WorldWideScience

Sample records for retroreflectors

  1. Planar metasurface retroreflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Horie, Yu; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Faraon, Andrei

    2017-07-01

    Metasurfaces are two-dimensional arrangements of subwavelength scatterers that control the propagation of optical waves. Here, we show that cascaded metasurfaces, each performing a predefined mathematical transformation, provide a new optical design framework that enables new functionalities not yet demonstrated with single metasurfaces. Specifically, we demonstrate that retroreflection can be achieved with two vertically stacked planar metasurfaces, the first performing a spatial Fourier transform and its inverse, and the second imparting a spatially varying momentum to the Fourier transform of the incident light. Using this concept, we fabricate and test a planar monolithic near-infrared retroreflector composed of two layers of silicon nanoposts, which reflects light along its incident direction with a normal incidence efficiency of 78% and a large half-power field of view of 60°. The metasurface retroreflector demonstrates the potential of cascaded metasurfaces for implementing novel high-performance components, and enables low-power and low-weight passive optical transmitters.

  2. The GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic co-location in space through the precision orbit determination of GPS satellites via satellite laser ranging will contribute significantly towards improving the accuracy and stability of the international terrestrial reference frame. NASA recently formed the GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project to develop and deliver retroreflectors for integration on the next generation of GPS satellites. These retroreflectors will be an important contributor to achieving a global accuracy of 1.0 mm and 0.1 mm/year stability in the international terrestrial reference frame. We report here the current status of the GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project.

  3. FY 2006 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  4. Relativistic theory of the falling retroreflector gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Neil

    2018-02-01

    We develop a relativistic treatment of interference between light reflected from a falling cube retroreflector in the vertical arm of an interferometer, and light in a reference beam in the horizontal arm. Coordinates that are nearly Minkowskian, attached to the falling cube, are used to describe the propagation of light within the cube. Relativistic effects such as the dependence of the coordinate speed of light on gravitational potential, propagation of light along null geodesics, relativity of simultaneity, and Lorentz contraction of the moving cube, are accounted for. The calculation is carried to first order in the gradient of the acceleration of gravity. Analysis of data from a falling cube gravimeter shows that the propagation time of light within the cube itself causes a significant reduction in the value of the acceleration of gravity obtained from measurements, compared to assuming reflection occurs at the face. An expression for the correction to g is derived and found to agree with experiment. Depending on the instrument, the correction can be several microgals, comparable to commonly applied corrections such as those due to polar motion and earth tides. The controversial ‘speed of light’ correction is discussed. Work of the US government, not subject to copyright.

  5. Performance of Cat's Eye Modulating Retro-Reflectors for Free-Space Optical Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabinovich, W. S; Goetz, P. G; Mahon, R; Swingen, L; Murphy, J; Gilbreath, G. C; Binari, S; Waluschka, E

    2004-01-01

    Modulating retro-reflectors (MRR) couple passive optical retro-reflectors with electro-optic modulators to allow free-space optical communication with a laser and pointing/acquisition/tracking system required on only one end of the link...

  6. Retroreflector field tracker. [noncontact optical position sensor for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargocki, F. E.; Ray, A. J.; Hall, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    An electrooptical position-measuring instrument, the Retroreflector Field Tracker or RFT, is described. It is part of the Dynamic Augmentation Experiment - a part of the payload of Space Shuttle flight 41-D in Summer 1984. The tracker measures and outputs the position of 23 reflective targets placed on a 32-m solar array to provide data for determination of the dynamics of the lightweight structure. The sensor uses a 256 x 256 pixel CID detector; the processor electronics include three Z-80 microprocessors. A pulsed laser diode illuminator is used.

  7. MOONLIGHT: A NEW LUNAR LASER RANGING RETROREFLECTOR INSTRUMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garattini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 1969 Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR to the Apollo Cube Corner Reflector (CCR arrays has supplied several significant tests of gravity: Geodetic Precession, the Strong and Weak Equivalence Principle (SEP, WEP, the Parametrized Post Newtonian (PPN parameter , the time change of the Gravitational constant (G, 1/r2 deviations and new gravitational theories beyond General Relativity (GR, like the unified braneworld theory (G. Dvali et al., 2003. Now a new generation of LLR can do better using evolved laser retroreflectors, developed from tight collaboration between my institution, INFN–LNF (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and Douglas Currie (University of Maryland, USA, one of the fathers of LLR. The new lunar CCR is developing and characterizing at the “Satellite/Lunar laser ranging Characterization Facility” (SCF, in Frascati, performing our new industry standard space test procedure, the “SCF-Test”; this work contains the experimental results of the SCF-Test applied to the new lunar CCR, and all the new payload developments, including the future SCF tests. The International Lunar Network (ILN research project considers our new retroreflector as one of the possible “Core Instruments”

  8. An omnidirectional retroreflector based on the transmutation of dielectric singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun Gui; Ong, C K; Tyc, Tomás; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2009-08-01

    Transformation optics is a concept used in some metamaterials to guide light on a predetermined path. In this approach, the materials implement coordinate transformations on electromagnetic waves to create the illusion that the waves are propagating through a virtual space. Transforming space by appropriately designed materials makes devices possible that have been deemed impossible. In particular, transformation optics has led to the demonstration of invisibility cloaking for microwaves, surface plasmons and infrared light. Here, on the basis of transformation optics, we implement a microwave device that would normally require a dielectric singularity, an infinity in the refractive index. To fabricate such a device, we transmute a dielectric singularity in virtual space into a mere topological defect in a real metamaterial. In particular, we demonstrate an omnidirectional retroreflector, a device for faithfully reflecting images and for creating high visibility from all directions. Our method is robust, potentially broadband and could also be applied to visible light using similar techniques.

  9. Design and Manufacture of a Low-Profile Radar Retro-Reflector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bird, Dudley

    2005-01-01

    .... Radar retro-reflectors are often passive, but active elements can be included to enhance the backscattered signal, or to modify it in some way, such as by the introduction of modulation or simulation of range profiles...

  10. Animal-eyeball vs. road-sign retroreflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathaniel R; Filko, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    The retroreflective characteristics of ex-vitro cow and deer eyeballs were compared to those of man-made materials used in road signs and bicycle-style reflectors. Reflected intensities were measured using a goniometer that consists of a green He-Ne laser as the light source, and a photomultiplier tube as the detector. It was found that the best quality road-sign reflector, made from a 200-micron-scale, close-packed array of corner cubes, is approximately six times more efficient than a cow eyeball at returning light in the direction of the incoming beam. Less expensive man-made retroreflectors, utilizing 35-micron glass beads (as in mailbox decals) or millimeter-scale arrays of corner cubes (bicycle-style reflectors) are, however, less efficient than the cow eye. The high quality of animal eyeball optics is evidenced by their extremely tight angular spread (full width half maximum congruent with 1 degrees) of retroreflected intensity about the incident path. Moreover, as the reflector itself is rotated relative to the incident beam, the eyeballs preserve their efficiency of retroreflection better than the man-made materials. Interference-diffraction patterns were observed in the retroreflected beams from the small-scale corner cubes, but were not observed in eyeball retroreflection.

  11. Development of the Laser Retroreflector Array (LRA) for SARAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Vincent; Gasc, Karine; Sengenes, Pierre; Salcedo, Corinne; Imperiali, Stéphan; du Jeu, Christian

    2017-11-01

    CNES (French spatial agency) will provide the AltiKa high resolution altimeter, Doris instrument and the LRA (Laser Retroreflector Array) for SARAL (Satellite with Argos and AltiKa) in cooperation with ISRO (Indian space agency). The LRA is a passive equipment reflecting the laser beams coming from the Earth ground stations. Computing the send-return time travel of the laser beams allows the determination of the satellite altitude within an accuracy of a few millimeters. The reflective function is done by a set of 9 corner cube reflectors, with a conical arrangement providing a 150 degrees wide field of view over the full 360 degrees azimuth angle. According to CNES optomechanical specifications, the LRA has been developed by SESO (French optical firm). SESO has succeeded in providing the corner cube reflectors with a very stringent dihedral angle error of 1.6 arcsec and an accuracy within +/-0.5 arcsec. During this development, SESO has performed mechanical, thermal and thermo-optical analyses. The optical gradient of each corner cube, as well as angular deviations and PSF (Point Spread Function) in each laser range finding direction, have been computed. Mechanical and thermal tests have been successfully performed. A thermo-optical test has successfully confirmed the optical effect of the predicted in-flight thermal gradients. Each reflector is characterized in order to find its best location in the LRA housing and give the maximum optimization to the space telemetering mission.

  12. Active retroreflector to measure the rotational orientation in conjunction with a laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, O.; Wachten, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2012-10-01

    High precision optical non-contact position measurement is a key technology in modern engineering. Laser trackers (LT) can determine accurately x-y-z coordinates of passive retroreflectors. Next-generation systems answer the additional need to measure an object's rotational orientation (pitch, yaw, roll). These devices are based on photogrammetry or on enhanced retroreflectors. However, photogrammetry relies on camera systems and time-consuming image processing. Enhanced retroreflectors analyze the LT's beam but are restricted in roll angle measurements. Here we present an integrated laser based method to evaluate all six degrees of freedom. An active retroreflector directly analyzes its orientation to the LT's beam path by outcoupling laser light on detectors. A proof of concept prototype has been designed with a specified measuring range of 360° for roll angle measurements and +/-15° for pitch and yaw angle respectively. The prototype's optical design is inspired by a cat's eye retroreflector. First results are promising and further improvements are under development. We anticipate our method to facilitate simple and cost-effective six degrees of freedom measurements. Furthermore, for industrial applications wide customizations are possible, e.g. adaptation of measuring range, optimization of accuracy, and further system miniaturization.

  13. Performance analysis of next-generation lunar laser retroreflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocci, Emanuele; Martini, Manuele; Contessa, Stefania; Porcelli, Luca; Mastrofini, Marco; Currie, Douglas; Delle Monache, Giovanni; Dell'Agnello, Simone

    2017-09-01

    Starting from 1969, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo and Lunokhod Cube Corner Retroreflectors (CCRs) provided several tests of General Relativity (GR). When deployed, the Apollo/Lunokhod CCRs design contributed only a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Today the improvement over the years in the laser ground stations makes the lunar libration contribution relevant. So the libration now dominates the error budget limiting the precision of the experimental tests of gravitational theories. The MoonLIGHT-2 project (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests - Phase 2) is a next-generation LLR payload developed by the Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and Cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory (SCF _ Lab) at the INFN-LNF in collaboration with the University of Maryland. With its unique design consisting of a single large CCR unaffected by librations, MoonLIGHT-2 can significantly reduce error contribution of the reflectors to the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession and other GR tests compared to Apollo/Lunokhod CCRs. This paper treats only this specific next-generation lunar laser retroreflector (MoonLIGHT-2) and it is by no means intended to address other contributions to the global LLR error budget. MoonLIGHT-2 is approved to be launched with the Moon Express 1(MEX-1) mission and will be deployed on the Moon surface in 2018. To validate/optimize MoonLIGHT-2, the SCF _ Lab is carrying out a unique experimental test called SCF-Test: the concurrent measurement of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the CCR under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator and simulated space environment. The focus of this paper is to describe the SCF _ Lab specialized characterization of the performance of our next-generation LLR payload. While this payload will improve the contribution of the error budget of the space segment (MoonLIGHT-2

  14. GLRS-R 2-colour retroreflector target design and predicted performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Glenn

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on the retroreflector ground-target design for the GLRS-R spaceborne dual-wavelength laser ranging system. The described passive design flows down from the requirements of high station autonomy, high global FOV (up to 60 degrees zenith angle), little or no multiple pulse returns, and adequate optical cross section for most ranging geometries. The proposed solution makes use of 5 hollow cube-corner retroreflectors of which one points to the zenith and the remaining four are inclined from the vertical at uniform azimuthal spacings. The need for fairly large (is approximately 10 cm) retroreflectors is expected (within turbulence limitations) to generate quite narrow diffraction lobes, thus placing non-trivial requirements on the vectorial accuracy of velocity aberration corrections. A good compromise solution is found by appropriately spoiling just one of the retroreflector dihedral angles from 90 degrees, thus generating two symmetrically oriented diffraction lobes in the return beam. The required spoil angles are found to have little dependence on ground target latitude. Various link budget analyses are presented, showing the influence of such factors as point-ahead optimization, turbulence, ranging angle, atmospheric visibility and ground target thermal deformations.

  15. KrF laser amplifier with phase-conjugate Brillouin retroreflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, M C

    1982-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of phase-conjugate stimulated Brillouin scattering mirrors to produce high-quality, short-pulse KrF laser beams from angular multiplexed and regenerative amplifiers. The mirror was also shown to isolate systems optically from amplifier spontaneous emission. Automatic alignment of targets using this mirror as a retroreflector was also demonstrated.

  16. Long-range active retroreflector to measure the rotational orientation in conjunction with a laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, O.; Wachten, Christian; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    High precision optical non-contact position measurement is a key technology in modern engineering. Laser trackers (LT) accurately determine x-y-z coordinates of passive retroreflectors. Next-generation systems answer the need to measure an object`s rotational orientation (pitch, yaw, roll). So far, these devices are based either on photogrammetry or on enhanced retroreflectors. Here we present a new method to measure all six degrees of freedom in conjunction with a LT. The basic principle is to analyze the orientation to the LT's beam path by coupling-out laser radiation. The optical design is inspired by a cat's eye retroreflector equipped with an integrated beam splitter layer. The optical spherical aberration is compensated, which reduces the divergence angle for the reflected beam by one order of magnitude compared to an uncompensated standard system of the same size. The wave front distortion is reduced to less than 0.1 λ @ 633 nm for beam diameters up to 8 mm. Our active retroreflector is suitable for long-range measurements for a distance > 10 m.

  17. Free-Space Optical Communications Link at 1550-nm using Multiple-Quantum-Well Modulating Retroreflectors in a Marine Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabinovich, W. S; Mahon, R; Burris, H. R; Gilbreath, G. C; Goetz, P. G; Moore, C. I; Stell, M. F; Vilcheck, M. J; Witkowsky, J. L; Swingen, L

    2005-01-01

    A 1550-nm eye-safe, free-space optical communications link is demonstrated at rates up to 5 Mbits/s over a distance of 2 km in the Chesapeake Bay, using quantum-well-based modulating retroreflectors...

  18. Ring retroreflector system consisting of cube-corner reflectors with special coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistrov, V B; Sadovnikov, M A; Sokolov, A L; Shargorodskiy, V D

    2013-01-01

    The ring retroreflector system (RS) consisting of cubecorner reflectors (CCRs) with a special coating of reflecting surfaces, intended for uniaxially Earth-oriented navigation satellites, is considered. The error of distance measurement caused by both the laser pulse delay in the CCR and its spatial position (CCR configuration) is studied. It is shown that the ring RS, formed by the CCR with a double-spot radiation pattern, allows the distance measurement error to be essentially reduced. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  19. Reflectivity reduction of retro-reflector installed in LHD due to plasma surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, N.; Ohtawa, Y.; Ebihara, A.; Akiyama, T.; Tokitani, M.; Ashikawa, N.; Kawahata, K.

    2008-10-01

    Optical reflectivity of the retro-reflector installed in LHD as the first mirror was reduced seriously by plasma wall interaction. In order to understand the mechanism of the reflectivity reduction, optical and material properties of the mirror surfaces have been examined extensively. It was found that the deposited impurity layers caused the serious reduction of the reflectivity. Formation of iron oxide, bulges structure and He bubbles are the major factors for the reflectivity reduction in the wide wave length range. (author)

  20. Active retroreflector with in situ beam analysis to measure the rotational orientation in conjunction with a laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, O.; Wachten, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2013-04-01

    High precision optical non-contact position measurement is a key technology in modern engineering. Laser trackers (LT) can determine accurately x-y-z coordinates of passive retroreflectors. Next-generation systems answer the additional need to measure an object`s rotational orientation (pitch, yaw, roll). These devices are based either on photogrammetry or on enhanced retroreflectors. However, photogrammetry relies on costly camera systems and time-consuming image processing. Enhanced retroreflectors analyze the LT`s beam but are restricted in roll angle measurements. In the past we have presented a new method [1][2] to measure all six degrees of freedom in conjunction with a LT. Now we dramatically optimized the method and designed a new prototype, e.g. taking into consideration optical alignment, reduced power loss, highly optimized measuring signals and higher resolution. A method is described that allows compensating the influence of the LT's beam offset during tracking the active retroreflector. We prove the functionality of the active retroreflector with the LT and, furthermore, demonstrate the capability of the system to characterize the tracking behavior of a LT. The measurement range for the incident laser beam is +/-12° with a resolution of 0.6".

  1. Optimization of a Michelson interferometer with a rotating retroreflector in opitcal design, spectral resolution, and optical throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschberger, P.; Tank, V.

    1993-01-01

    A newly designed Michelson interferometer for Fourier spectroscopy utilizes a nutating retroreflector (cube corner mirror) to generate alterations in geometrical and optical paths. The practical optomechanical design of a Fourier-transform spectrometer incorporating a rotating retroreflector for path-length alteration is considered. (The instrument has been given the name MIROR, for Michelson Interferometer with a Rotating Retroreflector.) Two parameters of the instrument are essential: the maximum optical path difference, which yields the spectral resolution of the instrument, and the diameter of the transmitted beam, which determines the throughput and hence the achievable signal-to-noise ratio. The maximum allowable beam diameter is calculated as a function of the geometry and the orientation of the rotating retroreflector and the other optical components. The geometrical configuration and the orientation of all the optical components with respect to one another are also optimized for the maximum transmitted beam diameter when the required path difference is given. A principal investigation of different possible configurations of the optical components is presented. Then a quantitative optimization for an interferometer employing a retroreflector having a 5-in. (12.7-cm) aperture diameter requiring an optical path difference of more than 10 cm (spectral resolution better than 0.1 cm -1 ) is performed. Finally a simplified but enhanced design is described. 10 refs., 15 figs

  2. Ray-tracing studies for a whole-viewing-angle retroreflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.; Friedsam, H.

    2000-01-01

    The APS Survey and Alignment team uses LEICA laser trackers for the majority of their alignment tasks. These instruments utilize several different retroreflectors for tracking the path of the laser interferometer. Currently in use are open-air corner cubes with an acceptance angle of ±20 degree, corner cube prisms with an acceptance angle of ±50degree, and a Cat's eye with an acceptance angle of ±60degree. Best measurement results can be achieved by using an open-air corner cube that eliminates the need for the laser beam to travel through a different medium before it returns to the instrument detector. However, the trade off is a small acceptance angle. In order to overcome the limitations of the small acceptance angles, Takatsuji et al. has proposed the creation of a full-viewing-angle retroreflector. Based on the notion that the radius R 1 of a common Cat's eye is proportional to R 2 , one can write: R 1 = (n minus 1)R 2 . In the case that n, the refractive index of glass, equals 2, the radii R 1 and R 2 are identical, and one can create a solid sphere Cat's eye. This design has the advantages that no adhesives are used to bond the two hemispheres together, misalignments between the hemispheres are not an issue, and most importantly, larger acceptance angles are possible. This paper shows the results of their ray tracing calculations characterizing the geometrical optics

  3. Measuring coalignment of retroreflectors with large lateral incoming-outgoing beam offset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütze, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.Schuetze@aei.mpg.de; Sheard, Benjamin S.; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) and Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstr. 38, 30167 Hanover (Germany); Farrant, David [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Bradfield Road, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Shaddock, Daniel A. [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Australian National University, Acton, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    A method based on phase-shifting Fizeau interferometry is presented with which retroreflectors with large incoming-outgoing beam separations can be tested. The method relies on a flat Reference Bar that is used to align two auxiliary mirrors parallel to each other to extend the aperture of the interferometer. The method is applied to measure the beam coalignment of a prototype Triple Mirror Assembly of the GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer, a future satellite-to-satellite tracking device for Earth gravimetry. The Triple Mirror Assembly features a lateral beam offset of incoming and outgoing beam of 600 mm, whereas the acceptance angle for the incoming beam is only about ±2 mrad. With the developed method, the beam coalignment of the prototype Triple Mirror Assembly was measured to be 9 μrad with a repeatability of below 1 μrad.

  4. Measuring coalignment of retroreflectors with large lateral incoming-outgoing beam offset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schütze, Daniel; Sheard, Benjamin S.; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten; Farrant, David; Shaddock, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    A method based on phase-shifting Fizeau interferometry is presented with which retroreflectors with large incoming-outgoing beam separations can be tested. The method relies on a flat Reference Bar that is used to align two auxiliary mirrors parallel to each other to extend the aperture of the interferometer. The method is applied to measure the beam coalignment of a prototype Triple Mirror Assembly of the GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer, a future satellite-to-satellite tracking device for Earth gravimetry. The Triple Mirror Assembly features a lateral beam offset of incoming and outgoing beam of 600 mm, whereas the acceptance angle for the incoming beam is only about ±2 mrad. With the developed method, the beam coalignment of the prototype Triple Mirror Assembly was measured to be 9 μrad with a repeatability of below 1 μrad

  5. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Stewart, Hamilton; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-12-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: 1) target identification; 2) target tracking; 3) target location; 4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); 5) parcel tracking, and; 6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  6. Transformation of the corner: A shield cloak and a planar retro-reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R.; Lei, Z. Y.; Fan, J.; Gao, D. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Xie, Y. J.

    2013-10-01

    A metallic sheet, coated with a few blocks of all-dielectric isotropic materials, is presented for creating an illusion or an image of a corner based on quasi-conformal transformation optics. On the one hand, our design is able to generate cloaking effects to conceal objects hiding inside a corner. On the other hand, we propose to use such a planar transformation device to represent a corner reflector that reflects light directly back to its source. The full wave simulation shows our device is capable of operating considerably well in a broad frequency range, and presents only the appearance of a bare corner functioning as a shield cloak or a planar retro-reflector.

