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Sample records for retrieved orthodontic miniscrew

  1. Miniscrew implant applications in contemporary orthodontics

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    Hong-Po Chang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for orthodontic treatment modalities that provide maximal anchorage control but with minimal patient compliance requirements has led to the development of implant-assisted orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Skeletal anchorage with miniscrew implants has no patient compliance requirements and has been widely incorporated in orthodontic practice. Miniscrew implants are now routinely used as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatment. This review summarizes recent data regarding the interpretation of bone data (i.e., bone quantity and quality obtained by preoperative diagnostic computed tomography (CT or by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT prior to miniscrew implant placement. Such data are essential when selecting appropriate sites for miniscrew implant placement. Bone characteristics that are indications and contraindications for treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. Additionally, bicortical orthodontic skeletal anchorage, risks associated with miniscrew implant failure, and miniscrew implants for nonsurgical correction of occlusal cant or vertical excess are reviewed. Finally, implant stability is compared between titanium alloy and stainless steel miniscrew implants.

  2. [Microscopic comparison of the miniscrew's surface used in orthodontics: before and after use].

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    Sebbar, M; Bourzgui, F; Lazrak, L; Aazzab, B; El Quars, F

    2012-11-01

    The aim of our work is to study the modifications affecting the surface condition of miniscrews retrieved from patients following an orthodontic treatment and comparing these miniscrews to unused ones. This study involved ten miniscrews placed in seven patients after orthodontic treatment for various indications. These miniscrews of the same manufacturer (Dual Top Anchor System® [Jeil Medical Corporation, Seoul, Korea]) were observed under optical microscope (Leica DM2500M) in order to examine their surface. Four new Miniscrews of different manufacturers, including the manufacturer of Miniscrews trademarks patients (Abso Anchor [Dentos, Daegu, South Korea] Infiniti [DB Orthodontics, Silsden, West Yorkshire, UK], Dual Top(®) [Jeil Medical Corporation, Seoul, Korea], IMTEC(®) [Ardmore, Okla]) were examined under the same microscope to compare with the used miniscrews. The study of the new miniscrews showed an irregular surface with machining and polishing defects, in the form of stripes that could constitute election's point for electrochemical attacks. Compared with the new one, the miniscrew used showed pitting corrosion attacks and cracks, mainly in the machining defects. These attacks were localized over the whole of miniscrews. It is suggested that improving the surface finish can increase the corrosion resistance of these miniscrews. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival of palatal miniscrews used for orthodontic appliance anchorage: a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagkiolidou, A.; Ludwig, B.; Pazera, P.; Gkantidis, N.; Pandis, N.; Katsaros, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine the overall success of miniscrews inserted in the paramedian palatal region for support of various appliances during orthodontic treatment. METHODS: The patients received 1 or 2 miniscrews in the paramedian anterior palate of 8.0-mm length and

  4. Intrusion of an overerupted molar using orthodontic miniscrew implant: A preprosthodontic therapy

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    Indumathi Sivakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the use of orthodontic miniscrew implant in the intrusion of overerupted molar as a preprosthodontic therapy. A 37-year-old woman with an overerupted maxillary right first molar encroaching on the opposing mandibular edentulous space was successfully intruded using a single miniscrew implant and partial fixed orthodontic appliance. The prosthodontic clinician may adopt this conservative and cost-effective strategy in their routine practice and avoid clinical crown reduction.

  5. Survival of palatal miniscrews used for orthodontic appliance anchorage: a retrospective cohort study.

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    Karagkiolidou, Angeliki; Ludwig, Björn; Pazera, Pawel; Gkantidis, Nikolaos; Pandis, Nikolaos; Katsaros, Christos

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the overall success of miniscrews inserted in the paramedian palatal region for support of various appliances during orthodontic treatment. The patients received 1 or 2 miniscrews in the paramedian anterior palate of 8.0-mm length and 1.6-mm diameter placed during orthodontic treatment by the same experienced orthodontist. In total, 196 patients (121 girls, 75 boys; median age, 11.7; interquartile range, 3.7) who received 384 miniscrews were evaluated. Two hundred four miniscrews were used with rapid palatal expansion appliances, 136 with appliances for distalization of posterior teeth, and 44 with other appliances, such as transpalatal arches for tooth stabilization. The overall survival of the miniscrews was excellent (97.9%) in the cases examined. Cox regression analysis showed no difference in the overall survival rates of miniscrews loaded with different appliances for sex (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.27; P = 0.73) after adjusting for appliance and age. This study shows that miniscrews placed in the paramedian anterior palate for supporting various orthodontic appliances have excellent survival. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dental Extrusion with Orthodontic Miniscrew Anchorage: A Case Report Describing a Modified Method

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    Horliana, Ricardo Fidos; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Wuo, Alexandre do Vale; Perez, Fl?vio Eduardo Guillin; Abr?o, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the skeletal anchorage through miniscrews has expanded the treatment options in orthodontics (Yamaguchi et al., 2012). We hereby present a modified method for tooth extrusion for cases where crown-lengthening surgery is contraindicated for aesthetic reasons. This modified method uses three orthodontic appliances: a mini-implant, an orthodontic wire, and a bracket. The aim of this case report was to increase the length of the clinical crown of a fractured tooth (tooth 23) by m...

  7. Root perforation associated with the use of a miniscrew implant used for orthodontic anchorage: a case report.

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    McCabe, P; Kavanagh, C

    2012-07-01

    To highlight one of the possible complications associated with the inter-radicular placement of orthodontic miniscrews. This case report describes the endodontic treatment and surgical repair of an iatrogenic root perforation involving a maxillary first molar tooth following the placement of an orthodontic miniscrew placed for anchorage purposes in the treatment of an adult patient. The orthodontic treatment plan was completed. The long-term follow-up shows a successful treatment outcome. Inter-radicular placement of orthodontic miniscrews is a valuable source of anchorage in the treatment of orthodontic patients. Root perforation is a possible complication from inter-radicular placement of orthodontic miniscrews. Root perforation can be successfully treated, but may involve apical surgery. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  8. Tissue reaction surrounding miniscrews for orthodontic anchorage: An animal experiment

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    Stephanie Shih-Hsuan Chen

    2012-03-01

    Results and conclusions: (1 Tissue surrounding roots damaged by a miniscrew showed a significant inflammatory response. (2 Root resorption was occasionally observed after 3 weeks following insertion of a miniscrew even if the miniscrew was not in direct contact with the root. (3 Root repair was noted with a cementoblast lining along the resorption surface at as early as 3 weeks after miniscrew insertion. Alveolar bone filled in the lesion when the root damage was large so that the contour of the alveolar bone followed that of the damaged root, with the width of the periodontal ligament space being maintained. (4 Stable miniscrews were mainly those which did not contact adjacent roots, and for which the surrounding tissue showed only a small inflammatory response with some extent of direct bone contact around the miniscrew. On the contrary, most of the failed miniscrews were those which had direct contact with adjacent roots, and which exhibited severe tissue inflammation and were covered by thick layers of soft tissue. Failure was detected 3 weeks after insertion. Surprisingly, the epithelial lining surrounding the miniscrews might not have spontaneously resolved 6 weeks after screw removal. Persistent infection in the sinus tract was noted, and this would require attention.

  9. Evaluation of the Effect of Platelet-Released Growth Factor and Immediate Orthodontic Loading on the Removal Torque of Miniscrews.

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    Bayani, Shahin; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Aghaabbasi, Sharereh; Farsinejad, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of platelet-released growth factor (PRGF) and immediate orthodontic forces on the removal torque of miniscrews. This study was conducted on three male dogs aged 6 to 8 months with a body weight of 17.6 to 18.4 kg. Sixty miniscrews were inserted in the posterior aspect of the femur. There were four groups, including loaded miniscrews with application of PRGF, unloaded miniscrews without application of PRGF, unloaded miniscrews with PRGF, and loaded miniscrews without PRGF. Twenty miniscrews were inserted in the femoral bone of one foot of each dog, including all the aforementioned subgroups. After 12 weeks, the miniscrews were removed by a removal torque tester device and measured in newton centimeters. The mean removal torque values in four groups of immediately loaded screws with PRGF, unloaded screws with PRGF, immediately loaded screws without PRGF, and unloaded screws without PRGF were 19.68, 21.74, 13.65, and 15.46 Ncm, respectively. It was shown that the mean removal torque value for the group with PRGF was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P = .0001). Although there was a tendency toward a decrease in removal torque value with immediate loading, it was not statistically significant (P = .21). According to the results of this study, applying PRGF with miniscrews increased their stability, but the delivery of immediate force on miniscrews had no effect on the miniscrews' stability.

  10. Dental extrusion with orthodontic miniscrew anchorage: a case report describing a modified method.

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    Horliana, Ricardo Fidos; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Wuo, Alexandre do Vale; Perez, Flávio Eduardo Guillin; Abrão, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the skeletal anchorage through miniscrews has expanded the treatment options in orthodontics (Yamaguchi et al., 2012). We hereby present a modified method for tooth extrusion for cases where crown-lengthening surgery is contraindicated for aesthetic reasons. This modified method uses three orthodontic appliances: a mini-implant, an orthodontic wire, and a bracket. The aim of this case report was to increase the length of the clinical crown of a fractured tooth (tooth 23) by means of an orthodontic extrusion with the modified method of Roth and Diedrich.

  11. Comparison of stainless steel and titanium alloy orthodontic miniscrew implants: a mechanical and histologic analysis.

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    Brown, Ryan N; Sexton, Brent E; Gabriel Chu, Tien-Min; Katona, Thomas R; Stewart, Kelton T; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2014-04-01

    The detailed mechanical and histologic properties of stainless steel miniscrew implants used for temporary orthodontic anchorage have not been assessed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare them with identically sized titanium alloy miniscrew implants. Forty-eight stainless steel and 48 titanium alloy miniscrew implants were inserted into the tibias of 12 rabbits. Insertion torque and primary stability were recorded. One hundred grams of tensile force was applied between half of the implants in each group, resulting in 4 subgroups of 24 specimens each. Fluorochrome labeling was administered at weeks 4 and 5. When the rabbits were euthanized at 6 weeks, stability and removal torque were measured in half (ie, 12 specimens) of each of the 4 subgroups. Microdamage burden and bone-to-implant contact ratio were quantified in the other 12 specimens in each subgroup. Mixed model analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. All implants were stable at insertion and after 6 weeks. The only significant difference was the higher (9%) insertion torque for stainless steel. No significant differences were found between stainless steel and titanium alloy miniscrew implants in microdamage burden and bone-to-implant contact regardless of loading status. Stainless steel and titanium alloy miniscrew implants provide the same mechanical stability and similar histologic responses, suggesting that both are suitable for immediate orthodontic clinical loads. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accelerated Tooth Movement with Orthodontic Mini-Screws

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    S. Aksakalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report outlines the possibility of accelerated tooth movement with the combination of microosteoperforation and mini-screws. A 14-year-old male patient presented Class II malocclusion with maxillary incisor protrusion. Upper first premolars were extracted, and after leveling, accelerated canine distalization started. For pre- and postdistalization times, amount of distalization, periodontal health, and root resorption were assessed. Within the limitations of this case report, micro-osteoperforations with mini-screw have a potential for shortening the treatment time.

  13. Effect of insertion method and postinsertion time interval prior to force application on the removal torque of orthodontic miniscrews.

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    Sharifi, Maryam; Ghassemi, Amirreza; Bayani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Success of orthodontic miniscrews in providing stable anchorage is dependent on their stability. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of insertion method and postinsertion time interval on the removal torque of miniscrews as an indicator of their stability. Seventy-two miniscrews (Jeil Medical) were inserted into the femoral bones of three male German Shepherd dogs and assigned to nine groups of eight miniscrews. Three insertion methods, including hand-driven, motor-driven with 5.0-Ncm insertion torque, and motor-driven with 20.0-Ncm insertion torque, were tested. Three time intervals of 0, 2, and 6 weeks between miniscrew insertion and removal were tested as well. Removal torque values were measured in newton centimeters by a removal torque tester (IMADA). Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Bonferroni post hoc test at a .05 level of significance. A miniscrew survival rate of 93% was observed in this study. The highest mean value of removal torque among the three postinsertion intervals (2.4 ± 0.59 Ncm) was obtained immediately after miniscrew insertion with a statistically significant difference from the other two time intervals (P torque values were obtained immediately after insertion.

  14. Root canal treatment of a periradicular lesion caused by unintentional root damage after orthodontic miniscrew placement: a case report.

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    Er, K; Bayram, M; Taşdemir, T

    2011-12-01

    To present the successful endodontic management of a maxillary lateral incisor tooth with a periradicular lesion caused by unintentional root damage after orthodontic miniscrew placement. A 22-year-old female was diagnosed with a skeletal Class II, Division 2 malocclusion with Class II molar and canine relationships on both sides. The treatment plan included distalization of the maxillary first molars bilaterally followed by full fixed appliance therapy. For the maxillary molar distalization, an appliance in conjunction with a miniscrew anchorage system was designed. Two months later, the patient came to the clinic with complaints of pain in the maxillary right lateral incisor region. On intraoral examination, intraoral sinus tracts were detected in the maxillary right buccal sulcus and palate. A large radiolucent lesion with a well-defined margin around the root of the maxillary right lateral incisor was seen. Root canal treatment was performed on the maxillary right lateral incisor tooth. The root canal was filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer, using a lateral compaction technique. The final restoration of the tooth was completed using composite, and the tooth was reviewed after 10 months. The tooth was asymptomatic and radiographically showed repair of the lesion. Healing was achieved without any need for further endodontic or surgical intervention. Key learning points • This case illustrates the need to take care with miniscrews when performing orthodontic treatment, especially when the miniscrews are in close proximity to root apices. • The periradicular lesion as a result of miniscrew damage was successfully treated with root canal treatment. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  15. Comparative evaluation of insertion torque and mechanical stability for self-tapping and self-drilling orthodontic miniscrews - an in vitro study.

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    Tepedino, Michele; Masedu, Francesco; Chimenti, Claudio

    2017-05-30

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between insertion torque and stability of miniscrews in terms of resistance against dislocation, then comparing a self-tapping screw with a self-drilling one. Insertion torque was measured during placement of 30 self-drilling and 31 self-tapping stainless steel miniscrews (Leone SpA, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) in synthetic bone blocks. Then, an increasing pulling force was applied at an angle of 90° and 45°, and the displacement of the miniscrews was recorded. The statistical analysis showed a statistically significant difference between the mean Maximum Insertion Torque (MIT) observed in the two groups and showed that force angulation and MIT have a statistically significant effect on miniscrews stability. For both the miniscrews, an angle of 90° between miniscrew and loading force is preferable in terms of stability. The tested self-drilling orthodontic miniscrews showed higher MIT and greater resistance against dislocation than the self-tapping ones.

  16. Natural reversal of tooth discoloration and pulpal response to testing following removal of a miniscrew implant for orthodontic anchorage: a case report.

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    Qin, Y J; Zhang, G D; Zhang, Y; Ping, Y F; Zhao, C Y

    2016-04-01

    To highlight the reversal of signs suggesting pulpal necrosis following removal of a mini-implant without endodontic intervention. A 23-year-old woman presented with a class III malocclusion, with crowded and malformed teeth and excessive gingival display. During orthodontic treatment, a Tomas orthodontic miniscrew was placed between the root apices of the maxillary central incisors. This was carried out by an orthodontic specialist who had treated more than 700 patients (with more than 2000 mini-implants) over the past 9 years. After 2 weeks of treatment, the right maxillary central incisor discoloured and did not respond to electrical pulp tests (EPT) but was sensitive to endo-ice. The miniscrew was removed under local anaesthesia. Teeth 11 and 21 were fixed with ligation wire, and glass-ionomer cement (GIC) was added to the occlusal surfaces of the first and second maxillary molars to heighten the occlusion and disclude the maxillary anterior teeth. After 4 months, the colour and pulp reactions to EPT and endo-ice of tooth 11 returned to normal. Because the use of a miniscrew had appeared to damage the pulp, subsequent a conservative orthodontic treatment using, traditional 'J' hooks was used and achieved satisfactory results. After 23 months of orthodontic treatment, the treatment was complete and a 15-month follow-up showed a successful outcome. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. An alternative approach to extruding a vertically impacted lower third molar using an orthodontic miniscrew: A case report with cone-beam CT follow-up.

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    Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez; No-Cortes, Juliana; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmão Paraíso; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2014-06-01

    One of the most common oral surgical procedures is the extraction of the lower third molar (LTM). Postoperative complications such as paresthesia due to inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury are commonly observed in cases of horizontal and vertical impaction. The present report discusses a case of a vertically impacted LTM associated with a dentigerous cyst. An intimate contact between the LTM roots and the mandibular canal was observed on a panoramic radiograph and confirmed with cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) cross-sectional cuts. An orthodontic miniscrew was then used to extrude the LTM prior to its surgical removal in order to avoid the risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury. CBCT imaging follow-up confirmed the success of the LTM orthodontic extrusion.

  18. An alternative approach to extruding a vertically impacted lower third molar using an orthodontic miniscrew: A case report with cone-beam CT follow-up

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    Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzales; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmaeo Paraiso; Arita, Emiko Saito [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of Saeo Paulo, Saeo Paulo (Brazil); No-Cortes, Julian [Orthodontic Clinic, Saeo Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    One of the most common oral surgical procedures is the extraction of the lower third molar (LTM). Postoperative complications such as paresthesia due to inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury are commonly observed in cases of horizontal and vertical impaction. The present report discusses a case of a vertically impacted LTM associated with a dentigerous cyst. An intimate contact between the LTM roots and the mandibular canal was observed on a panoramic radiograph and confirmed with cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) cross-sectional cuts. An orthodontic miniscrew was then used to extrude the LTM prior to its surgical removal in order to avoid the risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury. CBCT imaging follow-up confirmed the success of the LTM orthodontic extrusion.

  19. An alternative approach to extruding a vertically impacted lower third molar using an orthodontic miniscrew: A case report with cone-beam CT follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzales; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmaeo Paraiso; Arita, Emiko Saito; No-Cortes, Julian

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common oral surgical procedures is the extraction of the lower third molar (LTM). Postoperative complications such as paresthesia due to inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury are commonly observed in cases of horizontal and vertical impaction. The present report discusses a case of a vertically impacted LTM associated with a dentigerous cyst. An intimate contact between the LTM roots and the mandibular canal was observed on a panoramic radiograph and confirmed with cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) cross-sectional cuts. An orthodontic miniscrew was then used to extrude the LTM prior to its surgical removal in order to avoid the risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury. CBCT imaging follow-up confirmed the success of the LTM orthodontic extrusion.

  20. Prognostic factors associated with the success rates of posterior orthodontic miniscrew implants: A subgroup meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Bin; Kusnoto, Budi; Kim, Eun-Jeong; BeGole, Ellen A; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Lim, Hoi-Jeong

    2016-03-01

    To systematically review previous studies and to assess, via a subgroup meta-analysis, the combined odds ratio (OR) of prognostic factors affecting the success of miniscrew implants (MIs) inserted into the buccal posterior region. Three electronic searches that were limited to articles on clinical human studies using MIs that were published in English prior to March 2015 were conducted. The outcome measure was the success of MIs. Patient factors included age, sex, and jaw of insertion (maxilla vs. mandible), while the MI factors included length and diameter. A meta-analysis was performed on 17 individual studies. The quality of each study was assessed for non-randomized studies and quantified using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The meta-analysis outcome was a combined OR. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses based on the study design, study quality, and sample size of miniscrews implanted were performed. Significantly higher success rates were revealed for MIs inserted in the maxilla, for patients ≥ 20 years of age, and for long MIs (≥ 8 mm) and MIs with a large diameter (> 1.4 mm). All subgroups acquired homogeneity, and the combined OR of the prospective studies (OR, 3.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.10-6.44) was significantly higher in the maxilla than that in the retrospective studies (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.60-2.74). When a treatment plan is made, these risk factors, i.e. jaw of insertion, age, MI length, and MI diameter, should be taken into account, while sex is not critical to the success of MIs.

  1. Class III malocclusion with complex problems of lateral open bite and severe crowding successfully treated with miniscrew anchorage and lingual orthodontic brackets.

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    Yanagita, Takeshi; Kuroda, Shingo; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we report the successful use of miniscrews in a patient with an Angle Class III malocclusion, lateral open bite, midline deviation, and severe crowding. Simultaneously resolving such problems with conventional Class III treatment is difficult. In this case, the treatment procedure was even more challenging because the patient preferred to have lingual brackets on the maxillary teeth. As a result, miniscrews were used to facilitate significant asymmetric tooth movement in the posterior and downward directions; this contributed to the camouflage of the skeletal mandibular protrusion together with complete resolution of the severe crowding and lateral open bite. Analysis of the jaw motion showed that irregularities in chewing movement were also resolved, and a stable occlusion was achieved. Improvements in the facial profile and dental arches remained stable at the 18-month follow-up. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the implantation position of mini-screws for orthodontic treatment in the maxillary molar area by a micro CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takenobu; Nojima, Kunihiko; Nishii, Yasushi; Takaki, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hideharu

    2004-01-01

    The interalveolar septum between the upper first molar and the second premolar of the separated human maxillary bone was three-dimensionally observed by micro CT to evaluate the appropriate mini-screw type implant placement position by considering the relationship between the tooth roots and the maxillary sinus. After taking micro CTs of 5 human maxillary bones, horizontally sectioned images of the interalveolar septum area 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 mm deep from the crest of the alveolar ridge were reconstructed by three-dimensional reconstruction software. The bucco-lingual and mesio-distal lengths and area in each sectioned interalveolar septum were measured using digital image measurement software. Using the results, the interalveolar septum area between the upper first molar and the second premolar approximately 6-8 mm deep from the alveolar crest in the tooth root apical direction was determined to be the safest position for mini-screw implantation. Furthermore, lateral implantation from the palatal side was deduced to be the safest approach. (author)

  3. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu-Tzu; Yu, Jian-Hong; Lo, Lun-Jou; Hsu, Pin-Hsin; Lin, CHun-Li

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD), and 3D printing (3DP) to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic) miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical ...

  4. Accurate pre-surgical determination for self-drilling miniscrew implant placement using surgical guides and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Ken; Kawaguchi, Misuzu; Tabuchi, Masako; Goto, Shigemi

    2010-12-01

    Miniscrew implants have proven to be effective in providing absolute orthodontic anchorage. However, as self-drilling miniscrew implants have become more popular, a problem has emerged, i.e. root contact, which can lead to perforation and other root injuries. To avoid possible root damage, a surgical guide was fabricated and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to incorporate guide tubes drilled in accordance with the planned direction of the implants. Eighteen patients (5 males and 13 females; mean age 23.8 years; minimum 10.7, maximum 45.5) were included in the study. Forty-four self-drilling miniscrew implants (diameter 1.6, and length 8 mm) were placed in interradicular bone using a surgical guide procedure, the majority in the maxillary molar area. To determine the success rates, statistical analysis was undertaken using Fisher's exact probability test. CBCT images of post-surgical self-drilling miniscrew implant placement showed no root contact (0/44). However, based on CBCT evaluation, it was necessary to change the location or angle of 52.3 per cent (23/44) of the guide tubes prior to surgery in order to obtain optimal placement. If orthodontic force could be applied to the screw until completion of orthodontic treatment, screw anchorage was recorded as successful. The total success rate of all miniscrews was 90.9 per cent (40/44). Orthodontic self-drilling miniscrew implants must be inserted carefully, particularly in the case of blind placement, since even guide tubes made on casts frequently require repositioning to avoid the roots of the teeth. The use of surgical guides, fabricated using CBCT images, appears to be a promising technique for placement of orthodontic self-drilling miniscrew implants adjacent to the dental roots and maxillary sinuses.

