with impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs protein degradation; therefore, we hypothesized that the increase in GFAP may be the result of impaired proteasomal activity in astrocytes. We investigated the effect of proteasome inhibitors on GFAP expression and other intermediate filament proteins in human astrocytoma cells and in a rat brain model for astrogliosis. Extensive quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis resulted unexpectedly in a strong decrease of GFAP mRNA to Hol, E. M. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19332645

  14. Revising the Role of a Dioxirane as an Intermediate in the Uncatalyzed Hydroperoxidation of Cyclohexanone in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhko, Elena; Solmi, Stefania; Cavani, Fabrizio; Albini, Angelo; Righi, Paolo; Ravelli, Davide

    2015-06-19

    The mechanism of the oxidation of cyclohexanone with an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide has been investigated. Experiments revealed the preliminary formation of an intermediate, identified as cyclohexylidene dioxirane, in equilibrium with the ketone, followed by formation of 1-hydroperoxycyclohexanol (Criegee adduct). Computational analysis with explicit inclusion of up to two water molecules rationalized the formation of the dioxirane intermediate via addition of the hydroperoxide anion to the ketone and revealed that this species is not involved in the formation of the Criegee adduct. The direct addition of hydrogen peroxide to the ketone is predicted to be favored over hydrolysis of the dioxirane, the latter in competition with ring opening to carbonyl oxide followed by hydration. However, dioxirane may account for the formation of the bis-hydroperoxide derivative.

  15. Evidence of long-term structured cuckoo parasitism on individual magpie hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Morales, Mercedes; Gabriel Martínez, Juan; Martín-Gálvez, David; A Dawson, Deborah; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Juan; Burke, Terry; Avilés, Jesús M

    2013-03-01

    Brood parasites usually reduce their host's breeding success, resulting in strong selection for the evolution of host defences. Intriguingly, some host individuals/populations show no defence against parasitism, which has been explained within the frame of three different evolutionary hypotheses. One of these hypotheses posits that intermediate levels of defence at the population level may result from nonrandom distribution of parasitism among host individuals (i.e. structured parasitism). Empirical evidence for structured brood parasitism is, however, lacking for hosts of European cuckoos due to the absence of long-term studies. Here, we seek to identify the patterns of structured parasitism by studying great spotted cuckoo parasitism on individual magpie hosts over five breeding seasons. We also aim to identify whether individual characteristics of female magpies and/or their territories were related to the status of repeated parasitism. We found that 28·3% of the females in our population consistently escaped from cuckoo parasitism. Only 11·3% of females were always parasitized, and the remaining 60·4% changed their parasitism status. The percentage of females that maintained their status of parasitism (i.e. either parasitized or nonparasitized) between consecutive years varied over the study. Females that never suffered cuckoo parasitism built bigger nests than parasitized females at the beginning of the breeding season and smaller nests than those of parasitized females later in the season. Nonparasitized females also moved little from year to year and preferred areas with different characteristics over the course of the breeding season than parasitized females. Overall, females escaping from cuckoo parasitism reared twice as many chicks per year than those that were parasitized. In conclusion, our study reveals for first time the existence of a structured pattern of cuckoo parasitism based on phenotypic characteristics of individual hosts and of their

  16. Receptor- and reactive intermediate-mediated mechanisms of teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Peter G; Lee, Crystal J J; McCallum, Gordon P; Perstin, Julia; Harper, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely alter the development of the fetus at critical periods during pregnancy, resulting in death, or in structural and functional birth defects in the surviving offspring. This process of teratogenesis may not be evident until a decade or more after birth. Postnatal functional abnormalities include deficits in brain function, a variety of metabolic diseases, and cancer. Due to the high degree of fetal cellular division and differentiation, and to differences from the adult in many biochemical pathways, the fetus is highly susceptible to teratogens, typically at low exposure levels that do not harm the mother. Insights into the mechanisms of teratogenesis come primarily from animal models and in vitro systems, and involve either receptor-mediated or reactive intermediate-mediated processes. Receptor-mediated mechanisms involving the reversible binding of xenobiotic substrates to a specific receptor are exemplified herein by the interaction of the environmental chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or "dioxin") with the cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which translocates to the nucleus and, in association with other proteins, binds to AH-responsive elements (AHREs) in numerous genes, initiating changes in gene transcription that can perturb development. Alternatively, many xenobiotics are bioactivated by fetal enzymes like the cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) to highly unstable electrophilic or free radical reactive intermediates. Electrophilic reactive intermediates can covalently (irreversibly) bind to and alter the function of essential cellular macromolecules (proteins, DNA), causing developmental anomalies. Free radical reactive intermediates can enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules and/or altered signal transduction. The teratogenicity of reactive intermediates is determined to a large extent

