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Sample records for reveal in-situ time-resolved

  1. Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary mineralogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Rossman, George R; Gleckler, Anthony

    2010-09-10

    Planetary mineralogy can be revealed through a variety of remote sensing and in situ investigations that precede any plans for eventual sample return. We briefly review those techniques and focus on the capabilities for on-surface in situ examination of Mars, Venus, the Moon, asteroids, and other bodies. Over the past decade, Raman spectroscopy has continued to develop as a prime candidate for the next generation of in situ planetary instruments, as it provides definitive structural and compositional information of minerals in their natural geological context. Traditional continuous-wave Raman spectroscopy using a green laser suffers from fluorescence interference, which can be large (sometimes saturating the detector), particularly in altered minerals, which are of the greatest geophysical interest. Taking advantage of the fact that fluorescence occurs at a later time than the instantaneous Raman signal, we have developed a time-resolved Raman spectrometer that uses a streak camera and pulsed miniature microchip laser to provide picosecond time resolution. Our ability to observe the complete time evolution of Raman and fluorescence spectra in minerals makes this technique ideal for exploration of diverse planetary environments, some of which are expected to contain strong, if not overwhelming, fluorescence signatures. We discuss performance capability and present time-resolved pulsed Raman spectra collected from several highly fluorescent and Mars-relevant minerals. In particular, we have found that conventional Raman spectra from fine grained clays, sulfates, and phosphates exhibited large fluorescent signatures, but high quality spectra could be obtained using our time-resolved approach.

  2. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  3. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mueller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA. The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.

  4. Nanocrystallization of amorphous alloys using microwaves: In situ time-resolved synchrotron radiation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicula, R; Stir, M; Ishizaki, K; Vaucher, S [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research - Empa, Feuerwerkerstr. 39, CH 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Catala-Civera, J M, E-mail: radu.nicula@empa.c [Polytechnical University of Valencia, School of Telecommunication, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-01-01

    Important energy and time savings can be achieved with the thermal treatment of materials by replacing conventional heating methods with microwave heating. The nanocrystallization of Co-Fe-W-B amorphous alloy powders under microwave irradiation was followed for the first time by in situ time-resolved synchrotron radiation powder diffraction. It is shown that even a very short exposure to the electromagnetic field (single pulse microwave application) typically of the order of a few seconds is sufficient to obtain the bulk nano-crystalline state. A metastable high-temperature Co-W-B orthorhombic phase forms during the microwave heating, which gradually transforms to the tetragonal Co{sub 2}B stable phase.

  5. In situ characterization of ZnTe epilayer irradiation via time-resolved and power-density-dependent Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemeier, V.; Berth, G.; Zrenner, A.; Larramendi, E. M.; Woggon, U.; Lischka, K.; Schikora, D.

    2011-10-01

    Laser irradiation damage in ZnTe epilayers was analyzed in situ by power-density-dependent and time-resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy. Damage by ablation or compound decomposition on the sample surface was revealed by the decrease of the ZnTe-nLO mode intensity with the increase of laser power density. The appearance of the peaks associated with the stronger crystalline-tellurium modes, tellurium aggregates and second-order Raman scattering at room temperature μ-Raman spectra was observed for higher power densities than 4.4 × 105 W cm-2. The Raman signal time transients of ZnTe-nLO and crystalline-tellurium modes reveal an exponential evolution of the laser irradiation damage and a fast formation of crystalline tellurium aggregates on the layer surface.

  6. Time Resolved Nucleation and Growth of Monodisperse FeOOH Nanoparticles Observed in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, B. A.; Zhu, M.; Zhang, H.; Waychunas, G.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The nucleation and growth of oxide minerals from aqueous solution is a poorly understood process. Complexities such as two-stage precipitation, phase transformation, and hydrolysis often inhibit simple interpretation. In this study, we track the thermally induced nucleation and growth of akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanoparticles from FeCl3 solutions, using in situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in reaction temperature (from 37 deg C to 80 deg C) and FeCl3 concentration (from 5 mM to 800 mM) produce systematic changes in nucleation rate, growth rate, particle size distribution, and aspect ratio. Low FeCl3 concentrations and high temperatures lead to formation of very small particles via rapid nucleation. (FeCl3 solutions are actually more supersaturated with respect to akaganeite when concentrations are low, due to the acid-base chemistry of ferric iron.) Increasing the FeCl3 concentration leads to large, highly monodisperse particles via size focused growth. Suspensions of highly monodisperse, elongated particles are found to self-organize into two dimensional colloidal crystals. The well-controlled growth processes in this system make it possible to conduct detailed kinetic modeling, and determine how both nucleation and growth rate respond to changes in the experimental conditions.

  7. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  8. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J.; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  9. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  10. Time-resolved metabolomics reveals metabolic modulation in rice foliage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arita Masanori

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate the interaction of dynamics among modules that constitute biological systems, comprehensive datasets obtained from "omics" technologies have been used. In recent plant metabolomics approaches, the reconstruction of metabolic correlation networks has been attempted using statistical techniques. However, the results were unsatisfactory and effective data-mining techniques that apply appropriate comprehensive datasets are needed. Results Using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS and capillary electrophoresis diode-array detection (CE-DAD, we analyzed the dynamic changes in the level of 56 basic metabolites in plant foliage (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica at hourly intervals over a 24-hr period. Unsupervised clustering of comprehensive metabolic profiles using Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM allowed classification of the biochemical pathways activated by the light and dark cycle. The carbon and nitrogen (C/N metabolism in both periods was also visualized as a phenotypic linkage map that connects network modules on the basis of traditional metabolic pathways rather than pairwise correlations among metabolites. The regulatory networks of C/N assimilation/dissimilation at each time point were consistent with previous works on plant metabolism. In response to environmental stress, glutathione and spermidine fluctuated synchronously with their regulatory targets. Adenine nucleosides and nicotinamide coenzymes were regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We also demonstrated that SOM analysis was applicable to the estimation of unidentifiable metabolites in metabolome analysis. Hierarchical clustering of a correlation coefficient matrix could help identify the bottleneck enzymes that regulate metabolic networks. Conclusion Our results showed that our SOM analysis with appropriate metabolic time-courses effectively revealed the synchronous dynamics among metabolic modules and elucidated the

  11. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm‑1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm‑1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm‑1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  12. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  13. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. In situ determination of aging precipitation in deformed Fe-Cu and Fe-Cu-B-N alloys by time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, S.M.; Van Dijk, N.H.; Paladugu, M.; Schut, H.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2010-01-01

    We performed in situ time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements on high-purity Fe-Cu and Fe-Cu-B-N alloys during isothermal aging at 550 °C in order to study the potential self-healing of deformation-induced defects by nanosized Cu precipitation. Three different samples with

  15. Dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel-doped magnesium hydride investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.R.; Andreasen, A.; Vegge, Tejs

    2006-01-01

    The dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel (Ni)-doped (2w/w%) magnesium hydride (MgH2) have been investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction (PXD). Deactivated samples, i.e. air exposed, are investigated in order to focus on the effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) surface layers...

  16. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  17. Wall current probe: a non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, R; Gaboriau, F; Hagelaar, G J M

    2013-08-01

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  18. In vivo time-resolved microtomography reveals the mechanics of the blowfly flight motor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Walker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dipteran flies are amongst the smallest and most agile of flying animals. Their wings are driven indirectly by large power muscles, which cause cyclical deformations of the thorax that are amplified through the intricate wing hinge. Asymmetric flight manoeuvres are controlled by 13 pairs of steering muscles acting directly on the wing articulations. Collectively the steering muscles account for <3% of total flight muscle mass, raising the question of how they can modulate the vastly greater output of the power muscles during manoeuvres. Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based study performing micrometre-resolution, time-resolved microtomography on the 145 Hz wingbeat of blowflies. These data represent the first four-dimensional visualizations of an organism's internal movements on sub-millisecond and micrometre scales. This technique allows us to visualize and measure the three-dimensional movements of five of the largest steering muscles, and to place these in the context of the deforming thoracic mechanism that the muscles actuate. Our visualizations show that the steering muscles operate through a diverse range of nonlinear mechanisms, revealing several unexpected features that could not have been identified using any other technique. The tendons of some steering muscles buckle on every wingbeat to accommodate high amplitude movements of the wing hinge. Other steering muscles absorb kinetic energy from an oscillating control linkage, which rotates at low wingbeat amplitude but translates at high wingbeat amplitude. Kinetic energy is distributed differently in these two modes of oscillation, which may play a role in asymmetric power management during flight control. Structural flexibility is known to be important to the aerodynamic efficiency of insect wings, and to the function of their indirect power muscles. We show that it is integral also to the operation of the steering muscles, and so to the functional flexibility of the

  19. X-ray-induced reduction of Au ions in an aqueous solution in the presence of support materials and in situ time-resolved XANES measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Yuji, E-mail: okubo@upst.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakagawa, Takashi; Seino, Satoshi; Kugai, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Takao A. [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nitani, Hiroaki; Niwa, Yasuhiro [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-07-31

    In situ time-resolved XANES measurements of Au ions in an aqueous solution in the presence of support materials were performed under synchrotron X-ray irradiation. The synchrotron X-ray-induced reduction of Au ions leads to the formation of Au nanoparticles on the carbon particles, acrylic cell or polyimide window. The deposited Au metallic spots were affected by the wettability of carbon particles. Synchrotron X-ray-induced reduction of Au ions in an aqueous solution with or without support materials is reported. To clarify the process of radiation-induced reduction of metal ions in aqueous solutions in the presence of carbon particles as support materials, in situ time-resolved XANES measurements of Au ions were performed under synchrotron X-ray irradiation. XANES spectra were obtained only when hydrophobic carbon particles were added to the precursor solution containing Au ions. Changes in the shape of the XANES spectra indicated a rapid reduction from ionic to metallic Au in the precursor solution owing to synchrotron X-ray irradiation. In addition, the effects of the wettability of the carbon particles on the deposited Au metallic spots were examined. The deposited Au metallic spots were different depending on the relationship of surface charges between metal precursors and support materials. Moreover, a Au film was obtained as a by-product only when hydrophilic carbon particles were added to the precursor solution containing the Au ions.

  20. Bimodal Exciplex Formation in Bimolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer Revealed by Ultrafast Time-Resolved Infrared Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Marius; Licari, Giuseppe Léonardo; Vauthey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of a moderately exergonic photoinduced charge separation has been investigated by ultrafast time-resolved infrared absorption with the dimethylanthracene/phthalonitrile donor/acceptor pair in solvents covering a broad range of polarity. A distinct spectral signature of an exciplex could be identified in the −C≡N stretching region. On the basis of quantum chemistry calculations, the 4–5 times larger width of this band compared to those of the ions and of the locally excited donor ...

  1. Monitoring early stages of silver particle formation in a polymer solution by in situ and time resolved small angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Gaetano; Mari, Alessandra; Amenitsch, Heinz; Pifferi, Augusto; Cannas, Carla; Suber, Lorenza

    2010-11-01

    Silver particles have been prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in acidic aqueous solution containing a low concentration of a commercial polynaphthalene sulfonate polymer (Daxad 19) as dispersant agent. The reduction has been induced and controlled by the slow addition of ascorbic acid at a fixed rate; in this way, we were able to monitor the formation of a silver crystalline colloidal dispersion by in situ and time resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurements. Modeling the scattering intensity with interacting spherical particles in a polymer-Ag like-fractal template allowed us to distinguish different stages involving liquid-like ordered cluster nucleation, cluster growth up to primary particle formation and particle coalescence. Between primary particle formation and particle coalescence, we observed the occurrence of a transient phase of core-shell type structures having primary particles as stable cores in expanding shells built by the organic polymer. We discuss these results in a twofold perspective pertaining both to technology, relative to controlled fabrication of metal nanoparticles and to basic chemical physics, dealing with non standard stepwise crystallization from solutions.Silver particles have been prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in acidic aqueous solution containing a low concentration of a commercial polynaphthalene sulfonate polymer (Daxad 19) as dispersant agent. The reduction has been induced and controlled by the slow addition of ascorbic acid at a fixed rate; in this way, we were able to monitor the formation of a silver crystalline colloidal dispersion by in situ and time resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurements. Modeling the scattering intensity with interacting spherical particles in a polymer-Ag like-fractal template allowed us to distinguish different stages involving liquid-like ordered cluster nucleation, cluster growth up to primary particle formation and particle

  2. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations During Welding of 1045 Steel using Spatially Resolved and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; DebRoy, T

    2005-10-28

    Synchrotron-based methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. These techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, allow in-situ experiments to be performed during welding and provide direct observations of high temperature phases that form under the intense thermal cycles that occur. This paper presents observations of microstructural evolution that occur during the welding of a medium carbon AISI 1045 steel, using SRXRD to map the phases that are present during welding, and TRXRD to dynamically observe transformations during rapid heating and cooling. SRXRD was further used to determine the influence of welding heat input on the size of the high temperature austenite region, and the time required to completely homogenize this region during welding. These data can be used to determine the kinetics of phase transformations under the steep thermal gradients of welds, as well as benchmark and verify phase transformation models.

  3. Skyrmion Hall effect revealed by direct time-resolved X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzius, Kai; Lemesh, Ivan; Krüger, Benjamin; Bassirian, Pedram; Caretta, Lucas; Richter, Kornel; Büttner, Felix; Sato, Koji; Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Förster, Johannes; Reeve, Robert M.; Weigand, Markus; Bykova, Iuliia; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.; Kläui, Mathias

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates for future spintronic applications such as skyrmion racetrack memories and logic devices. They exhibit exotic and complex dynamics governed by topology and are less influenced by defects, such as edge roughness, than conventionally used domain walls. In particular, their non-zero topological charge leads to a predicted `skyrmion Hall effect', in which current-driven skyrmions acquire a transverse velocity component analogous to charged particles in the conventional Hall effect. Here, we use nanoscale pump-probe imaging to reveal the real-time dynamics of skyrmions driven by current-induced spin-orbit torques. We find that skyrmions move at a well-defined angle ΘSkH that can exceed 30° with respect to the current flow, but in contrast to conventional theoretical expectations, ΘSkH increases linearly with velocity up to at least 100 ms-1. We qualitatively explain our observation based on internal mode excitations in combination with a field-like spin-orbit torque, showing that one must go beyond the usual rigid skyrmion description to understand the dynamics.

  4. Probing the influence of X-rays on aqueous copper solutions using time-resolved in situ combined video/X-ray absorption near-edge/ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J. Gerbrand; Beale, Andrew M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068; de Groot, Frank M. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ video monitoring and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been used for the first time in a combined manner to study the effect of synchrotron radiation on a series of homogeneous aqueous copper solutions in a

  5. Investigation of the formation process of photodeposited Rh nanoparticles on TiO2 by in situ time-resolved energy-dispersive XAFS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Teramura, Kentaro; Okuoka, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Seiji; Kato, Kazuo; Shishido, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2010-09-07

    The photodeposition process of Rh metal nanoparticles on a TiO(2) photocatalyst from RhCl(3) aqueous solution in the presence of methanol as a sacrificial oxidant, which consists of the direct reduction of Rh(3+) ions to Rh metal and the formation of Rh nanoparticles, was uncovered by in situ time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray absorption fine structure (DXAFS) analysis in a liquid-solid suspension state. The fractions of Rh metal particles and Rh(3+) precursor were estimated by the least-squares fitting of each X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectrum by a linear combination of authentic spectra corresponding to Rh(0) and Rh(3+). The fraction of Rh metal linearly increased with photoirradiation time and saturated after 90 min of photoirradiation. The coordination number (Rh-Rh pair) was evaluated by the curve fitting of the Rh-Rh scattering at 2.45 A in the Fourier transforms (FT) of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. The coordination number linearly increased with photoirradiation time and attained a constant value of 10 after 90 min of photoirradiation. This value is lower than that for the Rh foil (12). These suggest the formation of fine Rh metal nanoparticles on TiO(2). In addition, the diminution rate of Rh(3+) as determined by ICP analysis was in good agreement with the increased rates for the fraction of Rh metal particles estimated by XANES spectra and the coordination number (Rh-Rh pair) evaluated by FT-EXAFS spectra. This result strongly supports the fact that electrons generated by charge separation reduce the Rh(3+) precursor to an Rh metal particle at a moment in time and at a constant rate. The Rh particles do not grow in incremental steps, but Rh particles with a uniform size appear one after another on the surface.

  6. Charge Carriers Modulate the Bonding of Semiconductor Nanoparticle Dopants As Revealed by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Asra; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Xiaohan; Rowland, Clare E. [Department; Jawaid, Ali M.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Gulec, Ahmet; Shamirian, Armen; Zuo, Xiaobing; Klie, Robert F.; Schaller, Richard D. [Department; Snee, Preston T.

    2017-08-31

    Understanding the electronic structure of doped semiconductors is essential to realize advancements in electronics and in the rational design of nanoscale devices. Reported here are the results of time-resolved X-ray absorption studies on copper-doped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that provide an explicit description of the electronic dynamics of the dopants. The interaction of a dopant ion and an excess charge carrier is unambiguously observed via monitoring the oxidation state. The experimental data combined with DFT calculations demonstrate that dopant bonding to the host matrix is modulated by its interaction with charge carriers. Furthermore, the transient photoluminescence and the kinetics of dopant oxidation reveal the presence of two types of surface-bound ions that create mid-gap states.

  7. Time-resolved dual transcriptomics reveal early induced Nicotiana benthamiana root genes and conserved infection-promoting Phytophthora palmivora effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Edouard; Gogleva, Anna; Hainaux, Thomas; Doumane, Mehdi; Tulin, Frej; Quan, Clément; Yunusov, Temur; Floch, Kévin; Schornack, Sebastian

    2017-05-11

    Plant-pathogenic oomycetes are responsible for economically important losses in crops worldwide. Phytophthora palmivora, a tropical relative of the potato late blight pathogen, causes rotting diseases in many tropical crops including papaya, cocoa, oil palm, black pepper, rubber, coconut, durian, mango, cassava and citrus. Transcriptomics have helped to identify repertoires of host-translocated microbial effector proteins which counteract defenses and reprogram the host in support of infection. As such, these studies have helped in understanding how pathogens cause diseases. Despite the importance of P. palmivora diseases, genetic resources to allow for disease resistance breeding and identification of microbial effectors are scarce. We employed the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana to study the P. palmivora root infections at the cellular and molecular levels. Time-resolved dual transcriptomics revealed different pathogen and host transcriptome dynamics. De novo assembly of P. palmivora transcriptome and semi-automated prediction and annotation of the secretome enabled robust identification of conserved infection-promoting effectors. We show that one of them, REX3, suppresses plant secretion processes. In a survey for early transcriptionally activated plant genes we identified a N. benthamiana gene specifically induced at infected root tips that encodes a peptide with danger-associated molecular features. These results constitute a major advance in our understanding of P. palmivora diseases and establish extensive resources for P. palmivora pathogenomics, effector-aided resistance breeding and the generation of induced resistance to Phytophthora root infections. Furthermore, our approach to find infection-relevant secreted genes is transferable to other pathogen-host interactions and not restricted to plants.

  8. Time-Resolved Transcriptomics and Bioinformatic Analyses Reveal Intrinsic Stress Responses during Batch Culture of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Evert-Jan; Ridder, Anja N.J.A.; Lulko, Andrzej T.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2011-01-01

    We have determined the time-resolved transcriptome of the model gram-positive organism B. subtilis during growth in a batch fermentor on rich medium. DNA microarrays were used to monitor gene transcription using 10-minute intervals at 40 consecutive time points. From the growth curve and analysis of

  9. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Johan Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    overall transformation time into hydrate form were used as model compounds. The transformations were monitored using direct structural information from time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The kinetics of these transformations were estimated using multivariate data analysis (principal component......Abstract Transformation of the solid-state form of a drug compound in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract may alter the drug bioavailability and in extreme cases result in patient fatalities. The solution-mediated anhydrate-to-hydrate phase transformation was examined using an in vitro model...... dependence on the dispersion media used, indicating the complexity of the nucleation process. Furthermore, when the CBZ and NF material was compacted into tablets the transformation times were remarkably slower. Results suggest that variations in the composition of the contents of the stomach/gut may affect...

  10. Spin-orbit torque-driven skyrmion dynamics revealed by time-resolved X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Song, Kyung Mee; Han, Hee-Sung; Jung, Min-Seung; Im, Mi-Young; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Kun Soo; Fischer, Peter; Hong, Jung-Il; Choi, Jun Woo; Min, Byoung-Chul; Koo, Hyun Cheol; Chang, Joonyeon

    2017-05-24

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures with attractive properties suitable for high-density and low-power spintronic device applications. Much effort has been dedicated to understanding the dynamical behaviours of the magnetic skyrmions. However, experimental observation of the ultrafast dynamics of this chiral magnetic texture in real space, which is the hallmark of its quasiparticle nature, has so far remained elusive. Here, we report nanosecond-dynamics of a 100nm-diameter magnetic skyrmion during a current pulse application, using a time-resolved pump-probe soft X-ray imaging technique. We demonstrate that distinct dynamic excitation states of magnetic skyrmions, triggered by current-induced spin-orbit torques, can be reliably tuned by changing the magnitude of spin-orbit torques. Our findings show that the dynamics of magnetic skyrmions can be controlled by the spin-orbit torque on the nanosecond time scale, which points to exciting opportunities for ultrafast and novel skyrmionic applications in the future.

  11. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound...

  12. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Goo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3 and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI.

  13. Structural changes in single membranes in response to an applied transmembrane electric potential revealed by time-resolved neutron/X-ray interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tronin, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Gupta, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Worcester, D. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Biology Division, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lauter, V. [Spallation Neutron Source, Neutron Science Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Strzalka, J.; Kuzmenko, I. [Advanced Photon Source, X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Blasie, J.K., E-mail: jkblasie@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► Time-resolved (or transient) neutron/X-ray reflectivity. ► Neutron/X-ray reflectivity enhanced by interferometric techniques. ► Electric potential induced changes in a hybrid lipid bilayer membrane. ► Electric potential induced changes in a voltage-sensor protein membrane. - Abstract: The profile structure of a hybrid lipid bilayer, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was investigated as a function of the applied transbilayer electric potential via time-resolved neutron reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, and fully reversible structural changes were observed in the distal half (with respect to the substrate surface) of the hybrid bilayer comprised of a zwitterionic phospholipid in response to a +100 mV potential with respect to 0 mV. These arise presumably due to reorientation of the electric dipole present in the polar headgroup of the phospholipid and its resulting effect on the thickness of the phospholipid’s hydrocarbon chain layer within the hybrid bilayer’s profile structure. The profile structure of the voltage-sensor domain from a voltage-gated ion channel protein within a phospholipid bilayer membrane, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was also investigated as a function of the applied transmembrane electric potential via time-resolved X-ray reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, fully-reversible, and different structural changes in the protein were detected in response to ±100 mV potentials with respect to 0 mV. The approach employed is that typical of transient spectroscopy, shown here to be applicable to both neutron and X-ray reflectivity of thin films.

  14. Structural changes in single membranes in response to an applied transmembrane electric potential revealed by time-resolved neutron/X-ray interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronin, A; Chen, C-H; Gupta, S; Worcester, D; Lauter, V; Strzalka, J; Kuzmenko, I; Blasie, J K

    2013-08-30

    The profile structure of a hybrid lipid bilayer, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was investigated as a function of the applied transbilayer electric potential via time-resolved neutron reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, and fully reversible structural changes were observed in the distal half (with respect to the substrate surface) of the hybrid bilayer comprised of a zwitterionic phospholipid in response to a +100mV potential with respect to 0mV. These arise presumably due to reorientation of the electric dipole present in the polar headgroup of the phospholipid and its resulting effect on the thickness of the phospholipid's hydrocarbon chain layer within the hybrid bilayer's profile structure. The profile structure of the voltage-sensor domain from a voltage-gated ion channel protein within a phospholipid bilayer membrane, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was also investigated as a function of the applied transmembrane electric potential via time-resolved X-ray reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, fully-reversible, and different structural changes in the protein were detected in response to ±100mV potentials with respect to 0mV. The approach employed is that typical of transient spectroscopy, shown here to be applicable to both neutron and X-ray reflectivity of thin films.

  15. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P.

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  16. Effective pumping proton collection facilitated by a copper site (CuB) of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase, revealed by a newly developed time-resolved infrared system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Minoru; Nakashima, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Ogura, Takashi; Mochizuki, Masao; Kang, Jiyoung; Tateno, Masaru; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Kato, Koji; Yoshikawa, Shinya

    2013-10-18

    X-ray structural and mutational analyses have shown that bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) pumps protons electrostatically through a hydrogen bond network using net positive charges created upon oxidation of a heme iron (located near the hydrogen bond network) for O2 reduction. Pumping protons are transferred by mobile water molecules from the negative side of the mitochondrial inner membrane through a water channel into the hydrogen bond network. For blockage of spontaneous proton back-leak, the water channel is closed upon O2 binding to the second heme (heme a3) after complete collection of the pumping protons in the hydrogen bond network. For elucidation of the structural bases for the mechanism of the proton collection and timely closure of the water channel, conformational dynamics after photolysis of CO (an O2 analog)-bound CcO was examined using a newly developed time-resolved infrared system feasible for accurate detection of a single C=O stretch band of α-helices of CcO in H2O medium. The present results indicate that migration of CO from heme a3 to CuB in the O2 reduction site induces an intermediate state in which a bulge conformation at Ser-382 in a transmembrane helix is eliminated to open the water channel. The structural changes suggest that, using a conformational relay system, including CuB, O2, heme a3, and two helix turns extending to Ser-382, CuB induces the conformational changes of the water channel that stimulate the proton collection, and senses complete proton loading into the hydrogen bond network to trigger the timely channel closure by O2 transfer from CuB to heme a3.

  17. Effective Pumping Proton Collection Facilitated by a Copper Site (CuB) of Bovine Heart Cytochrome c Oxidase, Revealed by a Newly Developed Time-resolved Infrared System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Minoru; Nakashima, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Ogura, Takashi; Mochizuki, Masao; Kang, Jiyoung; Tateno, Masaru; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Kato, Koji; Yoshikawa, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    X-ray structural and mutational analyses have shown that bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) pumps protons electrostatically through a hydrogen bond network using net positive charges created upon oxidation of a heme iron (located near the hydrogen bond network) for O2 reduction. Pumping protons are transferred by mobile water molecules from the negative side of the mitochondrial inner membrane through a water channel into the hydrogen bond network. For blockage of spontaneous proton back-leak, the water channel is closed upon O2 binding to the second heme (heme a3) after complete collection of the pumping protons in the hydrogen bond network. For elucidation of the structural bases for the mechanism of the proton collection and timely closure of the water channel, conformational dynamics after photolysis of CO (an O2 analog)-bound CcO was examined using a newly developed time-resolved infrared system feasible for accurate detection of a single C=O stretch band of α-helices of CcO in H2O medium. The present results indicate that migration of CO from heme a3 to CuB in the O2 reduction site induces an intermediate state in which a bulge conformation at Ser-382 in a transmembrane helix is eliminated to open the water channel. The structural changes suggest that, using a conformational relay system, including CuB, O2, heme a3, and two helix turns extending to Ser-382, CuB induces the conformational changes of the water channel that stimulate the proton collection, and senses complete proton loading into the hydrogen bond network to trigger the timely channel closure by O2 transfer from CuB to heme a3. PMID:23996000

  18. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  19. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  20. The time course of non-photochemical quenching in phycobilisomes of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as revealed by picosecond time-resolved fluorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, E G; Schmitt, F-J; Shirshin, E A; Svirin, M D; Elanskaya, I V; Friedrich, T; Fadeev, V V; Paschenko, V Z; Rubin, A B

    2014-09-01

    As high-intensity solar radiation can lead to extensive damage of the photosynthetic apparatus, cyanobacteria have developed various protection mechanisms to reduce the effective excitation energy transfer (EET) from the antenna complexes to the reaction center. One of them is non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of the phycobilisome (PB) fluorescence. In Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 this role is carried by the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), which reacts to high-intensity light by a series of conformational changes, enabling the binding of OCP to the PBs reducing the flow of energy into the photosystems. In this paper the mechanisms of energy migration in two mutant PB complexes of Synechocystis sp. were investigated and compared. The mutant CK is lacking phycocyanin in the PBs while the mutant ΔPSI/PSII does not contain both photosystems. Fluorescence decay spectra with picosecond time resolution were registered using a single photon counting technique. The studies were performed in a wide range of temperatures - from 4 to 300 K. The time course of NPQ and fluorescence recovery in darkness was studied at room temperature using both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The OCP induced NPQ has been shown to be due to EET from PB cores to the red form of OCP under photon flux densities up to 1000 μmolphotonsm⁻²s⁻¹. The gradual changes of the energy transfer rate from allophycocyanin to OCP were observed during the irradiation of the sample with blue light and consequent adaptation to darkness. This fact was interpreted as the revelation of intermolecular interaction between OCP and PB binding site. At low temperatures a significantly enhanced EET from allophycocyanin to terminal emitters has been shown, due to the decreased back transfer from terminal emitter to APC. The activation of OCP not only leads to fluorescence quenching, but also affects the rate constants of energy transfer as shown by model based analysis of the decay associated

  1. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  2. Surface phenomena revealed by in situ imaging: studies from adhesion, wear and cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Yeung, Ho; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2017-03-01

    Surface deformation and flow phenomena are ubiquitous in mechanical processes. In this work we present an in situ imaging framework for studying a range of surface mechanical phenomena at high spatial resolution and across a range of time scales. The in situ framework is capable of resolving deformation and flow fields quantitatively in terms of surface displacements, velocities, strains and strain rates. Three case studies are presented demonstrating the power of this framework for studying surface deformation. In the first, the origin of stick-slip motion in adhesive polymer interfaces is investigated, revealing a intimate link between stick-slip and surface wave propagation. Second, the role of flow in mediating formation of surface defects and wear particles in metals is analyzed using a prototypical sliding process. It is shown that conventional post-mortem observation and inference can lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to formation of surface cracks and wear particles. The in situ framework is shown to unambiguously capture delamination wear in sliding. Third, material flow and surface deformation in a typical cutting process is analyzed. It is shown that a long-standing problem in the cutting of annealed metals is resolved by the imaging, with other benefits such as estimation of energy dissipation and power from the flow fields. In closure, guidelines are provided for profitably exploiting in situ observations to study large-strain deformation, flow and friction phenomena at surfaces that display a variety of time-scales.

  3. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  4. A direct interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and the hERG voltage-gated K+ channel revealed by atomic force microscopy and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; D'Sa, Lauren; Talker, Ronel; Dupuis, Elodie; Maurin, Fabrice; Martin, Patrick; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier; Edwardson, J Michael

    2014-11-14

    The sigma-1 receptor is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, widely expressed in central and peripheral tissues, which can translocate to the plasma membrane and modulate the function of various ion channels. The human ether-à-go-go-related gene encodes hERG, a cardiac voltage-gated K(+) channel that is abnormally expressed in many human cancers and is known to interact functionally with the sigma-1 receptor. Our aim was to investigate the nature of the interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and hERG. We show that the two proteins can be co-isolated from a detergent extract of stably transfected HEK-293 cells, consistent with a direct interaction between them. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the isolated protein confirmed the direct binding of the sigma-1 receptor to hERG monomers, dimers, and tetramers. hERG dimers and tetramers became both singly and doubly decorated by sigma-1 receptors; however, hERG monomers were only singly decorated. The distribution of angles between pairs of sigma-1 receptors bound to hERG tetramers had two peaks, at ∼90 and ∼180° in a ratio of ∼2:1, indicating that the sigma-1 receptor interacts with hERG with 4-fold symmetry. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®) allowed the detection of the interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and hERG within the plane of the plasma membrane. This interaction was resistant to sigma ligands, but was decreased in response to cholesterol depletion of the membrane. We suggest that the sigma-1 receptor may bind to hERG in the endoplasmic reticulum, aiding its assembly and trafficking to the plasma membrane. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Time-resolved studies with FELs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Artem [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Max-Planck Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, Daniel, E-mail: Rolles@phys.ksu.edu [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Free-electron lasers open up new possibilities for studying ultrafast dynamics. • We describe the current status of the field and recent exemplary experiments. • Experiments studying charge transfer in dissociating molecules are discussed. • Photoelectron diffraction from aligned gas-phase molecules is presented. • We give an outlook on future developments and perspectives. - Abstract: Intense femtosecond VUV, XUV, and X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers (FELs) enable time-resolved experiments studying ultrafast dynamics in a large variety of systems relevant, e.g., to physics, chemistry, biology, and material sciences. In this paper, we focus on time-resolved studies of gas-phase molecules, which lie at the crossroad between atomic, molecular and optical physics and ultrafast photochemistry. We describe the current status of the field and discuss typical experimental configurations used for pump-probe experiments with FELs. We illustrate them with three recent examples for such experiments performed at the FLASH and LCLS FELs studying charge transfer following XUV and X-ray photoabsorption as well as photoelectron diffraction from aligned molecules. We conclude with a short outlook on future developments and perspectives for femtosecond pump-probe experiments with FELs.

  6. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Peter J. [Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire d' Hydrodynamique (LadHyX), Palaiseau (France); Violato, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio [Delft University of Technology, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured three-dimensional flow fields have then been postprocessed by the dynamic mode decomposition which identifies coherent structures that contribute significantly to the dynamics of the jet. Both temporal and spatial analyses have been performed. Where the jet exhibits a primary axisymmetric instability followed by a pairing of the vortex rings, dominant dynamic modes have been extracted together with their amplitude distribution. These modes represent a basis for the low-dimensional description of the dominant flow features. (orig.)

  7. Time resolved spectroscopy of shock compressed liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K.; Duvall, G. E.

    1982-04-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed for using a rotating mirror camera to record time-resolved absorption spectra of liquids undergoing shock compression. Experimental records have been obtained for cells containing liquid carbon disulfide shocked, through reverberation, to peak pressures of 55, 80, 100 and 120 kbar. Experiments have been performed using both reflected and transmitted light. Time and spectral resolution were limited to approximately 30 nsec and 30 Å; spectral range was from 4000 to 2500 Å. This initial work on carbon disulfide shows it to become highly absorptive when shocked to low pressures of 8 to 14 kbar, and to progressively become a better broadband reflector as the pressure in a thin layer rings up to the final value. A decay in the reflectivity after reaching peak pressure in the 120 kbar experiment may indicate chemical decomposition. This is in accord with earlier results of S. A. Sheffield based on measurement of flow parameters.

  8. Submicroscopic deletions at the WAGR locus, revealed by nonradioactive in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantes, J.A.; Bickmore, W.A.; Fletcher, J.M.; Hanson, I.M.; Heyningen, V. van (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Ballesta, F. (Hospital Clinic 1, Barcelona (Spain))

    1992-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with biotin-labeled probes mapping to 11p13 has been used for the molecular analysis of deletions of the WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation) locus. They have detected a submicroscopic 11p13 deletion in a child with inherited aniridia who subsequently presented with Wilms tumor in a horseshoe kidney, only revealed at surgery. The mother, who has aniridia, was also found to carry a deletion including both the aniridia candidate gene (AN2) and the Wilms tumor predisposition gene (WT1). This is therefore a rare case of an inherited WAGR deletion. Wilms tumor has so far only been associated with sporadic de novo aniridia cases. The authors have shown that a cosmid probe for a candidate aniridia gene, homologous to the mouse Pax-6 gene, is deleted in cell lines from aniridia patients with previously characterized deletions at 11p13, while another cosmid marker mapping between two aniridia-associated translocation breakpoints (and hence a second candidate marker) is present on both chromosomes. These results support the Pax-6 homologue as a strong candidate for the AN2 gene. FISH with cosmid probes has proved to be a fast and reliable technique for the molecular analysis of deletions. It can be used with limited amounts of material and has strong potential for clinical applications. 41 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Xiao, Pan; Christensen, James; Zhou, Min; Summers, Christopher J.; Dlott, Dana D.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-07-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  10. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhitao [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N., E-mail: naresh.thadhani@mse.gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Zhou, Min [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorescence in Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Allison Yeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been used clinically for treating various diseases including malignant tumors. The main advantages of PDT over traditional cancer treatments are attributed to the localized effects of the photochemical reactions by selective illumination, which then generate reactive oxygen species and singlet oxygen molecules that lead to cell death. To date, over- or under-treatment still remains one of the major challenges in PDT due to the lack of robust real-time dose monitoring techniques. Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF provides fluorescence lifetime profiles of the targeted fluorophores. It has been demonstrated that TRF offers supplementary information in drug-molecular interactions and cell responses compared to steady-state intensity acquisition. Moreover, fluorescence lifetime itself is independent of the light path; thus it overcomes the artifacts given by diffused light propagation and detection geometries. TRF in PDT is an emerging approach, and relevant studies to date are scattered. Therefore, this review mainly focuses on summarizing up-to-date TRF studies in PDT, and the effects of PDT dosimetric factors on the measured TRF parameters. From there, potential gaps for clinical translation are also discussed.

  12. Time-resolved tribo-thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Blau, Peter J.

    1999-03-01

    Wear of coated surfaces tends to progress through a series of stages in which damage accumulates until the coating fails to protect its substrate. Depending on the coating system and the contact conditions, these stages can sometimes be detected as a series of discrete periods of changing frictional behavior, or they can occur quite rapidly, leading to rapid removal of the coating. A new technique has been developed to capture magnified infrared (IR) images of a selected location on a moving wear surface and to synchronize these cycle-by-cycle images with the instantaneous friction force that occurs at the same location. A pin-on-disk tribometer has been used to demonstrate the principle, but other kinds of test geometries can also be used. Contrast in the IR images derives not only from the surface temperatures but also from the emissivity of surface features. A spatial calibration of the system allows the measurement of the width of the wear path as a function of time. By studying a series of captured and friction- synchronized images, it is possible to observe the detailed progression of wear and the corresponding frictional transitions in a limitless variety of materials. Examples of several different materials, including, steel, aluminum, brass, and paint, will be used to illustrate the application of time-resolved microscopic tribo-thermography to coatings research.

  13. Time resolved strain dependent morphological study of electrically conducting nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Mateus, Artur; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and reliable method is introduced to understand the network behaviour of nano-fillers in a polymeric matrix under uniaxial strain coupled with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes) are conductive and the particles form a percolating network that becomes apparent source of electrical conduction and consequently the samples behave as a bulk conductor. Polyurethane based nanocomposites containing 2% w/w multiwall carbon nanotubes are studied. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite was (3.28×10-5s/m).The sample was able to be extended to an extension ratio of 1.7 before fracture. A slight variation in the electrical conductivity is observed under uniaxial strain which we attribute to the disturbance of conductive pathways. Further, this work is coupled with in- situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering measurements using a synchrotron beam line to enable its measurements to be made during the deformation cycle. We use a multiscale structure to model the small angle x-ray data. The results of the analysis are interpreted as the presence of aggregates which would also go some way towards understanding why there is no alignment of the carbon nanotubes.

  14. In situ measurements reveal extremely low pH in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Erik; Loibide, Amaia Irixar; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2017-01-01

    We measured pH in situ in the top organic soil horizons in heathland and pine forest and found values between 2.6 and 3.2. This was 0.5e0.8 units lower than concurrent laboratory pH measurements of the same soil, which raises questions about the interpretation of pH measurements. We propose...... that the higher pH recorded by standard laboratory methods may be due to buffering ions from soil biota released from drying, grinding and rewetting of soil samples, whereas the in situ pH reflects the correct level of acidification....

  15. Genome differentiation between Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as revealed by genomic in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haider, S.N.; Ramanna, M.S.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2002-01-01

    Using an F1 hybrid between Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii (2n = 2x = 24) and its BC1 progeny, an attempt was made to cytologically differentiate the genomes through genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH). When total genomic DNA of L. pennellii was used as a probe with a concentration of 2

  16. Time-resolved spin-dependent processes in magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the time-resolved magnetic field effects (MFEs) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the transient electroluminescence (EL) method. The values of magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) decrease with the time, and the decreasing slope is proportional to the driving voltage. Specifically, negative MELs are seen when the driving voltage is high enough (V > 11 V). We propose a model to elucidate the spin-dependent processes and theoretically simulate the time-resolved MELs. In particular, this dynamic analysis of time-resolved MELs reveals that the intersystem crossing between singlet and triplet electron-hole pairs and the triplet-triplet annihilation are responsible for the time-resolved MELs at the beginning and enduring periods of the pulse, respectively.

  17. The origin of molecular mobility during biomass pyrolysis as revealed by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Anthony; Castro-Diaz, Miguel; Brosse, Nicolas; Bouroukba, Mohamed; Snape, Colin

    2012-07-01

    The thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks offers an important potential route for the production of biofuels and value-added green chemicals. Pyrolysis is the first phenomenon involved in all biomass thermochemical processes and it controls to a major extent the product composition. The composition of pyrolysis products can be affected markedly by the extent of softening that occurs. In spite of extensive work on biomass pyrolysis, the development of fluidity during the pyrolysis of biomass has not been quantified. This paper provides the first experimental investigation of proton mobility during biomass pyrolysis by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The origin of mobility is discussed for cellulose, lignin and xylan. The effect of minerals on cellulose mobility is also investigated. Interactions between polymers in the native biomass network are revealed by in situ (1)H NMR analysis. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Nano-Second Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study of Olivine Under Laser-induced Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.; Ichiyanagi, K.; Adachi, S.; Nozawa, S.; Koshihara, S.; Zolensky, M.

    2009-03-01

    We performed in-situ nano-second time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis of olivine by synchronization of X-ray and laser pulses. We could successfully obtain 0-30 ns Laue diffraction images at the shock pressure of 1.2-6.5 GPa.

  19. Revealing correlation of valence state with nanoporous structure in cobalt catalyst nanoparticles by in situ environmental TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Huolin L; Pach, Elzbieta A; Diaz, Rosa E; Stach, Eric A; Salmeron, Miquel; Zheng, Haimei

    2012-05-22

    Simultaneously probing the electronic structure and morphology of materials at the nanometer or atomic scale while a chemical reaction proceeds is significant for understanding the underlying reaction mechanisms and optimizing a materials design. This is especially important in the study of nanoparticle catalysts, yet such experiments have rarely been achieved. Utilizing an environmental transmission electron microscope equipped with a differentially pumped gas cell, we are able to conduct nanoscopic imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy in situ for cobalt catalysts under reaction conditions. Studies reveal quantitative correlation of the cobalt valence states with the particles' nanoporous structures. The in situ experiments were performed on nanoporous cobalt particles coated with silica, while a 15 mTorr hydrogen environment was maintained at various temperatures (300-600 °C). When the nanoporous particles were reduced, the valence state changed from cobalt oxide to metallic cobalt and concurrent structural coarsening was observed. In situ mapping of the valence state and the corresponding nanoporous structures allows quantitative analysis necessary for understanding and improving the mass activity and lifetime of cobalt-based catalysts, for example, for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis that converts carbon monoxide and hydrogen into fuels, and uncovering the catalyst optimization mechanisms.

  20. In Situ X-Ray Probing Reveals Fingerprints of Surface Platinum Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-08-24

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pt L{sub 3} edge is a useful probe for Pt-O interactions at polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. We show that XAS using the high energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) mode, applied to a well-defined monolayer Pt/Rh(111) sample where the bulk penetrating hard x-rays probe only surface Pt atoms, provides a unique sensitivity to structure and chemical bonding at the Pt-electrolyte interface. Ab initio multiple-scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code and complementary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results indicate that the commonly observed large increase of the white-line at high electrochemical potentials on PEMFC cathodes originates from platinum oxide formation, whereas previously proposed chemisorbed oxygen-containing species merely give rise to subtle spectral changes.

  1. European flint landraces grown in situ reveal adaptive introgression from modern maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bitocchi

    Full Text Available We have investigated the role of selection in the determination of the detected levels of introgression from modern maize hybrid varieties into maize landraces still cultivated in situ in Italy. We exploited the availability of a historical collection of landraces undertaken before the introduction and widespread use of modern maize, to analyse genomic changes that have occurred in these maize landraces over 50 years of co-existence with hybrid varieties. We have combined a previously published SSR dataset (n=21 with an AFLP loci dataset (n=168 to provide higher resolution power and to obtain a more detailed picture. We show that selection pressures for adaptation have favoured new alleles introduced by migration from hybrids. This shows the potential for analysis of historical introgression even over this short period of 50 years, for an understanding of the evolution of the genome and for the identification of its functionally important regions. Moreover, this demonstrates that landraces grown in situ represent almost unique populations for use for such studies when the focus is on the domesticated plant. This is due to their adaptation, which has arisen from their dynamic evolution under a continuously changing agro-ecological environment, and their capture of new alleles from hybridisation. We have also identified loci for which selection has inhibited introgression from modern germplasm and has enhanced the distinction between landraces and modern maize. These loci indicate that selection acted in the past, during the formation of the flint and dent gene pools. In particular, the locus showing the strongest signals of selection is a Misfit transposable element. Finally, molecular characterisation of the same samples with two different molecular markers has allowed us to compare their performances. Although the genetic-diversity and population-structure analyses provide the same global qualitative pattern, which thus provides the same

  2. Embryonic stem cell-like features of testicular carcinoma in situ revealed by genome-wide gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Wirkner, Ute

    2004-01-01

    in their stoichiometry on progression into embryonic carcinoma. We compared the CIS expression profile with patterns reported in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which revealed a substantial overlap that may be as high as 50%. We also demonstrated an over-representation of expressed genes in regions of 17q and 12, reported......Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the common precursor of histologically heterogeneous testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), which in recent decades have markedly increased and now are the most common malignancy of young men. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we identified >200 genes highly...

  3. Distance dependence of the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 revealed by in situ ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero-Genevrier, Adrián; Boissiere, Cédric; Nicole, Lionel; Grosso, David

    2012-07-04

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was utilized to follow in situ photodegradation of organic species in the vicinity of TiO(2) nanoparticles during UV irradiation. Stacked layers composed of TiO(2), mesoporous SiO(2), and mixed mesoporous SiO(2)/TiO(2) nanocomposites with controlled thickness and porosity were used as model materials. Lauric acid molecules and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) layers were used as model mobile and immobile pollutants, respectively. The local photocatalytic activity was deduced by monitoring the variation of the thickness and refractive index of each independent layer. We show that the photocatalyzed degradation of an organic pollutant takes place only when the latter is located in close vicinity to the TiO(2) nanoparticle surface or can naturally diffuse toward it. As a result, the reaction efficiency is directly related to the organic pollutant diffusion. We also show that the distance of photocatalysis efficiency (d(s)) at which radical intermediates are still present and active is <10 nm from the TiO(2) surface under the conditions of the experiments. This was confirmed by the fact that an immobile condensed organic phase such as PVC was protected from the photocatalytic degradation when separated from the TiO(2) by a 20 nm layer of mesoporous silica.

  4. Tribology. Mechanisms of antiwear tribofilm growth revealed in situ by single-asperity sliding contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosvami, N N; Bares, J A; Mangolini, F; Konicek, A R; Yablon, D G; Carpick, R W

    2015-04-03

    Zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZDDPs) form antiwear tribofilms at sliding interfaces and are widely used as additives in automotive lubricants. The mechanisms governing the tribofilm growth are not well understood, which limits the development of replacements that offer better performance and are less likely to degrade automobile catalytic converters over time. Using atomic force microscopy in ZDDP-containing lubricant base stock at elevated temperatures, we monitored the growth and properties of the tribofilms in situ in well-defined single-asperity sliding nanocontacts. Surface-based nucleation, growth, and thickness saturation of patchy tribofilms were observed. The growth rate increased exponentially with either applied compressive stress or temperature, consistent with a thermally activated, stress-assisted reaction rate model. Although some models rely on the presence of iron to catalyze tribofilm growth, the films grew regardless of the presence of iron on either the tip or substrate, highlighting the critical role of stress and thermal activation. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Time resolved fluorescence of naproxen in organogel medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M. Isabel; Izquierdo, M. Angeles; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen and the self assembled fibrillar network created by a low molecular weight organogelator has been probed by means of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  6. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  7. In situ cardiac perfusion reveals interspecific variation of intraventricular flow separation in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, William; Axelsson, Michael; Altimiras, Jordi; Wang, Tobias

    2016-07-15

    The ventricles of non-crocodilian reptiles are incompletely divided and provide an opportunity for mixing of oxygen-poor blood and oxygen-rich blood (intracardiac shunting). However, both cardiac morphology and in vivo shunting patterns exhibit considerable interspecific variation within reptiles. In the present study, we develop an in situ double-perfused heart approach to characterise the propensity and capacity for shunting in five reptile species: the turtle Trachemys scripta, the rock python Python sebae, the yellow anaconda Eunectes notaeus, the varanid lizard Varanus exanthematicus and the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps To simulate changes in vascular bed resistance, pulmonary and systemic afterloads were independently manipulated and changes in blood flow distribution amongst the central outflow tracts were monitored. As previously demonstrated in Burmese pythons, rock pythons and varanid lizards exhibited pronounced intraventricular flow separation. As pulmonary or systemic afterload was raised, flow in the respective circulation decreased. However, flow in the other circulation, where afterload was constant, remained stable. This correlates with the convergent evolution of intraventricular pressure separation and the large intraventricular muscular ridge, which compartmentalises the ventricle, in these species. Conversely, in the three other species, the pulmonary and systemic flows were strongly mutually dependent, such that the decrease in pulmonary flow in response to elevated pulmonary afterload resulted in redistribution of perfusate to the systemic circuit (and vice versa). Thus, in these species, the muscular ridge appeared labile and blood could readily transverse the intraventricular cava. We conclude that relatively minor structural differences between non-crocodilian reptiles result in the fundamental changes in cardiac function. Further, our study emphasises that functionally similar intracardiac flow separation evolved independently in

  8. Time-resolved photoluminescence properties of semiconductor quantum dot superlattices of different microcrystal shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Weon-Sik, E-mail: wschae@kbsi.re.kr; Choi, Eunjin; Ku Jung, Yun [Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Seung [Department of Chemistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin-Kyu [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-14

    We report time-resolved photoluminescence properties on semiconductor quantum dot (QD) superlattices (SLs) using PL lifetime imaging microscopy at a single particle level. PL lifetime imaging technique clearly reveals that different shaped QD SL microcrystals have different time-resolved PL characteristics. The faceted SL microcrystals consisted of well-organized QDs showed faster recombination rates than those of the spherical microparticles including randomly organized QDs, which can be explained by the different degree of energetic couplings among component QDs due to different packing fraction.