  5. Comparison of the success rate between self-drilling and self-tapping miniscrews: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jianru; Ge, Mengke; Li, Meile; Li, Chunjie; Li, Yu; Li, Xiaobing; Zhao, Zhihe

    2017-06-01

    Both the self-drilling and self-tapping miniscrews have been commonly used as anchorage reinforcement devices in orthodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the success rates of self-drilling and self-tapping miniscrews in orthodontic practice. Literature searches were performed by electronic search in database including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and SIGLE, and manual search of relevant journals and reference lists of included studies. Randomized controlled trials, clinical controlled trials and cohort studies comparing the success rates of self-drilling and self-tapping miniscrews as orthodontic anchorage. The data of success rates and root contact rates were extracted by two investigators independently. After evaluating the risk of bias, the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Subgroup analysis was performed on the basis of study design, follow-ups, participant ages and immediate/delayed loading. Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the stability of the results in meta-analysis. Six studies assessed as high quality were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis results showed no difference between the two types of screws in the success rates. The root contact rates of the two screws were similar, while self-drilling miniscrews displayed higher risk of failure when contacting with a tooth root. Currently available clinical evidence suggests that the success rates of self-tapping and self-drilling miniscrews are similar. Determination of the position and direction of placement should be more precise when self-drilling miniscrews are used in sites with narrow root proximity. None. None. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD, and 3D printing (3DP to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical template fabrication. The customized surgical template CAD model was fabricated offset based on the teeth/mucosa/bracket contour profiles in the superimposition model and exported to duplicate the plastic template using the 3DP technique and polymer material. An anterior retraction and intrusion clinical test for the maxillary canines/incisors showed that two miniscrews were placed safely and did not produce inflammation or other discomfort symptoms one week after surgery. The fitness between the mucosa and template indicated that the average gap sizes were found smaller than 0.5 mm and confirmed that the surgical template presented good holding power and well-fitting adaption. This study addressed integrating CBCT and laser scan image superposition; CAD and 3DP techniques can be applied to fabricate an accurate customized surgical template for dental orthodontic miniscrews.

  7. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tzu; Yu, Jian-Hong; Lo, Lun-Jou; Hsu, Pin-Hsin; Lin, CHun-Li

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD), and 3D printing (3DP) to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic) miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical template fabrication. The customized surgical template CAD model was fabricated offset based on the teeth/mucosa/bracket contour profiles in the superimposition model and exported to duplicate the plastic template using the 3DP technique and polymer material. An anterior retraction and intrusion clinical test for the maxillary canines/incisors showed that two miniscrews were placed safely and did not produce inflammation or other discomfort symptoms one week after surgery. The fitness between the mucosa and template indicated that the average gap sizes were found smaller than 0.5 mm and confirmed that the surgical template presented good holding power and well-fitting adaption. This study addressed integrating CBCT and laser scan image superposition; CAD and 3DP techniques can be applied to fabricate an accurate customized surgical template for dental orthodontic miniscrews.

  8. Mini-Implants in the Anchorage Armamentarium: New Paradigms in the Orthodontics

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    Masaru Yamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paradigms have started to shift in the orthodontic world since the introduction of mini-implants in the anchorage armamentarium. Various forms of skeletal anchorage, including miniscrews and miniplates, have been reported in the literature. Recently, great emphasis has been placed on the miniscrew type of temporary anchorage device (TAD. These devices are small, are implanted with a relatively simple surgical procedure, and increase the potential for better orthodontic results. Therefore, miniscrews not only free orthodontists from anchorage-demanding cases, but they also enable clinicians to have good control over tooth movement in 3 dimensions. The miniplate type also produces significant improvements in treatment outcomes and has widened the spectrum of orthodontics. The purpose of this paper is to update clinicians on the current concepts and versatile uses and clinical applications of skeletal anchorage in orthodontics.

  9. Miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion for managing arch perimeter in an adult patient

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    Amanda Carneiro da Cunha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Etiology of dental crowding may be related to arch constriction in diverse dimensions, and an appropriate manipulation of arch perimeter by intervening in basal bone discrepancies cases, may be a key for crowding relief, especially when incisors movement is limited due to underlying pathology, periodontal issues or restrictions related to soft tissue profile. Objectives: This case report illustrates a 24-year old woman, with maxillary transverse deficiency, upper and lower arches crowding, Class II, division 1, subdivision right relationship, previous upper incisors traumatic episode and straight profile. A non-surgical and non-extraction treatment approach was feasible due to the miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion technique (MARPE. Methods: The MARPE appliance consisted of a conventional Hyrax expander supported by four orthodontic miniscrews. A slow expansion protocol was adopted, with an overall of 40 days of activation and a 3-month retention period. Intrusive traction miniscrew-anchored mechanics were used for correcting the Class II subdivision relationship, managing lower arch perimeter and midline deviation before including the upper central incisors. Results: Post-treatment records show an intermolar width increase of 5 mm, bilateral Class I molar and canine relationships, upper and lower crowding resolution, coincident dental midlines and proper intercuspation. Conclusions: The MARPE is an effective treatment approach for managing arch-perimeter deficiencies related to maxillary transverse discrepancies in adult patients.

  10. Miniscrew-assisted mandibular molar distalization in a patient with skeletal class-III malocclusion: A clinical case report

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    Seyed Mohammadreza Safavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In nongrowing patients with mild skeletal Class-III malocclusion, premolar extraction or molar distalization in the lower arch can be done as a part of camouflage treatment. Temporary anchorage devices are widely used for this purpose because they do not produce undesirable reciprocal effects and do not depend on the patient′s cooperation. However, most reported cases in this regard have used interradicular miniscrews in the mandibular arch and these have a risk of failure as they can loosen due to collision with adjacent roots. This article showcases mandibular molar distalization utilizing miniscrews, inserted at the retromolar area to correct a Class-III problem. A 24-year-old girl with a mild skeletal Class-III malocclusion and dental Class-III molar and canine relationship bilaterally was referred for orthodontic treatment. The treatment plan included distalization of the lower molars bilaterally followed by full fixed appliance therapy, after third molar extractions. For the lower molar distalization, the miniscrews were inserted at the retromolar pad. At the end of 21 months, a Class-I molar and canine relationship, normal overjet and overbite were obtained. The average amount of distalization of mandibular first molar was 3.2 mm at the crown level. In conclusion, placing miniscrews at the retromolar pad area for lower molar distalization was found to be a simple and effective method for correcting anterior cross bite and mandibular anterior crowding or protrusion, without the need for patient compliance.

  11. Finite element analysis of the effect of force directions on tooth movement in extraction space closure with miniscrew sliding mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yukio; Kawamura, Jun; Fukui, Hisao

    2012-10-01

    Miniscrews placed in bone have been used as orthodontic anchorage in extraction space closure with sliding mechanics. The movement patterns of the teeth depend on the force directions. To move the teeth in a desired pattern, the appropriate direction of force must be selected. The purpose of this article is to clarify the relationship between force directions and movement patterns. By using the finite element method, orthodontic movements were simulated based on the remodeling law of the alveolar bone. The power arm length and the miniscrew position were varied to change the force directions. When the power arm was lengthened, rotation of the entire maxillary dentition decreased. The posterior teeth were effective for preventing rotation of the anterior teeth through an archwire. In cases of a high position of a miniscrew, bodily tooth movement was almost achieved. The vertical component of the force produced intrusion or extrusion of the entire dentition. Within the limits of the method, the mechanical simulations demonstrated the effect of force direction on movement patterns. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Class III malocclusion treated with distalization of the mandibular dentition with miniscrew anchorage: A 2-year follow-up.

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    Chen, Kun; Cao, Yang

    2015-12-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic camouflage treatment for a 16-year-old Chinese girl with a Class III malocclusion. The treatment included extractions of the mandibular second molars, fixed appliance therapy, and miniscrew-aided mandibular arch distalization. Pretreatment, posttreatment, and 2-year follow-up records are shown. The anterior negative overjet and the Class III molar and canine relationships were corrected. The patient's facial profile was greatly improved. The mandibular third molars erupted into the second molar spaces, with acceptable intercuspation with the maxillary dentition. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Movimentação de molares inferiores ancorados em mini-parafusos Mandibular molar uprighting, using mini-screw as anchorage

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    Rosana Canteras Di Matteo

    2005-08-01

    posterior to the tooth. Three pacients with ages between 40 and 48 years old (two females and one male were selected. The three of them presented mesially tipped molars, positioned posterior to the edentulous areas, on both sides of the mandible. These patients received orthodontic treatment during a period of 6 and 12 months with the MD3 technique. Titanium mini-screws were positioned bilaterally, under local anesthesia. One incision with 1 cm was done in each side of the mandibular external oblique line, distally to the tipped molars. After that, the mini-screws were positioned and sutures were done, leaving the mini-screws heads exposed. After one week, orthodontic loads (between 150 and 200 grams/force were applied to the mini-screws through elastics. A certain degree of inflammation around the mini-screws was noticed, but it was controlled by hygienic procedure. This surgery procedure was simple and could be done easily by the orthodontist. The dimensions and shapes of the mini-screws proved to be appropriate and their removal after the orthodontic movement were done without difficulty. The result was time reduction on the molars uprighting, without side effects on the others teeth. The use of mini-screws seems to be a good alternative for an effective orthodontic anchorage on the uprighting mandibular molars.

  14. Revisiting the stability of mini-implants used for orthodontic anchorage

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    Chung-Chen Jane Yao

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed that once the dental surgeon becomes familiar with the procedure, the stability of orthodontic mini-implants depends on the type of mini-implant, age of the patient, implantation site, and the healing time of the mini-implant. Miniplates are a more feasible anchorage system when miniscrews fail repeatedly.

  15. Mini-screw implant or transpalatal arch-mediated anchorage reinforcement during canine retraction: a randomized clinical trial.

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    Sharma, Mohit; Sharma, Vineet; Khanna, Bharat

    2012-06-01

    To compare mesial movement of upper first molars during maxillary canine retraction using a pre-adjusted edgewise appliance provided by anchorage reinforcement and a transpalatal arch or mini-screw implant. Randomized clinical trial. Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India. From a cohort of subjects requiring the extraction of both upper first premolars and pre-adjusted edgewise appliances to correct their malocclusion, a total of 30 were randomly allocated to receive two different forms of anchorage reinforcement: group A--receiving mini-screw implant and group B--receiving a transpalatal arch Group A subjects received titanium mini-screw implants placed at the start of treatment between the maxillary second premolar and maxillary first molar. Maxillary second premolars were secured to the mini-screw implants using of 0.010-inch stainless steel ligature wire. Group B subjects received a custom-made transpalatal arch which was soldered to maxillary first molar bands. Active canine retraction was initiated in both groups on placement of a 0.019×0.025-inch stainless steel archwire using nickel titanium closed coil springs. Mesial movement of the upper first molars as measured on pre- (T1) and post-treatment (T2) lateral skull radiographs. The results showed that in group A the mean mesial movement of the first molars between T1 and T2 was 0.0 mm (SD 0.02; P = 0.90), whereas in Group B there was a mean forward movement of the first maolars of 2.48 mm (SD 0.71; Pimplants placed prior to levelling and aligning were able to provide absolute anchorage during maxillary canine retraction, in contrast to a transpalatal arch.

  16. Use of palatally inserted mini-screw for upper molar distalization: A case series

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    Valliollah Arash

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Reports have shown that molars can be distalized successfully with virtually no orthodontic anchorage loss with an intraosseous anchorage, even with fully erupted second molars. The purpose of this study was evaluating the effects of mini-screws as skeletal anchorage for upper molar distalization. In this case series, three patients needing maxillary first molar distalization, were selected. mini-screw was inserted in the anterior part of the palate. The screws were anchored to the first premolars by transpalatal arch and immediately loaded (150-160 g by 0.018-inch arch-wire and steel open-coil spring to distalize maxillary molars. The skeletal and dental changes were measured on cephalograms obtained before and after distalization. The amount of first molar distalization in the patients was 4 mm with 2°of tipping, 4 mm with 5°of tipping, and 3.5 mm with 2°of tipping respectively. Upper incisors and first premolars were stable during distalization.       

  17. Combined use of miniscrews and clear appliances for the treatment of bialveolar protrusion without conventional brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nak-Chun; Park, Young-Chel; Jo, Yong-Min; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2009-05-01

    The increasing demand for esthetic orthodontic treatment has led to the development of tooth-colored and even "invisible" appliances. Although sequential removable clear aligners have several advantages over conventional bracket systems, they have some limitations in extraction treatment. This case report presents the esthetic extraction treatment of a patient with bialveolar protrusion; conventional brackets were not used. The treatment was completed in 2 steps. The first step involved segmental retraction of the anterior teeth by using miniscrews and an anterior lingual splint with a clear lever arm. The second step involved alignment and finishing by using sequential removable clear aligners. The patient's esthetic demands were fulfilled successfully during treatment, and satisfactory facial profile and occlusion were achieved after treatment.

  18. Evaluation of periodontal condition in intruded molars using miniscrews

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    Habib Ollah Ghanbari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the periodontal condition of intruded molars in various phases of treatments. Methods: 30 patients with at least one overerupted upper first molar were selected. Upper molar bands with brackets were cemented. Two miniscrews were placed in the mesiopalatal and mesiobuccal aspect of the aforementioned teeth. A titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA spring was attached to the head of miniscrew in one end and ligated to the bracket in the other end to reach the predetermined force. Plaque index (PI, probing pocket depth (PPD, keratinized gingiva (KG, The distance between miniscrew (M.S and gingival level (GL, and bleeding on probing (BOP were recorded before loading and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 months post-loading .Results:  All patients completed the study and no complications were reported. Statistically significant intrusion (2.1 ± 0.9 mm was obtained during active treatment. Inserting miniscrews generally was presented with greater sulcus bleeding, plaque accumulation and plaque formation at follow-up visits. There was a statistically significant increase in PI, PPD and BOP indices. Furthermore, the results showed decrease in KG level and M.S to GL level. Conclusion: Miniscrews can provide a clinical benefit as an absolute anchorage device. However, keeping a good oral hygiene is essential to achieve ideal results, because the presence of miniscrews, as a foreign object in mouth, and intrusion force might be harmful for periodontal tissues

  19. Can we close large prosthetic space with orthodontics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesko, Mauro Elias; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Valentini, Fernanda; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    For years, the treatment for the replacement of a missing tooth was a fixed dental prosthesis. Currently, implants are indicated to replace missing teeth due to high clinical success and with the advantage of not performing preparations in the adjacent tooth. Another option for space closure is the use of orthodontics associated to miniscrews for anchorage allowing better control of the orthodontic biomechanics and especially making possible closure of larger prosthetic spaces. Thus, this article describes two cases with indications and discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of using orthodontics for prosthetic spaces closure. The cases herein presented show that it is possible to close an space when there are available teeth in the adjacent area. It can be concluded that when a malocclusion is present there will be a strong trend to indicate space closure by orthodontic movement as it preserves natural teeth and seems a more physiological approach.

  20. A review of biomarkers in peri-miniscrew implant crevicular fluid (PMICF

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    Avinash Kaur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporary anchorage devices (TADs which include miniscrew implants (MSIs have evolved as useful armamentarium in the management of severe malocclusions and assist in complex tooth movements. Although a multitude of factors is responsible for the primary and secondary stability of miniscrew implants, contemporary research highlights the importance of biological interface of MSI with bone and soft tissue in augmenting the success of implants. The inflammation and remodeling associated with MSI insertion or loading are reflected through biomarkers in peri-miniscrew implant crevicular fluid (PMICF which is analogous to the gingival crevicular fluid. Analysis of biomarkers in PMICF provides indicators of inflammation at the implant site, osteoclast differentiation and activation, bone resorption activity and bone turnover. The PMICF for assessment of these biomarkers can be collected non-invasively via paper strips, periopaper or micro capillary pipettes and analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or immunoassays. The markers and mediators of inflammation have been previously studied in relation to orthodontic tooth movement include interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8, growth factors and other proteins like tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL, chondroitin sulphate (CS and osteoprotegerin (OPG. Studies have indicated that successful and failed MSIs have different concentrations of biomarkers in PMICF. However, there is a lack of comprehensive information on this aspect of MSIs. Therefore, a detailed review was conducted on the subject. Results A literature search revealed six relevant studies: two on IL-1β; one on IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8; one on TNF-α; one on CS; and one on RANKL/OPG ratio. One study showed an increase in IL-1β levels upon MSI loading, peak in 24 hours (h, followed by a decrease in 21 days to reach baseline in 300 days. A 6

  1. Centennial inventory: the changing face of orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, Joseph G

    2015-11-01

    The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics celebrates its centennial, safeguarded by the nearly 115-year-old American Association of Orthodontists. This journey witnessed the rise and demise of various developments, concepts, and procedures, while basic knowledge is still needed. Various periods can be defined in the past century, but the goals remain to obtain more accurate diagnosis through precise anatomic imaging, more controlled and faster tooth movement, more discreet appliances, and the balance of esthetics, function, and stability. The most recent technologic advances have buttressed these goals. Cone-beam computed tomography has brought 3-dimensional assessment to daily usage, albeit the original enthusiasm is tempered by the risk of additional radiation. Temporary anchorage devices or miniscrews have revolutionized orthodontic practice and loom as a solid cornerstone of orthodontic science. Decortication and microperforation promise to speed up tooth displacement by stimulating vascularization. The concept of the regional acceleratory phenomenon has touched upon even the timing of orthognathic surgery. The burden of esthetic appliances remains, with the demand for "cosmetic" appliances and clear aligners. Have these developments changed the face of orthodontics? Have we engaged in another turn wherein certain treatment modalities may fade, while others join mainstream applications? These questions are addressed in this essay on the challenges, promises, and limitations of current orthodontic technology, enhancement of biologic response, and personalized treatment approaches. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficiency of piezosurgery technique in miniscrew supported en-masse retraction: a single-centre, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçer, Nilüfer Irem; Arman-Özçirpici, Ayça; Oduncuoglu, Bahar Füsun; Göçmen, Jülide Sedef; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2017-11-30

    Piezoelectric surgery is a newly introduced technique for rapid tooth movement. However, the efficiency of this technique has not been investigated on en-masse retraction cases yet. To investigate the efficiency of piezosurgery technique in accelerating miniscrew supported en-masse retraction and study the biological tissue response. In addition, to show if this technique induces a difference in dental, skeletal and soft tissue changes on lateral cephalograms, and in canine and molar rotations, besides intercanine and intermolar widths on dental casts. We conducted a randomized, single-centred, parallel-group, controlled trial, requiring upper right and left first premolar extractions on 30 patients above the minimum age of 14 years at the beginning of retraction. Piezosurgery-assisted versus conventional en-masse retraction anchored from miniscrews placed between second premolars and first molars, bilaterally. The main outcome was the en-masse retraction rate. Secondary outcomes were gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) volume and GCF content of receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL), changes regarding cephalometric and dental cast variables, and miniscrew success rates. Accomplished with opaque, sealed envelopes. Applicable for data assessment only. Commenced in February 2013 and ended in October 2014. Thirty-one patients were included in the study and divided into 2 groups of piezosurgery (n = 16) and control (n = 15). After 9.3 months of follow-up, no statistically significant difference was observed between groups for neither retraction rates (P = 0.958) nor GCF parameters (P > 0.05). Changes in lateral cephalometric and dental cast variables, and miniscrew success rates did not show significant differences either. Based on the results of this study, piezosurgery technique was found to be ineffective in accelerating en-masse retraction, and promoting a difference in the studied GCF parameters, skeletal and dental variables. The trial was not

  3. DIRECT USAGE OF MINISCREW ANCHORAGE TO INTRUDE OVERERUPTED MAXILLARY POSTERIOR TEETH BEFORE PROSTHODONTIC PREPARATION:A CASE REPORT

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    Yasemin Bahar Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overeruption of maxillary molars due loss of opposing teeth creates occlusal and functional interferences. Before reconstruction can be initiated, intrusion of overerupted molars becomes essential. This report illustrates treatment of overerupted maxillary premolar and molar via direct use of miniscrew anchorage. A 24-year old female had lost first and second left mandibular molars due to pulpal necrotizing agents, resulting with a large alveolar bone defect and overerupted maxillary premolar and molar. She had a history of unsuccessful alveolar distraction of mandibular left premolars to increase the alveolar bone height prior to implant placement. Patient was satisfied with her smile and refused comprehensive orthodontic treatment. Maxillary premolar and molar were intruded segmentally for 4mm in 8 months, using a combination of a mini-implant and partialfixed edgewise appliances. Biological responses of teeth and surrounding bony structures to intrusion appeared normal and acceptable in radiographic and clinical examination.

  4. Miniscrew design and bone response: defining a correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Karan; Kalha, Anmol S

    2013-01-01

    This prospective clinical trial aims at correlating miniscrew implant (MSI) micro/macro architecture, the method of placement, and biologic markers in peri-MSI crevicular fluid (PMICF) as indicators of bone response. A comparative evaluation of surface morphology of the MSIs before placement and after retrieval defines a correlation between the architecture of the MSIs and the bone- implant contact ratio. Two types of MSIs (hybrid and cylindric) were placed in ten patients using a split-mouth technique with the aid of a restricted random number table. Each of the MSIs was placed in the intraradicular area between the second premolar and first molar in the attached gingiva, 4 mm from the cementoenamel junction. The MSIs were immediately loaded, and PMICF was collected on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 42 and evaluated using a standard laboratory protocol. Surface morphology before placement and after retrieval of the MSI was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at a magnification of ×11, ×40, and ×1,000. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels observed were lower in the hybrid MSI in comparison to the cylindric MSI. For both MSIs, ALP and AST levels showed a trend of significant increase at days 0, 7, and 14 and then a significant decrease on days 21, 28, and 42. Observations from SEM showed an oxide layer over the entire surface of the bone-expanding hybrid MSI; this layer was observed only at the tip of the cylindric MSI. Levels of both the diagnostic tissue destruction biologic markers ALP and AST are significantly higher in cylindric MSIs compared with hybrid MSIs, indicating a correlation to the type and method of placement of the MSI. The inflammatory markers show a definitive trend, with an elevation until day 14 and a decline after that, indicating an active inflammatory process until day 14 that could be correlated to tissue trauma. Observations from the SEM show a greater oxide layer formation in the hybrid MSI

  5. Multidisciplinary management including periodontics, orthodontics, implants, and prosthetics for an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Teresa; Neves, Manuel; Alves, Célia

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the complex dental treatment of an adult patient with multiple missing teeth, mild chronic periodontitis, and a malocclusion with a cant of the occlusal plane. After periodontal treatment, titanium implants and a miniscrew were placed to correct the occlusal plane canting with orthodontic treatment. Prosthodontic treatment was completed by using osseointegrated implants to replace the missing teeth. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances bone formation around miniscrew implants.

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    Ganzorig, Khaliunaa; Kuroda, Shingo; Maeda, Yuichi; Mansjur, Karima; Sato, Minami; Nagata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    Miniscrew implants (MSIs) are currently used to provide absolute anchorage in orthodontics; however, their initial stability is an issue of concern. Application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) can promote bone healing. Therefore, LIPUS application may stimulate bone formation around MSIs and enhance their initial stability. To investigate the effect of LIPUS exposure on bone formation after implantation of titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (SS) MSIs. MSIs made of Ti-6Al-4V and 316L SS were placed on rat tibiae and treated with LIPUS. The bone morphology around MSIs was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional micro-computed tomography. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on Ti and SS discs were treated with LIPUS, and the temporary expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined. Bone-implant contact increased gradually from day 3 to day 14 after MSI insertion. LIPUS application increased the cortical bone density, cortical bone thickness, and cortical bone rate after implantation of Ti and SS MSIs (P<0.05). LIPUS exposure induced ALP upregulation in MC3T3-E1 cells at day 3 (P<0.05). LIPUS enhanced bone formation around Ti and SS MSIs, enhancing the initial stability of MSIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quick response codes in Orthodontics

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    Moidin Shakil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quick response (QR code codes are two-dimensional barcodes, which encodes for a large amount of information. QR codes in Orthodontics are an innovative approach in which patient details, radiographic interpretation, and treatment plan can be encoded. Implementing QR code in Orthodontics will save time, reduces paperwork, and minimizes manual efforts in storage and retrieval of patient information during subsequent stages of treatment.

  8. Impact of radiation history, gender and age on bone quality in sites for orthodontic skeletal anchorage device placement.