  17. Imaging multiple intermediates of single-virus membrane fusion mediated by distinct fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Kye-Il; Tai, April; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wong, Clement; Wang, Pin

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion plays an essential role in the entry of enveloped viruses into target cells. The merging of viral and target cell membranes is catalyzed by viral fusion proteins, which involves multiple sequential steps in the fusion process. However, the fusion mechanisms mediated by different fusion proteins involve multiple transient intermediates that have not been well characterized. Here, we report a synthetic virus platform that allows us to better understand the different fusion mechanisms driven by the diverse types fusion proteins. The platform consists of lentiviral particles coenveloped with a surface antibody, which serves as the binding protein, along with a fusion protein derived from either influenza virus (HAmu) or Sindbis virus (SINmu). By using a single virus tracking technique, we demonstrated that both HAmu- and SINmu-bearing viruses enter cells through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but they required different endosomal trafficking routes to initiate viral fusion. Direct observation of single viral fusion events clearly showed that hemifusion mediated by SINmu upon exposure to low pH occurs faster than that mediated by HAmu. Monitoring sequential fusion processes by dual labeling the outer and inner leaflets of viral membranes also revealed that the SINmu-mediated hemifusion intermediate is relatively long-lived as compared with that mediated by HAmu. Taken together, we have demonstrated that the combination of this versatile viral platform with the techniques of single virus tracking can be a powerful tool for revealing molecular details of fusion mediated by various fusion proteins.

  18. Dimerization interface of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase tunes the formation of its catalytic intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhi Xu

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD, EC 1.1.1.35 is a homodimeric enzyme localized in the mitochondrial matrix, which catalyzes the third step in fatty acid β-oxidation. The crystal structures of human HAD and subsequent complexes with cofactor/substrate enabled better understanding of HAD catalytic mechanism. However, numerous human diseases were found related to mutations at HAD dimerization interface that is away from the catalytic pocket. The role of HAD dimerization in its catalytic activity needs to be elucidated. Here, we solved the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans HAD (cHAD that is highly conserved to human HAD. Even though the cHAD mutants (R204A, Y209A and R204A/Y209A with attenuated interactions on the dimerization interface still maintain a dimerization form, their enzymatic activities significantly decrease compared to that of the wild type. Such reduced activities are in consistency with the reduced ratios of the catalytic intermediate formation. Further molecular dynamics simulations results reveal that the alteration of the dimerization interface will increase the fluctuation of a distal region (a.a. 60-80 that plays an important role in the substrate binding. The increased fluctuation decreases the stability of the catalytic intermediate formation, and therefore the enzymatic activity is attenuated. Our study reveals the molecular mechanism about the essential role of the HAD dimerization interface in its catalytic activity via allosteric effects.

  19. A Substellar Companion to the Intermediate-Mass Giant 11 Com

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Y J; Zhao, G; Noguchi, Kunio; Wang, H; Kambe, Eiji; Ando, Hiroyasu; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Chen, Y Q; Okada, Norio; Toyota, Eri; Omiya, Masashi; Masuda, Seiji; Takeda, Yoichi; Murata, Daisuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Ida, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    We report the detection of a substellar companion orbiting the intermediate-mass giant star 11 Com (G8 III). Precise Doppler measurements of the star from Xinglong station and Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO) revealed Keplerian velocity variations with an orbital period of 326.03 +/- 0.32 days, a semiamplitude of 302.8 +/- 2.6 m/s, and an eccentricity of 0.231 +/- 0.005. Adopting a stellar mass of 2.7 +/- 0.3 M_solar, the minimum mass of the companion is 19.4 +/- 1.5 M_Jup, well above the deuterium burning limit, and the semimajor axis is 1.29 +/- 0.05 AU. This is the first result from the joint planet search program between China and Japan aiming at revealing statistics of substellar companions around intermediate-mass giants. 11 Com b emerged from 300 targets of the planet search program at OAO. The current detection rate of a brown dwarf candidate seems to be comparable to that around solar-type stars within orbital separations of $\\sim$3 AU.