  9. In situ measures of foraging success and prey encounter reveal marine habitat-dependent search strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thums, Michele; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Hindelli, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    Predators are thought to reduce travel speed and increase turning rate in areas where resources are relatively more abundant, a behavior termed "area-restricted search." However, evidence for this is rare, and few empirical data exist for large predators. Animals exhibiting foraging site fidelity could also be spatially aware of suitable feeding areas based on prior experience; changes in movement patterns might therefore arise from the anticipation of higher prey density. We tested the hypothesis that regions of area-restricted search were associated with a higher number of daily speed spikes (a proxy for potential prey encounter rate) and foraging success in southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina), a species exhibiting both area-restricted searches and high interannual foraging site fidelity. We used onshore morphological measurements and diving data from archival tags deployed during winter foraging trips. Foraging success was inferred from in situ changes in relative lipid content derived from measured changes in buoyancy, and first-passage time analysis was used to identify area-restricted search behavior. Seals exhibited relatively direct southerly movement on average, with intensive search behavior predominantly located at the distal end of tracks. The probability of being in search mode was positively related to changes in relative lipid content; thus, intensively searched areas were associated with the highest foraging success. However, there was high foraging success during the outward transit even though seals moved through quickly without slowing down and increasing turning rate to exploit these areas. In addition, the probability of being in search mode was negatively related to the number of daily speed spikes. These results suggest that movement patterns represent a response to prior expectation of the location of predictable and profitable resources. Shelf habitat was 4-9 times more profitable than the other habitats, emphasizing the importance

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis of the mobile flavin cofactor in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conformational heterogeneity of the FAD cofactor in -hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) was investigated with time-resolved polarized flavin fluorescence. For binary enzyme/substrate (analogue) complexes of wild-type PHBH and Tyr222 mutants, crystallographic studies have revealed two distinct flavin conformations ...

  11. In situ proteo-metabolomics reveals metabolite secretion by the acid mine drainage bio-indicator, Euglena mutabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, David; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Gallien, Sébastien; Casiot, Corinne; Hamelin, Jérôme; Gilard, Françoise; Heintz, Dimitri; Schaeffer, Christine; Carapito, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bertin, Philippe N

    2012-07-01

    Euglena mutabilis is a photosynthetic protist found in acidic aquatic environments such as peat bogs, volcanic lakes and acid mine drainages (AMDs). Through its photosynthetic metabolism, this protist is supposed to have an important role in primary production in such oligotrophic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the exact contribution of E. mutabilis in organic matter synthesis remains unclear and no evidence of metabolite secretion by this protist has been established so far. Here we combined in situ proteo-metabolomic approaches to determine the nature of the metabolites accumulated by this protist or potentially secreted into an AMD. Our results revealed that the secreted metabolites are represented by a large number of amino acids, polyamine compounds, urea and some sugars but no fatty acids, suggesting a selective organic matter contribution in this ecosystem. Such a production may have a crucial impact on the bacterial community present on the study site, as it has been suggested previously that prokaryotes transport and recycle in situ most of the metabolites secreted by E. mutabilis. Consequently, this protist may have an indirect but important role in AMD ecosystems but also in other ecological niches often described as nitrogen-limited.

  12. Identifying Fossil Biosignatures and Minerals in Mars Analog Materials Using Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, S.; Farmer, J.; Alerstam, E.; Maruyama, Y.; Blacksberg, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mars sample return has been identified as a top priority in the planetary science decadal survey. A Mars sample selection and caching mission would be the likely first step in this endeavor. Such a mission would aim to select and prioritize for return to Earth aqueously formed geological samples present at a selected site on Mars, based upon their potential for biosignature capture and preservation. If evidence of past life exists and is found, it is likely to come via the identification of fossilized carbonaceous matter of biological origin (kerogen) found in the selected samples analyzed in laboratories after return to Earth. Raman spectroscopy is considered one of the primary techniques for analyzing materials in situ and selecting the most promising samples for Earth return. We have previously performed a pilot study to better understand the complexities of identifying kerogen using Raman spectroscopy. For the study, we examined a variety of Mars analog materials representing a broad range of mineral compositions and kerogen maturities. The study revealed that kerogen identification in many of the most promising lithologies is often impeded by background fluorescence that originates from long (>10 ns to ms) and short (organic matter in the samples. This work explores the potential for time-gated Raman spectroscopy to enable clear kerogen and mineral identifications in such samples. The JPL time-resolved Raman system uses time gating to reduce background fluorescence. It uses a custom-built SPAD (single photon avalanche diode) detector, featuring a 1-ns time-gate, and electronically variable gate delay. Results for a range of fluorescent samples show that the JPL system reduces fluorescence, allowing the identification of both kerogen and mineral components more successfully than with conventional Raman systems. In some of the most challenging samples, the detection of organic matter is hindered by a combination of short lifetime fluorescence and weak Raman

  13. Nanosecond time-resolved investigations using the in situ of dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrange, Thomas; Campbell, Geoffrey H; Reed, B W; Taheri, Mitra; Pesavento, J Bradley; Kim, Judy S; Browning, Nigel D

    2008-10-01

    Most biological processes, chemical reactions and materials dynamics occur at rates much faster than can be captured with standard video rate acquisition methods in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). Thus, there is a need to increase the temporal resolution in order to capture and understand salient features of these rapid materials processes. This paper details the development of a high-time resolution dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) that captures dynamics in materials with nanosecond time resolution. The current DTEM performance, having a spatial resolution <10nm for single-shot imaging using 15ns electron pulses, will be discussed in the context of experimental investigations in solid state reactions of NiAl reactive multilayer films, the study of martensitic transformations in nanocrystalline Ti and the catalytic growth of Si nanowires. In addition, this paper will address the technical issues involved with high current, electron pulse operation and the near-term improvements to the electron optics, which will greatly improve the signal and spatial resolutions, and to the laser system, which will allow tailored specimen and photocathode drive conditions.

  14. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids An Experimental Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Renato

    2007-01-01

    Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids introduces current state-of-the-art techniques in the study of complex dynamical problems in liquid phases. With a unique focus on the experimental aspects applied to complex liquids, this volume provides an excellent overview into the quickly emerging field of soft-matter science. Researchers and engineers will find a comprehensive review of current non-linear spectroscopic and optical Kerr effect techniques, in addition to an in-depth look into relaxation dynamics in complex liquids. This volume offers current experimental findings in transient grating spectroscopy and their application to viscoelastic phenomena in glass-formers, dynamics of confined liquid-crystals, and a time-resolved analysis of the host-quest interactions of dye molecules in liquid-crystal matter. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids provides a cohesive introduction suitable for individuals involved in this emerging field, complete with the latest experimental procedures of complex ...

  15. The asymmetrical structure of Golgi apparatus membranes revealed by in situ atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haijiao; Su, Weiheng; Cai, Mingjun; Jiang, Junguang; Zeng, Xianlu; Wang, Hongda

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus has attracted intense attentions due to its fascinating morphology and vital role as the pivot of cellular secretory pathway since its discovery. However, its complex structure at the molecular level remains elusive due to limited approaches. In this study, the structure of Golgi apparatus, including the Golgi stack, cisternal structure, relevant tubules and vesicles, were directly visualized by high-resolution atomic force microscope. We imaged both sides of Golgi apparatus membranes and revealed that the outer leaflet of Golgi membranes is relatively smooth while the inner membrane leaflet is rough and covered by dense proteins. With the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Triton X-100, we confirmed the existence of lipid rafts in Golgi apparatus membrane, which are mostly in the size of 20 nm -200 nm and appear irregular in shape. Our results may be of significance to reveal the structure-function relationship of the Golgi complex and pave the way for visualizing the endomembrane system in mammalian cells at the molecular level.

  16. The asymmetrical structure of Golgi apparatus membranes revealed by in situ atomic force microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiao Xu

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus has attracted intense attentions due to its fascinating morphology and vital role as the pivot of cellular secretory pathway since its discovery. However, its complex structure at the molecular level remains elusive due to limited approaches. In this study, the structure of Golgi apparatus, including the Golgi stack, cisternal structure, relevant tubules and vesicles, were directly visualized by high-resolution atomic force microscope. We imaged both sides of Golgi apparatus membranes and revealed that the outer leaflet of Golgi membranes is relatively smooth while the inner membrane leaflet is rough and covered by dense proteins. With the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Triton X-100, we confirmed the existence of lipid rafts in Golgi apparatus membrane, which are mostly in the size of 20 nm -200 nm and appear irregular in shape. Our results may be of significance to reveal the structure-function relationship of the Golgi complex and pave the way for visualizing the endomembrane system in mammalian cells at the molecular level.

  17. Microfluidics: From crystallization to serial time-resolved crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Sui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Capturing protein structural dynamics in real-time has tremendous potential in elucidating biological functions and providing information for structure-based drug design. While time-resolved structure determination has long been considered inaccessible for a vast majority of protein targets, serial methods for crystallography have remarkable potential in facilitating such analyses. Here, we review the impact of microfluidic technologies on protein crystal growth and X-ray diffraction analysis. In particular, we focus on applications of microfluidics for use in serial crystallography experiments for the time-resolved determination of protein structural dynamics.

  18. Variable chromatin structure revealed by in situ spatially correlated DNA cleavage mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risca, Viviana I; Denny, Sarah K; Straight, Aaron F; Greenleaf, William J

    2017-01-12

    Chromatin structure at the length scale encompassing local nucleosome-nucleosome interactions is thought to play a crucial role in regulating transcription and access to DNA. However, this secondary structure of chromatin remains poorly understood compared with the primary structure of single nucleosomes or the tertiary structure of long-range looping interactions. Here we report the first genome-wide map of chromatin conformation in human cells at the 1-3 nucleosome (50-500 bp) scale, obtained using ionizing radiation-induced spatially correlated cleavage of DNA with sequencing (RICC-seq) to identify DNA-DNA contacts that are spatially proximal. Unbiased analysis of RICC-seq signal reveals regional enrichment of DNA fragments characteristic of alternating rather than adjacent nucleosome interactions in tri-nucleosome units, particularly in H3K9me3-marked heterochromatin. We infer differences in the likelihood of nucleosome-nucleosome contacts among open chromatin, H3K27me3-marked, and H3K9me3-marked repressed chromatin regions. After calibrating RICC-seq signal to three-dimensional distances, we show that compact two-start helical fibre structures with stacked alternating nucleosomes are consistent with RICC-seq fragmentation patterns from H3K9me3-marked chromatin, while non-compact structures and solenoid structures are consistent with open chromatin. Our data support a model of chromatin architecture in intact interphase nuclei consistent with variable longitudinal compaction of two-start helical fibres.

  19. Biocytin filling of adult gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in situ reveals extensive, spiny, dendritic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca E; Han, Seong-Kyu; Herbison, Allan E

    2005-03-01

    Ultrastructural studies suggest that GnRH neurons receive relatively few synaptic inputs. However, these techniques are biased toward the analysis of portions of the neuron containing GnRH peptide. Using acute brain slices prepared from transgenic GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice, individual fluorescing GnRH neurons were identified, patched, and filled with the small-molecular-weight dye biocytin. Cells were subsequently visualized with an avidin-conjugated fluorophore, and their morphological characteristics were analyzed by confocal microscopy. In total, 45 GnRH neurons from seven adult male and eight diestrus female mice were examined. Unexpectedly, we found that GnRH neurons possess remarkably long dendritic processes, in some cases extending over 1000 microm distal to the cell body. The somata and dendrites of all GnRH neurons were decorated with an assortment of spine-like protrusions, including filopodia, in an heterogeneous manner. Overall, GnRH neurons had a mean dendritic spine density of 0.4 spines/microm, with the highest densities found in the first 50 microm of the dendrite. GnRH neurons with dendrites running in a horizontal orientation had significantly (P < 0.05) more spines than dendrites with a vertical orientation. The comparison of male and female GnRH neurons revealed no sexually differentiated characteristics of somal or dendritic spine density. Using a technique in which the full extent of the GnRH neuron can be visualized, we demonstrate here a previously unrecognized GnRH neuron morphology of long dendrites covered in spines. These observations suggest that GnRH neurons are not poorly innervated and that they receive abundant excitatory synaptic inputs.

  20. Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Besselink, R.; Stawski, Tomasz; Castricum, H.L.; Levy, D.; Zayat, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on time-resolved studies of nanostructure development in sol-gel liquids, that is, diluted sols, wet gels, and drying thin fffilms. The most commonly investigated classes of sol-gel materials are silica, organically modified silica, template-directed mesostructured silica,

  1. Time-resolved THz spectroscopy in a parallel plate waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy inside a novel parallel plate waveguide where one of the metallic plates is replaced by a transparent conducting oxide. Considerable improvements to the waveguide loss coefficient are shown, with a power absorption coefficient of 4cm-1 at 0.5 THz...

  2. Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy: Recent progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-06-16

    Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) combines the known advantages of single-particle cryo-EM in visualizing molecular structure with the ability to dissect the time progress of a reaction between molecules in vitro. Here some of the recent progress of this methodology and its first biological applications are outlined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-Resolved 2PPE and Time-Resolved PEEM as a Probe of LSP's in Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bayer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique (TR-2PPE has been applied to study static and dynamic properties of localized surface plasmons (LSP in silver nanoparticles. Laterally, integrated measurements show the difference between LSP excitation and nonresonant single electron-hole pair creation. Studies below the optical diffraction limit were performed with the detection method of time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM. This microscopy technique with a resolution down to 40 nm enables a systematic study of retardation effects across single nanoparticles. In addition, as will be shown in this paper, it is a highly sensitive sensor for coupling effects between nanoparticles.

  4. Revealing the surface and bulk regimes of isothermal graphene growth on Ni with in situ kinetic measurements and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Merkulov, Igor A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In situ optical diagnostics are used to reveal the isothermal nucleation and growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni across a wide temperature range (560 C < T < 840 C) by chemical vapor deposition from single, sub-second pulses of acetylene. An abrupt, two-orders of magnitude change in growth times (~ 100s to 1s) is revealed at T = 680 C. Below and above this temperature, similar sigmoidal kinetics are measured and attributed to autocatalytic growth reactions but by two different mechanisms, surface assembly and dissolution/precipitation, respectively. These data are used to develop a simple and general kinetic model for graphene growth that includes the nucleation phase and includes the effects of carbon solubility in metals, describes delayed nucleation, and allows the interpretation of the competition between surface and bulk growth modes. The sharp transition in growth kinetics at T = 680 C is explained by a change in defect site density required for nucleation due to a transition in the carbon-induced mobility of the Ni surface. The easily-implemented optical reflectivity diagnostics and the simple kinetic model described here allow a pathway to optimize the growth of graphene on metals with arbitrary carbon solubility.

  5. In situ hybridization and sequence analysis reveal an association of Plasmodium spp. with mortalities in wild passerine birds in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinhopl, Nora; Nedorost, Nora; Mostegl, Meike M; Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    Native European passerine birds are frequently clinically inapparent carriers of haemosporidian parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Clinical disease and death are only exceptionally reported. In the present study, tissue samples of 233 wild passerine birds found dead in Eastern Austria were examined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and partial cytochrome B gene sequence analysis for the presence, abundance and taxonomic assignment of Plasmodium spp. In 34 cases (14.6%), ISH yielded a positive result with large numbers of developmental stages in different cell types of the spleen, liver, brain and lung. The abundance of the tissue stages, which was comparable to fatal cases of avian malaria in penguins, suggested a major contribution to the cause of death. Genetic analysis revealed infections with representatives of three different valid species of Plasmodium, Plasmodium elongatum, Plasmodium lutzi and Plasmodium vaughani. Genetically identical parasite lineages had been found in a previous study in penguins kept in the Vienna zoo, providing evidence for the role of wild birds as reservoir hosts. Further, this study provides evidence that several species of Plasmodium are able to abundantly proliferate in endemic wild birds ultimately resulting in mortalities.

  6. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB 030501 using INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, V.; Borkowski, J.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst...... Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F20-200 keV similar or equal to 3.5x10(-6) erg cm(-2)) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20-400 keV range which is consistent...

  7. Benchtop time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Anjan; Kimura, T; Otani, Y; Fukuma, Y; Akahane, K; Meguro, S

    2008-12-01

    We present here the construction and application of a compact benchtop time-resolved Kerr magnetometer to measure the magnetization precession in magnetic thin films and lithographically patterned elements. As opposed to very expensive femtosecond lasers this system is built upon a picosecond pulsed injection diode laser and electronic pulse and delay generators. The precession is triggered by the electronic pulses of controlled duration and shape, which is launched onto the sample by a microstrip line. We used polarized optical pulses synchronous to the electronic pulses to measure the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The system is integrated in a conventional upright microscope configuration with separate illumination, imaging, and magneto-optical probe paths. The system offers high stability, relative ease of alignment, sample changing, and a long range of time delay. We demonstrate the measurements of time-resolved dynamics of a Permalloy microwire and microdot using this system, which showed dynamics at two different time scales.

  8. Logarithmic based optical delay for time-resolved data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Richard L; Barisas, B George; Levinger, Nancy E

    2010-09-01

    A method has been established that generates values spaced according to a mathematical function, specifically the logarithm function that can be applied to a stepper motor. Here, it is applied to yield logarithmically spaced time delay points for subnanosecond interferometric time-resolved experiments using a stepper motor controlled translation stage. Application of this method is discussed in terms of three input parameters: the optical delay stage time resolution, dt; the time of maximum delay, d(stop); and the desired number of data points, N. The method improves the efficiency of interferometric time-resolved data collection while providing data collection effective to determine decay parameters. In principle, this technique could be generalized to any mathematical function.

  9. Gated detector for time-resolved photoemission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, Carsten; Kaiser, Alexander; Cramm, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Photoemission microscopy in combination with X-ray circular dichroism is a well established tool to image magnetic domain patterns in micrometer sized structures. Apart from imaging static magnetization patterns, the microscope can be integrated in a time-resolved setup. Here a magnetic field pulse is used to excite a dynamic response of the micromagnetic ordering in the structures, which is in turn imaged by pulsed X-ray illumination from a synchrotron source. With this technique, precession dynamics and domain wall movements in polycristalline permalloy structures have already been successfully investigated. However, the timing requirements make it necessary to use single-bunch beam conditions for these experiments. Here, we present and compare two different approaches for fast switching of the imaging unit of the microscope in order to exploit the hybrid bunch in the normal injection pattern of Bessy II for time-resolved experiments.

  10. Kinetic and Conformational Insights of Protein Adsorption onto Montmorillonite Revealed Using in Situ ATR-FTIR/2D-COS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael P; Martínez, Carmen Enid

    2016-08-09

    Protein adsorption onto clay minerals is a process with wide-ranging impacts on the environmental cycling of nutrients and contaminants. This process is influenced by kinetic and conformational factors that are often challenging to probe in situ. This study represents an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic investigation of the adsorption of a model protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) onto a clay mineral (montmorillonite) at four concentrations (1.50, 3.75, 7.50, and 15.0 μM) under environmentally relevant conditions. At all concentrations probed, FTIR spectra show that BSA readily adsorbs onto montmorillonite. Adsorption kinetics follow an Elovich model, suggesting that primary limitations on adsorption rates are surface-related heterogeneous energetic restrictions associated with protein rearrangement and lateral protein-protein interaction. BSA adsorption onto montmorillonite fits the Langmuir model, yielding K = 5.97 × 10(5) M(-1). Deconvolution and curve fitting of the amide I band at the end of the adsorption process (∼120 min) shows a large extent of BSA unfolding upon adsorption at 1.50 μM, with extended chains and turns increasing at the expense of α-helices. At higher concentrations/surface coverages, BSA unfolding is less pronounced and a more compact structure is assumed. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2D-COS) analysis reveals three different pathways corresponding to adsorbed conformations. At 1.50 μM, adsorption increases extended chains, followed by a loss in α-helices and a subsequent increase in turns. At 3.75 μM, extended chains decrease and then aggregated strands increase and side chains decrease, followed by a decrease in turns. With 7.50 and 15.0 μM BSA, the loss of side-chain vibrations is followed by an increase in aggregated strands and a subsequent decrease in turns and extended chains. Overall, the BSA concentration and resultant surface coverage have a profound

  11. Time-resolved potentiometry on liquid-liquid interface

    OpenAIRE

    Mansfeldová, Věra

    2017-01-01

    MSc. Věra Mansfeldová Dissertation thesis: Time-resolved potentiometry on liquid-liquid interface Abstract The aim of this work is to explore the method of temporal resolution in potentiometry as a new prospective electrochemical analytical technique. In connection with interface of two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) it may find utilization in analytical chemistry. This technique up to my knowledge has not been published yet. Potential response of analyte on liquid/liquid interface ...

  12. On the interpretation of time-resolved anisotropic diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we review existing systematic treatments for the interpretation of anisotropic diffraction patterns from partially aligned symmetric top molecules. Such patterns arise in the context of time-resolved diffraction experiments. We calculate diffraction patterns for ground-state NaI ex......I excited with an ultraviolet laser. The results are interpreted with the help of a qualitative analytic model, and general recommendations on the analysis and interpretation of anisotropic diffraction patterns are given....

  13. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  14. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...... coherent detection, respectively. We find that the measured frequency dependent conductivity can be well described by a Drude-Smith model, supplemented by a Lorentz model oscillating near 5 THz....

  15. Time-resolved crystallography using the Hadamard Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Briony A.; Beddard, Godfrey S.; Owen, Robin L.; Pearson, Arwen R.

    2014-01-01

    A new method for performing time-resolved X-ray crystallographic experiments based on the Hadamard Transform is proposed and demonstrated. The time-resolution is defined by the underlying periodicity of the probe pulse sequence and the signal to noise is greatly improved compared to the fastest experiments depending on a single pulse. This approach is general and equally applicable to any spectroscopic or imaging measurement where the probe can be encoded. PMID:25282611

  16. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse and by me......This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... and by measuring the transmission of a terahertz probe pulse, the photoconductivity of the excited sample can be obtained. By changing the relative arrival time at the sample between the pump and the probe pulse, the photoconductivity dynamics can be studied on a picosecond timescale. The rst studied semiconductor...... be signicantly reduced. Besides time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurement, optical transmission, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy experiments on black silicon are presented....

  17. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Chelliah V; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2016-03-14

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.

  18. Time-resolved photoinduced Kerr rotation in semiconductor microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumori, Y.; Kosaka, H. [Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan); CREST-JST (Japan); Kato, N.; Edamatsu, K. [Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan); Yamamoto, N.; Akahane, K. [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Nukuikita, Koganei-shi, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    We studied photoinduced Kerr effect in cavity polaritons in a semiconductor microcavity by carefully measuring the time-resolved Kerr rotation and ellipticity spectra. The Kerr rotation angle of the microcavity polaritons is a hundred times larger than a conventional single quantum well. A spectral shape analysis of the observed spectra suggests that the photoindeced Kerr effect mainly results from a line broadening of the polarions due to spin-polarized polariton-polariton scattering. Enhancement in oscillator strength also contributes to the large rotation angle. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of organic-plasmonic hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Fiutowski, Jacek

    We study the optical properties of organic thin films and crystalline organic nanofibers as well as their interaction with plasmonic materials by means of laser-scanning fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TR-PLS). The aim of our...... research is to understand and developed organic-plasmonic hybrid systems with tailored optical and plasmonic properties such as wave-guiding, enhance second-harmonic response and lasing. We are able to image, gather information about the fundamental coupling mechanism, as well as study charge...

  20. Development of new devices for time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez Martínez, David

    2015-01-01

    La Tesis Doctoral desarrollada por D. David Ibáñez Martínez que lleva por título “Development of new devices for time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry” ha sido realizada en el área de Química Analítica de la Universidad de Burgos y dirigida por los doctores Álvaro Colina Santamaría y Mª Aránzazu Heras Vidaurre. En este trabajo se han desarrollado nuevas celdas y dispositivos espectroelectroquímicos que permiten el estudio tanto de nuevos materiales como de mecanismos químicos de reacció...

  1. Time-resolved SERS for characterizing extracellular vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojalin, Tatu; Saari, Heikki; Somersalo, Petter; Laitinen, Saara; Turunen, Mikko; Viitala, Tapani; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Smith, Zachary J.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a platform for characterizing extracellular vesicles (EV) by using gold-polymer nanopillar SERS arrays simultaneously circumventing the photoluminescence-related disadvantages of Raman with a time-resolved approach. EVs are rich of biochemical information reporting of, for example, diseased state of the biological system. Currently, straightforward, label-free and fast EV characterization methods with low sample consumption are warranted. In this study, SERS spectra of red blood cell and platelet derived EVs were successfully measured and their biochemical contents analyzed using multivariate data analysis techniques. The developed platform could be conveniently used for EV analytics in general.

  2. Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy of small tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Comelli, Daniela; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Kienle, Alwin

    2007-07-01

    Time-resolved transmittance measurements were performed in the wavelength range of 610 or 700 to 1050 nm on phantom slabs and bone tissue cubes of different sizes. The data were best fitted with solutions of the diffusion equation for an infinite slab and for a parallelepiped to investigate how size and optical properties of the samples affect the results obtained with the two models. When small samples are considered, the slab model overestimates both optical coefficients, especially the absorption. The parallelepiped model largely compensates for the small sample size and performs much better also when the absorption spectra are interpreted with the Beer's law to estimate bone tissue composition.

  3. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution...... of long lifetime (similar to 20 mu s) components in K-feldspars is greater than that in Na-feldspars at each detection wavelength. From any one feldspar sample, red and blue IR-OSL signals have a greater contribution of long lifetime components than UV IR-OSL. We found this long lifetime component...

  4. Self-Assembled Framework Formed During Lithiation of SnS2 Nanoplates Revealed by in Situ Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kuibo; Zhang, Minghao; Hood, Zachary D; Pan, Jie; Meng, Ying Shirley; Chi, Miaofang

    2017-07-18

    batteries, must be clearly understood. Probing these dynamic evolution processes, i.e. the lithiation reactions and morphology evolutions, are often challenging. It requires both high-resolution chemical analysis and microstructural identification. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has recently been raised as one of the most powerful techniques for monitoring electrochemical processes in anode materials for LIBs. In this work, we focus on elucidating the origin of the structural stability of SnS2 during electrochemical cycling by revealing the microstructural evolution of SnS2 upon lithiation using in situ TEM. Crystalline SnS2 was observed to undergo a two-step reaction after the initial lithium intercalation: (1) irreversible formation of metallic tin and amorphous lithium sulfide and (2) reversible transformation of metallic tin to Li-Sn alloys, which is determined to be the rate-determining step. More interestingly, it was discovered that a self-assembled composite framework formed during the irreversible conversion reaction, which has not been previously reported. Crystalline Sn nanoparticles are well arranged within an amorphous Li2S "matrix" in this self-assembled framework. This nanoscale framework confines the locations of individual Sn nanoparticles and prevents particle agglomeration during the subsequent cycling processes, therefore providing desired structural tolerance and warranting a sufficientelectron pathway. Our results not only explain the outstanding cycling stability of SnS2 over metallic tin anodes, but also provide important mechanistic insights into the design of high-performance electrodes for next-generation LIBs through the integration of a unique nanoframework.

  5. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  6. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence study of all-trans-retinal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Yuval; Presiado, Itay; Gepshtein, Rinat; Simkovitch, Ron; Huppert, Dan

    2014-11-01

    UV-vis steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques were employed to study the ultrafast relaxation path of all-trans-retinal. We found that the steady-state emission spectrum consists mainly of two bands that we assign to the allowed transition from the ? state and the forbidden transition from the ?(ππ*) state. The time-resolved emission signal is dependent on the excitation wavelength, and is composed of three decay components. The short-time component of less than 80 fs, irrespective of the solvent, is assigned to the transition from the ? state. The intermediate-time decay component is assigned to the transition from the ?(ππ*) state, depends on the solvent's polarity and not on the existence of hydrogen bonds between the solute and the solvent or the viscosity of the latter. It has a lifetime of ~1 ps in polar solvents, and of 0.6 and 0.4 ps in the non-polar solvents n-octane and cyclohexane, respectively.

  8. Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Liu, Jiang; Engquist, Isak; Ederth, Thomas

    2017-01-25

    An understanding of the doping and ion distributions in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is required to approach a realistic conduction model which can precisely explain the electrochemical reactions, p-n junction formation, and ion dynamics in the active layer and to provide relevant information about LECs for systematic improvement of function and manufacture. Here, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy is used to monitor anion density profile and polymer structure in situ and for time-resolved mapping of electrochemical doping in an LEC under bias. The results are in very good agreement with the electrochemical doping model with respect to ion redistribution and formation of a dynamic p-n junction in the active layer. We also physically slow ions by decreasing the working temperature and study frozen-junction formation and immobilization of ions in a fixed-junction LEC device by FTIR imaging. The obtained results show irreversibility of the ion redistribution and polymer doping in a fixed-junction device. In addition, we demonstrate that infrared microscopy is a useful tool for in situ characterization of electroactive organic materials.

  9. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Danny J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-02-14

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid-IR spectrum. Using ab initio calculations on specific parts of the rotaxane, and by comparing the transient spectra of the normal rotaxane with that of the N-deuterated version, we can assign the observed vibrational modes of each species occurring during the shuttling cycle in an unambiguous way. The complete time- and frequency-dependent data set is analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). Using a kinetic model to describe the time-dependent concentrations of the transient species, we derive the absorption spectra associated with each stage in the operation cycle of the molecular shuttle, including the recombination of the charged species.

  10. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michel Antolovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach.

  11. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  12. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  13. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J. [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  14. Time resolved optical Bloch oscillations in porous silicon superlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghulinyan, Mher; Gaburro, Zeno; Pavesi, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Oton, Claudio J. [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Department of Fundamental Physics, University of La Laguna, La Laguna 38204 Tenerife (Spain); Sapienza, Riccardo; Costantino, Paola; Wiersma, Diederik S. [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy and INFM, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Florence) (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    We report on the observation of time resolved Bloch oscillations of light waves in optical superlattice structures. The structures are series of coupled microcavities, which are grown in porous silicon with high control of optical parameters. A controlled linear gradient of refractive index along the growth direction was maintained to tilt the photonic band gap of the superlattice. This is in perfect analogy to the tilted electronic miniband structure of a semiconductor in an electric field. In this way an optical Wannier-Stark ladder of equidistant optical modes was formed. Their frequency separation defines the period of the photon Bloch oscillations. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with transfer matrix calculations. The observed phenomenon is the optical counterpart of the well known electronic Bloch oscillations. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Revealing the Role of Interfacial Properties on Catalytic Behaviors by in Situ Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xia-Guang; Wei, Jie; Wang, Chen; Chen, Shu; Sun, Han-Lei; Wang, Ya-Hao; Chen, Bing-Hui; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Wu, De-Yin; Li, Jian-Feng; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2017-08-02

    Insightful understanding of how interfacial structures and properties affect catalytic processes is one of the most challenging issues in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, the essential roles of Pt-Au and Pt-oxide-Au interfaces on the activation of H2 and the hydrogenation of para-nitrothiophenol (pNTP) were studied at molecular level by in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS). Pt-Au and Pt-oxide-Au interfaces were fabricated through the synthesis of Pt-on-Au and Pt-on-SHINs nanocomposites. Direct spectroscopic evidence demonstrates that the atomic hydrogen species generated on the Pt nanocatalysts can spill over from Pt to Au via the Pt-Au and Pt-TiO2-Au interfaces, but would be blocked at the Pt-SiO2-Au interfaces, leading to the different reaction pathways and product selectivity on Pt-on-Au and Pt-on-SHINs nanocomposites. Such findings have also been verified by the density functional theory calculation. In addition, it is found that nanocatalysts assembled on pinhole-free shell-isolated nanoparticles (Pt-on-pinhole-free-SHINs) can override the influence of the Au core on the reaction and can be applied as promising platforms for the in situ study of heterogeneous catalysis. This work offers a concrete example of how SERS/SHINERS elucidate details about in situ reaction and helps to dig out the fundamental role of interfaces in catalysis.

  16. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  17. Graphene quantum dots-terbium ions as novel sensitive and selective time-resolved luminescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorent-Martínez, Eulogio J; Durán, Gema M; Ríos, Ángel; Ruiz-Medina, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    We propose an alternative approach for the development of analytical methods based on terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL). TSL is based on the complexation between Tb(III) ions and fluorescent organic compounds that have appropriate functional groups to complex with Tb(III). We report the use of graphene quantum dot (GQDs) nanoparticles to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of TSL detection. GQDs can react with terbium ions through the carboxylic groups present in their structure. These Tb(III)-GQD complexes, formed in situ in aqueous solution, can be used as time-resolved luminescent probes. Ascorbic acid was selected as a target analyte to demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method. The selectivity of the TSL method was highly improved for most of the interferences tested. Under the optimum conditions [Tb(III) concentration 5 × 10-4 mol L-1, GQD concentration 4 mg L-1], a minimum 100% increase in selectivity was observed for several vitamins and common cations that may be present in the samples to be analyzed. In addition, the analytical signal showed a 30% enhancement with the use of GQDs compared with the use of merely Tb(III) ions, with a detection limit of 0.12 μg mL-1. The repeatability and intermediate precision were lower than 3% and 5%, respectively. From the results obtained, the implementation of GQDs in TSL can lead to the development of novel time-resolved luminescent probes with high analytical potential. Graphical abstract Quenching of Tb(III)-graphene quantum dot (GQD) luminescence by ascorbic acid (AA). TBL terbium-sensitized luminescence.

  18. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and imaging: new approaches to the analysis of cultural heritage and its degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Austin; Cesaratto, Anna; Bellei, Sara; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Toniolo, Lucia; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, Daniela

    2014-04-02

    Applications of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the analysis of cultural heritage are presented. Examples range from historic wall paintings and stone sculptures to 20th century iconic design objects. A detailed description of the instrumentation developed and employed for analysis in the laboratory or in situ is given. Both instruments rely on a pulsed laser source coupled to a gated detection system, but differ in the type of information they provide. Applications of FLIM to the analysis of model samples and for the in-situ monitoring of works of art range from the analysis of organic materials and pigments in wall paintings, the detection of trace organic substances on stone sculptures, to the mapping of luminescence in late 19th century paintings. TRPL and FLIM are employed as sensors for the detection of the degradation of design objects made in plastic. Applications and avenues for future research are suggested.

  19. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Spectroscopy and Imaging: New Approaches to the Analysis of Cultural Heritage and Its Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Nevin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM to the analysis of cultural heritage are presented. Examples range from historic wall paintings and stone sculptures to 20th century iconic design objects. A detailed description of the instrumentation developed and employed for analysis in the laboratory or in situ is given. Both instruments rely on a pulsed laser source coupled to a gated detection system, but differ in the type of information they provide. Applications of FLIM to the analysis of model samples and for the in-situ monitoring of works of art range from the analysis of organic materials and pigments in wall paintings, the detection of trace organic substances on stone sculptures, to the mapping of luminescence in late 19th century paintings. TRPL and FLIM are employed as sensors for the detection of the degradation of design objects made in plastic. Applications and avenues for future research are suggested.

  20. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  1. Time resolved spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of single semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Robert; Krasselt, Cornelius; Borczyskowski, Christian von [TU Chemnitz (DE). Institute of Physics, Department of Optical Spectroscopy and Molecular Physics (OSMP), NanoMA

    2010-07-01

    The photoluminescence of single emitters like semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) shows intermittency, called blinking, which divides the intensity time traces into bright ''on''-, dark ''off''-and intermediate-states. The distribution of ''off''-times shows power law behavior with an exponential decay. While the power law behavior of ''off''-times is well understood, it is less evident for ''on''-times. We investigate the blinking-dynamics of CdSe/ZnS-nanocrystals using time resolved confocal microscopy, spectroscopy and lifetime measurements. The intensity time traces are analysed with special focus on intermediate intensities, by varying the threshold separating the on- and off- from intermediate-states. Further the intensity time traces are compared with spectral- and lifetime- time traces in order to obtain correlations between intensities, lifetimes and spectral positions. We report new insights into the intrinsic dynamics of QD.

  2. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved microwave conductivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Obadiah G.; Moore, David T.; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Dewei; Yan, Yanfa; Zhu, Kai; Rumbles, Garry

    2017-11-10

    Flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (fp-TRMC) is a versatile, highly sensitive technique for studying the complex photoconductivity of solution, solid, and gas-phase samples. The purpose of this paper is to provide a standard reference work for experimentalists interested in using microwave conductivity methods to study functional electronic materials, describing how to conduct and calibrate these experiments in order to obtain quantitative results. The main focus of the paper is on calculating the calibration factor, K, which is used to connect the measured change in microwave power absorption to the conductance of the sample. We describe the standard analytical formulae that have been used in the past, and compare them to numerical simulations. This comparison shows that the most widely used analytical analysis of fp-TRMC data systematically under-estimates the transient conductivity by ~60%. We suggest a more accurate semi-empirical way of calibrating these experiments. However, we emphasize that the full numerical calculation is necessary to quantify both transient and steady-state conductance for arbitrary sample properties and geometry.

  3. Time-resolved biophysical approaches to nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cardarelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules are continuously shuttling across the nuclear envelope barrier that separates the nucleus from the cytoplasm. Instead of being just a barrier to diffusion, the nuclear envelope is rather a complex filter that provides eukaryotes with an elaborate spatiotemporal regulation of fundamental molecular processes, such as gene expression and protein translation. Given the highly dynamic nature of nucleocytoplasmic transport, during the past few decades large efforts were devoted to the development and application of time resolved, fluorescence-based, biophysical methods to capture the details of molecular motion across the nuclear envelope. These methods are here divided into three major classes, according to the differences in the way they report on the molecular process of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In detail, the first class encompasses those methods based on the perturbation of the fluorescence signal, also known as ensemble-averaging methods, which average the behavior of many molecules (across many pores. The second class comprises those methods based on the localization of single fluorescently-labelled molecules and tracking of their position in space and time, potentially across single pores. Finally, the third class encompasses methods based on the statistical analysis of spontaneous fluorescence fluctuations out of the equilibrium or stationary state of the system. In this case, the behavior of single molecules is probed in presence of many similarly-labelled molecules, without dwelling on any of them. Here these three classes, with their respective pros and cons as well as their main applications to nucleocytoplasmic shuttling will be briefly reviewed and discussed.

  4. Monitoring tissue metabolism via time-resolved laser fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Buchholz, Rainer; Emmrich, Frank; Fink, Frank; Geddes, Clive L.; Pfeifer, Lutz; Raabe, Ferdinand; Marx, Uwe

    1999-05-01

    Most assays for drug screening are monitoring the metabolism of cells by detecting the NADH content, which symbolize its metabolic activity, indirectly. Nowadays, the performance of a LASER enables us to monitor the metabolic state of mammalian cells directly and on-line by using time-resolved autofluorescence detection. Therefore, we developed in combination with tissue engineering, an assay for monitoring minor toxic effects of volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are accused of inducing Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). Furthermore, we used the Laserfluoroscope (LF) for pharmacological studies on human bone marrow in vitro with special interest in chemotherapy simulation. In cancer research and therapy, the effect of chemostatica in vitro in the so-called oncobiogram is being tested; up to now without great success. However, it showed among other things that tissue structure plays a vital role. Consequently, we succeeded in simulating a chemotherapy in vitro on human bone marrow. Furthermore, after tumor ektomy we were able to distinguish between tumoric and its surrounding healthy tissue by using the LF. With its sensitive detection of metabolic changes in tissues the LF enables a wide range of applications in biotechnology, e.g. for quality control in artificial organ engineering or biocompatability testing.

  5. Fielding of a Time-Resolved Tomographic Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Frayer, Brian Cox, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Mike Jones, Morris Kaufman

    2008-09-11

    A diagnostic instrument has been developed for the acquisition of high-speed time-resolved images at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument was developed in order to create time histories of the electron beam. Four discrete optical subsystems view Cerenkov light generated at an x-ray target inside of a vacuum envelope. Each system employs cylindrical optics to image light in one direction and collapse light in the orthogonal direction. Each of the four systems images and collapses in unique axes, thereby capturing unique information. Light along the imaging axis is relayed via optical fiber to streak cameras. A computer is used to reconstruct the original image from the four optically collapsed images. Due to DARHT’s adverse environment, the instrument can be operated remotely to adjust optical parameters and contains a subsystem for remote calibration. The instrument was deployed and calibrated, and has been used to capture and reconstruct images. Matters of alignment, calibration, control, resolution, and adverse conditions will be discussed.

  6. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to Channelrhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglof eRitter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins.

  7. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved microwave conductivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Obadiah G.; Moore, David T.; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Dewei; Yan, Yanfa; Zhu, Kai; Rumbles, Garry

    2017-12-01

    Flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (fp-TRMC) is a versatile, highly sensitive technique for studying the complex photoconductivity of solution, solid, and gas-phase samples. The purpose of this paper is to provide a standard reference work for experimentalists interested in using microwave conductivity methods to study functional electronic materials, describing how to conduct and calibrate these experiments in order to obtain quantitative results. The main focus of the paper is on calculating the calibration factor, K, which is used to connect the measured change in microwave power absorption to the conductance of the sample. We describe the standard analytical formulae that have been used in the past, and compare them to numerical simulations. This comparison shows that the most widely used analytical analysis of fp-TRMC data systematically under-estimates the transient conductivity by ~60%. We suggest a more accurate semi-empirical way of calibrating these experiments. However, we emphasize that the full numerical calculation is necessary to quantify both transient and steady-state conductance for arbitrary sample properties and geometry.

  8. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Stambouli, D.; Carli, P.; Massi, D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated human cutaneous basal cell carcinoma ex-vivo samples by combined time resolved two photon intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy. Morphological and spectroscopic differences were found between malignant skin and corresponding healthy skin tissues. In comparison with normal healthy skin, cancer tissue showed a different morphology and a mean fluorescence lifetime distribution slightly shifted towards higher values. Topical application of delta-aminolevulinic acid to the lesion four hours before excision resulted in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal arising from malignant tissue, due to the accumulation of protoporphyrines inside tumor cells. Contrast enhancement was prevalent at tumor borders by both two photon fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Fluorescence-based images showed a good correlation with conventional histopathological analysis, thereby supporting the diagnostic accuracy of this novel method. Combined morphological and lifetime analysis in the study of ex-vivo skin samples discriminated benign from malignant tissues, thus offering a reliable, non-invasive tool for the in-vivo analysis of inflammatory and neoplastic skin lesions.

  9. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  10. Live cell imaging of mitochondria following targeted irradiation in situ reveals rapid and highly localized loss of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Dietrich W M; Siebenwirth, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Reindl, Judith; Girst, Stefanie; Muggiolu, Giovanna; Simon, Marina; Barberet, Philippe; Seznec, Hervé; Zischka, Hans; Multhoff, Gabriele; Schmid, Thomas E; Dollinger, Guenther

    2017-04-25

    The reliance of all cell types on the mitochondrial function for survival makes mitochondria an interesting target when trying to understand their role in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. By harnessing highly focused carbon ions and protons using microbeams, we have performed in situ live cell imaging of the targeted irradiation of individual mitochondria stained with Tetramethyl rhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE), a cationic fluorophore which accumulates electrophoretically in polarized mitochondria. Targeted irradiation with both carbon ions and protons down to beam spots of <1 μm induced a near instant loss of mitochondrial TMRE fluorescence signal in the targeted area. The loss of TMRE after targeted irradiation represents a radiation induced change in mitochondrial membrane potential. This is the first time such mitochondrial responses have been documented in situ after targeted microbeam irradiation. The methods developed and the results obtained have the ability to shed new light on not just mitochondria's response to radiation but to further elucidate a putative mechanism of radiation induced depolarization and mitochondrial response.

  11. Segmental duplications within the Glycine max genome revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization of bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Janice; Walling, Jason G; Young, Nevin D; Shoemaker, Randy C; Jackson, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is presumed to be an ancient polyploid based on chromosome number and multiple RFLP fragments in genetic mapping. Direct cytogenetic observation of duplicated regions within the soybean genome has not heretofore been reported. Employing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of genetically anchored bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) in soybean, we were able to observe that the distal ends of molecular linkage group E had duplicated regions on linkage groups A2 and B2. Further, using fiber-FISH, it was possible to measure the molecular size and organization of one of the duplicated regions. As FISH did not require repetitive DNA for blocking fluorescence signals, we assume that the 200-kb genome region is relatively low in repetitive sequences. This observation, along with the observation that the BACs are located in distal euchromatin regions, has implications for genome structure/evolution and the approach used to sequence the soybean genome.

  12. A robust noise reduction technique for time resolved CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhoubo; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Williamson, Eric E; Kotsenas, Amy L; DeLone, David R; Manduca, Armando; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-01-01

    To develop a noise reduction method for time resolved CT data, especially those with significant patient motion. PArtial TEmporal Nonlocal (PATEN) means is a technique that uses the redundant information in time-resolved CT data to achieve noise reduction. In this method, partial temporal profiles are used to determine the similarity (or weight) between pixels, and the similarity search makes use of both spatial and temporal information, providing robustness to patient motion. The performance of the PATEN filter was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated with nine cardiac CT patient data sets and five CT brain perfusion patient data sets. In cardiac CT, PATEN was applied to reduce noise primarily in the reduced-dose phases created with electrocardiographic (ECG) pulsing. CT number accuracy and noise reduction were evaluated in both full-dose phases and reduced-dose phases between filtered backprojection images and PATEN filtered images. In CT brain perfusion, simulated quarter dose data were obtained by adding noise to the raw data of a routine dose scan. PATEN was applied to the simulated low-dose images. Image noise, time-intensity profile accuracy, and perfusion parameter maps were compared among low-dose, low-dose+PATEN filter, and full-dose images. The noise reduction performance of PATEN was compared to a previously proposed noise reduction method, time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) bilateral filtering. In 4D cardiac CT, after PATEN filtering, the image noise in the reduced-dose phases was greatly reduced, making anatomical structures easier to identify. The mean decreases in noise values between the original and PATEN images were 11.0% and 53.8% for the full and reduced-dose phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively. TIPS could not achieve effective noise reduction. In CT brain perfusion, PATEN achieved a 55.8%-66.3% decrease in image noise in the low-dose images. The contrast to noise ratio in the axial images was increased and was comparable to

  13. Microsecond Time-Resolved Circular Dichroism of Rhodopsin Photointermediates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yiren Gu; Szundi, Istvan; Lewis, James W.; Kliger, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved circular dichroism measurements, over a spectral range from 300 to 700 nm, were made at delays of 5, 100 and 500 μs after room temperature photoexcitation of bovine rhodopsin in lauryl maltoside suspension. The purpose was to provide more structural information about intermediate states in the activation of rhodopsin and other G protein-coupled receptors. In particular, information was sought about photointermediates that are isochromic or nearly isochromic in their unpolarized absorbance. The circular dichroism spectrum of lumirhodopsin, obtained after correcting the 5 μs difference CD data for the rhodopsin bleached, was in reasonable agreement with the lumirhodopsin CD spectrum obtained previously by thermal trapping at -76°C. Similarly, the metarhodopsin II spectrum obtained at 500 μs delay was also in agreement with the results of previous work on the temperature trapped form of metarhodopsin II. However, the CD of the mixture formed at 100 μs delay after photoexcitation, whose only visible absorbing component is lumirhodopsin, could not be accounted for near 480 nm in terms of the initially formed, 5 μs lumirhodopsin CD spectrum. Thus, the CD spectrum of lumirhodopsin changes on the time scale from 5 to 100 μs, showing reduced rotational strength in its visible band, possibly associated with either a process responsible for a small spectral shift that occurs in the lumirhodopsin absorbance spectrum at earlier times or the Schiff base deprotonation-reprotonation which occurs during equilibration of lumirhodopsin with the Meta I380 photointermediate. Either explanation suggests a chromophore conformation change closely associated with deprotonation which could be the earliest direct trigger of activation. PMID:19905009

  14. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  15. Time-Resolved Kinetic Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy in a Room-Temperature Flow Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Ruscic, Branko; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-12-11

    Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy is a potentially powerful tool for studying chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics. Branching ratios of multiple reaction products and intermediates can be measured with unprecedented chemical specificity; molecular isomers, conformers, and vibrational states have distinct rotational spectra. Here we demonstrate chirped-pulse spectroscopy of vinyl cyanide photoproducts in a flow tube reactor at ambient temperature of 295 K and pressures of 1-10 μbar. This in situ and time-resolved experiment illustrates the utility of this novel approach to investigating chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics. Following 193 nm photodissociation of CH2CHCN, we observe rotational relaxation of energized HCN, HNC, and HCCCN photoproducts with 10 μs time resolution and sample the vibrational population distribution of HCCCN. The experimental branching ratio HCN/HCCCN is compared with a model based on RRKM theory using high-level ab initio calculations, which were in turn validated by comparisons to Active Thermochemical Tables enthalpies.

  16. Time-resolved cell culture assay analyser (TReCCA Analyser) for the analysis of on-line data: data integration--sensor correction--time-resolved IC50 determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochead, Julia; Schessner, Julia; Werner, Tobias; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved cell culture assays circumvent the need to set arbitrary end-points and reveal the dynamics of quality controlled experiments. However, they lead to the generation of large data sets, which can represent a complexity barrier to their use. We therefore developed the Time-Resolved Cell Culture Assay (TReCCA) Analyser program to perform standard cell assay analyses efficiently and make sophisticated in-depth analyses easily available. The functions of the program include data normalising and averaging, as well as smoothing and slope calculation, pin-pointing exact change time points. A time-resolved IC50/EC50 calculation provides a better understanding of drug toxicity over time and a more accurate drug to drug comparison. Finally the logarithmic sensor recalibration function, for sensors with an exponential calibration curve, homogenises the sensor output and enables the detection of low-scale changes. To illustrate the capabilities of the TReCCA Analyser, we performed on-line monitoring of dissolved oxygen in the culture media of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 treated with different concentrations of the anti-cancer drug Cisplatin. The TReCCA Analyser is freely available at www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/biowissenschaften/ipmb/biologie/woelfl/Research.html. By introducing the program, we hope to encourage more systematic use of time-resolved assays and lead researchers to fully exploit their data.

  17. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of nucleotide flipping by restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Robert K; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Chen, Kai; Kubala, Marta; Siksnys, Virginijus; Jones, Anita C

    2009-11-01

    Restriction enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C, specific for interrupted 5-bp target sequences, flip the central base pair of these sequences into their protein pockets to facilitate sequence recognition and adjust the DNA cleavage pattern. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-aminopurine-labelled DNA in complex with each of these enzymes in solution to explore the nucleotide flipping mechanism and to obtain a detailed picture of the molecular environment of the extrahelical bases. We also report the first study of the 7-bp cutter, PfoI, whose recognition sequence (T/CCNGGA) overlaps with that of the Ecl18kI-type enzymes, and for which the crystal structure is unknown. The time-resolved fluorescence experiments reveal that PfoI also uses base flipping as part of its DNA recognition mechanism and that the extrahelical bases are captured by PfoI in binding pockets whose structures are quite different to those of the structurally characterized enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C. The fluorescence decay parameters of all the enzyme-DNA complexes are interpreted to provide insight into the mechanisms used by these four restriction enzymes to flip and recognize bases and the relationship between nucleotide flipping and DNA cleavage.