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    Konermann, A; Appel, T; Wenghoefer, M; Sirokay, S; Dirk, C; Jäger, A; Götz, W

    2015-05-01

    Stability of orthodontic miniscrew implants is prerequisite to their success and durability in orthodontic treatment. As investigations revealed a positive correlation of miniscrew stability to periimplant bone quality, it has been the aim of this study to analyze the bone structure of resection preparations of human mandibles histologically by investigating the samples according to age, gender and exposure to radiotherapy. Inflammation- and tumor-free alveolar bone sections from human mandibles (n = 31) with previously diagnosed carcinoma, chronic osteomyelitis or cysts were analyzed histomorphologically and histomorphometrically as to the dimension of trabeculae in cancellous areas. Group A investigated the impact of a history of radiation therapy, group B of gender and group C contrasted biopsies from individuals aging under 60 or over 60 years. Statistics were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis-test. Radiation, gender and age did not significantly influence bone density. The mean bone density averaged 40.7 ± 15.0% of spongiosa for the total collective with a median age of 58.4 years ± 14.7 years. Our findings provide new information on bone quality, thus contributing to a more precise evaluation of the parameters affecting and those not affecting miniscrew implant stability. On the basis of these results, the formulation of clinical guidelines for risk assessment of therapeutic approaches in patients prior to insertion of orthodontic skeletal anchorage devices seems to be conceivable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Orthodontic scars

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    Vinay Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic therapy apart from its benefits also has potential risks and limitations in terms of tissue damage. Fortunately, in orthodontics, risks are minimal and infrequent However, all potential risks and limitations should be considered and addressed when making the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risk of various types of soft and hard tissue damages (e.g. decalcification of enamel, lacerations, ulcerations, temporomandibular joint disorders, etc-, apart from treatment failure in itself. If correcting a malocclusion is to be of benefit, the advantages offered should outweigh any possible damage- All preventive procedures should be considered during and after orthodontic treatment to restore the normal health of soft and hard tissues. Hence, the orthodontist should be vigilant and prudent enough in assessing and monitoring every aspect of these tissues at any given stage and time in order to achieve a healthy and successful final result.

  10. Restoration of a vertical alveolar bone defect by orthodontic relocation of a mesially impacted mandibular first molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Wook; Choi, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2015-04-01

    An impacted mandibular first molar tends to cause serious bone defects of the adjacent teeth. When choosing between the 2 typical treatment options-extraction or orthodontic relocation of the impacted tooth-the decision should be based on assessment of the prognosis. A 22-year-old man with severe mesioangulation and impaction of the mandibular first molar and a related vertical bone defect on the distal side of the second premolar was treated with extraction of the second molar and orthodontic relocation of the first molar with a retromolar miniscrew. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment involving premolar extraction was conducted. Strategic extraction of the molar and adequate orthodontic movement helped to restore the bone structure on the affected side. This case report suggests the effectiveness of restoration of bone defects by using viable periodontal tissues around the impacted tooth for the longevity of the periodontium. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  12. Surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  13. Titanium alloy vs. stainless steel miniscrews: an in vivo split-mouth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollero, P; Di Fazio, V; Pavoni, C; Cordaro, M; Cozza, P; Lione, R

    2018-04-01

    To compare in vivo Titanium Alloy (TiA) with Stainless Steel (SS) miniscrews Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) using removal torque and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) analysis. 15 subjects (6 males and 9 females) who required maximum anchorage were recruited. For each patient, a TiA TAD and a SS TAD with same length and width were implanted following a randomized split-mouth study design. Retraction was carried out with nickel-titanium spring ligated directly from the anterior hooks of the archwire to the TADs to produce 90 to 100 g of force. When no further anchorage supplementation was needed, the TADs were removed. The removal torque values were registered with a digital screwdriver. After removal, the TADs were collected in a fixed solution and examined using SEM and X-ray microanalysis. All TADs remained intact, with a 100% success rate. There was no difference in removal torque between TiA and SS miniscrews (4.4 ± 1.3 N-cm and 5.1 ± 0.7 N-cm, respectively). All specimens' loss of gloss with signs of biological contaminations resulted in a dull implant surface. SEM photomicrographs of TiA miniscrews showed predominantly blood cells while SS miniscrews showed the precipitation of an amorphous layer with low cellular component. There was no difference in spectroscopic analysis between TiA and SS miniscrews. TiA and SS miniscrews had comparable removal torque values. SEM photomicrographs showed no evidence of osseointegration with both TADs having similar biological responses.

  14. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The least clinical experience was recorded in pre-bone graft orthodontics (7.4%) and orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery (5.5%). Some of the challenges highlighted by the residents were low patients turn out for orthodontic care and the absence of multidisciplinary treatment for craniofacial patients in their ...

  15. Quantity and quality assessment of randomized controlled trials on orthodontic practice in PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tatsuo; Takayama, Hisako; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2010-07-01

    To find current high-quality evidence for orthodontic practice within a reasonable time, we tested the performance of a PubMed search. PubMed was searched using publication type randomized controlled trial and medical subject heading term "orthodontics" for articles published between 2003 and 2007. The PubMed search results were compared with those from a hand search of four orthodontic journals to determine the sensitivity of PubMed search. We evaluated the precision of the PubMed search result and assessed the quality of individual randomized controlled trials using the Jadad scale. Sensitivity and precision were 97.46% and 58.12%, respectively. In PubMed, of the 277 articles retrieved, 161 (58.12%) were randomized controlled trials on orthodontic practice, and 115 of the 161 articles (71.42%) were published in four orthodontic journals: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, The Angle Orthodontist, the European Journal of Orthodontics, and the Journal of Orthodontics. Assessment by the Jadad scale revealed 60 high-quality randomized controlled trials on orthodontic practice, of which 45 (75%) were published in these four journals. PubMed is a highly desirable search engine for evidence-based orthodontic practice. To stay current and get high-quality evidence, it is reasonable to look through four orthodontic journals: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, The Angle Orthodontist, the European Journal of Orthodontics, and the Journal of Orthodontics.

  16. Average interradicular sites for miniscrew insertion: should dental crowding be considered?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepedino, Michele; Cattaneo, Paolo; Masedu, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define a map of interradicular spaces where miniscrew can be likely placed at a level covered by attached gingiva, and to assess if a correlation between crowding and availability of space exists. METHODS: Panoramic radiographs and digital models of 40 patients were selected according...

  17. Laser-treated stainless steel mini-screw implants: 3D surface roughness, bone-implant contact, and fracture resistance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, He-Kyong; Chu, Tien-Min; Dechow, Paul; Stewart, Kelton; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the biomechanical properties and bone-implant intersurface response of machined and laser surface-treated stainless steel (SS) mini-screw implants (MSIs). Forty-eight 1.3mm in diameter and 6mm long SS MSIs were divided into two groups. The control (machined surface) group received no surface treatment; the laser-treated group received Nd-YAG laser surface treatment. Half in each group was used for examining surface roughness (Sa and Sq), surface texture, and facture resistance. The remaining MSIs were placed in the maxilla of six skeletally mature male beagle dogs in a randomized split-mouth design. A pair with the same surface treatment was placed on the same side and immediately loaded with 200 g nickel-titanium coil springs for 8 weeks. After killing, the bone-implant contact (BIC) for each MSI was calculated using micro computed tomography. Analysis of variance model and two-sample t test were used for statistical analysis with a significance level of P titanium alloy MSIs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Should the orthodontic brackets always be removed prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr

    2015-01-01

    Request for temporary removal of orthodontic appliances due to medical conditions that require magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is not uncommon in daily practice in the field of orthodontics. This may be at the expense of time and cost. Metal Orthodontic appliances cause more signal loss and image distortion as compared to ceramic and titanium ones. Stainless steel and large brackets in addition to the oriented miniscrews in relation to the axis of magnetic field may cause severe signal loss and image distortion. Moreover, gradient echo and frequency-selective fat saturation MR protocols are more susceptible to metal artifacts. The spin echo and fat-suppression protocols, low magnetic field strength (e.g., 1.5 Tesla vs. 3 Tesla), small field of view, high-resolution matrix, thin slice, increased echo train length and increased receiver band width could be applied to lessen the metal artifacts in MR images. The larger the distance between an appliance and desired location to be imaged, the lower the distortion and signal loss. Decision to remove brackets should be made based on its composition and desired anatomic location. In this review, first the principles of MR imaging are introduced (Part-I) and then the interactions of orthodontic appliances and magnetic field are farther discussed (Part-II). PMID:27195213

  19. [The prehistory of orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Julien

    2015-06-01

    Orthodontics came into being in 1728. Previously, practitioners were at a loss when confronted with crooked teeth. A Latin philosopher had an ingenious flash of orthodontic inspiration. Other authors were content to either extract the malposed teeth or to modify their shape. However, interest in an approach to preventive orthodontics had now begun. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  20. [APPLICATION OF COMPRESSION MINI-SCREWS IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH INJURY OF ELBOW JOINT BONES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverov, V A; Egorov, K S

    2015-01-01

    A case report presents the experience of application of compression pileateless mini-screws (Gerbert's screws) in treatment of intra-articular fractures, which formed the elbow joint (44 cases). There were performed 32 operations concerning fracture of head of radius, 10 operations on the occasion of fractures of distal section of the humerus and 2 operations on the coronoid process. Long-term treatment results were followed-up in 31 patients during more than 6 months. On basis of analysis of treatment results the authors made a conclusion that the application of mini-screws in case of bone fractures, which formed the elbow joint, allowed realization of stable osteosynthesis after anatomic reposition of articular surfaces, obtaining good anatomical and functional result and shortened the terms of patient's treatment.

  1. Ingestion of an orthodontic archwire resulting in a perforated bowel: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Preeti; Machesney, Michael Robert; Sharma, Pratik K

    2016-09-01

    Accidentally, ingesting components of an orthodontic appliance can result in serious consequences for the patient. This paper presents one such complication, not previously reported, where the patient needed emergency surgery to retrieve part of an orthodontic appliance. This case report highlights the consequences of and possible solutions to prevent patients inhaling or ingesting parts of their appliance.

  2. Allergy and orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Sunitha; Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on allergy in orthodontics and to identify the predisposing factors and the implications of the allergic reaction in the management of patients during orthodontic treatment. A computerized literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published on allergy in relation to orthodontics. The MeSH term used was allergy and orthodontics. Allergic response to alloys in orthodontics, particularly nickel, has been extensively studied and several case reports of nickel-induced contact dermatitis have been documented. Current evidence suggests that the most common allergic reaction reported in orthodontics is related to nickel in orthodontic appliances and allergic response is more common in women due to a previous sensitizing exposure from nickel in jewellery. Studies have implicated allergy in the etiology of hypo-dontia. It has also been considered as a high-risk factor for development of extensive root resorption during the course of orthodontic treatment. This review discusses the relationship and implications of allergy in orthodontics. PMID:24987632

  3. [Preprosthetic orthodontic treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahl-Andersen, B.; Prahl, C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of a preprosthetic orthodontic treatment is to position the teeth in such a way that a treatment with (fixed) dental prostheses is made possible or simplified or to affect the result of this treatment positively. Conceivable preprosthetic orthodontic treatments are: correcting primary

  4. Duration of surgical-orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häll, Birgitta; Jämsä, Tapio; Soukka, Tero; Peltomäki, Timo

    2008-10-01

    To study the duration of surgical-orthodontic treatment with special reference to patients' age and the type of tooth movements, i.e. extraction vs. non-extraction and intrusion before or extrusion after surgery to level the curve of Spee. The material consisted files of 37 consecutive surgical-orthodontic patients. The files were reviewed and gender, diagnosis, type of malocclusion, age at the initiation of treatment, duration of treatment, type of tooth movements (extraction vs. non-extraction and levelling of the curve of Spee before or after operation) and type of operation were retrieved. For statistical analyses two sample t-test, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman rank correlation tests were used. Mean treatment duration of the sample was 26.8 months, of which pre-surgical orthodontics took on average 17.5 months. Patients with extractions as part of the treatment had statistically and clinically significantly longer treatment duration, on average 8 months, than those without extractions. No other studied variable seemed to have an impact on the treatment time. The present small sample size prevents reliable conclusions to be made. However, the findings suggest, and patients should be informed, that extractions included in the treatment plan increase chances of longer duration of surgical-orthodontic treatment.

  5. Implants for orthodontic anchorage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowen; Sun, Yannan; Zhang, Yimei; Cai, Ting; Sun, Feng; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Implantanchorage continues to receive much attention as an important orthodontic anchorage. Since the development of orthodontic implants, the scope of applications has continued to increase. Although multiple reviews detailing implants have been published, no comprehensive evaluations have been performed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of implants based on data published in review articles. An electronic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Ebsco and Sicencedirect for reviews with “orthodontic” and “systematic review or meta analysis” in the title, abstract, keywords, or full text was performed. A subsequent manual search was then performed to identify reviews concerning orthodontic implants. A manual search of the orthodontic journals American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO), European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO), and Angle Othodontist was also performed. Such systematic reviews that evaluated the efficacy and safety of orthodontic implants were used to indicate success rates and molar movements. A total of 23 reviews were included in the analysis. The quality of each review was assessed using a measurement tool for Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR), and the review chosen to summarize outcomes had a quality score of >6. Most reviews were less than moderate quality. Success rates of implants ranged in a broad scope, and movement of the maxillary first molar was superior with implants compared with traditional anchorage. PMID:29595673

  6. 21 CFR 872.5410 - Orthodontic appliance and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5410 Orthodontic appliance and... device includes the preformed orthodontic band, orthodontic band material, orthodontic elastic band...

  7. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  8. Laser diagnostics in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2003-10-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucose membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of measuring system on formation of the speckle-interferometric signal is studied.

  9. Health economic evaluations in orthodontics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollenius, Ola; Petrén, Sofia; Björnsson, Liselotte; Norlund, Anders; Bondemark, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Economic evaluation is assuming increasing importance as an integral component of health services research. To conduct a systematic review of the literature and assess the evidence from studies presenting orthodontic treatment outcomes and the related costs. The literature review was conducted in four steps, according to Goodman's model, in order to identify all studies evaluating economic aspects of orthodontic interventions. The search covered the databases Medline, Cinahl, Cochrane, Embase, Google Scholar, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database, and SCOPUS, for the period from 1966 to September 2014. The inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing at least two different orthodontic interventions, evaluation of both economic and orthodontic outcomes, and study populations of all ages. The quality of each included study was assessed as limited, moderate, or high. The overall evidence was assessed according to the GRADE system (The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). The applied terms for searches yielded 1838 studies, of which 989 were excluded as duplicates. Application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria identified 26 eligible studies for which the full-text versions were retrieved and scrutinized. At the final analysis, eight studies remained. Three studies were based on cost-effectiveness analyses and the other five on cost-minimization analysis. Two of the cost-minimization studies included a societal perspective, i.e. the sum of direct and indirect costs. The aims of most of the studies varied widely and of studies comparing equivalent treatment methods, few were of sufficiently high study quality. Thus, the literature to date provides an inadequate evidence base for economic aspects of orthodontic treatment. This systematic review disclosed that few orthodontic studies have presented both economic and clinical outcomes. There is currently

  10. Biodegradation of orthodontic metallic brackets and associated implications for friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Saulo; Soares, Paulo; Camargo, Elisa S; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando; Maruo, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of clinical exposure on the surface morphology, dimensions, and frictional behavior of metallic orthodontic brackets. Ninety-five brackets, of 3 commercial brands, were retrieved from patients who had finished orthodontic treatment. As-received brackets, matched by type and brand, were used for comparisons. Surface morphology and precipitated material were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis. Bracket dimensions were measured with a measuring microscope. Resistance to sliding on a stainless steel wire was assessed. Retrieved brackets showed surface alterations from corrosion, wear, and plastic deformation, especially in the external slot edges. Film deposition over the alloy surface was observed to a variable extent. The main elements in the film were carbon, oxygen, calcium, and phosphorus. The as-received brackets showed differences (P brackets' slots. The frictional behavior differed among brands. Retrieved brackets of 2 brands showed 10% to 20% increases in resistance to sliding. Metallic brackets undergo significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, possibly with increased friction. At present, it is difficult to predict the impact of these changes on the clinical performance of orthodontic components. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Digital workflows in contemporary orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars R Christensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital workflows are now increasingly possible in orthodontic practice. Workflows designed to improve the customization of orthodontic appliances are now available through laboratories and orthodontic manufacturing facilities in many parts of the world. These now have the potential to improve certain aspects of patient care.

  12. Miniscrew-assisted mandibular molar distalization in a patient with skeletal class-III malocclusion: A clinical case report

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohammadreza Safavi; Farnaz Younessian; Sarvraj Kohli

    2013-01-01

    In nongrowing patients with mild skeletal Class-III malocclusion, premolar extraction or molar distalization in the lower arch can be done as a part of camouflage treatment. Temporary anchorage devices are widely used for this purpose because they do not produce undesirable reciprocal effects and do not depend on the patient′s cooperation. However, most reported cases in this regard have used interradicular miniscrews in the mandibular arch and these have a risk of failure as they can loosen ...

  13. A digital volumetric tomography (DVT study in the mandibular molar region for miniscrew placement during mixed dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur S. Bhattad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess bone thickness for miniscrew placement in the mandible during mixed dentition by using digital volumetric tomograph (DVT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 15 healthy patients aged 8-10 years old, with early exfoliated mandibular second deciduous molar, were included. DVT images of one quadrant of the mandible were obtained using Kodak extraoral imaging systems and analyzed by Kodak dental imaging software. The error of the method (EM was calculated using Dahlberg's formula. Mean and standard deviation were calculated at 6 and 8 mm from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ.Paired t-test was used to analyze the measurements. RESULTS: Buccal cortical bone thickness, mesiodistal width and buccolingual bone depth at 6 mm were found to be 1.73 + 0.41, 2.15 + 0.49 and 13.18 + 1.22 mm, respectively; while at 8 mm measurements were 2.42 + 0.34, 2.48 + 0.33 and 13.65 + 1.25 mm, respectively. EM for buccal cortical bone thickness, mesiodistal width and buccolingual bone depth was 0.58, 0.40 and 0.48, respectively. The difference in measurement at 6 and 8 mm for buccal cortical plate thickness (P 0.05. CONCLUSION: Bone thickness measurement has shown promising evidence for safe placement of miniscrews in the mandible during mixed dentition. The use of miniscrew is the best alternative, even in younger patients.

  14. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Mohanlal Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report demonstrates an orthodontic method that offers short treatment time and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 23-year-old female with Angle′s Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion with periodontal pocket with 31 and reduced thickness of the buccal cortical plate of lower anteriors, requested shortened orthodontic treatment time. This surgery technique included buccal full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the case was completed in approximately 7 months and 3 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of patient revealed good results. Preexisting thin labial bony cortical plate with lower anteriors was covered. This finding suggests credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon.

  15. Cephalometry in orthodontic practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theunissen, J.J.W.; Terlingen, P.J.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Cephalometry is applied in orthodontic practice to: - obtain information on the growth of the skull - assist diagnosis of the relationship between the jaws and abnormalities in dentition - evaluate the results of treatment. The course of the diagnostic procedure with the aid of the Ricketts analysis and evaluation of the treatment results using five superimpositions is demonstrated by means of two examples. (Auth.)

  16. Orthodontic-periodontal interactions: Orthodontic extrusion in interdisciplinary regenerative treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Kaitsas, Roberto

    2018-06-01

    Orthodontics is a periodontal treatment. "Guided orthodontic regeneration" (GOR) procedures use orthodontic movements in perio-restorative patients. The GOR technique includes a guided orthodontic "soft tissue" regeneration (GOTR) and a guided orthodontic "bone" regeneration (GOBR) with a plastic soft tissue approach and a regenerating reality. The increased amount of soft tissue gained with orthodontic movement can be used for subsequent periodontal regenerative techniques. The increased amount of bone can as well improve primary implant stability and, eventually, simplify a GTR technique to regenerate soft tissues, to restore tooth with external resorption in aesthetic zone or to extract a tooth to create new hard-soft tissue for adjacent teeth. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires: Progress in their knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontics, is quickly increasing the demand for treatments with a very low aesthetic impact in the social life. More and more adult patients want satisfy their necessity to have a beautiful smile, with “invisible” appliances. Numerous are the opportunities to perform an aesthetic orthodontic treatment such as lingual orthodontics, clear aligners or clear labial orthodontics. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires are a component of clear labial orthodontics together with aestheti...

  18. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  19. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiekwe, G I; Oguchi, C O; daCosta, O O; Utomi, I L

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial orthodontics has been shown to be a critical component of the care of patients with craniofacial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions and clinical experience in cleft and craniofacial care, of orthodontic residents in Nigeria. Questionnaires were sent out to orthodontic residents in the six Postgraduate Orthodontic Training Centers in the country at that time. The questionnaires were self-administered and covered areas in beliefs in cleft care and the clinical experience and challenges faced by the residents in the provision of craniofacial orthodontic care at their various institutions. Thirty-three respondents returned completed questionnaires, with a response rate of 97%. All the respondents believed that residents should be involved in cleft and craniofacial care. Postnatal counseling was the clinical procedure in which the residents reported the highest level of clinical experience (47.4%). The least clinical experience was recorded in pre-bone graft orthodontics (7.4%) and orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery (5.5%). Some of the challenges highlighted by the residents were low patients turn out for orthodontic care and the absence of multidisciplinary treatment for craniofacial patients in their centers. Orthodontic residents in Nigeria believe that they should be involved in the management of patients with craniofacial anomalies and cleft lip and palate. However, majority of the residents have limited clinical experience in the management of these patients. A lot more needs to be done, to expose orthodontic residents in training, to all aspects of the orthodontic and multidisciplinary team care required for the cleft/craniofacial patient.

  20. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  1. Mini-screws, a viable adjunct along with Incognito lingual appliance: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Invisible orthodontics have been around for too long, and with the advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology appliances such as Incognito TM has made the whole treatment experience more pleasant and aesthetic. However, even in lingual orthodontics, biomechanics play the most important role, and the use of temporary anchorage devices (TADs has made the whole treatment more effective and efficient. This article focuses on cases where TADs in lingual appliances play a critical role in the treatment of various malocclusions.

  2. The 100 top-cited articles in orthodontics from 1975 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jifang; Han, Zongkai; Geng, Guannan; Yan, Weijun; Shao, Ping

    2013-05-01

    To identify the 100 top-cited articles published in orthodontics journals and to analyze their characteristics to investigate the achievement and development of orthodontics research in past decades. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge Database and the 2011 Journal Citation Report Science Editions were used to retrieve the 100 top-cited articles published in orthodontics journals since 1975. Some basic information was collected by the Analyze Tool on the Web of Science, including citation time, publication title, journal name, publication year, and country and institution of origin. A further study was then performed to determine authorship, article type, field of study, study design, and level of evidence. The 100 target articles were retrieved from three journals: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (n  =  74), The Angle Orthodontist (n = 15), and European Journal of Orthodontics (n  =  11). Since 1975, the articles cited 89 to 545 times mainly originated from the United States, and the overwhelming majority of articles were clinical. The most common study design was case series; 40 articles were classified as level IV and 12 as level V evidence. The 100 top-cited articles in orthodontics are generally old articles, rarely possessing high-level evidence.

  3. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolski F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. Keywords: tooth movement, pain control, drug therapy, laser therapy

  4. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  5. Periodontic and orthodontic treatment in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marianne M A; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an update of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics in adults. Specific areas reviewed are the reaction of periodontal tissue to orthodontic forces, the influence of tooth movement on the periodontium, the effect of circumferential supracrestal fiberotomy in preventing orthodontic relapse, the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, microbiology associated with orthodontic bands, and mucogingival and esthetic considerations. In addition, the relationship between orthodontics and implants (eg, using dental implants for orthodontic anchorage) is discussed.

  6. Nonsurgical correction of a Class III malocclusion in an adult by miniscrew-assisted mandibular dentition distalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yan; Han, Xianglong; Guo, Yongwen; Li, Jingyu; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    This article reports the successful use of miniscrews in the mandible to treat a 20-year-old Mongolian woman with a chief complaint of anterior crossbite. The patient had a skeletal Class III malocclusion with a mildly protrusive mandible, an anterior crossbite, and a deviated midline. In light of the advantages for reconstruction of the occlusal plane and distal en-masse movement of the mandibular arch, we used a multiloop edgewise archwire in the initial stage. However, the maxillary incisors were in excessive labioversion accompanied by little retraction of the mandibular incisors; these results were obviously not satisfying after 4 months of multiloop edgewise archwire treatment. Two miniscrews were subsequently implanted vertically in the external oblique ridge areas of the bilateral mandibular ramus as skeletal anchorage for en-masse distalization of the mandibular dentition. During treatment, the mandibular anterior teeth were retracted about 4.0 mm without negative lingual inclinations. The movement of the mandibular first molar was almost bodily translation. The maxillary incisors maintained good inclinations by rotating their brackets 180° along with the outstanding performance of the beta-titanium wire. The patient received a harmonious facial balance, an attractive smile, and ideal occlusal relationships. The outcome was stable after 1 year of retention. Our results suggest that the application of miniscrews in the posterior area of the mandible is an effective approach for Class III camouflage treatment. This technique requires minimal compliance and is particularly useful for correcting Class III patients with mild mandibular protrusion and minor crowding. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lingual orthodontic education: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Kanta Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing demand for lingual orthodontics, the technique is not very popular among the orthodontists in general. Lingual orthodontics differs from the conventional labial technique in all aspects. Lack of comprehensive training in this field is a major obstacle in popularizing this science of invisible orthodontics. At present, short-term courses and part-time degree programs are the means to learn this technique and the demand for more comprehensive lingual orthodontic education is on a rise among orthodontists. Lingual orthodontics as a super specialty discipline with full-time residency program can be a step forward. This will groom orthodontists to acquire the finest skills to finish lingual cases but also help to the science to grow with dedicated research work.