  20. Surface Intermediates on Metal Electrodes at High Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms widely suggested for the O2-reduc-tion or H2-oxidation SOFC reactions involve inter-mediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In airat moderate temperatures (500øC) Pt in contact with YSZ ...... is covered with adsorbed oxygen which vanishes at high temperature (1000øC). On Ni (YSZ) a specific layer of NiO is observed abovethe equilibrium potential while no surface species can identified at SOFC anode conditions....

  1. On the polarization of fermion in an intermediate state

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloshin, A E

    2016-01-01

    We show that calculation of a scattered fermion polarization (for a pure initial state) is equivalent to the problem of looking for complete polarization axis of bispinor. This gives the method for calculation of polarization applicable for both final and intermediate state fermions. We suggest to use fermion propagator (bare or dressed) in form of spectral representation, which gives the orthogonal off-shell energy projectors. This representation leads to covariant separation of particle and antiparticle contributions and gives a natural definition for polarization of intermediate state fermion.

  2. Surface intermediates on metal electrodes at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse;

    1998-01-01

    in contact with YSZ is covered with adsorbed oxygen which vanishes at high temperature (1000 degrees C). On Ni (YSZ) a specific layer of NiO is observed above the equilibrium potential while no surface species involving hydrogen can be identified at SOFC anode conditions. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier......The mechanisms widely conceived for the O(2)-reduction or H(2)-oxidation reactions in SOFC's involve intermediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In air at moderate temperatures (500 degrees C) Pt...

  3. THE CASE FOR AN INTERMEDIATE EXCHANGE RATE REGIME

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN WILLIAMSON

    2007-01-01

    The argument that any exchange rate regimes other than firmly fixed and freely floating rates were infeasible — the so-called bipolarity thesis — acquired great popularity in the wake of the Asian crisis of a decade ago, but it has almost vanished today. One reason is surely the unkind empirical evidence, which shows that intermediate regimes — measured as those where both reserve and exchange rate changes lie in an intermediate range — are not in fact tending to disappear (Levy Yeyati and St...

  4. Gravitational Radiation of Binaries Coalescence into Intermediate Mass Black Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑾; 仲元红; 潘宇

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the gravitation waveforms of binaries coalescence into intermediate mass black holes (about 30 times of the solar mass). We focus on the non-spinning intermediate mass black hole located less than 100 Mpc from earth. By comparing two simulation waveforms (effective one body numerical relativity waveform (EOBNR), phenomenological waveform), we discuss the relationship between the effective distance and frequency; and through analyzing large amounts of data in event, we find that the phenomenological waveform is much smoother than EOBNR waveform, and has higher accuracy at the same effective distance.

  5. Intermediate Mass Fragments Emission in Peripheral Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Taccetti, N.

    The collision 116Sn + 93Nb at 29.5 AMeV in direct and reverse kinematics has been studied at LNS in Catania. In particular the emission pattern in the νperp - νpar plane of Intermediate Mass Fragments with Z=3-7 (IMF's) shows that for peripheral reactions most of IMF's are emitted at velocities intermediate between those of the projectile- and target-like products. From coulomb trajectory calculations one can infere that these IMF's are produced mainly in the interaction zone, in a short time interval at the end of the target-projectile interaction.

  6. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  7. Sobre o teorema do valor intermediário

    OpenAIRE

    Morais, Fabio Maia de [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study the Intermediate Value Theorem and we present some applications. This kind of theorem is typical from Calculus in graduation courses. But it is easy to understand and it can be used to solve problems related to topics from high school, for example, to guarantee the existence of solutions for certain equations Neste trabalho estudamos o Teorema do Valor Intermediário e apresentamos várias aplica ções. Embora seja um teorema visto em cursos universitários, o teorema e d...

  8. Heat reveals faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinreich, Bernhard [Solarschmiede GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Engineering Dept.

    2010-07-01

    Gremlins cannot hide from the all-revealing view of a thermographic camera, whereby it makes no difference whether it is a roof-mounted system or a megawatt-sized farm. Just as diverse are the range of faults that, with the growing level of expertise, can now be detected and differentiated with even greater detail. (orig.)