  18. Time-resolved GISAXS and cryo-microscopy characterization of block copolymer membrane formation

    KAUST Repository

    Marques, Debora S.

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and cryo-microscopy were used for the first time to understand the pore evolution by copolymer assembly, leading to the formation of isoporous membranes with exceptional porosity and regularity. The formation of copolymer micelle strings in solution (in DMF/DOX/THF and DMF/DOX) was confirmed by cryo field emission scanning electron microscopy (cryo-FESEM) with a distance of 72 nm between centers of micelles placed in different strings. SAXS measurement of block copolymer solutions in DMF/DOX indicated hexagonal assembly with micelle-to-micelle distance of 84-87 nm for 14-20 wt% copolymer solutions. GISAXS in-plane peaks were detected, revealing order close to hexagonal. The d-spacing corresponding to the first peak in this case was 100-130 nm (lattice constant 115-150 nm) for 17 wt% copolymer solutions evaporating up to 100 s. Time-resolved cryo-FESEM showed the formation of incipient pores on the film surface after 4 s copolymer solution casting with distances between void centers of 125 nm. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Homoeologous chromosome pairing between the A and B genomes of Musa spp. revealed by genomic in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeridi, Mouna; Bakry, Frédéric; Escoute, Jacques; Fondi, Emmanuel; Carreel, Françoise; Ferchichi, Ali; D'Hont, Angélique; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite

    2011-10-01

    Most cooking banana and several desert bananas are interspecific triploid hybrids between Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome). In addition, M. balbisiana has agronomical characteristics such as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses that could be useful to improve monospecific acuminata cultivars. To develop efficient breeding strategies for improving Musa cultivars, it is therefore important to understand the possibility of chromosome exchange between these two species. A protocol was developed to prepare chromosome at meiosis metaphase I suitable for genomic in situ hybridization. A series of technical challenges were encountered, the main ones being the hardness of the cell wall and the density of the microsporocyte's cytoplasm, which hampers accessibility of the probes to the chromosomes. Key parameters in solving these problems were addition of macerozyme in the enzyme mix, the duration of digestion and temperature during the spreading phase. This method was applied to analyse chromosome pairing in metaphase from triploid interspecific cultivars, and it was clearly demonstrated that interspecific recombinations between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana chromosomes do occur and may be frequent in triploid hybrids. These results provide new insight into Musa cultivar evolution and have important implications for breeding.

  20. In situ observations of the basal angiosperm Amborella trichopoda reveal a long fruiting cycle overlapping two annual flowering periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcade, Fanny; Pouteau, Robin; Jaffré, Tanguy; Marmey, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Amborella trichopoda is the sole living angiosperm species belonging to the sister lineage of all other extant flowering plants. In the last decade, the species has been the focus of many phylogenetic, genomic and reproductive biology studies, bringing new highlights regarding the evolution of flowering plants. However, little attention has been paid to in situ A. trichopoda populations, particularly to their fruiting cycle. In this study, an A. trichopoda population was observed during three annual flowering cycles. Individuals and branches were labeled in order to monitor the fruiting cycle precisely, from the flowering stage until the abscission of the fruit. Fruit exocarp was green during the first 9 months following flowering, turned red when the next flowering started a year later then remained on the branch during another year, between fruit ripping and abscission. Presence of fruits with two stages of maturity on shrubs was always noticed. Germination tests showed that seeds acquired their germination capacity 1 year after flowering, when fruits changed color. A. trichopoda's fruiting cycle is a long process overlapping two annual flowering periods. These results introduce a new model for flowering and fruiting cycles. The availability of mature seeds on shrubs for more than 1 year is likely to maximize opportunities to be dispersed, thus promoting the survival of this basal angiosperm.

  1. Deep-sea in situ observations of gonatid squid and their prey reveal high occurrence of cannibalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, H. J. T.; Robison, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    In situ observations are rarely applied in food web studies of deep-sea organisms. Using deep-sea observations obtained by remotely operated vehicles in the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we examined the prey choices of more than 100 individual squids of the genus Gonatus. Off the California coast, these squids are abundant, semelparous (one reproductive cycle) oceanic predators but their diet has remained virtually unknown. Gonatus onyx and Gonatus berryi were observed to feed on mesopelagic fishes (in particular the myctophid Stenobrachius leucopsarus) as often as on squids but inter-specific differences in feeding were apparent. Gonatids were the most common squid prey and while cannibalism occurred in both species it was particularly high in Gonatus onyx (42% of all prey items). Typically, the size of prey was similar to the size of the predator but the squids were also seen to take much larger prey. Postjuvenile gonatids are opportunistic predators that consume nektonic members of the meso-and bathypelagic communities, including their own species. Such voracious feeding is likely necessary to support the high energetic demands associated with the single reproductive event; and for females the long brooding period during which they must depend on stored resources.

  2. Time-Resolved Fluorescent Immunochromatography of Aflatoxin B1 in Soybean Sauce: A Rapid and Sensitive Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Du; Zhang, Zhaowei; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wen

    2016-07-14

    Rapid and quantitative sensing of aflatoxin B1 with high sensitivity and specificity has drawn increased attention of studies investigating soybean sauce. A sensitive and rapid quantitative immunochromatographic sensing method was developed for the detection of aflatoxin B1 based on time-resolved fluorescence. It combines the advantages of time-resolved fluorescent sensing and immunochromatography. The dynamic range of a competitive and portable immunoassay was 0.3-10.0 µg·kg(-1), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 µg·kg(-1) and recoveries of 87.2%-114.3%, within 10 min. The results showed good correlation (R² > 0.99) between time-resolved fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Soybean sauce samples analyzed using time-resolved fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test revealed that 64.2% of samples contained aflatoxin B1 at levels ranging from 0.31 to 12.5 µg·kg(-1). The strip test is a rapid, sensitive, quantitative, and cost-effective on-site screening technique in food safety analysis.

  3. In situ spectroscopy reveals that microorganisms in different phyla use different electron transfer biomolecules to respire aerobically on soluble iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Blake

    2016-12-01

    transfer pathways that are characterized by different redox-active prosthetic groups. In situ absorbance spectroscopy is shown to be a useful complement to existing means of investigating the details of energy generation in intact microorganisms under physiological conditions.

  4. Time-resolved photoluminescence and photoreflectance spectroscopy of GaN layers grown on SiN-treated sapphire substrate: Optical properties evolution at different growth stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, M.; Soltani, S.; Chine, Z.; Rebey, A.; Shakfa, M. K.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic study of the optical properties evolution of GaN films during the complete growth process on SiN-treated sapphire substrates by atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The growth process was monitored using in-situ laser reflectometry and was interrupted at different stages to obtain the studied samples. The obtained samples were ex-situ characterized by means of photoluminescence (PL), photoreflectance (PR) and time-resolved PL (TRPL) spectroscopies. The PL emission from the samples of the initial growth stages originates from nano-crystallite and defect states due to the 3D growth mode. However, with increasing layer thickness, the 2D growth mode is established, and the PL spectrum is dominated by free-exciton emission. The electric field extracted by applying the Franz-Keldysh oscillation (FKO) theory on the PR spectra shows a trend to decrease as the GaN layer thickness is increased. For fully coalesced layers, the FKO totally disappears, and the PR spectrum is dominated by free-exciton transitions. TRPL measurements demonstrate the contribution of two processes to the PL decay, i.e., fast and slow components. While the slow decay time reveals the same sensitivity to different types of dislocations (twist and tilt mosaics), the fast decay time is more affected by the twist mosaic than by the tilt one.

  5. Resistive switching mechanism in the one diode-one resistor memory based on p+-Si/n-ZnO heterostructure revealed by in-situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Liang; Li, Xiaomei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong

    2017-03-21

    One diode-one resistor (1D1R) memory is an effective architecture to suppress the crosstalk interference, realizing the crossbar network integration of resistive random access memory (RRAM). Herein, we designed a p + -Si/n-ZnO heterostructure with 1D1R function. Compared with the conventional multilayer 1D1R devices, the structure and fabrication technique can be largely simplified. The real-time imaging of formation/rupture process of conductive filament (CF) process demonstrated the RS mechanism by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Meanwhile, we observed that the formed CF is only confined to the outside of depletion region of Si/ZnO pn junction, and the formation of CF does not degrade the diode performance, which allows the coexistence of RS and rectifying behaviors, revealing the 1D1R switching model. Furthermore, it has been confirmed that the CF is consisting of the oxygen vacancy by in-situ TEM characterization.

  6. Time-resolved statistics of photon pairs in two-cavity Josephson photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dambach, Simon; Kubala, Bjoern; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institute for Complex Quantum Systems and IQST, Ulm University (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We analyze the creation and emission of pairs of highly nonclassical microwave photons in a setup where a voltage-biased Josephson junction is connected in series to two electromagnetic oscillators. Tuning the external voltage such that the Josephson frequency equals the sum of the two mode frequencies, each tunneling Cooper pair creates one additional photon in both of the two oscillators. The time-resolved statistics of photon emission events from the two oscillators is investigated by means of single- and cross-oscillator variants of the second-order correlation function g{sup (2)}(τ) and the waiting-time distribution w(τ). They provide insight into the strongly correlated quantum dynamics of the two oscillator subsystems and reveal a rich variety of quantum features of light including strong antibunching and the presence of negative values in the Wigner function. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Revisiting the photophysics of 9-fluorenone: Ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence and theoretical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Sølling, Theis I.; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2017-10-01

    Ultrafast intersystem crossing dynamics of fluorenone in gas and condensed phases were investigated by time-resolved mass spectrometry and fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy. The former shows the ultrafast Franck-Condon relaxation and the internal conversion dynamics of isolated fluorenone in the gas phase. The latter reveals that the vibrational relaxation time is 2.2 ps and a 110 ps fluorescence lifetime of fluorenone in hexane. The fluorescence lifetime in acetonitrile and dimethylsulfoxide is 16 ns and 15.1 ns, respectively. The potential energy surface along the Cdbnd O out of plane bending motion shows that this coordinate is important for ISC in both polar and non-polar solvents.

  8. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, D. A., E-mail: david.walsh@stfc.ac.uk; Snedden, E. W. [Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, STFC Daresbury National Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jamison, S. P. [Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, STFC Daresbury National Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  9. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, D. A.; Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-05-01

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  10. Imaging spin dynamics in monolayer WS2 by time-resolved Kerr rotation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Elizabeth J.; Newburger, Michael J.; Luo, Yunqiu Kelly; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Singh, Simranjeet; Martin, Iwan B.; Cichewicz, Edward J., Jr.; Jonker, Berend T.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) have immense potential for future spintronic and valleytronic applications due to their 2D nature and long spin/valley lifetimes. We investigate the origin of these long-lived states in n-type WS2 using time-resolved Kerr rotation microscopy and photoluminescence microscopy with ~1 µm spatial resolution. Comparing the spatial dependence of the Kerr rotation signal and the photoluminescence reveals a correlation with neutral exciton emission, which is likely due to the transfer of angular momentum to resident conduction electrons with long spin/valley lifetimes. In addition, we observe an unexpected anticorrelation between the Kerr rotation and trion emission, which provides evidence for the presence of long-lived spin/valley-polarized dark trions. We also find that the spin/valley polarization in WS2 is robust to magnetic fields up to 700 mT, indicative of spins and valleys that are stabilized with strong spin–orbit fields.

  11. A Time-Resolved Study on Nanodisc-to-Vesicle Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Mahabir, Suanne; Wan, Wan Kei; Kastaras, John

    2011-03-01

    Structural phase diagram of a phospholipid mixture composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) and dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) contains many rich morphologies, e.g., nanodiscs also known as ``bicelles'', bilayered ribbons, unilamellar vesicles (ULVs), multi-lamellar vesicles (MLVs) and perforated lamellae. In this report, we will present time-resolved small angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering measurements of the structural transformation from nanodiscs to ULVs as a function of temperature, lipid concentration and charge density. The result will reveal the growth rate of nanodiscs and all the intermediate structures along the transformation process. Through the understanding of the kinetic pathway, the size and polydispersity of the self-assembled nano-size ULVs can be well-controlled. These ULVs can be used as a carrier for therapeutics or imaging probes.

  12. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmerman, Dolev [Department; Leshchev, Denis [Department; Hsu, Darren J. [Department; Hong, Jiyun [Department; Kosheleva, Irina [Center; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical

    2017-09-05

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ~8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  13. Time-resolved SAXS characterization of the shell growth of silica-coated magnetite nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Alexander; Daikeler, Alexander; Guo, Xiaoai; Dingenouts, Nico; Nirschl, Hermann

    2014-07-01

    Time-resolved characterization of silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles during synthesis is performed using our self-developed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) instrument. The shell growth (5-20 nm) is determined quantitatively using a core-shell sphere model. SAXS analyses provide reliable information on the shell thickness despite the complex geometry of the synthesized nanocomposites. They are in good agreement with transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. Firstly, time-resolved SAXS analyses are used to study the influence of the precursor concentration (tetraethyl orthosilicate) on growth kinetics. Time evolution of the shell thickness can be described by diffusion-limited shell growth, obeying kinetics of first order in the precursor concentration. Furthermore, SAXS measurements provide information on the standard deviation of the shell thickness as a function of the coating time. Its decrease observed with increasing coating time is explained by a self-sharpening mechanism and/or a morphology evolution to more isometric shapes. Additionally, the influence of ammonia is studied. By increasing its concentration, the growth rate is affected. However, the final shell thickness and the standard deviation do not change significantly. For low ammonia concentration, by contrast, the SAXS and TEM observations reveal superimposed silica gelation. In addition, coating reaction was conducted at elevated temperature (40 °C). SAXS patterns measured as a function of the coating time and TEM micrographs reveal simultaneous production of classic Stöber particles under these conditions. Hence, SAXS is found to have a big potential for on-line monitoring of the shell properties.

  14. Hydrogen-Mediated Electron Doping of Gold Clusters As Revealed by In Situ X-ray and UV-vis Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Ryo; Hayashi, Shun; Yamazoe, Seiji; Kato, Kazuo; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2017-06-01

    We previously reported that small (∼1.2 nm) gold clusters stabilized by poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (Au:PVP) exhibited a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band at ∼520 nm in the presence of NaBH4. To reveal the mechanism of this phenomenon, the electronic structure of Au:PVP during the reaction with NaBH4 in air was examined by means of in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy at Au L3-edge and UV-vis spectroscopy. These measurements indicated that the appearance of the LSPR band is not associated with the growth in size but is ascribed to electron doping to the Au sp band by the adsorbed H atoms.

  15. Quantitative analysis of pulmonary perfusion using time-resolved parallel 3D MRI - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C.; Buhmann, R.; Plathow, C.; Puderbach, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Abt. Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Risse, F. [Abt. Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, S. [Abt. Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Meyer, F.J. [Abt. Innere Medizin III, Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Purpose: to assess the use of time-resolved parallel 3D MRI for a quantitative analysis of pulmonary perfusion in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. Materials and methods: eight patients with pulmonary embolism or pulmonary hypertension were examined with a time-resolved 3D gradient echo pulse sequence with parallel imaging techniques (FLASH 3D, TE/TR: 0.8/1.9 ms; flip angle: 40 ; GRAPPA). A quantitative perfusion analysis based on indicator dilution theory was performed using a dedicated software. Results: patients with pulmonary embolism or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension revealed characteristic wedge-shaped perfusion defects at perfusion MRI. They were characterized by a decreased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) and pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and increased mean transit time (MTT). Patients with primary pulmonary hypertension or eisenmenger syndrome showed a more homogeneous perfusion pattern. The mean MTT of all patients was 3.3 - 4.7 s. The mean PBF and PBV showed a broader interindividual variation (PBF: 104-322 ml/100 ml/min; PBV: 8 - 21 ml/100 ml). Conclusion: time-resolved parallel 3D MRI allows at least a semi-quantitative assessment of lung perfusion. Future studies will have to assess the clinical value of this quantitative information for the diagnosis and management of cardiopulmonary disease. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Evaluation der zeitlich aufgeloesten 3D MRT mit paralleler Bildgebung (PAT) fuer die quantitative Analyse der Lungenperfusion bei Patienten mit kardiopulmonalen Erkrankungen. Material und Methoden: Acht Patienten mit Lungenembolie oder pulmonaler Hypertension wurden mit einer zeitlich aufgeloesten 3D Gradientenecho-Pulssequenz mit PAT (FLASH 3D, TE/TR: 0.8/1.9 ms; Flipwinkel: 40 ; GRAPPA) untersucht. Eine quantitative Perfusionsanalyse basierend auf der Indikator-Verduennungsmethode wurde mit einer dezidierten Software durchgefuehrt. Ergebnisse: Patienten mit Lungenembolie oder chronischer thromboembolischer pulmonaler

  16. Branch Point Withdrawal in Elongational Startup Flow by Time-Resolved Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Ruocco, N.

    2016-05-27

    We present a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigation of a blend composed of a dendritic polymer and a linear matrix with comparable viscosity in start-up of an elongational flow at Tg + 50. The two-generation dendritic polymer is diluted to 10% by weight in a matrix of a long well-entangled linear chains. Both components consist of mainly 1,4-cis-polyisoprene but differ in isotopic composition. The resulting scattering contrast is sufficiently high to permit time-resolved measurements of the system structure factor during the start-up phase and to follow the retraction processes involving the inner sections of the branched polymer in the nonlinear deformation response. The outer branches and the linear matrix, on the contrary, are in the linear deformation regime. The linear matrix dominates the rheological signature of the blend and the influence of the branched component can barely be detected. However, the neutron scattering intensity is predominantly that of the (branched) minority component so that its dynamics is clearly evident. In the present paper, we use the neutron scattering data to validate the branch point withdrawal process, which could not be unambiguously discerned from rheological measurements in this blend. The maximal tube stretch that the inner branches experience, before the relaxed outer arm material is incorporated into the tube is determined. The in situ scattering experiments demonstrate for the first time the leveling-off of the strain as the result of branch point withdrawal and chain retraction directly on the molecular level. We conclude that branch point motion in the mixture of architecturally complex polymers occurs earlier than would be expected in a purely branched system, presumably due to the different topological environment that the linear matrix presents to the hierarchically deep-buried tube sections. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  17. Imaging of Transient Structures Using Nanosecond in Situ TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Judy S.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Armstrong, Michael R.; King, Wayne E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2008-09-01

    The microstructure and properties of a material depend on dynamic processes such as defect motion, nucleation and growth, and phase transitions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can spatially resolve these nanoscale phenomena but lacks the time resolution for direct observation. We used a photoemitted electron pulse to probe dynamic events with “snapshot” diffraction and imaging at 15-nanosecond resolution inside of a dynamic TEM. With the use of this capability, the moving reaction front of reactive nanolaminates is observed in situ. Time-resolved images and diffraction show a transient cellular morphology in a dynamically mixing, self-propagating reaction front, revealing brief phase separation during cooling, and thus provide insights into the mechanisms driving the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis.

  18. Metagenomics and in situ analyses reveal Propionivibrio spp. to be abundant GAO in biological wastewater treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Albertsen, Mads; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely applied for phosphorus removal from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth. However, glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) may...... and genome annotation supported that the “Ca. Accumulibacter” and Propionivibrio were behaving as PAO and GAO, respectively. FISH analyses of full-scale EBPR systems revealed that Propionivibrio spp. can be abundant. The discovery of Propionivibrio, a putative GAO closely related to “Ca. Accumulibacter...

  19. In Situ Microscopy Analysis Reveals Local Innate Immune Response Developed around Brucella Infected Cells in Resistant and Susceptible Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, Richard; Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Machelart, Arnaud; De Trez, Carl; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Magez, Stefan; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Carlier, Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Brucella are facultative intracellular bacteria that chronically infect humans and animals causing brucellosis. Brucella are able to invade and replicate in a broad range of cell lines in vitro, however the cells supporting bacterial growth in vivo are largely unknown. In order to identify these, we used a Brucella melitensis strain stably expressing mCherry fluorescent protein to determine the phenotype of infected cells in spleen and liver, two major sites of B. melitensis growth in mice. In both tissues, the majority of primary infected cells expressed the F4/80 myeloid marker. The peak of infection correlated with granuloma development. These structures were mainly composed of CD11b+ F4/80+ MHC-II+ cells expressing iNOS/NOS2 enzyme. A fraction of these cells also expressed CD11c marker and appeared similar to inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs). Analysis of genetically deficient mice revealed that differentiation of iNOS+ inflammatory DC, granuloma formation and control of bacterial growth were deeply affected by the absence of MyD88, IL-12p35 and IFN-γ molecules. During chronic phase of infection in susceptible mice, we identified a particular subset of DC expressing both CD11c and CD205, serving as a reservoir for the bacteria. Taken together, our results describe the cellular nature of immune effectors involved during Brucella infection and reveal a previously unappreciated role for DC subsets, both as effectors and reservoir cells, in the pathogenesis of brucellosis. PMID:22479178

  20. In-situ atomic force microscopy observation revealing gel-like plasticity on a metallic glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Huang, J. C.; Kuan, S. Y.; Nieh, T. G.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    It has been decade-long and enduring efforts to decipher the structural mechanism of plasticity in metallic glasses; however, it still remains a challenge to directly reveal the structural change, if any, that precedes; and dominant plastics flow in them. Here, by using the dynamic atomic force microscope as an "imaging" as well as a "forcing" tool, we unfold a real-time sequence of structural evolution occurring on the surface of an Au-Si thin film metallic glass. In sharp contrast to the common notion that plasticity comes along with mechanical softening in bulk metallic glasses, our experimental results directly reveal three types of nano-sized surface regions, which undergo plasticity but exhibit different characters of structural evolution following the local plasticity events, including stochastic structural rearrangement, unusual local relaxation and rejuvenation. As such, yielding on the metallic-glass surface manifests as a dynamic equilibrium between local relaxation and rejuvenation as opposed to shear instability in bulk metallic-glasses. Our finding demonstrates that plasticity on the metallic glass surface of Au-Si metallic glass bears much resemblance to that of the colloidal gels, of which nonlinear rheology rather than shear instability governs the constitutive behavior of plasticity.

  1. Mechanochemical Knoevenagel condensation investigated in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Haferkamp

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanochemical Knoevenagel condensation of malononitrile with p-nitrobenzaldehyde was studied in situ using a tandem approach. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were combined to yield time-resolved information on the milling process. Under solvent-free conditions, the reaction leads to a quantitative conversion to p-nitrobenzylidenemalononitrile within 50 minutes. The in situ data indicate that the process is fast and proceeds under a direct conversion. After stopping the milling process, the reaction continues until complete conversion. The continuous and the stopped milling process both result in crystalline products suitable for single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  2. High-resolution time-resolved imaging of in vitro Arabidopsis rosette growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, Stijn; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Blomme, Jonas; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Daele, Twiggy; Van Akoleyen, Dirk; Storme, Veronique; Coppens, Frederik; T S Beemster, Gerrit; Inzé, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Although quantitative characterization of growth phenotypes is of key importance for the understanding of essential networks driving plant growth, the majority of growth-related genes are still being identified based on qualitative visual observations and/or single-endpoint quantitative measurements. We developed an in vitro growth imaging system (IGIS) to perform time-resolved analysis of rosette growth. In this system, Arabidopsis plants are grown in Petri dishes mounted on a rotating disk, and images of each plate are taken on an hourly basis. Automated image analysis was developed in order to obtain several growth-related parameters, such as projected rosette area, rosette relative growth rate, compactness and stockiness, over time. To illustrate the use of the platform and the resulting data, we present the results for the growth response of Col-0 plants subjected to three mild stress conditions. Although the reduction in rosette area was relatively similar at 19 days after stratification, the time-lapse analysis demonstrated that plants react differently to salt, osmotic and oxidative stress. The rosette area was altered at various time points during development, and leaf movement and shape parameters were also affected differently. We also used the IGIS to analyze in detail the growth behavior of mutants with enhanced leaf size. Analysis of several growth-related parameters over time in these mutants revealed several specificities in growth behavior, underlining the high complexity of leaf growth coordination. These results demonstrate that time-resolved imaging of in vitro rosette growth generates a better understanding of growth phenotypes than endpoint measurements. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Studies of Minerals, Organic and Biogenic Materials through Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Ismail, Syed; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Nyugen, Trac; Elsayed-Ali, hani

    2009-01-01

    A compact remote Raman spectroscopy system was developed at NASA Langley Research center and was previously demonstrated for its ability to identify chemical composition of various rocks and minerals. In this study, the Raman sensor was utilized to perform time-resolved Raman studies of various samples such as minerals and rocks, Azalea leaves and a few fossil samples. The Raman sensor utilizes a pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser as excitation source, a 4-inch telescope to collect the Raman-scattered signal from a sample several meters away, a spectrograph equipped with a holographic grating, and a gated intensified CCD (ICCD) camera system. Time resolved Raman measurements were carried out by varying the gate delay with fixed short gate width of the ICCD camera, allowing measurement of both Raman signals and fluorescence signals. Rocks and mineral samples were characterized including marble, which contain CaCO3. Analysis of the results reveals the short (approx.10-13 s) lifetime of the Raman process, and shows that Raman spectra of some mineral samples contain fluorescence emission due to organic impurities. Also analyzed were a green (pristine) and a yellow (decayed) sample of Gardenia leaves. It was observed that the fluorescence signals from the green and yellow leaf samples showed stronger signals compared to the Raman lines. Moreover, it was also observed that the fluorescence of the green leaf was more intense and had a shorter lifetime than that of the yellow leaf. For the fossil samples, Raman shifted lines could not be observed due the presence of very strong short-lived fluorescence.

  4. Competitive solid-phase immunoassay of gastrin in serum using time-resolved fluorometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anders H; Assaad, Fahed N; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2011-01-01

    A competitive solid-phase assay for the measurement of gastrin in serum using time-resolved fluorescence was developed as an alternative to conventional radioimmunoassay (RIA) technology.......A competitive solid-phase assay for the measurement of gastrin in serum using time-resolved fluorescence was developed as an alternative to conventional radioimmunoassay (RIA) technology....

  5. Time-resolved detection of surface plasmon polaritons with a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Ha, T.; Jensen, Jacob Riis

    1998-01-01

    We present the time-resolved detection of surface plasmon polaritons with an STM. The results indicate that the time resolved signal is due to rectification of coherently superimposed plasmon voltages. The comparison with differential reflectivity measurements shows that the tip itself influences...

  6. Pyrosequencing reveals high-temperature cellulolytic microbial consortia in Great Boiling Spring after in situ lignocellulose enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Peacock

    Full Text Available To characterize high-temperature cellulolytic microbial communities, two lignocellulosic substrates, ammonia fiber-explosion-treated corn stover and aspen shavings, were incubated at average temperatures of 77 and 85°C in the sediment and water column of Great Boiling Spring, Nevada. Comparison of 109,941 quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences (pyrotags from eight enrichments to 37,057 quality-filtered pyrotags from corresponding natural samples revealed distinct enriched communities dominated by phylotypes related to cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic Thermotoga and Dictyoglomus, cellulolytic and sugar-fermenting Desulfurococcales, and sugar-fermenting and hydrogenotrophic Archaeoglobales. Minor enriched populations included close relatives of hydrogenotrophic Thermodesulfobacteria, the candidate bacterial phylum OP9, and candidate archaeal groups C2 and DHVE3. Enrichment temperature was the major factor influencing community composition, with a negative correlation between temperature and richness, followed by lignocellulosic substrate composition. This study establishes the importance of these groups in the natural degradation of lignocellulose at high temperatures and suggests that a substantial portion of the diversity of thermophiles contributing to consortial cellulolysis may be contained within lineages that have representatives in pure culture.

  7. Visualizing the electrochemical reaction of ZnO nanoparticles with lithium by in situ TEM: two reaction modes are revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qingmei; Dong, Zimin; Zhang, Jun; Du, Gaohui; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-06-01

    The lithiation reaction of ZnO as an anode in a lithium-ion battery (LIB) is unclear. The electrochemical behavior of ZnO was investigated inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) by constructing a nano-LIB using an individual ZnO/graphene sheet as the electrode. The lithiation reaction of ZnO/graphene was monitored by simultaneous determination of the structure with high-resolution TEM, electron diffraction pattern and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Two kinds of reaction modes were revealed in terms of different reaction rates. One was the violent reaction mode, in which one particle can evolve into an aggregate of many nanoparticles within the Li2O matrix in 1-2 min. The other was the peaceful evolution mode, in which each ZnO nanoparticle evolves into a core-shell particle with multi-domains constituted of Zn and LiZn nanograins. Abnormally large Zn nanocrystals grow quickly in the violent reaction mode, which can suppress the formation of LiZn and impair the reversible capacity. Our observations give direct evidence and important insights for the lithiation mechanism of metal oxide anodes in LIBs.

  8. Subsurface influence on the structure of protein adsorbates as revealed by in situ X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähl, Hendrik; Evers, Florian; Grandthyll, Samuel; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Loskill, Peter; Lessel, Matthias; Hüsecken, Anne K; Brenner, Thorsten; Tolan, Metin; Jacobs, Karin

    2012-05-22

    The adsorption process of proteins to surfaces is governed by the mutual interactions among proteins, the solution, and the substrate. Interactions arising from the substrate are usually attributed to the uppermost atomic layer. This actual surface defines the surface chemistry and hence steric and electrostatic interactions. For a comprehensive understanding, however, the interactions arising from the bulk material also have to be considered. Our protein adsorption experiments with globular proteins (α-amylase, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme) clearly reveal the influence of the subsurface material via van der Waals forces. Here, a set of functionalized silicon wafers enables a distinction between the effects of surface chemistry and the subsurface composition of the substrate. Whereas the surface chemistry controls whether the individual proteins are denatured, the strength of the van der Waals forces affects the final layer density and hence the adsorbed amount of proteins. The results imply that van der Waals forces mainly influence surface processes, which govern the structure formation of the protein adsorbates, such as surface diffusion and spreading.

  9. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of metal hydride based hydrogen storage systems using in-situ Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bellosta von Colbe, J. M.; Bücherl, T.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2016-10-01

    For the storage of hydrogen, complex metal hydrides are considered as highly promising with respect to capacity, reversibility and safety. The optimization of corresponding storage tanks demands a precise and time-resolved investigation of the hydrogen distribution in scaled-up metal hydride beds. In this study it is shown that in situ fission Neutron Radiography provides unique insights into the spatial distribution of hydrogen even for scaled-up compacts and therewith enables a direct study of hydrogen storage tanks. A technique is introduced for the precise quantification of both time-resolved data and a priori material distribution, allowing inter alia for an optimization of compacts manufacturing process. For the first time, several macroscopic fields are combined which elucidates the great potential of Neutron Imaging for investigations of metal hydrides by going further than solely 'imaging' the system: A combination of in-situ Neutron Radiography, IR-Thermography and thermodynamic quantities can reveal the interdependency of different driving forces for a scaled-up sodium alanate pellet by means of a multi-correlation analysis. A decisive and time-resolved, complex influence of material packing density is derived. The results of this study enable a variety of new investigation possibilities that provide essential information on the optimization of future hydrogen storage tanks.

  10. Micromechanics of ultra-toughened electrospun PMMA/PEO fibres as revealed by in-situ tensile testing in an electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Richard L.; Ström, Valter; Gedde, Ulf W.; Mallon, Peter E.; Hedenqvist, Mikael S.; Olsson, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    A missing cornerstone in the development of tough micro/nano fibre systems is an understanding of the fibre failure mechanisms, which stems from the limitation in observing the fracture of objects with dimensions one hundredth of the width of a hair strand. Tensile testing in the electron microscope is herein adopted to reveal the fracture behaviour of a novel type of toughened electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide) fibre mats for biomedical applications. These fibres showed a toughness more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of pristine PMMA fibres. The in-situ microscopy revealed that the toughness were not only dependent on the initial molecular alignment after spinning, but also on the polymer formulation that could promote further molecular orientation during the formation of micro/nano-necking. The true fibre strength was greater than 150 MPa, which was considerably higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (17 MPa). This necking phenomenon was prohibited by high aspect ratio cellulose nanocrystal fillers in the ultra–tough fibres, leading to a decrease in toughness by more than one order of magnitude. The reported necking mechanism may have broad implications also within more traditional melt–spinning research. PMID:25208692

  11. Hybrid perovskite solar cells: In situ investigation of solution-processed PbI2 reveals metastable precursors and a pathway to producing porous thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Barrit, Dounya

    2017-04-17

    The successful and widely used two-step process of producing the hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3, consists of converting a solution deposited PbI2 film by reacting it with CH3NH3I. Here, we investigate the solidification of PbI2 films from a DMF solution by performing in situ grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) measurements. The measurements reveal an elaborate sol–gel process involving three PbI2⋅DMF solvate complexes—including disordered and ordered ones—prior to PbI2 formation. The ordered solvates appear to be metastable as they transform into the PbI2 phase in air within minutes without annealing. Morphological analysis of air-dried and annealed films reveals that the air-dried PbI2 is substantially more porous when the coating process produces one of the intermediate solvates, making this more suitable for subsequent conversion into the perovskite phase. The observation of metastable solvates on the pathway to PbI2 formation open up new opportunities for influencing the two-step conversion of metal halides into efficient light harvesting or emitting perovskite semiconductors.

  12. Time-resolved crystallization of deeply cooled liquid hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    This thesis serves two main purposes: 1. The introduction of a novel experimental method to investigate phase change dynamics of supercooled liquids 2. First-time measurements for the crystallization behaviour for hydrogen isotopes under various conditions (1) The new method is established by the synergy of a liquid microjet of ∼ 5 μm diameter and a scattering technique with high spatial resolution, here linear Raman spectroscopy. Due to the high directional stability and the known velocity of the liquid filament, its traveling axis corresponds to a time axis static in space. Utilizing evaporative cooling in a vacuum environment, the propagating liquid cools down rapidly and eventually experiences a phase transition to the crystalline state. This temporal evolution is probed along the filament axis, ultimately resulting in a time resolution of 10 ns. The feasibility of this approach is proven successfully within the following experiments. (2) A main object of study are para-hydrogen liquid filaments. Raman spectra reveal a temperature gradient of the liquid across the filament. This behaviour can quantitatively be reconstructed by numerical simulations using a layered model and is rooted in the effectiveness of evaporative cooling on the surface and a finite thermal conductivity. The deepest supercoolings achieved are ∼ 30% below the melting point, at which the filament starts to solidify from the surface towards the core. With a crystal growth velocity extracted from the data the appropriate growth mechanism is identified. The crystal structure that initially forms is metastable and probably the result of Ostwald's rule of stages. Indications for a transition within the solid towards the stable equilibrium phase support this interpretation. The analog isotope ortho-deuterium is evidenced to behave qualitatively similar with quantitative differences being mass related. In further measurements, isotopic mixtures of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium are

  13. Steady state and time resolved optical characterization studies of Zn2SnO4 nanowires for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakami, Baichhabi R.; Poudyal, Uma; Nandyala, Shashank R.; Rimal, Gaurab; Cooper, Jason K.; Zhang, Xuejie; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wenyong; Pikal, Jon M.

    2016-10-01

    Nanowires are a promising option for sensitized solar cells, sensors, and display technology. Most of the work thus far has focused on binary oxides for these nanowires, but ternary oxides have advantages in additional control of optical and electronic properties. Here, we report on the diffuse reflectance, Low Temperature and Room Temperature Photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation spectrum, and Time Resolved PL (TRPL) of Zinc Tin Oxide (ZTO) nanowires grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition. The PL from the ZTO nanowires does not exhibit any band gap or near gap emission, and the diffuse reflectance measurement confirms that these ZTO nanowires have a direct forbidden transition. The broad PL spectrum reveals two Gaussian peaks centered at 1.86 eV (red) and 2.81 eV (blue), representing two distinct defect states or complexes. The PL spectra were further studied by the Time Resolved Emission Spectrum and intensity dependent PL and TRPL. The time resolved measurements show complex non-exponential decays at all wavelengths, indicative of defect to defect transitions, and the red emissive states decay much slower than the blue emissive states. The effects of annealing in air and vacuum are studied to investigate the origin of the defect states in the nanowires, showing that the blue states are related to oxygen vacancies. We propose an energy band model for the nanowires containing defect states within the band gap and the associated transitions between these states that are consistent with our measurements.

  14. Silicon drift detectors as a tool for time-resolved fluorescence XAFS on low-concentrated samples in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Peter; Tröger, Larc; Materlik, Gerhard; Reckleben, Christian; Hansen, Karsten; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Clausen, Bjerne S

    2002-07-01

    A silicon drift detector (SDD) was used for ex situ and time-resolved in situ fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) on low-concentrated catalyst samples. For a single-element and a seven-element SDD the energy resolution and the peak-to-background ratio were verified at high count rates, sufficient for fluorescence XAFS. An experimental set-up including the seven-element SDD without any cooling and an in situ cell with gas supply and on-line gas analysis was developed. With this set-up the reduction and oxidation of a zeolite supported catalyst containing 0.3 wt% platinum was followed by fluorescence near-edge scans with a time resolution of 10 min each. From ex situ experiments on low-concentrated platinum- and gold-based catalysts fluorescence XAFS scans could be obtained with sufficient statistical quality for a quantitative analysis. Structural information on the gold and platinum particles could be extracted by both the Fourier transforms and the near-edge region of the XAFS spectra. Moreover, it was found that with the seven-element SDD concentrations of the element of interest as low as 100 ppm can be examined by fluorescence XAFS.

  15. Spatially and time-resolved magnetization dynamics driven by spin-orbit torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Manuel; Garello, Kevin; Mendil, Johannes; Avci, Can Onur; Grimaldi, Eva; Murer, Christoph; Feng, Junxiao; Gabureac, Mihai; Stamm, Christian; Acremann, Yves; Finizio, Simone; Wintz, Sebastian; Raabe, Jörg; Gambardella, Pietro

    2017-10-01

    Current-induced spin-orbit torques are one of the most effective ways to manipulate the magnetization in spintronic devices, and hold promise for fast switching applications in non-volatile memory and logic units. Here, we report the direct observation of spin-orbit-torque-driven magnetization dynamics in Pt/Co/AlOx dots during current pulse injection. Time-resolved X-ray images with 25 nm spatial and 100 ps temporal resolution reveal that switching is achieved within the duration of a subnanosecond current pulse by the fast nucleation of an inverted domain at the edge of the dot and propagation of a tilted domain wall across the dot. The nucleation point is deterministic and alternates between the four dot quadrants depending on the sign of the magnetization, current and external field. Our measurements reveal how the magnetic symmetry is broken by the concerted action of the damping-like and field-like spin-orbit torques and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and show that reproducible switching events can be obtained for over 1012 reversal cycles.

  16. Time-resolved footprinting for the study of the structural dynamics of DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclavi, Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Transcription is often regulated at the level of initiation by the presence of transcription factors or nucleoid proteins or by changing concentrations of metabolites. These can influence the kinetic properties and/or structures of the intermediate RNA polymerase-DNA complexes in the pathway. Time-resolved footprinting techniques combine the high temporal resolution of a stopped-flow apparatus with the specific structural information obtained by the probing agent. Combined with a careful quantitative analysis of the evolution of the signals, this approach allows for the identification and kinetic and structural characterization of the intermediates in the pathway of DNA sequence recognition by a protein, such as a transcription factor or RNA polymerase. The combination of different probing agents is especially powerful in revealing different aspects of the conformational changes taking place at the protein-DNA interface. For example, hydroxyl radical footprinting, owing to their small size, provides a map of the solvent-accessible surface of the DNA backbone at a single nucleotide resolution; modification of the bases using potassium permanganate can reveal the accessibility of the bases when the double helix is distorted or melted; cross-linking experiments report on the formation of specific amino acid-DNA contacts, and DNase I footprinting results in a strong signal-to-noise ratio from DNA protection at the binding site and hypersensitivity at curved or kinked DNA sites. Recent developments in protein footprinting allow for the direct characterization of conformational changes of the proteins in the complex.

  17. SUDDEN POLARIZATION IN THE TWISTED, PHANTOM STATE OF TETRAPHENYLETHYLENE DETECTED BY TIME-RESOLVED MICROWAVE CONDUCTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUDDEBOOM, W; JONKER, SA; WARMAN, JM; DEHAAS, MP; VERMEULEN, MJW; JAGER, WF; DELANGE, B; FERINGA, BL; FESSENDEN, RW

    1993-01-01

    Photoexcitation of the symmetrical molecules tetraphenylethylene and tetra-p-methoxyphenylethylene dissolved in saturated hydrocarbon solvents results in a transient increase in the dielectric loss of the solutions as monitored using the nanosecond time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC)

  18. The Application of Time Resolved Dielectric Instruments to Air Force Ground Fleet Maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Stephanie

    1998-01-01

    In 1993 the Military Equipment Evaluation Program (MEEP) located at Eglin Air Force Base, FL, evaluated a time resolved dielectric instrument for use in air force ground fleet maintenance applications...

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-04-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2-4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. Copyright © 2016 Iwata-Otsubo et al.

  20. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  1. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning studies of hexamethylcyclopentadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom.......Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom....

  2. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  3. Operation mechanism of a molecular machine revealed using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Daniel J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Brouwer, Albert M; Buma, Wybren Jan; Leigh, David A; Woutersen, Sander

    2010-06-04

    Rotaxanes comprise macrocycles that can shuttle between docking stations along an axle. We explored the nanosecond shuttling mechanism by reversing the relative binding affinities of two stations through ultraviolet-induced transient reduction. We monitored the ensuing changes in the CO-stretching bands of the two stations and the shuttling macrocycle by means of an infrared probing pulse. Because hydrogen-bond scission and formation at the initial and final stations led to well-resolved changes in the respective CO-stretch frequencies, the departure and arrival of the macrocycle could be observed separately. We found that the shuttling involves two steps: thermally driven escape from the initial station, followed by rapid motion along the track ending either at the initial or final station. By varying the track's length, we found that the rapid motion approximates a biased one-dimensional random walk. However, surprisingly, the direction of the overall motion is opposite that of the bias.

  4. Operation mechanism of a molecular machine revealed using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, M.R.; Bodis, P.; Shaw, D.J.; Bakker, B.H.; Newton, A.C.; Kay, E.R.; Brouwer, A.M.; Buma, W.J.; Leigh, D.A.; Woutersen, S.

    2010-01-01

    Rotaxanes comprise macrocycles that can shuttle between docking stations along an axle. We explored the nanosecond shuttling mechanism by reversing the relative binding affinities of two stations through ultraviolet-induced transient reduction. We monitored the ensuing changes in the CO-stretching

  5. Time-Resolved Fast Mammalian Behavior Reveals the Complexity of Protective Pain Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam E. Browne

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Potentially harmful stimuli are detected at the skin by nociceptor sensory neurons that drive rapid protective withdrawal reflexes and pain. We set out to define, at a millisecond timescale, the relationship between the activity of these sensory neurons and the resultant behavioral output. Brief optogenetic activation of cutaneous nociceptors was found to activate only a single action potential in each fiber. This minimal input was used to determine high-speed behavioral responses in freely behaving mice. The localized stimulus generated widespread dynamic repositioning and alerting sub-second behaviors whose nature and timing depended on the context of the animal and its position, activity, and alertness. Our findings show that the primary response to injurious stimuli is not limited, fixed, or localized, but is dynamic, and that it involves recruitment and gating of multiple circuits distributed throughout the central nervous system at a sub-second timescale to effectively both alert to the presence of danger and minimize risk of harm.

  6. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanhua; Billings, Gabriel; Hubbard, Troy P; Park, Joseph S; Yin Leung, Ka; Liu, Qin; Davis, Brigid M; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Waldor, Matthew K

    2017-10-03

    Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection). Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant's fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen) collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot). PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida's fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses.IMPORTANCE Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) enables genome-wide mapping of the genetic determinants of fitness, typically based on observations at a single sampling point. Here, we move beyond analysis of endpoint TIS data to create a framework for analysis of time series TIS data, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). We applied PACE to identify genes that contribute to colonization of a natural host by the fish pathogen Edwardsiella piscicida. PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida's fitness in vivo than were detected using a terminal sampling point, and its clustering of mutants with related fitness profiles informed design of new live vaccine candidates. PACE yields insights into patterns of fitness dynamics and circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies. Finally, the PACE method should be applicable to additional "omic" time series data, including screens based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats with Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9). Copyright © 2017 Yang et al.

  7. Jasmonate-mediated stomatal closure under elevated CO2 revealed by time-resolved metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliar stomatal movements are critical for regulating plant water status and gas exchange. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are known to induce stomatal closure. However, current knowledge on CO2 signal transduction in stomatal guard cells is limited. Here we report the metabolomic respo...

  8. Time-resolved and tissue-specific systems analysis of the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kleemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sequence of events leading to the development of insulin resistance (IR as well as the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are incompletely understood. As reductionist approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing an understanding of the pathogenesis of IR, there is a need for an integrative, time-resolved approach to elucidate the development of the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male ApoE3Leiden transgenic mice exhibiting a humanized lipid metabolism were fed a high-fat diet (HFD for 0, 1, 6, 9, or 12 weeks. Development of IR was monitored in individual mice over time by performing glucose tolerance tests and measuring specific biomarkers in plasma, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analysis to assess IR in a tissue-specific manner. To elucidate the dynamics and tissue-specificity of metabolic and inflammatory processes key to IR development, a time-resolved systems analysis of gene expression and metabolite levels in liver, white adipose tissue (WAT, and muscle was performed. During HFD feeding, the mice became increasingly obese and showed a gradual increase in glucose intolerance. IR became first manifest in liver (week 6 and then in WAT (week 12, while skeletal muscle remained insulin-sensitive. Microarray analysis showed rapid upregulation of carbohydrate (only liver and lipid metabolism genes (liver, WAT. Metabolomics revealed significant changes in the ratio of saturated to polyunsaturated fatty acids (liver, WAT, plasma and in the concentrations of glucose, gluconeogenesis and Krebs cycle metabolites, and branched amino acids (liver. HFD evoked an early hepatic inflammatory response which then gradually declined to near baseline. By contrast, inflammation in WAT increased over time, reaching highest values in week 12. In skeletal muscle, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and inflammation was gradually suppressed with HFD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HFD-induced IR is a time- and tissue

  9. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle eTallet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The prolactin receptor (PRLR is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L or PRLR blockade (antagonist involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue-native electrophoresis, BRET1, we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell-surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements.

  10. Time-resolved observations of water oxidation intermediates on a cobalt oxide nanoparticle catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; de Respinis, Moreno; Frei, Heinz

    2014-04-01

    In any artificial photosynthetic system, the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen provides the electrons needed for the reduction of protons or carbon dioxide to a fuel. Understanding how this four-electron reaction works in detail is important for the development of improved robust catalysts made of Earth-abundant materials, like first-row transition-metal oxides. Here, using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and under reaction conditions, we identify intermediates of water oxidation catalysed by an abundant metal-oxide catalyst, cobalt oxide (Co3O4). One intermediate is a surface superoxide (three-electron oxidation intermediate absorbing at 1,013 cm-1), whereas a second observed intermediate is attributed to an oxo Co(IV) site (one-electron oxidation intermediate absorbing at 840 cm-1). The temporal behaviour of the intermediates reveals that they belong to different catalytic sites. Knowledge of the structure and kinetics of surface intermediates will enable the design of improved metal-oxide materials for more efficient water oxidation catalysis.

  11. Time-resolved vortex wake of a common swift flying over a range of flight speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsson, P.; Muijres, F. T.; Hedenström, A.

    2011-01-01

    The wake of a freely flying common swift (Apus apus L.) is examined in a wind tunnel at three different flight speeds, 5.7, 7.7 and 9.9 m s−1. The wake of the bird is visualized using high-speed stereo digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). Wake images are recorded in the transverse plane, perpendicular to the airflow. The wake of a swift has been studied previously using DPIV and recording wake images in the longitudinal plane, parallel to the airflow. The high-speed DPIV system allows for time-resolved wake sampling and the result shows features that were not discovered in the previous study, but there was approximately a 40 per cent vertical force deficit. As the earlier study also revealed, a pair of wingtip vortices are trailing behind the wingtips, but in addition, a pair of tail vortices and a pair of ‘wing root vortices’ are found that appear to originate from the wing/body junction. The existence of wing root vortices suggests that the two wings are not acting as a single wing, but are to some extent aerodynamically detached from each other. It is proposed that this is due to the body disrupting the lift distribution over the wing by generating less lift than the wings. PMID:21131333

  12. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  13. Characterization of powellite-based solid solutions by site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Heck, Stephanie; Bosbach, Dirk; Ganschow, Steffen; Walther, Clemens; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2013-06-21

    We present a comprehensive study of the solid solution system Ca2(MoO4)2-NaGd(MoO4)2 on the molecular scale, by means of site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Eu(3+) is used as a trace fluorescent probe, homogeneously substituting for Gd(3+) in the solid solution crystal structure. Site-selective TRLFS of a series of polycrystalline samples covering the whole composition range of the solid solution series from 10% substitution of Ca(2+) to the NaGd end-member reveals it to be homogeneous throughout the whole range. The trivalent ions are incorporated into the powellite structure in only one coordination environment, which exhibits a very strong ligand-metal interaction. Polarization-dependent measurements of a single crystal of NaGd(Eu)(MoO4)2 identify the coordination geometry to be of C2v point symmetry. The S4 symmetry of the Ca site within the powellite lattice can be transformed into C2v assuming minor motion in the first coordination sphere.

  14. Time-resolved measurement of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer processes in perylene diimides (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Robin Carl; Baal, Eduard; Sundermeyer, Jörg; Chatterjee, Sangam

    2017-02-01

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid (PTCDA) and respective derivatives (e.g. perylene diimide - PDI) are widely used as dyes but also for device applications such as organic field effect transistors or in organic photovoltaics. Due to their intrinsically high quantum efficiencies they are also used as spectroscopic standards. One major drawback of these materials is their low solubility in organic solvents which can be addressed by long alkyl substitutions. When introducing a tertiary amine into the molecule a mechanism known as photoinduced electron transfer (PET) can occur. Here, following an optically excited HOMO-LUMO transition of the core, an electron from the electron lone pair of the amine is transferred to the HOMO of the perylene core. Hence, radiative recombination is disallowed and photoluminescence effectively quenched. Here, we perform a systematic study of the distance dependence of the PET by introducing alkyle groups as spacer units between PDI core and the tertiary amine. Dynamics of the PET are extracted from ultrafast time-resolved photoluminescence measurement data. A rate equation model, simulating a three level system, reveals rate constant of the back electron transfer, otherwise not accessible with our experimental methods. Assuming a Marcus model of electron transfer, electronic coupling strength between the electronic states involved in the respective transitions can be calculated. In addition to the distance dependence, the effects of protonation and methylation of the the tertiary amine units are studied.