  8. Clear aligners in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, T

    2017-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Tooth Positioner (TP Orthodontics) in 1944, removable appliances analogous to clear aligners have been employed for mild to moderate orthodontic tooth movements. Clear aligner therapy has been a part of orthodontic practice for decades, but has, particularly since the introduction of Invisalign appliances (Align Technology) in 1998, become an increasingly common addition to the orthodontic armamentarium. An internet search reveals at least 27 different clear aligner products currently on offer for orthodontic treatment. The present paper will highlight the increasing popularity of clear aligner appliances, as well as the clinical scope and the limitations of aligner therapy in general. Further, the paper will outline the differences between the various types of clear aligner products currently available. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Correction of a Class III malocclusion with over 20 mm of space to close in the maxilla by using miniscrews for extra anchorage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuning, K.H.

    2008-01-01

    Unilateral closure of maxillary extraction spaces in patients with Class III malocclusion can be challenging. This case report describes the closure of first premolar and first molar extraction spaces in a patient with a Class III dental relationship. Two miniscrews were used for intraoral skeletal

  10. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    Objective: To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. Materials and Methods: The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European

  11. Current advances in orthodontic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Wang, Yan; Jian, Fan; Liao, Li-Na; Yang, Xin; Lai, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic pain is an inflammatory pain that is initiated by orthodontic force-induced vascular occlusion followed by a cascade of inflammatory responses, including vascular changes, the recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells, and the release of neurogenic and pro-inflammatory mediators. Ultimately, endogenous analgesic mechanisms check the inflammatory response and the sensation of pain subsides. The orthodontic pain signal, once received by periodontal sensory endings, reaches the sensory cortex for pain perception through three-order neurons: the trigeminal neuron at the trigeminal ganglia, the trigeminal nucleus caudalis at the medulla oblongata and the ventroposterior nucleus at the thalamus. Many brain areas participate in the emotion, cognition and memory of orthodontic pain, including the insular cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. A built-in analgesic neural pathway—periaqueductal grey and dorsal raphe—has an important role in alleviating orthodontic pain. Currently, several treatment modalities have been applied for the relief of orthodontic pain, including pharmacological, mechanical and behavioural approaches and low-level laser therapy. The effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief has been validated, but its effects on tooth movement are controversial. However, more studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of other modalities. Furthermore, gene therapy is a novel, viable and promising modality for alleviating orthodontic pain in the future. PMID:27341389

  12. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Gritsch

    Full Text Available The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone. Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period, and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period. No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1 or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05. In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  13. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  14. Effects of pilot holes on longitudinal miniscrew stability and bony adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Lauren Ohlenforst; Campbell, Phillip M; Spears, Robert; Ceen, Richard F; Melo, Ana Cláudia; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to longitudinally evaluate the effects of pilot holes on miniscrew implant (MSI) stability and to determine whether the effects can be attributed to the quality or the quantity of bone surrounding the MSI. Using a randomized split-mouth design in 6 skeletally mature female foxhound-mix dogs, 17 MSIs (1.6 mm outer diameter) placed with pilot holes (1.1 mm) were compared with 17 identical MSIs placed without pilot holes. Implant stability quotient measurements of MSI stability were taken weekly for 7 weeks. Using microcomputed tomography with an isotropic resolution of 6 μm, bone volume fractions were measured for 3 layers of bone (6-24, 24-42, and 42-60 μm) surrounding the MSIs. At placement, the MSIs with pilot holes showed significantly (P holes (48.3 vs 47.5). Over time, the implant stability quotient values decreased significantly more for the MSIs placed with pilot holes than for those placed without pilot holes. After 7 weeks, the most coronal aspect of the 6- to 24-μm layer of cortical bone and the most coronal aspects of all 3 layers of trabecular bone showed significantly larger bone volume fractions for the MSIs placed without pilot holes than for those placed with pilot holes. MSIs placed with pilot holes show greater primary stability, but greater decreases in stability over time, due primarily to having less trabecular bone surrounding them. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Eldad Sharon; Revital Sharabi; Adi Eden; Asher Zabrovsky; Gilad Ben-Gal; Esi Sharon; Yoav Pietrokovski; Yael Houri-Haddad; Nurit Beyth

    2018-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacter...

  16. Does common prescription medication affect the rate of orthodontic tooth movement? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrygiannakis, Militiadis A; Kaklamanos, Eleftherios G; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2018-03-06

    As the taking of any medication may theoretically affect the complex pathways responsible for periodontal tissue homeostasis and the events leading to orthodontic tooth movement, it is considered important for the orthodontist to be able to identify prospective patients' history and patterns of pharmaceutical consumption. To systematically investigate and appraise the quality of the available evidence regarding the effect of commonly prescribed medications on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Search without restrictions in eight databases and hand searching until June 2017. Controlled studies investigating the effect of commonly prescribed medications with emphasis on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Following study retrieval and selection, relevant data was extracted and the risk of bias was assessed using the SYRCLE's Risk of Bias Tool. Twenty-seven animal studies, involving various pharmacologic and orthodontic interventions, were finally identified. Most studies were assessed to be at unclear or high risk of bias. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement was shown to increase after the administration of diazepam, Vitamin C and pantoprazole, while simvastatin, atorvastatin, calcium compounds, strontium ranelate, propranolol, losartan, famotidine, cetirizine, and metformin decreased the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. No interference with the rate of orthodontic tooth movement was reported for phenytoin, phenobarbital and zinc compounds, whereas, inconsistent or conflicting effects were noted after the administration of L-thyroxine, lithium compounds, fluoxetine and insulin. The quality of the available evidence was considered at best as low. Commonly prescribed medications may exhibit variable effects on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Although the quality of evidence was considered at best as low, raising reservations about the strength of the relevant recommendations, the clinician should be capable of identifying patients taking

  17. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  18. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire?bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are c...

  19. Treatment of Angle Class I Malocclusion with Severe Bimaxillary Protrusion using Miniscrew Implants and Periodontal Ligament Distraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Prabhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion is common in Asian population. In this patient with procumbent upper and lower lips, excessive lip strain, proclined and protruded maxillary and mandibular incisors with vertical growth pattern, an acceptable treatment result, was achieved with 4-first-premolar extractions. This case report is presented with the aim, to describe the treatment approach for bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion using miniscrew implants for anchorage in upper arch and periodontal ligament distraction for canine retraction in lower arch and then retraction of incisors into the newly formed bone distal to lateral incisor. Treatment was completed in 18 months. The patient profile was improved, with reduction in lip procumbency, decrease in lip eversion and protrusion, and decrease mentalis strain. Dentally, the interincisal angulation improved significantly because both the maxillary and mandibular incisors were uprighted after space closer.

  20. [Root resorption and orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbar, M; Bourzgui, F

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of root resorption during and at the end of orthodontic treatment and to assess its relationship with age, sex and treatment with or without extractions. Our study included 82 patients (51 women and 31 men) aged between 6 and 38 years, who received orthodontic treatment. Evaluation of root resorption was performed on panoramics at the beginning and at the end of orthodontic treatment. All the teeth were observed. The degree of root resorption was increased respectively by the standards in four ordinal levels (4). Data analysis was performed by Epi Info 6.0. Root resorption was present in all the teeth and maxillary incisors are the most affected. The correlation between age and root resorption was significant (p = 0.008). Women were more affected by resorption (P = 0.002). Patients treated with extraction showed more root resorption (p = 0.12). Our results suggest that orthodontic treatment is involved in the development of root resorption. The most often teeth resorbed are maxillary incisors. Age, sex and orthodontic extractions can be considered as risk factors for root resorption.

  1. Orthodontic parotitis: a rare complication from an orthodontic appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Eileen; Cobb, Alistair R M

    2012-12-01

    A case is presented of a 14-year-old female undergoing orthodontic fixed appliance treatment who presented with right facial swelling in the parotid region. An initial diagnosis of acute infective parotitis was made by her primary care clinician. However, after clinical examination and ultrasonographic imaging, a diagnosis of salivary stasis secondary to inflammatory occlusion of Stensen's ductal orifice was made. The ductal orifice had been traumatized by the adjacent orthodontic appliance. This has not been described before in the literature. The differential diagnosis of parotid enlargement in children is discussed.

  2. The World of Orthodontic apps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of the portable electronic devices such as the smartphones and handheld tablets has increased over the years, and this is true in the health-care industry also. This is because of the development of various patient management softwares. The use of apps to manage, educate, and inform patient is not uncommon among orthodontists nowadays. The aim of this article was to review the various apps available on the Google Play Store and iOS Apple Store for orthodontists and patients. Four smartphones using orthodontically relevant keywords such as orthodontics, orthodontists, and braces were searched and reviewed in detail. Out of the 354 orthodontically relevant apps available in both Android and Apple operating systems, the apps could be categorized as orthodontist-related apps or patient-related apps. Under these categories they could be further classified as practice managements apps, patient education apps, model analysis apps, tooth material calculators, patient reminder apps, etc.

  3. Metal Hypersensitivity in Orthodontic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Maheshwari Sanjeev K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment of individuals with metal hypersensitivity is a matter of concern for the orthodontist. Orthodontic appliances contain metals like Nickel, Cobalt and Chromium etc. Metals may cause allergic reactions and are known as allergens. Reaction to these metals is due to biodegradation of metals in the oral cavity. This may lead to the formation of corrosion products and their exposure to the patient. Nickel is the most common metal to cause hypersensitivity reaction. Chromium ranks second among the metals, known to trigger allergic reactions. The adverse biological reactions to these metals may include hypersensitivity, dermatitis and asthma. In addition, a significant carcinogenic and mutagenic potential has been demonstrated. The orthodontist must be familiar with the best possible alternative treatment modalities to provide the safest, most effective care possible in these cases. The present article focuses on the issue of metal hypersensitivity and its management in orthodontic

  4. Myths and realities in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P S; Springate, S D; Chate, R A C

    2015-02-16

    Comprehensive orthodontic treatment typically comprises an initial phase of alignment over a period of four to six months, followed by vertical, transverse and antero-posterior corrections, space closure, finishing and detailing to enhance dental and facial aesthetics and function. Each course of treatment involves a series of decisions and alternatives relating to objectives, appliance design and treatment mechanics. In recent years there has been increasing interest in short-term approaches to treatment with more limited objectives and the avoidance of phases traditionally considered integral to successful treatment. In this review the veracity of accepted truths in orthodontics are discussed; specifically, the importance of initial molar relationship, final incisor relationship, the merits of orthodontic extractions, anticipated treatment times, the value of modern fixed appliance systems, the importance of torque expression and the relative merits of bonded retainers and inter-proximal reduction are considered.

  5. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  6. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf MOOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17, and various comparisons were performed using the chi-square test. The study revealed that there was a statistically significant association in CPITN scores between the orthodontic and non-orthodontic patients (p < 0.01. The study showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment have increased plaque accumulation and probing depth resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Proper oral hygiene practices and interdental aids should be employed to control plaque.

  7. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients' periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  8. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannan Aous

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients′ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  9. Orthodontics at a Pivotal Point of Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The profession of orthodontics is projected to face a multitude of challenges. Do cyclic forces accelerate the rate of tooth movement and hence the speed of orthodontic treatment? Would bioengineered cementum and dentine be a solution to root resorption? What would orthodontics be like when bioengineered periodontal ligament and alveolar bone become clinical practice, or one day, entire teeth are bioengineered? Would it be possible to selectively differentiate stem cells into osteoblasts or osteoclasts by either static or cyclic forces? What is the new demand on orthodontic expertise with increasingly automated appliances? What will be the impact of the next generation of dental implants or rapid prototyped crowns on orthodontics? A century ago, Edward Angle’s practice of fixed appliances, along with other seminal contributions, such as functional appliances, established the profession of orthodontics. Today, the biophysical principles of orthodontics remain largely unchanged from Angle’s era, despite incremental refinements of brackets and wires. The paucity of fundamental innovations in orthodontics for decades presents intrinsic risks for the profession. This review will identify challenges for contemporary orthodontics and delineate strategies for the profession to evolve in an era of unprecedented scientific and technological advances, and serve as a call to action for the orthodontic profession. PMID:25018618

  10. Patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Renske; Bos, Annemieke; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the expectations of children and their primary care-givers towards orthodontic treatment and to compare the results with those of a UK sample. A questionnaire survey of children and their primary care-givers attending for their first consultation. The Department of Orthodontics at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), the Netherlands. A total of 168 subjects (84 patients and 84 parents) completed the questionnaire. The children were aged 10 to 14 years. The responses of the children and parents and differences between boys and girls were examined using parametric statistical methods. The data from the Dutch sample were compared with a similar UK sample. Patients and parents shared similar expectations of orthodontic treatment, with the exception of expectations of having a brace fitted at the first appointment, orthodontic treatment involving headgear, any problems with orthodontic treatment, duration of orthodontic treatment and concerning reactions from the public. Among the child participants, boys and girls only differed in their expectations of orthodontic treatment involving jaw surgery. Differences between Dutch and English participants were found regarding the first visit, type of orthodontic treatment, reactions from the public, and pain and problems with orthodontic treatment. Since the expectations of patients and their parents differ on several aspects, effective communication between the orthodontist, patient and parent is considered to be essential. Our hypothesis that Dutch patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment differ from the expectations of English patients and parents was supported.

  11. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  12. Myofunctional orthodontic for growth child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal growth and development is a concern for every parent! If your child’s teeth are not straight, facial growth and development could also be affected. Current orthodontic treatment can damage teeth, restrict jaw growth and usually is not a stable result. Most importantly, braces and extractions do not address the real causes of crooked teeth and quite often once they are removed, the teeth crowd up again. Studies have shown that teeth will have a tendency to change their positions after treatment hence the potential need for lifetime retainers with traditional orthodontics. Our orthodontic treatment uses myofunctional techniques to address the poor oral habits (known as myofunctional habits that are the real, underlying causes of crooked teeth and uses light, intermittent forces to align the teeth. Myofunctional orthodontic techniques have been practiced by Orthodontists and Dentists around the world for over 25 years. This is done through the use of a series of removable dental appliances that are worn for just 1-2 hours each day and overnight while sleeping. In traditional adult orthodontic treatment, certain factors can contribute to less stable results and likely long term or permanent retainers being required if poor oral habits have not been corrected. Orofacial Myofunctional therapy is a profound process used to address the improper function of the tongue and facial muscles used at rest. Treatment may help address the symptoms of a a wide variety of health issues, ranging from opening airways, to treating headaches, Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD, and poor digestion just to name a few. Myofunctional therapy is the “neuromuscular re-education or re-patterning of the oral and facial muscles”. The therapy includes facial and tongue exercises and techniques that modify the poor habits that affect proper tongue position, improved breathing, chewing, and swallowing.

  13. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  14. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    OpenAIRE

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opi...

  15. Versatile Auxiliary Orthodontic Spring for Orthodontic Correction of Impacted Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion such as impacted tooth is not uncommon. Many approaches with various auxiliary springs have been reported in literature till date for correction of such malocclusions. They had biomechanical, retentive and stability drawbacks inherent in their designs. This article presents the innovative approach for orthodontic correction of impacted tooth, especially with light force appliance, i.e. Begg′s appliance, where round wires in round molar tubes are used throughout treatment. A versatile auxiliary orthodontic spring (VAOS is fabricated in the 0.018 inch Australian stainless steel round wire, which may be anchored on round molar buccal tube, and desirable force vector may be applied in any of the three dimensions. Fabrication and its clinical application are discussed.

  16. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Foreign Body Retrieval Foreign body retrieval is the removal of ... foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves the removal of ...

  17. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    The paper touches upon indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Different conceptions of what subject indexing means are described as a basis for defining an operational subject indexing strategy for images. The methodology is based on the art historian Erwin Panofsky......), special knowledge about image codes, and special knowledge about history of ideas. The semiologist Roland Barthes has established a semiology for pictorial expressions based on advertising photos. Barthes uses the concepts denotation/connotation where denotations can be explained as the sober expression...

  18. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  19. Pain and Tissue Damage in Response to Orthodontic Tooth Movement: Are They Correlated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuoghi, Osmar A; Topolski, Francielle; de Faria, Lorraine P; de Mendonça, Marcos R

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the correlation between pain and tissue damage in response to orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), such as hyalinization and external apical root resorption (EARR). The literature review was used as a methodological strategy, following the knowledge development process - constructivist (ProKnow-C). Study axes were defined and keywords that best represented each axis were selected. The terms were submitted to an adherence test and validation, resulting in 12 keyword combinations. Searches were carried out in the most representative databases for the selected terms, without restriction as for language or publication dates. Retrieved studies were filtered using the EndNote X6 program and classified according to analysis of title, abstract, and keywords. The final portfolio of articles was submitted to bibliometric and systematic analysis. A total of 1,091 studies were retrieved, out of which 719 were repeated and 335 were removed in the classification stage. A total of 37 articles remained in the final portfolio. Only one article was in line with the purpose of this study, indicating absence of correlation between pain and EARR in response to OTM. Further studies are necessary to confirm whether orthodontic pain might serve as a criterion for the use of appropriate mechanical forces, contributing to minimize tissue damage following OTM. This article presents a systematic literature review, in which scientific evidence of the correlation between pain and tissue damage during orthodontic movement was studied, providing a scientific answer for the following question: Is pain reported by patients associated with application of inappropriate orthodontic force? Thus, it aims at aiding the orthodontist in the definition of clinical parameters for the use of optimal orthodontic force.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress for Miniscrew Implant Proximal to Root Under Occlusal Force and Implant Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Li-Hua; Guo, Na; Zhou, Guan-jun; Qie, Hui; Li, Chen-Xi; Lu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Because of the narrow interradicular spaces and varying oral anatomies of individual patients, there is a very high risk of root proximity during the mini implants inserting. The authors hypothesized that normal occlusal loading and implant loading affected the stability of miniscrew implants placed in proximity or contact with the adjacent root. The authors implemented finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the effectiveness of root proximity and root contact. Stress distribution in the bone was assessed at different degrees of root proximity by generating 4 finite element models: the implant touches the root surface, the implant was embedded in the periodontal membrane, the implant touches the periodontal surface, and the implant touches nothing. Finite element analysis was then carried out with simulations of 2 loading conditions for each model: condition A, involving only tooth loading and condition B, involving both tooth and implant loading. Under loading condition A, the maximum stress on the bone for the implant touching the root was the distinctly higher than that for the other models. For loading condition B, peak stress areas for the implant touching the root were the area around the neck of the mini implant and the point of the mini implant touches the root. The results of this study suggest that normal occlusal loading and implant loading contribute to the instability of the mini implant when the mini implant touches the root.

  1. Medical emergencies in a dental office: inhalation and ingestion of orthodontic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Leon; Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Aizenbud, Dror

    2011-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature regarding inhalation and ingestion of orthodontic appliances and suggest ways to manage and prevent these events. The authors conducted literature searches of free text and Medical Subject Headings terms by using PubMed and Embase databases and selected appropriate studies. They analyzed retrieved articles according to several parameters: inhalation or ingestion event, number of cases, patient's sex and age, type of orthodontic appliance, in-office event or out-of-office event, and medical treatment. The authors found a total of 2,279 articles in their preliminary search. Eighteen reports of 24 cases from this search met all of the search criteria (that is, clinical studies, case reports or reviews limited to English, Hebrew or Arabic on any form of aspiration or inhalation of orthodontic appliances). Most cases (67 percent) involved ingested objects, and of those cases, the majority (57 percent) occurred in female patients. Most cases (85 percent) occurred outside the orthodontist's office. Seventeen patients (71 percent) had been treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance. In 60 percent of cases, the maxilla was involved. With one exception, no severe complications were reported (only seven patients were examined in a hospital emergency department), and patients were discharged uneventfully from the orthodontic office or emergency department. Orthodontists and team members should participate in medical emergency management courses that emphasize the use of guidelines in cases of inhalation or ingestion of orthodontic objects. Each orthodontist's office should develop written emergency protocols for out-of-office events and present them to patients and their parents at the start of treatment.

  2. Records needed for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robine J Rischen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditionally, dental models, facial and intra-oral photographs and a set of two-dimensional radiographs are used for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. As evidence is lacking, the discussion is ongoing which specific records are needed for the process of making an orthodontic treatment plan. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the contribution and importance of different diagnostic records for making an orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. DATA SOURCES: An electronic search in PubMed (1948-July 2012, EMBASE Excerpta Medica (1980-July 2012, CINAHL (1982-July 2012, Web of Science (1945-July 2012, Scopus (1996-July 2012, and Cochrane Library (1993-July 2012 was performed. Additionally, a hand search of the reference lists of included studies was performed to identify potentially eligible studies. There was no language restriction. STUDY SELECTION: The patient, intervention, comparator, outcome (pico question formulated for this study was as follows: for patients who need orthodontic treatment (P, will the use of record set X (I compared with record set Y (C change the treatment plan (O? Only primary publications were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Independent extraction of data and quality assessment was performed by two observers. RESULTS: Of the 1041 publications retrieved, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 4 studies were of high quality. Because of the limited number of high quality studies and the differences in study designs, patient characteristics, and reference standard or index test, a meta-analysis was not possible. CONCLUSION: Cephalograms are not routinely needed for orthodontic treatment planning in Class II malocclusions, digital models can be used to replace plaster casts, and cone-beam computed tomography radiographs can be indicated for impacted canines. Based on the findings of this review, the minimum record set required for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning could not be defined. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

  3. Changes in the surface roughness and friction coefficient of orthodontic bracket slots before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomo; Lin, Jiuxiang; Ding, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the surface roughness of bracket slots and the friction coefficient between the bracket and the stainless steel archwire before and after orthodontic treatment. There were four experimental groups: groups 1 and 2 were 3M new and retrieved brackets, respectively, and groups 3 and 4 were BioQuick new and retrieved brackets, respectively. All retrieved brackets were taken from patients with the first premolar extraction and using sliding mechanics to close the extraction space. The surface roughness of specimens was evaluated using an optical interferometry profilometer, which is faster and nondestructive compared with a stylus profilometer, and provided a larger field, needing no sample preparation, compared with atomic force microscopy. Orthodontic treatment resulted in significant increases in surface roughness and coefficient of friction for both brands of brackets. However, there was no significant difference by brand for new or retrieved brackets. These retrieval analysis results highlight the necessity of reevaluating the properties and clinical behavior of brackets during treatment to make appropriate treatment decisions. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 21 CFR 872.5500 - Extraoral orthodontic headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral orthodontic headgear. 872.5500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5500 Extraoral orthodontic headgear. (a) Identification. An extraoral orthodontic headgear is a device intended for use with an orthodontic appliance to...

  5. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  6. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, Nicky A; Hickman, Joy; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mattick, Rye Cr; Millett, Declan T; Worthington, Helen V

    2018-04-09

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2003. A new full search was conducted on 26 September 2017 but no new studies were identified. We have only updated the search methods section in this new version. The conclusions of this Cochrane Review remain the same. To evaluate the effects of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 26 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 26 September 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 26 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 26 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in

  7. Age effect on orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of age on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement based on critical literature reviews, studies on a standardized orthodontic animal model and a non-invasive clinical investigation. A systematic review was performed on the optimum force for

  8. Dentistry's oldest specialty: orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) has 15,500 members worldwide and is the oldest and largest of the recognized dental specialties. A strategic planning process has identified six key challenges, and this article describes the progress that is being made in the areas of (a) consumer education, (b) volunteer leadership development, (c) recruitment and retention of orthodontic educators, (d) relationships with ADA and other healthcare organizations, (e) the AAO's role in international orthodontics, and (f) advocacy. The AAO is working for freedom of choice in dental healthcare providers; fee-for-service dental care; orthodontic insurance coverage as a benefit of employment, with direct reimbursement as the preferred plan; self-referred access to specialists; private and public funding that promote quality orthodontic care; and the retention of tax deductibility of dental healthcare benefits, including orthodontic care.