  9. The Conscious Individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the evolutionary development of human consciousness and its increasingly complex and sophisticated organization as human personality from the instinctive behavior of the animal and the subconscious conformity characteristic of early forms of human civilization through progressive stages of transition from physical to social to mental levels of awareness and from the undifferentiated social consciousness of the member of the tribe to the emergence of independent thinking, creativity and uniqueness, which characterize the Conscious Individual. The individual and the collective evolve in tandem. The collective imparts its acquired capacities to its members. The emerging individual acts as a catalyst to spur further development of the collective. Each stage of the journey is the same in essence and structure at progressively higher levels of consciousness and organization. The higher the level achieved by the collective in terms of quality and complexity, the greater the knowledge and organization demanded of the individual. The article ends by cataloging crucial points at which modern society is mired in outmoded conceptions, superstitious beliefs, pre-modern values and archaic institutions that obstruct humanity’s further evolution from problems and limitations to ever-expanding opportunities. The conscious individual is the key to that process.

  10. Unfavorable Individuals in Social Gaming Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichao; Chen, Guanrong; Guan, Jihong; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-12-01

    In social gaming networks, the current research focus has been on the origin of widespread reciprocal behaviors when individuals play non-cooperative games. In this paper, we investigate the topological properties of unfavorable individuals in evolutionary games. The unfavorable individuals are defined as the individuals gaining the lowest average payoff in a round of game. Since the average payoff is normally considered as a measure of fitness, the unfavorable individuals are very likely to be eliminated or change their strategy updating rules from a Darwinian perspective. Considering that humans can hardly adopt a unified strategy to play with their neighbors, we propose a divide-and-conquer game model, where individuals can interact with their neighbors in the network with appropriate strategies. We test and compare a series of highly rational strategy updating rules. In the tested scenarios, our analytical and simulation results surprisingly reveal that the less-connected individuals in degree-heterogeneous networks are more likely to become the unfavorable individuals. Our finding suggests that the connectivity of individuals as a social capital fundamentally changes the gaming environment. Our model, therefore, provides a theoretical framework for further understanding the social gaming networks.

  11. Individually Controlled Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    individual differences in physiological and psychological response, clothing insulation, activity, preference for air temperature and movement, etc., exist between people. Environmental conditions acceptable for most of the occupants in buildings may be achieved by providing each occupant......The thermal environment and inhaled air quality in buildings to which occupants are exposed has an effect on their health, comfort, performance and productivity. Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform environment. However, large...... knowledge on human response to an individually controlled microenvironment. Recently developed new principles and methods for individually controlled local heating and clean air distribution aimed at improving occupants¿ comfort and performance, as well as protection of occupants from airborne transmission...

  12. [Individual adaptation strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldasheva, A A

    2014-01-01

    The article looks at the relation between adaptation strategy and individual style of activity based on the doctrine of human adaptation of V.I. Medvedev that enables opening up characteristics of professional activity in diverse environments. It illustrates a role and the relation between physiological and psychological mechanisms, which can vary, depending on individual adaptation strategies of a person. Theoretical and practical studies based on activity paradigm allow us to look at the basic principles of human interaction with the environment from a new perspective. Based on the law on the conceptual model of adaptation proposed by V.I. Medvedev, the article illustrates that humans are active figures in adaptation situations, modeling their own adaption strategies, using different individual styles manifested in the programs of adaptive behaviour.

  13. Nitrous oxide production from reactive nitrification intermediates: a concerted action of biological and chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Nicolas; Heil, Jannis; Liu, Shurong; Wei, Jing; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    intermediates into the soil matrix. It will be shown that the magnitude of these chemically produced N2O fluxes is not only governed by soil nitrogen availability and soil water content, but also by organic matter content and composition, pH, redox conditions and redox-active metal ion content. The presented data reveal that the interplay between biological and chemical processes is relevant for soil N2O emissions. The integration of these processes and their additional controlling variables in soil N trace gas emission models would very likely have a great potential for reducing the uncertainty in emission model results and for facilitating the design of appropriate, site-specific N2O mitigation strategies.