  7. Ray-tracing studies for a whole-viewing-angle retro-reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.; Friedsam, H.

    1999-01-01

    The APS Survey and Alignment team uses LEICA laser trackers for the majority of their alignment tasks. These instruments utilize several different retro-reflectors for tracking the path of the laser interferometer. Currently in use are open-air comer cubes with an acceptance angle of ±20 deg C, comer cube prisms with an acceptance angle of ±50 deg C, and a Cat's eye with an acceptance angle of ±60 deg C. Best measurement results can be achieved by using an open-air comer cube that eliminates the need for the laser beam to travel through a different medium before it returns to the instrument detector. However, the trade off is a small acceptance angle. In order to overcome the limitations of the small acceptance angles, Takatsuji et al. have proposed the creation of a full-viewing-angle retro-reflector. Based on the notion that the radius R 1 of a common Cat's eye is proportional to R 2 , one can write: R 1 = (n-1)R 2 In the case that n, the refractive index of glass, equals 2, the radii R 1 and R 2 are identical, and one can create a solid sphere Cat's eye. This design has the advantages that no adhesives are used to bond the two hemispheres together, misalignments between the hemispheres are not an issue, and most importantly, larger acceptance angles are possible. This paper shows the results of our ray tracing calculations characterizing the geometrical optics. In Section 2 we derived the analytical expressions for choosing the index of refraction n of a glass sphere based on the specifications of the reflected beam. We also provided an approximation for calculating the minimum radius of a reflector sphere based on efficiency considerations. Finally, in section 3, the analytically derived results were confirmed in a design study for a Cat's eye. (authors)

  8. International, private-public, multi-mission, next-generation lunar laser retroreflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agnello, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo/Lunokhod Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) arrays supplied some of the best tests of General Relativity (GR): possible changes in the gravitational constant, weak and strong equivalence principle, gravitational self-energy (PPN parameter beta), geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law [1][2]. LLR has also provided significant information on the composition of the deep interior of the Moon [3]. LLR physics analysis also allows for constraints on extensions of GR (like spacetime torsion [4]) and on new gravitational physics that may explain the gravitational universe without Dark Matter and Dark Energy (like Non-Minimally Coupled gravity [5]). LLR is the only Apollo/Lunokhod experiment still in operation. In the 1970s LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the capabilities of ground stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (in particular APOLLO in USA) improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, current CCR arrays dominate the error. With the US/Italy project LLRRA21/MoonLIGHT (Lunar Laser Ranging Retroreflector Array for the 21st century/Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High accuracy Tests) UMD (Univ. of Maryland) and INFN (Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics) developed a new-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100 mm diameter), unaffected by the effect of librations, that will improve the LLR accuracy by a factor of ten to one hundred. The performance of this 'big CCR' is being characterized at the SCF_Lab test facility at INFN-LNF, Frascati, Italy [6]. INFN also developed INRRI (INstrument for landing-Roving laser Retroreflector Investigations), a microreflector payload for the lunar surface to be laser-ranged by orbiters [7]. This will further extend the physics and lunar science reach of LLR. INRRI can also provide positioning services on the far side (it is proposed

  9. Thermo-mechanical behavior of retro-reflector and resulting parallelism error of laser beams for Wendelstein 7-X interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, X.B., E-mail: pengxb@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, 230031 Hefei Anhui (China); Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Hirsch, M.; Köppen, M.; Fellinger, J.; Bykov, V.; Schauer, F. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Vliegenthart, W. [TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, P.O. Box 2600, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The criterion for thermo-mechanical design of W7-X interferometer retro-reflector. • Thermo-mechanical analysis of retro-reflector with two different methods. • The most flexible part in the retro-reflector is spring washer. • Calculation of parallelism error between the incoming and reflected laser beams. • The parallelism error is much lower than the design limit 28 arcs. - Abstract: A 10 channels interferometer will be used in the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) for plasma density control and density profile tracking with laser beams passing through the plasma. Due to complex shape of non-planar modular coils and divertor structure, there are no large poloidally opposite ports on the plasma vessel (PV). Therefore 10 in-vessel Corner Cube Retro-reflectors (CCRs) will be used. The CCRs are integrated in the water cooled heat shield and exposed directly to thermal loads from plasma radiation. Thermo-mechanical issues are very important for the design of the CCR because deformation and flatness as well as mutual angles of the three reflecting surfaces would affect the parallelism of the laser beams and the functionality of the interferometer. Intensive work has been done to explore a suitable design for the CCR concerning thermo-mechanical behavior. Previous studies Ye et al. (2008, 2009) and Köppen et al. (2011) focused on structural optimization to decrease thermal stress in the reflecting plates under the thermal loads, and on computation and check of curvature radii of the deformed reflecting surfaces with the design criterion that the curvature radius must be bigger than 200 m. The paper presents detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the current improved CCR under thermal loads and bolt preloads. The results of the thermo-mechanical analysis were used for the study of the resulting parallelism error of the laser beams with newly developed and more reasonable design criterion.

  10. Thermo-mechanical behavior of retro-reflector and resulting parallelism error of laser beams for Wendelstein 7-X interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, X.B.; Hirsch, M.; Köppen, M.; Fellinger, J.; Bykov, V.; Schauer, F.; Vliegenthart, W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The criterion for thermo-mechanical design of W7-X interferometer retro-reflector. • Thermo-mechanical analysis of retro-reflector with two different methods. • The most flexible part in the retro-reflector is spring washer. • Calculation of parallelism error between the incoming and reflected laser beams. • The parallelism error is much lower than the design limit 28 arcs. - Abstract: A 10 channels interferometer will be used in the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) for plasma density control and density profile tracking with laser beams passing through the plasma. Due to complex shape of non-planar modular coils and divertor structure, there are no large poloidally opposite ports on the plasma vessel (PV). Therefore 10 in-vessel Corner Cube Retro-reflectors (CCRs) will be used. The CCRs are integrated in the water cooled heat shield and exposed directly to thermal loads from plasma radiation. Thermo-mechanical issues are very important for the design of the CCR because deformation and flatness as well as mutual angles of the three reflecting surfaces would affect the parallelism of the laser beams and the functionality of the interferometer. Intensive work has been done to explore a suitable design for the CCR concerning thermo-mechanical behavior. Previous studies Ye et al. (2008, 2009) and Köppen et al. (2011) focused on structural optimization to decrease thermal stress in the reflecting plates under the thermal loads, and on computation and check of curvature radii of the deformed reflecting surfaces with the design criterion that the curvature radius must be bigger than 200 m. The paper presents detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the current improved CCR under thermal loads and bolt preloads. The results of the thermo-mechanical analysis were used for the study of the resulting parallelism error of the laser beams with newly developed and more reasonable design criterion

  11. MOONLIGHT: A NEW LUNAR LASER RANGING RETROREFLECTOR AND THE LUNAR GEODETIC PRECESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR arrays (developed by the University of Maryland, UMD supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (Alley et al., 1970; Chang et al., 1971; Bender et al.,1973: possible changes in the gravitational constant, gravitational self-energy, weak equivalence principle, geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law. The LNF group, in fact, has just completed a new measurement of the lunar geodetic precession with Apollo array, with accuracy of 9 × 10−3, comparable to the best measurement to date. LLR has also provided significant information on the composition and origin of the moon. This is the only Apollo experiment still in operation. In the 1970s Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the ranging capabilities of ground stations improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, Apollo CCR arrays dominate the error budget. With the project MoonLIGHT (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests, in 2006 INFN-LNF joined UMD in the development and test of a new-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100mm diameter unaffected by the effect of librations. With MoonLIGHT CCRs the accuracy of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession can be improved up to a factor 100 compared to Apollo arrays. From a technological point of view, INFN-LNF built and is operating a new experimental apparatus (Satellite/lunar laser ranging Characterization Facility, SCF and created a new industry-standard test procedure (SCF-Test to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of CCRs in accurately laboratory-simulated space conditions, for industrial and scientific applications. Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP and the

  12. Thermo-optical vacuum testing of IRNSS laser retroreflector array qualification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, L.; Boni, A.; Ciocci, E.; Contessa, S.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G.; Intaglietta, N.; Martini, M.; Mondaini, C.; Patrizi, G.; Salvatori, L.; Tibuzzi, M.; Lops, C.; Cantone, C.; Tuscano, P.; Maiello, M.; Venkateswaran, R.; Chakraborty, P.; Ramana Reddy, C. V.; Sriram, K. V.

    2017-09-01

    We describe the activities performed by SCF_Lab (Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory) of INFN-LNF for the thermo-optical vacuum testing activity of a IRNSS (Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System) LRA (Laser Retroreflector Array), under contract for ISRO-LEOS. To our knowledge, this is the first publication on the characterization of the optical performance of an LRA operating at about 36,000 km altitude (typical of regional GNSS segments, namely QZSS, COMPASS-G) executed in fully representative, carefully lab-simulated space conditions. In particular, this is the only such publication concerning IRNSS. Since laser ranging to its altitude is more challenging than to GNSS altitudes (from about 19,100 km for GLONASS to about 23,200 km for Galileo), comparative measurements were long awaited by ILRS (International Laser Ranging Service) and we present measurements of the absolute laser return to ground stations of the ILRS in terms of lidar OCS (Optical Cross Section) at the IRNSS relevant value of velocity aberration, in turn derived from measurements of the full FFDP (Far Field Diffraction Pattern) over a very large range of velocity aberrations. These measurements were acquired: (i) on a full-size qualification model of a IRNSS CCR (Cube Corner Retroreflector) LRA that ISRO-LEOS provided to INFN-LNF; (ii) during the lab-simulation of a 1/4 orbit segment, in which the LRA CCRs are exposed to the perturbation of the sun heat at varying angles, from grazing incidence (90° with respect to the direction perpendicular to the plane of array), up to the perpendicular to the LRA, with a same time variation consistent with the actual space orbit. In this 1/4 orbit condition, the LRA experiences potentially large thermal degradations of the OCS, depending on the detailed thermal and mechanical design of the LRA. Since all GNSS constellations have different LRA designs or configurations, this is another

  13. Study of wire electrical discharge machined folded-up corner cube retroreflector with a tunable cantilever beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fan; Wang, Yen-Hung; Tsai, Jui-che

    2018-03-01

    This work has developed an approach to construct a corner cube retroreflector (CCR). A two-dimensional cutout pattern is first fabricated with wire electrical discharge machining process. It is then folded up into a three-dimensional CCR suspended on a cantilever beam. The folded-up CCR may be driven through external actuators for optical modulation; it can also mechanically respond to perturbation, acceleration, etc., to function as a sensor. Mechanical (static and dynamic modeling) and optical (ray tracing) analyses are also performed.

  14. Wave-optics simulation of the double-pass beam propagation in modulating retro-reflector FSO systems using a corner cube reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guowei; You, Shengzui; Bi, Meihua; Fan, Bing; Lu, Yang; Zhou, Xuefang; Li, Jing; Geng, Hujun; Wang, Tianshu

    2017-09-10

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication utilizing a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) is an innovative way to convey information between the traditional optical transceiver and the semi-passive MRR unit that reflects optical signals. The reflected signals experience turbulence-induced fading in the double-pass channel, which is very different from that in the traditional single-pass FSO channel. In this paper, we consider the corner cube reflector (CCR) as the retro-reflective device in the MRR. A general geometrical model of the CCR is established based on the ray tracing method to describe the ray trajectory inside the CCR. This ray tracing model could treat the general case that the optical beam is obliquely incident on the hypotenuse surface of the CCR with the dihedral angle error and surface nonflatness. Then, we integrate this general CCR model into the wave-optics (WO) simulation to construct the double-pass beam propagation simulation. This double-pass simulation contains the forward propagation from the transceiver to the MRR through the atmosphere, the retro-reflection of the CCR, and the backward propagation from the MRR to the transceiver, which can be realized by a single-pass WO simulation, the ray tracing CCR model, and another single-pass WO simulation, respectively. To verify the proposed CCR model and double-pass WO simulation, the effective reflection area, the incremental phase, and the reflected beam spot on the transceiver plane of the CCR are analyzed, and the numerical results are in agreement with the previously published results. Finally, we use the double-pass WO simulation to investigate the double-pass channel in the MRR FSO systems. The histograms of the turbulence-induced fading in the forward and backward channels are obtained from the simulation data and are fitted by gamma-gamma (ΓΓ) distributions. As the two opposite channels are highly correlated, we model the double-pass channel fading by the product of two correlated

  15. Retroreflector for Photonic Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    reflected by a target . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Ωrefl solid angle into which radiant flux is reflected off a target . . . . . 14 atar radius of...the target’s diffraction pattern is approximately Rλ atar , where R is the distance from the target to the receiver optic and atar is the radius of...the target. If the diffraction pattern is much greater than the radius of the receiver collecting aperture, arcv, or Rλ atar ≫ arcv, the receiver only

  16. Simulation of environment effects on retroreflectors in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsenya, V.S.; Donne, A.J.H.; Bardamid, A.F.; Belyaeva, A.I.; Berezhnyj, V.L.; Galuza, A.A.; Gil, Ch.; Konovalov, V.G.; Lipa, M.; Malaquais, A.; Naidenkova, D.I.; Ryzhkov, V.I.; Schunke, B.; Solodovchenko, S.I.; Topkov, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    Two plasma diagnostics in ITER will use cube-corner reflectors (CCR): poloidal polarimetry and toroidal interferometry/polarimetry. The multichannel poloidal polarimetry system is planned to operate at a wavelength of 118.8 μm. The multichannel toroidal interferometry/polarimetry system is based on a CO 2 laser operating at wavelengths of 10.6 and 9.27 μm. The long term sputtering by charge exchange atoms and/or deposition of carbon-based (or beryllium-based) contaminant layers can affect the optical properties of the CCR. The role of both these potentially deleterious effects on the CCR operation is analyzed in this article, taking into account the probing beam wavelength and the CCR locations. The conclusion is that for the intended use of a CCR in the poloidal polarimetry at 118 μm neither erosion nor deposition should pose a problem. On the other hand, in the toroidal interferometry/polarimetry system operating at 10 μm, care must be taken to reduce the charge exchange atom flux and it is likely that deposition will occur and could have deleterious effects especially on the polarization properties of the reflected radiation

  17. Thermo-mechanical analysis of retro-reflectors for interferometry and polarimetry in W7-X

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köppen, M.; Hirsch, M.; Ernst, J.; Vliegenthart, W.A.; Ye, M.Y.; Bykov, V.; Schauer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is presently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald, Germany. The plasma density profile will be measured by two-colour interferometry where for each line of sight through the plasma the phase shifts of two far-infrared

  18. Thermo-mechanical behavior of retro-reflector and resulting parallelism error of laser beams for Wendelstein 7-X interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, X.B.; Hirsch, M.; Köppen, M.; Fellinger, J.; Bykov, V.; Schauer, F.; Vliegenthart, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    A 10 channels interferometer will be used in the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) for plasma density control and density profile tracking with laser beams passing through the plasma. Due to complex shape of non-planar modular coils and divertor structure, there are no large poloidally opposite ports on the

  19. A micro-machined retro-reflector for improving light yield in ultra-high-resolution gamma cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, J.W.T.; Korevaar, M.A.N.; Kreuger, R.; Ligtvoet, C.M.; Schotanus, P.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution imaging of x-ray and gamma-ray distributions can be achieved with cameras that use charge coupled devices (CCDs) for detecting scintillation light flashes. The energy and interaction position of individual gamma photons can be determined by rapid processing of CCD images of

  20. Method and apparatus for Doppler frequency modulation of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, J. S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Shumate, M. S.; Seaman, C. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for frequency modulating radiation, such as from a laser, for optoacoustic detectors, interferometers, heterodyne spectrometers, and similar devices. Two oppositely reciprocating cats-eye retroreflectors are used to Doppler modulate the radiation. By reciprocally moving both retroreflectors, the center of mass is maintained constant to permit smooth operation at many Hertz. By slightly offsetting the axis of one retroreflector relative to the other, multiple passes of a light beam may be achieved for greater Doppler shifts with the same reciprocating motion of the retroreflectors.

  1. Lunar geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Dickey, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Experience with the dynamics and data analyses for earth and moon reveals both similarities and differences. Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides information on the lunar orbit, rotation, solid-body tides, and retroreflector locations.

  2. Improved double-pass michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Interferometer design separates beams by offsetting centerlines of cat's-eye retroreflectors vertically rather than horizontally. Since beam splitter is insensitive to minimum-thickness condition in this geometry, relatively-low-cost, optically flat plate can be used.

  3. Precision Lunar Laser Ranging For Lunar and Gravitational Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Arnold, D.; Dabney, P. W.; Livas, J. C.; McGarry, J. F.; Neumann, G. A.; Zagwodzki, T. W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser ranging to retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Lunar missions over the past 39 years have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Significant advances in these areas will require placing modern retroreflectors and/or active laser ranging systems at new locations on the lunar surface. Ranging to new locations will enable better measurements of the lunar librations, aiding in our understanding of the interior structure of the moon. More precise range measurements will allow us to study effects that are too small to be observed by the current capabilities as well as enabling more stringent tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Setting up retroreflectors was a key part of the Apollo missions so it is natural to ask if future lunar missions should include them as well. The Apollo retroreflectors are still being used today, and nearly 40 years of ranging data has been invaluable for scientific as well as other studies such as orbital dynamics. However, the available retroreflectors all lie within 26 degrees latitude of the equator, and the most useful ones within 24 degrees longitude of the sub-earth meridian. This clustering weakens their geometrical strength.

  4. Multileaf collimator and related apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    In radiotherapy apparatus using a multileaf collimator, the adjustment positions of the individual leaves can be determined optically by means of a video camera which observes the leaves via a radiation transparent mirror in the beam path. In order to overcome problems of low contrast and varying object brightness, the improvement comprises adding retroreflectors to the collimator leaves whose positions are known relative to the inner edge of the respective leaf. The retroreflectors can extend along the length of the leaf or they can be small. For setting up, corresponding manually adjustable optical diaphragm leaves can be used to project an optical simulation of the treatment area onto the patient, retroreflectors being similarly located relative to the shadow-casting edge of the leaves. (author)

  5. Rendezvous and docking tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Art J.; Ross, Susan E.; Deming, Douglas R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual solid-state rendezvous and docking tracker (RDT) has been devised for generating range and attitude data for a docking vehicle relative to a target vehicle. Emphasis is placed on the approach of the Orbiter to a link with the Space Station. Three laser illuminators ring the optical axis of the lens a directed toward retroreflectors on the target vehicle. Each retroreflector is equipped with a bandpass filter for a designated illumination frequency. Data are collected sequentially over a 20 deg field of view as the range closes to 100-1000 m. A fourth ranging retroreflector 0.3 m from center is employed during close-in maneuvers. The system provides tracking data on motions with 6 deg of freedom, and furnishes 500 msec updates (to be enhanced to 100 msec) to the operator at a computer console.

  6. LLR data analysis and impact on lunar dynamics from recent developments at OCA LLR Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vishnu; Fienga, Agnes; Courde, Clement; Torre, Jean-Marie; Exertier, Pierre; Samain, Etienne; Feraudy, Dominique; Albanese, Dominique; Aimar, Mourad; Mariey, Hervé; Viot, Hervé; Martinot-Lagarde, Gregoire

    2016-04-01

    Since late 2014, OCA LLR station has been able to range with infrared wavelength (1064nm). IR ranging provides both temporal and spatial improvement in the LLR observations. IR detection also permits in densification of normal points, including the L1 and L2 retroreflectors due to better signal to noise ratio. This contributes to a better modelisation of the lunar libration. The hypothesis of lunar dust and environmental effects due to the chromatic behavior noticed on returns from L2 retroreflector is discussed. In addition, data analysis shows that the effect of retroreflector tilt and the use of calibration profile for the normal point deduction algorithm, contributes to improving the precision of normal points, thereby impacting lunar dynamical models and inner physics.

  7. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10th power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the earth's shadow.

  8. Long open-path TDL based system for monitoring the background concentration for deployment at Jungfraujoch High Altitude Research Station- Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, V.; van den Bergh, H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2009-12-01

    A new long-open-path instrument developed at EPFL for methane and water vapor observation will be presented. The instrument is developed and will be used within the GAW+ CH program and aims at long-term monitoring of background methane concentration at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (3580 mASL). The instrument is built on the monostatic scheme (transceiver -distant retroreflector) using a 1.65 nm tunable diode laser (TDL) and a retroreflector at 1200 m from the transceiver. The data will be compared with in-situ measurements to evaluate the effect of the station on the in-situ data.