  9. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. [Evidence-based quality assessment of 10-year orthodontic clinical trials in 4 major dental journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-nan; Lei, Fei-fei; Cao, Yan-li; Fu, Min-kui

    2010-02-01

    To assess the quality of orthodontic clinical trials published in 4 major dental journals in the past 10 years and establish the reference standard for orthodontic clinical trials and quality control of dental journals. All the clinical trials published in Chinese Journal of Stomatology, West China Journal of Stomatology, Journal of Practice Stomatology and Chinese Journal of Orthodontics from 1999 to 2008 were searched. The demographic information of the papers was extracted and the quality of the clinical trials according to the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT) was assessed. Four hundred and ninety-four clinical trials were retrieved, and 21.3% (105/494) of them were supported by grants. For the study design, only 26.1% (129/494) were prospective studies, and 3.8% (19/494) were randomized clinical trials. It was hard to evaluate precisely due to the lack of information about the details of the study designs. For the randomized clinical trials, the lack of details for randomization, allocation concealment, blinding and intention to treat compromised the quality. The general quality of clinical trials in orthodontics is poor. It needs to be improved both in the clinical study design and the paper writing.

  11. Evaluation and Comparison of Accuracy of Measuring the Position of Miniscrew Implants using Two-dimensional Orthopantomogram and a Three-dimensional Imaging with Direct Method on Dried Skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R H Kamble

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Ortopantomogram shows more variations on linear and angular measurements as compared to direct method and 3D radiography whereas direct method and 3D radiography show no difference. But, we can calculate the angulations of miniscrew implant placement by angular regression model.

  12. [Presurgical orthodontics for facial asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrère, H

    2003-03-01

    As with the treatment of all facial deformities, orthodontic pre-surgical preparation for facial asymmetry should aim at correcting severe occlusal discrepancies not solely on the basis of a narrow occlusal analysis but also in a way that will not disturb the proposed surgical protocol. In addition, facial asymmetries require specific adjustments, difficult to derive and to apply because of their inherent atypical morphological orientation of both alveolar and basal bony support. Three treated cases illustrate different solutions to problems posed by pathological torque: this torque must be considered with respect to proposed surgical changes, within the framework of their limitations and their possible contra-indications.

  13. [A call for qualitative research in Orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitschaky, O; Hofnung, T; Zini, A

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research is an umbrella term for an array of attitudes and strategies for conducting inquiries that are aimed at discerning how human beings understand, experience, and interpret the social world. It is employed in many different academic disciplines most particularly in the social sciences and humanities, however recently more and more qualitative research is being conducted under the medical sciences including dentistry and orthodontics. This is due to its nature of in-depth investigation, which can provide answers to questions that cannot be satisfactorily answered using quantitative methods alone. The aims of this article are to discuss the characteristics of qualitative research, to review the orthodontic English literature, and to highlight the advantages of qualitative research in orthodontics. The literature review yielded several important conclusions regarding qualitative research in orthodontics: 1. most of the qualitative research done in orthodontics chose to use semi structured in-depth interviews for data collection; 2. qualitative research highlights aspects that are very important, and sometimes crucial to everyday practice and long term treatment; 3. there is a lack of qualitative studies in the field of orthodontics. Taking into account the nature of the orthodontic treatment, which is a prolonged one, demanding of a good orthodontist-patient rapport, and a wide perspective on behalf of the clinician, filling the gap in the discipline through conducting more qualitative studies aimed at understanding the point of view of the patient, as well as that of the clinician, may be beneficial for the improvement of the treatment.

  14. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  15. Orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cássio Volponi; Saraiva, Luciana; Bauer, Flávio Paim Falcão; Kimura, Rui Yoshio; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; Bernardo, Carlos Cheque; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Pustiglioni, Francisco Emílio

    2018-04-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is a condition that promotes breakdown of the periodontal tissues in a short time. In severe cases, pathologic migration of teeth and tooth loss can occur, producing esthetic and functional problems for the patient. Orthodontic treatment may be recommended to restore esthetics and masticatory function. We assessed the effects of orthodontic movement in the periodontal tissues of treated patients with AP. Ten subjects (ages 25.0 ± 5.22 years) with AP received periodontal treatment followed by orthodontic treatment. Maintenance sessions were performed monthly under a strict dental biofilm control. They were compared with 10 periodontally healthy subjects (ages 22.9 ± 5.23 years) who received orthodontic treatment. Probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and dental plaque index were measured at baseline, after orthodontic treatment, and after 4 months. Statistical analysis showed improvement in all clinical parameters between baseline and 4 months after orthodontic treatment: probing pocket depth (0.29 mm), clinical attachment level (0.38 mm), bleeding on probing (4.0%), and dental plaque index (11%). The periodontal parameters of the AP patients remained stable during orthodontic treatment under strict biofilm control. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Eldad; Sharabi, Revital; Eden, Adi; Zabrovsky, Asher; Ben-Gal, Gilad; Sharon, Esi; Pietrokovski, Yoav; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Beyth, Nurit

    2018-03-27

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacterial outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of orthodontic cement containing QPEI nanoparticles in reducing S. mutans and Lactobacillus casei outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of extracted lower incisors. The antibacterial effect on S. mutans and L. casei outgrowth of Neobond bracket adhesive orthodontic cement with and without QPEI nanoparticles was compared. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using crystal violet staining and bacterial count (CFU/mL). The teeth in the experimental group, with the QPEI nanoparticles cement, showed significantly lower optical density (OD) values and CFU counts of S. mutans and L. casei than the teeth in the control group ( p brackets.

  17. The evolution of cephalometric diagnosis in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Barbosa Guerra da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although the development of CT have represented a landmark in diagnostic imaging, its use in Dentistry turned out very discretely over the years. With the appearance of programs for analysis of three-dimensional images, specific for Orthodontics and Orthognathic surgery, a new reality is being built. OBJECTIVE: The authors of this study aim to inform the orthodontic society of fundamentals about digital cephalometric radiographic image and computed tomography, discussing about: Field of view (FOV, radiation doses, demands for the use in Orthodontics and radiographic simulations.

  18. [Application of holistic integrative medicine in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L

    2017-08-09

    Holistic integrative medicine (HIM) is a new medical knowledge system, which is formed based on the theory of HIM. HIM treats people as a whole by combining the results of basic medical research, clinical practice and clinical research during the treatment process. The concept of HIM runs through the education and treatment of orthodontics. HIM is the trending norm of both modern medicine and orthodontics. This review is about the concept of HIM and the advantages and disadvantages of specialization. Moreover, this review also discusses the vital role of HIM in orthodontic treatment and development.

  19. Caries risk and orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsahl Vital, Sibylle; Haignere-Rubinstein, Claire; Lasfargues, Jean-Jacques; Chaussain, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    It is now established that orthodontic treatment increases the risk of carious lesions, with consequent harm to the patient and a high risk of compromising treatment outcome. This risk is related to the appliances, which increase the number of sites where plaque can accumulate as well as to changes in the bacterial flora and the age of the patient. A thorough evaluation of the risk of caries is therefore needed before any appliance is put in place and further evaluations should then be performed regularly throughout the course of treatment. In addition, preventive measures should be taken, involving first and foremost educating and motivating patients regarding the need for good oral hygiene. Prevention also implies adequate usage of the various sources of local fluoride administration, notably the application of fluoride-rich varnish. Other prophylactic measures such as using chlorhexidine varnish and sealing dental grooves are also recommended. Finally, the orthodontist can reduce to a minimum the use of items likely to retain dental plaque such as bands and elastomeric ties. The aim of this article is to suggest a specific diagnostic approach and to present the scientifically validated prevention measures, which need to be applied throughout orthodontic treatment. Copyright 2010 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceptions of orthodontic case complexity among orthodontists, general practitioners, orthodontic residents, and dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elizabeth M; English, Jeryl D; Johnson, Cleverick D; Swearingen, Elizabeth B; Akyalcin, Sercan

    2017-02-01

    Our aims were to assess the perceptions of orthodontic case complexity among orthodontists, general dentists, orthodontic residents, and dental students and to compare their perceptions with the American Board of Orthodontics Discrepancy Index (DI). Orthodontists, general dentists, orthodontic residents, and dental students (n = 343) participated in a Web-based survey. Pretreatment orthodontic records of 29 cases with varying DI scores were obtained. Respondents were asked to evaluate case complexity on a 100-point visual analog scale. Additional information was collected on participants' orthodontic education and orthodontic treatment preferences. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between the average complexity score and the DI score. Repeated measures analysis with linear mixed models was used to assess the association between the average complexity score and the DI score and whether the association between the 2 scores varied by level of difficulty or panel group. The level of significance for all analyses was set at P clear aligners. DI score was significantly associated with complexity perceptions (P = 0.0168). Associations between average complexity and DI score varied significantly by provider group (P = 0.0033), with orthodontists and residents showing the strongest associations. When the DI score was greater than 15, orthodontists and residents perceived cases as more complex than did the other provider groups. Orthodontists and orthodontic residents had better judgments for evaluating orthodontic case complexity. The high correlation between orthodontic professionals' perceptions and DI scores suggested that additional orthodontic education and training have an influence on the ability to recognize case complexity. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidimensional Scaling for Orthodontic Root Resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teodora Preoteasa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the risk factors for the severity of orthodontic root resorption. The multidimensional scaling (MDS visualization method is used to investigate the experimental data from patients who received orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dentistry, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, during a period of 4 years. The clusters emerging in the MDS plots reveal features and properties not easily captured by classical statistical tools. The results support the adoption of MDS for tackling the dentistry information and overcoming noise embedded into the data. The method introduced in this paper is rapid, efficient, and very useful for treating the risk factors for the severity of orthodontic root resorption.

  2. Effect of drugs on orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sarah Aulia Amrullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response to mechanical forces given to the teeth in orthodontic treatment, which involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structure. Remodeling changes in periodontal tissues are considered to be essential in effecting orthodontic tooth movement which is the base of orthodontic correction. Molecules produced in various diseased tissues or drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients, can influence mechanically stressed periodontal tissue through the circulation and interact with target cell combination of which may be inhibitory, additive or synergize. Medications might have an important influence on the rate of tooth movement, and information on their consumption is essential to adequately discuss treatment planning with patients. Therefore it is imperative to the practitioners being in medical profession, must pay close attention to the drug consumption history of every patient before and during the course of treatment.

  3. Iatrogenic orthodontic dental trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencay, Koray; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Yaman, Duygu; Ozgen, Mehmet; Demirel, Korkud

    2013-01-01

    Iatrogenic trauma can be defined as any adverse condition in a patient resulting from treatment by a physician or dentist. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risks of tissue damage and treatment failure. The aim of this article is to present traumatic oral tissue lesions resulting from iatrogenic orthodontic origin with a 2-year follow-up period based on orthodontic intervention followed by periodontal surgery. The management of traumatic injuries is dependent on the severity of the involvement of the periodontal tissues. While, in most cases, the elimination of the offending agent and symptomatic therapy is sufficient, in severe cases, or when the injury resulted in permanent defects, periodontal/regenerative therapy may be necessary. The dentist must be aware of these risks in order to help the patient make a fully informed choice whether to proceed with orthodontic treatment. The skill, experience, and up-to-date knowledge of dentists are the main factors to prevent possible iatrogenic traumas.

  4. Comparison of Arch Width Changes Following Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-21

    Nov 21, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: The study was conducted with pre- and post-treatment digital models from ... or posterior arch width following orthodontic treatment ..... premolar extraction cases show significant arch width increases in ...

  5. ORTHODONTIC MANAGEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit ARORA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Special needs individuals are children or adults pre‐ vented by a physical or mental condition permitting their full participation to the normal range of activities of their age groups. They usually exhibit high orthodontic treat‐ ment needs because of an increased prevalence and seve‐ rity of malocclusions. These conditions often require a coordinated craniofacial orthodontic and surgical treat‐ ment in a team setting, to achieve optimal outcome. Ort‐ hodontic treatments for patients born with facial differences tend to be more complex than ordinary ortho‐ dontics. This multidisciplinary treatment often starts from birth and extends up to the late teen years. The young patient may require treatment by multiple specialists, including a craniofacial surgeon, pediatrician, geneticist, neurosurgeon, ENT, speech and language therapist, pedi‐ atric dentist, oral surgeon and prosthodontist. The objec‐ tive of this paper is to summarize protocols of orthodontic treatment and to present various orthodontic management protocols regarding the children with special needs.

  6. Extra-oral Appliances in Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzian, Mohammed; Alharbi, Fahad; McIntyre, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Extra-oral appliances are used in orthodontics to apply forces to the jaws, dentition or both and the popularity of these appliances is cyclical. Although the use of retraction headgear for the management of Class II malocclusion has declined over the last 20 years with the refinement of non-compliance approaches, including temporary anchorage devices, headgear still has a useful role in orthodontics. The use of protraction headgear has increased as more evidence of its effectiveness for the treatment of Class lIl malocclusion has become available. This paper describes the mechanics and contemporary uses of headgear in orthodontics for primary care dentists and specialist orthodontists. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Extra-oral appliances have specific uses in orthodontic biomechanics. Clinicians using retraction headgear and protraction headgear should be familiar with their clinical indications, the potential problems and how these can be avoided.

  7. "The Dreaded Black Triangle" - Orthodontics : The Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Janardhanam

    2010-01-01

    The black triangle that resulted due to orthodontic treatment in a 15 year old female patient had been alleviated by using both orthodontic and periodontic means. This report explains the various treatment modalities that can be adopted to avoid embarrassing post-treatment results. Several methods of managing patients with gingival diastemas exist, but the interdisciplinary aspects of treatment must be emphasized to achieve best results. The orthodontist can play a significant role in helping to manage these cases.

  8. Surgery preceding orthodontics in bimaxillary cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saravana Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery is performed to alter the shape of the jaws to increase the facial esthetic and improve the occlusions. Surgery prior orthodontics reduces the total length of the treatment of the patients, followed by orthodontics treatment. Advantages is positive outcome in short period of time. Surgical procedure includes Anterior Maxillary osteotomy and Anterior subapical mandibular osteotomy. Complication includes haemorrhage, paraesthesia, malunion of bone, etc.

  9. Current clinical research in orthodontics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon

    2006-10-01

    This essay explores briefly the approach of the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory to the systematic and rigorous investigation of the usual outcome of orthodontic treatment in the practices of experienced clinicians. CRIL's goal is to produce a shareable electronic database of reliable, valid, and representative data on clinical practice as an aid in the production of an improved environment for truly evidence-based orthodontic treatment.

  10. Right wire in orthodontics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Hashim

    2015-01-01

    Quality of orthodontic wire such as stiffness, hardness, resiliency, elasticity and working range are important determinants of the effectivenes of tooth movement. Commonly used types of orthodontic arch wire:1) stainless steel(ss) wire, 2) conventional nickel- titanium (NiTi)alloy wire,3) improved super elastic NiTi- alloy wire( also called low hysteresis(LH)wire), and titanium molybdenum alloy(TMA) wire.

  11. [Apical resorption in pre-surgical orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasente, M; Merlini, C; Amelotti, C; Antonioli, M; Roghi, M

    1991-07-15

    Apical root resorption is a frequent phenomenon observed in pre-surgical orthodontic; the reason is double: we deal with adult patients and we often move the teeth in the opposite direction compared to the position obtained in previous inefficacious orthodontic treatments. Notwithstanding the amount of apical root resorption we couldn't record an hyper-mobility of the teeth and a long term evaluation of occlusal stability didn't show any significant change.

  12. Quality assessment of orthodontic radiography in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Ekholm, Marja; Haukka, Jari; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna

    2016-02-01

    Numbers of dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) and lateral cephalometric radiographs (LCRs) outweigh other radiographic examinations in 7- to 12-year-old Finns. Orthodontists and general practitioners (GPs) involved in orthodontics hold therefore the highest responsibility of the exposure of children to ionising radiation with its risks. Against this background, lack of reports on the quality of orthodontic radiography is surprising. The purpose of our study was to shed some light and draw the awareness of the orthodontic community on the subject by analyzing the quality of orthodontic radiography in Oral Healthcare Department of City of Helsinki, in the capital of Finland. We analyzed randomly selected 241 patient files with DPTs and 118 patient files with LCRs of 7- to 12-year-olds for the indications of radiography, quality of referrals, status of interpretation, and number of failed radiographs. The majority of DPTs (95%) and all LCRs had been ordered for orthodontic reasons. Of the DPTs, 60% were ordered by GPs, and of the LCRs, 64% by orthodontists. The referrals were adequate for most DPTs (78%) and LCRs (73%), orthodontists being responsible for the majority of inadequate referrals. Of the DPTs, 80% had been interpreted. Of the LCRs, 65% lacked interpretation, but 67% had been analysed cephalometrically. Failed radiographs, leading to repeated exposure, were found in 2-3%. The quality assessment revealed that orthodontic radiography may not completely fulfill the criteria of good practice. Our results stress further need of continuing education in radiation protection among both orthodontists and GPs involved in orthodontics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Orthodontic Tooth Movement with Clear Aligners

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Carl T.; McGorray, Susan P.; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. ev...

  14. Social media use by orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzell, M; Knight, A; Antoun, J S; Farella, M

    2013-12-01

    Internet-based social media sites have recently surged in popularity and are often used to share thoughts and seek support about health issues. The aim of this study was to investigate how orthodontic patients use Internet-based social media sites to share their treatment-related experiences and attitudes towards braces. A secondary objective was to investigate whether an online or mobile application would be considered helpful in improving co-operation with the use of orthodontic appliances. Patients visiting the orthodontic clinic at the University of Otago were asked to participate in a cross-sectional survey that sought details of their Internet-based social media use and their thoughts about the development of a reminder application. The sample comprised 130 orthodontic patients, with a mean age of 17.2 (SD 6.9) and a nearly equal sex distribution (52.3% were female). Internet-based social media sites were used by 80.8%, with Facebook being the most popular. Some 13.3% of the sample had posted comments about braces on these social media sites. Only 6.7% had considered obtaining information about orthodontic treatment from Internet-based social media sites, with the majority (81%) preferring to seek this information directly from their orthodontist. Nearly two-thirds of those who had difficulty remembering to wear their orthodontic appliances reported that a reminder application on their phone would be beneficial. A large proportion of orthodontic patients use Internet-based social media sites, although only a few currently use them to post about treatment-related topics. Social media sites may provide a useful channel of communication for patients seeking support. Further research is needed to evaluate the use of phone reminder applications in orthodontics.

  15. High-intensity laser application in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Franzotti Sant’Anna

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In dental practice, low-level laser therapy (LLLT and high-intensity laser therapy (HILT are mainly used for dental surgery and biostimulation therapy. Within the Orthodontic specialty, while LLLT has been widely used to treat pain associated with orthodontic movement, accelerate bone regeneration after rapid maxillary expansion, and enhance orthodontic tooth movement, HILT, in turn, has been seen as an alternative for addressing soft tissue complications associated to orthodontic treatment. Objective: The aim of this study is to discuss HILT applications in orthodontic treatment. Methods: This study describes the use of HILT in surgical treatments such as gingivectomy, ulotomy, ulectomy, fiberotomy, labial and lingual frenectomies, as well as hard tissue and other dental restorative materials applications. Conclusion: Despite the many applications for lasers in Orthodontics, they are still underused by Brazilian practitioners. However, it is quite likely that this demand will increase over the next years - following the trend in the USA, where laser therapies are more widely used.

  16. Patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics as a treatment option. Methods Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment were asked to complete two sets of questionnaires; the first set included questions about age, sex, and level of education and general questions about orthodontic treatment; and the second set was related to the corticotomy-assisted orthodontics. Before answering the corticotomy questions, a brief description of the clinical procedure was explained and photographs of an actual procedure were shown. Results A total of 150 subjects were approached and 129 (86%) agreed to answer the questionnaires (72 male and 57 female patients). Of these, only 3.1% did hear about corticotomy and 7.8% selected corticotomy instead of extraction. Fear from the surgery (53.2%) was the most frequent reason for not selecting corticotomy followed by fear from pain (36.9%). The acceptance of corticotomy between males and females was similar. No relationship was found between the level of education and prior knowledge of the procedure, P=0.857. Prior knowledge about corticotomy was not a factor in selecting it as a treatment option (P=0.556) to reduce the treatment time (P=0.427). Conclusion The acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics as a treatment option was low. Fear from the surgery was the main reason for not selecting it. The acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics was not related to patient’s level of education or sex. PMID:26316719

  17. A discerning approach to simple aesthetic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, J H; Sharma, S; Roberts-Harry, D; Qureshi, T

    2015-02-16

    There is currently considerable interest from general dental practitioners (GDPs) in the use of simple orthodontics to treat adult malocclusions. There is controversy in this, particularly in relation to 'quick fixes', simple orthodontics and 'straight teeth in six months' as opposed to more conventional treatment where the whole malocclusion is treated. This article will present a case for the use of simple aesthetic adult orthodontics in a measured and planned way. It will discuss the processes, planning and the importance of consent. It will also highlight how digital technology is used to preview, consent and execute an aesthetic result. Many of the recent systems emerging, have been as a result of the demand and supply of cosmetic dentistry. This, to a degree, has not helped since the implication of a 'quick-fix' is associated with this field. There has also been discussion on what the limits of GDP orthodontics should be. There is variability in how GDPs approach orthodontics, their experience, skill and ability to treat to an acceptable standard. Short courses may be one way of delivering orthodontic training but some of these courses are not regulated and the amount of internal mentoring is variable. This article highlights some of the systems in use, and potential upsides and downsides of this approach.

  18. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  19. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire-bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design.

  20. Orthodontic management of a periodontally compromised dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Zaveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion superimposed with severe periodontitis may present a great challenge to clinicians while providing orthodontic treatment due the episodic and site-specific nature of the disease with risk of rapid tissue breakdown. However, orthodontic treatment in such situation may contribute significantly to the overall rehabilitation both functionally and esthetically. In this article, a case report outlines a combined periodontic-orthodontic management of compromised dentition. A 37-year-old female patient with significant medical history was treated for Class II Division 1 type of malocclusion associated with spaced upper and lower anterior teeth, deep overbite, and increased overjet, superimposed with chronic generalized periodontitis and bone loss. Treatment was completed using temporary anchorage devices assisted strategically applied force and modified tandem retraction biomechanics amidst management of acute inflammatory episodes during and mucogingival complication after treatment. Affected areas healed very well after post-orthodontic periodontal treatment with minimal pocket depth, and bleeding on probing, and a healthy zone of attached gingiva at the follow up visits. The orthodontic results lead to improvement in patient's facial profile, lip posture, and correction of protrusion which addressed her main concern. One year follow-up shows good orthodontic and periodontic stability. The report highlights the importance of identifying “at risk” individuals and continuous monitoring of disease status during treatment. Despite all precautionary measures, a flare-up during the treatment can be anticipated.

  1. Knowledge of Orthodontics as a Dental Specialty: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % correctly answered that orthodontics involves malocclusion and its management. Concerning the treatment procedures used in orthodontic clinics, 54.1% of them selected rearrangement of teeth. When asked to identify the appliances used in ...

  2. Normative and Subjective Need for Orthodontic Treatment within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. Methods: One ... Professionals usually classify the normative need for. Original Article ..... orthodontic services among adolescents in the United States. Am. J Orthod ...

  3. Piezosurgery®-assisted periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Vilas Pakhare

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontic procedure has become useful adjunct to reduce orthodontic treatment time as compared with conventional orthodontics. This case demonstrates the use of Piezosurgery® to facilitate rapid tooth movement with relatively shorter treatment time. A 23-year-old male with Angles Class I malocclusion having spaced anterior teeth and protrusion requested orthodontic treatment with reduced time period. Before surgery, presurgical orthodontic treatment was done to do initial alignment of the teeth. This was followed by piezosurgical corticotomy and final space closure was achieved by active orthodontic tooth movement. The total treatment time required to complete the orthodontic treatment was 5 months. 1-year follow-up revealed no evidence of any adverse periodontal effects or relapse. Thus, Piezosurgery®-assisted corticotomy may prove to be a noble and effective treatment approach to decrease the orthodontic treatment time.