  15. Time-resolved four-wave-mixing spectroscopy for inner-valence transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Thomas; Kaldun, Andreas; Blättermann, Alexander; Meyer, Kristina; Stooß, Veit; Rebholz, Marc; Birk, Paul; Hartmann, Maximilian; Brown, Andrew; Van Der Hart, Hugo; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Non-collinear four-wave mixing (FWM) techniques at near-infrared (NIR), visible, and ultraviolet frequencies have been widely used to map vibrational and electronic couplings, typically in complex molecules. However, correlations between spatially localized inner-valence transitions among different sites of a molecule in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range have not been observed yet. As an experimental step towards this goal we perform time-resolved FWM spectroscopy with femtosecond NIR and attosecond XUV pulses. The first two pulses (XUV-NIR) coincide in time and act as coherent excitation fields, while the third pulse (NIR) acts as a probe. As a first application we show how coupling dynamics between odd- and even-parity inner-valence excited states of neon can be revealed using a two-dimensional spectral representation. Experimentally obtained results are found to be in good agreement with ab initio time-dependent R-matrix calculations providing the full description of multi-electron interactions,...

  16. The singlet-oxygen-sensitized delayed fluorescence in mammalian cells: a time-resolved microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Marek; Biehl, Anna-Louisa; Dědic, Roman; Hála, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The present work provides a proof-of-concept that the singlet oxygen-sensitized delayed fluorescence (SOSDF) can be detected from individual living mammalian cells in a time-resolved microscopy experiment. To this end, 3T3 mouse fibroblasts incubated with 100 μM TPPS4 or TMPyP were used and the microsecond kinetics of the delayed fluorescence (DF) were recorded. The analysis revealed that SOSDF is the major component of the overall DF signal. The microscopy approach enables precise control of experimental conditions - the DF kinetics are clearly influenced by the presence of the (1)O2 quencher (sodium azide), H2O/D2O exchange, and the oxygen concentration. Analysis of SOSDF kinetics, which was reconstructed as a difference DF kinetics between the unquenched and the NaN3-quenched samples, provides a cellular (1)O2 lifetime of τΔ = 1-2 μs and a TPPS4 triplet lifetime of τT = 22 ± 5 μs in agreement with previously published values. The short SOSDF acquisition times, typically in the range of tens of seconds, enable us to study the dynamic cellular processes. It is shown that SOSDF lifetimes increase during PDT-like treatment, which may provide valuable information about changes of the intracellular microenvironment. SOSDF is proposed and evaluated as an alternative tool for (1)O2 detection in biological systems.

  17. Spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence studies of Eu-doped GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyein, Ei Ei; Hömmerich, U.; Heikenfeld, J.; Lee, D. S.; Steckl, A. J.; Zavada, J. M.

    2003-03-01

    We report on spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) studies performed on Eu-doped GaN prepared by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy. Using above-gap excitation, the integrated PL intensity of the main Eu3+ line at 622.3 nm (5D0→7F2 transition) decreased by nearly 90% between 14 K and room temperature. Using below-gap excitation, the integrated intensity of this line decreased by only ˜50% for the same temperature range. In addition, the Eu3+ PL spectrum and decay dynamics changed significantly compared to above-gap excitation. These results suggest the existence of different Eu3+ centers with distinct optical properties. Photoluminescence excitation measurements revealed resonant intra-4f absorption lines of Eu3+ ions, as well as a broad excitation band centered at ˜400 nm. This broad excitation band overlaps higher lying intra-4f Eu3+ energy levels, providing an efficient pathway for carrier-mediated excitation of Eu3+ ions in GaN.

  18. Time-resolved microplasma electron dynamics in a pulsed microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, S. K.; Hoskinson, A. R.; Hopwood, J.

    2013-10-01

    Microwave-driven microplasmas are typically operated in a steady-state mode in which the electron temperature is constant in time. Transient measurements of excitation temperature and helium emission lines, however, suggest that short microwave pulses can be used to increase the electron energy by 20-30%. Time-resolved optical emission spectrometry reveals an initial burst of light emission from the igniting microplasma. This emission overshoot is also correlated with a measured increase in excitation temperature. Excimer emission lags atomic emission, however, and does not overshoot. A simple model shows that an increase in electron temperature is responsible for the overshoot of atomic optical emission at the beginning of each microwave pulse. The formation of dimers and subsequent excimer emission requires slower three-body collisions with the excited rare gas atoms, which is why excimer emission does not overshoot the steady-state values. Similar results are observed in argon gas. The overshoot in electron temperature may be used to manipulate the collisional production of species in microplasmas using short, low-duty cycle microwave pulses.

  19. Time-resolved microplasma excitation temperature in a pulsed microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey; Monfared, Shabnam; Hoskinson, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Microwave-driven microplasmas are usually operated in a steady-state mode such that the electron temperature is constant in time. Transient measurements of excitation temperature and helium emission lines, however, suggest that short microwave pulses can be used to raise the electron energy by 20-30% for approximately 100 ns. Time-resolved optical emission spectrometry reveals an initial burst of light emission from the igniting microplasma. This emission overshoot is also correlated with a measured increase in excitation temperature. Excimer emission lags atomic emission, however, and does not overshoot. A simple model demonstrates that an increase in electron temperature is responsible for the overshoot of atomic optical emission at the beginning of each microwave pulse. The formation of dimers and subsequent excimer emission requires slower three-body collisions with the excited rare gas atom; this is why excimer emission does not overshoot the steady state value. Similar experimental and modeling results are observed in argon gas. The overshoot in electron temperature may be used to manipulate the collisional production of species in microplasmas using short, low-duty cycle microwave pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the USAF and Physical Sciences Inc., under contract No. FA8650-C-12-C-2312. Additional support was provided by the DARPA MPD program under award FA9550-12-1-0006.

  20. In situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamlagain, Bhawani; Sugito, Tessa A; Deptula, Paulina; Edelmann, Minnamari; Kariluoto, Susanna; Varmanen, Pekka; Piironen, Vieno

    2018-01-01

    The in situ production of active vitamin B12 was investigated in aqueous cereal-based matrices with three strains of food-grade Propionibacterium freudenreichii . Matrices prepared from malted barley flour (33% w/v; BM), barley flour (6%; BF), and wheat aleurone (15%; AM) were fermented. The effect of cobalt and the lower ligand 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMBI) or its natural precursors (riboflavin and nicotinamide) on active B12 production was evaluated. Active B12 production was confirmed by UHPLC-UV-MS analysis. A B12 content of 12-37 μg·kg -1 was produced in BM; this content increased 10-fold with cobalt and reached 940-1,480 μg·kg -1 with both cobalt and DMBI. With riboflavin and nicotinamide, B12 production in cobalt-supplemented BM increased to 712 μg·kg -1 . Approximately, 10 μg·kg -1 was achieved in BF and AM and was increased to 80 μg·kg -1 in BF and 260 μg·kg -1 in AM with cobalt and DMBI. The UHPLC and microbiological assay (MBA) results agreed when both cobalt and DMBI or riboflavin and nicotinamide were supplemented. However, MBA gave ca. 20%-40% higher results in BM and AM supplemented with cobalt, indicating the presence of human inactive analogues, such as pseudovitamin B12. This study demonstrates that cereal products can be naturally fortified with active B12 to a nutritionally relevant level by fermenting with P. freudenreichii .

  1. SVD-aided pseudo principal-component analysis: A new method to speed up and improve determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oang, Key Young; Yang, Cheolhee; Muniyappan, Srinivasan; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2017-07-01

    Determination of the optimum kinetic model is an essential prerequisite for characterizing dynamics and mechanism of a reaction. Here, we propose a simple method, termed as singular value decomposition-aided pseudo principal-component analysis (SAPPA), to facilitate determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data by bypassing any need to examine candidate kinetic models. We demonstrate the wide applicability of SAPPA by examining three different sets of experimental time-resolved data and show that SAPPA can efficiently determine the optimum kinetic model. In addition, the results of SAPPA for both time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) and transient absorption (TA) data of the same protein reveal that global structural changes of protein, which is probed by TRXSS, may occur more slowly than local structural changes around the chromophore, which is probed by TA spectroscopy.

  2. SVD-aided pseudo principal-component analysis: A new method to speed up and improve determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Key Young Oang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the optimum kinetic model is an essential prerequisite for characterizing dynamics and mechanism of a reaction. Here, we propose a simple method, termed as singular value decomposition-aided pseudo principal-component analysis (SAPPA, to facilitate determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data by bypassing any need to examine candidate kinetic models. We demonstrate the wide applicability of SAPPA by examining three different sets of experimental time-resolved data and show that SAPPA can efficiently determine the optimum kinetic model. In addition, the results of SAPPA for both time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS and transient absorption (TA data of the same protein reveal that global structural changes of protein, which is probed by TRXSS, may occur more slowly than local structural changes around the chromophore, which is probed by TA spectroscopy.

  3. Automated Design of Probes for rRNA-Targeted Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Reveals the Advantages of Using Dual Probes for Accurate Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, L. Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M.; Ökten, Hatice E.; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu). PMID:24928876

  4. Human milk fat globules: polar lipid composition and in situ structural investigations revealing the heterogeneous distribution of proteins and the lateral segregation of sphingomyelin in the biological membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christelle; Ménard, Olivia

    2011-03-01

    Although human milk fat globules (MFG) are of primary importance since they are the exclusive lipid delivery carriers in the gastrointestinal tract of breast-fed infants, they remain the poorly understood aspect of milk. The objectives of this study were to investigate these unique colloidal assemblies and their interfacial properties, i.e. composition and structure of their biological membrane. In mature breast milk, MFG have a mean diameter of 4-5 microm, a surface area of about 2m(2)/g fat and an apparent zeta potential ζ=-6.7 ± 0.5 mV at 37°C. Human MFG contain 3-4mg polar lipids/g fat as quantified by HPLC/ELSD. The main polar lipids are sphingomyelin (SM; 36-45%, w/w), phosphatidylcholine (19-23%, w/w) and phosphatidylethanolamine (10-15%, w/w). In situ structural investigations of human MFG have been performed using light and confocal microscopy with adapted fluorescent probes, i.e. Nile Red, the extrinsic phospholipid Rh-DOPE, Fast Green and the lectin WGA-488. This study revealed a spatial heterogeneity in the human milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), with the lateral segregation of SM in liquid-ordered phase domains of various shapes and sizes surrounded by a liquid-disordered phase composed of the glycerophospholipids in which the proteins are dispersed. The glycocalyx formed by glycoproteins and cytoplasmic remnents have also been characterised around human MFG. A new model for the structure of the human MFGM is proposed and discussed. The unique composition and lateral organisation of the human MFGM components could be of metabolic significance and have health impact for the infants that need to be further explored. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. ANG-2 for quantitative Na(+) determination in living cells by time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Sodium ions (Na(+)) play an important role in a plethora of cellular processes, which are complex and partly still unexplored. For the investigation of these processes and quantification of intracellular Na(+) concentrations ([Na(+)]i), two-photon coupled fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) was performed in the salivary glands of the cockroach Periplaneta americana. For this, the novel Na(+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Asante NaTRIUM Green-2 (ANG-2) was evaluated, both in vitro and in situ. In this context, absorption coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields and 2P action cross-sections were determined for the first time. ANG-2 was 2P-excitable over a broad spectral range and displayed fluorescence in the visible spectral range. Although the fluorescence decay behaviour of ANG-2 was triexponential in vitro, its analysis indicates a Na(+)-sensitivity appropriate for recordings in living cells. The Na(+)-sensitivity was reduced in situ, but the biexponential fluorescence decay behaviour could be successfully analysed in terms of quantitative [Na(+)]i recordings. Thus, physiological 2P-FLIM measurements revealed a dopamine-induced [Na(+)]i rise in cockroach salivary gland cells, which was dependent on a Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) activity. It was concluded that ANG-2 is a promising new sodium indicator applicable for diverse biological systems.

  6. Extracting Time-Resolved Information from Time-Integrated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Grifoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS data are characterized by a strong dependence on the acquisition time after the onset of the laser plasma. However, time-resolved broadband spectrometers are expensive and often not suitable for being used in portable LIBS instruments. In this paper we will show how the analysis of a series of LIBS spectra, taken at different delays after the laser pulse, allows the recovery of time-resolved spectral information. The comparison of such spectra is presented for the analysis of an aluminium alloy. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density are evaluated, starting from the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra, respectively. The results are compared and discussed.

  7. Luminescent trimethoprim-polyaminocarboxylate lanthanide complex conjugates for selective protein labeling and time-resolved bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D. Rajasekhar; Pedró Rosa, Laura E.; Miller, Lawrence W.

    2011-01-01

    Labeling proteins with long-lifetime emitting lanthanide (III) chelate reporters enables sensitive, time-resolved luminescence bioaffinity assays. Heterodimers of trimethoprim (TMP) covalently linked to various cs124-sensitized, polyaminocarboxylate chelates stably retain lanthanide ions and exhibit quantum yields of europium emission up to 20% in water. A time-resolved, luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) assay showed that TMP-polyaminocarboxylates bind to Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (eDHFR) fusion proteins with nanomolar affinity in purified solutions and in bacterial lysates. The ability to selectively impart terbium or europium luminescence to fusion proteins in complex physiological mixtures bypasses the need for specific antibodies and simplifies sample preparation. PMID:21619068

  8. Time-resolved electron transport in quantum-dot systems; Zeitaufgeloester Elektronentransport in Quantendotsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croy, Alexander

    2010-06-30

    In this thesis the time-resolved electron transport in quantum dot systems was studied. For this two different formalisms were presented: The nonequilibrium Green functions and the generalized quantum master equations. For both formalisms a propagation method for the numerical calculation of time-resolved expectation values, like the occupation and the electron current, was developed. For the demonstration of the propagation method two different question formulations were considered. On the one hand the stochastically driven resonant-level model was studied. On the other hand the pulse-induced transport through a double quantum dot was considered.

  9. Mobile charge generation dynamics in P3HT: PCBM observed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  10. Advances in high-order harmonic generation sources for time-resolved investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reduzzi, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Carpeggiani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kühn, Sergei [ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Kft., Dugonics ter 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Calegari, Francesca [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nisoli, Mauro; Stagira, Salvatore [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vozzi, Caterina [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dombi, Peter [ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Kft., Dugonics ter 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Wigner Research Center for Physics, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Kahaly, Subhendu [ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Kft., Dugonics ter 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Tzallas, Paris; Charalambidis, Dimitris [ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Kft., Dugonics ter 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Foundation for Research and Technology – Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Lasers, P.O. Box 1527, GR-711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Varju, Katalin [ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Kft., Dugonics ter 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Osvay, Karoly [ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Kft., Dugonics ter 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); and others

    2015-10-15

    We review the main research directions ongoing in the development of extreme ultraviolet sources based on high-harmonic generation for the synthesization and application of trains and isolated attosecond pulses to time-resolved spectroscopy. A few experimental and theoretical works will be discussed in connection to well-established attosecond techniques. In this context, we present the unique possibilities offered for time-resolved investigations on the attosecond timescale by the new Extreme Light Infrastructure Attosecond Light Pulse Source, which is currently under construction.

  11. Time resolved resonant photoemission study of energy level alignment at donor/acceptor interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, R.; Pincelli, T.; Cossaro, A.; Verdini, A.; Goldoni, A.; Cichoň, S.; Caputo, M.; Pedio, M.; Panaccione, G.; Silly, M. G.; Sirotti, F.; Morgante, A.; Dell'Angela, M.

    2017-09-01

    The knowledge of the picosecond dynamics of the energy level alignment between donor and acceptor materials in organic photovoltaic devices under working conditions is a challenge for fundamental material research. We measured by means of time-resolved Resonant X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (RPES) the energy level alignment in ZnPc/C60 films. We employed 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses to pump the system simulating sunlight excitation and X-rays from the synchrotron as a probe. We measured changes in the valence bands due to pump induced modifications of the interface dipole. Our measurements prove the feasibility of time-resolved RPES with high repetition rate sources.

  12. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of conjugated polymer/CdSe nanorod composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Lek, Jun Y.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    report ultrafast carrier dynamics in hybrid CdSe nanorod / poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) bulk heterojunction films measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, and compare to the well studied P3HT/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend. Both films show an improved peak photoconduct......report ultrafast carrier dynamics in hybrid CdSe nanorod / poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) bulk heterojunction films measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, and compare to the well studied P3HT/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend. Both films show an improved peak...

  13. Time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in condensed matter: A road map to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell’Angela, Martina [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Institute of Physics II, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Malvestuto, Marco, E-mail: marco.malvestuto@elettra.eu [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We provide perspectives in the field Time resolved XAS in condensed matter. • A look at the new technological innovations that are shaping the field of pulsed X-ray sources are introduced. • New experimental schemes for tr-XAS are illustrated. - Abstract: Nowadays cutting edge femtosecond EUV and soft X-rays radiation sources are the driving force of groundbreaking time resolved X-ray spectroscopies. These new light sources are allowing pioneering experiments in the field of ultrafast phenomena and disclosing new insights about the physics of the out-of-equilibrium matter. Here we report an introductory and concise outlook about some possible perspectives in this field.

  14. Photoluminescence, time-resolved emission and photoresponse of plasma-modified porous silicon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyahia, Be., E-mail: benyahiabedra@hotmail.com [Unité de Développement de la Technologie du Silicium, 2 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 Merveilles, Algiers 16200 (Algeria); Guerbous, L. [Centre de Recherche Nucléaire d' Alger, 2 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare, Algiers 16000 (Algeria); Gabouze, N.; Mahmoudi, Br. [Unité de Développement de la Technologie du Silicium, 2 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 Merveilles, Algiers 16200 (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    Photoluminescence and photoelectrical study on plasma-modified porous silicon (PS) thin films is presented. Porous silicon passivated by hydrocarbon groups (CH{sub x}) shows an intense broad and stable photoluminescence (PL) band centered at 623 nm whereas the maximum of the photosensitivity spectrum is placed around 400 nm. Along with its potential utilization for silicon-based light emitters' fabrication, it could also represent an appealing option for the improvement of energy conversion efficiency in silicon-based solar cells whether by using its luminescence properties (photon down-conversion) or the excess photocurrent produced by an improved high-energy photon's absorption. Excitation spectra (PLE) under steady-state conditions are reported. PLE shows that visible PL is excited by light from UV region. The time-resolved photoluminescence of CH{sub x}/PS in the range of some tenth of μs are investigated at room temperature. The PL decay line shape, in CH{sub x}/PS is well described by stretched exponential. The photosensitivity spectroscopy shows a significant increase of absorption at high photon energy excitation. - Highlights: • Coating porous silicon (PS) by hydrocarbon (CH{sub x}) reduces nonradiative transition. • Drop of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity. • The PL of CH{sub x}/PS is due to radiative transitions at 1.8 and 1.87 eV. • Photosensitivity revealed an excess spectral response (SR) at high-energy excitation. • For photovoltaic PL and SR could be used for the evolution of the silicon solar cells.

  15. Taking the pulse of snowmelt: in situ sensors reveal seasonal, event and diurnal patterns of nitrate and dissolved organic matter variability in an upland forest stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian A. Pellerin; John Franco Saraceno; James B. Shanley; Stephen D. Sebestyen; George R. Aiken; Wilfred M. Wollheim; Brian A. Bergamaschi

    2012-01-01

    Highly resolved time series data are useful to accurately identify the timing, rate, and magnitude of solute transport in streams during hydrologically dynamic periods such as snowmelt. We used in situ optical sensors for nitrate (NO3-) and chromophoric dissolved organic matter fluorescence (FDOM) to measure surface water...

  16. Development of a ratiometric time-resolved luminescence sensor for pH based on lanthanide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingjing; Ye, Zhiqiang; Xin, Chenglong; Yuan, Jingli

    2013-01-25

    Time-resolved luminescence bioassay technique using lanthanide complexes as luminescent probes/sensors has shown great utilities in clinical diagnostics and biotechnology discoveries. In this work, a novel terpyridine polyacid derivative that can form highly stable complexes with lanthanide ions in aqueous media, (4'-hydroxy-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-6,6''-diyl) bis(methylenenitrilo) tetrakis(acetic acid) (HTTA), was designed and synthesized for developing time-resolved luminescence pH sensors based on its Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) complexes. The luminescence characterization results reveal that the luminescence intensity of HTTA-Eu(3+) is strongly dependent on the pH values in weakly acidic to neutral media (pK(a) = 5.8, pH 4.8-7.5), while that of HTTA-Tb(3+) is pH-independent. This unique luminescence response allows the mixture of HTTA-Eu(3+) and HTTA-Tb(3+) (the HTTA-Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) mixture) to be used as a ratiometric luminescence sensor for the time-resolved luminescence detection of pH with the intensity ratio of its Tb(3+) emission at 540 nm to its Eu(3+) emission at 610 nm, I(540 nm)/I(610 nm), as a signal. Moreover, the UV absorption spectrum changes of the HTTA-Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) mixture at different pHs (pH 4.0-7.0) also display a ratiometric response to the pH changes with the ratio of absorbance at 290 nm to that at 325 nm, A(290 nm)/A(325 nm), as a signal. This feature enables the HTTA-Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) mixture to have an additional function for the pH detection with the absorption spectrometry technique. For loading the complexes into the living cells, the acetoxymethyl ester of HTTA was synthesized and used for loading HTTA-Eu(3+) and HTTA-Tb(3+) into the cultured HeLa cells. The luminescence imaging results demonstrated the practical utility of the new sensor for the time-resolved luminescence cell imaging application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Birth of a bubble: sub-second 4D in-situ synchrotron tomography reveals role of silicate crystals in degassing of andesitic magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleše, Pia; Brun, Francesco; Casselman, Jake; Fife, Julie L.; Higgins, Michael D.; Lanzafame, Gabriele N.; Mancini, Lucia; Baker, Don R.

    2017-04-01

    Bubbles in silicate magmas are one of the main controls on eruption explosivity. Previous investigations of bubble dynamics in magmatic systems were generally conducted on natural post-eruption samples or quenched experimental charges; both types of studies provide only a view of the final state of a dynamic system, with little information on how that state was achieved. One of the most important and most elusive parameters, the exact location of bubble nucleation sites, cannot yet be directly observed in natural volcanic systems. We present a 4D X-ray microscopy study of bubble behaviour using experiments that simulate natural conditions as close as is currently possible with the aim of revealing the initial nucleation dynamics and growth of water bubbles in a magma. 4D in-situ synchrotron X-ray tomography experiments were conducted on hydrous, crystal-bearing andesitic run products produced at 1 GPa to observe bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. The high-pressure run products were heated at 1 atm to above the solidus and observed in 3D at a resolution of 3 µm3 every 0.5 s for a total of 50 s. We discovered that bubbles nucleated heterogeneously on plagioclase/melt interfaces and on clinopyroxene crystals. Heterogeneous nucleation on oxides and homogeneous nucleation within the melt occurred significantly after bubble nucleation on silicates. The 3D bubble-crystal contact angle was not constant but changed with time; initially the contact angle was very large and decreased with bubble growth. Bubbles grew much larger than their associated crystal, producing textures similar to some natural volcanic samples. After each experiment the bubbly samples were scanned at sub-micron spatial resolutions to confirm that bubbles nucleated at the silicate crystal/melt interface. Our results show that the presence of silicate phases in magmas must be taken into account when discussing vesiculation in natural systems. We also demonstrate the power and

  18. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Dynamic Time-Resolved Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Cyanide Photoproducts in a Room Temperature Flow Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    Chirped-pulsed (CP) Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy invented by Brooks Pate and coworkers a decade ago is an attractive tool for gas phase chemical dynamics and kinetics studies. A good reactor for such a purpose would have well-defined (and variable) temperature and pressure conditions to be amenable to accurate kinetic modeling. Furthermore, in low pressure samples with large enough number of molecular emitters, reaction dynamics can be observable directly, rather than mediated by supersonic expansion. In the present work, we are evaluating feasibility of in situ time-resolved CP spectroscopy in a room temperature flow tube reactor. Vinyl cyanide (CH_2CHCN), neat or mixed with inert gasses, flows through the reactor at pressures 1-50 μbar (0.76-38 mTorr) where it is photodissociated by a 193 nm laser. Millimeter-wave beam of the CP spectrometer co-propagates with the laser beam along the reactor tube and interacts with nascent photoproducts. Rotational transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCCCN are detected, with ≥10 μs time-steps for 500 ms following photolysis of CH_2CHCN. The post-photolysis evolution of the photoproducts' rotational line intensities is investigated for the effects of rotational and vibrational thermalization of energized photoproducts. Possible contributions from bimolecular and wall-mediated chemistry are evaluated as well.

  20. Time-resolved Imaging of H2 + (D2 +) Nuclear Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    The spatio-temporal evolution of H2 + (D2 +) nuclear wave packets is mapped using time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging. We visualize the motion of both dissociating and bound parts of the wave packet, observe its dephasing and subsequent revivals. The reconstructed probability density of the wave packet is in good agreement with earlier theoretical predictions.

  1. On the theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2008-01-01

    of the experimental diffraction signal for both types of X-ray sources. We present a simple analysis of time-resolved X-ray scattering for direct bond breaking in diatomic molecules. This essentially analytical approach highlights the relation between the signal and the time-dependent quantum distribution...

  2. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR...

  3. Ambiguities in the interpretation of time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements on lipid vesicle systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langen, H. van; Levine, Y.K.; Ameloot, M.; Pottel, H.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements on DPH and TMA-DPH in POPC vesicles with and without cholesterol in terms of the rotational diffusion model shows two distinct χr2 minima which are statistically equivalent. This is explained by the fact that the anisotropy decay

  4. Expected resolution and detectability of adenocarcinoma tumors within human breast in time-resolved images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Nossal, Ralph J.; Dadmarz, Roya; Schwartzentruber, Douglas; Bonner, Robert F.

    1995-04-01

    The prospects for time-resolved optical mammography rests on the ability to detect adenocarcinoma within the breast with sufficient resolution and specificity to compete with X-ray mammography. We characterized the optical properties of an unusually large (6 cm diameter) fresh adenocarcinoma and normal breast tissue (determined by histology to be predominantly adipose tissue) obtained from a patient undergoing mastectomy. Large specimens (5 mm thick and 3 cm wide) allowed the determination of absorption and scattering coefficients and their spatial heterogeneity as probed with a 1 mm diameter laser beam at 633 nm and 800 nm utilizing total reflectance and transmittance measure with integrating spheres. The difference between scattering coefficients of the malignant tumor and those of normal (principally adipose) breast tissue at 633 nm was much greater than the heterogeneity within each sample. This scattering difference is the principal source of contrast, particularly in time-resolved images. However, the high scattering coefficient of normal breast tissue at 633 nm limits the practicality of time-resolved mammography of a human breast compressed to 5 cm. Although the scattering coefficient of the normal breast tissue decreases at 800 nm, the differences between the optical properties of normal and abnormal breast tissue also are reduced. We used these empirical results in theoretical expressions obtained from random walk theory to quantify the expected resolution, contrast, and the detected intensity of 3, 6, and 9 mm tumors within otherwise homogeneous human breasts as a function of the gating-time of time-resolved optical mammography.

  5. Chilling injury in stored nectarines and its detection by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurie, S.; Vanoli, M.; Dagar, A.; Weksler, A.; Eccher Zerbini, P.C.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Lovati, F.; Feng, R.; Rizzolo, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nectarine fruit after cold storage soften normally, but become dry instead of juicy and can develop flesh browning, bleeding and a gel-like or glassy formation of the flesh near the pit. An experiment was conducted to see if time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy could distinguish these internal

  6. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%)

  7. Simultaneous reference and differential waveform acquisition in time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David; Fujiwara, Masazumi

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for data acquisition in time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy experiments. Our approach is based on simultaneous collection of reference and differential THz scans. Both the optical THz generation beam and the pump beam are modulated at two different frequencies that are no...

  8. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy in a parallel-plate waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved THz spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate photoconductivity dynamics in a wide variety of materials with sub-picosecond resolution, all without applying contacts to the material. This technique uses coherently detected and broadband pulses of far-infrared light, known as TH...

  9. Time-resolved proton polarisation (TPP) images tyrosyl radical sites in bovine liver catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Oliver; Jouve, Hélène M.; Stuhrmann, Heinrich B.

    2017-05-01

    A differentiation between dynamic polarised protons close to tyrosyl radical sites in catalase and those of the bulk is achieved by time-resolved polarised neutron scattering. Three radical sites, all of them being close to the molecular centre and the heme, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369 the radial site of which had previously been proven by EPR.

  10. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  11. Evolution of a Rippled Membrane during Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis Studied by Time-Resolved AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) for lipid membrane curvature is explored by monitoring, through time-resolved atomic force microscopy, the hydrolysis of supported double bilayers in the ripple phase. The ripple phase presents a corrugated morphology. PLA2 is shown to have higher activity...

  12. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  13. Hexamethylcyclopentadiene: time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    comparing time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) with ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations on the MS-MR-CASPT2 level of theory. We disentangle the relationship between two phenomena that dominate the immediate molecular response upon light absorption: a spectrally dependent delay...

  14. Fluctuations between high- and low-modularity topology in time-resolved functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Betzel, Richard F; He, Ye; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Sporns, Olaf

    2017-08-17

    Modularity is an important topological attribute for functional brain networks. Recent human fMRI studies have reported that modularity of functional networks varies not only across individuals being related to demographics and cognitive performance, but also within individuals co-occurring with fluctuations in network properties of functional connectivity, estimated over short time intervals. However, characteristics of these time-resolved functional networks during periods of high and low modularity have remained largely unexplored. In this study we investigate basic spatiotemporal properties of time-resolved networks in the high and low modularity periods during rest, with a particular focus on their spatial connectivity patterns, temporal homogeneity and test-retest reliability. We show that spatial connectivity patterns of time-resolved networks in the high and low modularity periods are represented by increased and decreased dissociation of the default mode network module from task-positive network modules, respectively. We also find that the instances of time-resolved functional connectivity sampled from within the high (respectively, low) modularity period are relatively homogeneous (respectively, heterogeneous) over time, indicating that during the low modularity period the default mode network interacts with other networks in a variable manner. We confirmed that the occurrence of the high and low modularity periods varies across individuals with moderate inter-session test-retest reliability and that it is correlated with previously-reported individual differences in the modularity of functional connectivity estimated over longer timescales. Our findings illustrate how time-resolved functional networks are spatiotemporally organized during periods of high and low modularity, allowing one to trace individual differences in long-timescale modularity to the variable occurrence of network configurations at shorter timescales. Copyright © 2017 The Authors

  15. Structural evolution of NM (Ni and Mn) lithium-rich layered material revealed by in-situ electrochemical Raman spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Xin; Li, Bing; Liu, Bo; Liu, Bi-Ju; Zhao, Jin-Bao; Ren, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Li-rich layered materials are one of promising candidates of cathode materials for energy storage in electric vehicles (EVs) due to their high energy density. The practical application of these materials relies on the in-depth understanding of the crystal structures and reaction mechanisms during the electrochemical processes to overcome the potential decay issue. In this work, in-situ electrochemical Raman spectroscopy has been developed and used to investigate the structural evolution of the Li-rich layered material (0.5LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2·0.5Li2MnO3). An electrochemical Raman spectroscopic cell with an excellent air-tightness and optical signal collection efficiency has been designed and used for in-situ investigation of the NM Li-rich material during the very first two electrochemical cycles. We found that the reactions of Ni2+ to Ni3+ and Ni3+ to Ni4+ appearing in the potential range of from 3.70 V to 4.45 V show a good reversibility. The in-situ Raman spectra after the first two electrochemical cycles also indicate the activation of Li2MnO3 changes the ionic local coordination structure and increases the ionic disorder of the pristine NM Li-rich layered material. This structural change has a great impact on the subsequent electrochemical cycles. The in-situ Raman spectroscopy results can help to improve the performance of NM Li-rich layered materials.

  16. In vivo and in situ synchrotron radiation-based μ-XRF reveals elemental distributions during the early attachment phase of barnacle larvae and juvenile barnacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkbeil, Tobias; Mohamed, Tawheed; Simon, Rolf; Batchelor, David; Di Fino, Alessio; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2016-02-01

    Barnacles are able to establish stable surface contacts and adhere underwater. While the composition of adult barnacle cement has been intensively studied, far less is known about the composition of the cement of the settlement-stage cypris larva. The main challenge in studying the adhesives used by these larvae is the small quantity of material available for analysis, being on the order of nanograms. In this work, we applied, for the first time, synchrotron radiation-based μ-X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μ-XRF) for in vivo and in situ analysis of young barnacles and barnacle cyprids. To obtain biologically relevant information relating to the body tissues, adhesives, and shell of the organisms, an in situ sample environment was developed to allow direct microprobe investigation of hydrated specimens without pretreatment of the samples. In 8-day-old juvenile barnacles (Balanus improvisus), the junctions between the six plates forming the shell wall showed elevated concentrations of calcium, potassium, bromine, strontium, and manganese. Confocal measurements allowed elemental characterization of the adhesive interface of recently attached cyprids (Balanus amphitrite), and substantiated the accumulation of bromine both at the point of initial attachment as well as within the cyprid carapace. In situ measurements of the cyprid cement established the presence of bromine, chlorine, iodine, sulfur, copper, iron, zinc, selenium, and nickel for both species. The previously unrecognized presence of bromine, iron, and selenium in the cyprid permanent adhesive will hopefully inspire further biochemical investigations of the function of these substances.

  17. Time-resolved X-ray imaging of magnetization dynamics in Spin Transfer Torque devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chembrolu, Venkatesh

    Study of spin-dependent transport phenomena in ferromagnetic metals has gained a lot of interest amongst both theoretical and experimental physicists in the last two decades. In addition to being a rich field of study in terms of basic research, these studies have led to some very important technological applications. Discovery of the Giant Magneto Resistance (GMR) effect in 1988--89 revolutionized the read head technology for hard drives, thus making very high storage densities possible. The proposal and the subsequent experimental conformation of the existence of Spin Transfer Torque (STT) effect in ferromagnetic multi-layers promises to be a good candidate for developing high density, non-volatile, magnetic random access memory (MRAM) and tunable DC driven microwave oscillators. The subject matter of study in this thesis is investigation of the magnetization switching mechanism in STT devices. Most of the experimental advances in the study of STT phenomena have been made via measurements of various electrical transport properties. The primary contribution of the work being presented in this thesis is an introduction of a complementary technique to study STT phenomena, viz., X-ray imaging based time resolved study of magnetization dynamics. The possibility of imaging in the sub-100 nm regime, combined with 100 ps time resolution provides a unique way to study the magnetization dynamics in STT devices. We have performed pump-probe experiments by using the Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley. Our experiments have revealed for the first time, the details of magnetization switching dynamics under the influence of STT. For our samples, we have identified two types of switching that primarily occur, viz., vortex-driven switching (VDS) and switching by C-state flip-over (CSF). Both these switching mechanisms can be described in a generic way in terms of the motion of magnetic vortex cores. In the last part of this

  18. Time resolved spectroscopic investigation of SiD2 + D2: kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubaiey, Najem A.; Walsh, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Silylenes (silanediyls) have made an important impact on organosilicon chemistry even if it is of more recent foundation than carbenes in organic chemistry and much less complete. These species are highly reactive intermediates. They play a central role in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of various silicon-containing thin films which have a technological importance in microelectronics as well as in the dry etching processes of silicon wafers. Spectroscopic methods have been developed to observe these species, a necessary pre-requisite to their direct monitoring. In this work, deuterated phenylsilane precursor, PhSiD3 was chosen for SiD2 because its analogue phenylsilane, PhSiH3 proved to be a good precursor for SiH2 and the high quality decay signals observed revealed that SiD2 be readily detected from PhSiD3 and that if other decomposition pathways (e.g. PhSiD + D2) are occurring, they do not effect measurements of the rate constants for SiD2. The absorption spectrum of SiD2 formed from the flash photolysis of a mixture of PhSiD3 and SF6 at 193nm were found in the region 17384-17391 cm-1 with strong band at 17387.07 cm-1. This single rotational line of pQ1 was chosen to monitor SiD2 removal. Time-resolved studies of SiD2 have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reactions with D2. The reactions were studied over the pressure range 5-100 Torr (in SF6 bath gas) at four temperatures in the range 298-498K. Single decay from 10 photolysis laser shots were averaged and found to give reasonable first-order kinetics fits. Second order kinetics were obtained by pressure dependence of the pseudo first order decay constants and substance D2 pressures within experimental error. The reaction was found to be weakly pressure dependent at all temperatures, consistent with a third-body mediated association process. In addition, SiH2+ H2 reaction is approximately ca. 60% faster than SiD2+D2 reaction. Theoretical extrapolations (using Lindemann

  19. Time resolved spectroscopic investigation of SiD2 + D2: kinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Rubaiey Najem A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silylenes (silanediyls have made an important impact on organosilicon chemistry even if it is of more recent foundation than carbenes in organic chemistry and much less complete. These species are highly reactive intermediates. They play a central role in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of various silicon-containing thin films which have a technological importance in microelectronics as well as in the dry etching processes of silicon wafers. Spectroscopic methods have been developed to observe these species, a necessary pre-requisite to their direct monitoring. In this work, deuterated phenylsilane precursor, PhSiD3 was chosen for SiD2 because its analogue phenylsilane, PhSiH3 proved to be a good precursor for SiH2 and the high quality decay signals observed revealed that SiD2 be readily detected from PhSiD3 and that if other decomposition pathways (e.g. PhSiD + D2 are occurring, they do not effect measurements of the rate constants for SiD2. The absorption spectrum of SiD2 formed from the flash photolysis of a mixture of PhSiD3 and SF6 at 193nm were found in the region 17384-17391 cm-1 with strong band at 17387.07 cm-1. This single rotational line of pQ1 was chosen to monitor SiD2 removal. Time-resolved studies of SiD2 have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reactions with D2. The reactions were studied over the pressure range 5-100 Torr (in SF6 bath gas at four temperatures in the range 298-498K. Single decay from 10 photolysis laser shots were averaged and found to give reasonable first-order kinetics fits. Second order kinetics were obtained by pressure dependence of the pseudo first order decay constants and substance D2 pressures within experimental error. The reaction was found to be weakly pressure dependent at all temperatures, consistent with a third-body mediated association process. In addition, SiH2+ H2 reaction is approximately ca. 60% faster than SiD2+D2 reaction. Theoretical extrapolations (using

  20. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.

  1. Identifiability of models for time-resolved fluorescence with underlying distributions of rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boens, Noël; Van der Auweraer, Mark

    2014-02-01

    The deterministic identifiability analysis of photophysical models for the kinetics of excited-state processes, assuming errorless time-resolved fluorescence data, can verify whether the model parameters can be determined unambiguously. In this work, we have investigated the identifiability of several uncommon models for time-resolved fluorescence with underlying distributions of rate constants which lead to non-exponential decays. The mathematical functions used here for the description of non-exponential fluorescence decays are the stretched exponential or Kohlrausch function, the Becquerel function, the Förster type energy transfer function, decay functions associated with exponential, Gaussian and uniform distributions of rate constants, a decay function with extreme sub-exponential behavior, the Mittag-Leffler function and Heaviside's function. It is shown that all the models are uniquely identifiable, which means that for each specific model there exists a single parameter set that describes its associated fluorescence δ-response function.

  2. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target.

  3. Broad-band time-resolved near infrared spectroscopy in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.C.; Pastor, I.; Cal, E. de la; McCarthy, K.J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Diaz, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    First experimental results on broad-band, time-resolved Near Infrared (NIR;here loosely defined as covering from 750 to 1650 nm) passive spectroscopy using a high sensitivity InGaAs detector are reported for the TJ-II Stellarator. Experimental set-up is described together with its main characteristics, the most remarkable ones being its enhanced NIR response, broadband spectrum acquisition in a single shot, and time-resolved measurements with up to 1.8 kHz spectral rate. Prospects for future work and more extended physics studies in this newly open spectral region in TJ-II are discussed. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchione, T.; Denes, P.; Jobe, R. K.; Johnson, I. J.; Joseph, J. M.; Li, R. K.; Perazzo, A.; Shen, X.; Wang, X. J.; Weathersby, S. P.; Yang, J.; Zhang, D.

    2017-03-01

    The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μmμm spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixel noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.

  5. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz.

  6. Time-resolved PEEM measurements on single-crystalline Fe-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Alexander; Wiemann, Carsten; Cramm, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung IFF-9, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Time-resolved photo-electron emission microscopy (TR-PEEM) provides a method for investigating the spatial and temporal magnetodynamics of micron-sized magnetic elements. By the use of e-beam evaporation thin films of (100)-oriented Iron in bcc-structure can be epitaxially grown on GaAs substrates with a Silver buffer layer. Due to their single-crystallinity the films exhibit a four-fold in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The films have been microstructured by lithographic techniques and the micromagnetic response on a short magnetic field pulse was investigated by the TR-PEEM technique. Compared to well-studied polycrystalline Permalloy samples the magnetocrystalline anisotropy gives rise to additional terms in the effective magnetic field, leading to different magnetodynamic behaviour. Results of the time-resolved measurements are presented and compared to those of anisotropy-free Permalloy structures.

  7. Theoretical Study of Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy from Coupled Chromophore Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Matro, A; Matro, Alexander; Cina, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations of time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy from a pair of chromophores coupled by an excitation transfer interaction are presented. For the purpose of investigating the effects of nuclear motion on the energy transfer and anisotropy, an illustrative model is developed that provides each chromophore with a single intramolecular vibrational mode. Account is taken of non-instantaneous excitation and time- and frequency-resolved detection. Effects of excitation pulse duration, detection window duration and frequency resolution, and excitation transfer coupling strength on the time-resolved anisotropy are examined in detail. Effects of vibrational relaxation and dephasing are also examined using a simplified Redfield description of the effects of coupling to a thermal bath.

  8. Intracellular Monitoring of AS1411 Aptamer by Time-Resolved Microspectrofluorimetry and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočišová, Eva; Praus, Petr; Bok, Jiří; Bonneau, Stéphanie; Sureau, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy imaging-two complementary fluorescence techniques-provide important information about the intracellular distribution, level of uptake and binding/interactions inside living cell of the labeled molecule of interest. They were employed to monitor the "fate" of AS1411 aptamer labeled by ATTO 425 in human living cells. Confocal microspectrofluorimeter adapted for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence measurements by using a phase-modulation principle with homodyne data acquisition was employed to obtain emission spectra and to determine fluorescence lifetimes in U-87 MG tumor brain cells and Hs68 non-tumor foreskin cells. Acquired spectra from both the intracellular space and the reference solutions were treated to observe the aptamer localization and its interaction with biological structures inside the living cell. The emission spectra and the maximum emission wavelengths coming from the cells are practically identical, however significant lifetime lengthening was observed for tumor cell line in comparison to non-tumor one.

  9. On the intrinsic photophysics of indigo: a time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy study of the indigo carmine dianion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterley, Adam S; Horke, Daniel A; Verlet, Jan R R

    2012-12-14

    The intrinsic photophysics of indigo has been studied using gas-phase time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the indigo carmine dianion (InC(2-)). The action spectrum reveals that the gas-phase absorption spectrum arising from the S(1) indigo. Femtosecond spectroscopy shows that the S(1) state decays on a 1.4 ps timescale. Through isotopic substitution, the primary mechanism on the S(1) excited state can be assigned to an intra-molecular proton transfer, which is the same as that which has been observed in solution. However, the excited state lifetime is significantly shorter in vacuum. These similarities and differences are discussed in terms of recent theoretical investigations of the S(1) excited state of indigo.

  10. Time-resolved optical imaging through turbid media using a fast data acquisition system based on a gated CCD camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Andrea, Cosimo; Comelli, Daniela; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2003-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for the acquisition of time-resolved data for optical tomography. A fast gated CCD has been used as a parallel detector to acquire in one shot the light intensity exiting a phantom within a very short time slice. By using a pulsed illumination and repeating the acquisition at different delays, the time behaviour of the diffused transmittance can be recorded very quickly. Scattering inclusions embedded in a 5 cm thick phantom have been revealed by fitting a set of 120 images, delayed 50 ps from one another, with a mathematical model based on the random walk theory. Moreover, absorption inclusions have been detected in time-gated images taken at suitable delays.

  11. Relaxation Dynamics in Photoexcited Chiral Molecules Studied by Time-Resolved Photoelectron Circular Dichroism: Toward Chiral Femtochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Comby, Antoine; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Descamps, Dominique; Légaré, Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Petit, Stéphane; Pons, Bernard; Fabre, Baptiste; Mairesse, Yann; Blanchet, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Unravelling the main initial dynamics responsible for chiral recognition is a key stepin the understanding of many biological processes. However this challenging task requires a sensitive enantiospecic probe to investigate molecular dynamics on their natural femtosecond timescale. Here we show that, in the gas phase, the ultrafast relaxationdynamics of photoexcited chiral molecules can be tracked by recording Time-ResolvedPhotoElectron Circular Dichroism (TR-PECD) resulting from the photoionisation bya circularly polarized probe pulse. A large forward/backward asymmetry along theprobe propagation axis is observed in the photoelectron angular distribution. Its evolution with pump-probe delay reveals ultrafast dynamics that are inaccessible in theangle-integrated photoelectron spectrum nor via the usual electron emission anisotropyparameter ($\\beta$). PECD, which originates from the electron scattering in the chiral molecular potential, appears as a new sensitive observable for ultrafast molecular dynamicsin ch...

  12. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  13. Wide-field time-resolved luminescence imaging and spectroscopy to decipher obliterated documents in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mototsugu; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Akao, Yoshinori; Higashikawa, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    We applied a wide-field time-resolved luminescence (TRL) method with a pulsed laser and a gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) for deciphering obliterated documents for use in forensic science. The TRL method can nondestructively measure the dynamics of luminescence, including fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes, which prove to be useful parameters for image detection. First, we measured the TRL spectra of four brands of black porous-tip pen inks on paper to estimate their luminescence lifetimes. Next, we acquired the TRL images of 12 obliterated documents at various delay times and gate times of the ICCD. The obliterated contents were revealed in the TRL images because of the difference in the luminescence lifetimes of the inks. This method requires no pretreatment, is nondestructive, and has the advantage of wide-field imaging, which makes it is easy to control the gate timing. This demonstration proves that TRL imaging and spectroscopy are powerful tools for forensic document examination.

  14. Light harvesting, light adaptation and photoprotection in aquatic photosynthesis studies by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chukhutsina, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aquatic photosynthetic organisms unavoidably experience light fluctuations that vary in amplitude, duration and origin, compromising their photosynthetic efficiency. Weather conditions and underwater flow cause continuous changes in irradiance to which the organisms have to adapt. Many light-adaptation strategies of photosynthetic organisms, such as light acclimation, photoprotection and state transitions are still not well understood. In this thesis, time-resolved fluorescence s...

  15. Glucose Sensing by Time-Resolved Fluorescence of Sol-Gel Immobilized Glucose Oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Rosario; Ventura, Bartolomeo Della; De Nicola, Sergio; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Lepore, Maria

    2011-01-01

    A monolithic silica gel matrix with entrapped glucose oxidase (GOD) was constructed as a bioactive element in an optical biosensor for glucose determination. Intrinsic fluorescence of free and immobilised GOD was investigated in the visible range in presence of different glucose concentrations by time-resolved spectroscopy with time-correlated single-photon counting detector. A three-exponential model was used for analysing the fluorescence transients. Fractional intensities and mean lifetime...

  16. Direct time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer of deoxyblebbistatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-De; Zhu, Ruixue; Lee Phillips, David

    2017-09-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of deoxyblebbistatin was investigated using femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. An ultrafast intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (IHAT) appears to take place via the first singlet excited state of deoxyblebbistatin within 8 ps. Absorption and fluorescence photochemical results indicate the IHAT process leads to mainly conversion of deoxyblebbistatin into an enol form final product which was observed and characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  17. A Time-Resolved Dynamic Stall Investigation Based On Coherent Structure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mulleners, Karen; Raffel, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic stall on an airfoil comprises a series of complex aerodynamic phenomena in response to an unsteady change of the angle of attack. It is accompanied by a lift overshoot and delayed massive flow separation with respect to static stall. The classical hallmark of the dynamic stall phenomenon is the dynamic stall vortex. The flow over an oscillating OA209 airfoil under dynamic stall conditions was investigated by means of unsteady surface pressure measurements and time-resolved particle im...

  18. Time resolved analysis of water drainage in porous asphalt concrete using neutron radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, L D; Sedighi Gilani, M; Derome, D; Jerjen, I; Vontobel, P

    2013-07-01

    Porous asphalt as a road surface layer controls aquaplaning as rain water can drain through its highly porous structure. The process of water drainage through this permeable layer is studied using neutron radiography. Time-resolved water configuration and distribution within the porous structure are reported. It is shown that radiography depicts the process of liquid water transport within the complex geometry of porous asphalt, capturing water films, filled dead end pores and water islands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulations of Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction in Laue Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lings, B.; DeCamp, M. F.; Reis, D.A.; Fahy, S.; Wark, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    A method of computer simulation of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction (TRXD) in asymmetric Laue (transmission) geometry with an arbitrary propagating strain perpendicular to the crystal surface is presented. We present two case studies for possible strain generation by short-pulse laser irradiation: (i) a thermoelastic-like analytic model; (ii) a numerical model including effects of electron-hole diffusion, Auger recombination, deformation potential and thermal diffusion. A comparison with recen...

  20. Singular value decomposition as a tool for background corrections in time-resolved XFEL scattering data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    The development of new X-ray light sources, XFELs, with unprecedented time and brilliance characteristics has led to the availability of very large datasets with high time resolution and superior signal strength. The chaotic nature of the emission processes in such sources as well as entirely nov...... on singular-value decomposition of no-signal subsets of acquired datasets in combination with model inputs and appears generally applicable to time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering experiments....

  1. Technical note: Time-resolved immunofluorometric assay for growth hormone in ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvendahl, P.; Adamsen, J.; Lund, Regina Teresa

    2003-01-01

    for 4 h at 25degreesC. Plates were then washed six times, incubated for 5 to 10 min with 250 muL of enhancement solution, and fluorescence read with a time-resolved fluorometer. The sensitivity of the assay was 0.1 ng/mL, and the working range was 0.2 to 200 ng/mL. Recovery of quantitative amounts...

  2. Time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy imaging of mode coupling between three interacting magnetic vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao; Cheng, X. M., E-mail: xcheng@brynmawr.edu [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010 (United States); Keavney, D. J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Asmat-Uceda, M.; Buchanan, K. S. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Melikyan, A. [American Physical Society, Ridge, New York 11961 (United States)

    2014-09-08

    The interactions between three magnetic vortices in a planar equilateral triangular arrangement were studied by time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy. The gyrotropic resonance frequencies of the three individual vortices in the tri-disk system are different from one another and also shifted from that of an isolated vortex by as much as 12%. A comparison with analytical calculations and numerical simulations shows that the observed frequency shifts result from the dipolar interaction between the vortices.