  9. Analysis of the physical simulation on Fourier transform infrared spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Peng-yuan; Wan, Yu-xi; Zhao, Zhen

    2017-10-01

    A kind of oscillating arm type Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) which based on the corner cube retroreflector is presented, and its principle and properties are studied. It consists of a pair of corner cube retroreflector, beam splitter and compensator. The optical path difference(OPD) is created by oscillating reciprocating motion of the moving corner cube pair, and the OPD value is four times the physical shift value of the moving corner cube pair. Due to the basic property of corner cube retroreflector, the oscillating arm type FTS has no tilt problems. It is almost ideal for very high resolution infrared spectrometer. However, there are some factors to reduce the FTS capability. First, wavefront aberration due to the figures of these surfaces will reduce modulation of FTS system; second, corner cube retroreflector consist of three plane mirror, and orthogonal to each other. When there is a deviation from right angle, it will reduced the modulation of system; third, the apexes of corner cube retroreflector are symmetric about the surface of beam splitter, if one or both of the corner cube retroreflector is displaced laterally from its nominal position, phase of off-axis rays returning from the two arms were difference, this also contributes to loss of modulation of system. In order to solve these problems, this paper sets up a non-sequential interference model, and a small amount of oscillating arm rotation is set to realize the dynamic simulation process, the dynamic interference energy data were acquired at different times, and calculated the modulation of the FTS system. In the simulation, the influence of wedge error of beam splitter, compensator or between them were discussed; effects of oscillating arm shaft deviation from the coplanar of beam splitter was analyzed; and compensation effect of corner cube retroreflector alignment on beam splitter, oscillating arm rotary shaft alignment error is analyzed. In addition, the adjustment procedure

  10. Lunar Laser Ranging Science: Gravitational Physics and Lunar Interior and Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James G.; Turyshev, Slava G.; Boggs, Dale H.; Ratcliff, J. Todd

    2004-01-01

    Laser pulses fired at retroreflectors on the Moon provide very accurate ranges. Analysis yields information on Earth, Moon, and orbit. The highly accurate retroreflector positions have uncertainties less than a meter. Tides on the Moon show strong dissipation, with Q=33+/-4 at a month and a weak dependence on period. Lunar rotation depends on interior properties; a fluid core is indicated with radius approx.20% that of the Moon. Tests of relativistic gravity verify the equivalence principle to +/-1.4x10(exp -13), limit deviations from Einstein's general relativity, and show no rate for the gravitational constant G/G with uncertainty 9x10(exp -13)/yr.

  11. Establishment of a computer-controlled retroreflection measurement system at the National Metrology Institute of Turkey (UME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samedov, Farhad; Celikel, Oguz; Bazkir, Ozcan

    2005-01-01

    In order to characterize photometric properties of retroreflectors, a fully automated retroreflector measurement system is designed in National Metrology Institute of Turkey (UME). The system is composed of a lighting projector, a goniometer, filter radiometers, 100 dB transimpedance amplifiers, and 24-bit resolution analog-digital converter card with a special software. The established system provides a new calibration capability to determine the luminous intensity and retroreflection coefficients of the retroreflective materials with the expanded uncertainties of 1.07% and 1.13% (k=2), respectively. The traceability in retroreflection measurements was linked to the detector-based photometric scale of UME

  12. Aerial 3D display by use of a 3D-shaped screen with aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Nao; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to realize an aerial 3D display. We design optical system that employs a projector below a retro-reflector and a 3D-shaped screen. A floating 3D image is formed with aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR). Our proposed system is composed of a 3D-shaped screen, a projector, a quarter-wave retarder, a retro-reflector, and a reflective polarizer. Because AIRR forms aerial images that are plane-symmetric of the light sources regarding the reflective polarizer, the shape of the 3D screen is inverted from a desired aerial 3D image. In order to expand viewing angle, the 3D-shaped screen is surrounded by a retro-reflector. In order to separate the aerial image from reflected lights on the retro- reflector surface, the retro-reflector is tilted by 30 degrees. A projector is located below the retro-reflector at the same height of the 3D-shaped screen. The optical axis of the projector is orthogonal to the 3D-shaped screen. Scattered light on the 3D-shaped screen forms the aerial 3D image. In order to demonstrate the proposed optical design, a corner-cube-shaped screen is used for the 3D-shaped screen. Thus, the aerial 3D image is a cube that is floating above the reflective polarizer. For example, an aerial green cube is formed by projecting a calculated image on the 3D-shaped screen. The green cube image is digitally inverted in depth by our developed software. Thus, we have succeeded in forming aerial 3D image with our designed optical system.

  13. Flexture plate motion-transfer mechanism, beam-splitter assembly, and interferometer incorporating the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Dettori, Mark D. (Farmington, CT); Grigely, Lawrence J. (South Windsor, CT); Murray, Terence C. (Winchester, MA); Solomon, Peter R. (West Hartford, CT); Van Dine, C. Peter (Bolton, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

    1996-01-01

    A multiplicity of one-piece flexure plates are assembled in pairs to provide a support system on which a retroreflector may be mounted for reciprocal motion. Combined with balance bodies, the flexure plates provide a support system having portions that are dynamically and statically balanced with one another, irrespective of orientation, so as to thereby immunize the unit against extraneous forces. The motion transfer assembly is especially adapted for use to support a moving retroreflector in a two-arm interferometer that may further include a beamsplitter assembly constructed from a one-piece, integrally formed body, the body having convergent, optically flat planar surfaces of specular reflectance, and means for adjustably mounting a beamsplitter therein. The spectrometer is of modular construction, and employs an integrated clocking sub-assembly as well as a light-weight voice-coil motor.

  14. Tests of Gravity Using Lunar Laser Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Merkowitz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lunar laser ranging (LLR has been a workhorse for testing general relativity over the past four decades. The three retroreflector arrays put on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts and the French built arrays on the Soviet Lunokhod rovers continue to be useful targets, and have provided the most stringent tests of the Strong Equivalence Principle and the time variation of Newton’s gravitational constant. The relatively new ranging system at the Apache Point 3.5 meter telescope now routinely makes millimeter level range measurements. Incredibly, it has taken 40 years for ground station technology to advance to the point where characteristics of the lunar retroreflectors are limiting the precision of the range measurements. In this article, we review the gravitational science and technology of lunar laser ranging and discuss prospects for the future.

  15. Far-infrared contraband-detection-system development for personnel-search applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenbaum, R.L.

    1982-09-01

    Experiments have been conducted toward the development of an active near-millimeter-wave, far infrared, personnel search system for the detection of contraband. These experiments employed a microwave hybrid tee interferometer/radiometer scanning system and quasi-optical techniques at 3.3-mm wavelength to illuminate and detect the reflection from target objects against a human body background. Clothing and other common concealing materials are transport at this wavelength. Retroreflector arrays, in conjunction with a Gunn diode radiation source, were investigated to provide all-angle illumination and detection of specular reflections from unaligned and irregular-shaped objects. Results indicate that, under highly controlled search conditions, metal objects greater than or equal to 25 cm 2 can be detected in an enclosure lined with retroreflectors. Further development is required to produce a practical personnel search system. The investigation and feasibility of alternate far infrared search techniques are presented. 23 figures, 2 tables

  16. A Monocular SLAM Method to Estimate Relative Pose During Satellite Proximity Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Truth rotation values are obtained from the spot of a laser pointer that is fixed to the CubeSat and points 76 Figure 44. The AFIT 6U CubeSat Air Bearing...Demonstration for Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) spacecraft, which irradiates retro-reflectors of a known orienta- tion with a laser to solve the...minimize the additional sub-system requirements on the spacecraft. Most spacecraft already have star trackers , which use dedicated CPUs to perform stellar

  17. Optical smart card using semipassive communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, I; Green, Shlomo; Dimkov, Ilan

    2006-03-15

    An optical secure short-range communication system is presented. The mobile unit (optical smart card) of this system utilizes a retroreflector with an optical modulator, using light from the stationary unit; this mobile unit has very low power consumption and can be as small as a credit card. Such optical smart cards offer better security than RF-based solutions, yet do not require physical contact. Results from a feasibility study model are included.

  18. Preliminary result of bunch length measurement using a modified Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xuling; Luo Feng; Bei Hua; Dai Zhimin; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Jianbing; Lu Shanliang; Yu Tiemin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the femtosecond accelerator device which was built at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), recently a modified far infrared Michelson interferometer has been developed to measure the length of electron bunches via the optical autocorrelation method. Compared with our former normal Michelson interferometer, we use a hollow retroreflector instead of a flat mirror as the reflective mirror. The experimental setup and results of the bunch length measurement will be described in this paper. (authors)

  19. Bifacial PV cell with reflector for stand-alone mast for sensor powering purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Michael L.; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter B.; Riedel, N.; Rødder, Peter M.; Rødder, Kristin

    2017-09-01

    Reflectors to bifacial PV-cells are simulated and prototyped in this work. The aim is to optimize the reflector to specific latitudes, and particularly northern latitudes. Specifically, by using minimum semiconductor area the reflector must be able to deliver the electrical power required at the condition of minimum solar travel above the horizon, worst weather condition etc. We will test a bifacial PV-module with a retroreflector, and compare the output with simulations combined with local solar data.

  20. Diffraction gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  1. Probing General Relativity and New Physics with Lunar Laser Ranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Agnello, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Maiello, M., E-mail: mauro.maiello@lnf.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Currie, D.G. [University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, MD (United States); Boni, A.; Berardi, S.; Cantone, C.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Intaglietta, N.; Lops, C.; Garattini, M.; Martini, M.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Tibuzzi, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Vittori, R. [Aeronautica Militare Italiana (AMI), Rome (Italy); Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), Rome (Italy); Bianco, G. [ASI-Centro di Geodesia Spaziale, Matera (Italy); Coradini, A. [INAF-Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dionisio, C. [Rheinmetall Italia S.p.A., Via Affile 102, 00131 Rome (Italy); March, R. [INFN-LNF and CNR-Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo (IAC), Viale del Policlinico 137, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bellettini, G. [INFN-LNF and Department of Mathematics, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2012-11-11

    Over the past 40 years, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR, developed by the Univ. of Maryland (PI) and INFN-LNF (Co-PI)) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) arrays have supplied almost all the significant tests of General Relativity (Currie et al., 2009 [12]). LLR can evaluate the PPN (Post Newtonian Parameters), addressing this way both the possible changes in the gravitational constant and the self-energy properties of the gravitational field. In addition, the LLR has provided significant information on the composition and origin of the Moon. This is the only Apollo experiment that is still in operation. Initially the Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Over the decades, the ranging capabilities of the ground stations have improved by more than two orders of magnitude. Now, because of the lunar librations, the existing Apollo retroreflector arrays contribute a significant fraction of the limiting errors in the range measurements. We built a new experimental apparatus (the 'Satellite/Lunar Laser Ranging Characterization Facility', SCF) and created a new test procedure (the SCF-Test) to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of cube corner laser retroreflectors in space for industrial and scientific applications (Dell'Agnello et al., 2011 [13]). Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the SLR retroreflector payload under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator. The apparatus includes infrared cameras for non-invasive thermometry, thermal control and real-time movement of the payload to experimentally simulate satellite orientation on orbit with respect to both solar illumination and laser interrogation beams. These unique capabilities provide experimental validation of the space segment for SLR and Lunar Laser Ranging

  2. Long open-path TDL based system for monitoring background concentration for deployment at Jungfraujoch High Altitude Research Station- Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Valentin; van den Bergh, Hubert; Parlange, Marc

    2010-05-01

    A new, long open-path instrument for monitoring of path-averaged methane and water vapor concentrations will be presented. The instrument is built on the monostatic scheme (transceiver - distant retroreflector). A VCSEL tunable diode laser (TDL) with a central wavelength of 1654 nm is used as a light source. A specially designed, single-cell, hollow-cube retroreflector with 150 mm aperture will be installed at 1200 m from the transceiver in the final deployment at Jungfraujjoch and 100 mm retroreflectors will be used in the other applications. The receiver is built around a 20 cm Newtonian telescope. To avoid distortions in the shape of a methane line, caused by atmospheric turbulences, the line is scanned within 1 µs. Fast InGaAs photodiodes and 200 MHz are used to achieve this scanning rate. The expected concentration resolution for the above mentioned path lengths is of the order of 2 ppb. The instrument is developed at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology - Lausanne (EPFL) Switzerland and will be used within the GAW+ CH program for long-term monitoring of background methane concentration in the Swiss Alps. After completing the initial tests at EPFL the instrument will be installed in 2012 at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (HARSJ) located at 3580 m ASL. The HARSJ is one of the 24 global GAW stations and carries on continuous observations of a number of trace gasses, including methane. One of the goals of the project is to compare path-averaged to ongoing point measurements of methane in order to identify possible influence of the station. Future deployments of a copy of the instrument include the Colombian part of Amazonia and Siberian wetlands.

  3. Nominal SARAL Transfer Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, David A.; Lemoine, Frank (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives a calculation of the range correction and cross section of the SARAL (Satellite with Argos and ALtiKa) Indian/French ocean radar satellite retroreflector array assuming the cube corners are coated and have a dihedral angle offset of about 1.5 arcseconds to account for velocity aberration. The cubes are assumed to all have the same orientation within the mounting. The derived range correction may be applied in precise orbit determination analyses that use Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data to SARAL.

  4. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  5. Automatic laser beam alignment using blob detection for an environment monitoring spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidir, Jarjees; Chen, Youhua; Anderson, Gary

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a fully automated system to align an infra-red laser beam with a small retro-reflector over a wide range of distances. The component development and test were especially used for an open-path spectrometer gas detection system. Using blob detection under OpenCV library, an automatic alignment algorithm was designed to achieve fast and accurate target detection in a complex background environment. Test results are presented to show that the proposed algorithm has been successfully applied to various target distances and environment conditions.

  6. Frequency scanning interferometry for CLIC component fiducialisation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamugasa, Solomon William; Mainaud Durand, Helene; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy for the fiducialisation of CLIC’s Main Beam Quadrupole (MBQ) magnets using Frequency Scanning Interferometry (FSI). We have developed complementary device for a commercial FSI system to enable coordinate determination via multilateration. Using spherical high index glass retroreflectors with a wide acceptance angle, we optimise the geometry of measurement stations with respect to fiducials -- thus improving the precision of coordinates. We demonstrate through simulations that the 10 μm uncertainty required in the vertical and lateral axes for the fiducialisation of the MBQ can be attained using FSI multilateration.

  7. Shrinking optical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, W H; Pendry, J B

    2009-01-01

    Much of optics depends on objects being much larger than the wavelength of light: shadows of opaque objects are sharp only if free of diffraction effects, and 'cat's eye' retroreflectors function only if they are large. Here, we show how to make theoretically arbitrarily small versions of these devices by exploiting the power of a negatively refracting lens to magnify objects that are smaller than the wavelength, thus creating the effect of a large object while keeping all physical dimensions small. We also give a new perspective on the 'perfect lens theorem' on which the paper is based.

  8. Ozone Sensor for Application in Medium Voltage Switchboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia De Maria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of a new spectroscopic type fiber sensor for ozone detection in electrical components of Medium Voltage (MV network is evaluated. The sensor layout is based on the use of an optical retroreflector, to improve the detection sensitivity, and it was especially designed for detecting in situ rapid changes of ozone concentration. Preliminary tests were performed in a typical MV switchboard. Artificial defects simulated predischarge phenomena arising during real operating conditions. Results are discussed by a comparison with data simultaneously acquired with a standard partial discharge system.

  9. Current Trends and Challenges in Satellite Laser Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Graham M.; Bianco, Giuseppe; Noll, Carey E.; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Pearlman, Michael R.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is used to measure accurately the distance from ground stations to retro-reflectors on satellites and on the Moon. SLR is one of the fundamental space-geodetic techniques that define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), which is the basis upon which many aspects of global change over space, time, and evolving technology are measured; with VLBI the two techniques define the scale of the ITRF; alone the SLR technique defines its origin (geocenter). The importance of the reference frame has recently been recognized at the inter-governmental level through the United Nations, which adopted in February 2015 the Resolution "Global Geodetic Reference Frame for Sustainable Development." Laser Ranging provides precision orbit determination and instrument calibration and validation for satellite-borne altimeters for the better understanding of sea level change, ocean dynamics, ice mass-balance, and terrestrial topography. It is also a tool to study the dynamics of the Moon and fundamental constants and theories. With the exception of the currently in-orbit GPS constellation, all GNSS satellites now carry retro-reflectors for improved orbit determination, harmonization of reference frames, and in-orbit co-location and system performance validation; the next generation of GPS satellites due for launch from 2019 onwards will also carry retro-reflectors. The ILRS delivers weekly realizations that are accumulated sequentially to extend the ITRF and the Earth Orientation Parameter series with a daily resolution. SLR technology continues to evolve towards the next-generation laser ranging systems and it is expected to successfully meet the challenges of the GGOS2020 program for a future Global Space Geodetic Network. Ranging precision is improving as higher repetition rate, narrower pulse lasers, and faster detectors are implemented within the network. Automation and pass interleaving at some stations is expanding temporal coverage and

  10. Laser technology for high precision satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Fixed and mobile laser ranging stations have been developed to track satellites equipped with retro-reflector arrays. These have operated consistently at data rates of once per second with range precision better than 50 cm, using Q-switched ruby lasers with pulse durations of 20 to 40 nanoseconds. Improvements are being incorporated to improve the precision to 10 cm, and to permit ranging to more distant satellites. These include improved reflector array designs, processing and analysis of the received reflection pulses, and use of sub-nanosecond pulse duration lasers.

  11. Current developments in optical engineering and commercial optics; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 7-11, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert E. (Editor); Pollicove, Harvey M. (Editor); Smith, Warren J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on current developments in optical engineering and commercial optics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: large optics fabrication technology drivers and new manufacturing techniques, new technology for beryllium mirror production, design examples of hybrid refractive-diffractive lenses, optical sensor designs for detecting cracks in optical materials, retroreflector field-of-view properties for open and solid cube corners, correction of misalignment-dependent aberrations of the HST via phase retrieval, basic radiometry review for seeker test set, radiation effects on visible optical elements, and nonlinear simulation of efficiency for large-orbit nonwiggler FELs.

  12. Intercomparison of lunar laser and traditional determinations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Dickey, J. O.; Williams, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    Since August, 1969, ranges to one or more retroreflector arrays on the lunar surface have been measured by means of a laser procedure. Analysis of these measurements improves determination, not only of the orbit and librations of the moon, but also of the rotational parameters of the earth, including the X and Y coordinates of the terrestrial pole, and the true rotational angle of the earth with respect to atomic or to broadcast time. The considered approach for deriving the Universal Time 1 (UT1) involves two steps. During the first step the parameters of the lunar orbit and librations are solved along with the coordinates of the retroreflectors on the moon and of the observatory. Improved values of the Universal Time 0 (UT0) and range corrections at the observatory are obtained in the second step. Attention is given to lunar laser ranging (LLR), raw data in UT1, an harmonic analysis of the LLR UT1 data, and data obtained in 1980. The results provide UT1 with an accuracy of a factor of 2 or more better than was previously available from conventional astrometric data.

  13. Spatially-Scanned Dual Comb Spectroscopy for Atmospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, K.; Waxman, E.; Giorgetta, F.; Cermak, M.; Coddington, I.; Hesselius, D.; Ruben, S.; Swann, W.; Rieker, G. B.; Newbury, N.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring trace gas emissions from sources that are spatially complex and temporally variable, such as leaking natural gas infrastructure, is challenging with current measurement systems. Here, we present a new technique that provides the path-integrated concentrations of multiple gas species between a ground station and a retroreflector mounted on a small quadcopter. Such a system could provide the ability to quantify small area emissions sources as well measure vertical mixing within the boundary layer. The system is based on a near-infrared dual frequency-comb spectroscopy system (DCS) covering 1.58-1.7 microns, which enables rapid, accurate measurements of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO. The eye-safe laser light is launched from a telescope on a fast azimuth, elevation gimbal to a small quadcopter carrying a lightweight retroreflector as well as a high-precision real-time kinematic GPS receiver (for real-time cm-level path length measurements) and pressure, temperature and humidity sensors. Here, we show the results of test measurements from controlled releases of CH4 as well as from test vertical profiles.

  14. Contributions to reference systems from Lunar Laser Ranging using the IfE analysis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Franz; Biskupek, Liliane; Müller, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) provides various quantities related to reference frames like Earth orientation parameters, coordinates and velocities of ground stations in the Earth-fixed frame and selenocentric coordinates of the lunar retro-reflectors. This paper presents the recent results from LLR data analysis at the Institut für Erdmessung, Leibniz Universität Hannover, based on all LLR data up to the end of 2016. The estimates of long-periodic nutation coefficients with periods between 13.6 days and 18.6 years are obtained with an accuracy in the order of 0.05-0.7 milliarcseconds (mas). Estimations of the Earth rotation phase Δ UT are accurate at the level of 0.032 ms if more than 14 normal points per night are included. The tie between the dynamical ephemeris frame to the kinematic celestial frame is estimated from pure LLR observations by two angles and their rates with an accuracy of 0.25 and 0.02 mas per year. The estimated station coordinates and velocities are compared to the ITRF2014 solution and the geometry of the retro-reflector network with the DE430 solution. The given accuracies represent 3 times formal errors of the parameter fit. The accuracy for Δ UT is based on the standard deviation of the estimates with respect to the reference C04 solution.

  15. A prototype imaging second harmonic interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobes, F.C.; Bretz, N.L.

    1997-01-01

    We have built a prototype imaging second harmonic interferometer, which is intended to test critical elements of a design for a tangential array interferometer on C-Mod 6 . The prototype uses a pulsed, 35 mJ, 10 Hz multimode, Nd:YAG laser, LiB 3 O 5 doublers, a fan beam created by a cylindrical lens, four retroreflector elements, and a CCD camera as a detector. The prototype also uses a polarization scheme in which the interference information is eventually carried by two second harmonic beams with crossed polarization. These are vector summed and differenced, and separated, by a Wollaston prism, to give two spots on the CCD. There is a pair of these spots for each retroreflector used. The phase information is directly available as the ratio of the difference to sum the intensities of the two spots. We have tested a single channel configuration of this prototype, varying the phase by changing the pressure in an air cell, and we have obtained a 5:1 light to dark ratio, and a clear sinusoidal variation of the ratio as a function of pressure change. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Laser metrology for a next generation gravimetric mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottini, Sergio; Biondetti, Giorgio; Cesare, Stefano; Castorina, Giuseppe; Musso, Fabio; Pisani, Marco; Leone, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    Within the ESA technology research project "Laser Interferometer High Precision tracking for LEO", Thales Alenia Space Italia is developing a laser metrology system for a Next Generation Gravimetric Mission (NGGM) based on satellite-to-satellite tracking. This technique is based on the precise measurement of the displacement between two satellites flying in formation at low altitude for monitoring the variations of Earth's gravity field at high resolution over a long time period. The laser metrology system that has been defined for this mission consists of the following elements: • an heterodyne Michelson interferometer for measuring the distance variation between retroreflectors positioned on the two satellites; • an angle metrology for measuring the orientation of the laser beam in the reference frames of the two satellites; • a lateral displacement metrology for measuring the deviations of the laser beam axis from the target retro-reflector. The laser interferometer makes use of a chopped measurement beam to avoid spurious signals and nonlinearity caused by the unbalance between the strong local beam and the weak return beam. The main results of the design, development and test activities performed on the breadboard of the metrology system are summarized in this paper.