  4. Piezosurgery®-assisted periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhare, Vikas Vilas; Khandait, Chinmay Harishchandra; Shrivastav, Sunita Satish; Dhadse, Prasad Vijayrao; Baliga, Vidya Sudhindhra; Seegavadi, Vasudevan Dwarkanathan

    2017-01-01

    Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontic procedure has become useful adjunct to reduce orthodontic treatment time as compared with conventional orthodontics. This case demonstrates the use of Piezosurgery ® to facilitate rapid tooth movement with relatively shorter treatment time. A 23-year-old male with Angles Class I malocclusion having spaced anterior teeth and protrusion requested orthodontic treatment with reduced time period. Before surgery, presurgical orthodontic treatment was done to do initial alignment of the teeth. This was followed by piezosurgical corticotomy and final space closure was achieved by active orthodontic tooth movement. The total treatment time required to complete the orthodontic treatment was 5 months. 1-year follow-up revealed no evidence of any adverse periodontal effects or relapse. Thus, Piezosurgery ® -assisted corticotomy may prove to be a noble and effective treatment approach to decrease the orthodontic treatment time.

  5. Periodontal tissue destruction caused by an elastic orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Once this cooperation is lost, possible negative effects may be the consequence. ... that arises when elastic orthodontic spacers are being used in the mouth. Key words: Open-flap curettage, Orthodontic spacer, Periodontal destruction ...

  6. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kazanc?, Fatih; Aydo?an, Cihan; Alkan, ?zer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. Methods One hundred and eigh...

  7. In-Office Bleaching During Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Dutra, Hélio; Morais, Alexandre; Sgura, Ricardo; Devito-Moraes, André Guaraci

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to pursue teeth whitening treatment protocols during orthodontic treatment with no esthetic loss. Many patients undergoing orthodontic treatment desire to have a straight and well aligned dentition, but also whiter teeth. For many years, it was believed that carrying out a whitening treatment with positioned orthodontic brackets in place would result in localized spots on the enamel labial surfaces of teeth. However, a deeper understanding of the bleaching process suggests that the oxidation caused by products, which results from hydrogen peroxide decomposition, are able to diffuse peripherally into the tooth structure and reach even that under the cemented brackets. Two in-office-bleaching treatments were performed in patients using orthodontic fixed braces in two or three 40-minute sessions using a 35% hydrogen peroxide. In-office bleaching is possible and effective, even with orthodontic brackets in position. The teeth were successfully bleached despite the presence of brackets. All biological criteria have been fulfilled satisfying patients' expectations of aligned and whitened teeth in less time than if treatments had been performed separately, with satisfactory results and no esthetic loss. The whitening of teeth is possible during orthodontic treatment with fixed braces without any esthetic loss. The in-office bleaching treatment with brackets in position also may act as a motivation factor, preventing patient withdrawal or treatment interruption. Therefore, at the end of the orthodontic treatment, the patient is able to display an aligned, functional and whitened smile. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:83-92, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A comparitive clinical study between self tapping and drill free screws as a source of rigid orthodontic anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Kotrashetti, S M; Naik, Vijay

    2012-03-01

    Self-tapping miniscrews are commonly being used as a temporary anchorage device for orthodontic purpose. A prerequisite for the insertion of these screws is the preparation of a pilot hole, which is time consuming and may result in damage to nerves, tooth root, drill bit breakage and thermal necrosis of bone. On the other hand the design of drill-free screws enables them to be inserted without drilling. The aim of this prospective study was to compare the stability and clinical response of the soft tissue around the self tapping and drill free screws when used for orthodontic anchorage for en mass retraction of maxillary anterior teeth. The study sample consisted of 20 patients requiring retraction of maxillary anterior teeth. The screws were placed in the alveolar bone between maxillary 2nd premolar and 1st molar bilaterally at the junction of attached gingiva and moveable mucosa. Pilot hole was drilled on the side which was selected for insertion of the self tapping screw under copious irrigation, after which it was inserted. Drill free screw was inserted on the contralateral side without predrilling. All screws were immediately loaded with 150-200 gm of retraction force. Patients were recalled for regular follow up for a period of 6 months. If the screws became mobile or showed any signs of inflammation during the course of the study, they were considered to be a failure. After a period of 6 months an overall success rate of 77.5% was noted. Four self tapping and five drill-free screws failed during the study. There was no statistically significant difference between the two types of screws with respect to success/failure. Mobility was found to be the major cause for the failure. Both self-tapping and the drill-free screws are effective anchorage units. But the latter have an edge over the conventional self-tapping screws because of decrease in operative time, little bone debris, less thermal damage, lower morbidity, and minimal patient discomfort as

  9. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthodontic plastic bracket. 872.5470 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5470 Orthodontic plastic bracket. (a) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply...

  10. Patients treated with orthodontic-myofunctional therapeutic protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomanno, S; Antonini, G; D'Alatri, L; D'Angelantonio, M; Fiorita, A; Deli, R

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to report three cases that needed myofunctional and orthodontic treatment and the good results achieved after the therapy. Orthodontic treatment alone, in presence of bad habits, is not enough to solve the orthodontic issues, so it needs to be combined with myofunctional treatment.

  11. Extraction mechanics in lingual orthodontics: Challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar M Hegde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century has witnessed a slow but sure incorporation of lingual orthodontic protocols into the orthodontic mainstream. Extraction mechanics with lingual orthodontic appliance poses challenges to even the most experienced clinician. This article is a case series of three cases treated by extraction mechanics in a detailed and sequential manner.

  12. Trends in contemporary orthodontic research publications: Evaluation of three major orthodontic journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P Kumar Prasanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the inclination of orthodontic research published in original articles in three of the most popular and recognized orthodontic journals with high impact factor; American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO, the Angle Orthodontist (AO, and European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO published in a 5-year duration time frame (2010–2014. Materials and Methods: Online search with supplementary hand searching was undertaken for original research articles in these three orthodontic journals from 2010 to 2014. Classification of data was completed autonomously by manual and direct appraisal of the manuscript of each journal. Results and Conclusion: Three thousand one hundred and forty articles published in AJODO, AO, and EJO in the particular time period were selected, out of which 1783 original research study articles (56.78% were appraised for classification in their various respective knowledge domains. AO (82.73% and EJO (76.99% were relatively more committed toward publication of research work in comparison to AJODO (34.55%. Research articles based on perception and questionnaires (12%, temporary anchorage devices (11%, cone-beam computed tomography (8%, invisible orthodontics (lingual orthodontics, clear aligners, esthetic brackets, and wires (5%, and airway examination (5% were the five most recurrently selected subjects of interest (41% in these three journals during the observation period. The total number of research articles published in the three journals reduced statistically significantly in 2014 when compared to 2010.

  13. Orthodontics in the "Art" of Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetics in dentistry has of late become an awakening/actor among patients and often serves as a major reason for seeking dental treatment and care. Ever since the introduction of orthodontics as a separate specialty branch in dentistry, a variety of techniques have evolved, and methods developed both in the type of devices/instruments used and treatments planned. The discipline of orthodontic aesthetics involves micro and macro aesthetics, gingival, and facial aesthetics. This article helps focus on the artistic part of the orthodontic science. It brings out various important factors involved in customizing aesthetic orthodontic treatment planning according to the individual needs of the patient. Through this kind of treatment planning not only are the functional and biological needs of the patient met, they also provide a stable and durable results. Less invasive treatment planning makes it easier for the patient to select future treatment options as new technologies keep evolving. The review was selected by typing aesthetic orthodontics in the Google search engine, Pubmed, and Pubmed Central. Literature review of articles reflecting history, different analysis, factors responsible, and the latest technique was conducted.

  14. Allergic reactions seen in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Görücü Coşkuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy can be defined as inappropriate and harmful response to harmless and ordinary materials. Allergic reactions, like in other fields of dentistry, can also be seen in the field of orthodontics. The reactions that occur against orthodontic materials can be seen as irritant or hypersensitivity reactions. The main reason of the irritant reactions is friction between soft tissues and orthodontic appliances. However, the reason of the hypersensitivity reactions is usually the antigenicity of the materials. Hypersensitivity reactions are usually seen as allergic contact dermatitis on face and neck; the occurrence of mucosal-gingival reactions and dermal and systemic reactions are rare. Latex, metal and acrylic resins are the most common allergens in orthodontics. Apart from these materials, allergic reactions can occur against bonding materials, extraoral appliances, disinfectants and antimicrobial agents. The reactions that occur against extraoral appliances usually result from metallic and elastic parts of the appliances or the appliance parts that are in contact with skin. Orthodontists should be aware of the allergic reactions to protect their patients’ health. The aim of this review was to evaluate the allergic reactions seen in orthodontic patients and discuss the cautions that orthodontists can take.

  15. Compliance with removable orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmal

    2017-12-22

    be more compliant than older groups. Three studies also found compliance to be better in the early stages of treatment. Integration between quantitative and qualitative studies was not possible.ConclusionsCompliance with removable orthodontic appliances is suboptimal. Patients wear appliances for considerably less time than stipulated and self-reported. Compliance may be increased when patients are aware of monitoring; however, further research is required to identify effective interventions and possible barriers in order to improve removable orthodontic appliance compliance.

  16. Iatrogenics in Orthodontics and its challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Gustavo Mattos; Feitosa, Henrique Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontics has gone through remarkable advances for those who practice it with dignity and clinical quality, such as the unprecedented number of patients treated of some type of iatrogenic problems (post-treatment root resorptions; occlusal plane changes; midline discrepancies, asymmetries, etc). Several questions may raise useful reflections about the constant increase of iatrogenics. What is causing it? Does it occur when dentists are properly trained? In legal terms, how can dentists accept these patients? How should they be orthodontically treated? What are the most common problems? This study analyzed and discussed relevant aspects to understand patients with iatrogenic problems and describe a simple and efficient approach to treat complex cases associated with orthodontic iatrogenics.

  17. Adult orthodontics: multi- or interdisciplinary treatment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of adult patients seen in the orthodontic offices are presenting with an ongoing degeneration caused either by loss of one or more teeth and/or progressing periodontal disease. The treatment of these patients can rarely stand alone and both diagnosis and treatment planning...... experiments carried out on monkeys and dogs have repeatedly demonstrated that it is possible to regain lost attachment even in the case of horizontal bone loss through a carefully conducted combined periodontal- and orthodontic treatment and long-term follow-up have confirmed that the results can...... of the conservative approach practiced in many places within periodontology, it should be appreciated that any orthodontic tooth movement involving intrusive components should not be performed in the presence of pathological pockets. New regenerative periodontal treatment procedures have improved the prognosis...

  18. Connectionist Interaction Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominich, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of connectionist views for adaptive clustering in information retrieval focuses on a connectionist clustering technique and activation spreading-based information retrieval model using the interaction information retrieval method. Presents theoretical as well as simulation results as regards computational complexity and includes…

  19. Clear aligners for orthodontic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Hanieh; Graham, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical trials (CENTRAL), Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, Google Scholar and LILACS databases. Clinical prospective and retrospective studies of orthodontic treatment with clear aligners on patients over the age of 15 that included clear descriptions of the materials and applied technique were included. Selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Two reviewers extracted data independently with study quality being assessed using the grading system described by the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). A narrative summary of the findings was presented. Eleven studies involving a total of 480 patients were included consisting of two randomised controlled trials, five prospective studies and four retrospective studies. Six studies were considered to be of moderate quality, the remainder of limited quality. Most of the studies presented with methodological problems: small sample size, bias and confounding variables, lack of method error analysis, blinding in measurements, and deficient or missing statistical methods. The quality level of the studies was not sufficient to draw any evidence-based conclusions.

  20. Orthodontic appliance preferences of children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Daniel K; Fields, Henry W; Johnston, William M; Rosenstiel, Stephen F; Firestone, Allen R; Christensen, James C

    2010-12-01

    Although attractiveness and acceptability of orthodontic appliances have been rated by adults for themselves and for adolescents, children and adolescents have not provided any substantial data. The objective of this study was to evaluate preferences and acceptability of orthodontic appliances in children and adolescents. Images of orthodontic appliances previously captured and standardized were selected and incorporated into a computer-based survey. Additional images of shaped brackets and colored elastomeric ties, as well as discolored clear elastomeric ties, were captured and incorporated onto existing survey images with Photoshop (Adobe, San Jose, Calif). The survey displayed 12 orthodontic appliance variations to 139 children in 3 age groups: 9 to 11 years (n = 45), 12 to 14 years (n = 49), and 15 to 17 years (n = 45). The subjects rated each image for attractiveness and acceptability. All images were displayed and rated twice to assess rater reliability. Overall reliability ratings were r = 0.74 for attractiveness and k = 0.66 for acceptability. There were significant differences in bracket attractiveness and acceptability in each age group. The highest-rated appliances were clear aligners, twin brackets with colored ties, and shaped brackets with and without colored ties. Colored elastomeric ties improved attractiveness significantly over brackets without colored ties for children in the 12-to-14 year group. There was a tendency for older subjects to rate clear orthodontic appliances higher than did younger subjects. Ceramic brackets with discolored ties tended to be rated lower than ceramic brackets with new ties and scored lowest in acceptability and attractiveness in all age groups. Girls rated shaped brackets significantly higher than did boys. Children's preferences for orthodontic appliances differ by age and sex. Child and adolescent preferences differ from adult preferences. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby

  1. Fibrotic encapsulation of orthodontic appliance in palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Jananni; Muthanandam, Sivaramakrishnan; Umapathy, Gubernath; Kannan, Anitha Logaranjani

    2017-01-01

    Iatrogenic trauma though not serious is very common in dental practice. Orthodontic treatment can inflict such injuries as they are prolonged over a long period of time. Ill-fabricated orthodontic appliances, such as wires and brackets, or the patients' habits such as application of constant pressure over the appliance can traumatize the adjacent oral soft tissues. In rare cases, these appliances can get embedded into the mucosa and gingival tissues. This case report describes one such case of iatrogenic trauma to the palatal mucosa due to entrapment of a tongue spike appliance and its surgical management.

  2. Postgraduate training in orthodontics in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anwar Ali; Sandler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly describes the postgraduate pathways in orthodontics in the United Kingdom. It is hoped that this will assist potential trainees who want to pursue postgraduate training to understand the different career pathways available to them. It may also add to the knowledge of some senior colleagues who can explain these career opportunities to their students, as not all potential trainees will have the opportunity to read this article. In the following pages we will discuss the different pathways leading to specialist qualification in orthodontics, in the United Kingdom. PMID:23960517

  3. Root resorption after orthodontic treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatania, Archana; Shivalinga, B M; Kiran, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Root resorption that occurs in permanent teeth is an unwanted process and is considered pathologic. Although apical root resorption occurs in individuals who have never experienced orthodontic tooth movement, the incidence among treated individuals is seen to be significantly higher. Some resorption occurs in most orthodontic patients, but because of repair the changes are difficult to detect with radiographic examination and therefore are clinically insignificant. This article gives a review of the various types of root resorption, the etiological factors, the biology and the identification of root resorption.

  4. ORTHODONTIC DEVICES VS. ALLERGIC REACTIONS IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sodor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope. The scope of the study was to evaluate the adverse reactions upon the intra- and extraoral tissues, produced by the insertion of orthodontic devices, on a populational group of Romania, for determining the frequencies of the allergic reactions and for comparing them with the sex, age, urban/rural background, malocclusion, orthodontic device, oral hygiene prior to and during the orthodontic treatment. Materials and method. The observation sheets of 621 patients (255 boys and 366 girls with ages between 6 and 29 years, from the Orthodontics Clinics of the Policlinics of the “Sf. Spiridon” Urgency Hospital and from a private orthodontic consulting room of Iaşi, have been statistically evaluated with the SPSS 17.0 for Windows program. Results. Pearson correlation and linear regression evidenced the relations between the adverse reactions produced during the orthodontic treatment, on one side, and the age, dental hygiene and types of orthodontic devices, on the other. The results obtained put into evidence significant relations between the adolescent age and the allergy to nickel manifested in antecedents, between the scarce oral hygiene of the patients prior to the orthodontic treatment and gingival enlargement, between the scarce oral hygiene of the patients during the orthodontic treatment and the localized or generalized gingivitis and the bleedings and gingival overgrowths, between the mobile orthodontic devices and the allergic reactions to acrylic resins (p and t = 0.000. Relevant connections have been also evidenced between the fixed orthodontic devices and the allergic reactions to the polymeric biomaterials from the orthodontic devices (p = 0.005 and t = 0.034. Conclusions. Statistical evaluation of the adverse effects induced by orthodontic devices may be used for stating the development of allergic reactions to the substances entering the composition of orthodontic devices, with reference to the cytotoxicology and

  5. Trace metal ions release from fixed orthodontic appliances and DNA damage in oral mucosa cells by in vivo studies: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downarowicz, Patrycja; Mikulewicz, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    An overview of professional literature referring to the release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliances and their influence on oral mucosa in conditions of in vivo are presented, along with a detailed analysis of the exposure of the cells of cheek mucosa epithelium to metal ions. Electronic databases (PubMed, Elsevier, Ebsco) were searched with no language restrictions. The relevant orthodontic journals and reference lists were checked for all eligible studies. A total of 38 scientific articles were retrieved in the initial search. However, only 7 articles met the inclusion criteria. Statistically significant differences in the levels of the amount of nickel ions, cobalt ions and chromium ions were observed in cells of cheek mucosa. The most biocompatible material used in the production of fixed orthodontic appliances is titanium, and the least biocompatible material is steel, which releases the largest amount of nickel and chromium. Metal ions are released from fixed orthodontic appliances only in the first phase of treatment. It is recommended to conduct further, long-term research on a larger number of patients to define the influence of using fixed orthodontic appliances and biological effect they might have on tissues.

  6. Orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostino, Paola; Ugolini, Alessandro; Signori, Alessio; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Harrison, Jayne E; Riley, Philip

    2014-08-08

    A posterior crossbite occurs when the top back teeth bite inside the bottom back teeth. When it affects one side of the mouth, the lower jaw may have to move to one side to allow the back teeth to meet together. Several treatments have been recommended to correct this problem. Some treatments widen the upper teeth while others are directed at treating the cause of the posterior crossbite (e.g. breathing problems or sucking habits). Most treatments have been used at each stage of dental development. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 21 January 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 21 January 2014), and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 21 January 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites in children and adults. Two review authors, independently and in duplicate, screened the results of the electronic searches, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. We attempted to contact the first named authors of the included studies for missing data and for clarification. We used risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to summarise dichotomous (event) data, and mean differences (MD) with 95% CIs to summarise continuous data. We performed meta-analyses using fixed-effect models (we would have used random-effects models if we had included four or more studies in a meta-analysis) when comparisons and outcomes were sufficiently similar. We

  7. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic imaging in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, W C; Azevedo, B; Toghyani, S; Farman, A G

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 15 years, cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has emerged as an important supplemental radiographic technique for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, especially in situations which require an understanding of the complex anatomic relationships and surrounding structures of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT imaging provides unique features and advantages to enhance orthodontic practice over conventional extraoral radiographic imaging. While it is the responsibility of each practitioner to make a decision, in tandem with the patient/family, consensus-derived, evidence-based clinical guidelines are available to assist the clinician in the decision-making process. Specific recommendations provide selection guidance based on variables such as phase of treatment, clinically-assessed treatment difficulty, the presence of dental and/or skeletal modifying conditions, and pathology. CBCT imaging in orthodontics should always be considered wisely as children have conservatively, on average, a three to five times greater radiation risk compared with adults for the same exposure. The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the operation of CBCT equipment as it relates to image quality and dose, highlight the benefits of the technique in orthodontic practice, and provide guidance on appropriate clinical use with respect to radiation dose and relative risk, particularly for the paediatric patient. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  9. Electropolishing-Orthodontic Office: A Simplified Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Munjal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electropolishing plays an important role in dentistry by providing enhanced mechanical properties, better corrosion protection, physical appearance and ease of cleaning various metallic attachments. To achieve all these objectives, we present here a simple and economical way to fabricate a electropolisher which has wide applications in orthodontic office (recycle brackets, anneal retention wires, etc..

  10. Surgically facilitated orthodontic treatment : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Eelke J.; Jansma, Johan; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Corticotomy and dental distraction have been proposed as effective and safe methods to shorten orthodontic treatment duration in adolescent and adult patients. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting these claims. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane

  11. SURGICAL ORTHODONTICS: LITERATURE REVIEW AND CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Piyush HEDA; Babita RAGHUWANSHI; Amit PRAKASH; Kishore SONAWANE

    2013-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery is a surgical procedure largely practiced throughout the world for the correction of various maxillofacial deformities. The procedure for correcting a particular deformity will be done after proper evaluation, which includes cephalometric, dental model analysis and photographs. The patient undergoes pre-surgical orthodontic correction for dental compensation, after which surgery is planned. During the last few decades, the profession has witnessed ...

  12. Orthodontic treatment: Introducing finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, W.D. van; Leeuwen, E.J. van

    1998-01-01

    The aim of orthodontic treatment is the displacement of teeth by means ofspecial appliances, like braces and brackets. Through these appliances the orthodontist can apply a set of forces to the teeth which wilt result in its displacement through the jawbone. Finite Element analysis of this process

  13. [Psychology and psychosomatics of the orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábián, Gábor; Bálint, Mária; Fábían, Tibor Károly

    2005-06-01

    Psychosomatic problems related to orthodontic treatment are a special group of oral psychosomatic disorders. The most frequent complaints are related to aesthetics and occlusion. Most of the patients are children, adolescence or young adults, with special emotional problems. Authors reviewed the most important knowledge related to this specific field, but some general aspects of oral psychosomatics are also discussed.

  14. Current Sterilization Protocols-An Orthodontic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Vinod Korath

    2010-01-01

    Part I of this article focuses on the working principles of various methods of sterilization with an appraisalof their effects on orthodontic instruments. Additionally,contributory factors of instrument damage is enumerated to emphasis the importance of adhering to precise protocols and manufacturer recommendations as well as in alleviating some misconceptions about sterilization induced instrument damage.

  15. Delayed bracket placement in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Wigati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beside bracket position, the timing of bracket placement is one of the most essential in orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Even it seems simple the timing of bracket placement can be crucial and significantly influence the result of orthodontic treatment. However it is often found brackets are placed without complete understanding of its purpose and effects, which could be useless and even detrimental for the case. Purpose: The aim of this case report is to show that the timing of bracket placement could be different depending on the cases. Case: Five different cases are presented here with different timing of bracket placement. Case management: On these cases, brackets were placed on the upper arch first, on the lower arch first, or even only on some teeth first. Good and efficient orthodontic treatment results were achieved. Conclusion: For every orthodontic case, from the very beginning of treatment, bracket should be placed with the end result in mind. If brackets are correctly placed at a correct time, better treatment result could be achieved without unnecessary round tripping tooth movement.

  16. Material testing of reconditioned orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, S; Rewari, A; Keilig, L; Widu, F; Jäger, A; Bourauel, C

    2012-12-01

    While all manufacturers of orthodontic brackets label these products for single use, there are commercial providers offering bracket reconditioning (or "recycling"). We conducted this study to investigate the effects of different recycling techniques on material-related parameters in orthodontic brackets, aiming to derive indications for clinical use and conclusions about the biocompatibility, longevity, and application of recycled brackets. New metal brackets (equilibrium(®); Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany) were compared to brackets recycled by different techniques, including direct flaming with a Bunsen burner, chemical reconditioning in an acid bath, a commercial unit (Big Jane; Esmadent, IL, USA), and outsourcing to a company (Ortho Clean, Dellstedt, Germany). Material-related examinations included the following: (1) corrosion behavior by static immersion testing and use of a mass spectrometer to determine nickel-ion concentrations in the corrosive medium, (2) surface features in scanning electron micrographs before and after corrosion testing, (3) Vickers hardness using a hardness testing machine, (4) shear bond strength as defined in DIN 13990-1, (5) dimensional stability of the bracket slots by light microscopy, and (6) frictional loss as assessed by an orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Each examination was performed on ten brackets. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Compared to the new brackets, those recycled in an acid bath or by a commercial provider revealed significant dimensional changes (pbrackets varied according to the recycling techniques employed. The group of brackets recycled by one company revealed hardness values that differed from those of all the other groups. No significant differences were observed in nickel-ion release, frictional loss, and shear bond strength. Recycling was found to significantly reduce the corrosion resistance and dimensional stability of orthodontic brackets. As the savings

  17. Laparoscopic specimen retrieval bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorgick, Noam

    2014-10-01

    Specimen retrieval bags have long been used in laparoscopic gynecologic surgery for contained removal of adnexal cysts and masses. More recently, the concerns regarding spread of malignant cells during mechanical morcellation of myoma have led to an additional use of specimen retrieval bags for contained "in-bag" morcellation. This review will discuss the indications for use retrieval bags in gynecologic endoscopy, and describe the different specimen bags available to date.