  14. Exploring Individual Differences in Preschoolers' Causal Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Aubry; Booth, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Preschoolers, as a group, are highly attuned to causality, and this attunement is known to facilitate memory, learning, and problem solving. However, recent work reveals substantial individual variability in the strength of children's "causal stance," as demonstrated by their curiosity about and preference for new causal information. In…

  15. Individual Innovativeness Levels of Educational Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coklar, Ahmet Naci

    2012-01-01

    In the present study carried out with 190 educational administrators, the individual innovativeness of educational administrators was examined. As a result of the study, it was found out that the educational administrators considered themselves as early adaptors. It was also revealed that professional seniority was not important in terms of…

  16. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual DosimetryWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY/JUNE will be available from their usual dispatchers on Tuesday 2 May.Please have your films changed before the 12 May.The colour of the dosimeter valid in is MAY/JUNE is YELLOW.Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Friday 28 April.

  17. Individualizing anaemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Francisco, Angel L M

    2010-12-01

    Individualized strategies for managing renal anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) need to be advanced. Recent outcomes from clinical studies prompted a narrowing of the guideline-recommended haemoglobin target (11-12 g/dL) due to increased mortality and morbidity when targeting higher haemoglobin concentrations. Maintaining a narrow target is a clinical challenge, as haemoglobin concentration tends to fluctuate. The goal of individualized treatment is to achieve the haemoglobin target at the lowest ESA dose while avoiding significant fluctuations in haemoglobin concentrations and persistently low or high concentrations. This may require changes to the ESA dose and dosing frequency over the course of treatment.

  18. Breeding performance of blue tits (Cyanistes cæruleus ultramarinus) in relation to lead pollution and nest failure rates in rural, intermediate, and urban sites in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmia, Zahra; Scheifler, Renaud; Crini, Nadia; Maas, Samuel; Giraudoux, Patrick; Benyacoub, Slim

    2013-03-01

    The breeding parameters and the egg and nestling morphology of Cyanistes caeruleus populations from rural, intermediate, and urban sites in Algeria and the relationships of those variables with lead contamination were studied during three consecutive years. Breeding success was explained only by predation and vandalism rates. Predation was higher in the rural area, whereas vandalism was higher in the urban site. The other measured breeding parameters and egg characteristics were relatively insensitive to study site. The morphology of urban nestlings exhibited a trend toward smaller body size and mass compared to individuals from intermediate and rural sites. Although lead concentrations were higher in the tissues of urban birds than in intermediate and rural individuals, we did not detect a clear influence of this variable on nestling morphology. We conclude that urbanization influenced blue tit breeding parameters through predation and vandalism and nestling morphology through mechanisms other than lead pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) harbor Sarcocystis neurona and act as intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, L S; Mehler, S; Nelson, K; Elsheikha, H M; Murphy, A J; Knust, B; Tanhauser, S M; Gearhart, P M; Rossano, M G; Bowman, D D; Schott, H C; Patterson, J S

    2008-05-06

    We tested the hypothesis that brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) harbor Sarcocystis neurona, the agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), and act as intermediate hosts for this parasite. In summer 1999, wild caught brown-headed cowbirds were collected and necropsied to determine infection rate with Sarcocystis spp. by macroscopic inspection. Seven of 381 (1.8%) birds had grossly visible sarcocysts in leg muscles with none in breast muscles. Histopathology revealed two classes of sarcocysts in leg muscles, thin-walled and thick-walled suggesting two species. Electron microscopy showed that thick-walled cysts had characteristics of S. falcatula and thin-walled cysts had characteristics of S. neurona. Thereafter, several experiments were conducted to confirm that cowbirds had viable S. neurona that could be transmitted to an intermediate host and cause disease. Specific-pathogen-free opossums fed cowbird leg muscle that was enriched for muscle either with or without visible sarcocysts all shed high numbers of sporocysts by 4 weeks after infection, while the control opossum fed cowbird breast muscle was negative. These sporocysts were apparently of two size classes, 11.4+/-0.7 microm by 7.6+/-0.4 microm (n=25) and 12.6+/-0.6 microm by 8.0+/-0 microm (n=25). When these sporocysts were excysted and introduced into equine dermal cell tissue culture, schizogony occurred, most merozoites survived and replicated long term and merozoites sampled from the cultures with long-term growth were indistinguishable from known S. neurona isolates. A cowbird Sarcocystis isolate, Michigan Cowbird 1 (MICB1), derived from thin-walled sarcocysts from cowbirds that was passaged in SPF opossums and tissue culture went on to produce neurological disease in IFNgamma knockout mice indistinguishable from that of the positive control inoculated with S. neurona. This, together with the knowledge that S. falcatula does not cause lesions in IFNgamma knockout mice, showed that cowbird

  20. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.