  17. Testing the equivalence principle on a trampoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a Galilean test of the equivalence principle in which two pairs of test mass assemblies (TMA) are in free fall in a comoving vacuum chamber for about 0.9 s. The TMA are tossed upward, and the process repeats at 1.2 s intervals. Each TMA carries a solid quartz retroreflector and a payload mass of about one-third of the total TMA mass. The relative vertical motion of the TMA of each pair is monitored by a laser gauge working in an optical cavity formed by the retroreflectors. Single-toss precision of the relative acceleration of a single pair of TMA is 3.5×10-12 g. The project goal of Δg/g = 10-13 can be reached in a single night's run, but repetition with altered configurations will be required to ensure the correction of systematic error to the nominal accuracy level. Because the measurements can be made quickly, we plan to study several pairs of materials.

  18. Flipping interferometry and its application for quantitative phase microscopy in a micro-channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitshtain, Darina; Turko, Nir A; Javidi, Bahram; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-05-15

    We present a portable, off-axis interferometric module for quantitative phase microscopy of live cells, positioned at the exit port of a coherently illuminated inverted microscope. The module creates on the digital camera an interference pattern between the image of the sample and its flipped version. The proposed simplified module is based on a retro-reflector modification in an external Michelson interferometer. The module does not contain any lenses, pinholes, or gratings and its alignment is straightforward. Still, it allows full control of the off-axis angle and does not suffer from ghost images. As experimentally demonstrated, the module is useful for quantitative phase microscopy of live cells rapidly flowing in a micro-channel.

  19. Particle-based optical pressure sensors for 3D pressure mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Niladri; Xie, Yan; Chalaseni, Sandeep; Mastrangelo, Carlos H

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents particle-based optical pressure sensors for in-flow pressure sensing, especially for microfluidic environments. Three generations of pressure sensitive particles have been developed- flat planar particles, particles with integrated retroreflectors and spherical microballoon particles. The first two versions suffer from pressure measurement dependence on particles orientation in 3D space and angle of interrogation. The third generation of microspherical particles with spherical symmetry solves these problems making particle-based manometry in microfluidic environment a viable and efficient methodology. Static and dynamic pressure measurements have been performed in liquid medium for long periods of time in a pressure range of atmospheric to 40 psi. Spherical particles with radius of 12 μm and balloon-wall thickness of 0.5 μm are effective for more than 5 h in this pressure range with an error of less than 5%.

  20. Energy scavenging sensors for ultra-low power sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dominic C.; Liu, Jing Jing; Faulkner, Grahame E.; Vachiramon, Pithawat; Collins, Steve; Elston, Steven J.

    2010-08-01

    The 'internet of things' will require very low power wireless communications, preferably using sensors that scavenge power from their environment. Free space optics allows communications over long ranges, with simple transceivers at each end, offering the possibility of low energy consumption. In addition there can be sufficient energy in the communications beam to power simple terminals. In this paper we report experimental results from an architecture that achieves this. A base station that tracks sensors in its coverage area and communicates with them using low divergence optical beams is presented. Sensor nodes use modulated retro-reflectors to communicate with the base station, and the nodes are powered by the illuminating beam. The paper presents design and implementation details, as well as future directions for this work.

  1. Optical wireless communications for micromachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dominic C.; Yuan, Wei Wen; Liu, Jing Jing; Faulkner, Grahame E.; Elston, Steve J.; Collins, Steve; Parry-Jones, Lesley A.

    2006-08-01

    A key challenge for wireless sensor networks is minimizing the energy required for network nodes to communicate with each other, and this becomes acute for self-powered devices such as 'smart dust'. Optical communications is a potentially attractive solution for such devices. The University of Oxford is currently involved in a project to build optical wireless links to smart dust. Retro-reflectors combined with liquid crystal modulators can be integrated with the micro-machine to create a low power transceiver. When illuminated from a base station a modulated beam is returned, transmitting data. Data from the base station can be transmitted using modulation of the illuminating beam and a receiver at the micro-machine. In this paper we outline the energy consumption and link budget considerations in the design of such micro-machines, and report preliminary experimental results.

  2. Interplanetary laser ranging - an emerging technology for planetary science missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, D.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2012-09-01

    Interplanetary laser ranging (ILR) is an emerging technology for very high accuracy distance determination between Earth-based stations and spacecraft or landers at interplanetary distances. It has evolved from laser ranging to Earth-orbiting satellites, modified with active laser transceiver systems at both ends of the link instead of the passive space-based retroreflectors. It has been estimated that this technology can be used for mm- to cm-level accuracy range determination at interplanetary distances [2, 7]. Work is being performed in the ESPaCE project [6] to evaluate in detail the potential and limitations of this technology by means of bottom-up laser link simulation, allowing for a reliable performance estimate from mission architecture and hardware characteristics.

  3. Gravity model improvement using GEOS-3 (GEM 9 and 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, F. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Laubscher, R. E.; Wagner, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of collocation permitted GEM 9 to be a larger field than previous derived satellite models, GEM 9 having harmonics complete to 20 x 20 with selected higher degree terms. The satellite data set has approximately 840,000 observations, of which 200,000 are laser ranges taken on 9 satellites equipped with retroreflectors. GEM 10 is complete to 22 x 22 with selected higher degree terms out to degree and order 30 amounting to a total of 592 coefficients. Comparisons with surface gravity and altimeter data indicate a substantial improvement in GEM 9 over previous satellite solutions; GEM 9 is in even closer agreement with surface data than the previously published GEM 6 solution which contained surface gravity. In particular the free air gravity anomalies calculated from GEM 9 and a surface gravity solution are in excellent agreement for the high degree terms.

  4. KT Fund: Five years of funding for impact

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic safety, ion beam therapy, event management for communities, emergency lighting… this year’s applications for funding through the Knowledge Transfer Fund demonstrate the breadth of possible applications of CERN technology beyond high-energy physics.     The use of high index glass spherical targets as retroreflectors for a 3D interferometer is the subject of one of the 2015 KT Fund Projects.   Following the 2015 selection committee held in January, the KT Fund has funded a total of seven new projects that aim to further develop CERN technologies to a level where they can be transferred and subsequently make a positive impact on society. “CERN’s ambitious scientific programme requires state-of-the-art technologies that are not always directly reusable by society because they were not designed with this purpose in mind,” explains David Mazur, Section Leader of the IP Dissemination Section. “Since 2011, the KT...

  5. Highly sensitive straightness measurement system using a ball-lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minho; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Cho, Nahm-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new and simple optical technique to accurately measure the straightness errors of a linear stage is proposed. To improve the performance, including the measurement sensitivity and resolution of the measurement system, and to simultaneously measure two-dimensional straightness errors (2D straightness errors), an optical system was designed using a laser, a retro-reflector, a ball-lens, and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (2D PSD). The characteristics of the measurement system were analytically and experimentally investigated. A prototype measurement system was manufactured based on the investigated results, and the performances of this system have been tested. The measuring performance of the system was easily improved by about 12 times using the proposed technique and it can be further improved. It is shown that the proposed technique can easily and effectively improve the performance of a conventional straightness measurement system based on the geometric optical method using a PSD. (paper)

  6. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  7. Lunar Fluid Core and Solid-Body Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2-5] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening has been improving [3,5] and now seems significant. This strengthens the case for a fluid lunar core.

  8. Gas detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Bayly, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The gas detection system provides for the effective detection of gas leaks over a large area. It includes a laser which has a laser line corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. A He-Xe laser scans a number of retroreflectors which are strategically located around a D 2 O plant to detect H 2 S leaks. The reflected beam is focused by a telescope, filtered, and passed into an infrared detector. The laser may be made to emit two frequencies, one of which corresponds with an H 2 S absorption line; or it may be modulated on and off the H 2 S absorption line. The relative amplitude of the absorbed light will be a measure of the H 2 S present

  9. Comparative studies to the design of the interferometer at W7-X with respect to technical boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, H.; Dinklage, A.; Hirsch, M.; Kornejew, P.; Fischer, R.

    2008-01-01

    For the optimisation of the beam line configuration of the multi-channel interferometer at the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator the probabilistic approach of Bayesian experimental design (BED) is applied. Parameters of physical interest are directly implemented as design criteria. The quality of the design is analysed according to its expected information gain (expected utility) about the parameters of interest, which enables one to compare different diagnostic configurations quantitatively. The focus of this work lies on the comparison of different technical approaches for the interferometer diagnostic. Different physical problems (high confinement regimes, neoclassical predictions) and their effect on the density distribution are applied as optimisation goals. The influence of the port system and the in-vessel components (retro-reflectors) is discussed. For this, the design was done with and without technical restrictions, the resulting expected utilities are compared and analysed. Furthermore, the impact of an additional beamline at a different toroidal position (congruent to the Thomson scattering diagnostic) is examined

  10. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO, in NM, can detect pho- ton bounces from retroreflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference — only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations / turbulence (gravitational waves in the flow of the dynamical 3-space rela- tive to local systems / observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an e ective “gravi- tational wave” detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave / turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  11. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO, in NM, can detect photon bounces from retroreflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  12. Lunar Rotation, Orientation and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Boggs, D. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Moon is the most familiar example of the many satellites that exhibit synchronous rotation. For the Moon there is Lunar Laser Ranging measurements of tides and three-dimensional rotation variations plus supporting theoretical understanding of both effects. Compared to uniform rotation and precession the lunar rotational variations are up to 1 km, while tidal variations are about 0.1 m. Analysis of the lunar variations in pole direction and rotation about the pole gives moment of inertia differences, third-degree gravity harmonics, tidal Love number k2, tidal dissipation Q vs. frequency, dissipation at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and emerging evidence for an oblate boundary. The last two indicate a fluid core, but a solid inner core is not ruled out. Four retroreflectors provide very accurate positions on the Moon. The experience with the Moon is a starting point for exploring the tides, rotation and orientation of the other synchronous bodies of the solar system.

  13. Far-infrared tangential interferometer/polarimeter design and installation for NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, E. R., E-mail: evrscott@ucdavis.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Barchfeld, R. [Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Riemenschneider, P.; Domier, C. W.; Sohrabi, M.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Muscatello, C. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Kaita, R.; Ren, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Far-infrared Tangential Interferometer/Polarimeter (FIReTIP) system has been refurbished and is being reinstalled on the National Spherical Torus Experiment—Upgrade (NSTX-U) to supply real-time line-integrated core electron density measurements for use in the NSTX-U plasma control system (PCS) to facilitate real-time density feedback control of the NSTX-U plasma. Inclusion of a visible light heterodyne interferometer in the FIReTIP system allows for real-time vibration compensation due to movement of an internally mounted retroreflector and the FIReTIP front-end optics. Real-time signal correction is achieved through use of a National Instruments CompactRIO field-programmable gate array.

  14. Earth orientation from lunar laser ranging and an error analysis of polar motion services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.; Williams, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) data are obtained on the basis of the timing of laser pulses travelling from observatories on earth to retroreflectors placed on the moon's surface during the Apollo program. The modeling and analysis of the LLR data can provide valuable insights into earth's dynamics. The feasibility to model accurately the lunar orbit over the full 13-year observation span makes it possible to conduct relatively long-term studies of variations in the earth's rotation. A description is provided of general analysis techniques, and the calculation of universal time (UT1) from LLR is discussed. Attention is also given to a summary of intercomparisons with different techniques, polar motion results and intercomparisons, and a polar motion error analysis.

  15. Linear negative magnetoresistance in two-dimensional Lorentz gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluck, J.; Hund, M.; Heckenthaler, T.; Heinzel, T.; Siboni, N. H.; Horbach, J.; Pierz, K.; Schumacher, H. W.; Kazazis, D.; Gennser, U.; Mailly, D.

    2018-03-01

    Two-dimensional Lorentz gases formed by obstacles in the shape of circles, squares, and retroreflectors are reported to show a pronounced linear negative magnetoresistance at small magnetic fields. For circular obstacles at low number densities, our results agree with the predictions of a model based on classical retroreflection. In extension to the existing theoretical models, we find that the normalized magnetoresistance slope depends on the obstacle shape and increases as the number density of the obstacles is increased. The peaks are furthermore suppressed by in-plane magnetic fields as well as by elevated temperatures. These results suggest that classical retroreflection can form a significant contribution to the magnetoresistivity of two-dimensional Lorentz gases, while contributions from weak localization cannot be excluded, in particular for large obstacle densities.

  16. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°.

  17. Faraday rotation calculations for a FIR polarimeter on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieswand, C.

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of the safety factor profile has been considered as an essential diagnostics for ITER. Without the presence of a neutral beam, the only reliable diagnostics which can fulfill the requirements for the q-profile determination is at present the polarimetry. This paper presents the results of calculations of the Faraday rotation and the Cotton-Mouton effect for various plasma configurations (considered as typical) and various beam geometries which can eventually be realized in spite of the restricted access. The calculations should help to find a decision for the wavelength and the number and the position of the observation chords of a possible polarimeter system on ITER. The paper does not deal with technical questions concerning the implementation of such a system on ITER. The potential use of internal retro-reflectors or waveguides for the beams is not discussed. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs

  18. New perspectives for high accuracy SLR with second generation geodesic satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Glenn

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on the accuracy limitations imposed by geodesic satellite signatures, and on the potential for achieving millimetric performances by means of alternative satellite concepts and an optimized 2-color system tradeoff. Long distance laser ranging, when performed between a ground (emitter/receiver) station and a distant geodesic satellite, is now reputed to enable short arc trajectory determinations to be achieved with an accuracy of 1 to 2 centimeters. This state-of-the-art accuracy is limited principally by the uncertainties inherent to single-color atmospheric path length correction. Motivated by the study of phenomena such as postglacial rebound, and the detailed analysis of small-scale volcanic and strain deformations, the drive towards millimetric accuracies will inevitably be felt. With the advent of short pulse (less than 50 ps) dual wavelength ranging, combined with adequate detection equipment (such as a fast-scanning streak camera or ultra-fast solid-state detectors) the atmospheric uncertainty could potentially be reduced to the level of a few millimeters, thus, exposing other less significant error contributions, of which by far the most significant will then be the morphology of the retroreflector satellites themselves. Existing geodesic satellites are simply dense spheres, several 10's of cm in diameter, encrusted with a large number (426 in the case of LAGEOS) of small cube-corner reflectors. A single incident pulse, thus, results in a significant number of randomly phased, quasi-simultaneous return pulses. These combine coherently at the receiver to produce a convolved interference waveform which cannot, on a shot to shot basis, be accurately and unambiguously correlated to the satellite center of mass. This paper proposes alternative geodesic satellite concepts, based on the use of a very small number of cube-corner retroreflectors, in which the above difficulties are eliminated while ensuring, for a given emitted pulse, the return

  19. Calibration method for a vision guiding-based laser-tracking measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Mingwei; Wei, Zhenzhong; Hu, Mengjie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-01-01

    Laser-tracking measurement systems (laser trackers) based on a vision-guiding device are widely used in industrial fields, and their calibration is important. As conventional methods typically have many disadvantages, such as difficult machining of the target and overdependence on the retroreflector, a novel calibration method is presented in this paper. The retroreflector, which is necessary in the normal calibration method, is unnecessary in our approach. As the laser beam is linear, points on the beam can be obtained with the help of a normal planar target. In this way, we can determine the function of a laser beam under the camera coordinate system, while its corresponding function under the laser-tracker coordinate system can be obtained from the encoder of the laser tracker. Clearly, when several groups of functions are confirmed, the rotation matrix can be solved from the direction vectors of the laser beams in different coordinate systems. As the intersection of the laser beams is the origin of the laser-tracker coordinate system, the translation matrix can also be determined. Our proposed method not only achieves the calibration of a single laser-tracking measurement system but also provides a reference for the calibration of a multistation system. Simulations to evaluate the effects of some critical factors were conducted. These simulations show the robustness and accuracy of our method. In real experiments, the root mean square error of the calibration result reached 1.46 mm within a range of 10 m, even though the vision-guiding device focuses on a point approximately 5 m away from the origin of its coordinate system, with a field of view of approximately 200 mm  ×  200 mm. (paper)

  20. Spin motion determination of the Envisat satellite through laser ranging measurements from a single pass measured by a single station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Jean-Noël; Šilha, Jiří; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology is used to accurately determine the position of space objects equipped with so-called retro-reflectors or retro-reflector arrays (RRA). This type of measurement allows to measure the range to the spacecraft with high precision, which leads to determination of very accurate orbits for these targets. Non-active spacecraft, which are not attitude controlled any longer, tend to start to spin or tumble under influence of the external and internal torques and forces. If the return signal is measured for a non-spherical non-active rotating object, the signal in the range residuals with respect to the reference orbit is more complex. For rotating objects the return signal shows an oscillating pattern or patterns caused by the RRA moving around the satellite's centre of mass. This behaviour is projected onto the radial component measured by the SLR. In our work, we demonstrate how the SLR ranging technique from one sensor to a satellite equipped with a RRA can be used to precisely determine its spin motion during one passage. Multiple SLR measurements of one target over time allow to accurately monitor spin motion changes which can be further used for attitude predictions. We show our solutions of the spin motion determined for the non-active ESA satellite Envisat obtained from measurements acquired during years 2013-2015 by the Zimmerwald SLR station, Switzerland. All the necessary parameters are defined for our own so-called point-like model which describes the motion of a point in space around the satellite centre of mass.

  1. Full-Duplex Digital Communication on a Single Laser Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, D. A.; MacCannell, J. A.; Lee, G.; Selves, E. R.; Moore, D.; Payne, J. A.; Garrett, C. D.; Dahlstrom, N.; Shay, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed free-space optical communication system would operate in a full-duplex mode, using a single constant-power laser beam for transmission and reception of binary signals at both ends of the free-space optical path. The system was conceived for two-way data communication between a ground station and a spacecraft in a low orbit around the Earth. It has been estimated that in this application, a data rate of 10 kb/s could be achieved at a ground-station-to-spacecraft distance of 320 km, using a laser power of only 100 mW. The basic system concept is also applicable to terrestrial free-space optical communications. The system (see figure) would include a diode laser at one end of the link (originally, the ground station) and a liquid-crystal- based retroreflecting modulator at the other end of the link (originally, the spacecraft). At the laser end, the beam to be transmitted would be made to pass through a quarter-wave plate, which would convert its linear polarization to right circular polarization. For transmission of data from the laser end to the retroreflector end, the laser beam would be modulated with subcarrier phase-shift keying (SC-PSK). The transmitted beam would then pass through an aperture- sharing element (ASE) - basically, a mirror with a hole in it, used to separate the paths of the transmitted and received light beams. The transmitted beam would continue outward through a telescope (which, in the original application, would be equipped with a spacecraft-tracking system) that would launch the transmitted beam along the free-space optical path to the retroreflector end.

  2. Trajectory control sensor engineering model detailed test objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph Martin

    1991-01-01

    The concept employed in an existing Trajectory Control Sensor (TCS) breadboard is being developed into an engineering model to be considered for flight on the Shuttle as a Detailed Test Objective (DTO). The sensor design addresses the needs of Shuttle/SSF docking/berthing by providing relative range and range rate to 1500 meters as well as the perceived needs of AR&C by relative attitude measurement over the last 100 meters. Range measurement is determined using a four-tone ranging technique. The Doppler shift on the highest frequency tone will be used to provide direct measurement of range rate. Bearing rate and attitude rates will be determined through back differencing of bearing and attitude, respectively. The target consists of an isosceles triangle configuration of three optical retroreflectors, roughly one meter and one-half meter in size. After target acquisition, the sensor continually updates the positions of the three retros at a rate of about one hertz. The engineering model is expected to weigh about 25 pounds, consume 25-30 watts, and have an envelope of about 1.25 cubic feet. The following concerns were addressed during the presentation: are there any concerns with differentiating attitude and bearing to get attitude and bearing rates? Since the docking scenario has low data bandwidth, back differencing is a sufficient approximation of a perfect differentiator for this application. Could range data be obtained if there were no retroreflectors on the target vehicle? Possibly, but only at close range. It would be dependent on target characteristics.

  3. Development and applications of retro-reflective surfaces for ultrasound in LBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    pulse or a complete absence of a reflection like a shadow. In that way, it suffices to align the sensor with the diaphragm instead of the fuel assembly which is much easier to achieve as the robotics on which the sensor is mounted move parallel with the diaphragm. The alignment requirement in the latter approach can be further relaxed by using a tiling of retro-reflectors on the lower surface of the diaphragm. In that way, alignment becomes less vital and the main source of acoustic energy loss - geometric spread of the beam - is almost completely removed, leaving only absorption losses. In this paper, we present the first results in developing a retro reflectance surface for ultrasound in LBE. We present experimental results for different designs of retro-reflectors in both water and LBE. We discuss both linear and array retro-reflectors of different sizes and investigate the influence of the main relevant ultrasonic parameters such as wavelength and spot size on the strength of the received reflection under different alignment angles. We also demonstrate how retro-reflective surfaces can be exploited when localizing objects using linear and rotating scanning methods. (authors)

  4. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, L.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Mitchell, J.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-loop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of"pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  5. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Linda L.; Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, A. S.; Carrington, Connie; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success ofthe Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-Ioop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of "pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  6. Jason-1 and Jason-2 POD Using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melachroinos, Stavros; Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Rowlands, David D.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Beckley, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The Jason-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful Jason-1 altimetry satellite mission launched in December 7, 2001. Both, Jason-2 and Jason-1 are equipped with a GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). A series of dynamic and reduced-dynamic Jason-2 orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on GPS-only data and the std0905 standards, have been completed till cy74through cycle 74 using the IGS05 framework. These orbits, now publicly available, have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS with the GSFC std0905 SLR/DORIS orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by JPL, ESA and CNES. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the IGS08 and repro1 framework for the Jason-2 and Jason-1 GPS POD processing with the NASA GSFC GEODYN software. . In our updated GPS POD, ambiguity fixing and updated time variable and static gravity fields. We also evaluate the implementation of non-tidal and degree-1 loading displacement as forward modeling to the tracking stations. Reduced-dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model errors and TRF instability. In particular, we assess their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the North/South direction as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame.