  3. Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in periodic potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Zenesini, A.; Lignier, H.; Tayebirad, G.; Radogostowicz, J; Ciampini, D; Mannella, R.; Wimberger, S.; Morsch, O.; Arimondo, E.

    2009-01-01

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the step-like time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the width of the tunneling steps and discuss the...

  4. In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Webster, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces employs multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. Combined geochemistry and mineralogy measurements reveal the phases present, their composition, morphology, and isotope ratios of constituents. Small and primitive bodies often present a special case where little to no compositional information has been obtained from ground-based or remote measurements. For example, Trojan asteroids and other D-type objects as well as Phobos and Deimos exhibit relatively featureless reflectance spectra as obtained by remote measurements. Yet samples of primitive material in the meteorite collection (e.g. Allende) reveal a fine grained structure with many phases and a wealth of chemical information. On-surface measurements are therefore a necessary component for understanding the origins of these solar system bodies. We will present measurement techniques that could provide microscopic mineralogy and isotope geochemistry. We will discuss instrumentation and measurements relevant to small body exploration - focusing more specifically on our recent results from the techniques of microscopic time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and Tunable Laser Spectroscopy (TLS). The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This work was performed in part at the California Institute of Technology for the Keck Institute for Space Studies, which is funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  6. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  7. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of a Sheared Flow Stabilized Z-pinch Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Eleanor

    2016-10-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-pinch Project investigates the use of sheared-axial flows to stabilize an otherwise unstable plasma configuration. Diagnostics with sub-microsecond resolution are required to obtain accurate time-resolved data since the plasma pulse is approximately 100 μs. Analyzing the Doppler shift of impurity line radiation from the pinch provides a measure of the velocity profile and is a reliable method of determining the plasma sheared flow. The velocity profile is spatially resolved through the use of a 20-chord fiber bundle. The ZaP-HD experiment has used a PI-MAX intensified CCD array to record a single time-resolved spectrum per plasma pulse. Obtaining the evolution of the velocity profile using this method required spectra acquired over hundreds of pulses with identical initial parameters and varying acquisition times. The use of a Kirana 05M ultra-fast framing camera is investigated for recording time-resolved velocity profiles during a single pulse. The Kirana utilizes an ultraviolet intensifier to record 180 frames of UV light at up to 2 million frames per second. An ultraviolet optics system is designed to couple the exit port of an Acton SP-500i spectrometer to the Kirana UV intensifier and focus spectra at the camera detector plane. This work is supported by US DoE FES, NNSA, and ARPA-E ALPHA.

  8. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT. PMID:26417526

  9. The analysis of time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy based on positive matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Li, Zhu; Li, Bo; Shi, Guolong; Li, Minqiang; Yu, Daoyang; Liu, Jinhuai

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy (OWAS) makes use of an evanescent field to detect the polarized absorption spectra of sub-monomolecular adlayers. This technique is suitable for the investigation of kinetics at the solid/liquid interface of dyes, pigments, fluorescent molecules, quantum dots, metallic nanoparticles, and proteins with chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate the application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) to analyze time-resolved OWAS for the first time. Meanwhile, PCA is researched to compare with PMF. The absorption/desorption kinetics of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic process of Meisenheimer complex between Cysteine and TNT are selected as samples to verify experimental system and analytical methods. The results are shown that time-resolved OWAS can well record the absorption/desorption of R6G onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic formation process of Meisenheimer complexes. The feature of OWAS extracted by PMF is dynamic and consistent with the results analyzed by the traditional function of time/wavelength-absorbance. Moreover, PMF prevents the negative factors from occurring, avoids contradicting physical reality, and makes factors more easily interpretable. Therefore, we believe that PMF will provide a valuable analysis route to allow processing of increasingly large and complex data sets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Wake losses from averaged and time-resolved power measurements at full scale wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Mana, Matteo; Becchetti, Matteo; Segalini, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    This work deals with the experimental analysis of wake losses fluctuations at full-scale wind turbines. The test case is a wind farm sited on a moderately complex terrain: 4 turbines are installed, having 2 MW of rated power each. The sources of information are the time-resolved data, as collected from the OPC server, and the 10-minutes averaged SCADA data. The objective is to compare the statistical distributions of wake losses for far and middle wakes, as can be observed through the “fast” lens of time-resolved data, for certain selected test-case time series, and through the “slow” lens of SCADA data, on a much longer time basis that allow to set the standards of the mean wake losses along the wind farm. Further, time-resolved data are used for an insight into the spectral properties of wake fluctuations, highlighting the role of the wind turbine as low-pass filter. Summarizing, the wind rose, the layout of the site and the structure of the data sets at disposal allow to study middle and far wake behavior, with a “slow” and “fast” perspective.

  11. A New Approach to Time-Resolved 3D-PTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Troolin, Dan; Bjorkquist, Dan; TSI Inc Team

    2017-11-01

    Volumetric three-component velocimetry via particle tracking is a powerful alternative to TomoPIV. It has been thoroughly documented that compared to TomoPIV, particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) methods (whether 2D or 3D) better resolve regions of high velocity gradient, identify fewer ghost particles, and are less computationally demanding, which results in shorter processing times. Recently, 3D-PTV has seen renewed interest in the PIV community with the availability of time-resolved data. Of course, advances in hardware are partly to thank for that availability-higher speed cameras, more effective memory management, and higher speed lasers. But in software, algorithms that utilize time resolved data to improve 3D particle reconstruction and particle tracking are also under development and advancing (e.g. shake-the-box, neighbor tracking reconstruction, etc.). .In the current study, we present a new 3D-PTV method that incorporates time-resolved data. We detail the method, its performance in terms of particle identification and reconstruction error and their relation to varying seeding densities, as well as computational performance.

  12. Hydrodynamic Radii of Ranibizumab, Aflibercept and Bevacizumab Measured by Time-Resolved Phosphorescence Anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Srikantha, Nishanthan; Barber, Matthew J; Neffendorf, James E; Suhling, Klaus; Jackson, Timothy L

    2016-08-01

    To measure the hydrodynamic radii of intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs ranibizumab, aflibercept and bevacizumab with μs time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy. Ruthenium-based dye Ru(bpy)2(mcbpy - O - Su - ester)(PF6)2, whose lifetime of several hundred nanoseconds is comparable to the rotational correlation time of these drugs in buffer, was used as a label. The hydrodynamic radii were calculated from the rotational correlation times of the Ru(bpy)2(mcbpy - O - Su - ester)(PF6)2-labelled drugs obtained with time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy measurements in buffer/glycerol solutions of varying viscosity. The measured radii of 2.76±0.04 nm for ranibizumab, 3.70±0.03 nm for aflibercept and 4.58±0.01 nm for bevacizumab agree with calculations based on molecular weight and other experimental measurements. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy is a relatively simple and straightforward method that allows experimental measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of individual proteins, and is superior to theoretical calculations which cannot give the required accuracy for a particular protein.

  13. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  14. Quantifying intracellular equilibrium dissociation constants using single-channel time-resolved FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras-Martínez, Gloria; Andrieu, Josu; Larijani, Banafshé; Requejo-Isidro, Jose

    2018-01-01

    Quantification of the intracellular equilibrium dissociation constant of the interaction, Kd , is challenging due to the variability of the relative concentrations of the interacting proteins in the cell. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the donor provides an accurate measurement of the molecular fraction of donor involved in FRET, but the fraction of bound acceptor is also needed to reliably estimate Kd . We present a method that exploits the spectroscopic properties of the widely used eGFP - mCherry FRET pair to rigorously determine the intracellular Kd based on imaging the fluorescence lifetime of only the donor (single-channel FLIM). We have assessed the effect of incomplete labelling and determined its range of application for different Kd using Monte Carlo simulations. We have demonstrated this method estimating the intracellular Kd for the homodimerisaton of the oncogenic protein 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) in different cell lines and conditions, revealing a competitive mechanism for its regulation. The measured intracellular Kd was validated against in-vitro data. This method provides an accurate and generic tool to quantify protein interactions in situ. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. LiMn2O4 Surface Chemistry Evolution during Cycling Revealed by in Situ Auger Electron Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ching-Yen; Leung, Kevin; Haasch, Richard T; Dillon, Shen J

    2017-10-04

    This work utilizes in situ electrochemical and analytical characterization during cycling of LiMn2O4 (LMO) equilibrated at different potentials in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment. The LMO reacts with organic molecules in the vacuum to form a high surface concentration of Li2CO3 (≈50% C) during initial charging to 4.05 V. Charging to higher potentials reduces the overall Li2CO3 concentration (≈15% C). Discharging to 3.0 V increases the Li2CO3 concentration (≈30% C) and over discharging to 0.1 V again reduces its concentration (≈15% C). This behavior is reproducible over 5 cycles. The model geometry utilized suggests that oxygen from LMO can participate in redox of carbon, where LMO contributes oxygen to form the carbonate in the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). Similar results were obtained from samples cycled ex situ, suggesting that the model in situ geometry provides reasonably representative information about surface chemistry evolution. Carbon redox at LMO and the inherent voltage instability of the Li2CO3 likely contributes significantly to its capacity fade.

  16. Prospective time-resolved LCA of fully electric supercap vehicles in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Benedikt M; Dura, Hanna; Baumann, Manuel J; Weil, Marcel R

    2015-07-01

    The ongoing transition of the German electricity supply toward a higher share of renewable and sustainable energy sources, called Energiewende in German, has led to dynamic changes in the environmental impact of electricity over the last few years. Prominent scenario studies predict that comparable dynamics will continue in the coming decades, which will further improve the environmental performance of Germany's electricity supply. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is the methodology commonly used to evaluate environmental performance. Previous LCA studies on electric vehicles have shown that the electricity supply for the vehicles' operation is responsible for the major part of their environmental impact. The core question of this study is how the prospective dynamic development of the German electricity mix will affect the impact of electric vehicles operated in Germany and how LCA can be adapted to analyze this impact in a more robust manner. The previously suggested approach of time-resolved LCA, which is located between static and dynamic LCA, is used in this study and compared with several static approaches. Furthermore, the uncertainty issue associated with scenario studies is addressed in general and in relation to time-resolved LCA. Two scenario studies relevant to policy making have been selected, but a moderate number of modifications have been necessary to adapt the data to the requirements of a life cycle inventory. A potential, fully electric vehicle powered by a supercapacitor energy storage system is used as a generic example. The results show that substantial improvements in the environmental repercussions of the electricity supply and, consequentially, of electric vehicles will be achieved between 2020 and 2031 on the basis of the energy mixes predicted in both studies. This study concludes that although scenarios might not be able to predict the future, they should nonetheless be used as data sources in prospective LCA studies, because in many cases

  17. Application of time-resolved fluorescence for direct and continuous probing of release from polymeric delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger, Mathieu L; Sheng, Wangzhong; McFearin, Cathryn L; Berezin, Mikhail Y; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-11-10

    Though accurately evaluating the kinetics of release is critical for validating newly designed therapeutic carriers for in vivo applications, few methods yet exist for release measurement in real time and without the need for any sample preparation. Many of the current approaches (e.g. chromatographic methods, absorption spectroscopy, or NMR spectroscopy) rely on isolation of the released material from the loaded vehicles, which require additional sample purification and can lead to loss of accuracy when probing fast kinetics of release. In this study we describe the use of time-resolved fluorescence for in situ monitoring of small molecule release kinetics from biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems. This method relies on the observation that fluorescent reporters being released from polymeric drug delivery systems possess distinct excited-state lifetime components, reflecting their different environments in the particle suspensions, i.e., confined in the polymer matrices or free in the aqueous environment. These distinct lifetimes enable real-time quantitative mapping of the relative concentrations of dye in each population to obtain precise and accurate temporal information on the release profile of particular carrier/payload combinations. We found that fluorescence lifetime better distinguishes subtle differences in release profiles (e.g. differences associated with dye loading) than conventional steady-state fluorescence measurements, which represent the averaged dye behavior over the entire scan. Given the method's applicability to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cargo, it could be employed to model the release of any drug-carrier combination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-Resolved SAXS Studies of the Kinetics of Thermally Triggered Release of Encapsulated Silica Nanoparticles from Block Copolymer Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mable, Charlotte J; Derry, Matthew J; Thompson, Kate L; Fielding, Lee A; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P

    2017-06-13

    Silica-loaded poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) diblock copolymer vesicles are prepared in the form of concentrated aqueous dispersions via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). As the concentration of silica nanoparticles present during the PISA synthesis is increased up to 35% w/w, higher degrees of encapsulation of this component within the vesicles can be achieved. After centrifugal purification to remove excess non-encapsulated silica nanoparticles, SAXS, DCP, and TGA analysis indicates encapsulation of up to hundreds of silica nanoparticles per vesicle. In the present study, the thermally triggered release of these encapsulated silica nanoparticles is examined by cooling to 0 °C for 30 min, which causes in situ vesicle dissociation. Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the change in diblock copolymer morphology and also enable direct visualization of the released silica nanoparticles. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering is used to quantify the extent of silica release over time. For an initial silica concentration of 5% w/w, cooling induces a vesicle-to-sphere transition with subsequent nanoparticle release. For higher silica concentrations (20 or 30% w/w) cooling only leads to perforation of the vesicle membranes, but silica nanoparticles are nevertheless released through the pores. For vesicles prepared in the presence of 30% w/w silica, the purified silica-loaded vesicles were cooled to 0 °C for 30 min, and SAXS patterns were collected every 15 s. A new SAXS model has been developed to determine both the mean volume fraction of encapsulated silica within the vesicles and the scattering length density. Satisfactory data fits to the experimental SAXS patterns were obtained using this model.

  19. In-situ X-ray diffraction reveals the degradation of crystalline CH3NH3PbI3 by water-molecule collisions at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Masaki; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Nagaoka, Ryota; Miyake, Tomoya; Abdullaev, Ulugbek; Ota, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yoshifumi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2018-02-01

    We have developed a vacuum-compatible chamber for in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and have used it to characterize the changing crystal structure of an inorganic–organic hybrid perovskite material, CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3), during interactions with water vapor at room temperature. In the XRD spectra, we have observed the degradation of MAPbI3 and the creation of MAPbI3 hydrates, which follow simple rate equations. The time constant for the degradation of MAPbI3 during accelerated aging suggests that multiple collisions of water molecules with the MAPbI3 crystal trigger the degradation of the crystal.

  20. Direct evidence of water-assisted sintering of cobalt on carbon nanofiber catalysts during simulated Fischer-Tropsch conditions revealed with in situ mossbauer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezemer, G Leendert; Remans, Tom J; van Bavel, Alexander P; Dugulan, A Iulian

    2010-06-30

    Cobalt on carbon nanofiber model catalysts with very small dispersed cobalt particles of 5 nm were subjected to H(2)O/H(2) treatments at 20 bar and 220 degrees C. Using in situ Mossbauer spectroscopy we could unambiguously prove that oxidation of the nanoparticles by water will not occur when hydrogen is present. Only in a water/argon atmosphere did oxidation take place. This rules out oxidation as the deactivation mechanism in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Even more important, we define the relative humidity (RH) as a key parameter to understanding deactivation by water. At a RH below 25% sintering was absent even when measuring for 4 weeks, whereas at a high RH of 62% as much as half of the small super paramagnetic cobalt particles (Fischer-Tropsch conditions amounted to 73%, which could be directly related to the metal dispersion loss 77% due to sintering as evidenced by detailed TEM analysis of the spent sample.

  1. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Poburski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner.

  2. Low-temperature and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Stokkum, I. H. M.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T. M.

    2004-09-01

    The phototropins are plant blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine residue in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The spectroscopic properties of the LOV2 domain of phototropin 1 of Avena sativa (oat) have been investigated by means of low-temperature absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The low-temperature absorption spectrum of the LOV2 domain showed a fine structure around 473 nm, indicating heterogeneity in the flavin binding pocket. The fluorescence quantum yield of the flavin cofactor increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from room temperature to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K, allowing for an accurate positioning of the flavin triplet state in the LOV2 domain at 16900 cm-1. Fluorescence from the cryotrapped covalent adduct state was extremely weak, with a fluorescence spectrum showing a maximum at 440 nm. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments utilizing a synchroscan streak camera revealed a singlet-excited state lifetime of the LOV2 domain of 2.4 ns. FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed a pH-dependent lifetime ranging between 2.9 ns at pH 2.0 to 4.7 ns at pH 8.0. No spectral shifting of the flavin emission was observed in the LOV2 domain nor in FMN in aqueous solution.

  3. Low-temperature and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Stokkum, I.H.; Grondelle, Rienkvan; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T. (UC)

    2004-12-13

    The phototropins are plant blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine residue in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The spectroscopic properties of the LOV2 domain of phototropin 1 of Avena sativa (oat) have been investigated by means of low-temperature absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The low-temperature absorption spectrum of the LOV2 domain showed a fine structure around 473 nm, indicating heterogeneity in the flavin binding pocket. The fluorescence quantum yield of the flavin cofactor increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from room temperature to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K, allowing for an accurate positioning of the flavin triplet state in the LOV2 domain at 16900 cm{sup -1}. Fluorescence from the cryotrapped covalent adduct state was extremely weak, with a fluorescence spectrum showing a maximum at 440 nm. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments utilizing a synchroscan streak camera revealed a singlet-excited state lifetime of the LOV2 domain of 2.4 ns. FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed a pH-dependent lifetime ranging between 2.9 ns at pH 2.0 to 4.7 ns at pH 8.0. No spectral shifting of the flavin emission was observed in the LOV2 domain nor in FMN in aqueous solution.

  4. The last glaciation of Bear Peninsula, central Amundsen Sea Embayment of Antarctica: Constraints on timing and duration revealed by in situ cosmogenic 14C and 10Be dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joanne S.; Smith, James A.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Young, Nicolás E.; Goehring, Brent M.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Lamp, Jennifer L.; Finkel, Robert C.; Gohl, Karsten

    2017-12-01

    Ice streams in the Pine Island-Thwaites region of West Antarctica currently dominate contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic ice sheet. Predictions of future ice-mass loss from this area rely on physical models that are validated with geological constraints on past extent, thickness and timing of ice cover. However, terrestrial records of ice sheet history from the region remain sparse, resulting in significant model uncertainties. We report glacial-geological evidence for the duration and timing of the last glaciation of Hunt Bluff, in the central Amundsen Sea Embayment. A multi-nuclide approach was used, measuring cosmogenic 10Be and in situ14C in bedrock surfaces and a perched erratic cobble. Bedrock 10Be ages (118-144 ka) reflect multiple periods of exposure and ice-cover, not continuous exposure since the last interglacial as had previously been hypothesized. In situ14C dating suggests that the last glaciation of Hunt Bluff did not start until 21.1 ± 5.8 ka - probably during the Last Glacial Maximum - and finished by 9.6 ± 0.9 ka, at the same time as ice sheet retreat from the continental shelf was complete. Thickening of ice at Hunt Bluff most likely post-dated the maximum extent of grounded ice on the outer continental shelf. Flow re-organisation provides a possible explanation for this, with the date for onset of ice-cover at Hunt Bluff providing a minimum age for the timing of convergence of the Dotson and Getz tributaries to form a single palaeo-ice stream. This is the first time that timing of onset of ice cover has been constrained in the Amundsen Sea Embayment.

  5. Application of a time-resolved optical brain imager for monitoring cerebral oxygenation during carotid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, Michal; Liebert, Adam; Staszkiewicz, Walerian; Gabrusiewicz, Andrzej; Sawosz, Piotr; Madycki, Grzegorz; Maniewski, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that time-resolved optical measurements of the head can estimate changes in the absorption coefficient with depth discrimination. Thus, changes in tissue oxygenation, which are specific to intracranial tissues, can be assessed using this advanced technique, and this method allows us to avoid the influence of changes to extracerebral tissue oxygenation on the measured signals. We report the results of time-resolved optical imaging that was carried out during carotid endarterectomy. This surgery remains the ``gold standard'' treatment for carotid stenosis, and intraoperative brain oxygenation monitoring may improve the safety of this procedure. A time-resolved optical imager was utilized within the operating theater. This instrument allows for the simultaneous acquisition of 32 distributions of the time-of-flight of photons at two wavelengths on both hemispheres. Analysis of the statistical moments of the measured distributions of the time-of-flight of photons was applied for estimating changes in the absorption coefficient as a function of depth. Time courses of changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin of the extra- and intracerebral compartments during cross-clamping of the carotid arteries were obtained. A decrease in the oxyhemoglobin concentration and an increase in the deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were observed in a large area of the head. Large changes were observed in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the site of clamped carotid arteries. Smaller amplitude changes were noted at the contralateral site. We also found that changes in the hemoglobin signals, as estimated from intracerebral tissue, are very sensitive to clamping of the internal carotid artery, whereas its sensitivity to clamping of the external carotid artery is limited. We concluded that intraoperative multichannel measurements allow for imaging of brain tissue hemodynamics. However, when monitoring the brain during carotid surgery, a single-channel measurement may be

  6. Time-Resolved Measurements of Suprathermal Ion Transport Induced by Intermittent Plasma Blob Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovet, A; Fasoli, A; Furno, I

    2014-11-28

    Suprathermal ion turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is generally nondiffusive, ranging from subdiffusive to superdiffusive depending on the interplay of the turbulent structures and the suprathermal ion orbits. Here, we present time-resolved measurements of the cross-field suprathermal ion transport in a toroidal magnetized turbulent plasma. Measurements in the superdiffusive regime are characterized by a higher intermittency than in the subdiffusive regime. Using conditional averaging, we show that, when the transport is superdiffusive, suprathermal ions are transported by intermittent field-elongated turbulent structures that are radially propagating.

  7. Time-resolved photoluminescence of cubic Mg doped GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.; Gaspar, C.; Monteiro, T.; Pereira, E.; Schoettker, B.; Frey, T.; As, D.J.; Schikora, D.; Lischka, K.

    1999-07-01

    Mg doped cubic GaN layers were studied by steady state and time resolved photoluminescence. The blue emission due to Mg doping can be decomposed in three bands. The decay curves and the spectral shift with time delays indicates donor-acceptor pair behavior. This can be confirmed by excitation density dependent measurements. Furthermore temperature dependent analysis shows that the three emissions have one impurity in common. The authors propose that this is an acceptor level related to the Mg incorporation and the three deep donor levels are due to compensation effects.

  8. A high sensitivity time-resolved microfluorimeter for real-time cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, M. L.; Tobin, M. J.; Clarke, D. T.; Gregory, C. M.; Jones, G. R.

    1996-10-01

    We describe an instrument based on the novel combination of synchrotron radiation, a high sensitivity time-resolved microfluorimeter, and a multiframe single photon counting data acquisition system. This instrument has been designed specifically to measure kinetic events in live cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and is capable of rapidly collecting multiple consecutive decay profiles from a small number of fluorophores. The low irradiance on the samples (measurements over periods of hours. A very low limit of detection (measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer are used to monitor the degree of clustering of epidermal growth factor receptors during endocytosis, over a period of about 1 h, with a 5 s resolution.

  9. Coalescence dynamics of size-selected gold clusters studied by time-resolved transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Foster, D.; Li, Z. Y.; Wilkinson, N.; Yuan, J.

    2017-09-01

    Coalescence dynamics of size-selected gold (Au) clusters (each with nominal 923 atoms), on amorphous Si3N4 substrate at room temperature, has been studied via time-resolved transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that the clusters approached each other in two stages. In the first stage, the drift velocity was independent of the particle separation and could be attributed to beam-induced random motion. In the second stage, the clusters were found to jump into contact with a much higher final averaged speed. This is independent of beam dose rates and is attributed to the van der Waal attraction.

  10. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  11. Time-Resolved Imaging and Manipulation of H2 Fragmentation in Intense Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2005-08-01

    We report on the experimental realization of time-resolved coincident Coulomb explosion imaging of H2 fragmentation in 1014 W/cm2 laser fields. Combining a high-resolution “reaction microscope” and a fs pump-probe setup, we map the motion of wave packets dissociating via one- or two-photon channels, respectively, and observe a new region of enhanced ionization. The long-term interferometric stability of our system allows us to extend pump-probe experiments into the region of overlapping pulses, which offers new possibilities for the manipulation of ultrafast molecular fragmentation dynamics.

  12. Measurements of Turbulent Convection Speeds in Multistream Jets Using Time-Resolved PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Convection speeds of turbulent velocities in jets, including multi-stream jets with and without flight stream, were measured using an innovative application of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The paper describes the unique instrumentation and data analysis that allows the measurement to be made. Extensive data is shown that relates convection speed, mean velocity, and turbulent velocities for multiple jet cases. These data support the overall observation that the local turbulent convection speed is roughly that of the local mean velocity, biased by the relative intensity of turbulence.

  13. Measurements of Turbulence Convection Speeds in Multistream Jets Using Time-Resolved PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Convection speeds of turbulent velocities in jets, including multi-stream jets with and without flight stream, were measured using an innovative application of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The paper describes the unique instrumentation and data analysis that allows the measurement to be made. Extensive data is shown that relates convection speed, mean velocity, and turbulent velocities for multiple jet cases. These data support the overall observation that the local turbulent convection speed is roughly that of the local mean velocity, biased by the relative intensity of turbulence.

  14. Sudden polarization in the twisted, phantom state of tetraphenylethylene detected by time-resolved microwave conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuddeboom, W.; Jonker, S.A.; Warman, J.M.; Haas, M.P. de; Vermeulen, M.J.W. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Jager, W.F.; Lange, B. de; Feringa, B.L. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)); Fessenden, R.W. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States))

    1993-04-21

    Photoexcitation of the symmetrical molecules tetraphenylethylene and tetra-p-methoxyphenylethylene dissolved in saturated hydrocarbon solvents results in a transient increase in the dielectric loss of the solutions as monitored using the nanosecond time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) technique. This provides direct evidence for the dipolar, or [open quotes]zwitterionic,[close quotes] nature of the [sup 1]p* phantom state formed from S[sub 1] by rotation around the central carbon-carbon bond. Dipole relaxation occurs mainly by charge inversion between the two energetically equivalent zwitterionic configurations. Z[sub [+-

  15. Time-resolved ultraviolet photoluminescence of ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Zhou, Xiaohong; Nukui, Takao; Saeki, Yu; Izumi, Sotaro; Tackeuchi, Atsushi; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Liang, Shuhua

    2014-02-01

    The ultraviolet photoluminescence of ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer grown by the thermal oxidation of ZnS with gallium was investigated by the time-resolved photoluminescence as a function of measuring temperature and excitation power. With increase of excitation power, the D0X emission is easily saturated than the DAP emission from ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer, and which is dramatically enhanced as compared with that from pure ZnO layer grown without gallium. The radiative recombination process with ultra-long lifetime controlled the carrier recombination of ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer.

  16. Ionic contrast terahertz time resolved imaging of frog auricular heart muscle electrical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Gallot, Guilhem

    2006-10-01

    The authors demonstrate the direct, noninvasive and time resolved imaging of functional frog auricular fibers by ionic contrast terahertz (ICT) near field microscopy. This technique provides quantitative, time-dependent measurement of ionic flow during auricular muscle electrical activity, and opens the way of direct noninvasive imaging of cardiac activity under stimulation. ICT microscopy technique was associated with full three-dimensional simulation enabling to measure precisely the fiber sizes. This technique coupled to waveguide technology should provide the grounds to development of advanced in vivo ion flux measurement in mammalian hearts, allowing the prediction of heart attack from change in K+ fluxes.

  17. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckl, C., E-mail: csto@lle.rochester.edu; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  18. Hole emission from Ge/Si quantum dots studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapteyn, C.M.A.; Lion, M.; Heitz, R.; Bimberg, D. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Miesner, C.; Asperger, T.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik

    2001-03-01

    Emission of holes from self-organized Ge quantum dots (QDs) embedded in Si Schottky diodes is studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS signal is rather broad and depends strongly on the filling and detection bias conditions. The observed dependence is interpreted in terms of carrier emission from many-hole states of the QDs. The activation energies obtained from the DLTS measurements are a function of the amount of stored charge and the position of the Fermi level in the QDs. (orig.)

  19. Photoemission with high-order harmonics: A tool for time-resolved core-level spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Holl; Raarup, Merete Krog; Balling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A setup for femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of solid surfaces is presented. The photon energies for core-level spectroscopy experiments are created by high-order harmonic generation from infrared 120-femtosecond laser pulses focused in a Ne gas jet. The present experimental...... realization allows the sample, located in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, to be illuminated by 106 65-eV photons per laser pulse at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The spectral width of a single harmonic is 0.77 eV (FWHM), and a few harmonics are selected by specially designed Mo/Si multi-layer mirrors. Photoelectrons...

  20. Two-dimensional time resolved measurements of the electron temperature in MST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Assocation, Padova (Italy); Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Assocation, Padova (Italy); Univ. di Padova, Padova, (Italy). Dipart. di Fisica; Marrelli, L. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Assocation, Padova (Italy); Martin, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Assocation, Padova (Italy); Univ. di Padova, Padova, (Italy). Dipart. di Fisica; Piovesan, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Assocation, Padova (Italy); Spizzo, G. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Assocation, Padova (Italy); Chapman, B. E. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Craig, D. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas; Den Hartog, D. J. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas; Goetz, J. A. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; O’Connell, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Prager, S. C. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas; Reyfman, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sarff, J. S. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) time resolved images of the electron temperature profile in the core of the MST reversed field pinchplasma are presented. The measurements have been obtained with a soft x-ray (SXR) tomographic diagnostic comprised of four cameras, each with a multichannel photodiode array, viewing the plasma from different poloidal angles, with a total of 74 channels. The 2D electron temperature profile is estimated by simultaneously measuring the SXR emissivity through different beryllium foils using the standard double-filter technique. With these methods, fast temperature variation in the core of the plasma (up to 100 kHz) can be analyzed.

  1. Time resolved bovine host reponse to virulence factors mapped in milk by selected reaction monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    to gram-positive and gram-negative cell wall components. The results demonstrated that the extent of protein regulation is much larger after challenge with LPS than with PGN underpinning the growing evidence that gram-negative bacteria cause a far more acute host response than gram-positive bacteria...... in milk samples from cows challenged with peptidoglycan (PGN) from the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli for 54 hours. This method allowed for the first time a thorough proteome analysis of the time-resolved response...

  2. A sensitive time-resolved radiation pyrometer for shock-temperature measurements above 1500 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The general design, calibration, and performance of a new high-sensitivity radiation pyrometer are described. The pyrometer can determine time-resolved temperatures (as low as 1500 K) in shocked materials by measuring the spectral radiance of light emitted from shocked solid samples in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (0.5-1.0 micron). The high sensitivity of the radiation pyrometer is attributed to the large angular aperture (0.06 sr), the large bandwidth per channel (up to 0.1 micron), the large photodiode detection areas (1.0 sq cm), and the small number of calibrated channels (4) among which light is divided.

  3. Optical and x-ray time resolved study of the structural transition in mixed valence manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Q. X.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved optical reflectivity and x-ray diffraction techniques are employed to study the laser-induced structural response in two charge and orbitally ordered manganites. Optical data indicate a non-thermal nature of the laser-triggered phase transition via the disappearance of an optical phonon related to the charge and orbitally ordered phase. The x-ray diffraction measurements on superlattice reflections confirm the non-thermal time scale of the initial step of this phase transition but also show that the complete change of structural symmetry is not instantaneous.

  4. Application of time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to study femtosecond damage process in thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Å iaulys, Nerijus; Gallais, Laurent; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2013-11-01

    An imaging of strongly excited thin film dielectric coating is done by the means of femtosecond time-resolved off-axis digital holography (TRDH). Ta2O5 single layer coating have been investigated at different time moments in transmission mode. The evolving damage process was recorded in series of microscopic amplitude and phase contrast images. Different processes were found to occur and namely: Kerr effect, free-electron generation, ultrafast lattice heating and shock wave generation. The trends in electronic contribution are qualitatively reproduced by the theoretical model while the other effects require additional studies.

  5. Performance of the Time Resolved Spectrometer for the 5 MeV Photo-Injector PHIN

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegaard, M; Mete, O; Csatari, M; Dabrowski, A; Dobert, S; Lefevre, T; Petrarca, M

    2011-01-01

    The PHIN photo-injector test facility is being commissioned at CERN to demonstrate the capability to produce the required beam for the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3), which includes the production of a 3.5A stable beam, bunched at 1.5 GHz with a relative energy spread of less than 1%. A 90◦ spectrometer is instrumented with an OTR screen coupled to a gated intensified camera, followed by a segmented beam dump for time resolved energy measurements. The following paper describes the transverse and temporal resolution of the instrumentation with an outlook towards single-bunch energy measurements.

  6. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-08-22

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115–54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201–41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651–9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237–51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5–20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242–6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445–50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725–9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We

  7. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measurements at the APS. PMID:22713903

  8. Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical model for thermal quenching in quartz, based on the previously suggested Mott–Seitz mechanism. In the model electrons from a dosimetric trap are raised by optical or thermal stimulation into the conduction band, followed by an electronic transition from...... simulations are carried out of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) experiments, in which the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes in quartz is studied as a function of the stimulation temperature. Good quantitative agreement is found between the simulation results and new...... experimental data obtained using a single-aliquot procedure on a sedimentary quartz sample....

  9. Time resolved temperature measurement of polymer surface irradiated by mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Oyama, Takahiro; Imai, Takayuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2017-08-01

    We have developed the time-resolved temperature measurement system by using a radiation thermometer FLIR SC620. Temporal temperature profiles of an acrylic resin surface by the irradiation of infrared free electron laser (FEL) pulse were recorded in an 8 ms resolution to measure an instantaneous temperature rise and decay profile. Under the single-shot condition, a peak temperature defined as the temperature jump from the ambient temperature was found to be proportional to the absorbance. Under the multi-shot condition, the temperature accumulation was found to reach a roughly constant value where the supply and release of the heat is balanced.

  10. Time-resolved SAXS measurements facilitated by online HPLC buffer exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Malene Hillerup; Toft, Katrine Nørgaard; David, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    be possible to separate contributions from individual species present in solution. Hence, time-resolved SAXS (TR-SAXS) data of processes in development can be analyzed. Many reported TR-SAXS results are initialized by a sudden change in buffer conditions facilitated by rapid mixing combined with either...... continuous or stopped flow. In this paper a method for obtaining TR-SAXS data from systems where the reaction is triggered by removal of a species is presented. This method is based on fast buffer exchange over a short desalting column facilitated by an online HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography...

  11. Time resolved IR-LIGS experiments for gas-phase trace detection and temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantoni, R.; Giorgi, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Snels, M. [CNR, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy). Istituto per i Materiali Speciali; Latzel, H.

    1997-01-01

    Time resolved Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy (LIGS) has been performed to detect different gases in mixtures at atmospheric pressure or higher. The possibility of trace detection of minor species and of temperature measurements has been demonstrated for various molecular species either of environmental interest or involved in combustion processes. In view of the application of tracing unburned hydrocarbons in combustion chambers, the coupling of the IR-LIGS technique with imaging detection has been considered and preliminary results obtained in small size ethylene/air flames are shown.

  12. An efficient and accurate approach to MTE-MART for time-resolved tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. P.; Scarano, F.

    2015-03-01

    The motion-tracking-enhanced MART (MTE-MART; Novara et al. in Meas Sci Technol 21:035401, 2010) has demonstrated the potential to increase the accuracy of tomographic PIV by the combined use of a short sequence of non-simultaneous recordings. A clear bottleneck of the MTE-MART technique has been its computational cost. For large datasets comprising time-resolved sequences, MTE-MART becomes unaffordable and has been barely applied even for the analysis of densely seeded tomographic PIV datasets. A novel implementation is proposed for tomographic PIV image sequences, which strongly reduces the computational burden of MTE-MART, possibly below that of regular MART. The method is a sequential algorithm that produces a time-marching estimation of the object intensity field based on an enhanced guess, which is built upon the object reconstructed at the previous time instant. As the method becomes effective after a number of snapshots (typically 5-10), the sequential MTE-MART (SMTE) is most suited for time-resolved sequences. The computational cost reduction due to SMTE simply stems from the fewer MART iterations required for each time instant. Moreover, the method yields superior reconstruction quality and higher velocity field measurement precision when compared with both MART and MTE-MART. The working principle is assessed in terms of computational effort, reconstruction quality and velocity field accuracy with both synthetic time-resolved tomographic images of a turbulent boundary layer and two experimental databases documented in the literature. The first is the time-resolved data of flow past an airfoil trailing edge used in the study of Novara and Scarano (Exp Fluids 52:1027-1041, 2012); the second is a swirling jet in a water flow. In both cases, the effective elimination of ghost particles is demonstrated in number and intensity within a short temporal transient of 5-10 frames, depending on the seeding density. The increased value of the velocity space

  13. Distribution of 45S rDNA in Modern Rose Cultivars (Rosa hybrida), Rosa rugosa, and Their Interspecific Hybrids Revealed by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Liu; Xu, Ting-Liang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Le; Yu, Chao; Dong, Gui-Min; Pan, Hui-Tang; Zhang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of the location and number of rDNA loci in the process of polyploidization in the genus Rosa, we examined 45S rDNA sites in the chromosomes of 6 modern rose cultivars (R. hybrida), 5 R. rugosa cultivars, and 20 hybrid progenies by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Variation in the number of rDNA sites in parents and their interspecific hybrids was detected. As expected, 4 rDNA sites were observed in the genomes of 4 modern rose cultivars, while 3 hybridization sites were observed in the 2 others. Two expected rDNA sites were found in 2 R. rugosa cultivars, while in the other 3 R. rugosa cultivars 4 sites were present. Among the 20 R. hybrida × R. rugosa offspring, 13 carried the expected number of rDNA sites, and 1 had 6 hybridization sites, which exceeded the expected number by far. The other 6 offspring had either 2 or 3 hybridization sites, which was less than expected. Differences in the number of rDNA loci were observed in interspecific offspring, indicating that rDNA loci exhibit instability after distant hybridization events. Abnormal chromosome pairing may be the main factor explaining the variation in rDNA sites during polyploidization. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A Catalytic Path for Electrolyte Reduction in Lithium-Ion Cells Revealed by in Situ Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei

    2015-03-11

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Although controlling the interfacial chemistry of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is crucial for maintaining the reversibility, electrolyte decomposition has not been fully understood. In this study, electrolyte decomposition on model electrode surfaces (Au and Sn) was investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Simultaneously obtained ATR-FTIR spectra and cyclic voltammetry measurements show that lithium ethylene dicarbonate and lithium propionate form on the Au electrode at 0.6 V, whereas diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate and lithium propionate form on the Sn electrode surface at 1.25 V. A noncatalytic reduction path on the Au surface and a catalytic reduction path on the Sn surface are introduced to explain the surface dependence of the overpotential and product selectivity. This represents a new concept for explaining electrolyte reactions on the anode of LIBs. The present investigation shows that catalysis plays a dominant role in the electrolyte decomposition process and has important implications in electrode surface modification and electrolyte recipe selection, which are critical factors for enhancing the efficiency, durability, and reliability of LIBs.

  15. Genomic in situ hybridization reveals both auto- and allopolyploid origins of different North and Central American hexaploid potato (Solanum sect. Petota) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendinen, Galina; Spooner, David M; Jiang, Jiming; Gavrilenko, Tatjana

    2012-06-01

    Wild potato ( Solanum L. sect. Petota Dumort.) species contain diploids (2n = 2x = 24) to hexaploids (2n = 6x = 72). J.G. Hawkes classified all hexaploid Mexican species in series Demissa Bukasov and, according to a classic five-genome hypothesis of M. Matsubayashi in 1991, all members of series Demissa are allopolyploids. We investigated the genome composition of members of Hawkes's series Demissa with genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), using labeled DNA of their putative progenitors having diploid AA, BB, or PP genome species or with DNA of tetraploid species having AABB or AAA(a)A(a) genomes. GISH analyses support S. hougasii Correll as an allopolyploid with one AA component genome and another BB component genome. Our results also indicate that the third genome of S. hougasii is more closely related to P or a P genome-related species. Solanum demissum Lindl., in contrast, has all three chromosome sets related to the basic A genome, similar to the GISH results of polyploid species of series Acaulia Juz. Our results support a more recent taxonomic division of the Mexican hexaploid species into two groups: the allopolyploid Iopetala group containing S. hougasii, and an autopolyploid Acaulia group containing S. demissum with South American species S. acaule Bitter and S. albicans (Ochoa) Ochoa.

  16. Development of functionalized terbium fluorescent nanoparticles for antibody labeling and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Tan, Mingqian; Wang, Guilan; Yuan, Jingli

    2005-01-15

    Silica-based functionalized terbium fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and developed as a fluorescence probe for antibody labeling and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. The nanoparticles were prepared in a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion containing a strongly fluorescent Tb(3+) chelate, N,N,N(1),N(1)-[2,6-bis(3'-aminomethyl-1'-pyrazolyl)phenylpyridine] tetrakis(acetate)-Tb(3+) (BPTA-Tb(3+)), Triton X-100, octanol, and cyclohexane by controlling copolymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino]propyl-trimethoxysilane (AEPS) with ammonia water. The characterizations by transmission electron microscopy and fluorometric methods show that the nanoparticles are spherical and uniform in size, 45 +/- 3nm in diameter, strongly fluorescent with fluorescence quantum yield of 10% and a long fluorescence lifetime of 2.0ms. The amino groups directly introduced to the nanoparticle's surface by using AEPS in the preparation made the surface modification and bioconjugation of the nanoparticles easier. The nanoparticle-labeled anti-human alpha-fetoprotein antibody was prepared and used for time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum samples. The assay response is linear from 0.10ngml(-1) to about 100ngml(-1) with the detection limit of 0.10ngml(-1). The coefficient variations (CVs) of the method are less than 9.0%, and the recoveries are in the range of 84-98% for human serum sample measurements.

  17. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miaja-Avila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3  keV spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe(2,2^{′}-bipyridine_{3}]^{2+} and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  18. Real-time digital signal processing in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2016-03-01

    The use of multiphoton interactions in biological tissue for imaging contrast requires highly sensitive optical measurements. These often involve signal processing and filtering steps between the photodetector and the data acquisition device, such as photon counting and lock-in amplification. These steps can be implemented as real-time digital signal processing (DSP) elements on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) devices, an approach that affords much greater flexibility than commercial photon counting or lock-in devices. We will present progress toward developing two new FPGA-based DSP devices for multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy applications. The first is a high-speed multiharmonic lock-in amplifier for transient absorption microscopy, which is being developed for real-time analysis of the intensity-dependence of melanin, with applications in vivo and ex vivo (noninvasive histopathology of melanoma and pigmented lesions). The second device is a kHz lock-in amplifier running on a low cost (50-200) development platform. It is our hope that these FPGA-based DSP devices will enable new, high-speed, low-cost applications in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy.

  19. Key Intermediates in Ribosome Recycling Visualized by Time-Resolved Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ziao; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Borg, Anneli; Sun, Ming; Chen, Bo; Grassucci, Robert A; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2016-12-06

    Upon encountering a stop codon on mRNA, polypeptide synthesis on the ribosome is terminated by release factors, and the ribosome complex, still bound with mRNA and P-site-bound tRNA (post-termination complex, PostTC), is split into ribosomal subunits, ready for a new round of translational initiation. Separation of post-termination ribosomes into subunits, or "ribosome recycling," is promoted by the joint action of ribosome-recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis-dependent manner. Here we used a mixing-spraying-based method of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize the short-lived intermediates of the recycling process. The two complexes that contain (1) both RRF and EF-G bound to the PostTC or (2) deacylated tRNA bound to the 30S subunit are of particular interest. Our observations of the native form of these complexes demonstrate the strong potential of time-resolved cryo-EM for visualizing previously unobservable transient structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of female breast lesions from multi-wavelength time-resolved optical mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Lorenzo [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Torricelli, Alessandro [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Pifferi, Antonio [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Taroni, Paola [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Danesini, Gianmaria [Dipartimento di Radiologia, Casa di Cura S. Pio X, via Francesco Nava 31, I-20159 Milan (Italy); Cubeddu, Rinaldo [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2005-06-07

    Characterization of both malignant and benign lesions in the female breast is presented as the result of a clinical study that involved more than 190 subjects in the framework of the OPTIMAMM European project. All the subjects underwent optical mammography, by means of a multi-wavelength time-resolved mammograph, in the range 637-985 nm. Optical images were processed by applying a perturbation model, relying on a nonlinear approximation of time-resolved transmittance curves in the presence of an inclusion, with the aim of estimating the major tissue constituents (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-haemoglobin, lipid and water) and structural parameters (linked to dimension and density of the scatterer centres) for both the lesion area and the surrounding tissue. The critical factors for the application of the perturbation model on in vivo data are also discussed. Forty-six malignant and 68 benign lesions were analysed. A subset of 32 cancers, 40 cysts and 14 fibroadenomas were found reliable for the perturbation analysis. For cancers, we show a higher blood content with respect to the surrounding tissue, while cysts are characterized by a lower concentration of scattering centres with respect to the surrounding tissue. For fibroadenomas, the low number of cases does not allow any definite conclusions.

  1. Molecular Tomography of the Quantum State by Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ischenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is described that can be used to reconstruct the quantum state of a molecular ensemble from time-dependent internuclear probability density functions determined by time-resolved electron diffraction. The procedure makes use of established techniques for evaluating the density matrix and the phase-space joint probability density, that is, the Wigner function. A novel expression for describing electron diffraction intensities in terms of the Wigner function is presented. An approximate variant of the method, neglecting the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix, was tested by analyzing gas electron diffraction data for N2 in a Boltzmann distribution and TRED data obtained from the 193 nm photodissociation of CS2 to carbon monosulfide, CS, at 20, 40, and 120 ns after irradiation. The coherent changes in the nuclear subsystem by time-resolved electron diffraction method determine the fundamental transition from the standard kinetics to the dynamics of the phase trajectory of the molecule and the tomography of molecular quantum state.

  2. Development of a High-Speed Digitizer to Time Resolve Nanosecond Fluorescence Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Moreno-García

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of a high-speed digitizer system to measure time-domain voltage pulses in nanoseconds range is presented in this work. The digitizer design includes a high performance digital signal processor, a high-bandwidth analog-to-digital converter of flash-type, a set of delay lines, and a computer to achieve the time-domain measurements. A program running on the processor applies a time-equivalent sampling technique to acquire the input pulse. The processor communicates with the computer via a serial port RS-232 to receive commands and to transmit data. A control program written in LabVIEW 7.1 starts an acquisition routine in the processor. The program reads data from processor point by point in each occurrence of the signal, and plots each point to recover the time-resolved input pulse after n occurrences. The developed prototype is applied to measure fluorescence pulses from a homemade spectrometer. For this application, the LabVIEW program was improved to control the spectrometer, and to register and plot time-resolved fluorescence pulses produced by a substance. The developed digitizer has 750 MHz of analog input bandwidth, and it is able to resolve 2 ns rise-time pulses with 150 ps of resolution and a temporal error of 2.6 percent.

  3. Determination of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria based on time-resolved fluorescence and tandem probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoxiao; Li, Zhizhang; Niu, Chenggang; Ruan, Min; Hang, Dawei; Zeng, Guangming

    2012-01-01

    To study the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), quantitative techniques are essential. In this report, the authors introduced an innovative method based on time-resolved fluorescence to quantify AOB as a representative of the major functional microorganisms in sewage water treatment. A bifunctional europium complex with the characteristics of long lifetime and intense luminescence was used as labels in the experiments. In the detection, the capture probe and dye-labeled reporter probe could form a two-probe tandem with the target sequence, and the determination of target DNA was done by monitoring the time-resolved fluorescence signals of europium complex-labeled reporter probe left on the glass slide surface. The experiment conditions consisting of concentration of capture probe, hybridization temperature, hybridization time and washing time were optimized. This method presents satisfactory specificity to common bacteria such as Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Escherichia coli and Paenibacillus polymyxa. The detection limit was 3.65 × 10(-11)mol L(-1). This detection system enables us to rapidly and sensitively analyze the microbial population variety in sewage water treatment.

  4. Assessment of swirl spray interaction in lab scale combustor using time-resolved measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, Kuppuraj; Jain, Manish; Basu, Saptarshi

    2017-11-01

    Liquid fuel injection in highly turbulent swirling flows becomes common practice in gas turbine combustors to improve the flame stabilization. It is well known that the vortex bubble breakdown (VBB) phenomenon in strong swirling jets exhibits complicated flow structures in the spatial domain. In this study, the interaction of hollow cone liquid sheet with such coaxial swirling flow field has been studied experimentally using time-resolved measurements. In particular, much attention is focused towards the near field breakup mechanism (i.e. primary atomization) of liquid sheet. The detailed swirling gas flow field characterization is carried out using time-resolved PIV ( 3.5 kHz). Furthermore, the complicated breakup mechanisms and interaction of the liquid sheet are imaged with the help of high-speed shadow imaging system. Subsequently, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is implemented over the instantaneous data sets to retrieve the modal information associated with the interaction dynamics. This helps to delineate more quantitative nature of interaction process between the liquid sheet and swirling gas phase flow field.

  5. Time-resolved structural studies of protein reaction dynamics: a smorgasbord of X-ray approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Katona, Gergely; Neutze, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Proteins undergo conformational changes during their biological function. As such, a high-resolution structure of a protein's resting conformation provides a starting point for elucidating its reaction mechanism, but provides no direct information concerning the protein's conformational dynamics. Several X-ray methods have been developed to elucidate those conformational changes that occur during a protein's reaction, including time-resolved Laue diffraction and intermediate trapping studies on three-dimensional protein crystals, and time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption studies on proteins in the solution phase. This review emphasizes the scope and limitations of these complementary experimental approaches when seeking to understand protein conformational dynamics. These methods are illustrated using a limited set of examples including myoglobin and haemoglobin in complex with carbon monoxide, the simple light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, and the superoxide scavenger superoxide reductase. In conclusion, likely future developments of these methods at synchrotron X-ray sources and the potential impact of emerging X-ray free-electron laser facilities are speculated upon.

  6. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  7. Efficiency estimates and practical aspects of an optical Kerr gate for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitruk, I.; Shynkarenko, Ye; Dmytruk, A.; Aleksiuk, D.; Kadan, V.; Korenyuk, P.; Zubrilin, N.; Blonskiy, I.

    2016-12-01

    We report experience of assembling an optical Kerr gate setup at the Femtosecond Laser Center for collective use at the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. This offers an inexpensive solution to the problem of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Practical aspects of its design and alignment are discussed and its main characteristics are evaluated. Theoretical analysis and numerical estimates are performed to evaluate the efficiency and the response time of an optical Kerr gate setup for fluorescence spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution. The theoretically calculated efficiency is compared with the experimentally measured one of ~12% for Crown 5 glass and ~2% for fused silica. Other characteristics of the Kerr gate are analyzed and ways to improve them are discussed. A method of compensation for the refractive index dispersion in a Kerr gate medium is suggested. Examples of the application of the optical Kerr gate setup for measurements of the time-resolved luminescence of Astra Phloxine and Coumarin 30 dyes and both linear and nonlinear chirp parameters of a supercontinuum are presented.