  18. Private information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Xun; Bertino, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with Private Information Retrieval (PIR), a technique allowing a user to retrieve an element from a server in possession of a database without revealing to the server which element is retrieved. PIR has been widely applied to protect the privacy of the user in querying a service provider on the Internet. For example, by PIR, one can query a location-based service provider about the nearest car park without revealing his location to the server.The first PIR approach was introduced by Chor, Goldreich, Kushilevitz and Sudan in 1995 in a multi-server setting, where the user retriev

  19. [Root resorption associated to orthodontic treatment: a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houb-Dine, Afaf; Rerhrhaye, Mariam; Ismaili, Zouheir; Rerhrhaye, Wiam

    2011-12-01

    Root resorption associated to orthodontic treatment is of multiple etiologies and a non intentional iatrogenic side effect which exists in almost all the orthodontic treatment. This clinical case of an apparently healthy patient illustrates the occurrence during the orthodontic treatment of a root resorption interesting the left central incisor, victims of previous traumatism and presenting a moderate periodontal attachment loss. The orthodontic treatment was carried out with light and continuous forces and a per-orthodontic periodontal maintenance in respect of periodontal requirements. As soon as the root resorption on the left central incisive was diagnosed, the active orthodontic treatment was interrupted in order to stabilize the lesion and a regular clinical and radiological monitoring was established.

  20. Evaluation of apical root resorption in orthodontic patients with maxillary anterior intrusion using utility arches and mini screws: A comparative clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muraleedhara Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of apical root resorption in orthodontic patients undergoing maxillary anterior intrusion using utility arches and mini screws; and to compare the efficacy of mini screws and utility arches in reducing over bite. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 20 patients, divided in two groups. Group A consisted of ten patients in whom titanium mini-screws were used Group B consisted of 10 patients in whom utility arches made of 0.017 × 0.25" TMA were used. Diagnostic records (study models and radiovisiography [RVG] were taken at 2 time intervals, T1 (just before implant/utility arch placement and T2 (at the end of intrusion 6 months later. The pre and post radiographic images were measured from incisal tip to the root apex with the help of intrascan DC software. Root resorption was computed as the difference between the pre-treatment total tooth length and the post treatment total tooth length. These values were subjected to statistical analyses using SPSS 16.00 statistical software. (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM Corporation, December 2007 Results: The results showed that root resorption was seen in both groups. Amount of resorption seen was higher in mini implant group than utility arch group. Mini implants were more efficient in reducing the overbite when compared to utility arches. Conclusion: It was concluded from the study that intrusion using mini implant resulted in more root resorption than utility arch; and mini implant was more effective in intruding the incisors than utility arch.

  1. Orthodontic Elastic Separator-Induced Periodontal Abscess: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Talia; Neronov, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Orthodontic elastic bands were proposed as being the source of gingival abscesses that can rapidly lead to bone loss and teeth exfoliation. We report an adolescent, otherwise, healthy patient whose periodontal status was sound. Shortly after undergoing preparations for orthodontic treatment consisting of orthodontic separators, he presented with a periodontal abscess for which there was no apparent etiology. A non-orthoradial X-ray was inconclusive, but an appropriate one revealed a subg...

  2. [From fundamental research to clinical development: a review of orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-he; Bai, Ding

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of malocclusion have emerged. The diagnostic and therapeutic techniques of orthodontics have evolved from two dimensions to five dimensions with the development of computer technology, auto-machining and imaging. Furthermore, interdisciplinary study has become the driving force for the advancement of fundamental research in orthodontics. The mechanisms of malocclusion and orthodontic tooth movement have been extensively studied to the details at the level of cells and molecules.

  3. Biomechanical aspects of external root resorption in orthodontic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Abuabara, Allan

    2007-01-01

    External apical root resorption is a common phenomenon associated with orthodontic treatment. The factors relevant to root resorption can be divided into biological and mechanical factors. Some mechanical and biological factors might be associated with an increased or decreased risk of root resorption during orthodontic treatment. For mechanical factors, the extensive tooth movement, root torque and intrusive forces, movement type, orthodontic force magnitude, duration and type of force a...

  4. Radiographic evaluation of apical root resorption following fixed orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Haghanifar; Valiollah Arash; Farhad Soboti; Nasim Jafari

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Apical root resorption is an adverse side effect of fixed orthodontic treatment which cannot be repaired. The aim of this study was to use panoramic radiographs to compare the root resorption before and after the orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise .018 appliance.Materials and Methods: The before and after treatment panoramic views of sixty-three patients needed fixed orthodontic treatment included 1520 teeth were categorized into 3 Grades (G0: without resorption...

  5. Surgical–orthodontic treatment of a skeletal class III malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Katiyar, Radha; Singh, G. K.; Mehrotra, Divya; Singh, Alka

    2010-01-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment option left. One indication for surgery obviously is a malocclusion too severe for orthodontics alone. It is possible now to be at least semiquantitative about the limits of orthodontic treatment, in the context of producing normal occlusion as the diagrams of the “envelope of di...

  6. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Clinical Orthodontics, and Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics were screened for advertisements implying superior performance compared with competitor products. Advertisements were classified according to type of product, availability, and currency of supporting references. A total of 99 unique advertisements claiming clinical benefit or superiority were identified. The overwhelming majority of the identified advertisements promoted appliance products (62.6%), orthodontic materials (14.1%), and dental operatory equipment, including imaging systems (12.1%). Advertisements were found to provide references or not regardless of the product type. Half of the advertisements referred to at least one peer-reviewed publication, whereas unpublished studies were cited by 25% of the advertisements. Most of the referenced articles were published within the past 5 years. The scientific background of advertisements in the orthodontic literature appears limited. While surveillance of journal advertising needs to be regulated, clinicians are urged to critically appraise the claims being made in orthodontic print advertisements by consulting the associated existing evidence.

  7. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancı, Fatih; Aydoğan, Cihan; Alkan, Özer

    2016-01-01

    Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. One hundred and eighty-nine children and their parents were interviewed about concerns related to orthodontic treatment. Patients and parents were asked about orthodontic treatment decisions. Answers were recorded as "yes," "no," or "don't know." Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare concerns between age groups, sexes, and treatment demand levels. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between patients and their parents. Concerns about orthodontic treatment were gathered under 10 items as follows: "feeling pain," "the appearance of braces," "being teased," "avoiding smiling," "speech problems," "dietary changes," "problems with transportation," "economic problems," "long treatment duration," and "missing school." There was no statistically significant difference in concerns between the sexes or age groups. Some concern items and treatment demand were inversely related in patients. The results of this study demonstrate patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment. Differences between the concerns of patients with different treatment demands imply that children might reject orthodontic treatment because of their concerns. Appropriate consultation of patients addressing their concerns may help reduce anxiety and improve the acceptance of treatment.

  8. Selling orthodontic need: innocent business decision or guilty pleasure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Marc Bernard

    2010-05-01

    The principal objective for most patients seeking orthodontic services is a detectable improvement in their dentofacial appearance. Orthodontic treatment, in the mind of the patient, is something that makes you look better, feel better about yourself, and perhaps enhances your social possibilities, ie, to find a companion or make a positive impression during a job interview. Orthodontics, as a speciality, has collectively advanced the idea that enhanced occlusion (bite) improves the health and longevity of the dentition, and as a result many patients seeking orthodontic services affirm that their secondary goal of treatment is an oral health benefit. It would appear that there is some disparity between the end-user of orthodontic services and the orthodontic provider's perception of what constitutes orthodontic need. The aim of this paper is to examine two contrasting models that characterise how dentists 'sell' orthodontic services to patients and to discuss the conflict between professional ethics, practice management and evidence-based decision-making in orthodontic practice.

  9. Segmented and sectional orthodontic technique: Review and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek El-Bialy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction in orthodontics has been blamed for many orthodontic-related problems in the literature. Much research as well as research and development by numerous companies have attempted to minimize friction in orthodontics. The aim of the present study was to critically review friction in orthodontics and present frictionless mechanics as well as differentiate between segmented arch mechanics (frictionless technique as compared to sectional arch mechanics. Comparison of the two techniques will be presented and cases treated by either technique are presented and critically reviewed regarding treatment outcome and anchorage preservation/loss.

  10. Differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Farah Amirah Mohd; Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical forces in orthodontic treatment used to treat malocclusion can cause inflamed gingival tissue and the process of tooth movement may resorb dental root. Root resorption is an iatrogenic effect of orthodontic treatment but it can be monitored using protein biomarker. This study aims to investigate the differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment using different staining methods. Human gingival crevicular fluid and saliva were collected from orthodontic patients before and after treatment. Protein profile were observed using SDS-PAGE. Our study shows down regulation of proteins after 3 months of treatment. Hence, there are potential values from this study to aid in investigation for specific biomarkers for root resorption.

  11. USE OF ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS INDICES FOR ORAL HEALTH SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakas, Enita; Tiro, Alisa; Vrazalica, Lejla Redzepagic; Hadzihasanovic, Dzana; Dzemidzic, Vildana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our study is to compare incidence of orthodontic malocclusion based on occlusal indices and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), and to evaluate the most commonly used method among the dentists for orthodontic treatment in Sarajevo. The sample consisted of 110 (31 female and 79 male)subjects older than 16 years with complete permanent dentition. Subjects were examined according to Occlusal Index (Angle classification of malocclusion, overjet, overbite, dental arch crowding and tooth rotation) and IOTN index. We conduct survey regarding which indexes are used in deciding on orthodontic treatment need, among primary health care and Orthodontist. The present study show differences between the presence of malocclusion and treatment need as assessed by these two used indices. Based on the survey that we conduct all primary health care doctors use Occlusal Index to decide need for orthodontic treatment, more than 95% of orthodontic specialist use Occlusal Index for treatment need estimation. When measuring and grading treatment needs we should rely on Index of orthodontic treatment need. In such high demand for orthodontic treatment need it is necessary to establish need for the orthodontic treatment as fundamental, so that individuals with greatest treatment need can be assigned priority.

  12. Root resorption following periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Literature evidence suggests that root resorption, an adverse side effect of orthodontic therapy, may be decreased under conditions of alveolar osteopenia, a condition characterized by diminished bone density and created secondary to alveolar corticotomy (Cort surgery. Purpose: To compare root resorption of the maxillary central incisors following nonextraction orthodontic therapy with and without Cort surgery. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised two groups, with and without Cort and was matched by age and gender: Cort-facilitated nonextraction orthodontics with 27 subjects, 53 central incisors of mean age 24.8 ± 10.2 years, and conventional (Conv nonextraction orthodontics with 27 subjects, 54 incisors with mean age of 19.6 ± 8.8 years. All periapical radiographs were taken with the paralleling technique; total tooth lengths of the right and left central incisors were measured by projecting and enlarging the periapical radiographs exactly 8 times. Results: t-tests revealed a significant decrease in treatment time in the Cort group (6.3 ± 8.0 vs. 17.4 ± 20.2 months, P = 0.000. Pretreatment root lengths were not significantly different (P = 0.11, but Conv had significantly shorter roots at posttreatment when compared with Cort (P = 0.03. Significant root resorption (P < 0.01 occurred in both Cort (0.3 mm and Conv (0.7 mm, but the increment of change was significantly greater in Conv (P < 0.03. The variable SNA increased significantly in the Cort (P = 0.001 group and decreased significantly in the Conv group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Based on the conditions of this study, it may be concluded that Cort-facilitated nonextraction orthodontic therapy results in less root resorption and enhanced alveolar support within a significantly reduced clinical service delivery time frame. Rapid orthodontic treatment and reduced apical root resorption are probably due to the transient osteopenia induced by the Cort surgery and inspired by

  13. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period

  14. Retrieval from semantic memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman-Vonk, Wietske

    1977-01-01

    The present study has been concerned with the retrieval of semantic information. Retrieving semantic information is a fundamental process in almost any kind of cognitive behavior. The introduction presented the main experimental paradigms and results found in the literature on semantic memory as

  15. Mini-placa como ancoragem ortodôntica: relato de caso Mini screw as orthodontic anchorage: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Zétola

    2005-08-01

    ígida pode ser utilizada com bastante propriedade no tratamento ortodôntico qunado for requerida uma ancoragem máxima.It is needless to say that anchorage control is necessary to a successful orthodontic treatment. Without it, it would be impossible to obtain an ideal occlusion through orthodontic mechanics in the majority of cases. The utilization of rigid devices, originated from face traumatology and implant dentistry principles, to obtain rigid anchorage in orthodontics revolutionized the way of treating cases with an unsatisfactory prognosis. Specially in cases where a lot of anchorage is needed and it is difficult or impossible to get it. The objective of this article was to revise the literature related to the use of mini-screw implant systems, to report a case where it was utilized and to discuss some aspects related to the usage of rigid anchorage orthodontics. The rigid anchorage was used in a 39 year old female patient, who had the upper left molars with a relevant extrusion due to the absence of the lower left molars. Fixed appliances were placed on the upper arch with a TPA connecting the second bicuspids. The TPA was used to anchor the intrusion of the upper left molars. A quad-helix appliance was used to correct the upper right third molar crossbite. Since the orthodontic intrusion with only dental anchorage did not have a satisfactory result, an "L" shaped titanium plate was placed on the maxilla, at the apical region of the upper first and second left molars, with the purpose of obtaining a rigid orthodontic anchorage to intrude them. Elastics were used during five months with intrusive force,the obtained intrusion was 6 millimeters. After the removal of the appliance, upper and lower dental bleaching was made and final prosthesis were placed over the implants. Through the literature reviewed and the case reported, it can be concluded that rigid anchorage can be indicated in orthodontic treatments where there is lack of anchorage or the need of an absolute

  16. American Board of Orthodontics: Time for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chun-Hsi; Tadlock, Larry P; Barone, Nicholas; Pangrazio-Kulbersh, Valmy; Sabott, David G; Foley, Patrick F; Trulove, Timothy S; Park, Jae Hyun; Dugoni, Steven A

    2018-03-01

    The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) works to certify orthodontists in a fair, reliable, and valid manner. The process must examine an orthodontist's knowledge, abilities, and critical thinking skills to ensure that each certified orthodontist has the expertise to provide the highest level of patient care. Many medical specialty boards and 4 American Dental Association specialty boards use scenario-based testing for board certification. Changing to a scenario-based clinical examination will allow the ABO to test more orthodontists. The new process will not result in an easier examination; standards will not be lowered. It will offer an improved testing method that will be fair, valid, and reliable for the specialty of orthodontics while increasing accessibility and complementing residency curricula. The ABO's written examination will remain as it is. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with hypoglossia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takuya; Sato, Chiemi; Kawakubo, Naomi; Moriyama, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case study was to provide a detailed report of the orthodontic approach used in treating a Japanese patient with congenital hypoglossia. The patient was a 6-year-old girl with hypoglossia, micrognathia, congenital absence of three incisors, and a telescopic occlusion accompanied by an extremely narrow lower arch. She had no limb anomalies, and her speech was normal. Bite opening and mandibular widening from the early mixed dentition dramatically improved the extremely constricted mandible and telescopic occlusion. Cephalometric tracings taken from the beginning to the end of active treatment revealed substantial forward and downward growth in the mandible over time, which may have contributed to correction of the intermaxillary relationship. Treatment of telescopic occlusion by bite opening and mandibular widening from the early mixed dentition may be effective in facilitating mandibular growth acceleration. An acceptable intermaxillary occlusal relationship and improvement of profile were achieved by an orthodontic approach in this case.

  18. Impacted canines: Etiology, diagnosis, and orthodontic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Manne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaction of maxillary and mandibular canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem, the treatment of which usually requires an interdisciplinary approach. Surgical exposure of the impacted tooth and the complex orthodontic mechanisms that are applied to align the tooth into the arch may lead to varying amounts of damage to the supporting structures of the tooth, not to mention the long treatment duration and the financial burden to the patient. Hence, it seems worthwhile to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, an overview of the incidence and sequelae, as well as the surgical, periodontal, and orthodontic considerations in the management of impacted canines is presented.

  19. Orthodontic-Surgical Alternatives for Tooth Ankylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo-Mira, Juan Felipe; Velásquez Velásquez, Mariluz

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for tooth ankylosis poses a big challenge in dentistry. Orthosurgical techniques must be included to obtain a satisfactory esthetic and functional result. The treatment options are surgical removal, segmentary osteotomy with immediate repo- sition and segmentary osteotomy with distraction osteogenesis, which can be done using distractors or orthodontics, thus achieving acceptable long-term outcomes. El tratamiento de dientes anquilosados presenta un gran desafio en odontologia. E...

  20. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    OpenAIRE

    Nakandakari, Cláudia; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Cassano, Daniel Serra; Raveli, Taísa Boamorte; Bianchi, Jonas; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever...

  1. Clinicians' Choices in Selecting Orthodontic Archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Izabella Pop

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the choices made by clinicians in selecting archwires during the initial, intermediate and final stages of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Methods: We carried out a questionnaire-based study at the Orthodontics and Pedodontics Clinic Târgu Mureș, between March 2012 and September 2012. The questionnaires consisted of two parts: the first included questions related to the dimension, alloy used in fabrication, section (round or rectangular and manufacturer of the archwires used by the orthodontists in their orthodontic practice, the second part was concerned with their personal opinion about the physical properties and disadvantages of the archwires. Results: From a total number of 90 distributed questionnaires, 62 were returned. The majority of clinicians are using stainless steel (SS and nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi wires in their fixed orthodontic treatments, very few are using beta-titanium (Beta Ti, copper nickel-titanium (Co- NiTi and esthetic archwires. The preferred dimension seem to be 0.022 inches in the appliance system. Regarding the wire dimensions, 0.014, 0.016 inch wires are mostly used from the round section group and 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.017 × 0.025 inch from the rectangular ones. Conclusions: There is a general lack of agreement between the clinicians surveyed regarding the properties of an ideal archwire and the disadvantages of the used wires. The most frequently used alloys seemed to be the SS and NiTi

  2. Value of informed consent in surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Sander; Becking, Alfred G; Tuinzing, D Bram

    2009-05-01

    Informed consent forms an important part of treatment, especially in the case of elective treatment. The aim of this survey was to establish how much patients can recall of the information given during an informed consent interview before orthognathic surgery. During the consultation, attention was given to all aspects of the treatment. However, because of "insurance-related factors," the need for treatment because of functional reasons was stressed over esthetics. The recall of information given during an informed consent interview before orthognathic surgery was measured using a questionnaire. Patients with a mandibular deficiency with a low mandibular plane angle were questioned after an informed consent interview regarding surgical orthodontic treatment. Esthetics were more frequently and functional problems were less frequently recalled as the reason for operation than was expected. The risk of a change in the sensation of the lower lip by surgery was frequently recalled as a reason to refrain from the operation. The overall recall rate of the possible risks and complications of orthodontic surgery was 40%. No reports were found of comparable research on the preoperative recall after consultation before surgical orthodontic surgery. The aspects of communication that can improve recall must be clarified. A recall rate of 100% seems a utopia, although an arbitrary line is needed to determine the quality of an informed consent interview.

  3. Modified grassline technique for orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmiller, Rose Marie

    2006-04-01

    Use of traditional orthodontic measures in the periodontally compromised dentition can be problematic. This article describes a variation of the Grassline technique, in which the author uses adhesive bonding to harmoniously re-align malpositioned teeth. In this simple, easy-to-learn technique, a cotton thread is used to achieve orthodontic tooth movement. Initial contact with the saliva causes shrinkage of the thread, exercising a minor force that moves the teeth while allowing enough time for the tissues to regenerate. With this moderate, intermittent force, successful treatment is achieved with minimal risk. Moreover, this orthodontic technique has been associated with an increase in bone volume. This article presents this new technique and details methods for maintaining treatment success. The technique also is compared with an approach described in the literature. Two case reports are presented; the technique is employed in the first to close a diastema in a periodontally compromised dentition and in the second to correct the migration of maxillary and mandibular incisors. Photographs and radiographs show the esthetic improvement achieved in both cases using this technique.

  4. [TMJ and orthodontics, "past, present and future"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manière-Ezvan, A; Oueiss, A; Busson, F

    2016-12-01

    In the past, the ATM was mainly associated with the growth of the mandibular condyle. Many studies (on rats) showed the role of condylar cartilage in the growth response following stimulation by orthopedic appliances. From where, Class II dysmorphosis "orthopedic" treatments to grow the mandible; but this concept is discussed in the literature in the absence of fully conclusive results and especially since the contribution of orthognathic surgery. Currently, the operating concept is the mechanical stimulation and therefore the function will shape the ATM during growth and that, from an early age. Prevention of dysmorphoses must go through behavioral counseling to be adopted by parents from the birth of their child: to stimulate mandibular propulsion breastfeeding, then by a hard diet inducing an alternating unilateral chewing. Ignorance of the specificity of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) notably among teenagers has, in the past, left a doubt about the positive or negative role that could have orthodontic treatment on the TMJ. Currently, the best knowledge of TMJ and TMD provides a better therapeutic conduct: behavioral counseling especially for the girl hyperdivergente with small condyles, control of the condylar position, occlusal adjustments at the end of orthodontic treatment. The future of TMJ in relation with orthodontics is based on prevention, screening and deepening of our knowledge. The orthodontist will thus not make a treatment in patients at risk or will identify it and finish the treatment perfectly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A network approach to orthodontic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auconi, P; Caldarelli, G; Scala, A; Ierardo, G; Polimeni, A

    2011-11-01

    Network analysis, a recent advancement in complexity science, enables understanding of the properties of complex biological processes characterized by the interaction, adaptive regulation, and coordination of a large number of participating components. We applied network analysis to orthodontics to detect and visualize the most interconnected clinical, radiographic, and functional data pertaining to the orofacial system. The sample consisted of 104 individuals from 7 to 13 years of age in the mixed dentition phase without previous orthodontic intervention. The subjects were divided according to skeletal class; their clinical, radiographic, and functional features were represented as vertices (nodes) and links (edges) connecting them. Class II subjects exhibited few highly connected orthodontic features (hubs), while Class III patients showed a more compact network structure characterized by strong co-occurrence of normal and abnormal clinical, functional, and radiological features. Restricting our analysis to the highest correlations, we identified critical peculiarities of Class II and Class III malocclusions. The topology of the dentofacial system obtained by network analysis could allow orthodontists to visually evaluate and anticipate the co-occurrence of auxological anomalies during individual craniofacial growth and possibly localize reactive sites for a therapeutic approach to malocclusion. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Dental students perception of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baswaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between physical appearance and perception of an esthetic deviation, and the impact of such deviation on self-esteem and body image are important issues in determining the benefits of orthodontic treatment. Aim: To assess dental students′ perception of orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 230 undergraduate dental students of Government Dental College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka formed the study group. Each classroom of the participants was visited, and self-administered questionnaire was given. An analysis of variance was done between the groups to test for statistical difference. Categorical variables were evaluated using a Chi-square test with the level of significance of P < 0.001. Results: About 75% of the students were aware of their dental esthetics. About 75% of females were satisfied with the attractiveness of their teeth when compared to 69% in males. House surgeons had more positive attitude compared to the 1 st year students. Conclusion: The dental students had good knowledge about the orthodontic treatment and had a positive attitude toward it. Females had very good knowledge, satisfaction and positive attitude compared to the males regarding dental esthetics and treatment. House surgeons were much more aware, very much satisfied and had a more positive attitude than 1 st year students.

  7. Lingual Orthodontics simplified : Incognito -customization perfected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroutioun Dedeyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic orthodontics is the need of the hour, fuelled by the increasing number of adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Alternatives to labial appliance include clear aligners and lingual appliance. Conventional lingual treatment is laborious in terms of laboratory setup and manual dexterity of the operator, coupled with less than optimum treatment results. Customization of the appliance to meet varied requirements of each patient due to highly variable lingual morphology within and amongst patients is the key to successful treatment in lingual orthodontics. Efforts at bracket base customization using intra-oral jigs and laboratory setups are fraught with unavoidable errors affecting treatment outcome. With the advent of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology the Eldorado of true customization is now a reality. This paper introduces the Incognito Appliance System based on custom-made brackets and custom-made series of pre-bent wires using state of art CAD/CAM manufacturing procedures.