  7. A new lunar absolute control point: established by images from the landing camera on Chang'e-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fen-Fei; Liu Jian-Jun; Li Chun-Lai; Ren Xin; Mu Ling-Li; Yan Wei; Wang Wen-Rui; Xiao Jing-Tao; Tan Xu; Zhang Xiao-Xia; Zou Xiao-Duan; Gao Xing-Ye

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of a lunar control network is one of the core tasks in selenodesy, in which defining an absolute control point on the Moon is the most important step. However, up to now, the number of absolute control points has been very sparse. These absolute control points have mainly been lunar laser ranging retroreflectors, whose geographical location can be observed by observations on Earth and also identified in high resolution lunar satellite images. The Chang'e-3 (CE-3) probe successfully landed on the Moon, and its geographical location has been monitored by an observing station on Earth. Since its positional accuracy is expected to reach the meter level, the CE-3 landing site can become a new high precision absolute control point. We use a sequence of images taken from the landing camera, as well as satellite images taken by CE-1 and CE-2, to identify the location of the CE-3 lander. With its geographical location known, the CE-3 landing site can be established as a new absolute control point, which will effectively expand the current area of the lunar absolute control network by 22%, and can greatly facilitate future research in the field of lunar surveying and mapping, as well as selenodesy

  8. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Xue-Mei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer’s effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

  9. Precision fiducialization of transport components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.; Bressler, V.E.; Cobb, J.K.; Jensen, D.R.; Ruland, R.E.; Walz, H.V.; Williams, S.H.

    1992-03-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a transport line designed to test both concept and advanced technology for application to future linear colliders. It is currently under construction at SLAC in the central beam line. Most of the quadrupoles of the FFTB have ab initio alignment tolerances of less than 30 microns, if the planned for beam based alignment tuning procedure is to converge. For such placement tolerances to have any meaning requires that the coordinates of the effective centers, seen by the beam particles, be tansferred to tooling (that can be reached by mechanical or optical alignment methods) located on the outside of the components to comparable or better values. We have constructed an apparatus that simultaneously locates to micron tolerances, the effective magnetic center of fussing lenses, as well as the electrical center of beam position monitors (BPM) imbedded therein, and once located, for transferring these coordinates to specially mounted tooling frames that supported the external retroreflectors used in a laser tracker based alignment of the beam line. Details of construction as well as experimental results from the method are presented

  10. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle rendezvous, stationkeeping and capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent spatial resolution of laser radar makes ladar or lidar an attractive candidate for Automated Rendezvous and Capture application. Previous applications were based on incoherent lidar techniques, requiring retro-reflectors on the target vehicle. Technology improvements (reduced size, no cryogenic cooling requirement) have greatly enhanced the construction of coherent lidar systems. Coherent lidar permits the acquisition of non-cooperative targets at ranges that are limited by the detection capability rather than by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements. The sensor can provide translational state information (range, velocity, and angle) by direct measurement and, when used with any array detector, also can provide attitude information by Doppler imaging techniques. Identification of the target is accomplished by scanning with a high pulse repetition frequency (dependent on the SNR). The system performance is independent of range and should not be constrained by sun angle. An initial effort to characterize a multi-element detection system has resulted in a system that is expected to work to a minimum range of 1 meter. The system size, weight and power requirements are dependent on the operating range; 10 km range requires a diameter of 3 centimeters with overall size at 3 x 3 x 15 to 30 cm, while 100 km range requires a 30 cm diameter.

  11. Gravity and Macro-Model Tuning for the Geosat Follow-on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Rowlands, David D.; Marr, Gregory C.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Cox, Christopher M.

    1999-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On (GFO) spacecraft was launched on February 10, 1998 and the primary objective of the mission was to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. The spacecraft tracking complement consisted of GPS receivers, a laser retroreflector and Doppler beacons. Since the GPS receivers have not yet returned reliable data, the only means of providing high-quality precise orbits has been though satellite laser ranging (SLR). The spacecraft has been tracked by the international satellite laser ranging network since April 22, 1998, and an average of 7.4 passes per day have been obtained from US and participating foreign stations. Since the predicted radial orbit error due to the gravity field is two to three cm, the largest contributor to the high SLR residuals (7-10 cm RMS for five day arcs) is the mismodelling of the non-conservative forces, not withstanding the development of a three-dimensional eight-panel model and an analytical attitude model for the GFO spacecraft. The SLR residuals show a clear correlation with beta-prime (solar elevation) angle, peaking in mid-August 1998 when the beta-prime angle reached -80 to -90 degrees. In this paper we discuss the tuning of the non-conservative force model, for GFO and report the subsequent addition of the GFO tracking data to the Earth gravity model solutions.

  12. The use of x-ray interferometry to investigate the linearity of the NPL Differential Plane Mirror Optical Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Downs, Michael J.

    2000-08-01

    The x-ray interferometer from the combined optical and x-ray interferometer (COXI) facility at NPL has been used to investigate the performance of the NPL Jamin Differential Plane Mirror Interferometer when it is fitted with stabilized and unstabilized lasers. This Jamin interferometer employs a common path design using a double pass configuration and one fringe is realized by a displacement of 158 nm between its two plane mirror retroreflectors. Displacements over ranges of several optical fringes were measured simultaneously using the COXI x-ray interferometer and the Jamin interferometer and the results were compared. In order to realize the highest measurement accuracy from the Jamin interferometer, the air paths were shielded to prevent effects from air turbulence and electrical signals generated by the photodetectors were analysed and corrected using an optimizing routine in order to subdivide the optical fringes accurately. When an unstabilized laser was used the maximum peak-to-peak difference between the two interferometers was 80 pm, compared with 20 pm when the stabilized laser was used.

  13. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures' dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-41D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  14. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, G. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie de Surface, Centre de Recherche sur les Materiaux Avances, Departement de genie des mines, de la metallurgie et des materiaux, Universite Laval, 1065, avenue de la Medecine, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Centre de recherche du CHUQ, Hopital St Francois d' Assise, 10, rue de l' Espinay, local E0-165, Quebec G1L 3L5 (Canada); Vallade, J. [Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES, CNRS, Technosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Agence de l' environnement et de la Ma Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -carettrise de l' Energie, 20, avenue du Gresille, BP 90406, F-49004 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F. [Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES, CNRS, Technosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Nijnatten, P. van [OMT Solutions bv, High Tech Campus 9, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  15. Development of transient internal probe (TIP) magnetic field diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is designed to permit measurement of internal magnetic fields, in hot, high density plasmas. The concept consists of accelerating a probe to high velocities (2.2 Km/s) in order to minimize probe exposure time to plasma. Faraday rotation within the probe is used to measure the local magnetic field. An Argon laser illuminates the probe consisting of a Faraday-rotator material with a retro-reflector that returns the incident light to the detection system. Performance results of the light gas gun and optical detection system will be shown. To date, the gas gun has been extensively tested consistently achieving velocities between 2 and 3 km/s. The probe and detection scheme have been tested by dropping the probe through a static magnetic field. Magnetic field resolution of 20 gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm has been achieved. System frequency response is 10Mhz. Work is currently being conducted to integrate the diagnostic system with laboratory plasma experiments. Specifically a gas interfaced system has been developed to prevent helium muzzle gas from entering the plasma chamber with the probe. Additionally the probe must be separated from the sabot which protects the probe during acceleration in the gas gun. Data will be presented showing the results of various separation techniques

  16. Interferometric 30 m bench for calibrations of 1D scales and optical distance measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkuri, J; Rantanen, A; Manninen, J; Esala, V-P; Lassila, A

    2012-01-01

    During construction of a new metrology building for MIKES, a 30 m interferometric bench was designed. The objective was to implement a straight, stable, adjustable and multifunctional 30 m measuring bench for calibrations. Special attention was paid to eliminating the effects of thermal expansion and inevitable concrete shrinkage. The linear guide, situated on top of a monolithic concrete beam, comprises two parallel round shafts with adjustable fixtures every 1 m. A carriage is moved along the rail and its position is followed by a reference interferometer. Depending on the measurement task, one or two retro-reflectors are fixed on the carriage. A microscope with a CCD camera and a monitor can be used to detect line mark positions on different line standards. When calibrating optical distance measuring instruments, various targets can be fixed to the carriage. For the most accurate measurements an online Abbe-error correction based on simultaneous carriage pitch measurement by a separate laser interferometer is applied. The bench is used for calibrations of machinist scales, tapes, circometers, electronic distance meters, total stations and laser trackers. The estimated expanded uncertainty for 30 m displacement for highest accuracy calibrations is 2.6 µm. (paper)

  17. Design issues for semi-passive optical communication devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, I.

    2007-09-01

    Optical smart cards are devices containing a retro-reflector, light modulator, and some computing and data storage capabilities to affect semi-passive communication. They do not produce light; instead they modulate and send back light received from a stationary unit. These devices can replace contact-based smart cards as well as RF based ones for applications ranging from identification to transmitting and validating data. Since their transmission is essentially focused on the receiving unit, they are harder to eavesdrop than RF devices, yet need no physical contact or alignment. In this paper we explore optical design issues of these devices and estimate their optical behavior. Specifically, we analyze how these compact devices can be optimized for selected application profiles. Some of the key parameters addressed are effective light efficiency (how much modulated signal can be received by the stationary unit given the amount of light it transmits), range of tilt angles (angle between device surface normal to the line connecting the optical smart card with the stationary unit) through which the device would be effective, and power requirements of the semi-passive unit. In addition, issues concerning compact packaging of this device are discussed. Finally, results of the analysis are employed to produce a comparison of achievable capabilities of these optical smart cards, as opposed to alternative devices, and discuss potential applications were they can be best utilized.

  18. Flat Engineered Multichannel Reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Asadchy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in engineered gradient metasurfaces have enabled unprecedented opportunities for light manipulation using optically thin sheets, such as anomalous refraction, reflection, or focusing of an incident beam. Here, we introduce a concept of multichannel functional metasurfaces, which are able to control incoming and outgoing waves in a number of propagation directions simultaneously. In particular, we reveal a possibility to engineer multichannel reflectors. Under the assumption of reciprocity and energy conservation, we find that there exist three basic functionalities of such reflectors: specular, anomalous, and retroreflections. Multichannel response of a general flat reflector can be described by a combination of these functionalities. To demonstrate the potential of the introduced concept, we design and experimentally test three different multichannel reflectors: three- and five-channel retroreflectors and a three-channel power splitter. Furthermore, by extending the concept to reflectors supporting higher-order Floquet harmonics, we forecast the emergence of other multichannel flat devices, such as isolating mirrors, complex splitters, and multi-functional gratings.

  19. Flat Engineered Multichannel Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadchy, V. S.; Díaz-Rubio, A.; Tcvetkova, S. N.; Kwon, D.-H.; Elsakka, A.; Albooyeh, M.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in engineered gradient metasurfaces have enabled unprecedented opportunities for light manipulation using optically thin sheets, such as anomalous refraction, reflection, or focusing of an incident beam. Here, we introduce a concept of multichannel functional metasurfaces, which are able to control incoming and outgoing waves in a number of propagation directions simultaneously. In particular, we reveal a possibility to engineer multichannel reflectors. Under the assumption of reciprocity and energy conservation, we find that there exist three basic functionalities of such reflectors: specular, anomalous, and retroreflections. Multichannel response of a general flat reflector can be described by a combination of these functionalities. To demonstrate the potential of the introduced concept, we design and experimentally test three different multichannel reflectors: three- and five-channel retroreflectors and a three-channel power splitter. Furthermore, by extending the concept to reflectors supporting higher-order Floquet harmonics, we forecast the emergence of other multichannel flat devices, such as isolating mirrors, complex splitters, and multi-functional gratings.

  20. Design of a Base Station for MEMS CCR Localization in an Optical Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Gook Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a design and implementation of a base station, capable of positioning sensor nodes using an optical scheme. The base station consists of a pulse laser module, optical detectors and beam splitter, which are mounted on a rotation-stage, and a Time to Digital Converter (TDC. The optical pulse signal transmitted to the sensor node with a Corner Cube Retro-reflector (CCR is reflected to the base station, and the Time of Flight (ToF data can be obtained from the two detectors. With the angle and flight time data, the position of the sensor node can be calculated. The performance of the system is evaluated by using a commercial CCR. The sensor nodes are placed at different angles from the base station and scanned using the laser. We analyze the node position error caused by the rotation and propose error compensation methods, namely the outlier sample exception and decreasing the confidence factor steadily using the recursive least square (RLS methods. Based on the commercial CCR results, the MEMS CCR is also tested to demonstrate the compatibility between the base station and the proposed methods. The result shows that the localization performance of the system can be enhanced with the proposed compensation method using the MEMS CCR.

  1. Fabry-Pérot Oscillation and Room Temperature Lasing in Perovskite Cube-Corner Pyramid Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Mi, Yang; Liu, Zhixiong; Shang, Qiuyu; Niu, Xinxiang; Shi, Jia; Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Jie; Du, Wenna; Wu, Zhiyong; Wang, Rui; Qiu, Xiaohui; Hu, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Tao; Liu, Xinfeng

    2018-01-01

    Recently, organometal halide perovskite-based optoelectronics, particularly lasers, have attracted intensive attentions because of its outstanding spectral coherence, low threshold, and wideband tunability. In this work, high-quality CH3 NH3 PbBr3 single crystals with a unique shape of cube-corner pyramids are synthesized on mica substrates using chemical vapor deposition method. These micropyramids naturally form cube-corner cavities, which are eminent candidates for small-sized resonators and retroreflectors. The as-grown perovskites show strong emission ≈530 nm in the vertical direction at room temperature. A special Fabry-Pérot (F-P) mode is employed to interpret the light confinement in the cavity. Lasing from the perovskite pyramids is observed from 80 to 200 K, with threshold ranging from ≈92 µJ cm-2 to 2.2 mJ cm-2 , yielding a characteristic temperature of T0 = 35 K. By coating a thin layer of Ag film, the threshold is reduced from ≈92 to 26 µJ cm-2 , which is accompanied by room temperature lasing with a threshold of ≈75 µJ cm-2 . This work advocates the prospect of shape-engineered perovskite crystals toward developing micro-sized optoelectronic devices and potentially investigating light-matter coupling in quantum optics.

  2. The C3PO project: a laser communication system concept for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, Benoît; Esmiller, Bruno; Gouy, Yann; Steck, Emilie; Quintana, Crisanto; Faulkner, Graham; O'Brien, Dominic; Sproll, Fabian; Wagner, Paul; Hampf, Daniel; Riede, Wolfgang; Salter, Michael; Wang, Qin; Platt, Duncan; Jakonis, Darius; Piao, Xiaoyu; Karlsson, Mikael; Oberg, Olof; Petermann, Ingemar; Michalkiewicz, Aneta; Krezel, Jerzy; Debowska, Anna; Thueux, Yoann

    2017-02-01

    The satellite market is shifting towards smaller (micro and nanosatellites), lowered mass and increased performance platforms. Nanosatellites and picosatellites have been used for a number of new, innovative and unique payloads and missions. This trend requires new concepts for a reduced size, a better performance/weight ratio and a reduction of onboard power consumption. In this context, disruptive technologies, such as laser-optical communication systems, are opening new possibilities. This paper presents the C3PO1 system, "advanced Concept for laser uplink/ downlink CommuniCation with sPace Objects", and the first results of the development of its key technologies. This project targets the design of a communications system that uses a ground-based laser to illuminate a satellite, and a Modulating Retro-Reflector (MRR) to return a beam of light modulated by data to the ground. This enables a downlink, without a laser source on the satellite. This architecture suits well to small satellite applications so as high data rates are potentially provided with very low board mass. C3PO project aims to achieve data rates of 1Gbit/s between LEO satellites and Earth with a communication payload mass of less than 1kilogram. In this paper, results of the initial experiments and demonstration of the key technologies will be shown.

  3. Design of multichannel laser interferometry for W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornejew, P.; Hirsch, M.; Bindemann, T.; Dinklage, A.; Dreier, H.; Hartfuss, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    An eight channel interferometer is developed for density feedback control and the continuous measurement of electron density profiles in the stellarator W7-X. An additional sightline is launched in the geometry of the Thomson scattering for cross calibration. Due to the W7-X coil geometry access is strongly restricted. This motivates the optimization of the sightline geometry and design studies for supplementary chords. In-vessel retroreflectors will be used and inserted in the first wall elements. To cope with associated mechanical vibrations and thermal drifts during the discharges with envisaged duration of 30 min either two-color or second harmonic interferometry techniques must be applied. Optimum wavelengths are found to be about 10 and 5 μm. A CO 2 /CO interferometer (10 μm/5 μm) will be tested and compared with an existing CO 2 /HeNe test interferometer. A special difficulty of remotely operated diagnostics is the need of long transmission lines with a path length of about 60 m required from the diagnostics location to the torus hall and back. Different arrangements will be compared

  4. Design of a base station for MEMS CCR localization in an optical sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Gook; Jeon, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Hyoun Jin; Kim, Jae Yoon

    2014-05-08

    This paper introduces a design and implementation of a base station, capable of positioning sensor nodes using an optical scheme. The base station consists of a pulse laser module, optical detectors and beam splitter, which are mounted on a rotation-stage, and a Time to Digital Converter (TDC). The optical pulse signal transmitted to the sensor node with a Corner Cube Retro-reflector (CCR) is reflected to the base station, and the Time of Flight (ToF) data can be obtained from the two detectors. With the angle and flight time data, the position of the sensor node can be calculated. The performance of the system is evaluated by using a commercial CCR. The sensor nodes are placed at different angles from the base station and scanned using the laser. We analyze the node position error caused by the rotation and propose error compensation methods, namely the outlier sample exception and decreasing the confidence factor steadily using the recursive least square (RLS) methods. Based on the commercial CCR results, the MEMS CCR is also tested to demonstrate the compatibility between the base station and the proposed methods. The result shows that the localization performance of the system can be enhanced with the proposed compensation method using the MEMS CCR.

  5. Active standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using hard-target backscattered light using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentrations. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using a quantum cascade laser open-path system that retrieves path-averaged concentrations by collecting the backscattered light from a remote hard target. It is a true standoff system and differs from other open-path systems that are deployed as point samplers or long-path transmission systems that use retroreflectors. The measured absorption spectra are obtained using a thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB quantum cascade laser at ~7.7 µm wavelength range with ~200 ns pulse width. Making fast time resolved observations, the system simultaneously realizes high spectral resolution and range to the target, resulting in path-averaged concentration retrieval. The system performs measurements at high speed ~15 Hz and sufficient range (up to 45 m, ~148 feet) achieving an uncertainty of 3.1 % and normalized sensitivity of 3.3 ppm m Hz-1/2 for N2O and 9.3 % and normalized sensitivity of 30 ppm m Hz-1/2 for CH4 with a 0.31 mW average power QCL. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile or multidirectional search and remote detection of gas leaks.

  6. The design of a second harmonic tangential array interferometer for C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretz, N.; Jobes, F.; Irby, J.

    1997-01-01

    A design for a tangential array interferometer for C-Mod operating at 1.06 and 0.53 μm is presented. This is a special type of two color interferometer in which a Nd:YAG laser is frequency doubled in a nonlinear crystal. Because the doubling efficiency is imperfect, two frequencies propagate collinearly through the plasma after which the 1.06 μm ray is doubled again mixing in the optical domain with the undoubled ray. The resulting interference is insensitive to path length but is affected by plasma dispersion in the usual way. A typical central fringe shift in C-Mod is expected to be 0.1 endash 1.0, but the absolute and relative accuracy in n e l measurements can be as high as in a conventional interferometer. This design uses a repetitively pulsed laser which is converted to a fan beam crossing the horizontal midplane. The chordal array is defined by internal retroreflectors on the C-Mod midplane which return the beam to the second doubler and a detector array. This interferometer design has beam diameters of a few millimeters and element spacings of a few centimeters, uses a repetitively pulsed, TEM 00 Nd:YAG laser, fiber optic beam transport, commercial components, and a compact optical design which minimizes port space requirements. An optical system design is presented which is based on the performance of a tabletop prototype at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Hardware in the Loop Performance Assessment of LIDAR-Based Spacecraft Pose Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2017-09-24

    In this paper an original, easy to reproduce, semi-analytic calibration approach is developed for hardware-in-the-loop performance assessment of pose determination algorithms processing point cloud data, collected by imaging a non-cooperative target with LIDARs. The laboratory setup includes a scanning LIDAR, a monocular camera, a scaled-replica of a satellite-like target, and a set of calibration tools. The point clouds are processed by uncooperative model-based algorithms to estimate the target relative position and attitude with respect to the LIDAR. Target images, acquired by a monocular camera operated simultaneously with the LIDAR, are processed applying standard solutions to the Perspective- n -Points problem to get high-accuracy pose estimates which can be used as a benchmark to evaluate the accuracy attained by the LIDAR-based techniques. To this aim, a precise knowledge of the extrinsic relative calibration between the camera and the LIDAR is essential, and it is obtained by implementing an original calibration approach which does not need ad-hoc homologous targets (e.g., retro-reflectors) easily recognizable by the two sensors. The pose determination techniques investigated by this work are of interest to space applications involving close-proximity maneuvers between non-cooperative platforms, e.g., on-orbit servicing and active debris removal.