  8. Denoising time-resolved microscopy image sequences with singular value thresholding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnival, Tom, E-mail: tjof2@cam.ac.uk; Leary, Rowan K., E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk; Midgley, Paul A., E-mail: pam33@cam.ac.uk

    2017-07-15

    Time-resolved imaging in microscopy is important for the direct observation of a range of dynamic processes in both the physical and life sciences. However, the image sequences are often corrupted by noise, either as a result of high frame rates or a need to limit the radiation dose received by the sample. Here we exploit both spatial and temporal correlations using low-rank matrix recovery methods to denoise microscopy image sequences. We also make use of an unbiased risk estimator to address the issue of how much thresholding to apply in a robust and automated manner. The performance of the technique is demonstrated using simulated image sequences, as well as experimental scanning transmission electron microscopy data, where surface adatom motion and nanoparticle structural dynamics are recovered at rates of up to 32 frames per second. - Highlights: • Correlations in space and time are harnessed to denoise microscopy image sequences. • A robust estimator provides automated selection of the denoising parameter. • Motion tracking and automated noise estimation provides a versatile algorithm. • Application to time-resolved STEM enables study of atomic and nanoparticle dynamics.

  9. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  10. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy for the combustion analysis of series production engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Bernd; Moeser, Petra; Hentschel, Werner

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents a device that detects light emerging from the combustion inside a series production automotive engine. Simultaneous time and wavelength resolution is achieved by this system and it can be applied in a simple manner to either diesel or spark ignition (SI) engines without any geometrical modification or the combustion chamber. An optical probe is inserted into spark plug or glow plug. A fiber is connected to the probe and leads the light to a spectrograph, which provides spectral analysis in the UV and visible wavelength ranges. An intensified streak camera with time resolution in the microsecond range completes the detection unit. This measuring system enables time-resolved emission spectroscopy applied to the light emitted during the combustion in a series production engine. Time-resolved emission spectra are presented from both a diesel and an SI engine. The time behavior of the internal temperature in a diesel engine combustion chamber and its dependence on engine speed and load are measured with this setup using a multiple two-color method. In an SI engine, the time behavior of the emissions of specific molecules or radicals is detected. Thus, differences in the combustion process are demonstrated to be caused by operation with different fuels.

  11. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  12. A hyperspectral time resolved DOT system to monitor physiological changes of the human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, F.; Peyrin, F.; Montcel, B.

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a growing area of research in the field of biomedical optics and neurosciences. Over the past 20 years, technical development allowed a more and more accurate detection of the brain activation, both spatially and in the calculation of the variations of chromophores's concentrations such as Hemoglobin, cytochrome c oxidase, etc. In particular, time resolved systems are able to distinguish between superficial layers (skin, skull) and deep layers (brain) allowing the differentiation between the systemic response and the response of the brain. In order to increase the accuracy of the brain's activation detection, we have developed a Hyperspectral Time Resolved DOT system. It is composed of a compact supercontinuum laser within the picosecond range for the source part and of an ICCD camera coupled with an imaging spectrometer for the detection part. This allows a simultaneous detection of the spatial and spectral dimension, as well as the time of flight of photons. Through the information acquired by our system, we've been able to retrieve, to our knowledge, the first spectrum of the physiology of the human brain activity as function as depth. Here we present the instrument and show our first in-vivo results that are demonstrating its capabilities to distinguish between the skin's response and the brain's responses during a cognitive task. We are also focused on the detection of the Fast Optical Signal.

  13. Time-Resolved WAXD and FTIR Studies on Imidization-Induced Molecular Ordering in Polyimide Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Moonhor; Shin, Tae Joo; Lee, Byeongdu; Wang, Xiaodong; Youn, Hwa Shik; Lee, Ki-Bong

    2000-03-01

    In general, aromatic polyimides are not melt-processable and not soluble in common solvents so that they are always processed in their soluble precursor forms and followed by imidization. Most poyimide precursors are poorly ordered in the solid state but molecular ordering develops during imidization. In this study, the imidization-induced molecular ordering in precursors of PMDA-ODA polyimide was examined in detail by time-resolved wide-angle X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation source at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory while the degree of imidization was monitored by time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy. The imidization was conducted isothermally and non-isothermally over 20-400 C under nitrogen atmosphere. The imidization behavior was dependent on the precursor types: polyamic acid started to imidize at 120 C while polyamic diethyl ester began to imidize at 190 C. The molecular ordering was strongly dependent on the degree of imidization: the molecular ordering was found to be developed as the imidization began. The molecular ordering behavior will be discussed in detail with considering precursor types and their imidization kinetics. [This study was supported in part by the Ministry of Industry and the Ministry of Science & Technology (G7 Project Program) and by POSCO].

  14. Time-Resolved Fluorometry Based Sandwich Hybridisation Assay for HLA-DQA1 Typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Sjöroos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A microtitration plate based time-resolved fluorescence (TRF hybridisation assay was developed for HLA typing utilising biotinylated sequence-specific catching probes and europium (Eu labelled gene locus-specific detection probe to allow time-resolved fluorometer reading of the reaction. In an application for HLA-DQA typing a 228 base pair long region of the polymorphic exon 2 of DQA1 gene was amplified and the denatured PCR product distributed into streptavidin-coated microtitration wells together with the detection probe and one of the catching probes. After incubation and washes, the enhancement solution was added and specific hybridisation signal detected by measuring the emitted light. A series of 100 isolated genomic DNA samples were studied using biotinylated probes specific for DQA1*01, *0101/0104, *0103/0201/0601, *0201, *03, *0401/0601, *05 and *0502 alleles with results demonstrating the capacity of the test to detect aimed alleles. A series of whole blood spot samples were also studied and the results confirmed the applicability of this modification of the test.

  15. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  16. Multi-Channel Amplifier-Discriminator for Highly Time-Resolved Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Lapington, J; Jarron, P

    2011-01-01

    A low-power multi-channel amplifier-discriminator was developed for application in highly time-resolved detection systems. The proposed circuit architecture, so-called Nino, is based on a time-over-threshold approach and shows a high potential for time-resolved readout of solid-state photo-detectors and of detectors based on vacuum technologies. The Irpics circuit was designed in a 250 nm CMOS technology, implementing 32 channels of a Nino version optimized to achieve high-time resolution on the output low-voltage differential signals (LVDS) while keeping a low power consumption of 10 mW per channel. Electrical characterizations of the circuit demonstrate a very low intrinsic time jitter on the output pulse leading edge, measured below 10 ps rms for each channel for high input signal charges (100 fC) and below 25 ps rms for low input signal charges (20-100 fC). The read-out architecture moreover permits to retrieve the input signal charge from the timing measurements, while a calibration procedure was develop...

  17. Entangling different-color photons via time-resolved measurement and active feed forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian-Ming; Zhang, Han; Yang, Jian; Sang, Zi-Ru; Jiang, Xiao; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-03-14

    Entangling independent photons is not only of fundamental interest but also of crucial importance for quantum-information science. Two-photon interference is a major method for entangling independent identical photons. If two photons are different in color, perfect two-photon coalescence can no longer happen, which makes the entangling of different-color photons difficult to realize. In this Letter, by exploring and developing time-resolved measurement and active feed forward, we have entangled two independent photons of different colors for the first time. We find that entanglement with a varying form can be identified for different two-photon temporal modes through time-resolved measurement. By using active feed forward, we are able to convert the varying entanglement into uniform entanglement. Adopting these measures, we have successfully entangled two photons with a frequency separation 16 times larger than their linewidths. In addition to its fundamental interest, our work also provides an approach for solving the frequency-mismatch problem for future quantum networks.

  18. In Situ Analysis of Metabolic Characteristics Reveals the Key Yeast in the Spontaneous and Solid-State Fermentation Process of Chinese Light-Style Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yu; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The in situ metabolic characteristics of the yeasts involved in spontaneous fermentation process of Chinese light-style liquor are poorly understood. The covariation between metabolic profiles and yeast communities in Chinese light-style liquor was modeled using the partial least square (PLS) regression method. The diversity of yeast species was evaluated by sequence analysis of the 26S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1/D2 domains of cultivable yeasts, and the volatile compounds in fermented grains were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). Eight yeast species and 58 volatile compounds were identified, respectively. The modulation of 16 of these volatile compounds was associated with variations in the yeast population (goodness of prediction [Q2] > 20%). The results showed that Pichia anomala was responsible for the characteristic aroma of Chinese liquor, through the regulation of several important volatile compounds, such as ethyl lactate, octanoic acid, and ethyl tetradecanoate. Correspondingly, almost all of the compounds associated with P. anomala were detected in a pure culture of this yeast. In contrast to the PLS regression results, however, ethyl lactate and ethyl isobutyrate were not detected in the same pure culture, which indicated that some metabolites could be generated by P. anomala only when it existed in a community with other yeast species. Furthermore, different yeast communities provided different volatile patterns in the fermented grains, which resulted in distinct flavor profiles in the resulting liquors. This study could help identify the key yeast species involved in spontaneous fermentation and provide a deeper understanding of the role of individual yeast species in the community. PMID:24727269

  19. Topological Analysis of HIV-1 Glycoproteins Expressed In Situ on Virus Surfaces Reveals Tighter Packing but Greater Conformational Flexibility than for Soluble gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tommy; Osawa, Keiko; Robinson, James E.; Crooks, Ema T.

    2013-01-01

    In natural infection, antibodies interact with HIV-1 primarily through nonfunctional forms of envelope glycoproteins (Env), including uncleaved (UNC) gp160 and gp41 stumps. These antigens are important to fully characterize, as they may be decoys that promote nonneutralizing responses and may also be targets for nonneutralizing effector responses. In this study, we compared the antigenic properties of Env expressed in situ on pseudovirion virus-like particle (VLP) surfaces and soluble gp120 using harmonized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and a panel of 51 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Only 32 of 46 soluble gp120-reactive MAbs recognized the primary UNC gp160 antigen of VLPs. Indeed, many epitopes were poorly exposed (C1, V2, C1-C4, C4, C4-V3, CD4 induced [CD4i], and PGT group 3) or obscured (C2, C5, and C1-C5) on VLPs. In further studies, VLP Env exhibited an increased degree of inter-MAb competition, the epicenter of which was the base of the V3 loop, where PGT, 2G12, V3, and CD4 binding site specificities competed. UNC gp160 also underwent more drastic soluble CD4 (sCD4)-induced conformational changes than soluble gp120, exposing CD4i, C1-C4, and V2 epitopes. A greater propensity of UNC gp160 to undergo conformational changes was also suggested by the induction of CD4i MAb binding to VLPs by a V3 MAb as well as by soluble CD4. The same effect was not observed for soluble gp120. Taken together, our data suggest that membrane-expressed UNC gp160 exists in a less “triggered” conformational state than soluble gp120 and that MAb binding to UNC gp160 tends to have greater conformational consequences. PMID:23740975

  20. Direct observation of photocarrier electron dynamics in C60 films on graphite by time-resolved two-photon photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Tsutomu; Nakaya, Masato; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is employed to probe the electronic states of a C60 fullerene film formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), acting as a model two-dimensional (2D) material for multi-layered graphene. Owing to the in-plane sp2-hybridized nature of the HOPG, the TR-2PPE spectra reveal the energetics and dynamics of photocarriers in the C60 film: after hot excitons are nascently formed in C60 via intramolecular excitation by a pump photon, they dissociate into photocarriers of free electrons and the corresponding holes, and the electrons are subsequently detected by a probe photon as photoelectrons. The decay rate of photocarriers from the C60 film into the HOPG is evaluated to be 1.31 × 1012 s−1, suggesting a weak van der Waals interaction at the interface, where the photocarriers tentatively occupy the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of C60. The photocarrier electron dynamics following the hot exciton dissociation in the organic thin films has not been realized for any metallic substrates exhibiting strong interactions with the overlayer. Furthermore, the thickness dependence of the electron lifetime in the LUMO reveals that the electron hopping rate in C60 layers is 3.3 ± 1.2 × 1013 s−1. PMID:27775005

  1. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlie, Mortiz

    2013-09-15

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to {sigma} <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at

  2. Time-resolved two-wavelength contouring of adaptive fluidic PDMS-lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Thomas; Grunwald, Ruediger; Steinmeyer, Günter; Griebner, Uwe; Schneider, Florian; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2009-05-01

    We present a synthesized sub-ps dual-wavelength laser source for digital holographic interferometry with a wide reconstruction range. The developed laser source generates two spectrally separated parts within one pulse. The sub-ps pulse duration desensitizes the holographic setup to environmental impacts. A center wavelength distance of only 12 nm with a high contrast was demonstrated by spectral shaping of the 50 nm broad seed spectrum of a CPA Ti:sapphire laser system centered at 800 nm. Time-resolved two-wavelength contouring requires the simultaneous and separable recording of two holograms. In general, a single CCD-camera is applied, and the spectral separation is realized by different reference wave tilts, which requires ambitious interferometric setups. Contrary to this, we introduce two CCD-cameras for digital holographic recording, thus essentially simplifying the interferometric setup by the need of only one propagation direction of the reference wave. To separate the holograms for the simultaneous recording process, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was extended by a polarization encoding sequence. To study our approach of time-resolved digital holographic two-wavelength contouring, an adaptive fluidic PDMS-lens with integrated piezoelectric actuator served as test object. The PDMS-lens consists of an oil-filled lens chamber and a pump actuator. If a voltage is applied to the piezoelectric bending actuator the fluid is pumped into the lens chamber which causes a curvature change of the 60-μm thick lens membrane and thus a shift of the focal length. The dynamic behavior of the PDMS-lens, driven at a frequency of 1 Hz, was investigated at a frame rate of 410 frames per second. The measured temporal change of the lens focal length between 98 and 44 mm followed the modulation of the piezoelectric voltage with a 30 V peak-to-peak amplitude. Due to the performed time-resolved two wavelength contouring, we are able to extract the optical path length differences

  3. An integrated approach using high time-resolved tools to study the origin of aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gilio, A. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); ARPA PUGLIA, Corso Trieste, 27, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gennaro, G. de, E-mail: gianluigi.degennaro@uniba.it [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); ARPA PUGLIA, Corso Trieste, 27, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dambruoso, P. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); ARPA PUGLIA, Corso Trieste, 27, 70126 Bari (Italy); Ventrella, G. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Long-range transport of natural and/or anthropogenic particles can contribute significantly to PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and some European cities often fail to comply with PM daily limit values due to the additional impact of particles from remote sources. For this reason, reliable methodologies to identify long-range transport (LRT) events would be useful to better understand air pollution phenomena and support proper decision-making. This study explores the potential of an integrated and high time-resolved monitoring approach for the identification and characterization of local, regional and long-range transport events of high PM. In particular, the goal of this work was also the identification of time-limited event. For this purpose, a high time-resolved monitoring campaign was carried out at an urban background site in Bari (southern Italy) for about 20 days (1st–20th October 2011). The integration of collected data as the hourly measurements of inorganic ions in PM{sub 2.5} and their gas precursors and of the natural radioactivity, in addition to the analyses of aerosol maps and hourly back trajectories (BT), provided useful information for the identification and chemical characterization of local sources and trans-boundary intrusions. Non-sea salt (nss) sulfate levels were found to increase when air masses came from northeastern Europe and higher dispersive conditions of the atmosphere were detected. Instead, higher nitrate and lower nss-sulfate concentrations were registered in correspondence with air mass stagnation and attributed to local traffic source. In some cases, combinations of local and trans-boundary sources were observed. Finally, statistical investigations such as the principal component analysis (PCA) applied on hourly ion concentrations and the cluster analyses, the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and the Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) models computed on hourly back-trajectories enabled to complete a cognitive

  4. Conventional and Ultrafast Pump-Probe Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jhih-An

    Raman scattering has become an invaluable tool for the study of strongly-correlated systems because it can directly probe phonons, magnetic excitations, and electronic excitations. The extension of Raman scattering to the time domain by using the pump-probe technique allows us to study the femtosecond dynamics under a non-equilibrium condition. Time-resolved Raman scattering thus is able to disentangle different fundamental interactions that are difficult to distinguish in the energy domain by their different temporal evolution. In this thesis we show the development of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy and its applications to investigate non-equilibrium dynamics in novel materials. The first part of this thesis is devoted to using large-shift Raman spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of Sr2IrO4, a spin-orbit-induced Mott insulator. We found two high-energy excitations of the d-shell multiplet at 690 meV and 680 meV with A1g and B1g symmetry respectively. We show that both pseudospin-flip and non-pseudosin-flip dd electronic transitions are Raman active, but only the latter are observed. The second part is devoted to the study of the time dynamics of electron-hole excitations as well as the G-phonon in graphite after an excitation by an intense laser pulse. We found that the increase of the G-phonon population occurs with a delay of ˜65 fs in contradiction with the two-temperature model. This time-delay is also evidenced by the absence of the so-called self-pumping for G phonons. It decreases with increased pump fluence. We show that these observations imply a new relaxation pathway: Instead of hot carriers transferring energy to G-phonons directly, the energy is first transferred to optical phonons near the zone boundary K-points, which then decay into G-phonons via phonon-phonon scattering. In the third part we study magnetic dynamics in insulating YBa2 Cu3O6+x using time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. We observed ultrafast melting of the magnetic order

  5. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankjaergaard, C.

    2010-02-15

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz and feldspar are widely used in accident dosimetry and luminescence dating. In order to improve already existing methods or to develop new methods towards extending the current limits of the technique, it is important to understand the charge movement within these materials. Earlier studies have primarily focussed on examination of the trap behaviour; however, this only tells half of the story as OSL is a combination of charge stimulation and recombination. By using time-resolved OSL (TR-OSL), one can directly examine the recombination route(s), and thus obtain insight into the other half of the process involved in luminescence emission. This thesis studies the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL, continuous-wave OSL, TL, optically stimulated exo-electron (OSE) emission and time-resolved OSE. These different techniques are used in combination with variable thermal or optical stimulation energy. The thesis first delves into three main methodological developments, namely (i) research and development of the equipment for TR-OSL measurements, (ii) finding the best method for multiple-exponential analysis of a TR-OSL curve, and (iii) optimisation of the pulsing configuration for the best separation of quartz OSL from a mixed quarts-feldspar sample. It then proceeds to study the different charge transport mechanisms subsequent to an optical stimulation pulse in quartz and feldspars. The results obtained for quartz conclude that the main lifetime component in quartz represents an excited state lifetime of the recombination centre, and the more slowly decaying components on the millisecond to seconds time scale arise from charge recycling

  6. A genome-wide in situ hybridization map of RNA-binding proteins reveals anatomically restricted expression in the developing mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Charlene

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs contribute to gene expression by regulating the form, abundance, and stability of both coding and non-coding RNA. In the vertebrate brain, RBPs account for many distinctive features of RNA processing such as activity-dependent transcript localization and localized protein synthesis. Several RBPs with activities that are important for the proper function of adult brain have been identified, but how many RBPs exist and where these genes are expressed in the developing brain is uncharacterized. Results Here we describe a comprehensive catalogue of the unique RBPs encoded in the mouse genome and provide an online database of RBP expression in developing brain. We identified 380 putative RBPs in the mouse genome. Using in situ hybridization, we visualized the expression of 323 of these RBP genes in the brains of developing mice at embryonic day 13.5, when critical fate choice decisions are made and at P0, when major structural components of the adult brain are apparent. We demonstrate i that 16 of the 323 RBPs examined show neural-specific expression at the stages we examined, and ii that a far larger subset (221 shows regionally restricted expression in the brain. Of the regionally restricted RBPs, we describe one group that is preferentially expressed in the E13.5 ventricular areas and a second group that shows spatially restricted expression in post-mitotic regions of the embryonic brain. Additionally, we find a subset of RBPs that share the same complex pattern of expression, in proliferating regions of the embryonic and postnatal NS and peripheral tissues. Conclusion Our data show that, in contrast to their proposed ubiquitous involvement in gene regulation, most RBPs are not uniformly expressed. Here we demonstrate the region-specific expression of RBPs in proliferating vs. post-mitotic brain regions as well as cell-type-specific RBP expression. We identify uncharacterized RBPs

  7. Time resolved measurements of cathode fall in high frequency fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrath, S.; Garner, R. C.; Lieder, G. H.; Ehlbeck, J.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements are presented of the time resolved cathode and anode falls of high frequency fluorescent lamps for a range of discharge currents typically encountered in dimming mode. Measurements were performed with the movable anode technique. Supporting spectroscopic emission measurements were made of key transitions (argon 420.1 nm and mercury 435.8 nm), whose onset coincide with cathode fall equalling the value associated with the energy, relative to the ground state, of the upper level of the respective transition. The measurements are in general agreement with the well-known understanding of dimmed lamp operation: peak cathode fall decreases with increasing lamp current and with increasing auxiliary coil heating. However, the time dependence of the measurements offers additional insight.

  8. Optical properties of drying wood studied by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, Keiji; Inagaki, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Ryunosuke; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2016-05-02

    We measured the optical properties of drying wood with the moisture contents ranging from 10% to 200%. By using time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy, the reduced scattering coefficient μs' and absorption coefficient μa were determined independent of each other, providing information on the chemical and structural changes, respectively, of wood on the nanometer scale. Scattering from dry pores dominated, which allowed us to determine the drying process of large pores during the period of constant drying rate, and the drying process of smaller pores during the period of decreasing drying rate. The surface layer and interior of the wood exhibit different moisture states, which affect the scattering properties of the wood.

  9. Time-Resolved Microwave Photoconductivity study of the Photophysics of Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopidakis, Nikos; Ferguson, Andrew; Shaheen, Sean; Rumbles, Garry

    2007-03-01

    Bulk heterojunctions composed of a blend of the polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the acceptor fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) are the prototypical organic photovoltaic devices. The photophysical processes that take place in these structures involve exciton generation and quenching, and free carrier transport, trapping and recombination. To probe these processes we have performed contactless Time-Resolved Microwave Photoconductivity measurements in pure polymer films and in bulk heterojunctions with varying PCBM concentration. We compare our results with various models for free carrier generation in the pure polymer and in the bulk heterojunction and develop a kinetic scheme to describe free carrier generation and recombination that is consistent with our experimental data. We show that exciton quenching in the presence of the acceptor (PCBM) involves first and second order processes that become prevalent at low and high light intensities, respectively.

  10. Time-Resolved Phosphorescence Anisotropy For Measuring Slow Rotational Diffusion In The Erythrocyte Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, A. G.; Czarnecki, J. J.; Blatt, E.; Sawyer, W. H.

    1988-06-01

    The cytoskeletal architecture of a cell controls many cell processes and characteristics (cell shape, motility, endocytosis, cell division, organelle position and movement). Many of these processes involve the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeletal elements, but the highly cross-linked polymer system must, of necessity, possess flexibility and motional freedom. Components of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton (actin, spectrin and band 4.1) may be reconstituted into a ternary complex which forms a viscous cross-linked gel. It is unlikely that this structure is identical to that existing in vivo, however, it does provide a convenient experimental model system in which the rotational motion of the individual components may be studied. We have examined this system using time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy which measures rotational diffusion in the microsecond to millisecond time window.

  11. Time-resolved luminescent biosensing based on inorganic lanthanide-doped nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Tu, Datao; Huang, Ping; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Zhuo; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-03-11

    Time-resolved (TR) photoluminescence (PL) biosensing has been widely adopted in many research and medical institutions. However, commercial molecular TRPL bioprobes like lanthanide (Ln(3+))-chelates suffer from poor photochemical stability and long-term toxicity. Inorganic Ln(3+)-doped nanocrystals (NCs), owing to their superior physicochemical properties over Ln(3+)-chelates, are regarded as a new generation of luminescent nanoprobes for TRPL biosensing. The long-lived PL of Ln(3+)-doped NCs combined with the TRPL technique is able to completely suppress the interference of the short-lived background, resulting in a background-free signal and therefore a remarkable sensitivity for biosensing. In this feature article, we summarize the latest advancements in inorganic Ln(3+)-doped NCs as TRPL nano-bioprobes from their fundamental optical properties to their potential applications for ultrasensitive biodetection and high-resolution bioimaging. Future efforts towards the commercialization of these nanoprobes are also proposed.

  12. Behavior of Time-Resolved Ion Energy Distribution Functions during Ion-Ion Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Komori, Akio; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1993-10-01

    When an external RF field is applied to an ion beam plasma system, ion-ion instability is suppressed at f/fii≳1, where f and fii are the frequency of the external RF field and the peak frequency of the instability, respectively. It is also observed that the time-averaged energy distribution function of the ion beam broadens when the instability is suppressed. In order to investigate the cause of this broadening, time-resolved energy distribution functions of ions are measured with a boxcar integrator. As a result, it is found that the energy distribution functions periodically change with the external RF field and the above broadening is apparently caused by the time-averaging of the energy distribution functions.

  13. Design considerations for a time-resolved tomographic diagnostic at DARHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris I. Kaufman, Daniel Frayer, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Alfred Meidinger

    2006-08-01

    An instrument has been developed to acquire time-resolved tomographic data from the electron beam at the DARHT [Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test] facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument contains four optical lines of sight that view a single tilted object. The lens design optically integrates along one optical axis for each line of sight. These images are relayed via fiber optic arrays to streak cameras, and the recorded streaks are used to reconstruct the original two-dimensional data. Installation of this instrument into the facility requires automation of both the optomechanical adjustments and calibration of the instrument in a constrained space. Additional design considerations include compound tilts on the object and image planes.

  14. Application of POD on time-resolved schlieren in supersonic multi-stream rectangular jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. G.; Magstadt, A. S.; Glauser, M. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of a supersonic rectangular nozzle with aft deck used for three-stream engines. The jet utilizes a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) configuration along with multiple streams, operating at a bulk flow Mj,1 = 1.6 and bypass stream Mj,3 = 1.0. This idealized representation consists of two canonical flows: a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) jet and a sonic wall jet. Time-resolved schlieren experiments were performed up to 100 kHz. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), as suggested by Lumley for structure identification in turbulent flows, is applied to the schlieren images and the spatial eigenfunctions and time-dependent coefficients are related to the flow structures. This research seeks to lay a foundation for fundamental testing of multi-stream SERNs and the identification of the flow physics that dominate these modern military nozzles.

  15. Pseudo-bimolecular [2+2] cycloaddition studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Schalk, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The first study of pseudo-bimolecular cycloaddition reaction dynamics in the gas phase is presented. We used femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) to study the [2+2] photocycloaddition in the model system pseudo-gem-divinyl[2.2]paracyclophane. From X-ray crystal diffraction...... measurements we found that the ground-state molecule can exist in two conformers; a reactive one in which the vinyl groups are immediately situated for [2+2] cycloaddition and a nonreactive conformer in which they point in opposite directions. From the measured S(1) lifetimes we assigned a clear relation...... between the conformation and the excited-state reactivity; the reactive conformer has a lifetime of 13 ps, populating the ground state through a conical intersection leading to [2+2] cycloaddition, whereas the nonreactive conformer has a lifetime of 400 ps. Ab initio calculations were performed to locate...

  16. Time-resolved measurements with intense ultrashort laser pulses: a 'molecular movie' in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2007-11-01

    We report on the high-resolution multidimensional real-time mapping of H2+ and D2+ nuclear wave packets performed employing time-resolved three-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging with intense laser pulses. Exploiting a combination of a "reaction microscope" spectrometer and a pump-probe setup with two intense 6-7 fs laser pulses, we simultaneously visualize both vibrational and rotational motion of the molecule, and obtain a sequence of snapshots of the squared ro-vibrational wave function with time-step resolution of ~ 0.3 fs, allowing us to reconstruct a real-time movie of the ultrafast molecular motion. We observe fast dephasing, or 'collapse' of the vibrational wave packet and its subsequent revival, as well as signatures of rotational excitation. For D2+ we resolve also the fractional revivals resulting from the interference between the counter-propagating parts of the wave packet.

  17. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  18. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  19. Hemodynamic quantification in brain arteriovenous malformations with time-resolved spin-labeled magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoult, Hélène; Bannier, Elise; Maurel, Pierre; Neyton, Clément; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Schmitt, Peter; Barillot, Christian; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves

    2014-08-01

    Unenhanced time-resolved spin-labeled magnetic resonance angiography enables hemodynamic quantification in arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Our purpose was to identify quantitative parameters that discriminate among different AVM components and to relate hemodynamic patterns with rupture risk. Sixteen patients presenting with AVMs (7 women, 9 men; mean age 37.1±15.9 years) were assigned to the high rupture risk or low rupture risk group according to anatomic AVM characteristics and rupture history. High temporal resolution (magnetic resonance angiography was performed on a 3-T MR system. After dedicated image processing, hemodynamic quantitative parameters were computed. T tests were used to compare quantitative parameters among AVM components, between the high rupture risk and low rupture risk groups, and between the hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic groups. Among the quantitative parameters, time-to-peak (Pmagnetic resonance angiography allows AVM-specific combined anatomic and quantitative analysis of AVM hemodynamics. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of a micelle-to-vesicle transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhaaf, S.U. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 -Grenoble (France); Schurtenberger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Amphiphilic molecules spontaneously self-assemble in solution to form a variety of aggregates. Only limited information is available on the kinetics of the structural transitions as well as on the existence of non-equilibrium or metastable states. Aqueous mixtures of lecithin and bile salt are very interesting biological model-systems which exhibit a spontaneous transition from polymer-like mixed micelles to vesicles upon dilution. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument D22, with its very high neutron flux and the broad range of scattering vectors covered in a single instrumental setting, allowed us for the first time to perform time-resolved scattering experiments in order to study the micelle-to-vesicle transition. The temporal evolution of the aggregate structures were followed and detailed information was obtained even on molecular length-scales. (author). 5 refs.

  1. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  2. Time-resolved Chemical Imaging of Molecules by High-order Harmonics and Ultrashort Rescattering Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chii Dong [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  3. Time-resolved microscopy of fs-laser-induced heat flows in glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonse, Jörn; Seuthe, Thomas; Grehn, Moritz; Eberstein, Markus; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Mermillod-Blondin, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    Time-resolved phase-contrast microscopy is employed to visualize spatio-temporal thermal transients induced by tight focusing of a single Ti:sapphire fs-laser pulse into a solid dielectric sample. This method relies on the coupling of the refractive index change and the sample temperature through the thermo-optic coefficient d n/d T. The thermal transients are studied on a timescale ranging from 10 ns up to 0.1 ms after laser excitation. Beyond providing direct insights into the laser-matter interaction, analyzing the results obtained also enables quantifying the local thermal diffusivity of the sample on a micrometer scale. Studies conducted in different solid dielectrics, namely amorphous fused silica (a-SiO2), a commercial borosilicate glass (BO33, Schott), and a custom alkaline earth silicate glass (NaSi66), illustrate the applicability of this approach to the investigation of various glassy materials.

  4. Glucose Sensing by Time-Resolved Fluorescence of Sol-Gel Immobilized Glucose Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Ventura, Bartolomeo Della; De Nicola, Sergio; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Lepore, Maria

    2011-01-01

    A monolithic silica gel matrix with entrapped glucose oxidase (GOD) was constructed as a bioactive element in an optical biosensor for glucose determination. Intrinsic fluorescence of free and immobilised GOD was investigated in the visible range in presence of different glucose concentrations by time-resolved spectroscopy with time-correlated single-photon counting detector. A three-exponential model was used for analysing the fluorescence transients. Fractional intensities and mean lifetime were shown to be sensitive to the enzymatic reaction and were used for obtaining calibration curve for glucose concentration determination. The sensing system proposed achieved high resolution (up to 0.17 mM) glucose determination with a detection range from 0.4 mM to 5 mM. PMID:22163807

  5. Glucose Sensing by Time-Resolved Fluorescence of Sol-Gel Immobilized Glucose Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lepore

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic silica gel matrix with entrapped glucose oxidase (GOD was constructed as a bioactive element in an optical biosensor for glucose determination. Intrinsic fluorescence of free and immobilised GOD was investigated in the visible range in presence of different glucose concentrations by time-resolved spectroscopy with time-correlated single-photon counting detector. A three-exponential model was used for analysing the fluorescence transients. Fractional intensities and mean lifetime were shown to be sensitive to the enzymatic reaction and were used for obtaining calibration curve for glucose concentration determination. The sensing system proposed achieved high resolution (up to 0:17 mM glucose determination with a detection range from 0:4 mM to 5 mM.

  6. Time-resolved ultraviolet photoluminescence of ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet photoluminescence of ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer grown by the thermal oxidation of ZnS with gallium was investigated by the time-resolved photoluminescence as a function of measuring temperature and excitation power. With increase of excitation power, the D0X emission is easily saturated than the DAP emission from ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer, and which is dramatically enhanced as compared with that from pure ZnO layer grown without gallium. The radiative recombination process with ultra-long lifetime controlled the carrier recombination of ZnO/ZnGa2O4 composite layer.

  7. Time-resolved ARPES at LACUS: Band Structure and Ultrafast Electron Dynamics of Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi, Alberto; Roth, Silvan; Gatti, Gianmarco; Arrell, Christopher A; Ojeda, José; van Mourik, Frank; Bugnon, Philippe; Magrez, Arnaud; Berger, Helmuth; Chergui, Majed; Grioni, Marco

    2017-05-31

    The manipulation of the electronic properties of solids by light is an exciting goal, which requires knowledge of the electronic structure with energy, momentum and temporal resolution. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) is the most direct probe of the effects of an optical excitation on the band structure of a material. In particular, tr-ARPES in the extreme ultraviolet (VUV) range gives access to the ultrafast dynamics over the entire Brillouin zone. VUV tr-ARPES experiments can now be performed at the ASTRA (ARPES Spectrometer for Time-Resolved Applications) end station of Harmonium, at LACUS. Its capabilities are illustrated by measurements of the ultrafast electronic response of ZrSiTe, a novel topological semimetal characterized by linearly dispersing states located at the Brillouin zone boundary.

  8. Time-Resolved Photoemission of Correlated Electrons Driven Out of Equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, B.; /SLAC, SIMES; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Freericks, J.K.; /Georgetown U.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the temporal evolution of the time-resolved photoemission response of the spinless Falicov-Kimball model driven out of equilibrium by strong, applied fields. The model is one of the few possessing a metal-insulator transition and admitting an exact solution in the time domain. The nonequilibrium dynamics, evaluated using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory, show how the driven system differs from two common viewpoints - a quasi-equilibrium system at an elevated, effective temperature (the 'hot' electron model) or a rapid interaction quench ('melting' of the Mott gap) - due to the rearrangement of electronic states and redistribution of spectral weight. The results demonstrate the inherent trade-off between energy and time resolution accompanying the finite width probe-pulses, characteristic of those employed in pump-probe, time-domain experiments, which can be used to focus attention on different aspects of the dynamics near the transition.

  9. Time-resolved photoluminescence of Zn(OH)2 and its composites with graphite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sm Z; Gayen, Taposh; Das, Bidyut B; Shi, Lingyan; Seredych, Mykola; Moussawi, Alaa; Bandosz, Teresa J; Alfano, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence is used to determine carrier recombination through radiative and nonradiative processes in zinc hydroxide Zn(OH)(2) and its porous composites with graphite oxide (GO). The decay times, measured by a streak camera, are found to be larger for zinc hydroxide (~1215±156 ps) than its composites (~976±81 ps for ZnGO-2 and 742±59 ps for ZnGO-5), but no significant changes in rise times (from 4.0 to 5.0 ps) are recorded. The dominant mechanism for the radiative process is attributed to free carrier recombination, while microporous networks present in these materials are found to be pathways for the nonradiative recombination process via multiphonon emission.

  10. Electron Temperature Measurement of Buried Layer Targets Using Time Resolved K-shell Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Edward; Foord, M. E.; Shepherd, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Scott, H.; London, R.; Martin, M.; Wilson, B.; Iglesias, C.; Mauche, C.; Whitley, H.; Nilsen, J.; Hoarty, D.; James, S.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M.; Allan, P.; Hobbs, L.

    2016-10-01

    Short pulse laser-heated buried layer experiments have been performed with the goal of creating plasmas with mass densities >= 1 g/cm3 and electron temperatures >= 500 eV. The buried layer geometry has the advantage of rapid energy deposition before significant hydrodynamic expansion occurs. For brief periods (< 40 ps) this provides a low gradient, high density platform for studying emission characteristics under extreme plasma conditions. A study of plasma conditions achievable using the Orion laser facility has been performed. Time resolved K-shell spectroscopy was used to determine the temperature evolution of buried layer aluminum foil targets. The measured evolution is compared to a 2-D PIC simulation done using LSP, which shows late time heating from the non-thermal electron population. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei, E-mail: tahei@riken.jp [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ultrafast Spectroscopy Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm{sup −1} region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  12. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  13. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 [mu]s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  14. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  15. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  16. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.; Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  17. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-07-01

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  18. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-07-21

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  19. Timing discriminator based on single-flux-quantum circuit toward high time-resolved photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yabuno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka

    2017-12-01

    We propose a new time discriminating method based on a single-flux quantum (SFQ) circuit to realize a high time-resolved single-photon detection scheme that uses a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SSPD). The timing discriminator consists of an SFQ comparator and an interface circuit for converting the output signals of an SSPD into SFQ pulses. Prior to connecting with the SSPD, we evaluated the timing jitters of the SFQ timing discriminator itself by applying external electrical pulses. The timing jitters of the SFQ timing discriminator were found to be dominated by the timing jitters in the interface circuit. However, it was estimated to be below 10 ps even with an input pulse amplitude of 20 μA, which is close to the typical output amplitude of the SSPD.

  20. Development of a New Time Resolved Irradiance Uniformity Mapper at Spasolab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barber C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved uniformity mapper developed at Spasolab based on two main premises: easy adaptability to different solar simulators and versatility in terms of irradiance operation range, extended up to 2 AM0. A modular two-stage design features independent bias PCB’s per each photodiode that allow for easy sensor swapping or different biasing for future sensor replacements. A new type of photodiode active biasing is also presented, with the main feature of being capable of switching on the bias voltage only during the acquisition process, hence reducing self-heating. Ad-hoc software developed in LabVIEW and PXI instrumentation enable the system to have different acquisition modes further expanding the irradiance range to be tested without risking hazard to the system due to overheating. Finally, outdoor calibration method and results for the system are also presented.

  1. Hydrogen release from sodium alanate observed by time-resolved neutron backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Aline [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Wuttke, Joachim, E-mail: aline.leon@kit.edu, E-mail: j.wuttke@fz-juelich.de [Juelich Centre for Neutron Science JCNS, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Outstation at FRM II, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-29

    Innermolecular motion in Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} gives rise to a Lorentzian spectrum with a wavenumber-independent width of about 1 {mu}eV at 180 {sup 0}C, which is probably due to the rotation of AlH{sub 6} tetrahedra. There is no such quasielastic line in NaAlH{sub 4} or NaH. Based on this finding, time-resolved measurements on the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES were used to monitor the decomposition kinetics of sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4{yields}}Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6{yields}} NaH. Both reaction steps were found to be accelerated by autocatalysis, most likely at the surfaces of Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} and NaH crystallites.

  2. Time-resolved stereoscopic PIV study of flashback in swirl flames at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Ebi, Dominik; Clemens, Noel

    2015-11-01

    Boundary layer flashback of turbulent premixed swirl flames can pose a major challenge to the operation of stationary gas turbines, especially with hydrogen-rich fuels. To improve our understanding of the physics behind this phenomenon at gas turbine relevant conditions, it is essential to investigate flashback at elevated pressures. With this purpose in mind, flashback experiments with hydrogen/methane-air premixtures are conducted in a model swirl combustor installed in an optically accessible high-pressure combustion facility. We have employed stereoscopic PIV in conjunction with high speed chemiluminiscence imaging to study the upstream propagation of the flame in the premix tube during flashback. Experiments are run at pressures ranging from 1 atm to 5 atm. These time-resolved measurements provide valuable insight into the flame-flow interaction during flashback at elevated pressures.

  3. Commissioning of a UV/time-resolved-FTIR beamline at the Duke FEL laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Hutson, M S; Chang, M S; Gillikin, A; Litvinenko, V N; Edwards, G

    2002-01-01

    We describe the commissioning of a novel two-color beamline at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory, designed to perform time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy in a pump-probe scheme with sub-nanosecond resolution to measure dynamical processes with durations as long as 10 ns. The UV pump pulses are produced by the tunable (193-700 nm) output of the OK-4 Storage-Ring FEL. The broadband, infrared probe pulses are generated as synchrotron radiation in a bending magnet downstream of the OK-4 wiggler. The repetition rate of the light source (2.79 MHz) is ideal for operating the interferometer in the rapid-scan, asynchronous sampling mode. An investigation of DNA photolyase is proposed.

  4. Time resolved measurements of cathode fall in high frequency fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadrath, S [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Garner, R C [Central Research and Services Laboratory, OSRAM Sylvania, 71 Cherry Hill Dr, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Lieder, G H [Research Light Sources, Osram GmbH, Hellabrunner Str. 1, D-81536 Munich (Germany); Ehlbeck, J [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2007-11-21

    Measurements are presented of the time resolved cathode and anode falls of high frequency fluorescent lamps for a range of discharge currents typically encountered in dimming mode. Measurements were performed with the movable anode technique. Supporting spectroscopic emission measurements were made of key transitions (argon 420.1 nm and mercury 435.8 nm), whose onset coincide with cathode fall equalling the value associated with the energy, relative to the ground state, of the upper level of the respective transition. The measurements are in general agreement with the well-known understanding of dimmed lamp operation: peak cathode fall decreases with increasing lamp current and with increasing auxiliary coil heating. However, the time dependence of the measurements offers additional insight.

  5. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-01-01

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the b...

  6. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  7. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, P; Kacprzak, M; Weigl, W; Borowska-Solonynko, A; Krajewski, P; Zolek, N; Ciszek, B; Maniewski, R; Liebert, A

    2012-12-07

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  8. A time resolved microfocus XEOL facility at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Taylor, R. P.; Quinn, P. D.; Finch, A. A.; Cibin, G.; Gianolio, D.; Sapelkin, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    We have constructed a Time-Resolved X-ray Excited Optical Luminescence (TR-XEOL) detection system at the Microfocus Spectroscopy beamline I18 at the Diamond Light Source. Using the synchrotron in "hybrid bunch mode", the data collection is triggered by the RF clock, and we are able to record XEOL photons with a time resolution of 6.1 ps during the 230 ns gap between the hybrid bunch and the main train of electron bunches. We can detect photons over the range 180-850 nm using a bespoke optical fibre, with X-ray excitation energies between 2 and 20 keV. We have used the system to study a range of feldspars. The detector is portable and has also been used on beamline B18 to collect Optically Determined X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (OD-XAS) in QEXAFS mode.

  9. Polar solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 by ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Intae; Joo, Taiha

    2009-12-01

    Polar solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 in acetonitrile, methanol, and butanol are investigated by dynamic Stokes shift function, S(t ). In small protic solvents, it is known that an initial ultrafast component below 50 fs constitutes more than half of the total solvation process. We use fluorescence up-conversion technique via two-photon absorption process, which can provide 40 fs time resolution for the whole emission wavelength range. Moreover, time-resolved fluorescence spectra are recorded directly without the spectral reconstruction. We observe a temporal oscillation in frequency of whole emission spectrum in the solvation curve. In the obtained S(t ), initial solvation time scale is 120 fs, invariant to solvents used in this experiment, although its amplitude varies in different solvents.

  10. User-based representation of time-resolved multimodal public transportation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandretti, Laura; Gauvin, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal transportation systems can be represented as time-resolved multilayer networks where different transportation modes connecting the same set of nodes are associated to distinct network layers. Their quantitative description became possible recently due to openly accessible datasets describing the geolocalised transportation dynamics of large urban areas. Advancements call for novel analytics, which combines earlier established methods and exploits the inherent complexity of the data. Here, our aim is to provide a novel user-based methodological framework to represent public transportation systems considering the total travel time, its variability across the schedule, and taking into account the number of transfers necessary. Using this framework we analyse public transportation systems in several French municipal areas. We incorporate travel routes and times over multiple transportation modes to identify efficient transportation connections and non-trivial connectivity patterns. The proposed method ...

  11. Time-resolved, optically detected NMR of fluids at high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliero, Daniela; Dong, Wei; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the use of optical Faraday rotation to monitor the nuclear-spin signal in a set of model F19- and H1-rich fluids. Our approach integrates optical detection with high-field, pulsed NMR so as to record the time-resolved evolution of nuclear-spins after rf excitation. Comparison of chemical-shift-resolved resonances allows us to set order-of-magnitude constrains on the relative amplitudes of hyperfine coupling constants for different bonding geometries. When evaluated against coil induction, the present detection modality suffers from poorer sensitivity, but improvement could be attained via multipass schemes. Because illumination is off-resonant i.e., the medium is optically transparent, this methodology could find extensions in a broad class of fluids and soft condensed matter systems.

  12. A novel and independent method for time-resolved gantry angle quality assurance for VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Greer, Peter B; Zwan, Benjamin J; Barnes, Michael P; Lehmann, Joerg

    2017-09-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery requires three key dynamic components; gantry rotation, dose rate modulation, and multi-leaf collimator motion, which are all simultaneously varied during the delivery. Misalignment of the gantry angle can potentially affect clinical outcome due to the steep dose gradients and complex MLC shapes involved. It is essential to develop independent gantry angle quality assurance (QA) appropriate to VMAT that can be performed simultaneously with other key VMAT QA testing. In this work, a simple and inexpensive fully independent gantry angle measurement methodology was developed that allows quantitation of the gantry angle accuracy as a function of time. This method is based on the analysis of video footage of a "Double dot" pattern attached to the front cover of the linear accelerator that consists of red and green circles printed on A4 paper sheet. A standard mobile phone is placed on the couch to record the video footage during gantry rotation. The video file is subsequently analyzed and used to determine the gantry angle from each video frame using the relative position of the two dots. There were two types of validation tests performed including the static mode with manual gantry angle rotation and dynamic mode with three complex test plans. The accuracy was 0.26° ± 0.04° and 0.46° ± 0.31° (mean ± 1 SD) for the static and dynamic modes, respectively. This method is user friendly, cost effective, easy to setup, has high temporal resolution, and can be combined with existing time-resolved method for QA of MLC and dose rate to form a comprehensive set of procedures for time-resolved QA of VMAT delivery system. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Monolithic microfluidic mixing-spraying devices for time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Mohamed, Hisham; Yassin, Aymen; Mannella, Carmen A; Agrawal, Rajendra K; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence

    2009-12-01

    The goal of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy is to determine structural models for transient functional states of large macromolecular complexes such as ribosomes and viruses. The challenge of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy is to rapidly mix reactants, and then, following a defined time interval, to rapidly deposit them as a thin film and freeze the sample to the vitreous state. Here we describe a methodology in which reaction components are mixed and allowed to react, and are then sprayed onto an EM grid as it is being plunged into cryogen. All steps are accomplished by a monolithic, microfabricated silicon device that incorporates a mixer, reaction channel, and pneumatic sprayer in a single chip. We have found that microdroplets produced by air atomization spread to sufficiently thin films on a millisecond time scale provided that the carbon supporting film is made suitably hydrophilic. The device incorporates two T-mixers flowing into a single channel of four butterfly-shaped mixing elements that ensure effective mixing, followed by a microfluidic reaction channel whose length can be varied to achieve the desired reaction time. The reaction channel is flanked by two ports connected to compressed humidified nitrogen gas (at 50 psi) to generate the spray. The monolithic mixer-sprayer is incorporated into a computer-controlled plunging apparatus. To test the mixing performance and the suitability of the device for preparation of biological macromolecules for cryo-EM, ribosomes and ferritin were mixed in the device and sprayed onto grids. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the ribosomes demonstrated retention of native structure, and 30S and 50S subunits were shown to be capable of reassociation into ribosomes after passage through the device.

  14. Time-Resolved Gravimetric Method To Assess Degassing of Roasted Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Suzuki, Tomonori; Balsiger, Franz; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2017-11-15

    During the roasting of coffee, thermally driven chemical reactions lead to the formation of gases, of which a large fraction is carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Part of these gases is released during roasting while part is retained inside the porous structure of the roasted beans and is steadily released during storage or more abruptly during grinding and extraction. The release of CO 2 during the various phases from roasting to consumption is linked to many important properties and characteristics of coffee. It is an indicator for freshness, plays an important role in shelf life and in packaging, impacts the extraction process, is involved in crema formation, and may affect the sensory profile in the cup. Indeed, and in view of the multiple roles it plays, CO 2 is a much underappreciated and little examined molecule in coffee. Here, we introduce an accurate, quantitative, and time-resolved method to measure the release kinetics of gases from whole beans and ground coffee using a gravimetric approach. Samples were placed in a container with a fitted capillary to allow gases to escape. The time-resolved release of gases was measured via the weight loss of the container filled with coffee. Long-term stability was achieved using a customized design of a semimicro balance, including periodic and automatic zero value measurements and calibration procedures. The novel gravimetric methodology was applied to a range of coffee samples: (i) whole Arabica beans and (ii) ground Arabica and Robusta, roasted to different roast degrees and at different speeds (roast air temperatures). Modeling the degassing rates allowed structural and mechanistic interpretation of the degassing process.

  15. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  16. A Novel Europium Chelate Coated Nanosphere for Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yifeng; Xu, Shaohan; He, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    A novel europium ligand 2, 2’, 2’’, 2’’’-(4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline-2, 9-diyl) bis (methylene) bis (azanetriyl) tetra acetic acid (BC-EDTA) was synthesized and characterized. It shows an emission spectrum peak at 610 nm when it is excited at 360 nm, with a large Stock shift (250 nm). It is covalently coated on the surface of a bare silica nanosphere containi free amino groups, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. We also observed an interesting phenomenon that when BC-EDTA is labeled with a silica nanosphere, the chelate shows different excitation spectrum peaks of about 295 nm. We speculate that the carboxyl has a significant influence on its excitation spectrum. The BC-EDTA/Eu3+coated nanosphere could be used as a fluorescent probe for time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We labeled the antibody with the fluorescent nanosphere to develop a nanosphere based hepatitis B surface antigen as a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay reagent, which is very easy to operate and eliminates potential contamination of Eu3+ contained in the environment. The analytical and functional sensitivities are 0.0037 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L (S/N≥2.0) respectively. The detection range is 0.08-166.67 μg/L, which is much wider than that of ELISA (0.2-5μg/L). It is comparable to the commercial dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoro-immunoassay system (DELFIA) reagents (0.2-145μg/L). We propose that it can fulfill clinical applications. PMID:26056826

  17. A Novel Europium Chelate Coated Nanosphere for Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Shen

    Full Text Available A novel europium ligand 2,2',2'',2'''-(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diyl bis (methylene bis (azanetriyl tetra acetic acid (BC-EDTA was synthesized and characterized. It shows an emission spectrum peak at 610 nm when it is excited at 360 nm, with a large Stock shift (250 nm. It is covalently coated on the surface of a bare silica nanosphere containi free amino groups, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. We also observed an interesting phenomenon that when BC-EDTA is labeled with a silica nanosphere, the chelate shows different excitation spectrum peaks of about 295 nm. We speculate that the carboxyl has a significant influence on its excitation spectrum. The BC-EDTA/Eu3+coated nanosphere could be used as a fluorescent probe for time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We labeled the antibody with the fluorescent nanosphere to develop a nanosphere based hepatitis B surface antigen as a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay reagent, which is very easy to operate and eliminates potential contamination of Eu3+ contained in the environment. The analytical and functional sensitivities are 0.0037 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L (S/N≥2.0 respectively. The detection range is 0.08-166.67 μg/L, which is much wider than that of ELISA (0.2-5 μg/L. It is comparable to the commercial dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoro-immunoassay system (DELFIA reagents (0.2-145 μg/L. We propose that it can fulfill clinical applications.

  18. Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy of CO Hydrogenation overSupported Ru Catalyst at 700K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2006-02-13

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of carbon monoxide hydrogenation over alumina-supported ruthenium were recorded on the millisecond timescale at 703 K using various H{sub 2} concentrations (1 atm total pressure). Adsorbed carbon monoxide was detected along with gas phase products methane (3016 and 1306 cm{sup -1}), water (sharp bands from 1900 - 1300 cm{sup -1}), and carbon dioxide (2348 cm{sup -1}). No other surface species were detected other than adsorbed carbon monoxide. The rate of formation of methane (2.5 {+-} 0.4 s{sup -1}) coincides with the rate of formation of carbon dioxide (3.4 {+-} 0.6 s{sup -1}), and bands due to water are observed to grow in over time. These results establish that methane and carbon dioxide originate from the same intermediate. The adsorbed carbon monoxide band is broad and unsymmetrical with a maximum at 2010 cm{sup -1} in spectra observed at 36 ms that shifts over 3000 ms to 1960 cm{sup -1} due to decreasing amounts of adsorbed carbon monoxide. Kinetic analysis of the adsorbed carbon monoxide band reveals that only a portion of the band can be temporally linked to gas phase products that we observe over the first 1000 ms of catalysis. This result suggests that we are observing dispersive kinetics, which is most likely due to heterogeneity of the surface environment.

  19. The primary photophysics of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain observed with time-resolved emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T M

    2011-01-01

    The phototropins are blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The primary reactions of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain were investigated by means of time-resolved and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. Synchroscan streak camera experiments revealed a fluorescence lifetime of 2.2 ns in LOV2. A weak long-lived component with emission intensity from 600 to 650 nm was assigned to phosphorescence from the reactive FMN triplet state. This observation allowed determination of the LOV2 triplet state energy level at physiological temperature at 16600 cm(-1). FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed pH-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of 2.7 ns at pH 2 and 3.9-4.1 ns at pH 3-8. Here, too, a weak phosphorescence band was observed. The fluorescence quantum yield of LOV2 increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from 293 to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K in the steady-state emission. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. The primary photophysics of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain observed with time-resolved emission spectroscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H.M.; Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T.M.

    2016-01-01

    The phototropins are blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The primary reactions of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain were investigated by means of time-resolved and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. Synchroscan streak camera experiments revealed a fluorescence lifetime of 2.2 ns in LOV2. A weak long-lived component with emission intensity from 600 to 650 nm was assigned to phosphorescence from the reactive FMN triplet state. This observation allowed determination of the LOV2 triplet state energy level at physiological temperature at 16600 cm−1. FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed pH-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of 2.7 ns at pH 2 and 3.9–4.1 ns at pH 3 to 8. Here, too, a weak phosphorescence band was observed. The fluorescence quantum yield of LOV2 increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from 293 to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K in the steady-state emission. PMID:21261629

  1. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and Raman studies of the phase transition mechanisms of methane hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Hisako, E-mail: hirai@sci.ehime-u.ac.jp; Kadobayashi, Hirokazu [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo [Japan Association of Synchrotron Radiation Institution, Harima 679-5198 (Japan); Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Nakano, Satoshi [National Institute for Material Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-01-14

    The mechanisms by which methane hydrate transforms from an sI to sH structure and from an sH to filled-ice Ih structure were examined using time-resolved X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with charge-coupled device camera observation under fixed pressure conditions. The XRD data obtained for the sI–sH transition at 0.8 GPa revealed an inverse correlation between sI and sH, suggesting that the sI structure is replaced by sH. Meanwhile, the Raman analysis demonstrated that although the 12-hedra of sI are retained, the 14-hedra are replaced sequentially by additional 12-hedra, modified 12-hedra, and 20-hedra cages of sH. With the sH to filled-ice Ih transition at 1.8 GPa, both the XRD and Raman data showed that this occurs through a sudden collapse of the sH structure and subsequent release of solid and fluid methane that is gradually incorporated into the filled-ice Ih to complete its structure. This therefore represents a typical reconstructive transition mechanism.

  2. Single-shot Raman spectroscopy and time-resolved reflectivity of a shocked TATB-based explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Philippe; Saint-Amans, Charles; Doucet, Michel; de Resseguier, Thibaut

    2015-06-01

    Single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiments under shockwave loading were performed in order to get information on the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a TATB-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects on the H-bonding network present in TATB. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Time-resolved reflectivity measurements under shock compression seem to indicate that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  3. Communication: Ultrafast time-resolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy of photoionization-induced proton transfer in phenol-ammonia complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ching-Chi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Ho, Jr-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Cheng, Po-Yuan, E-mail: pycheng@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-07

    Photoionization-induced proton transfer (PT) in phenol-ammonia (PhOH-NH{sub 3}) complex has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. Neutral PhOH-NH{sub 3} complexes prepared in a free jet are photoionized by femtosecond [1+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization via the S{sub 1} state, and the subsequent dynamics occurring in the cations is probed by delayed pulses that result in ion fragmentation. The observed temporal evolutions of the photofragmentation spectra are consistent with an intracomplex PT reaction. The experiments revealed that PT in [PhOH-NH{sub 3}]{sup +} cation proceeds in two distinct steps: an initial impulsive wave-packet motion in ∼70 fs followed by a slower relaxation of about 1 ps that stabilizes the system into the final PT configuration. These results indicate that for a barrierless PT system, even though the initial PT motions are impulsive and ultrafast, the reaction may take a much longer time scale to complete.

  4. Time resolved DNA occupancy dynamics during the respiratory oscillation uncover a global reset point in the yeast growth program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Amariei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural dynamics of chromatin have been implicated in the regulation of fundamental eukaryotic processes, such as DNA transcription, replication and repair. Although previous studies have revealed that the chromatin landscape, nucleosome remodeling and histone modification events are intimately tied into cellular energetics and redox state, few studies undertake defined time-resolved measurements of these state variables. Here, we use metabolically synchronous, continuously-grown yeast cultures to measure DNA occupancy and track global patterns with respect to the metabolic state of the culture. Combined with transcriptome analyses and ChIP-qPCR experiments, these paint an intriguing picture where genome-wide nucleosome focusing occurs during the recovery of energy charge, followed by clearance of the promoter regions and global transcriptional slow-down, thus indicating a nucleosome-mediated “reset point” for the cycle. The reset begins at the end of the catabolic and stress-response transcriptional programs and ends prior to the start of the anabolic and cell-growth transcriptional program, and the histones on genes from both the catabolic and anabolic superclusters are deacetylated.

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles using XFEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Obara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The charge-carrier dynamics of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles in an aqueous solution were studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser in combination with a synchronized ultraviolet femtosecond laser (268 nm. Using an arrival time monitor for the X-ray pulses, we obtained a temporal resolution of 170 fs. The transient X-ray absorption spectra revealed an ultrafast Ti K-edge shift and a subsequent growth of a pre-edge structure. The edge shift occurred in ca. 100 fs and is ascribed to reduction of Ti by localization of generated conduction band electrons into shallow traps of self-trapped polarons or deep traps at penta-coordinate Ti sites. Growth of the pre-edge feature and reduction of the above-edge peak intensity occur with similar time constants of 300–400 fs, which we assign to the structural distortion dynamics near the surface.

  6. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomographic imaging for the provision of both anatomical and functional information about biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2005-04-01

    We present in vivo images of near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of human lower legs and forearm to validate the dual functions of a time-resolved (TR) NIR DOT in clinical diagnosis, i.e., to provide anatomical and functional information simultaneously. The NIR DOT system is composed of time-correlated single-photon-counting channels, and the image reconstruction algorithm is based on the modified generalized pulsed spectral technique, which effectively incorporates the TR data with reasonable computation time. The reconstructed scattering images of both the lower legs and the forearm revealed their anatomies, in which the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscles. In the absorption images, some of the blood vessels were observable. In the functional imaging, a subject was requested to do handgripping exercise to stimulate physiological changes in the forearm tissue. The images of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentration changes in the forearm were obtained from the differential images of the absorption at three wavelengths between the exercise and the rest states, which were reconstructed with a differential imaging scheme. These images showed increases in both blood volume and oxyhemoglobin concentration in the arteries and simultaneously showed hypoxia in the corresponding muscles. All the results have demonstrated the capability of TR NIR DOT by reconstruction of the absolute images of the scattering and the absorption with a high spatial resolution that finally provided both the anatomical and functional information inside bulky biological tissues.

  7. Novel portable press for synchrotron time-resolved 3-D micro-imagining under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, J.; Le Godec, Y., E-mail: yann.legodec@impmc.upmc.fr; Bergame, F.; Morand, M. [IMPMC, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Mezouar, M.; Bauchau, S.; Alvarez-Murga, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Perrillat, J. P. [Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, Lyon (France); Bromiley, G.; Berg, M. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); King, A.; Guignot, N.; Itié, J. P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, St Aubin France (France); Atwood, Robert [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    Here we present the instrumental development to extend the synchrotron X-ray microtomography techniques to in situ studies under static compression (HP) or shear stress or the both conditions at high temperatures (HT). To achieve this, a new rotating tomography Paris-Edinburgh cell (rotoPEc) has been developed. This ultra-compact portable device, easily and successfully adapted to various multi-modal synchrotron experimental set-up at ESRF, SOLEIL and DIAMOND is explained in detail.

  8. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Jung, Jae Won; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-07-01

    The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 × 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 × 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 × 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared. For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame acquisition rate, thereby causing no frame missing. However, serious inplanar

  9. ns-μs Time-Resolved Step-Scan FTIR of ba3 Oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus: Protonic Connectivity of w941-w946-w927

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Nicolaides

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved step-scan FTIR spectroscopy has been employed to probe the dynamics of the ba3 oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus in the ns-μs time range and in the pH/pD 6–9 range. The data revealed a pH/pD sensitivity of the D372 residue and of the ring-A propionate of heme a3. Based on the observed transient changes a model in which the protonic connectivity of w941-w946-927 to the D372 and the ring-A propionate of heme a3 is described.

  10. Improving optical properties of in situ reduced graphene oxide/poly(3-hexylthiophene) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakour, Anass; Baitoul, Mimouna; Bajjou, Omar; Massuyeau, Florian; Faulques, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-graphene nanocomposites were successfully prepared by an in situ reduction of graphene oxide (GO). The main goal of this work was to investigate the changes introduced by the insertion of reduced GO (RGO) in the conjugated polymer P3HT on the optical and structural properties of the composites at different weight ratios. Raman scattering and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopies were primarily used to investigate reduction efficiency of GO sheets by hydrazine, and then to examine the nature of bonds between the components of the composites. The degree of homogeneity was investigated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy results obtained from the different film samples confirm the existence of an electronic interaction inside the composites, as well as a decrease in the bandgap of the composite films. Steady-state photoluminescence (PL) exhibits strong quenching after increasing RGO wt%. Moreover, time resolved PL shows a decrease in the mean lifetime of photogenerated excitons. Our study reveals the existence of charge/energy transfer at the interface between P3HT and in situ RGO at low concentrations, leading to an overall enhancement of optical properties which makes such composites promising candidates for photovoltaic applications.

  11. Unraveling gene regulatory networks from time-resolved gene expression data -- a measures comparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koseska Aneta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferring regulatory interactions between genes from transcriptomics time-resolved data, yielding reverse engineered gene regulatory networks, is of paramount importance to systems biology and bioinformatics studies. Accurate methods to address this problem can ultimately provide a deeper insight into the complexity, behavior, and functions of the underlying biological systems. However, the large number of interacting genes coupled with short and often noisy time-resolved read-outs of the system renders the reverse engineering a challenging task. Therefore, the development and assessment of methods which are computationally efficient, robust against noise, applicable to short time series data, and preferably capable of reconstructing the directionality of the regulatory interactions remains a pressing research problem with valuable applications. Results Here we perform the largest systematic analysis of a set of similarity measures and scoring schemes within the scope of the relevance network approach which are commonly used for gene regulatory network reconstruction from time series data. In addition, we define and analyze several novel measures and schemes which are particularly suitable for short transcriptomics time series. We also compare the considered 21 measures and 6 scoring schemes according to their ability to correctly reconstruct such networks from short time series data by calculating summary statistics based on the corresponding specificity and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that rank and symbol based measures have the highest performance in inferring regulatory interactions. In addition, the proposed scoring scheme by asymmetric weighting has shown to be valuable in reducing the number of false positive interactions. On the other hand, Granger causality as well as information-theoretic measures, frequently used in inference of regulatory networks, show low performance on the short time series analyzed in

  12. A platform for time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy in the near-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Paul S; Loughran, Thomas H J; Hendry, Euan; Barnes, William L; Hicken, Robert J; Childress, Jeffrey R; Katine, Jordan A

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM) is a powerful technique for the investigation of picosecond magnetization dynamics at sub-micron length scales by means of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The spatial resolution of conventional (focused) Kerr microscopy using a microscope objective lens is determined by the optical diffraction limit so that the nanoscale character of the magnetization dynamics is lost. Here we present a platform to overcome this limitation by means of a near-field TRSKM that incorporates an atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical access to a metallic AFM probe with a nanoscale aperture at its tip. We demonstrate the near-field capability of the instrument through the comparison of time-resolved polar Kerr images of magnetization dynamics within a microscale NiFe rectangle acquired using both near-field and focused TRSKM techniques at a wavelength of 800 nm. The flux-closure domain state of the in-plane equilibrium magnetization provided the maximum possible dynamic polar Kerr contrast across the central domain wall and enabled an assessment of the magneto-optical spatial resolution of each technique. Line profiles extracted from the Kerr images demonstrate that the near-field spatial resolution was enhanced with respect to that of the focused Kerr images. Furthermore, the near-field polar Kerr signal (∼1 mdeg) was more than half that of the focused Kerr signal, despite the potential loss of probe light due to internal reflections within the AFM tip. We have confirmed the near-field operation by exploring the influence of the tip-sample separation and have determined the spatial resolution to be ∼550 nm for an aperture with a sub-wavelength diameter of 400 nm. The spatial resolution of the near-field TRSKM was in good agreement with finite element modeling of the aperture. Large amplitude electric field along regions of the modeled aperture that lie perpendicular to the incident polarization indicate that the aperture can

  13. A platform for time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy in the near-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Paul S.; Loughran, Thomas H. J.; Hendry, Euan; Barnes, William L.; Hicken, Robert J.; Childress, Jeffrey R.; Katine, Jordan A.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM) is a powerful technique for the investigation of picosecond magnetization dynamics at sub-micron length scales by means of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The spatial resolution of conventional (focused) Kerr microscopy using a microscope objective lens is determined by the optical diffraction limit so that the nanoscale character of the magnetization dynamics is lost. Here we present a platform to overcome this limitation by means of a near-field TRSKM that incorporates an atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical access to a metallic AFM probe with a nanoscale aperture at its tip. We demonstrate the near-field capability of the instrument through the comparison of time-resolved polar Kerr images of magnetization dynamics within a microscale NiFe rectangle acquired using both near-field and focused TRSKM techniques at a wavelength of 800 nm. The flux-closure domain state of the in-plane equilibrium magnetization provided the maximum possible dynamic polar Kerr contrast across the central domain wall and enabled an assessment of the magneto-optical spatial resolution of each technique. Line profiles extracted from the Kerr images demonstrate that the near-field spatial resolution was enhanced with respect to that of the focused Kerr images. Furthermore, the near-field polar Kerr signal (˜1 mdeg) was more than half that of the focused Kerr signal, despite the potential loss of probe light due to internal reflections within the AFM tip. We have confirmed the near-field operation by exploring the influence of the tip-sample separation and have determined the spatial resolution to be ˜550 nm for an aperture with a sub-wavelength diameter of 400 nm. The spatial resolution of the near-field TRSKM was in good agreement with finite element modeling of the aperture. Large amplitude electric field along regions of the modeled aperture that lie perpendicular to the incident polarization indicate that the aperture can

  14. Simultaneous detection of imidacloprid and parathion by the dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haiyan; Sheng, Enze; Feng, Lu; Zhou, Liangliang; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua

    2015-10-01

    A highly sensitive direct dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) to detect parathion and imidacloprid simultaneously in food and environmental matrices was developed. Europium (Eu(3+)) and samarium (Sm(3+)) were used as fluorescent labels by coupling separately with L1-Ab and A1P1-Ab. Under optimal assay conditions, the half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) and limit of detection (LOD, IC10) were 10.87 and 0.025 μg/L for parathion and 7.08 and 0.028 μg/L for imidacloprid, respectively. The cross-reactivities (CR) were negligible except for methyl-parathion (42.4 %) and imidaclothiz (103.4 %). The average recoveries of imidacloprid ranged from 78.9 to 104.2 % in water, soil, rice, tomato, and Chinese cabbage with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.4 to 11.6 %, and those of parathion were from 81.5 to 110.9 % with the RSD of 3.2 to 10.5 %. The results of TRFIA for the authentic samples were validated by comparison with gas chromatography (GC) analyses, and satisfactory correlations (parathion: R (2) = 0.9918; imidacloprid: R (2) = 0.9908) were obtained. The results indicate that the dual-labeled TRFIA is convenient and reliable to detect parathion and imidacloprid simultaneously in food and environmental matrices.

  15. Multi-Site Simultaneous Time-Resolved Photometry with a Low Cost Electro-Optics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasdia, Forrest; Barjatya, Aroh; Bilardi, Sergei

    2017-05-30

    Sunlight reflected off of resident space objects can be used as an optical signal for astrometric orbit determination and for deducing geometric information about the object. With the increasing population of small satellites and debris in low Earth orbit, photometry is a powerful tool in operational support of space missions, whether for anomaly resolution or object identification. To accurately determine size, shape, spin rate, status of deployables, or attitude information of an unresolved resident space object, multi-hertz sample rate photometry is required to capture the relatively rapid changes in brightness that these objects can exhibit. OSCOM, which stands for Optical tracking and Spectral characterization of CubeSats for Operational Missions, is a low cost and portable telescope system capable of time-resolved small satellite photometry, and is field deployable on short notice for simultaneous observation from multiple sites. We present the electro-optical design principles behind OSCOM and light curves of the 1.5 U DICE-2 CubeSat and simultaneous observations of the main body of the ASTRO-H satellite after its fragmentation event.

  16. Time-resolved neutron reflectometry and photovoltaic device studies on sequentially deposited PCDTBT-fullerene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clulow, Andrew J; Tao, Chen; Lee, Kwan H; Velusamy, Marappan; McEwan, Jake A; Shaw, Paul E; Yamada, Norifumi L; James, Michael; Burn, Paul L; Gentle, Ian R; Meredith, Paul

    2014-09-30

    We have used steady-state and time-resolved neutron reflectometry to study the diffusion of fullerene derivatives into the narrow optical gap polymer poly[N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) to explore the sequential processing of the donor and acceptor for the preparation of efficient organic solar cells. It was found that when [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (60-PCBM) was deposited onto a thin film of PCDTBT from dichloromethane (DCM), a three-layer structure was formed that was stable below the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. When good solvents for the polymer were used in conjunction with DCM, both 60-PCBM and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (70-PCBM) were seen to form films that had a thick fullerene layer containing little polymer and a PCDTBT-rich layer near the interface with the substrate. Devices composed of films prepared by sequential deposition of the polymer and fullerene had efficiencies of up to 5.3%, with those based on 60-PCBM close to optimized bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells processed in the conventional manner. Sequential deposition of pure components to form the active layer is attractive for large-area device fabrication, and the results demonstrate that this processing method can give efficient solar cells.

  17. Optical tracking of embryonic vertebrates behavioural responses using automated time-resolved video-microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpitagama, Milanga; Kaslin, Jan; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2016-12-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) biotest performed on embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) has gained significant popularity as a rapid and inexpensive alternative approach in chemical hazard and risk assessment. The FET was designed to evaluate acute toxicity on embryonic stages of fish exposed to the test chemical. The current standard, similar to most traditional methods for evaluating aquatic toxicity provides, however, little understanding of effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of chemical stressors. We postulate that significant environmental effects such as altered motor functions, physiological alterations reflected in heart rate, effects on development and reproduction can occur at sub-lethal concentrations well below than LC10. Behavioral studies can, therefore, provide a valuable integrative link between physiological and ecological effects. Despite the advantages of behavioral analysis development of behavioral toxicity, biotests is greatly hampered by the lack of dedicated laboratory automation, in particular, user-friendly and automated video microscopy systems. In this work we present a proof-of-concept development of an optical system capable of tracking embryonic vertebrates behavioral responses using automated and vastly miniaturized time-resolved video-microscopy. We have employed miniaturized CMOS cameras to perform high definition video recording and analysis of earliest vertebrate behavioral responses. The main objective was to develop a biocompatible embryo positioning structures that were suitable for high-throughput imaging as well as video capture and video analysis algorithms. This system should support the development of sub-lethal and behavioral markers for accelerated environmental monitoring.

  18. Time resolved PIV analysis of flow over a NACA 0015 airfoil with Gurney flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troolin, D. R.; Longmire, E. K.; Lai, W. T.

    2006-08-01

    A NACA 0015 airfoil with and without a Gurney flap was studied in a wind tunnel with Re c = 2.0 × 105 in order to examine the evolving flow structure of the wake through time-resolved PIV and to correlate this structure with time-averaged measurements of the lift coefficient. The Gurney flap, a tab of small length (1-4% of the airfoil chord) that protrudes perpendicular to the chord at the trailing edge, yields a significant and relatively constant lift increment through the linear range of the C L versus α curve. Two distinct vortex shedding modes were found to exist and interact in the wake downstream of flapped airfoils. The dominant mode resembles a Kàrmàn vortex street shedding behind an asymmetric bluff body. The second mode, which was caused by the intermittent shedding of fluid recirculating in the cavity upstream of the flap, becomes more coherent with increasing angle of attack. For a 4% Gurney flap at α = 8°, the first and second modes corresponded with Strouhal numbers based on flap height of 0.18 and 0.13. Comparison of flow around ‘filled’ and ‘open’ flap configurations suggested that the second shedding mode was responsible for a significant portion of the overall lift increment.

  19. Multi-Site Simultaneous Time-Resolved Photometry with a Low Cost Electro-Optics System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forrest Gasdia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight reflected off of resident space objects can be used as an optical signal for astrometric orbit determination and for deducing geometric information about the object. With the increasing population of small satellites and debris in low Earth orbit, photometry is a powerful tool in operational support of space missions, whether for anomaly resolution or object identification. To accurately determine size, shape, spin rate, status of deployables, or attitude information of an unresolved resident space object, multi-hertz sample rate photometry is required to capture the relatively rapid changes in brightness that these objects can exhibit. OSCOM, which stands for Optical tracking and Spectral characterization of CubeSats for Operational Missions, is a low cost and portable telescope system capable of time-resolved small satellite photometry, and is field deployable on short notice for simultaneous observation from multiple sites. We present the electro-optical design principles behind OSCOM and light curves of the 1.5 U DICE-2 CubeSat and simultaneous observations of the main body of the ASTRO-H satellite after its fragmentation event.

  20. Prion protein alpha-to-beta transition monitored by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollesch, Julian; Künnemann, Eva; Glockshuber, Rudi; Gerwert, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    The conformational change of the recombinant, murine prion protein (PrP) from an alpha-helical to a beta-sheet enriched state was monitored by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The alpha-to-beta transition is induced by reduction of the single disulfide bond in PrP. This transition is believed to generate the scrapie form PrP(Sc), the supposed infectious agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. We followed the kinetics of this conformational change using a novel method for amide I band analysis of the infrared (IR) spectra. The amide I analysis provides the secondary structure. The amide I decomposition was calibrated with the three dimensional structure of cellular PrP solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The novel secondary structure analysis provides a root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of only 3% as compared to the NMR structure. Reduction of alpha-helical PrP caused the transient accumulation of a partially unfolded intermediate, followed by formation of a state with higher beta-sheet than alpha-helical structure contents. The novel approach allows us to now determine the secondary structure of the beta-sheet conformation. This was not determined by either NMR or X-ray. The experiments were performed in a double-sealed security cuvette developed for IR analysis of potentially infectious PrP samples outside the biosafety laboratory.

  1. Time-resolved diagnostic of an impulse discharge in variable pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Martinez, A.; Sobral, H.; Ruiz-Meza, A.

    2008-09-01

    The effect of gas pressure on the characteristics of a short-gap lightning discharge in air was investigated. For the tests, 70 ns front lightning pulses were applied to a short (11 cm) point-plane gap under variable pressure. The diagnostics employed included electric current and field measurements, spectroscopy in the visible and fast-frame photography. We found that the pressure has a clear effect on the electric field at the plane. For low pressures, the high fields measured (~7 kV cm-1) are comparable to the Laplacian field, indicating that very little ionization takes place in the gap at this pressure; at higher pressures the space charge contributes substantially to the field magnitude. The effect of pressure on the current pulse was, in contrast, minimal; its peak amplitude and shape remained largely unaffected by pressure. Time-resolved spectroscopy allowed the determination of the instantaneous electron density and temperature to be made; the latter, for example, was found to reach 33 000 K at t ~ 1 µs for most of the pressures employed. Using the measured temperature and radius we made estimations of the arc's resistance. We found that the Spitzer resistivity model gives values of resistance that are compatible with the experimental data obtained.

  2. Compact SPAD-Based Pixel Architectures for Time-Resolved Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Perenzoni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD image sensors for time-resolved imaging. The focus of the paper is on pixel architectures featuring small pixel size (<25 μm and high fill factor (>20% as a key enabling technology for the successful implementation of high spatial resolution SPAD-based image sensors. A summary of the main CMOS SPAD implementations, their characteristics and integration challenges, is provided from the perspective of targeting large pixel arrays, where one of the key drivers is the spatial uniformity. The main analog techniques aimed at time-gated photon counting and photon timestamping suitable for compact and low-power pixels are critically discussed. The main features of these solutions are the adoption of analog counting techniques and time-to-analog conversion, in NMOS-only pixels. Reliable quantum-limited single-photon counting, self-referenced analog-to-digital conversion, time gating down to 0.75 ns and timestamping with 368 ps jitter are achieved.

  3. Rapid and Sensitive Lateral Flow Immunoassay Method for Procalcitonin (PCT Based on Time-Resolved Immunochromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yang Shao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Procalcitonin (PCT is a current, frequently-used marker for severe bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to develop a cost-effective detection kit for rapid quantitative and on-site detection of PCT. To develop the new PCT quantitative detecting kit, a double-antibody sandwich immunofluorescent assay was employed based on time-resolved immunofluorescent assay (TRFIA combined with lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA. The performance of the new developed kit was evaluated in the aspects of linearity, precision, accuracy, and specificity. Two-hundred thirty-four serum samples were enrolled to carry out the comparison test. The new PCT quantitative detecting kit exhibited a higher sensitivity (0.08 ng/mL. The inter-assay coefficient of variation (CV and the intra-assay CV were 5.4%–7.7% and 5.7%–13.4%, respectively. The recovery rates ranged from 93% to 105%. Furthermore, a high correlation (n = 234, r = 0.977, p < 0.0001 and consistency (Kappa = 0.875 were obtained when compared with the PCT kit from Roche Elecsys BRAHMS. Thus, the new quantitative method for detecting PCT has been successfully established. The results indicated that the newly-developed system based on TRFIA combined with LFIA was suitable for rapid and on-site detection for PCT, which might be a useful platform for other biomarkers in point-of-care tests.

  4. Rapid and Sensitive Lateral Flow Immunoassay Method for Procalcitonin (PCT) Based on Time-Resolved Immunochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Cong-Rong; Xie, Chun-Mei; Wang, Xian-Guo; Liang, Rong-Liang; Xu, Wei-Wen

    2017-02-28

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a current, frequently-used marker for severe bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to develop a cost-effective detection kit for rapid quantitative and on-site detection of PCT. To develop the new PCT quantitative detecting kit, a double-antibody sandwich immunofluorescent assay was employed based on time-resolved immunofluorescent assay (TRFIA) combined with lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). The performance of the new developed kit was evaluated in the aspects of linearity, precision, accuracy, and specificity. Two-hundred thirty-four serum samples were enrolled to carry out the comparison test. The new PCT quantitative detecting kit exhibited a higher sensitivity (0.08 ng/mL). The inter-assay coefficient of variation (CV) and the intra-assay CV were 5.4%-7.7% and 5.7%-13.4%, respectively. The recovery rates ranged from 93% to 105%. Furthermore, a high correlation ( n = 234, r = 0.977, p LFIA was suitable for rapid and on-site detection for PCT, which might be a useful platform for other biomarkers in point-of-care tests.

  5. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S., E-mail: ginger@chem.washington.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  6. Time-resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Hopping: Body Size Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    The flow field of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is quantified with time-resolved tomographic PIV. In the current work, we compare body kinematics and flow disturbance between organisms of small (body length = 1.8 mm) versus medium (2.3 mm) versus large (2.65 mm) size. These plankters are equipped with a pair of antennae that are biramous such that the protopodite splits or branches into an exopodite and an endopodite. They beat the antennae pair synchronously to impulsively propel themselves, or `hop,' through the water. The stroke cycle of Daphnia magna is roughly 80 ms in duration and this period is evenly split between the power and recovery strokes. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. Unlike copepod escape motion, no body vortex is observed in front of the animal. Rather, the flow induced by each antennae consists of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrates a slow decay. The time-record of velocity (peak of 40 mm/s for the medium specimen) and hop acceleration (1.8 m/s2 for the medium specimen) are compared, as well as the strength, size, and decay of the induced viscous vortex rings. The viscous vortex ring analysis will be presented in the context of a double Stokeslet model consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width.

  7. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C H; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Li, Chufeng

    2014-07-17

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Reflective optical system for time-resolved electron bunch measurements at PITZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosbach, K.; Baehr, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Roensch-Schulenburg, J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    2011-01-15

    The Photo-Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ), produces pulsed electron beams with low transverse emittance and is equipped with diagnostic devices for measuring various electron bunch properties, including the longitudinal and transverse electron phase space distributions. The longitudinal bunch structure is recorded using a streak camera located outside the accelerator tunnel, connected to the diagnostics in the beam-line stations by an optical system of about 30 m length. This system mainly consists of telescopes of achromatic lenses, which transport the light pulses and image them onto the entrance slit of the streak camera. Due to dispersion in the lenses, the temporal resolution degrades during transport. This article presents general considerations for time-resolving optical systems as well as simulations and measurements of specific candidate systems. It then describes the development of an imaging system based on mirror telescopes which will improve the temporal resolution, with an emphasis on off-axis parabolic mirror systems working at unit magnification. A hybrid system of lenses and mirrors will serve as a proof of principle. (orig.)

  9. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  10. The time-resolved photoelectron spectrum of toluene using a perturbation theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, Gareth W.; Worth, Graham A.

    2014-12-01

    A theoretical study of the intra-molecular vibrational-energy redistribution of toluene using time-resolved photo-electron spectra calculated using nuclear quantum dynamics and a simple, two-mode model is presented. Calculations have been carried out using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method, using three levels of approximation for the calculation of the spectra. The first is a full quantum dynamics simulation with a discretisation of the continuum wavefunction of the ejected electron, whilst the second uses first-order perturbation theory to calculate the wavefunction of the ion. Both methods rely on the explicit inclusion of both the pump and probe laser pulses. The third method includes only the pump pulse and generates the photo-electron spectrum by projection of the pumped wavepacket onto the ion potential energy surface, followed by evaluation of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the subsequently propagated wavepacket. The calculations performed have been used to study the periodic population flow between the 6a and 10b16b modes in the S1 excited state, and compared to recent experimental data. We obtain results in excellent agreement with the experiment and note the efficiency of the perturbation method.

  11. The time-resolved photoelectron spectrum of toluene using a perturbation theory approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richings, Gareth W.; Worth, Graham A., E-mail: g.a.worth@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-28

    A theoretical study of the intra-molecular vibrational-energy redistribution of toluene using time-resolved photo-electron spectra calculated using nuclear quantum dynamics and a simple, two-mode model is presented. Calculations have been carried out using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method, using three levels of approximation for the calculation of the spectra. The first is a full quantum dynamics simulation with a discretisation of the continuum wavefunction of the ejected electron, whilst the second uses first-order perturbation theory to calculate the wavefunction of the ion. Both methods rely on the explicit inclusion of both the pump and probe laser pulses. The third method includes only the pump pulse and generates the photo-electron spectrum by projection of the pumped wavepacket onto the ion potential energy surface, followed by evaluation of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the subsequently propagated wavepacket. The calculations performed have been used to study the periodic population flow between the 6a and 10b16b modes in the S{sub 1} excited state, and compared to recent experimental data. We obtain results in excellent agreement with the experiment and note the efficiency of the perturbation method.

  12. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Microscopy for the Analysis of Semiconductor-Based Paint Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Comelli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In conservation, science semiconductors occur as the constituent matter of the so-called semiconductor pigments, produced following the Industrial Revolution and extensively used by modern painters. With recent research highlighting the occurrence of various degradation phenomena in semiconductor paints, it is clear that their detection by conventional optical fluorescence imaging and microscopy is limited by the complexity of historical painting materials. Here, we illustrate and prove the capabilities of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL microscopy, equipped with both spectral and lifetime sensitivity at timescales ranging from nanoseconds to hundreds of microseconds, for the analysis of cross-sections of paint layers made of luminescent semiconductor pigments. The method is sensitive to heterogeneities within micro-samples and provides valuable information for the interpretation of the nature of the emissions in samples. A case study is presented on micro samples from a painting by Henri Matisse and serves to demonstrate how TRPL can be used to identify the semiconductor pigments zinc white and cadmium yellow, and to inform future investigations of the degradation of a cadmium yellow paint.

  13. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry for time-resolved measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Mark A; Goddard, Andrew; Ingham, Trevor; Pilling, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    A time-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) that can simultaneously monitor multiple species on the millisecond time scale has been constructed. A pulsed photolysis laser is used to initiate reaction, and then via a pinhole the reaction mixture is sampled by the TOF-MS. The ions are created by photoionization via either a discharge lamp or a pulsed laser. Comparison between the two ionization sources showed that the laser is at least an order of magnitude more efficient, based on the time to accumulate the data. Also, unlike the continuous lamp the pulsed laser is not mass limited. Frequency tripling the 355 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser provided a convenient laser ionization source. However, using a dye laser provided an equally intense laser ionization source with the ability to tune the vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) light. To show the versatility of the system the kinetics of the reaction of SO and ClSO radicals with NO(2) were simultaneously measured, and using the dye laser the vuv light was tuned to 114 nm in order to observe H(2)CO being formed from the reaction between CH(3)CO and O(2).

  14. Broadband THz waveguiding and high-precision broadband time-resolved spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nielsen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    , have tailored dispersion and may be bent into sharp bends. Due to the confinement of the THz field in the core of the fibers they are ideal for stable guiding of THz light in confined environments, and may serve as a useful basis for a wealth of fiber-based photonic components in the THz range......We demonstrate optical fibers designed for the THz frequency range, fabricated in a low-loss polymer. The polymer fibers display a broadband loss of 0.4 dB/cm over the 0.1-1 THz range, with a minimum loss of 0.1 dB/cm in the region near 500 GHz. The fibers, based on endlessly single-mode design......, particularly in spectroscopic applications where tight confinement of the THz field is required. We further demonstrate a new spectroscopic technique for ultrafast time-resolved THz time-domain spectroscopy which simultaneously acquires both reference and sample data. By using this scheme we show...

  15. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  16. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  17. Separating grain-boundary and bulk recombination with time-resolved photoluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuciauskas, Darius [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA; Lu, Dingyuan [First Solar, 1035 Walsh Ave., Santa Clara, California 95050, USA; Grover, Sachit [First Solar, 1035 Walsh Ave., Santa Clara, California 95050, USA; Xiong, Gang [First Solar, 1035 Walsh Ave., Santa Clara, California 95050, USA; Gloeckler, Markus [First Solar, 1035 Walsh Ave., Santa Clara, California 95050, USA

    2017-12-04

    Two-photon excitation (2PE) microscopy allows contactless and non-destructive cross-sectional analysis of grain-boundary (GB) and grain-interior (GI) properties in polycrystalline solar cells, with measurements of doping uniformity, space-charge field distribution, and carrier dynamics in different regions of the device. Using 2PE time-resolved microscopy, we analyzed charge-carrier lifetimes near the GBs and in the GI of polycrystalline thin-film CdTe solar cells doped with As. When the grain radius is larger than the minority-carrier diffusion length, GI lifetimes are interpreted as the bulk lifetimes ..tau..B, and GB recombination velocity SGB is extracted by comparing recombination rates in the GI and near GBs. In As-doped CdTe solar cells, we find ..tau..B = 1.0-2.4 ns and SGB = (1-4) x 105 cm/s. The results imply the potential to improve solar cell voltage via GB passivation and reduced recombination center concentration in the GI.

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies of sodium lauryl ether sulfate micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Leidi C.; Silva, Volnir O.; Quina, Frank H., E-mail: quina@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Moreira Junior, Paulo F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tcacenco, Celize M. [Fundacao Instituto de Ensino para Osasco (FIEO/UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil). Centro Universitario FIEO. Centro de Estudos Quimicos

    2013-02-15

    Aggregation numbers (N{sub Ag}) of micelles of the commercial anionic detergent sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), with an average of two ethylene oxide subunits, were determined at 30 and 40 deg C by the time-resolved fluorescence quenching method with pyrene as the fluorescent probe and the N-hexadecylpyridinium ion as the quencher. The added-salt dependent growth of SLES micelles ({gamma} = 0.11-0.15, where {gamma} is the slope of a plot of log aggregation number vs. log [Y{sub aq}] and [Y{sub aq}] is the sodium counterion concentration free in the intermicellar aqueous phase) is found to be significantly lower than that of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles ({gamma} ca. 0.25), a difference attributed to the larger headgroup size of SLES. The I{sub 1}/I{sub 3} vibronic intensity ratio and the rate constant for intramicellar quenching of pyrene show that the pyrene solubilization microenvironment and the intramicellar microviscosity are insensitive to micelle size or the presence of added salt. (author)

  19. Time resolved FTIR study of the catalytic CO oxidation under periodic variation of the reactant concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzenberger, J.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Oxidation of CO over palladium/zirconia catalyst obtained from an amorphous Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} precursor was investigated by time resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Sine wave shaped modulation of the reactant concentration, i.e. variation of CO or O{sub 2} partial pressure, was used to induce variations of the IR signals of product (CO{sub 2}) and unconverted reactant (CO), which were detected in a multi-pass absorption cell. The phase shift {phi} between external perturbation and variation of the CO{sub 2} signal was examined in dependence on temperature (100{sup o}C{<=}T{<=}350{sup o}C) and modulation frequency (1.39x10{sup -4}Hz{<=}{omega}{<=}6.67x10{sup -2}Hz). From the phase shift values, a simple Eley-Rideal mechanism is excluded, and the rate limiting step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for the CO oxidation may be identified. Adsorption and possible surface movement of CO to the actual reaction site determine the rate of the CO oxidation on the palladium/zirconia catalyst used in our study. The introduction of an external perturbation is a first step towards the application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to heterogeneous catalyzed reactions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  20. Characterization of normal breast tissue heterogeneity using time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Tomas [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Swartling, Johannes [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Taroni, Paola [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-210 33 Milan (Italy); Torricelli, Alessandro [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-210 33 Milan (Italy); Lindblom, Pia [Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Ingvar, Christian [Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2005-06-07

    In recent years, extensive efforts have been made in developing near-infrared optical techniques to be used in detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Variations in optical properties of normal breast tissue set limits to the performance of such techniques and must therefore be thoroughly examined. In this paper, we present intra- and intersubject as well as contralateral variations of optical and physiological properties in breast tissue as measured by using four-wavelength time-resolved spectroscopy (at 660, 786, 916 and 974 nm). In total, 36 volunteers were examined at five regions at each breast. Optical properties (absorption, {mu}{sub a}, and reduced scattering, {mu}'{sub s}) are derived by employing diffusion theory. The use of four wavelengths enables determination of main tissue chromophores (haemoglobin, water and lipids) as well as haemoglobin oxygenation. Variations in all evaluated properties seen over the entire breast are approximately twice those for small-scale heterogeneity (millimetre scale). Intrasubject variations in optical properties are almost in all cases below 20% for {mu}'{sub s}, and 40% for {mu}{sub a}. Overall variations in water, lipid and haemoglobin concentrations are all in the order of 20%. Oxygenation is the least variable of the quantities evaluated, overall intrasubject variations being 6% on average. Extracted physiological properties confirm differences between pre- and post-menopausal breast tissue. Results do not indicate systematic differences between left and right breast000.

  1. Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect of Magnetic Thin Films for Ultrafast Thermal Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Yang; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Delin; Lattery, Dustin M; Li, Mo; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-07-07

    Thermomagnetic and magneto-optical effects are two fundamental but unique phenomena existing in magnetic materials. In this work, we demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) as an advanced thermal characterization technique by studying the original factors of the MOKE signal from four magnetic transducers, including TbFe, GdFeCo, Co/Pd, and CoFe/Pt. A figure of merit is proposed to evaluate the performance of the transducer layers, corresponding to the degree of the signal-to-noise ratio in TR-MOKE measurements. We observe improved figure of merit for rare-earth transition-metal-based TbFe and GdFeCo transducers and attribute this improvement to their relatively larger temperature-dependent magnetization and the Kerr rotation angle at the saturated magnetization state. Furthermore, an optimal thickness of TbFe is found to be ∼18.5 nm to give the best performance. Our findings will facilitate the nanoscale thermal characterization and the device design where the thermo-magneto-optical coupling plays an important role.

  2. Monitoring brain temperature by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2014-05-01

    Mild hypothermia (HT) is an effective neuroprotective strategy for a variety of acute brain injuries. However, the wide clinical adaptation of HT has been hampered by the lack of a reliable noninvasive method for measuring brain temperature, since core measurements have been shown to not always reflect brain temperature. The goal of this work was to develop a noninvasive optical technique for measuring brain temperature that exploits both the temperature dependency of water absorption and the high concentration of water in brain (80%-90%). Specifically, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS) to measure temperature in tissue-mimicking phantoms (in vitro) and deep brain tissue (in vivo) during heating and cooling, respectively. For deep brain tissue temperature monitoring, experiments were conducted on newborn piglets wherein hypothermia was induced by gradual whole body cooling. Brain temperature was concomitantly measured by TR-NIRS and a thermocouple probe implanted in the brain. Our proposed TR-NIRS method was able to measure the temperature of tissue-mimicking phantoms and brain tissues with a correlation of 0.82 and 0.66 to temperature measured with a thermometer, respectively. The mean difference between the TR-NIRS and thermometer measurements was 0.15°C±1.1°C for the in vitro experiments and 0.5°C±1.6°C for the in vivo measurements.

  3. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Borodziuk, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gus' kov, S. Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (Moscow Eng. Phys. Institute) (Russian Federation); Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Demchenko, N. N. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korneev, Ph. [National Research Nuclear University (Moscow Eng. Phys. Institute) (Russian Federation); Kalal, M. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Renner, O.; Smid, M. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Pisarczyk, P. [Warsaw University of Technology, ICS, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    The first space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) measurements realized on Prague Asterix Laser System are presented. The SMF was generated as a result of single laser beam (1.315 μm) interaction with massive planar targets made of materials with various atomic numbers (plastic and Cu). Measured SMF confirmed azimuthal geometry and their maximum amplitude reached the value of 10 MG at the laser energy of 250 J for both target materials. It was demonstrated that spatial distributions of these fields are associated with the character of the ablative plasma expansion which clearly depends on the target material. To measure the SMF, the Faraday effect was employed causing rotation of the vector of polarization of the linearly polarized diagnostic beam. The rotation angle was determined together with the phase shift using a novel design of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. To obtain sufficiently high temporal resolution, the polaro-interferometer was irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulse with the wavelength of 808 nm and the pulse duration of 40 fs. The results of measurements were compared with theoretical analysis.

  4. Time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy for nondestructive assessment of fruit and vegetable quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Vanoli, Maristella; Rizzolo, Anna; Eccher Zerbini, Paola

    2007-09-01

    In the majority of food and feed, due to the microscopic spatial changes in the refractive index, visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) light undergoes multiple scattering events and the overall light distribution is determined more by scattering rather than absorption. Conventional steady state VIS/NIR reflectance spectroscopy can provide information on light attenuation, which depends both on light absorption and light scattering, but cannot discriminate these two effects. On the contrary, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy (TRS) provides a complete optical characterisation of diffusive media in terms of their absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient. From the assessment of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, information can then be derived on the composition and internal structure of the medium. Main advantages of the technique are the absolute non-invasiveness, the potentiality for non-contact measurements, and the capacity to probe internal properties with no influence from the skin. In this work we review the physical and technical issues related to the use of TRS for nondestructive quality assessment of fruit and vegetable. A laboratory system for broadband TRS, based on tunable mode-locked lasers and fast microchannel plate photomultiplier, and a portable setup for TRS measurements, based on pulsed diode lasers and compact metal-channel photomultiplier, will be described. Results on broadband optical characterisation of fruits and applications of TRS to the detection of internal defects in pears and to maturity assessment in nectarines will be presented.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics in helium nanodroplets probed by femtosecond time-resolved EUV photoelectron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Wang, Chia C.; Buenermann, Oliver; Healy, Andrew T.; Leonard, Mathew; Peng, Chunte; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Gessner, Oliver

    2010-07-09

    The dynamics of electronically excited helium nanodroplets are studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. EUV excitation into a broad absorption band centered around 23.8 eV leads to an indirect photoemission process that generates ultraslow photoelectrons. A 1.58 eV probe pulse transiently depletes the indirect photoemission signal for pump-probe time delays <200 fs and enhances the signal beyond this delay. The depletion is due to suppression of the indirect ionization process by the probe photon, which generates a broad, isotropically emitted photoelectron band. Similar time scales in the decay of the high energy photoelectron signal and the enhancement of the indirect photoemission signal suggest an internal relaxation process that populates states in the range of a lower energy droplet absorption band located just below the droplet ionization potential (IP {approx} 23.0 eV). A nearly 70% enhancement of the ultraslow photoelectron signal indicates that interband relaxation plays a more dominant role for the droplet de-excitation mechanism than photoemission.

  6. Noninvasive evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Sato, Masato; Ishihara, Miya; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Makoto; Ushida, Takashi; Mochida, Joji

    2010-06-01

    Regenerative medicine requires noninvasive evaluation. Our objective is to investigate the application of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) using a nano-second-pulsed laser for evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). To prepare scaffold-free TEC, articular chondrocytes from 4-week-old Japanese white rabbits were harvested, and were inoculated at a high density in a mold. Cells were cultured for 5 weeks by rotating culture (RC) or static culture (SC). The RC group and SC group at each week (n = 5), as well as normal articular cartilage and purified collagen type II (as controls), were analyzed by TR-LIFS. The peak wavelength was compared with those of type II collagen immunostaining and type II collagen quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and tensile testing. The fluorescence peak wavelength of the TEC analyzed by this method shifted significantly in the RC group at 3 weeks, and in the SC group at 5 weeks (p TEC.

  7. Object classification through scattering media with deep learning on time resolved measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satat, Guy; Tancik, Matthew; Gupta, Otkrist; Heshmat, Barmak; Raskar, Ramesh

    2017-07-24

    We demonstrate an imaging technique that allows identification and classification of objects hidden behind scattering media and is invariant to changes in calibration parameters within a training range. Traditional techniques to image through scattering solve an inverse problem and are limited by the need to tune a forward model with multiple calibration parameters (like camera field of view, illumination position etc.). Instead of tuning a forward model and directly inverting the optical scattering, we use a data driven approach and leverage convolutional neural networks (CNN) to learn a model that is invariant to calibration parameters variations within the training range and nearly invariant beyond that. This effectively allows robust imaging through scattering conditions that is not sensitive to calibration. The CNN is trained with a large synthetic dataset generated with a Monte Carlo (MC) model that contains random realizations of major calibration parameters. The method is evaluated with a time-resolved camera and multiple experimental results are provided including pose estimation of a mannequin hidden behind a paper sheet with 23 correct classifications out of 30 tests in three poses (76.6% accuracy on real-world measurements). This approach paves the way towards real-time practical non line of sight (NLOS) imaging applications.

  8. Multichannel FPGA-Based Data-Acquisition-System for Time-Resolved Synchrotron Radiation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Hyeokmin; Gorfman, Semen; Heidbrink, Stefan; Pietsch, Ullrich; Vogt, Marco; Winter, Jens; Ziolkowski, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this contribution is to describe our recent development of a novel compact field-programmable gatearray (FPGA)-based data acquisition (DAQ) system for use with multichannel X-ray detectors at synchrotron radiation facilities. The system is designed for time resolved counting of single photons arriving from several-currently 12-independent detector channels simultaneously. Detector signals of at least 2.8 ns duration are latched by asynchronous logic and then synchronized with the system clock of 100 MHz. The incoming signals are subsequently sorted out into 10 000 time-bins where they are counted. This occurs according to the arrival time of photons with respect to the trigger signal. Repeatable mode of triggered operation is used to achieve high statistic of accumulated counts. The time-bin width is adjustable from 10 ns to 1 ms. In addition, a special mode of operation with 2 ns time resolution is provided for two detector channels. The system is implemented in a pocketsize FPGA-based hardware of 10 cm × 10 cm × 3 cm and thus can easily be transported between synchrotron radiation facilities. For setup of operation and data read-out, the hardware is connected via USB interface to a portable control computer. DAQ applications are provided in both LabVIEW and MATLAB environments.