  8. Midplane Faraday Rotation: A densitometer for BPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobes, F.C.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1992-02-01

    The density in a high field, high density tokamak such as BPX can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 μm laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then n e (R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel version about the center line of the tokamak. For BPX operated at full field and density, the rotation angle would be quite large -- about 75 degrees per pass. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 ''fringe,'' the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that BPX would be well served even at low densities by a Midplane Faraday Rotation densitometer of ∼64 channels. Both TFTR and PBX-M would be suitable test beds for the BPX system

  9. Fabry-Pérot Oscillation and Room Temperature Lasing in Perovskite Cube-Corner Pyramid Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Mi, Yang

    2018-01-10

    Recently, organometal halide perovskite-based optoelectronics, particularly lasers, have attracted intensive attentions because of its outstanding spectral coherence, low threshold, and wideband tunability. In this work, high-quality CH3 NH3 PbBr3 single crystals with a unique shape of cube-corner pyramids are synthesized on mica substrates using chemical vapor deposition method. These micropyramids naturally form cube-corner cavities, which are eminent candidates for small-sized resonators and retroreflectors. The as-grown perovskites show strong emission ≈530 nm in the vertical direction at room temperature. A special Fabry-Pérot (F-P) mode is employed to interpret the light confinement in the cavity. Lasing from the perovskite pyramids is observed from 80 to 200 K, with threshold ranging from ≈92 µJ cm-2 to 2.2 mJ cm-2 , yielding a characteristic temperature of T0 = 35 K. By coating a thin layer of Ag film, the threshold is reduced from ≈92 to 26 µJ cm-2 , which is accompanied by room temperature lasing with a threshold of ≈75 µJ cm-2 . This work advocates the prospect of shape-engineered perovskite crystals toward developing micro-sized optoelectronic devices and potentially investigating light-matter coupling in quantum optics.

  10. NGSLR Safety Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Jan

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging (NGSLR) station is the prototype for NASA's Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) systems which will be deployed around the world in the coming decade. The NGSLR system will be an autonomous, photon-counting SLR station with an expected absolute range accuracy of better than one centimeter and a normal point (time-averaged) range precision better than one millimeter. The system provides continuous (weather permitting), 24 hour tracking coverage to an existing constellation of approximately two dozen artificial satellites equipped with passive retroreflector arrays, using pulsed, 532 nm, class IV laser systems. Current details on the approved laser systems can be found in the Appendix 1 of this document. This safety plan addresses the potential hazards to emitted laser radiation, which can occur both inside and outside the shelter. Hazards within the shelter are mitigated through posted warning signs, activated warning lights, procedural controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), laser curtains, beam blocking systems, interlock controls, pre-configured laser control settings, and other controls discussed in this document. Since the NGSLR is a satellite tracking system, laser hazards exist outside the shelter to personnel on the shelter roof and to passing aircraft. Potential exposure to personnel outside the system is mitigated through the use of posted warning signs, access control, procedural controls, a stairwell interlock, beam attenuation/blocking devices, and a radar based aircraft detection system.

  11. Design and use of the IR gas-cloud scanner for measurement and imaging of the spatial distribution of gases at workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Kuile, Willem M.; van Veen, J. J.; Knoll, Bas

    1995-02-01

    Usual sampling methods and instruments for checking compliance with `threshold limit values' (TLV) of gaseous components do not provide much information on the mechanism which caused the measured workday average concentration. In the case of noncompliance this information is indispensable for the design of cost effective measures. The infrared gas cloud (IGC) scanner visualizes the spatial distribution of specific gases at a workplace in a quantitative image with a calibrated grayvalue scale. This helps to find the cause of an over- exposure, and so it permits effective abatement of high exposures in the working environment. This paper deals with the technical design of the IGC scanner. Its use is illustrated by some real-world problems. The measuring principle and the technical operation of the IGC-scanner are described. Special attention is given to the pros and cons of retro-reflector screens, the noise reduction methods and image presentation and interpretation. The latter is illustrated by the images produced by the measurements. Essentially the IGC scanner can be used for selective open-path measurement of all gases with a concentration in the ppm range and sufficiently strong distinct absorption lines in the infrared region between 2.5 micrometers and 14.0 micrometers . Further it could be useful for testing the efficiency of ventilation systems and the remote detection of gas leaks. We conclude that a new powerful technique has been added to the industrial hygiene facilities for controlling and improving the work environment.

  12. Geocenter Motion Derived from GNSS and SLR Tracking Data of LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. S.; Ning, F. S.; Tseng, K. H.; Tseng, T. P.; Wu, J. M.; Chen, K. L.

    2017-12-01

    Space geodesy techniques can provide the monitoring data of global variations with high precision and large coverage through the satellites. Geocenter motion (GM) describes the difference of CF (Center of Figure) respect to CM (Center of Mass of the Earth System) due to the re-distribution and deformation of the earth system. Because satellite tracking data between ground stations and satellites orbit around the CM, geocenter motion is related to the realization of the ITRF (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) origin. In this study, GPS (Global Positioning System) observation data of IGS (International GNSS Service) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data are applied to estimate the coordinates of observing sites on Earth's surface. The GPS observing sites are distributed deliberately and globally by 15° ×15° grids. Meanwhile, two different global ocean tide models are applied here. The model used in ITRF comparison and combination is parameter transformation, which is a mathematical formula allowing to transform the different frames between ITRF and CM system. Following the parameter transformation, the results of geocenter motion can be determined. The FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (F7C2) mission is a constellation of LEO (Low-Earth-Orbit) satellites, which will be launched in 2018. Besides the observing system for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate, the F7C2 will be equipped with LRR (Laser Ranging Retroreflector). This work is a pilot survey to study the application of LEO SLR data in Taiwan.

  13. Effects of stray lights on Faraday rotation measurement for polarimeter-interferometer system on EAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z Y; Liu, H Q; Ding, W X; Chen, J; Brower, D L; Lian, H; Wang, S X; Li, W M; Yao, Y; Zeng, L; Jie, Y X

    2018-01-01

    A double-pass radially view 11 chords polarimeter-interferometer system has been operated on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak and provides important current profile information for plasma control. Stray light originating from spurious reflections along the optical path (unwanted reflections from various optical components/mounts and transmissive optical elements such as windows, waveplates, and lens as well as the detectors) and also direct feedback from the retro-reflector used to realize the double-pass configuration can both contribute to contamination of the Faraday rotation measurement accuracy. Modulation of the Faraday rotation signal due to the interference from multiple reflections is observable when the interferometer phase (plasma density) varies with time. Direct reflection from the detector itself can be suppressed by employing an optical isolator consisting of a λ/4-waveplate and polarizer positioned in front of the mixer. A Faraday angle oscillation during the density ramping up (or down) can be reduced from 5°-10° to 1°-2° by eliminating reflections from the detector. Residual modulation arising from misalignment and stray light from other sources must be minimized to achieve accurate measurements of Faraday rotation.

  14. Midplane Faraday rotation: A densitometer for large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobes, F.C.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    The density in a large tokamak such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), or any of the proposed future US machines, can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 μm laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then n e (R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel inversion about the center line of the tokamak. For a large machine, operated at a full field of 30 T m and a density of 2x10 20 /m 3 , the rotation angle would be quite large-about 60 degree for two passes. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 ''fringe,'' the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that ITER, or any large tokamak, existing or proposed, would be well served even at low densities by a midplane Faraday rotation densitometer of ∼64 channels

  15. Status of Precise Orbit Determination for Jason-2 Using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melachroinos, S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    The JASON-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) and JASON-I altimetry missions. JASON-2 is equipped with a TRSR Blackjack GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). The most recent time series of orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on SLR/DORIS data have been completed using both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008. These orbits have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS for dynamic vs SLRlDORIS reduced-dynamic orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by other analysis centers (Lemoine et al., 2010; Zelensky et al., 2010; Cerri et al., 2010). We have recently upgraded the GEODYN software to implement model improvements for GPS processing. We describe the implementation of IGS standards to the Jason2 GEODYN GPS processing, and other dynamical and measurement model improvements. Our GPS-only JASON-2 orbit accuracy is assessed using a number of tests including analysis of independent SLR and altimeter crossover residuals, orbit overlap differences, and direct comparison to orbits generated at GSFC using SLR and DORIS tracking, and to orbits generated externally at other centers. Tests based on SLR and the altimeter crossover residuals provide the best performance indicator for independent validation of the NASAlGSFC GPS-only reduced dynamic orbits. For the ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 implementation of our GPS-only obits we are using the IGS05 and IGS08 standards. Reduced dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model error and TRF instability. We evaluate the GPS vs SLR & DORIS orbits produced using the GEODYN software and assess in particular their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the Z direction for both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame for altimeter satellite POD.

  16. Space Geodetic Technique Co-location in Space: Simulation Results for the GRASP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicz-Cieslak, M.; Pavlis, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System-GGOS, places very stringent requirements in the accuracy and stability of future realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF): an origin definition at 1 mm or better at epoch and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale (0.1 ppb) and orientation components. These goals were derived from the requirements of Earth science problems that are currently the international community's highest priority. None of the geodetic positioning techniques can achieve this goal alone. This is due in part to the non-observability of certain attributes from a single technique. Another limitation is imposed from the extent and uniformity of the tracking network and the schedule of observational availability and number of suitable targets. The final limitation derives from the difficulty to "tie" the reference points of each technique at the same site, to an accuracy that will support the GGOS goals. The future GGOS network will address decisively the ground segment and to certain extent the space segment requirements. The JPL-proposed multi-technique mission GRASP (Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space) attempts to resolve the accurate tie between techniques, using their co-location in space, onboard a well-designed spacecraft equipped with GNSS receivers, a SLR retroreflector array, a VLBI beacon and a DORIS system. Using the anticipated system performance for all four techniques at the time the GGOS network is completed (ca 2020), we generated a number of simulated data sets for the development of a TRF. Our simulation studies examine the degree to which GRASP can improve the inter-technique "tie" issue compared to the classical approach, and the likely modus operandi for such a mission. The success of the examined scenarios is judged by the quality of the origin and scale definition of the resulting TRF.

  17. First laser measurements to space debris in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejba, Paweł; Suchodolski, Tomasz; Michałek, Piotr; Bartoszak, Jacek; Schillak, Stanisław; Zapaśnik, Stanisław

    2018-05-01

    The Borowiec Satellite Laser Ranging station (BORL 7811, Borowiec) being a part of the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) went through modernization in 2014-2015. One of the main tasks of the modernization was the installation of a high-energy laser module dedicated to space debris tracking. Surelite III by Continuum is a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10 Hz repetition rate, a pulse width of 3-5 ns and a pulse energy of 450 mJ for green (532 nm). This new laser unit was integrated with the SLR system at Borowiec performing standard satellite tracking. In 2016 BORL 7811 participated actively to the observational campaigns related to the space debris targets from LEO region managed by the Space Debris Study Group (SDSG) of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). Currently, Borowiec station regularly tracks 36 space debris from the LEO regime, including typical rocket bodies (Russian/Chinese) and cooperative targets like the inactive TOPEX/Poseidon, ENVISAT, OICETS and others. In this paper the first results of space debris laser measurements obtained by the Borowiec station in period August 2016 - January 2017 are presented. The results gained by the SRC PAS Borowiec station confirm the rotation of the defunct TOPEX/Poseidon satellite which spins with a period of approximately 10 s. The novelty of this work is the presentation of the sample results of the Chinese CZ-2C R/B target (NORAD catalogue number 31114) which is equipped (probably) with retroreflectors. Laser measurements to space debris is a very desirable topic for the next years, especially in the context of the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) activity. Some targets are very easy to track like defunct ENVISAT or TOPEX/Poseidon. On the other hand, there is a big population of different LEO targets with different orbital and physical parameters, which are challenging for laser ranging like small irregular debris and rocket boosters.

  18. VisibleWind: wind profile measurements at low altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Tom; Bradford, Bill; Marchant, Alan; Apedaile, Tom; Wright, Cordell

    2009-09-01

    VisibleWindTM is developing an inexpensive rapid response system, for accurately characterizing wind shear and small scale wind phenomena in the boundary layer and for prospecting suitable locations for wind power turbines. The ValidWind system can also collect reliable "ground truth" for other remote wind sensors. The system employs small (0.25 m dia.) lightweight balloons and a tracker consisting of an Impulse 200 XL laser rangefinder coupled to a PC for automated data recording. Experiments on balloon trajectories demonstrate that the laser detection of range (+/- 0.5 m), together with measured azimuth and altitude, is an inexpensive, convenient, and capable alternative to other wind tracking methods. The maximum detection range has been increased to 2200 meters using micro-corner-cube retroreflector tape on balloons. Low power LEDs enable nighttime tracking. To avoid large balloon gyrations about the mean trajectory, we use balloons having low ascent rates and subcritical Reynolds numbers. Trajectory points are typically recorded every 4 - 7 seconds. Atmospheric features observed under conditions of inversions or "light and variable winds" include abrupt onsets of shear at altitudes of 100-250 m, velocity changes of order 1-3 m/s within layers of 10-20 m thickness, and veering of the wind direction by 180 degrees or more as altitude increases from 300 to 500 m. We have previously reported comparisons of balloon-based wind profiles with the output of a co-located sodar. Even with the Impulse rangefinder, our system still requires a "man in the loop" to track the balloon. A future system enhancement will automate balloon tracking, so that laser returns are obtained automatically at 1 Hz. While balloon measurements of large-scale, high altitude wind profiles are well known, this novel measurement system provides high-resolution, real-time characterization of the fluctuating local wind fields at the bottom of the boundary layer where wind power turbines and other

  19. Assessing Methods for Mapping 2D Field Concentrations of CO2 Over Large Spatial Areas for Monitoring Time Varying Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Botos, C.; Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.; Levine, Z. H.; Pintar, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for constructing 2D estimates of CO2 field concentrations from integrated open path measurements of CO2 concentrations. It provides a description of the methodology, an assessment based on simulated data and results from preliminary field trials. The Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE) system, currently under development by Exelis and AER, consists of a set of laser-based transceivers and a number of retro-reflectors coupled with a cloud-based compute environment to enable real-time monitoring of integrated CO2 path concentrations, and provides 2D maps of estimated concentrations over an extended area of interest. The GreenLITE transceiver-reflector pairs provide laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) measurements of differential absorption due to CO2 along intersecting chords within the field of interest. These differential absorption values for the intersecting chords of horizontal path are not only used to construct estimated values of integrated concentration, but also employed in an optimal estimation technique to derive 2D maps of underlying concentration fields. This optimal estimation technique combines these sparse data with in situ measurements of wind speed/direction and an analytic plume model to provide tomographic-like reconstruction of the field of interest. This work provides an assessment of this reconstruction method and preliminary results from the Fall 2014 testing at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) site in Bozeman, Montana. This work is funded in part under the GreenLITE program developed under a cooperative agreement between Exelis and the National Energy and Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Department of Energy (DOE), contract # DE-FE0012574. Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. is a major partner in this development.

  20. NEuclid: a long-range tilt-immune homodyne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, M. J.; Speake, C. C.

    2017-11-01

    The new Easy to Use Compact Laser Interferometric Device (nEUCLID) is a polarisation-based homodyne interferometer with substantially unequal arms that is tolerant to target mirror tilt. The design has no active components, uses standard optical components of 25 mm diameter, has a working distance of 706 mm and a reference arm-length of 21 mm. nEUCLID optics have a footprint of 210 x 190 x 180 mm, and has a tolerance to target mirror tilt of +/- 0.5 degrees, made possible by a novel new retro-reflector design [1]. nEUCLID was built to a set of specifications laid down by Airbus Defence and Space, who required a lowmass, low-power device to measure displacement with nanometre accuracy for space applications. At the University of Birmingham we have previously built a smaller, more compact tilt-insensitive homodyne interferometer - the EUCLID [2, 3, 4] - which has a working distance of 6 mm, a working range of +/- 3 mm, and a tilt range of +/- 1° [2]. We created a new optical design to allow a much larger working distance to be achieved (as discussed in Section II) and used this in a new interferometer - the nEUCLID. Section II describes the interferometer in detail; how nEUCLID is tilt insensitive, and the optical configuration. Section III states the design specifications from Airbus Defence and Space and the components used in the final design. The output interference pattern from nEUCLID, and how it has been corrected with a meniscus lens, is also discussed. In Section IV we discuss the results demonstrating the tilt immunity range, and the sensitivity of the device. Section V describes several potential applications of nEUCLID, and Section VI draws together our conclusions.

  1. Design and Development of High-Repetition-Rate Satellite Laser Ranging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Bang, Seong-Cheol; Sung, Ki-Pyoung; Lim, Hyung-Chul; Jung, Chan-Gyu; Kim, In-Yeung; Choi, Jae-Seung

    2015-09-01

    The Accurate Ranging System for Geodetic Observation ? Mobile (ARGO-M) was successfully developed as the first Korean mobile Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) system in 2012, and has joined in the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) tracking network, DAEdeoK (DAEK) station. The DAEK SLR station was approved as a validated station in April 2014, through the ILRS station ¡°data validation¡± process. The ARGO-M system is designed to enable 2 kHz laser ranging with millimeter-level precision for geodetic, remote sensing, navigation, and experimental satellites equipped with Laser Retroreflector Arrays (LRAs). In this paper, we present the design and development of a next generation high-repetition-rate SLR system for ARGO-M. The laser ranging rate up to 10 kHz is becoming an important issue in the SLR community to improve ranging precision. To implement high-repetition-rate SLR system, the High-repetition-rate SLR operation system (HSLR-10) was designed and developed using ARGO-M Range Gate Generator (A-RGG), so as to enable laser ranging from 50 Hz to 10 kHz. HSLR-10 includes both hardware controlling software and data post-processing software. This paper shows the design and development of key technologies of high-repetition-rate SLR system. The developed system was tested successfully at DAEK station and then moved to Sejong station, a new Korean SLR station, on July 1, 2015. HSLR-10 will begin normal operations at Sejong station in the near future.

  2. Tomographic Reconstruction of Tracer Gas Concentration Profiles in a Room with the Use of a Single OP-FTIR and Two Iterative Algorithms: ART and PWLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doo Y; Fessier, Jeffrey A; Yost, Michael G; Levine, Steven P

    2000-03-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) reconstructions of air contaminant concentration fields were conducted in a room-sized chamber employing a single open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) instrument and a combination of 52 flat mirrors and 4 retroreflectors. A total of 56 beam path data were repeatedly collected for around 1 hr while maintaining a stable concentration gradient. The plane of the room was divided into 195 pixels (13 × 15) for reconstruction. The algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) failed to reconstruct the original concentration gradient patterns for most cases. These poor results were caused by the "highly underdetermined condition" in which the number of unknown values (156 pixels) exceeds that of known data (56 path integral concentrations) in the experimental setting. A new CT algorithm, called the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS), was applied to remedy this condition. The peak locations were correctly positioned in the PWLS-CT reconstructions. A notable feature of the PWLS-CT reconstructions was a significant reduction of highly irregular noise peaks found in the ART-CT reconstructions. However, the peak heights were slightly reduced in the PWLS-CT reconstructions due to the nature of the PWLS algorithm. PWLS could converge on the original concentration gradient even when a fairly high error was embedded into some experimentally measured path integral concentrations. It was also found in the simulation tests that the PWLS algorithm was very robust with respect to random errors in the path integral concentrations. This beam geometry and the use of a single OP-FTIR scanning system, in combination with the PWLS algorithm, is a system applicable to both environmental and industrial settings.

  3. Validation of Galileo orbits using SLR with a focus on satellites launched into incorrect orbital planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sośnica, Krzysztof; Prange, Lars; Kaźmierski, Kamil; Bury, Grzegorz; Drożdżewski, Mateusz; Zajdel, Radosław; Hadas, Tomasz

    2018-02-01

    The space segment of the European Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo consists of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) and Full Operational Capability (FOC) spacecraft. The first pair of FOC satellites was launched into an incorrect, highly eccentric orbital plane with a lower than nominal inclination angle. All Galileo satellites are equipped with satellite laser ranging (SLR) retroreflectors which allow, for example, for the assessment of the orbit quality or for the SLR-GNSS co-location in space. The number of SLR observations to Galileo satellites has been continuously increasing thanks to a series of intensive campaigns devoted to SLR tracking of GNSS satellites initiated by the International Laser Ranging Service. This paper assesses systematic effects and quality of Galileo orbits using SLR data with a main focus on Galileo satellites launched into incorrect orbits. We compare the SLR observations with respect to microwave-based Galileo orbits generated by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) in the framework of the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment for the period 2014.0-2016.5. We analyze the SLR signature effect, which is characterized by the dependency of SLR residuals with respect to various incidence angles of laser beams for stations equipped with single-photon and multi-photon detectors. Surprisingly, the CODE orbit quality of satellites in the incorrect orbital planes is not worse than that of nominal FOC and IOV orbits. The RMS of SLR residuals is even lower by 5.0 and 1.5 mm for satellites in the incorrect orbital planes than for FOC and IOV satellites, respectively. The mean SLR offsets equal -44.9, -35.0, and -22.4 mm for IOV, FOC, and satellites in the incorrect orbital plane. Finally, we found that the empirical orbit models, which were originally designed for precise orbit determination of GNSS satellites in circular orbits, provide fully appropriate results also for highly eccentric orbits with variable linear

  4. Satellite laser ranging to low Earth orbiters: orbit and network validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel; Montenbruck, Oliver; Hackel, Stefan; Sośnica, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) to low Earth orbiters (LEOs) provides optical distance measurements with mm-to-cm-level precision. SLR residuals, i.e., differences between measured and modeled ranges, serve as a common figure of merit for the quality assessment of orbits derived by radiometric tracking techniques. We discuss relevant processing standards for the modeling of SLR observations and highlight the importance of line-of-sight-dependent range corrections for the various types of laser retroreflector arrays. A 1-3 cm consistency of SLR observations and GPS-based precise orbits is demonstrated for a wide range of past and present LEO missions supported by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). A parameter estimation approach is presented to investigate systematic orbit errors and it is shown that SLR validation of LEO satellites is not only able to detect radial but also along-track and cross-track offsets. SLR residual statistics clearly depend on the employed precise orbit determination technique (kinematic vs. reduced-dynamic, float vs. fixed ambiguities) but also reveal pronounced differences in the ILRS station performance. Using the residual-based parameter estimation approach, corrections to ILRS station coordinates, range biases, and timing offsets are derived. As a result, root-mean-square residuals of 5-10 mm have been achieved over a 1-year data arc in 2016 using observations from a subset of high-performance stations and ambiguity-fixed orbits of four LEO missions. As a final contribution, we demonstrate that SLR can not only validate single-satellite orbit solutions but also precise baseline solutions of formation flying missions such as GRACE, TanDEM-X, and Swarm.