  9. Time-resolved MR angiography of the intracranial venous system: an alternative MR venography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Hasan; Turan, Aynur; Erguen, Elif; Kosar, Pinar; Kosar, Ugur [Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Altindag, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-05-15

    To compare time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with two-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance venography (MRV), and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced (CE) MRV in the visualisation of normal cerebral veins and dural venous sinuses. This prospective study consisted of 35 consecutive patients. All patients were examined with TOF MRV, TRICKS MRA and CE MRV; a single dose of intravenous contrast material was administered for the last two sequences. The image quality of these techniques was assessed and compared qualitatively (by a semiquantitative scoring system) and quantitatively (by calculating signal-to-noise ratios [SNRs] and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]). Left transverse sinus, left sigmoid sinus, bilateral thalamostriate veins and Trolard veins were better visualised by TRICKS MRA and CE MRV compared with TOF MRV (P < 0.05). For left thalamostriate vein visualisation, TRICKS MRA was inferior to CE MRV (P < 0.05). With quantitative analysis the SNRs and CNRs were highest at TRICKS MRA, which was followed by CE MRV and TOF MRV (P < 0.05). Despite its limited spatial resolution, TRICKS MRA is comparable to static CE MRV and better than TOF MRV in the visualisation of normal dural sinuses and cerebral veins. (orig.)

  10. Neutron measurements with Time-Resolved Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, M.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Friedman, E.; Czasch, A.; Mardor, I.; Mor, I.; Weierganz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Results are presented from the latest experiment with a new neutron/gamma detector, a Time-Resolved, Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector. It is composed of a scintillating fiber-screen converter, bending mirror, lens and Event-Counting Image Intensifier (ECII), capable of specifying the position and time-of-flight of each event. TRECOR is designated for a multipurpose integrated system that will detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and explosives in cargo. Explosives are detected by Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography, and SNM by Dual Discrete-Energy gamma-Radiography. Neutrons and gamma-rays are both produced in the 11B(d,n+γ)12C reaction. The two detection modes can be implemented simultaneously in TRECOR, using two adjacent radiation converters that share a common optical readout. In the present experiment the neutron detection mode was studied, using a plastic scintillator converter. The measurements were performed at the PTB cyclotron, using the 9Be(d,n) neutron spectrum obtained from a thick Be-target at Ed ~ 13 MeV\\@. The basic characteristics of this detector were investigated, including the Contrast Transfer Function (CTF), Point Spread Function (PSF) and elemental discrimination capability.

  11. Conductivity of ZnO nanowires, nanoparticles, and thin films using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Jason B; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2006-12-21

    The terahertz absorption coefficient, index of refraction, and conductivity of nanostructured ZnO have been determined using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, a noncontact optical probe. ZnO properties were measured directly for thin films and were extracted from measurements of nanowire arrays and mesoporous nanoparticle films by applying Bruggeman effective medium theory to the composite samples. Annealing significantly reduces the intrinsic carrier concentration in the ZnO films and nanowires, which were grown by chemical bath deposition. The complex-valued, frequency-dependent photoconductivities for all morphologies were found to be similar at short pump-probe delay times. Fits using the Drude-Smith model show that films have the highest mobility, followed by nanowires and then nanoparticles, and that annealing the ZnO increases its mobility. Time constants for decay of photoinjected electron density in films are twice as long as those in nanowires and more than 5 times those for nanoparticles due to increased electron interaction with interfaces and grain boundaries in the smaller-grained materials. Implications for electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cells are discussed.

  12. Improved Fast, Deep Record Length, Time-Resolved Visible Spectroscopy of Plasmas Using Fiber Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Cruz, E.; Williams, A.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Horton, R.; Klauser, R.; Hwang, D.

    2017-10-01

    HyperV Technologies is developing a fiber-coupled, deep record-length, low-light camera head for performing high time resolution spectroscopy on visible emission from plasma events. By coupling the output of a spectrometer to an imaging fiber bundle connected to a bank of amplified silicon photomultipliers, time-resolved spectroscopic imagers of 100 to 1,000 pixels can be constructed. A second generation prototype 32-pixel spectroscopic imager employing this technique was constructed and successfully tested at the University of California at Davis Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX). Pixel performance of 10 Megaframes/sec with record lengths of up to 256,000 frames ( 25.6 milliseconds) were achieved. Pixel resolution was 12 bits. Pixel pitch can be refined by using grids of 100 μm to 1000 μm diameter fibers. Experimental results will be discussed, along with future plans for this diagnostic. Work supported by USDOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0013801.

  13. Water distribution in a sorption enhanced methanation reactor by time resolved neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgschulte, A; Delmelle, R; Duarte, R B; Heel, A; Boillat, P; Lehmann, E

    2016-06-29

    Water adsorption enhanced catalysis has been recently shown to greatly increase the conversion yield of CO2 methanation. However, the joint catalysis and adsorption process requires new reactor concepts. We measured the spatial water distribution in a model fixed bed reactor using time resolved neutron imaging. Due to the high neutron attenuation coefficient of hydrogen, the absorbed water in the sorption catalyst gives a high contrast allowing us to follow its formation and map its distribution. At the same time, the product gas was analysed by FTIR-gas analysis. The measurements provided crucial insights into the future design of sorption reactors: during the sorption enhanced reaction, a reaction front runs through the reactor. Once the extension of the reaction front reaches the exhaust, the conversion rate of sorption enhanced methanation decreases. The existence of a reaction front running through the reactor is prerequisite for a high conversion rate. We give a simple model of the experimental results, in particular the conditions, under which a reaction front is established. In particular the latter effect must be taken into account for the dimensions of a large scale reactor.

  14. Design of a portable fluorometer capable of time-resolved luminescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoying

    2004-11-01

    A rugged, filter-based fluorometer capable of time-resolved luminescence (TRL) measurements was designed, prototyped and tested for field applications. The instrument operation and data processing were controlled by a laptop computer running a custom LabVIEW program. A xenon flashlamp was used as the light source and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) as the photodetector. A gating technique was implemented to effectively overcome PMT saturation by intense xenon lamp flash so signal integrity was maintained even at very high gains, leading to improved sensitivity and reproducibility. The instrument was tested by TRL using tetracycline as a model analyte; and the signal was digitized at a 2-μs time resolution and a 12-bit amplitude resolution. Its performance was similar to or slightly better than that of a commercial fluorescence spectrophotometer. A 0-300 ppb linear dynamic range (r2 = 0.9996) and a 0.025-ppb limit of detection (LOD) were achieved with a <=5% relative standard deviation.

  15. Note: A time-resolved Kerr rotation system with a rotatable in-plane magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xuan; Gu, Xiaofang; Ji, Yang

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolved Kerr rotation system with a rotatable in-plane magnetic field has been constructed to study anisotropic spin relaxation of electrons in semiconductors. A permanent magnet magic ring is placed on top of a motor-driven rotation stage (RS) to create the rotatable in-plane magnetic field. The RS is placed on a second translation stage to vary the local magnetic field around a sample. The in-plane magnetic field in such a system varies from 0.05 to 0.95 T, with full-round 360° rotatablity, thus offering a convenient and low-cost way to study the anisotropy of spin dynamics in semiconductors. Its performance was demonstrated via measurement of the anisotropy of the spin dephasing time (SDT) of electrons in a two-dimensional electron system embedded in a GaAs/Al(0.35)Ga(0.65)As heterostructure. The SDT with B∥[110] was observed to be 10% larger than that with B∥[110], consistent with the results of others, which was measured via rotating sample.

  16. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. Time-resolved photoluminescence characterization of oxygen-related defect centers in AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genji, Kumihiro; Uchino, Takashi, E-mail: uchino@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2016-07-11

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the emission characteristics of oxygen-related defects in AlN in the temperature region from 77 to 500 K. Two PL components with different decay constants are observed in the near-ultraviolet to visible regions. One is the PL component with decay time of <10 ns and its peak position shifts to longer wavelengths from ∼350 to ∼500 nm with increasing temperature up to 500 K. This PL component is attributed to the radiative relaxation of photoexcited electrons from the band-edge states to the ground state of the oxygen-related emission centers. In the time region from tens to hundreds of nanoseconds, the second PL component emerges in the wavelength region from 300 to 400 nm. The spectral shape and the decay profiles are hardly dependent on temperature. This temperature-independent PL component most likely results from the transfer of photoexcited electrons from the band-edge states to the localized excited state of the oxygen-related emission centers. These results provide a detailed insight into the radiative relaxation processes of the oxygen-related defect centers in AlN immediately after the photoexcitation process.

  18. Development of time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kenji; Ohmae, Etsuko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Homma, Shu; Mimura, Tetsuya; Wada, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yoshizawa, Nobuko; Nasu, Hatsuko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Sakahara, Harumi; Yamashita, Yutaka; Ueda, Yukio

    2017-02-01

    We developed a time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography (RDOT) system to measure tumor responses to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients at the bedside. This system irradiates the breast with a three-wavelength pulsed laser (760, 800, and 830 nm) through a source fiber specified by an optical switch. The light collected by detector fibers is guided to a detector unit consisting of variable attenuators and photomultiplier tubes. Thirteen irradiation and 12 detection points were set to a measurement area of 50 × 50 mm for a hand-held probe. The data acquisition time required to obtain the temporal profiles within the measurement area is about 2 minutes. The RDOT system generates topographic and tomographic images of tissue properties such as hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen saturation using two imaging methods. Topographic images are obtained from the optical properties determined for each source-detector pair using a curve-fitting method based on the photon diffusion theory, while tomographic images are reconstructed using an iterative image reconstruction method. In an experiment using a tissue-like solid phantom, a tumor-like cylindrical target (15 mm diameter, 15 mm high) embedded in a breast tissue-like background medium was successfully reconstructed. Preliminary clinical measurements indicated that the tumor in a breast cancer patient was detected as a region of high hemoglobin concentration. In addition, the total hemoglobin concentration decreased during chemotherapy. These results demonstrate the potential of RDOT for evaluating the effectiveness of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer.

  19. Time-resolved products observed from high pressure deflagrating energetic materials using femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaug, J. M.; Glascoe, E. A.; Crowhurst, J. C.; Fried, L. E.; Armstrong, M. R.; Grant, C. D.

    2007-06-01

    What transient chemical species occur on the nanosecond to microsecond time-scale after an energetic material begins to deflagrate under Chapman-Jouguet conditions? What are the molecular lifetimes of transient species under similar conditions? Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to study the transient chemical phenomena of materials encapsulated in high-pressure diamond anvils cells (DACs), these and related questions can be addressed. Here we present a broadband time-resolved IR (TRIR) absorption technique applied to high-pressure deflagrating energetic materials. A 10 nanosecond laser pulse is introduced onto the surface of a high-pressure energetic material. After an induction period of approximately one microsecond the energetic material begins to deflagrate (1500+K) at subsonic velocities radially away from the laser ignited region. A mid-IR femtosecond laser pulse (pulse-gated, 2-10 micron tunable range) is transmitted through the deflagration front. The single-shot mid-IR absorbance is used to detect transient species. Our measurements provide a rigorous test of computational chemistry models.

  20. Complete time-resolved polarimetry of scattered light at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, David; Ayers, Shannon; Bell, Perry; Chow, Robert; Frieders, Gene; Hibbard, Robin L.; Michel, Pierre; Ralph, Joseph E.; Ross, James S.; Stanley, Joel R.; Vickers, James L.; Zeid, Ziad M.; Moody, John D.

    2015-08-01

    The 3ω scattered light polarimetry diagnostic in the 30° incidence cone backscatter diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being upgraded to measure the full time-resolved Stokes vector. Previously, the diagnostic had a single channel capable of diagnosing the time-integrated balance of the horizontal and vertical polarizations. Two additional channels were added - one that measures the balance of the 45° and 135° projections, and another that measures the right- and left-circular polarizations - and together the three complete the Stokes vector measurement. A division-of-aperture scheme is employed in which three nearby portions of the near field are sampled simultaneously. Time resolution is obtained by relaying an image of the measured regions onto a set of fibers coupled to diodes. The new diagnostic will be capable of measuring scattered light signals crossed-beam energy transfer in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. It will also be used to diagnose Faraday rotation induced by magnetic fields in collisionless shock and turbulent dynamo experiments later this year.

  1. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  2. A high accuracy broadband measurement system for time resolved complex bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, S; Malhotra, A; Ardelt, G; Ryschka, M

    2014-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements are useful tools in biomedical engineering and life science. Bioimpedance is the electrical impedance of living tissue and can be used in the analysis of various physiological parameters. Bioimpedance is commonly measured by injecting a small well known alternating current via surface electrodes into an object under test and measuring the resultant surface voltages. It is non-invasive, painless and has no known hazards. This work presents a field programmable gate array based high accuracy broadband bioimpedance measurement system for time resolved bioimpedance measurements. The system is able to measure magnitude and phase of complex impedances under test in a frequency range of about 10-500 kHz with excitation currents from 10 µA to 5 mA. The overall measurement uncertainties stay below 1% for the impedance magnitude and below 0.5° for the phase in most measurement ranges. Furthermore, the described system has a sample rate of up to 3840 impedance spectra per second. The performance of the bioimpedance measurement system is demonstrated with a resistor based system calibration and with measurements on biological samples.

  3. User-based representation of time-resolved multimodal public transportation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandretti, Laura; Karsai, Márton; Gauvin, Laetitia

    2016-07-01

    Multimodal transportation systems, with several coexisting services like bus, tram and metro, can be represented as time-resolved multilayer networks where the different transportation modes connecting the same set of nodes are associated with distinct network layers. Their quantitative description became possible recently due to openly accessible datasets describing the geo-localized transportation dynamics of large urban areas. Advancements call for novel analytics, which combines earlier established methods and exploits the inherent complexity of the data. Here, we provide a novel user-based representation of public transportation systems, which combines representations, accounting for the presence of multiple lines and reducing the effect of spatial embeddedness, while considering the total travel time, its variability across the schedule, and taking into account the number of transfers necessary. After the adjustment of earlier techniques to the novel representation framework, we analyse the public transportation systems of several French municipal areas and identify hidden patterns of privileged connections. Furthermore, we study their efficiency as compared to the commuting flow. The proposed representation could help to enhance resilience of local transportation systems to provide better design policies for future developments.

  4. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  5. Time-resolved temperature and number density measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond-duration discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Rounak; Boyson, Toby K.; O'Byrne, Sean

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a fast detection technique using diode laser absorption spectroscopy as an optical diagnostic tool to measure time-resolved temperature and number density in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond-duration discharge. Argon atoms in the 1 s3 metastable state were optically probed by current scanning a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode over the 1 s3→2 p4 transition at 794 nm. Temperature and number density measurements are presented at pulse energies from 20 μJ to 300 μJ, at a constant pressure of 2.67 kPa and 10 kHz repetition frequency. A time resolution of 2 ns was achieved for the measurements during and after the discharge pulse. We demonstrate the method used to make nanosecond resolution measurements, the precision of this technique and the effect of pulse energy on the translational temperature and number density of the metastable atoms. Our measurements show that, for small input pulse energies, the peak temperature of the argon atoms in the 1s3 state can exceed ambient room temperature by up to an order of magnitude.

  6. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid (4)He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-28

    Intense shock waves in superfluid (4)He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 10(4) m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  7. In vivo flow cytometry and time-resolved near-IR angiography and lymphography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Brock, Robert W.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2007-05-01

    Integration of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques with high-speed, high-resolution transmission and fluorescence microscopy shows great potential for in vivo flow cytometry and indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared (IR) angiography of blood and lymph microvessels. In particular, the capabilities of in vivo flow cytometry using rat mesentery and nude mouse ear models are demonstrated for real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells in skin, mesentery, lymph nodes, liver, kidney; studying vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics; monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems; high-speed imaging of cell deformability in flow; and label-free real-time monitoring of single cell extravasation from blood vessel lumen into tissue. As presented, the advantages of ICG IR-angiography include estimation of time resolved dye dynamics (appearance and clearance) in blood and lymph microvessels using fluorescent and photoacoustic modules of the integrated technique. These new approaches are important for monitoring and quantifying metastatic and apoptotic cells; comparative measurements of plasma and cell velocities; analysis of immune responses; monitoring of circulating macromolecules, chylomicrons, bacteria, viruses and nanoparticles; molecular imaging. In the future, we believe that the integrated technique presented will have great potential for translation to early disease diagnoses (e.g. cancer) or assessment of innovative therapeutic interventions in humans.

  8. Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

  9. Noninvasive detection of concealed explosives: depth profiling through opaque plastics by time-resolved Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Ingeborg E Iping; López-López, María; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Gooijer, Cees; Buijs, Joost B; Ariese, Freek

    2011-11-15

    The detection of explosives concealed behind opaque, diffusely scattering materials is a challenge that requires noninvasive analytical techniques for identification without having to manipulate the package. In this context, this study focuses on the application of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy (TRRS) with a picosecond pulsed laser and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) detector for the noninvasive identification of explosive materials through several millimeters of opaque polymers or plastic packaging materials. By means of a short (250 ps) gate which can be delayed several hundred picoseconds after the laser pulse, the ICCD detector allows for the temporal discrimination between photons from the surface of a sample and those from deeper layers. TRRS was applied for the detection of the two main isomers of dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 2,6-dinitrotoluene as well as for various other components of explosive mixtures, including akardite II, diphenylamine, and ethyl centralite. Spectra were obtained through different diffuse scattering white polymer materials: polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polyethylene (PE). Common packaging materials of various thicknesses were also selected, including polystyrene (PS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). With the demonstration of the ability to detect concealed, explosives-related compounds through an opaque first layer, this study may have important applications in the security and forensic fields.

  10. Dual time-resolved temperature-jump fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy for the study of fast protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caitlin M; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2017-05-05

    Time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) coupled with fluorescence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for monitoring protein dynamics. Although IR spectroscopy of the polypeptide amide I mode is more technically challenging, it offers complementary information because it directly probes changes in the protein backbone, whereas, fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive to the environment of specific side chains. With the advent of widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) it is possible to efficiently probe multiple IR frequencies with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here we describe a dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectrometer and its application to study protein folding dynamics. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser provides the T-jump source for both time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectroscopy, which are probed by a QCL and Ti:Sapphire laser, respectively. The Ho:YAG laser simultaneously pumps the time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectrometers. The instrument has high sensitivity, with an IR absorbance detection limit of jump induced difference spectrum from 50ns to 0.5ms. This study demonstrates the power of the dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectroscopy to resolve complex folding mechanisms by complementary IR absorbance and fluorescence measurements of protein dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detailed longitudinal sampling of glioma stem cells in situ reveals Chr7 gain and Chr10 loss as repeated events in primary tumor formation and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysan, Mehmet; Woolard, Kevin; Cam, Margaret C; Zhang, Wei; Song, Hua; Kotliarova, Svetlana; Balamatsias, Demosthenes; Linkous, Amanda; Ahn, Susie; Walling, Jennifer; Belova, Galina I; Fine, Howard A

    2017-11-15

    Intratumoral heterogeneity at the genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, and morphologic levels is a commonly observed phenomenon in many aggressive cancer types. Clonal evolution during tumor formation and in response to therapeutic intervention can be predicted utilizing reverse engineering approaches on detailed genomic snapshots of heterogeneous patient tumor samples. In this study, we developed an extensive dataset for a GBM case via the generation of polyclonal and monoclonal glioma stem cell lines from initial diagnosis, and from multiple sections of distant tumor locations of the deceased patient's brain following tumor recurrence. Our analyses revealed the tissue-wide expansion of a new clone in the recurrent tumor and chromosome 7 gain and chromosome 10 loss as repeated genomic events in primary and recurrent disease. Moreover, chromosome 7 gain and chromosome 10 loss produced similar alterations in mRNA expression profiles in primary and recurrent tumors despite possessing other highly heterogeneous and divergent genomic alterations between the tumors. We identified ETV1 and CDK6 as putative candidate genes, and NFKB (complex), IL1B, IL6, Akt and VEGF as potential signaling regulators, as potentially central downstream effectors of chr7 gain and chr10 loss. Finally, the differences caused by the transcriptomic shift following gain of chromosome 7 and loss of chromosome 10 were consistent with those generally seen in GBM samples compared to normal brain in large-scale patient-tumor data sets. © 2017 UICC.

  12. Studying Kinetics with Neutrons Prospects for Time-Resolved Neutron Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Eckold, Götz; Nagler, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    Neutrons are extremely versatile probes for investigating structure and dynamics in condensed matter. Due to their large penetration depth, they are ideal for in-situ measurements of samples situated in sophisticated and advanced environments. The advent of new high-intensity neutron sources and instruments, as well as the development of new real-time techniques, allows the tracking of transformation processes in condensed matter on a microscopic scale. The present volume provides a review of the state of the art of this new and exciting field of kinetics with neutrons

  13. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  14. Analysis of the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect for ultrafast magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdolski, I.; Alekhin, A.; Martens, U.; Bürstel, D.; Diesing, D.; Münzenberg, M.; Bovensiepen, U.; Melnikov, A.

    2017-05-01

    We discuss fundamental aspects of laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization probed by the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). Studying thin Fe films on MgO substrate in the absence of electronic transport, we demonstrate how to disentangle pump-induced variations of magnetization and magneto-optical coefficients. We provide a mathematical formalism for retrieving genuine laser-induced magnetization dynamics and discuss its applicability in real experimental situations. We further stress the importance of temporal resolution achieved in the experiments and argue that measurements of both time-resolved MOKE rotation and ellipticity are needed for the correct assessment of magnetization dynamics on sub-picosecond timescales. The framework developed here sheds light onto the details of the time-resolved MOKE technique and contributes to the understanding of the interplay between ultrafast laser-induced optical and magnetic effects.

  15. Time-resolved 3D contrast-enhanced MRA with GRAPPA on a 1.5-T system for imaging of craniocervical vascular disease: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Stephan; Mekle, Ralf; Taschner, Christian; Haller, Sven; Scheffler, Klaus; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Wetzel, Stephan G

    2006-05-01

    For three-dimensional (3D) imaging with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the cerebral and cervical circulation, both a high temporal and a high spatial resolution with isovolumetric datasets are of interest. In an initial evaluation, we analyzed the potential of contrast-enhanced (CE) time-resolved 3D-MRA as an adjunct for neurovascular MR imaging. In ten patients with various cerebrovascular disorders and vascularized tumors in the cervical circulation, high-speed MR acquisition using parallel imaging with the GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisitions (GRAPPA) algorithm on a 1.5-T system with a temporal resolution of 1.5 s per dataset and a nearly isovolumetric spatial resolution was applied. The results were assessed and compared with those from conventional MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). CE time-resolved 3D-MRA enabled the visualization and characterization of high-flow arteriovenous shunts in cases of vascular malformations or hypervascularized tumors. In steno-occlusive disease, the method provided valuable additional information about altered vessel perfusion compared to standard MRA techniques such as time-of-flight (TOF) MRA. The use of a nearly isovolumetric voxel size allowed a free-form interrogation of 3D datasets. Its comparatively low spatial resolution was found to be the major limitation. In this preliminary analysis, CE time-resolved 3D-MRA was revealed to be a promising complementary MRA sequence that enabled the visualization of contrast flow dynamics in various types of neurovascular disorders and vascularized cervical tumors.

  16. Time-resolved dual transcriptomics reveal early induced Nicotiana benthamiana root genes and conserved infection-promoting Phytophthora palmivora effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelisti, Edouard; Gogleva, Anna; Hainaux, Thomas; Doumane, Mehdi; Tulin, Frej; Quan, Clément; Yunusov, Temur; Floch, Kévin; Schornack, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant-pathogenic oomycetes are responsible for economically important losses in crops worldwide. Phytophthora palmivora, a tropical relative of the potato late blight pathogen, causes rotting diseases in many tropical crops including papaya, cocoa, oil palm, black pepper, rubber, coconut, durian, mango, cassava and citrus. Transcriptomics have helped to identify repertoires of host-translocated micr...

  17. Revealing the micromechanisms behind semi-solid metal deformation with time-resolved X-ray tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kareh, K. M.; Lee, P. D.; Atwood, R. C.; Connolley, T.; Gourlay, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of granular solid–liquid mixtures is key when deforming a wide range of materials from cornstarch slurries to soils, rock and magma flows. Here we demonstrate that treating semi-solid alloys as a granular fluid is critical to understanding flow behaviour and defect formation during casting. Using synchrotron X-ray tomography, we directly measure the discrete grain response during uniaxial compression. We show that the stress–strain response at 64–93% solid is due to the shear-in...

  18. Time-resolved granular dynamics of a rotating drum in a slumping regime as revealed by speckle visibility spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivkovic V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular materials in rotating drums are of wide interest not only because of their extensive use in the industrial contexts, but also as model systems in the study of natural disasters, such as avalanches or landslides. Most of available experimental methods are restricted to surface layer flows and dilute systems whilst the remainder can only resolve the granular dynamics to a fine scale with relatively poor temporal resolution or vice versa. In contrast, speckle visibility spectroscopy (SVS is able to resolve the average of the three components of motion of grains in dense systems in small volume of granular media several layer deep with spatio-temporal resolutions that allow the probing of the granular micro-dynamics. We have used this technique to study granular dynamics of surface avalanche flow in the slumping regime using both spherical glass and irregular sand particles. Although results are very similar, we determined that visually observed compaction at the beginning of avalanche process for irregular sand particles influence time evolution of the particle fluctuation velocity during avalanches.

  19. Time-resolved granular dynamics of a rotating drum in a slumping regime as revealed by speckle visibility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivkovic, V.; Yang, H.; Zheng, G.; Biggs, M.

    2017-06-01

    Granular materials in rotating drums are of wide interest not only because of their extensive use in the industrial contexts, but also as model systems in the study of natural disasters, such as avalanches or landslides. Most of available experimental methods are restricted to surface layer flows and dilute systems whilst the remainder can only resolve the granular dynamics to a fine scale with relatively poor temporal resolution or vice versa. In contrast, speckle visibility spectroscopy (SVS) is able to resolve the average of the three components of motion of grains in dense systems in small volume of granular media several layer deep with spatio-temporal resolutions that allow the probing of the granular micro-dynamics. We have used this technique to study granular dynamics of surface avalanche flow in the slumping regime using both spherical glass and irregular sand particles. Although results are very similar, we determined that visually observed compaction at the beginning of avalanche process for irregular sand particles influence time evolution of the particle fluctuation velocity during avalanches.

  20. [Time-Resolved XEOL Experiment System on BL14W1 at SSRF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao-hong; Jiang, Zheng; Xue, Song; Zheng, Li-fang

    2015-08-01

    A novel time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) experiment system was developed for X ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(XAFS) beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The TRXEOL system is composed of three parts: timing system, spectrometer system and nuclear instrument module (NIM) system. These three systems were integrated to measure and record the optical luminescence from the sample excited by the synchrotron X-ray pulses, according to the time-correlated single photon counting methodology. It's the first time in the domestic synchrotron radiation facilities to achieve TRXEOL experiment using the synchrotron X-ray pulses and the time structure of the storage ring. In this work, a SSRF-self-developed timing system was used, which is based on the Field programmable Gate Array and the high-speed serial communication technology. The timing system can provide trigger pulse synchronized with the X-ray pulse. The timing jitter is about 6 ps, and the timing delay resolution is 5 ps. The NIM system is the core of the TRXEOL experiment system, it has three main modules: the Constant Fraction Discriminator (CFD), the Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC) and the Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA). During one excitation circle, the spectrometer and the Photomultiplier Tube detector translate the induced luminescence of the sample excited by a single X-ray pulse into electrical pulse. The CFD module eliminates the timing walk larger than 50 ps induced by the amplitude of the electrical pulse. The TAC module calculates the time interval between the timing trigger pulse and the luminescence electrical pulse, and converts the interval into proportional amplitude of voltage. After plenty of circles, the MCA module gets the luminescence decay curve by recording and analyzing the voltage signals. And the data acquisition system gets the TRXEOL spectra by scanning the spectrometer and acquiring the frequency of the voltage pulses from the TAC

  1. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging

  2. Transient photoconductivity in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells, measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Cooke, David

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz conductivity of InGaN/GaN MQWs was studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Restoration of the built-in piezoelectric field leads to a nonexponential carrier density decay. Terahertz conductivity spectrum is described by the Drude-Smith......Terahertz conductivity of InGaN/GaN MQWs was studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Restoration of the built-in piezoelectric field leads to a nonexponential carrier density decay. Terahertz conductivity spectrum is described by the Drude-Smith...

  3. A sensitive solid-phase time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-lei; Song, Ke-fei; Zhang, Wei-lai; Li, Jun-ling

    2009-07-01

    In the device, a He-Ne laser of flash frequency 1-20 Hz was adopted as exciting light source, and three key technical problems have been solved successfully in order to enhance the detecting sensitivity and measuring stability of the device for time-resolved fluorimmunoassays(TRFIA)[1]. The first one is to design optimum exciting optical system, so that the exciting light beam excite the sample most effectively. The second one is to have a project spectrum filter which can reduce the affection of the background light to the photomultiplier tube and also ensure influence of the stray light and mixed diffusion light to the sample fluorescence to the least, the sample fluorescence through the integrating sphere and come to the grating monochromator, The right wavelength will be chosed through changing the angle of incidence of the grating monochromator. The third one is to simulate the principle of sample averaging of BOXCAR averager. In the device, SCM was used as primary controller and CPLD was used as timing controller. Through the preparation process, signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) will be improved, also adjust delay time, ampling frequency and sampling number arbitrarily. By testing, the sensitivity is 10-12mol/L(substance marked by Eu3+), examination repeat is <=2.5%, examination linearity is from 10-8mol/L to 10-12mol/L, correlation coefficient is 99.98%(p<=0.01). The instrument is advanced for ultrasensitive detection of antigen and antibody , and solve the tumor, genetic variation, the virus protein detection.

  4. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction.

  5. Time-resolved in vivo dosimetry for source tracking in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Jacob Graversen; Rylander, Susanne; Buus, Simon; Bentzen, Lise; Hokland, Steffen Bjerre; Søndergaard, Christian Skou; With, Anders Karl Mikael; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Tanderup, Kari

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that brachytherapy source tracking can be realized with in vivo dosimetry. This concept could enable real-time treatment monitoring. In vivo dosimetry was incorporated in the clinical routine during high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy at Aarhus University Hospital. The dosimetry was performed with a radioluminescent crystal positioned in a dedicated brachytherapy needle in the prostate. The dose rate was recorded every 50-100 ms during treatment and analyzed retrospectively. The measured total delivered dose and dose rates for each dwell position with dwell times >0.7 s were compared with expected values. Furthermore, the distance between the source and dosimeter, which was derived from the measured dose rates, was compared with expected values. The measured dose rate pattern in each needle was used to determine the most likely position of the needle relative to the dosimeter. In total, 305 needles and 3239 dwell positions were analyzed based on 20 treatments. The measured total doses differed from the expected values by -4.7 ± 8.4% (1SD) with range (-17% to 12%). It was possible to determine needle shifts for 304 out of 305 needles. The mean radial needle shift between imaging and treatment was 0.2 ± 1.1 mm (1SD), and the mean longitudinal shift was 0.3 ± 2.0 mm (1SD). Time-resolved in vivo dosimetry can be used to provide geometric information about the treatment progression of afterloading brachytherapy. This information may provide a clear indication of errors and uncertainties during a treatment and, therefore, enables real-time treatment monitoring. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantifying selection in evolving populations using time-resolved genetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Mustonen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Methods which uncover the molecular basis of the adaptive evolution of a population address some important biological questions. For example, the problem of identifying genetic variants which underlie drug resistance, a question of importance for the treatment of pathogens, and of cancer, can be understood as a matter of inferring selection. One difficulty in the inference of variants under positive selection is the potential complexity of the underlying evolutionary dynamics, which may involve an interplay between several contributing processes, including mutation, recombination and genetic drift. A source of progress may be found in modern sequencing technologies, which confer an increasing ability to gather information about evolving populations, granting a window into these complex processes. One particularly interesting development is the ability to follow evolution as it happens, by whole-genome sequencing of an evolving population at multiple time points. We here discuss how to use time-resolved sequence data to draw inferences about the evolutionary dynamics of a population under study. We begin by reviewing our earlier analysis of a yeast selection experiment, in which we used a deterministic evolutionary framework to identify alleles under selection for heat tolerance, and to quantify the selection acting upon them. Considering further the use of advanced intercross lines to measure selection, we here extend this framework to cover scenarios of simultaneous recombination and selection, and of two driver alleles with multiple linked neutral, or passenger, alleles, where the driver pair evolves under an epistatic fitness landscape. We conclude by discussing the limitations of the approach presented and outlining future challenges for such methodologies.

  7. Investigations of suspension stability of iron oxide nanoparticles using time-resolved UV-visible spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, S.; Vasanthakumari, R.; Tsuzuki, Takuya; Rangarajan, Murali

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the suspension stability of iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, magnetic susceptibility, and saturation magnetization over long time scales in dilute systems using time-resolved UV-visible spectroscopy. The effects of citric acid as a chelating agent and applied external magnetic field are also studied. UV-visible spectra are obtained at different times for citric-acid-stabilized nanoparticles dispersed in water, and the peak absorbance is tracked with time, in the presence and absence of external magnetic fields. It is seen that the nanoparticles sediment slowly even in the absence of chain formation, with the phenomenon occurring in two-to-three regimes for the systems studied. Sedimentation exhibits either exponential or power-law behavior of maximum absorbance with time. In the dilute dispersions studied, thermal dispersion is about two orders of magnitude stronger than van der Waals interactions, and chain formation is not easy. Yet, it is likely that local anisotropic structures of the nanoparticles form, through which the attractive interactions result in sedimentation. Citric acid gradually stabilizes the aggregating particles; after an initial faster sedimentation, electrostatic repulsion causes the particles to segregate, as observed by a linear increase in the concentration of the nanoparticles at long times. In the presence of magnetic field, stabilization effects are significantly reduced. It is seen that though the attractive force between the nanoparticles and the external field is smaller than Brownian forces, together with van der Waals interactions, these attractive forces likely act as directing agents facilitating sedimentation. This study demonstrates that aggregation-induced sedimentation of magnetic nanoparticles is likely to play a significant role in magnetic drug targeting even when the particles are stabilized with chelating agents.

  8. Reactions of 1-Hydroxy-1-methylethyl Radicals with NO2-: Time-Resolved Electron Spin Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipiak, Piotr; Camaioni, Donald M.; Fessenden, Richard W.; Carmichael, Ian; Hug, Gordon L.

    2006-09-11

    The reaction of the ?-hydroxyalkyl radical of 2-propanol (1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl radical) with nitrite ions was characterized. A product of the reaction was assigned as the adduct nitro radical anion, [HO-C(CH3)2NO2]??. This radical was identified using time-resolved electron spin resonance (TRESR). The radical?s magnetic parameters, the nitrogen hyperfine coupling constant aN of 26.39 G and its g-factor of 2.0052, are the same as those of the nitro radical anion previously discovered in ?OH spin-trapping experiments with the aci-anion of (CH3)2CHNO2. The rate constant for the decay of the ESR kinetic trace of (CH3)2C?-OH is of the same order of magnitude as the rate constant for the growth of the ESR kinetic trace of [HO-C(CH3)2NO2]??, further confirming the nature of the reaction. The bimolecular rate constant for the reaction at pH 7 is {approx}1.7 ? 106 M?1 s?1 measured by following ESR kinetic traces of (CH3)2C?-OH and 2.4 ? 106 M?1 s?1 following the growth of [HO-C(CH3)2NO2]??. The lack of better match in these two measurements is discussed. The yield of [HO-C(CH3)2NO2]?? was measured to be {approx}27% of the reaction of (CH3)2C?-OH with nitrite. Pulse radiolysis-conductivity experiments at lower pH (4.7) also show that electron transfer or the equivalent formation of [HO-C(CH3)2ONO]?? followed by rapid loss of ?NO represent only part of the reaction. These reactions are discussed with guidance by computations using density functional theory.

  9. Time-resolved assembly of chiral uranyl peroxo cage clusters containing belts of polyhedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jie; Nguyen, Kevin; Jouffret, Laurent; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2013-01-07

    Two chiral cage clusters built from uranyl polyhedra and (HPO(3))(2-) groups have been synthesized in pure yield and characterized structurally and spectroscopically in the solid state and aqueous solution. Synthesis reactions under ambient conditions in mildly acidic aqueous solutions gave clusters U(22)PO(3) and U(28)PO(3) that contain belts of four uranyl peroxide pentagonal and hexagonal bipyramids, in contrast to earlier reported uranyl peroxide cage clusters that are built from four-, five-, and six-membered rings of uranyl hexagonal bipyramids. U(22)PO(3) and U(28)PO(3) are also the first chiral uranyl-based cage clusters, the first that contain uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that contain no peroxide ligands, and the first that incorporate (HPO(3))(2-) bridges between uranyl ions. They are built from 22 uranyl polyhedra and 20 (HPO(3))(2-) groups, or 28 uranyl polyhedra and 24 (HPO(3))(2-) groups, with the outer and inner surfaces of the cages passivated by the O atoms of uranyl ions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profiles demonstrated that U(22)PO(3) clusters formed in solution within 1 h after mixing of reactants, and remained in solution for 2 weeks prior to crystallization. Time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and SAXS demonstrated that U(28)PO(3) clusters formed in solution within 1 h of mixing the reactants, and remained in solution 1 month before crystallization. Crystallization of U(22)PO(3) and U(28)PO(3) is accelerated by addition of KNO(3). Clusters of U(22)PO(3) with and without encapsulated cations exhibit markedly different aqueous solubility, reflecting the importance of cluster surface charge in fostering linkages through counterions to form a stable solid.

  10. A time-resolved fluoroimmuno assay of the IgM-rheumatoid factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluijs Veer, G; Soons, J W

    1992-05-01

    A time-resolved fluoroimmuno assay of the IgM-rheumatoid factor is described. Aggregated rabbit IgG was coated to microtitre plates to serve as the target protein. F(ab')2-fragments from antibodies, raised in rabbits against human IgM, were labelled with Eu3+ and used in the assay to mark the bound IgM-rheumatoid factor. The labelling procedure is easy to perform, and there is no need for special equipment. The shelf life of the label at -20 degrees C is at least one year. The lower detection limit of the assay is 1.3 x 10(3) IU/l. The range over which the IgM-rheumatoid factor can be measured at a within-run precision of less than 5% without varying the dilution (working range) is 5-1200 x 10(3) IU/l. Linearity in serum dilutions is good. There is good correlation with existing methods for the assay of IgM-rheumatoid factor. This correlation is better with an assay using rabbit IgG as the target than with one using human IgG. Comparison of methods shows that standardization, despite the use of the WHO Reference Preparation as the first calibrator, remains problematic. The 95th percentile in normal bloodbank donors is 8 x 10(3) IU/l. The costs for the reagents were about 0.5 Dutch florin (ca 0.30 US-$) per well. In conclusion, the method described here is analytically at least comparable with other methods, in precision, linearity, working range etc. Finally, it is easy to perform.

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence characterization of GaAs nanowire arrays on native substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagytė, Vilgailė; Barrigón, Enrique; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xulu; Heurlin, Magnus; Otnes, Gaute; Anttu, Nicklas; Borgström, Magnus T.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of nanowires (NWs) are often carried out on broken-off NWs in order to avoid the ensemble effects as well as substrate contribution. However, the development of NW-array solar cells could benefit from non-destructive optical characterization to allow faster feedback and further device processing. With this work, we show that different NW array and substrate spectral behaviors with delay time and excitation power can be used to determine which part of the sample dominates the detected spectrum. Here, we evaluate TRPL characterization of dense periodic as-grown GaAs NW arrays on a p-type GaAs substrate, including a sample with uncapped GaAs NWs and several samples passivated with AlGaAs radial shell of varied composition and thickness. We observe a strong spectral overlap of substrate and NW signals and find that the NWs can absorb part of the substrate luminescence signal, thus resulting in a modified substrate signal. The level of absorption depends on the NW-array geometry, making a deconvolution of the NW signal very difficult. By studying TRPL of substrate-only and as-grown NWs at 770 and 400 nm excitation wavelengths, we find a difference in spectral behavior with delay time and excitation power that can be used to assess whether the signal is dominated by the NWs. We find that the NW signal dominates with 400 nm excitation wavelength, where we observe two different types of excitation power dependence for the NWs capped with high and low Al composition shells. Finally, from the excitation power dependence of the peak TRPL signal, we extract an estimate of background carrier concentration in the NWs.

  12. a Time-Resolved X-Ray Study of Spinodal Decomposition in Aluminium-Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainville, Jacques

    Time resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) using synchrotron radiation was applied to the study of the kinetics of spinodal decomposition (SD) in an AlZn binary alloy at critical composition quenched into the immiscible region. These millisecond time scale measurements, performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Labs., N.Y.), constitute the first direct experimental verification in a binary alloy of the theory proposed by Langer, Bar-on and Miller in 1975 for SD. A scheme based on the composition distribution functional is proposed to account for the decomposition taking place during the quench. The interatomic mobility, a free energy gradient coefficient and two coefficients that suffice to determine a coarse-grained (intensive) free energy have been obtained in the framework of this theory. The mobilities obtained compare well with tracer diffusion measurements reported in literature. A dependence of the coarse-grained free energy coefficients on the coarse-graining length is found and a procedure is proposed to uniquely choose the values of these coefficients based on the predicted integrated intensity from the equilibrium concentrations and on the measured integrated intensities. Late-stage coarsening regimes were also investigated. In these regimes, growth exponents higher than the value 1/3 predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory are obtained. These higher values, comprised between 0.40 and 0.45 are consistent with predictions that alloys in which elastic effects are important can present a transition regime from a t ^{1/3} growth law to a t ^{1/2} law. The structure factors do not quite scale. They also present a shoulder at high wavevectors, a feature not reported before in metallic alloys.

  13. Time resolved and label free monitoring of extracellular metabolites by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Shalabaeva

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is an emerging field of cell biology that aims at the comprehensive identification of metabolite levels in biological fluids or cells in a specific functional state. Currently, the major tools for determining metabolite concentrations are mass spectrometry coupled with chromatographic techniques and nuclear magnetic resonance, which are expensive, time consuming and destructive for the samples. Here, we report a time resolved approach to monitor metabolite dynamics in cell cultures, based on Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS. This method is label-free, easy to use and provides the opportunity to simultaneously study a broad range of molecules, without the need to process the biological samples. As proof of concept, NIH/3T3 cells were cultured in vitro, and the extracellular medium was collected at different time points to be analyzed with our engineered SERS substrates. By identifying individual peaks of the Raman spectra, we showed the simultaneous detection of several components of the conditioned medium, such as L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan, glycine, L-phenylalanine, L-histidine and fetal bovine serum proteins, as well as their intensity changes during time. Furthermore, analyzing the whole Raman data set with the Principal Component Analysis (PCA, we demonstrated that the Raman spectra collected at different days of culture and clustered by similarity, described a well-defined trajectory in the principal component plot. This approach was then utilized to determine indirectly the functional state of the macrophage cell line Raw 264.7, stimulated with the lipopolysaccharide (LPS for 24 hours. The collected spectra at different time points, clustered by the PCA analysis, followed a well-defined trajectory, corresponding to the functional change of cells toward the activated pro-inflammatory state induced by the LPS. This study suggests that our engineered SERS surfaces can be used as a versatile tool both for the characterization

  14. Compromise of multiple time-resolved transcriptomics experiments identifies tightly regulated functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eKlie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of high-throughput technologies for data acquisition from different components (i.e., genes, proteins, and metabolites of a given biological system, generation of hypotheses and biological interpretations based on multivariate data sets become increasingly important. These technologies allow for simultaneous gathering of data from the same biological components under different perturbations, including changes in conditions and/or genotypic variation, resulting in so-called multiple data tables. Moreover, these data tables are obtained over a well-chosen time domain to capture the dynamics of the response of the biological system to the perturbation. The computational problem we address in this study is twofold: (1 derive a single data table, referred to as a compromise, which captures information common to the investigated set of multiple tables, and (2 identify biological components which contribute most to the determined compromise. Here we argue that recent extensions to principle component analysis called STATIS and dual-STATIS can be used to determine the compromise on which classical techniques for data analysis, such as clustering and term enrichment, can be subsequently applied. In addition, we illustrate that STATIS and dual-STATIS facilitate interpretations of a publically available transcriptomics data set capturing the time-resolved response of Arabidopsis thaliana to changing light and/or temperature conditions. We demonstrate that STATIS and dual-STATIS can be used not only to identify the components of a biological system whose behavior is similarly affected due to the perturbation (e.g., in time or condition, but also to specify the extent to which each dimension of the data tables reflect the perturbation. These findings ultimately provide insights in the components and pathways which could be under tight control in plant systems.

  15. Application of time-resolved glucose concentration photoacoustic signals based on an improved wavelet denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    Real-time monitoring of blood glucose concentration (BGC) is a great important procedure in controlling diabetes mellitus and preventing the complication for diabetic patients. Noninvasive measurement of BGC has already become a research hotspot because it can overcome the physical and psychological harm. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a well-established, hybrid and alternative technique used to determine the BGC. According to the theory of photoacoustic technique, the blood is irradiated by plused laser with nano-second repeation time and micro-joule power, the photoacoustic singals contained the information of BGC are generated due to the thermal-elastic mechanism, then the BGC level can be interpreted from photoacoustic signal via the data analysis. But in practice, the time-resolved photoacoustic signals of BGC are polluted by the varities of noises, e.g., the interference of background sounds and multi-component of blood. The quality of photoacoustic signal of BGC directly impacts the precision of BGC measurement. So, an improved wavelet denoising method was proposed to eliminate the noises contained in BGC photoacoustic signals. To overcome the shortcoming of traditional wavelet threshold denoising, an improved dual-threshold wavelet function was proposed in this paper. Simulation experimental results illustrated that the denoising result of this improved wavelet method was better than that of traditional soft and hard threshold function. To varify the feasibility of this improved function, the actual photoacoustic BGC signals were test, the test reslut demonstrated that the signal-to-noises ratio(SNR) of the improved function increases about 40-80%, and its root-mean-square error (RMSE) decreases about 38.7-52.8%.

  16. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow field in a stenosed, compliant arterial model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.; Jermy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Compliant (flexible) structures play an important role in several biological flows including the lungs, heart and arteries. Coronary heart disease is caused by a constriction in the artery due to a build-up of atherosclerotic plaque. This plaque is also of major concern in the carotid artery which supplies blood to the brain. Blood flow within these arteries is strongly influenced by the movement of the wall. To study these problems experimentally in vitro, especially using flow visualisation techniques, can be expensive due to the high-intensity and high-repetition rate light sources required. In this work, time-resolved particle image velocimetry using a relatively low-cost light-emitting diode illumination system was applied to the study of a compliant flow phantom representing a stenosed (constricted) carotid artery experiencing a physiologically realistic flow wave. Dynamic similarity between in vivo and in vitro conditions was ensured in phantom construction by matching the distensibility and the elastic wave propagation wavelength and in the fluid system through matching Reynolds ( Re) and Womersley number ( α) with a maximum, minimum and mean Re of 939, 379 and 632, respectively, and a α of 4.54. The stenosis had a symmetric constriction of 50 % by diameter (75 % by area). Once the flow rate reached a critical value, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were observed to occur in the shear layer between the main jet exiting the stenosis and a reverse flow region that occurred at a radial distance of 0.34 D from the axis of symmetry in the region on interest 0-2.5 D longitudinally downstream from the stenosis exit. The instability had an axis-symmetric nature, but as peak flow rate was approached this symmetry breaks down producing instability in the flow field. The characteristics of the vortex train were sensitive not only to the instantaneous flow rate, but also to whether the flow was accelerating or decelerating globally.

  17. Highly efficient detection of paclobutrazol in environmental water and soil samples by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenjiang, E-mail: lzj1984@ujs.edu.cn [School of the Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wei, Xi [School of the Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); The Affiliated First People' s Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212002 (China); Ren, Kewei; Zhu, Gangbing; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jiagao; Du, Daolin [School of the Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-11-01

    A fast and ultrasensitive indirect competitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) was developed for the analysis of paclobutrazol in environmental water and soil samples. Paclobutrazol hapten was synthesized and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) for producing polyclonal antibodies. Under optimal conditions, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50} value) and limit of detection (LOD, IC{sub 20} value) were 1.09 μg L{sup −} {sup 1} and 0.067 μg L{sup −} {sup 1}, respectively. The LOD of TRFIA was improved 30-fold compared to the already reported ELISA. There was almost no cross-reactivity of the antibody with the other structural analogues of triazole compounds, indicating that the antibody had high specificity. The average recoveries from spiked samples were in the range from 80.2% to 104.7% with a relative standard deviation of 1.0–9.5%. The TRFIA results for the real samples were in good agreement with that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography analyses. The results indicate that the established TRFIA has potential application for screening paclobutrazol in environmental samples. - Highlights: • The approach to design and synthesize the PBZ hapten was more straightforward. • A rapid and ultrasensitive TRFIA was developed and applied to the screening of PBZ. • The TRFIA for real soil samples showed reliability and high correlation with HPLC. • The PBZ TRFIA showed high sensitivity, simple operation, a wide range of quantitative analyses and no radioactive hazards.

  18. DCS - A High Flux Beamline for Time Resolved Dynamic Compression Science – Design Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D.; D' Amico, Kevin L.; Nudell, J.; Collins, J.; Schmidt, Oliver

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm2. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm2. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  19. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov; D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov; Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov; Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov; Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm{sup 2}. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm{sup 2}. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  20. A time-resolved model of the mesospheric Na layer: constraints on the meteor input function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. C. Plane

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-resolved model of the Na layer in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region is described, where the continuity equations for the major sodium species Na, Na+ and NaHCO3 are solved explicity, and the other short-lived species are treated in steady-state. It is shown that the diurnal variation of the Na layer can only be modelled satisfactorily if sodium species are permanently removed below about 85 km, both through the dimerization of NaHCO3 and the uptake of sodium species on meteoric smoke particles that are assumed to have formed from the recondensation of vaporized meteoroids. When the sensitivity of the Na layer to the meteoroid input function is considered, an inconsistent picture emerges. The ratio of the column abundance of Na+ to Na is shown to increase strongly with the average meteoroid velocity, because the Na is injected at higher altitudes. Comparison with a limited set of Na+ measurements indicates that the average meteoroid velocity is probably less than about 25 km s-1, in agreement with velocity estimates from conventional meteor radars, and considerably slower than recent observations made by wide aperture incoherent scatter radars. The Na column abundance is shown to be very sensitive to the meteoroid mass input rate, and to the rate of vertical transport by eddy diffusion. Although the magnitude of the eddy diffusion coefficient in the 80–90 km region is uncertain, there is a consensus between recent models using parameterisations of gravity wave momentum deposition that the average value is less than 3×105 cm2 s-1. This requires that the global meteoric mass input rate is less than about 20 td-1, which is closest to estimates from incoherent scatter radar observations. Finally, the diurnal variation in the meteoroid input rate only slight perturbs the Na layer, because the residence time of Na in the layer is several days, and diurnal effects are effectively averaged out.