  5. Segmentation, classification, and pose estimation of military vehicles in low resolution laser radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neulist, Joerg; Armbruster, Walter

    2005-05-01

    Model-based object recognition in range imagery typically involves matching the image data to the expected model data for each feasible model and pose hypothesis. Since the matching procedure is computationally expensive, the key to efficient object recognition is the reduction of the set of feasible hypotheses. This is particularly important for military vehicles, which may consist of several large moving parts such as the hull, turret, and gun of a tank, and hence require an eight or higher dimensional pose space to be searched. The presented paper outlines techniques for reducing the set of feasible hypotheses based on an estimation of target dimensions and orientation. Furthermore, the presence of a turret and a main gun and their orientations are determined. The vehicle parts dimensions as well as their error estimates restrict the number of model hypotheses whereas the position and orientation estimates and their error bounds reduce the number of pose hypotheses needing to be verified. The techniques are applied to several hundred laser radar images of eight different military vehicles with various part classifications and orientations. On-target resolution in azimuth, elevation and range is about 30 cm. The range images contain up to 20% dropouts due to atmospheric absorption. Additionally some target retro-reflectors produce outliers due to signal crosstalk. The presented algorithms are extremely robust with respect to these and other error sources. The hypothesis space for hull orientation is reduced to about 5 degrees as is the error for turret rotation and gun elevation, provided the main gun is visible.

  6. Precision orbit determination performance for CryoSat-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrama, Ernst

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our efforts to perform precision orbit determination (POD) of CryoSat-2 which depends on Doppler and satellite laser ranging tracking data. A dynamic orbit model is set-up and the residuals between the model and the tracking data is evaluated. The average r.m.s. of the 10 s averaged Doppler tracking pass residuals is approximately 0.39 mm/s; and the average of the laser tracking pass residuals becomes 1.42 cm. There are a number of other tests to verify the quality of the orbit solution, we compare our computed orbits against three independent external trajectories provided by the CNES. The CNES products are part of the CryoSat-2 products distributed by ESA. The radial differences of our solution relative to the CNES precision orbits shows an average r.m.s. of 1.25 cm between Jun-2010 and Apr-2017. The SIRAL altimeter crossover difference statistics demonstrate that the quality of our orbit solution is comparable to that of the POE solution computed by the CNES. In this paper we will discuss three important changes in our POD activities that have brought the orbit performance to this level. The improvements concern the way we implement temporal gravity accelerations observed by GRACE; the implementation of ITRF2014 coordinates and velocities for the DORIS beacons and the SLR tracking sites. We also discuss an adjustment of the SLR retroreflector position within the satellite reference frame. An unexpected result is that we find a systematic difference between the median of the 10 s Doppler tracking residuals which displays a statistically significant pattern in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SSA) area where the median of the velocity residuals varies in the range of -0.15 to +0.15 mm/s.

  7. Simulation of an advanced small aperture track system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tommy J.; Crockett, Gregg A.; Brunson, Richard L.; Beatty, Brad; Zahirniak, Daniel R.; Deuto, Bernard G.

    2001-08-01

    Simulation development for EO Systems has progressed to new levels with the advent of COTS software tools such as Matlab/Simulink. These tools allow rapid reuse of simulation library routines. We have applied these tools to newly emerging Acquisition Tracking and Pointing (ATP) systems using many routines developed through a legacy to High Energy Laser programs such as AirBorne Laser, Space Based Laser, Tactical High Energy Laser, and The Air Force Research Laboratory projects associated with the Starfire Optical Range. The simulation architecture allows ease in testing various track algorithms under simulated scenes with the ability to rapidly vary system hardware parameters such as track sensor and track loop control systems. The atmospheric turbulence environment and associated optical distortion is simulated to high fidelity levels through the application of an atmospheric phase screen model to produce scintillation of the laser illuminator uplink. The particular ATP system simulated is a small transportable system for tracking satellites in a daytime environment and projects a low power laser and receives laser return from retro-reflector equipped satellites. The primary application of the ATP system (and therefore the simulation) is the determination of the illuminator beam profile, jitter, and scintillation of the low power laser at the satellite. The ATP system will serve as a test bed for satellite tracking in a high background during daytime. Of particular interest in this simulation is the ability to emulate the hardware modelogic within the simulation to test and refine system states and mode change decisions. Additionally, the simulation allows data from the hardware system tests to be imported into Matlab and to thereby drive the simulation or to be easily compared to simulation results.

  8. Multi-GNSS orbit determination using satellite laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Grzegorz; Sośnica, Krzysztof; Zajdel, Radosław

    2018-04-01

    Galileo, BeiDou, QZSS, and NavIC are emerging global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) and regional navigation satellite systems all of which are equipped with laser retroreflector arrays for range measurements. This paper summarizes the GNSS-intensive tracking campaigns conducted by the International Laser Ranging Service and provides results from multi-GNSS orbit determination using solely SLR observations. We consider the whole constellation of GLONASS, all active Galileo, four BeiDou satellites: 1 MEO, 3 IGSO, and one QZSS. We analyze the influence of the number of SLR observations on the quality of the 3-day multi-GNSS orbit solution. About 60 SLR observations are needed for obtaining MEO orbits of sufficient quality with the root mean square (RMS) of 3 cm for the radial component when compared to microwave-based orbits. From the analysis of a minimum number of tracking stations, when considering the 3-day arcs, 5 SLR stations do not provide a sufficient geometry of observations. The solution obtained using ten stations is characterized with RMS of 4, 9, and 18 cm in the radial, along-track, and cross-track direction, respectively, for MEO satellites. We also investigate the impact of the length of orbital arc on the quality of SLR-derived orbits. Hence, 5- and 7-day arcs constitute the best solution, whereas 3-day arcs are of inferior quality due to an insufficient number of SLR observations and 9-day arcs deteriorate the along-track component. The median RMS from the comparison between 7-day orbital arcs determined using SLR data with microwave-based orbits assumes values in the range of 3-4, 11-16, and 15-27 cm in radial, along-track, and cross-track, respectively, for MEO satellites. BeiDou IGSO and QZSS are characterized by RMS values higher by a factor of 8 and 24, respectively, than MEO orbits.

  9. Precise Determination of the Baseline Between the TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Rolf; Rothacher, Markus; Michalak, Grzegorz; Moon, Yongjin

    TerraSAR-X, launched on June 15, 2007, and TanDEM-X, to be launched in September 2009, both carry the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) category A payload instrument package. The TOR consists of a high-precision dual-frequency GPS receiver, called Integrated GPS Occultation Receiver (IGOR), for precise orbit determination and atmospheric sounding and a Laser retro-reflector (LRR) serving as target for the global Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) ground station network. The TOR is supplied by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ) Germany, and the Center for Space Research (CSR), Austin, Texas. The objective of the German/US collaboration is twofold: provision of atmospheric profiles for use in numerical weather predictions and climate studies from the occultation data and precision SAR data processing based on precise orbits and atmospheric products. For the scientific objectives of the TanDEM- X mission, i.e., bi-static SAR together with TerraSAR-X, the dual-frequency GPS receiver is of vital importance for the millimeter level determination of the baseline or distance between the two spacecrafts. The paper discusses the feasibility of generating millimeter baselines by the example of GRACE, where for validation the distance between the two GRACE satellites is directly available from the micrometer-level intersatellite link measurements. The distance of the GRACE satellites is some 200 km, the distance of the TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X formation will be some 200 meters. Therefore the proposed approach is then subject to a simulation of the foreseen TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X formation. The effect of varying space environmental conditions, of possible phase center variations, multi path, and of varying center of mass of the spacecrafts are evaluated and discussed.

  10. AN INITIATIVE FOR CONSTRUCTION OF NEW-GENERATION LUNAR GLOBAL CONTROL NETWORK USING MULTI-MISSION DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Di

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A lunar global control network provides geodetic datum and control points for mapping of the lunar surface. The widely used Unified Lunar Control Network 2005 (ULCN2005 was built based on a combined photogrammetric solution of Clementine images acquired in 1994 and earlier photographic data. In this research, we propose an initiative for construction of a new-generation lunar global control network using multi-mission data newly acquired in the 21st century, which have much better resolution and precision than the old data acquired in the last century. The new control network will be based on a combined photogrammetric solution of an extended global image and laser altimetry network. The five lunar laser ranging retro-reflectors, which can be identified in LROC NAC images and have cm level 3D position accuracy, will be used as absolute control points in the least squares photogrammetric adjustment. Recently, a new radio total phase ranging method has been developed and used for high-precision positioning of Chang’e-3 lander; this shall offer a new absolute control point. Systematic methods and key techniques will be developed or enhanced, including rigorous and generic geometric modeling of orbital images, multi-scale feature extraction and matching among heterogeneous multi-mission remote sensing data, optimal selection of images at areas of multiple image coverages, and large-scale adjustment computation, etc. Based on the high-resolution new datasets and developed new techniques, the new generation of global control network is expected to have much higher accuracy and point density than the ULCN2005.

  11. Highly improved operation of monolithic BGO-PET blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Montoro, A.; Sanchez, F.; Majewski, S.; Zanettini, S.; Benlloch, J. M.; Gonzalez, A. J.

    2017-11-01

    In PET scanners both scintillation crystals and photosensors are key components defining the system's performance and cost. Original PET systems used BGO or NaI(Tl) scintillators but achieved limited performance due to its slow decay and relatively low light output. Moreover, NaI(Tl) has low stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons. In this study we report the possibility to reintroduce BGO crystals, and in particular in the form of monolithic blocks, especially suitable for low-dose large-size PET scanners, offering significantly improved sensitivity at a highly reduced cost compared to LYSO type fast scintillators. We have studied the performance of a monolithic BGO block as large as 50 × 50 × 15 mm3 with black-painted lateral walls to reduce lights spread, enabling accurate photon depth of interaction (DOI) measurements. A directional optical layer, called retro-reflector, was coupled to the entrance face bouncing back the scintillation light in the direction of the emission source and, therefore, adding to the light signal while preserving the narrow light cone distribution. Four configurations namely 12 × 12 and 16 × 16 SiPM arrays (3 mm × 3 mm each) as photosensors, with or without a nanopattern treatment at the crystal exit face, have been studied. This structure consisted of a thin layer of a specific high refractive index material shaped with a periodic nanopattern, increasing the scintillation light extraction. The readout returned information for each SiPM row and column, characterizing the X-Y light distribution projections. We have studied the detector spatial resolution using collimated 22Na sources at normal incidence. The DOI resolution was evaluated using collimated gamma beams with lateral incidence. The overall best detector performance was obtained for the 16× 16 SiPM array offering higher readout granularity. We have determined the spatial resolution for 3 separated DOI layers, obtaining the best results for the DOI region near to

  12. Ultrafast all-optical code-division multiple-access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Wing C.; Prucnal, Paul R.; Liu, Yanming

    1992-12-01

    In optical code-division multiple access (CDMA), the architecture of optical encoders/decoders is another important factor that needs to be considered, besides the correlation properties of those already extensively studied optical codes. The architecture of optical encoders/decoders affects, for example, the amount of power loss and length of optical delays that are associated with code sequence generation and correlation, which, in turn, affect the power budget, size, and cost of an optical CDMA system. Various CDMA coding architectures are studied in the paper. In contrast to the encoders/decoders used in prime networks (i.e., prime encodes/decoders), which generate, select, and correlate code sequences by a parallel combination of fiber-optic delay-lines, and in 2n networks (i.e., 2n encoders/decoders), which generate and correlate code sequences by a serial combination of 2 X 2 passive couplers and fiber delays with sequence selection performed in a parallel fashion, the modified 2n encoders/decoders generate, select, and correlate code sequences by a serial combination of directional couplers and delays. The power and delay- length requirements of the modified 2n encoders/decoders are compared to that of the prime and 2n encoders/decoders. A 100 Mbit/s optical CDMA experiment in free space demonstrating the feasibility of the all-serial coding architecture using a serial combination of 50/50 beam splitters and retroreflectors at 10 Tchip/s (i.e., 100,000 chip/bit) with 100 fs laser pulses is reported.

  13. Precise orbit determination of the Sentinel-3A altimetry satellite using ambiguity-fixed GPS carrier phase observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenbruck, Oliver; Hackel, Stefan; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    The Sentinel-3 mission takes routine measurements of sea surface heights and depends crucially on accurate and precise knowledge of the spacecraft. Orbit determination with a targeted uncertainty of less than 2 cm in radial direction is supported through an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, a Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite instrument, and a complementary laser retroreflector for satellite laser ranging. Within this study, the potential of ambiguity fixing for GPS-only precise orbit determination (POD) of the Sentinel-3 spacecraft is assessed. A refined strategy for carrier phase generation out of low-level measurements is employed to cope with half-cycle ambiguities in the tracking of the Sentinel-3 GPS receiver that have so far inhibited ambiguity-fixed POD solutions. Rather than explicitly fixing double-difference phase ambiguities with respect to a network of terrestrial reference stations, a single-receiver ambiguity resolution concept is employed that builds on dedicated GPS orbit, clock, and wide-lane bias products provided by the CNES/CLS (Centre National d'Études Spatiales/Collecte Localisation Satellites) analysis center of the International GNSS Service. Compared to float ambiguity solutions, a notably improved precision can be inferred from laser ranging residuals. These decrease from roughly 9 mm down to 5 mm standard deviation for high-grade stations on average over low and high elevations. Furthermore, the ambiguity-fixed orbits offer a substantially improved cross-track accuracy and help to identify lateral offsets in the GPS antenna or center-of-mass (CoM) location. With respect to altimetry, the improved orbit precision also benefits the global consistency of sea surface measurements. However, modeling of the absolute height continues to rely on proper dynamical models for the spacecraft motion as well as ground calibrations for the relative position of the altimeter reference point and the CoM.

  14. Contribution of Multi-GNSS Constellation to SLR-Derived Terrestrial Reference Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sośnica, K.; Bury, G.; Zajdel, R.

    2018-03-01

    All satellites of new Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are equipped with laser retroreflectors dedicated to Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper demonstrates the contribution of SLR tracking of multi-GNSS constellations to the improved SLR-derived reference frame and scientific products. We show a solution strategy with estimating satellite orbits, SLR station coordinates, geocenter coordinates, and Earth rotation parameters using SLR observations to 2 Laser Geodynamics Satellites (LAGEOS) and 55 GNSS satellites: 1 GPS, 31 Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema, 18 Galileo, 3 BeiDou Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit, 1 BeiDou Medium Earth Orbit, and 1 Quasi-Zenith Satellite System satellite for the period 2014.0-2017.4. Due to a substantial number of GNSS observations, the number of weekly solutions for some SLR stations, for example, Arkhyz, Komsomolsk, Altay, and Brasilia, is larger up to 41% in the combined LAGEOS + GNSS solution when compared to the LAGEOS-only solution. The SLR observations to GNSS can transfer the orientation of the reference frame from GNSS to SLR solutions. As a result, the SLR-derived pole coordinates and length-of-day estimates become more consistent with GNSS microwave-based results. The root-mean-square errors of length-of-day are reduced from 122.5 μs/d to 43.0 μs/d, whereas mean offsets are reduced from -81.6 μs/d to 0.5 μs/d in LAGEOS only and in the combined LAGEOS + GNSS solutions, respectively.

  15. Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobler, Jeremy [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Zaccheo, T. Scott [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Blume, Nathan [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Pernini, Timothy [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Braun, Michael [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Botos, Christopher [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This report describes the development and testing of a novel system, the Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE), for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of CO2 at Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) sites. The system consists of a pair of laser based transceivers, a number of retroreflectors, and a set of cloud based data processing, storage and dissemination tools, which enable 2-D mapping of the CO2 in near real time. A system was built, tested locally in New Haven, Indiana, and then deployed to the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) facility in Bozeman, MT. Testing at ZERT demonstrated the ability of the GreenLITE system to identify and map small underground leaks, in the presence of other biological sources and with widely varying background concentrations. The system was then ruggedized and tested at the Harris test site in New Haven, IN, during winter time while exposed to temperatures as low as -15 °CºC. Additional testing was conducted using simulated concentration enhancements to validate the 2-D retrieval accuracy. This test resulted in a high confidence in the reconstruction ability to identify sources to tens of meters resolution in this configuration. Finally, the system was deployed for a period of approximately 6 months to an active industrial site, Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP), where >1M metric tons of CO2 had been injected into an underground sandstone basin. The main objective of this final deployment was to demonstrate autonomous operation over a wide range of environmental conditions with very little human interaction, and to demonstrate the feasibility of the system for long term deployment in a GCS environment.

  16. Long open-path instrument for simultaneously monitoring of methane, CO2 and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Valentin; Parlange, Marc

    2013-04-01

    A new, long open-path instrument for monitoring of path-averaged methane, CO2 and water vapor concentrations will be presented. The instrument is built on the monostatic scheme (transceiver -distant retroreflector). A VCSEL with a central wavelength of 1654 nm is used as a light source. The receiver is built around a 20 cm Newtonian telescope. The design optical path length is 2000 m but can be further extended. To avoid distortions in the shape of the spectral lines caused by atmospheric turbulences they are scanned within 1 µs. The expected concentration resolution for the above mentioned path length is of the order of 2 ppb for methane, 100 ppb for CO2 and 100 ppm for water vapor. The instrument is developed at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology - Lausanne (EPFL) Switzerland and will be used within the GAW+ CH program for long-term monitoring of background methane and CO2 concentrations in the Swiss Alps. The initial calibration validation tests at EPFL were completed in December 2012 and the instrument will be installed at the beginning of 2013 at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (HARSJ). The HARSJ is located at 3580 m ASL and is one of the 24 global GAW stations. One of the goals of the project is to compare path-averaged to the ongoing point measurements of methane in order to identify possible influence of the station. Future deployments of a copy of the instrument include the Canadian arctic and Siberian wetlands. The instrument can be used for ground truthing of satellite observation as well.

  17. GreenLITE™: a novel approach for quantification of atmospheric methane concentrations, 2-D spatial distribution, and flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Pernini, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Braun, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE™) was originally developed by Harris and Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) under a cooperative agreement with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy. The system, initially conceived in 2013, used a pair of high-precision intensity modulated continuous wave (IMCW) transceivers and a series of retroreflectors to generate overlapping atmospheric density measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) for continuous monitoring of ground carbon storage sites. The overlapping measurements provide an estimate of the two-dimensional (2-D) spatial distribution of the gas within the area of interest using sparsely sampled tomography methods. GreenLITE™ is a full end-to-end system that utilizes standard 4G connectivity and an all cloud-based data storage, processing, and dissemination suite to provide autonomous, near-real-time data via a web-based user interface. The system has been demonstrated for measuring and mapping CO2 over areas from approximately 0.04 km2 to 25 km2 ( 200 m X 200 m, up to 5 km X 5 km), including a year-long demonstration over the city of Paris, France. In late 2016, the GreenLITE™ system was converted by Harris and AER to provide similar measurement capabilities for methane (CH4). Recent experiments have shown that GreenLITE™ CH4 retrieved concentrations agree with a Picarro cavity ring-down spectrometer, calibrated with World Meteorological Organization traceable gas, to within approximately 0.5% of background or 10-15 parts per billion. The system has been tested with several controlled releases over the past year, including a weeklong experiment at an industrial oil and gas facility. Recent experiments have been exploring the use of a box model-based approach for estimating flux, and the initial results are very promising. We will present a description of the instrument, share some recent methane experimental results, and describe the flux

  18. Comparison of Aromatic Hydrocarbon Measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobson, Bertram T.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Velasco, E.; Allwine, Gene; Westberg, Halvor H.; Lamb, Brian K.; Alexander, M.L.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Molina, Luisa T.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA upersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three different measurement methods were compared: a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), long path measurements using a UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (DOAS), and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization analysis (GC-FID) of canister samples. The principle focus was on the comparison between PTR-MS and DOAS data. Lab tests established that the PTR-MS and DOAS calibrations were consistent for a suite of aromatic compounds including benzene, toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, phenol and styrene. The point sampling measurements by the PTR-MS and GC-FID showed good correlations (r=0.6), and were in reasonable agreement for toluene, C 2 -alkylbenzenes and C3-alkylbenzenes. The PTR-MS benzene data were consistently high, indicating interference from ethylbenzene fragmentation for the 145 Td drift field intensity used in the experiment. Correlations between the open-path data measured at 16-m height over a 860-m path length (retroreflector in 430m distance), and the point measurements collected at 37-m sampling height were best for benzene (r=0.61), and reasonably good for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene, styrene, cresols and phenol (r>0.5). There was good agreement between DOAS and PTR-MS measurements of benzene after correction for the PTR-MS ethylbenzene interference. Mixing ratios easured by DOAS were on average a factor of 1.7 times greater than the PTR-MS data for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene and styrene. The level of agreement for the toluene data displayed a modest dependence on wind direction, establishing that spatial gradients - horizontal, vertical, or both - in toluene mixing ratios were significant, and up to a factor of 2 despite the fact that all measurements were conducted above

  19. Two-way laser ranging and time transfer experiments between LOLA and an Earth-based satellite laser ranging station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Sun, X.; Neumann, G. A.; Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E. M.; Hoffman, E.; Zagwodzki, T. W.; Torrence, M. H.; Mcgarry, J.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) has established time-of-flight measurements with mm precision to targets orbiting the Earth and the Moon using single-ended round-trip laser ranging to passive optical retro-reflectors. These high-precision measurements enable advances in fundamental physics, solar system dynamics. However, the received signal strength suffers from a 1/R4 decay, which makes it impractical for measuring distances beyond the Moon's orbit. On the other hand, for a two-way laser transponder pair, where laser pulses are both transmitted to and received from each end of the laser links, the signal strength at both terminals only decreases by 1/R2, thus allowing a greater range of distances to be covered. The asynchronous transponder concept has been previously demonstrated by a test in 2005 between the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) aboard the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft and NASA's Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) at a distance of ˜0.16 AU. In October 2013, regular two-way transponder-type range measurements were obtained over 15 days between the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft and NASA's ground station at White Sands, NM. The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) provides us a unique capability to test time-transfer beyond near Earth orbit. Here we present results from two-way transponder-type experiments between LOLA and GGAO conducted in March 2014 and 2017. As in the time-transfer by laser link (T2L2) experiments between a ground station and an earth-orbiting satellite, LOLA and GGAO ranged to each other simultaneously in these two-way tests at lunar distance. We measured the time-of-flight while cross-referencing the spacecraft clock to the ground station time. On May 4th, 2017, about 20 minutes of two-way measurements were collected. The

  20. Can space ties on board GNSS satellites replace terrestrial ties in the implementation of Terrestrial Reference Frames?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Sara; Zerbini, Susanna; Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul; Errico, Maddalena; Santi, Efisio

    2016-04-01

    The realization of Terrestrial Reference Frames (TRFs) must be periodically updated in order to account for newly acquired observations and for upgrades in data analysis procedures and/or combination techniques. Any innovative computation strategy should ameliorate the definition of the frame physical parameters, upon which a number of scientific applications critically rely. On the basis of the requirements of scientific cutting edge studies, the geodetic community has estimated that the present day challenge in the determination of TRFs is to provide a frame that is accurate and long-term stable at the level of 1 mm and 0.1 mm/y respectively. This work aims at characterizing the frame realized by a combination of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations via their co-location on board GNSS spacecrafts. In particular, it is established how such a frame compares to the traditional ITRF computation and what is the impact on the realization of the frame origin and scale. Four years of data from a global network encompassing about one hundred GNSS stations and all SLR sites have been analyzed. In order to ensure the highest possible consistency, the raw data of both techniques are treated with the same analysis Software (Bernese GNSS Software 5.2) following IERS2010 Conventions. Both weekly and long term solutions are carried out exploiting either the Bernese or the Combination and Analysis of Terrestrial Reference Frames (CATREF) Software packages. We present the results of a combination study involving GNSS data and SLR observations to the two LAGEOS and to the GNSS satellites equipped with retroreflector arrays. The latter type of measurements is currently not included in the computation of the official ITRF solutions. The assessment of the benefit that they could provide to the definition of the origin and scale of the ITRF is however worth investigating, as such data provide the potential for linking the GNSS and

  1. Precision alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Laura Elizabeth

    As techniques for manufacturing and metrology advance, optical systems are being designed with more complexity than ever before. Given these prescriptions, alignment and calibration can be a limiting factor in their final performance. Computer generated holograms (CGHs) have several unique properties that make them powerful tools for meeting these demanding tolerances. This work will present three novel methods for alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms. Alignment methods using CGHs require that the optical wavefront created by the CGH be related to a mechanical datum to locate it space. An overview of existing methods is provided as background, then two new alignment methods are discussed in detail. In the first method, the CGH contact Ball Alignment Tool (CBAT) is used to align a ball or sphere mounted retroreflector (SMR) to a Fresnel zone plate pattern with micron level accuracy. The ball is bonded directly onto the CGH substrate and provides permanent, accurate registration between the optical wavefront and a mechanical reference to locate the CGH in space. A prototype CBAT was built and used to align and bond an SMR to a CGH. In the second method, CGH references are used to align axi-symmetric optics in four degrees of freedom with low uncertainty and real time feedback. The CGHs create simultaneous 3D optical references where the zero order reflection sets tilt and the first diffracted order sets centration. The flexibility of the CGH design can be used to accommodate a wide variety of optical systems and maximize sensitivity to misalignments. A 2-CGH prototype system was aligned multiplied times and the alignment uncertainty was quantified and compared to an error model. Finally, an enhanced calibration method is presented. It uses multiple perturbed measurements of a master sphere to improve the calibration of CGH-based Fizeau interferometers ultimately measuring aspheric test surfaces. The improvement in the

  2. Computer modeling of the sensitivity of a laser water vapor sensor to variations in temperature and air speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, there is disagreement among existing methods of determining atmospheric water vapor concentration at dew-points below -40 C. A major source of error is wall effects which result from the necessity of bringing samples into the instruments. All of these instruments also have response times on the order of seconds. NASA Langley is developing a water vapor sensor which utilizes the absorption of the infrared radiation produced by a diode laser to estimate water vapor concentration. The laser beam is directed through an aircraft window to a retroreflector located on an engine. The reflected beam is detected by an infrared detector located near the laser. To maximize signal to noise, derivative signals are analyzed. By measuring the 2f/DC signal and correcting for ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and air speed (which results in a Doppler shifting of the laser beam), the water vapor concentration can be retrieved. Since this is an in situ measurement there are no wall effects and measurements can be made at a rate of more than 20 per second. This allows small spatial variations of water vapor to be studied. In order to study the sensitivity of the instrument to variations in temperature and air speed, a computer program which generated the 2f, 3f, 4f, DC and 2f/DC signals of the instrument as a function of temperature, pressure and air speed was written. This model was used to determine the effect of errors in measurement of the temperature and air speed on the measured water vapor concentration. Future studies will quantify the effect of pressure measurement errors, which are expected to be very small. As a result of these studied, a retrieval algorithm has been formulated, and will be applied to data taken during the PEM-West atmospheric science field mission. Spectroscopic studies of the water vapor line used by the instrument will be used to refine this algorithm. To prepare for these studies, several lasers have been studied to determine their

  3. Post-Newtonian Reference Frames For Advanced Theory Of The Lunar Motion And For A New Generation Of Lunar Laser Ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Y.; Kopeikon, S.

    2010-01-01

    We overview a set of post-Newtonian reference frames for a comprehensive study of the orbital dynamics and rotational motion of Moon and Earth by means of lunar laser ranging (LLR). We employ a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two post-Newtonian parameters, and , and utilize the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat at infinity. The primary reference frame covers the entire space-time, has its origin at the solar-system barycenter (SSB) and spatial axes stretching up to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to a set of distant quasars that are forming the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The secondary reference frame has its origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is locally-inertial and is not rotating dynamically in the sense that equation of motion of a test particle moving with respect to the EMB frame, does not contain the Coriolis and centripetal forces. Two other local frames geocentric (GRF) and selenocentric (SRF) have their origins at the center of mass of Earth and Moon respectively and do not rotate dynamically. Each local frame is subject to the geodetic precession both with respect to other local frames and with respect to the ICRF because of their relative motion with respect to each other. Theoretical advantage of the dynamically non-rotating local frames is in a more simple mathematical description. Each local frame can be aligned with the axes of ICRF after applying the matrix of the relativistic precession. The set of one global and three local frames is introduced in order to fully decouple the relative motion of Moon with respect to Earth from the orbital motion of the Earth-Moon barycenter as well as to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, an observer on Earth, and a retro-reflector on Moon to directly measurable

  4. Post-Newtonian reference frames for advanced theory of the lunar motion and for a new generation of Lunar laser ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yi.; Kopeikin, S.

    2010-01-01

    , an observer on Earth, and a retro-reflector on Moon to directly measurable quantities such as the proper time and the round-trip laser-light distance. We solve the gravity field equations and find out the metric tensor and the scalar field in all frames which description includes the post-Newtonian multipole moments of the gravitational field of Earth and Moon. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom (Authors)

  5. NASA Tech Briefs, January 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    ) Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons (35) Near-Infrared Photon-Counting Camera for High-Sensitivity Observations (36) Integrated Optics Achromatic Nuller for Stellar Interferometry (37) High-Speed Digital Interferometry (38) Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection (39) Shape and Color Features for Object Recognition Search (40) Explanation Capabilities for Behavior-Based Robot Control (41) A DNA-Inspired Encryption Methodology for Secure, Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (42) Quality Control Method for a Micro-Nano-Channel Microfabricated Device (43) Corner-Cube Retroreflector Instrument for Advanced Lunar Laser Ranging (44) Electrospray Collection of Lunar Dust (45) Fabrication of a Kilopixel Array of Superconducting Microcalorimeters with Microstripline Wiring Spacecraft Attitude Tracking and Maneuver Using Combined Magnetic Actuators (46) Coherent Detector for Near-Angle Scattering and Polarization Characterization of Telescope Mirror Coatings

  6. Continuous time-resolved regional methane leak detection with on-line background estimation using a novel combination of dual frequency comb laser spectroscopy and atmospheric inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, C. B.; Coburn, S.; Wright, R.; Baumann, E.; Cossel, K.; Sweeney, C.; Ghosh, S.; Newbury, N.; Prasad, K.; Coddington, I.; Rieker, G. B.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in natural gas extraction technology have led to increased US production and transport activity, and as a consequence, an increased need for monitoring of methane leaks. Current leak detection methods provide time snapshots, and not continuous, time-varying estimates of emissions. Most approaches also require specific atmospheric conditions, operators, or the use of a tracer gas, requiring site access. Given known intermittency in fugitive methane emissions, continuous monitoring is a critical need for emissions mitigation. We present a novel leak detection method that employs dual frequency comb spectrometry to offer continuous, autonomous, leak detection and quantification over square-km scale areas. The spectrometer is situated in a field of natural gas pads, and a series of retroreflectors around the field direct light back to a detector. The laser light spans 1620-1680 nm with 0.002 nm line spacing, measuring thousands of individual absorption features from multiple species. The result is high-stability trace gas (here CH4, CO2, and H2O) measurements over long (1 km+) open paths through the atmosphere. Measurements are used in an atmospheric inversion to estimate the time variability of emissions at each location of interest. Importantly, the measurement framework and inversion solve explicitly for background concentrations, which vary rapidly in fields of active oil and gas production. We present the results of controlled-leak field tests in rural Colorado. We demonstrate the ability to locate and size a leak located 1 km away from the spectrometer and varying in strength from 1.5 to 7.7 g/min, resulting in mean atmospheric enhancements of 20 ppb. The inversion correctly identifies when the leak turned on and off over a 24-hour period, and determines the mean leak strength to within 10% of the true controlled rate. We further demonstrate the ability of the system to correctly locate and size the start and end of simultaneous 2.7 to 4.8 g/min leaks

  7. Laser Ranging in Solar System: Technology Developments and New Science Measurement Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Mcgarry, J.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.

    2015-12-01

    Laser Ranging has played a major role in geodetic studies of the Earth over the past 40 years. The technique can potentially be used in between planets and spacecrafts within the solar system to advance planetary science. For example, a direct measurement of distances between planets, such as Mars and Venus would make significant improvements in understanding the dynamics of the whole solar system, including the masses of the planets and moons, asteroids and their perturbing interactions, and the gravity field of the Sun. Compared to the conventional radio frequency (RF) tracking systems, laser ranging is potentially more accurate because it is much less sensitive to the transmission media. It is also more efficient because the laser beams are much better focused onto the targets than RF beams. However, existing laser ranging systems are all Earth centric, that is, from ground stations on Earth to orbiting satellites in near Earth orbits or lunar orbit, and to the lunar retro-reflector arrays deployed by the astronauts in the early days of lunar explorations. Several long distance laser ranging experiments have been conducted with the lidar in space, including a two-way laser ranging demonstration between Earth and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MESSENGER spacecraft over 24 million km, and a one way laser transmission and detection experiment over 80 million km between Earth and the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the MGS spacecraft in Mars orbit. A one-way laser ranging operation has been carried out continuously from 2009 to 2014 between multiple ground stations to LRO spacecraft in lunar orbit. The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) on the LADEE mission has demonstrated that a two way laser ranging measurements, including both the Doppler frequency and the phase shift, can be obtained from the subcarrier or the data clocks of a high speed duplex laser communication system. Plans and concepts presently being studied suggest we may be

  8. PFS: the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer for Mars Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, V.; Grassi, D.; Orfei, R.; Biondi, D.; Mencarelli, E.; Mattana, A.; Nespoli, F.; Maturilli, A.; Giuranna, M.; Rossi, M.; Maggi, M.; Baldetti, P.; Chionchio, G.; Saggin, B.; Angrilli, F.; Bianchini, G.; Piccioni, G.; di Lellis, A.; Cerroni, P.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Coradini, A.; Fonti, S.; Orofino, V.; Blanco, A.; Colangeli, L.; Palomba, E.; Esposito, F.; Patsaev, D.; Moroz, V.; Zasova, L.; Ignatiev, N.; Khatuntsev, I.; Moshkin, B.; Ekonomov, A.; Grigoriev, A.; Nechaev, V.; Kiselev, A.; Nikolsky, Y.; Gnedykh, V.; Titov, D.; Orleanski, P.; Rataj, M.; Malgoska, M.; Jurewicz, A.; Blecka, M. I.; Hirsh, H.; Arnold, G.; Lellouch, E.; Marten, A.; Encrenaz, T.; Lopez Moreno, J.; Atreya, S., Gobbi, P.

    2004-08-01

    The Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) for the Mars Express mission is optimised for atmospheric studies, covering the IR range of 1.2-45 μm in two channels. The apodised spectral resolution is 2 cm-1, while the sampling is 1 cm-1. The FOV is about 2° for the short wavelength (SW) channel and 4° for the long wavelength (LW) channel, corresponding to spatial resolutions of 10 km and 20 km, respectively, from an altitude of 300 km. PFS will also provide unique data on the surface-atmosphere interaction and the mineralogical composition of the surface. It will be the first Fourier spectrometer covering 1-5 μm to orbit the Earth or Mars. The experiment has real-time onboard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in order to select the spectral range of interest for data transmission to ground. Measurement of the 15-μm CO2 band is very important. Its profile gives, via a complex temperature-profile retrieval technique, the vertical pressure temperature relation, which is the basis of the global atmospheric study. The SW channel uses a PbSe detector cooled to 200-220K, while the LW channel is based on a pyroelectric (LiTaO3) device working at room temperature. The interferogram is measured at every 150 nm displacement step of the corner cube retroreflectors (corresponding to 600 nm optical path difference) via a laser diode monochromatic interferogram (a sine wave), with the zero crossings controlling the double pendulum motion. PFS will operate for about 1.5 h around the pericentre of the orbit. With a measurement every 10 s, 600 measurements per orbit will be acquired, corresponding to 224 Mbit. Onboard compression will reduce it to 125 Mbit or less, depending on the allocated data volume per day. An important requirement is to observe at all local times in order to include night-side vertical temperature profiles. Total instrument mass is 31.2 kg.

  9. A Milestone for the VLT Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    the alignment of their rails and supports to the extreme accuracy of about 0.25 mm over a total distance of 66.7 metres ( PR Photos 26a-b/00 ). To achieve such an unusually high precision, ESO - in collaboration with the French company FOGALE - developed a measurement system that is based on the water-level principle. The delicate assembly and alignment of the critical sub-systems of the Delay Line were undertaken with the support of Fokker Space and TPD/TNO ( PR Photo 26e/00 ). Also for this, state-of-the-art methods were required in order to ensure a stringent performance of the system. This includes optical alignment of the optics with an accuracy at the arcsec level and positioning of the linear motors at the 0.01 mm (10 µm) level. The Delay Line is one of the key systems in the VLT Interferometer. It is responsible for the compensation of the length of the optical path that is different from the individual telescopes. Extreme accuracy needed In the case of the VLT, this accuracy of the path length compensation must be within a tolerance of only 0.05 µm (0.00005 mm) over a distance of 120 metres. The present concept by ESO and the Dutch contractors is based on a retro-reflector (a "Cat's Eye") that is fixed on a carriage that runs on two stainless steel rails ( PR Photos 26c-d/00 ). The motion on these rails is performed by a 60 metres linear motor and a piezo-transducer element. They are controlled by a laser metrology system that measures the instantaneous distances betwen the mirrors with the required accuracy. This carriage is 2.5 metres long and weighs 250 kg. The total friction force is less than 50 grammes, thanks to the extreme accuracy of the rail alignment and special ball bearings. Because of this, the total power required for the Delay Line operation is only about 15 W. The mirrors of the retro-reflector are made of aluminium by REOSC (France). They have been coated with a single layer of gold for the best possible reflection at infrared wavelengths

  10. Precise baseline determination for the TanDEM-X mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Rolf; Moon, Yongjin; Neumayer, Hans; Wermuth, Martin; Montenbruck, Oliver; Jäggi, Adrian

    The TanDEM-X mission will strive for generating a global precise Digital Elevation Model (DEM) by way of bi-static SAR in a close formation of the TerraSAR-X satellite, already launched on June 15, 2007, and the TanDEM-X satellite to be launched in May 2010. Both satellites carry the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) payload supplied by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. The TOR consists of a high-precision dual-frequency GPS receiver, called Integrated GPS Occultation Receiver (IGOR), and a Laser retro-reflector (LRR) for precise orbit determination (POD) and atmospheric sounding. The IGOR is of vital importance for the TanDEM-X mission objectives as the millimeter level determination of the baseline or distance between the two spacecrafts is needed to derive meter level accurate DEMs. Within the TanDEM-X ground segment GFZ is responsible for the operational provision of precise baselines. For this GFZ uses two software chains, first its Earth Parameter and Orbit System (EPOS) software and second the BERNESE software, for backup purposes and quality control. In a concerted effort also the German Aerospace Center (DLR) generates precise baselines independently with a dedicated Kalman filter approach realized in its FRNS software. By the example of GRACE the generation of baselines with millimeter accuracy from on-board GPS data can be validated directly by way of comparing them to the intersatellite K-band range measurements. The K-band ranges are accurate down to the micrometer-level and therefore may be considered as truth. Both TanDEM-X baseline providers are able to generate GRACE baselines with sub-millimeter accuracy. By merging the independent baselines by GFZ and DLR, the accuracy can even be increased. The K-band validation however covers solely the along-track component as the K-band data measure just the distance between the two GRACE satellites. In addition they inhibit an un-known bias which must be modelled in the comparison, so the

  11. Comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Jobson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA supersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003. Data from three different measurement methods were compared: a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, long path measurements using a UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (DOAS, and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization analysis (GC-FID of canister samples. The principle focus was on the comparison between PTR-MS and DOAS data. Lab tests established that the PTR-MS and DOAS calibrations were consistent for a suite of aromatic compounds including benzene, toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, phenol and styrene. The point sampling measurements by the PTR-MS and GC-FID showed good correlations (r=0.6, and were in reasonable agreement for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes and C3-alkylbenzenes. The PTR-MS benzene data were consistently high, indicating interference from ethylbenzene fragmentation for the 145 Td drift field intensity used in the experiment. Correlations between the open-path data measured at 16-m height over a 860-m path length (retroreflector in 430 m distance, and the point measurements collected at 37-m sampling height were best for benzene (r=0.61, and reasonably good for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene, styrene, cresols and phenol (r>0.5. There was good agreement between DOAS and PTR-MS measurements of benzene after correction for the PTR-MS ethylbenzene interference. Mixing ratios measured by DOAS were on average a factor of 1.7 times greater than the PTR-MS data for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene and styrene. The level of agreement for the toluene data displayed a modest dependence on wind direction, establishing that spatial gradients – horizontal, vertical, or both – in toluene mixing ratios were significant, and

  12. ESO and Fokker Space Sign Contract about VLTI Delay Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The European Southern Observatory is building the world's largest optical telescope, the Very Large Telescope (VLT) , at the ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile. The VLT consists of four 8.2-m unit telescopes and several smaller, moveable Auxiliary Telescopes. When coupled as the giant VLT Interferometer (VLTI) , they will together provide the sharpest images ever obtained by any optical telescope. It will in principle be able to see an astronaut on the surface of the Moon, 400,000 km away. The VLTI Delay Lines Fokker Space (Leiden, The Netherlands) has been awarded a contract for the delivery of the Delay Line of the VLTI. This is a mechanical-optical system that will compensate the optical path differences of the light beams from the individual telescopes. Such a system is necessary to ensure that the light from all telescopes arrive in the same phase at the focal point of the interferometer. Otherwise, the very sharp interferometric images cannot be obtained. ESO PR Photo 08/98 [JPEG, 102k] Schematic representation of the VLTI Delay Line, showing the retro-reflector on its moving base. For more details, please consult the technical explanation below. This highly accurate system will be developed in close co-operation with the Dutch institute TNO-TPD (Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research - Institute of Applied Physics) . The most innovative feature of the Delay Line is the new control strategy, a two-stage control system, based on linear motor technology, combined with high accuracy piezo-electric control elements. This enables the system to position the so-called cat's eye reflector system with an accuracy of only a few nanometers (millionth of a millimetre (nm)) over a stroke length of 60 metres. Within radio astronomy, interferometric techniques have been applied by Dutch astronomers since many years. They will now be able to contribute with their extensive knowledge of such systems to the next generation of astronomical interferometric