  8. Patient/parent expectations of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obilade, Omolara Abiodun; da Costa, Oluranti Olatokunbo; Sanu, Oluwatosin Oluyemi

    2017-03-01

    Expectations of orthodontic treatment may differ between the patient and their parents, as the parents' expectations may not reflect those of the child. The aim of this study, therefore, was to determine the expectations of patients and their parents. This was a clinic-based, comparative, cross-sectional study involving 110 patients aged between 10 and 19 years, as well as their accompanying parents or guardians. The expectations of both patients and parents were determined using a questionnaire developed by Sayers and Newton. Results showed that the expectations of the patients and parents differed significantly in a number of areas with the parents' expectations often exceeding those of the patients. Both patients and parents were found to be ignorant about some aspects of orthodontic treatment, with 47.3% of patients and 39.1% of parents unaware of the duration of orthodontic treatment and, as such, requiring information from their clinicians. The results highlight the importance of patient education and counseling as well as the need to focus on the individual patient and not assume that their expectations mirror those of the accompanying parent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Retrieval options study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

  10. Retrieval options study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval;

  11. Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Discusses topological aspects of theoretical information retrieval, including retrieval topology; similarity topology; pseudo-metric topology; document spaces as topological spaces; Boolean information retrieval as a subsystem of any topological system; and proofs of theorems. (LRW)

  12. Comparison of excursive occlusal force parameters in post-orthodontic and non-orthodontic subjects using T-Scan® III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadeer, Sarah; Abbas, Ahmed A; Sarinnaphakorn, Lertrit; Kerstein, Robert B

    2018-01-01

    Published studies indicate that orthodontically treated patients demonstrate increased posterior occlusal friction contributing to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms. This study investigated measured excursive movement occlusal contact parameters and their association with TMD symptoms between non- and post-orthodontic subjects. Twenty-five post-orthodontic and 25 non-orthodontic subjects underwent T-Scan® computerized occlusal analysis to determine their disclusion time (DT), the excursive frictional contacts, and occlusal scheme. Each subject answered a TMD questionnaire to determine the presence or absence of TMD symptoms. Statistical analysis compared the within group and between group differences (p orthodontic and 1.36 s in the non-orthodontic group. In the non-orthodontic group, 72.7% working and 27.3% non-working side contacts were seen, while in the post-orthodontic group, (near equal) 54.7% working and 45.3% non-working side contacts were seen. Presence of canine guidance was seen in 60% of the non-orthodontic group and 24% in the post-orthodontic group. Seventy-two percent of the post orthodontics subjects presented with one or more TMD symptoms. Significantly longer disclusion time, higher posterior frictional contacts, and more TMD symptoms were observed in the post-orthodontic group, suggesting that orthodontic treatment increases posterior tooth friction. Computerized occlusal analysis is an objective diagnostic tool determining the quality of excursive movements following orthodontic treatment.

  13. Review Article: A Review Of Adult Orthodontics – Role Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adjunctive and comprehensive orthodontic treatments are the main types of orthodontic therapy recommended for adult malocclusion. The orthodontic therapy and refer to the specialist appropriately. KEY WORDS: Review, Adult Orthodontics, General Dental Practitioner. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice Vol.7(1) 2004: ...

  14. The management of traumatic ankylosis during orthodontics: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T G

    2000-01-01

    Dental ankylosis may be a significant complication in orthodontic clinical practice. This case report describes the management of a malocclusion, complicated by an ankylosed maxillary central incisor, which arose during orthodontic treatment, following an acute traumatic injury. The use of the ankylosed incisor in successfully managing the significant Class II division 1 malocclusion is described.

  15. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practice among orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method:A self-administered questionnaire was utilised to assess oral health knowledge, attitude and practices among 46 orthodontic patients consisting of 18 males (39.1%) and 28 females (60.9%) with a mean age of 18.4 ± 7.6 years who were on active fixed orthodontic appliances at the University of Benin Teaching ...

  16. Multiple maxillofacial fractures in a patient undergoing orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A multi-disciplinary team approach for the management of maxillofacial fractures in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is suggested. Orthodontic treatment with surgical involvement has been found to improve both facial aesthetics and occlusal function. Key words: Maxillofacial, trauma, ...

  17. Patients knowledge about side effects of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Amalia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Disharmonious of dental arrangement can possibly create problems for the patient, such as the masticatory function, esthetical, psychosocial, and also the increased risk of trauma and periodontal disease. These are reasons for a patient to seek orthodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to know the patient’s knowledge about the side effects possibility that they receive during orthodontic treatment. The side effects include pain experience during orthodontic treatment, the possibility of soft tissue damage, email demineralization, loss of tooth vitality, periodontal problem, root resorption, temporomandibular joint disorders, and relapse. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients who registered at Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia on March-June 2009. The participants of this study were 100 patients, consist of 86 women and 14 men respectively. Twenty-seven questions about the side-effects of orthodontic treatment were used to obtain the patient’s knowledge and the result was categorized into 3 groups, good, average and poor. The result of the study showed that patient’s knowledge about the side effect of pain experience during orthodontic treatment was average and the patient’s knowledge about the possibility of soft tissue damage due to orthodontic treatment was good. However, the patient’s knowledge about the possibility of email demineralization, loss of tooth vitality, periodontal problem, root resorption, temporomandibular joint disorders and relapse due to orthodontic treatment was low.

  18. Orthodontic traction of impacted canine using magnet: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Larry CF; Wong, Ricky WK; King, Nigel M

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: A 15 year and 1 month old Chinese female with palatally impacted upper left canine was successfully treated with an upper removable appliance with a magnet incorporated to provide orthodontic traction force. This case report indicates the possibility of using magnetic force as a safe, effective and comfortable way for orthodontic traction.

  19. Surgical management of fractured orthodontic mini- implant- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Manthan; Jain, Anoop; Sumra, Nida

    2015-01-01

    The idea of absolute anchorage has always been an elusive goal for clinicians. Orthodontic mini-implants or temporary anchorage devices allow tooth movements previously thought to be impossible or difficult. Although extensive literature exists on use of temporary anchorage devices, their failures have been hardly focused upon, especially implant fracture. The following case report describes successful management of fractured orthodontic mini-implant.

  20. The Use of Miswak as Toothbrush for Orthodontic Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Khoirulzariah Ismail

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents a patient who is undergoing orthodontic treatment with upper and lower fixed appliance. An interesting point on this case is that the patient only uses Miswak as her oral hygiene tool due to her religious belief. The oral hygiene protocol was allowed and her oral health was closely monitored throughout her orthodontic treatment.

  1. Paradigm shifts in orthodontic treatment with mini-implant anchorage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Joung-Lin Liaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After the applications of mini-implant anchorage, the envelope of orthodontic treatment was expanded and some treatment modes were changed because of more predictable tooth movement with empowered anchorage. The author tried to share his experience of TADs applications for clarifying the paradigm shifts of orthodontic treatment assisted with the mini-implant anchorage.

  2. Periodontal Intervention in Speedy Orthodontics-A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amitabh; Sharma, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Surubhi

    2016-01-01

    The use of orthodontic treatment in adult patients is becoming more common and these patients have more specific objectives and concerns related to facial and dental aesthetics, specially regarding duration of treatment. Dentists are on the lookout for techniques for increased efficiency in orthodontic treatment. Alveolar Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment is a recent orthodontic technique that is recently gaining wide acceptance and is recorded as effective means of accelerating orthodontic treatment. A 17-year-old female patient was undergoing orthodontic treatment for the past one year but during her space closure, a visual examination confirmed a buccal thickening that was encountered in the buccal plate between premolars and canine. Periodontal intervention involved elective alveolar decortication in the form of dots performed around the teeth that were to be moved. This was carried out to induce a state of increased tissue turnover and a transient osteopenia, which further helps in faster rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Its main advantages are reduction of treatment time and post-orthodontic stability. PMID:26894189

  3. Highly cited orthodontic articles from 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevezanos, Panagiotis; Tsolakis, Apostolos I; Christou, Panagiotis

    2018-01-01

    Identification of highly cited articles based on the h-index and its properties is important for the evaluation of the past, present, and future of any research discipline. In this study, we aimed to identify the h-classic articles in orthodontics. One search on the Web of Science identified all articles from 2000 to 2015 in the 89 journals indexed by the 2015 InCites Journal Citation Reports in the scientific area "dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine." A second search was performed in the Web of Science using all mesh terms related to orthodontics. Then, we applied the h-classic method to select the recent articles with the greatest scientific impact in orthodontics. Eighty articles were considered as h-classic articles. They were published in 20 of the 89 dental journals of the 2015 InCites Journal Citation Reports list. Only 36 articles appeared in orthodontic journals: 23 in the American Journal of Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics (28.8%), 7 in The Angle Orthodontist (8.8%), and 6 in European Journal of Orthodontics (7.5%). Thirty-eight articles originated from Europe, 28 from the Americas, and 14 from the Middle East and Asia. More than half of fundamental orthodontic research is published in nonorthodontic journals showing that our field is currently limited, and interactions with other research fields should be sought to increase orthodontic research importance and appeal. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Class II correction prior to orthodontics with the carriere distalizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Class II correction is a challenge in orthodontics with many existing devices being complex, too compliance-driven, or too prone to breakage. The Carriere Distalizer allows for straightforward Class II correction prior to orthodontics (fixed or clear aligners) at a time when no other mechanics interfere, and compliance is at its best.

  5. Orthodontic Anchorage Implants: State-of-the-art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    The limits of an orthodontic treatment are often set by the lack of suitable anchorage. The mini-implant is used where conventional anchorage cannot be applied and not as a replacement for conventional anchorage. In patients with lack of teeth and reduced periodontium, skeletal anchorage allows...... will improve the reconstruction possibilities. The mini-implant has widened the orthodontic possibilities....

  6. Information retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  7. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-01-01

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler

  8. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... Anesthesia Safety X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Videos related to Foreign Body Retrieval ...

  9. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used ... bones also may be difficult to visualize. Additional evaluation is required when the suspected foreign body is ...

  10. Changing Information Retrieval Behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantiou, Ioanna D.; Lehrer, Christiane; Hess, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    on the continuance of LBS use and indicate changes in individuals' information retrieval behaviours in everyday life. In particular, the distinct value dimension of LBS in specific contexts of use changes individuals' behaviours towards accessing location-related information....

  11. Retrieve An Image

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Retrieve An Image. “A building”. “Box-shaped”. “Brown Color”. “Foreshortened view”. OR. Why not specify a similar looking picture? -- Main Motivation!

  12. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to Foreign Body Retrieval Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  13. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  14. Rotation Invariant Color Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Swapna Borde; Udhav Bhosle

    2013-01-01

    The new technique for image retrieval using the color features extracted from images based on LogHistogram is proposed. The proposed technique is compared with Global color histogram and histogram ofcorners .It has been observed that number of histogram bins used for retrieval comparison of proposedtechnique (Log Histogram)is less as compared to Global Color Histogram and Histogram of corners. Theexperimental results on a database of 792 images with 11 classes indicate that proposed method (L...

  15. Application of orthodontic forces prior to autotransplantation - case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J-H; Hwang, H-S; Chang, H-S; Hwang, Y-C

    2013-02-01

    This case report describes the successful autotransplantation of mandibular molars after application of orthodontic forces and discusses the advantages of this technique, that is, pre-application of an orthodontic force for autotransplantation. After clinical and radiographic examination, autotransplantation was planned with the patient's written informed consent. An orthodontic force was applied, and the surgical procedure was performed after tooth mobility had increased. Root canal treatment was performed within 2 weeks of autotransplantation. At the 1-year follow-up, the transplanted teeth revealed asymptomatic and healthy periodontal conditions. Autotransplantation is the surgical movement of a tooth from its original location to another site. The pre-application of orthodontic force technique was recently introduced for autogenous tooth transplantation. Pre-application of an orthodontic force may be a useful treatment option for autotransplantation. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  16. Socket sclerosis--an obstacle for orthodontic space closure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, Sebastian

    2009-07-01

    Socket sclerosis is a rare reaction to tooth extraction resulting in high-density bone in the center of the alveolar process, where, under normal circumstances, cancellous bone is to be expected. In an adult orthodontic patient, routine extractions of the mandibular first permanent bicuspids were performed, resulting in socket sclerosis and unsuccessful orthodontic space closure. Orthodontic mini-implants were inserted to augment anchorage and aid in space closure. In the presence of socket sclerosis, conventional orthodontic mechanics failed to close the extraction spaces. However, with absolute anchorage in place, space closure occurred at a nearly normal rate. After treatment, no signs of socket sclerosis were discernible on the periapical radiographs. Socket sclerosis can be an obstacle for orthodontic space closure if traditional mechanics are employed. However, mini-implant-reinforced anchorage can lead to successful space closure, resulting in complete resolution of the sclerotic sites.

  17. Applications of Social Media to Indian Orthodontic Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrushikesh Aphale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The buzzword today is ′social media′. The growth of social media has enveloped the healthcare sector as well, and an online presence has today become mandatory for growth of an individual and the profession as well. This article therefore defines, classifies and explains social media, its importance, trends and use in our country. The article further explains the value and applications of the social media to the orthodontists and to the Indian Orthodontic Society at large. It explains how the orthodontic practitioners and the Indian Orthodontic Society today use social media and the effects it has on the orthodontic profession and on the orthodontic scenario in the country. It also attempts to understand the trends and etiquettes for using the social media as professionals and the advantages and risks it carries with it.

  18. The Role of Hypoxia in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic forces are known to have various effects on the alveolar process, such as cell deformation, inflammation, and circulatory disturbances. Each of these conditions affecting cell differentiation, cell repair, and cell migration, is driven by numerous molecular and inflammatory mediators. As a result, bone remodeling is induced, facilitating orthodontic tooth movement. However, orthodontic forces not only have cellular effects but also induce vascular changes. Orthodontic forces are known to occlude periodontal ligament vessels on the pressure side of the dental root, decreasing the blood perfusion of the tissue. This condition is accompanied by hypoxia, which is known to either affect cell proliferation or induce apoptosis, depending on the oxygen gradient. Because upregulated tissue proliferation rates are often accompanied by angiogenesis, hypoxia may be assumed to fundamentally contribute to bone remodeling processes during orthodontic treatment.

  19. Novel orthodontic cement containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate with strong antibacterial capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Bai, Yuxing; Zhang, Ke

    2017-09-26

    Orthodontic treatments increase the incidence of white spot lesions. The objectives of this study were to develop an antibacterial orthodontic cement to inhibit demineralization, and to evaluate its enamel shear bond strength and anti-biofilm properties. Novel antibacterial monomer dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) was synthesized and incorporated into Transbond XT at 0, 1.5 and 3% by mass. Anti-biofilm activity was assessed using a human dental plaque microcosm biofilm model. Shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index were also tested. Biofilm activity precipitously dropped when contacting orthodontic cement with DMAHDM. Orthodontic cement containing 3% DMAHDM significantly reduced biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production (p0.1). By incorporating DMAHDM into Transbond XT for the first time, the modified orthodontic cement obtained a strong antibacterial capability without compromising the enamel bond strength.

  20. Long-term surgical-orthodontic management of hemimandibular hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Samuel C; Goonewardene, Mithran S

    2016-05-01

    Hemimandibular hyperplasia (HH), also known as hemimandibular hypertrophy, is characterised by excessive unilateral three-dimensional growth of the mandible after birth. Vertical unilateral elongation of the mandible becomes clinically evident as a rare form of vertical facial asymmetry. Aberrant growth of the facial skeleton affects the developing dentition and the dental compensatory mechanism is usually unable to maintain optimal occlusal relationships. The resulting malocclusion is effectively managed by combined surgical-orthodontic care to address the facial, skeletal and dental problems that confront clinicians. Orthodontists are advised to assess patients with HH during the post-treatment retention stage for continuing mandibular growth and assess the stability of treatment outcomes with long-term follow-up and records as required. To present a case of hemimandibular hyperplasia treated successfully by combined surgical-orthodontic care and evaluated for stability over a seven-year follow-up period. Surgical-orthodontic management was accomplished in four stages: 1) pre-surgical orthodontic; 21 surgical; 3) post-surgical orthodontic; and 4) post-treatment orthodontic retention. Complete orthodontic records, including extra- and intra-oral photographs, study models, and cephalograms plus panoramic radiographs were taken at the pretreatment, post-treatment, and seven-year orthodontic retention time-points. Facial, skeletal and dental goals were achieved in the three planes of space and the long-term stability of the treatment results was shown during a post-treatment orthodontic retention period of seven years. Hemimandibular hyperplasia is a true growth anomaly which may be managed effectively. Clinicians may expect successful long-term correction and stability by utilising a comprehensive surgical-orthodontic treatment approach.

  1. The knowledge and attitudes of orthodontic trainees towards orthodontic therapists: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sameer; Mack, Gavin

    2017-09-01

    To assess the knowledge and attitudes of orthodontic trainees towards orthodontic therapists (OTs) in the UK. Cross-sectional survey. UK-based orthodontic trainees. An electronic survey was sent to all members of the Training Grades Group of the British Orthodontic Society assessing exposure to OTs and their knowledge regarding current supervision guidelines and scope of practice. Attitudes towards OTs were also explored. Seventy-six responses (response rate 57%) were returned. Nearly 90% of trainees had no formal training regarding OTs. A total of 15.5% were aware of the correct current supervision guidelines and there was large variation in the knowledge of OTs' scope of practice. The majority of trainees were happy to supervise OTs, but only 22.4% felt prepared for this during training. In total, 63% of trainees felt that OTs could impact their own future job prospects. Currently, there is minimal formal training provided to trainees regarding the role of OTs. This is reflected in the lack of knowledge regarding supervision guidelines and scope of practice. Overall, trainees felt OTs were positive for the workforce but were concerned regarding the impact of their own future employment.

  2. The influence of orthodontic fixed appliances on the oral microbiota: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Osório Ayres de Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether there is scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that the presence of orthodontic fixed appliances influences the oral microbiota. Methods: The search for articles was conducted in PubMed; ISI Web of Knowledge and Ovid databases, including articles published in English until May 17th, 2012. They should report human observational studies presenting the following keywords: "fixed orthodontic appliance" AND "microbiological colonization"; OR "periodontal pathogens"; OR "Streptococcus"; OR "Lactobacillus"; OR "Candida"; OR "Tannerella forsythia"; OR "Treponema denticola"; OR "Fusobacterium nucleatum"; OR "Actimomyces actinomycetemcomitans"; OR "Prevotella intermedia", OR "Prevotella nigrescens"; OR "Porphyromonas gingivalis". Articles were previously selected by title and abstract. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed and classified as having low, moderate or high methodology quality. A new detailed checklist for quality assessment was developed based on the information required for applicable data extraction for reviews. The study design, sample, follow-up period, collection and microbial analysis methods, statistical treatment, results and discussion were assessed. Results: The initial search retrieved 305 articles of which 33 articles were selected by title and abstract. After full-text reading, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria, out of which 4 articles were classified as having low and 4 as moderate methodological quality. The moderate methodological quality studies were included in the systematic review. Conclusions: The literature revealed moderate evidence that the presence of fixed appliances influences the quantity and quality of oral microbiota.

  3. Critical factors for the success of orthodontic mini-implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Kyung, Hee Moon; Zhao, Wen Ting; Yu, Won Jae

    2009-03-01

    This systematic review was undertaken to discuss factors that affect mini-implants as direct and indirect orthodontic anchorage. The data were collected from electronic databases (Medline [Entrez PubMed], Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and All Evidence Based Medicine Reviews). Randomized clinical trials, prospective and retrospective clinical studies, and clinical trials concerning the properties, affective factors, and requirements of mini-implants were considered. The titles and abstracts that appeared to fulfill the initial selection criteria were collected by consensus, and the original articles were retrieved and evaluated with a methodologic checklist. A hand search of key orthodontic journals was performed to identify recent unindexed literature. The search strategy resulted in 596 articles. By screening titles and abstracts, 126 articles were identified. After the exclusion criteria were applied, 16 articles remained. The analyzed results of the literature were divided into 2 topics: placement-related and loading-related factors. Mini-implants are effective as anchorage, and their success depends on proper initial mechanical stability and loading quality and quantity.

  4. Association of orthodontic force system and root resorption: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Marina G; Meira, Josete B C; Cattaneo, Paolo M

    2015-05-01

    In this systematic review, we assessed the literature to determine which evidence level supports the association of orthodontic force system and root resorption. PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase databases were searched with no restrictions on year, publication status, or language. Selection criteria included human studies conducted with fixed orthodontic appliances or aligners, with at least 10 patients and the force system well described. A total of 259 articles were retrieved in the initial search. After the review process, 21 full-text articles met the inclusion criteria. Sample sizes ranged from 10 to 73 patients. Most articles were classified as having high evidence levels and low risks of bias. Although a meta-analysis was not performed, from the available literature, it seems that positive correlations exist between increased force levels and increased root resorption, as well as between increased treatment time and increased root resorption. Moreover, a pause in tooth movement seems to be beneficial in reducing root resorption because it allows the resorbed cementum to heal. The absence of a control group, selection criteria of patients, and adequate examinations before and after treatment are the most common methodology flaws. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Elemental, microstructural, and mechanical characterization of high gold orthodontic brackets after intraoral aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersche, Sepp; Sifakakis, Iosif; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the elemental composition, the microstructure, and the selected mechanical properties of high gold orthodontic brackets after intraoral aging. Thirty Incognito™ (3M Unitek, Bad Essen, Germany) lingual brackets were studied, 15 brackets as received (control group) and 15 brackets retrieved from different patients after orthodontic treatment. The surface of the wing area was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was performed, and the elemental composition was determined by X-ray EDS analysis (EDX). After appropriate metallographic preparation, the mechanical properties tested were Martens hardness (HM), indentation modulus (EIT), elastic index (ηIT), and Vickers hardness (HV). These properties were determined employing instrumented indentation testing (IIT) with a Vickers indenter. The results were statistically analyzed by unpaired t-test (α=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences evidenced in surface morphology and elemental content between the control and the experimental group. These two groups of brackets showed no statistically significant difference in surface morphology. Moreover, the mean values of HM, EIT, ηIT, and HV did not reach statistical significance between the groups (p>0.05). Under the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that the surface elemental content and microstructure as well as the evaluated mechanical properties of the Incognito™ lingual brackets remain unaffected by intraoral aging.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špalj, Stjepan; Šlaj, Martina; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Žak, Irena; Šimunović, Martina; Šlaj, Mladen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents. One thousand five hundred and ninety-seven subjects aged 11-19 years, without previous orthodontic history, from sixteen randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia, were examined. Malocclusion characteristics were assessed by using the criteria proposed by Bjork et al., the Dental Aesthetic Index, and the Aesthetic Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Data on TMD signs/symptoms and parafunctional behaviour were obtained by means of questionnaire and clinical examination, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were used for analysis. Twenty-two percent of children and young adolescents had one or more signs of TMD, ranging from 17% in age of 11 years up to 24% in age of 19. There was poor correlation between presence of TMD and orthodontic treatment need. Multiple logistic regression models showed that Class III, crowding and spacing were related to mandibular deflection on opening. Ectopic eruption was related to TMJ clicking, and severely tipped teeth with reduced mouth opening. Headaches presented a positive relationship with reverse overjet and severe rotations, and tooth wear with crowding, spacing and lateral openbite. Age, female gender and parafunctional habits were related to several TMD signs. Although logistic regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.05) malocclusions, parafunctional behaviours, age and gender accounted for less than 20% of the variability in TMD signs/symptoms. TMD signs and symptoms seemed to be poorly related to malocclusions or treatment needs.

  7. Effect of orthodontic pain on quality of life of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sujoy; Banerjee, Rajlakshmi; Shenoy, Usha; Agarkar, Sanket; Bhattacharya, Sangeeta

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an important aspect of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL). Understanding how patients' pain experiences during their treatment affect their quality of life (QOL) is important and the absence of pain/discomfort is important for achieving a high QOL. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between pain and OHRQOL among patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances and to evaluate whether patient motivation and counseling had an effect on the pain and discomfort. The McGill-Short-Form with visual analog scale and present pain intensity and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 indices were used to determine the intensity and severity of pain and to evaluate the QOL of 200 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment during different phases of treatment. There was a significant correlation found between pain and the QOL of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Overall score of OHRQOL increased significantly (mean 43.5 ± 10.9) in the initial phase of treatment where the incidence of severe to moderate pain was reported in 80% patients. Ninety-five percent patients felt pain or discomfort. After 1 day of appliance placement, more than 85% of patients experienced severe to mild pain whereas 9% of patients suffered very severe pain. Pain reduced over a week, and at the end of a month, 10.5% patients had moderate pain whereas majority, i.e., 58% of patients complained of only mild pain (P orthodontic treatment and has a significant effect on the QOL of orthodontic patients, especially during the initial phases of treatment. Patient motivation and counseling by the orthodontist have a profounding effect in reducing the pain and discomfort, improving the QOL, and an overall improvement in the patient compliance affecting the successful outcome of the treatment.

  8. Oral health with fixed appliances orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment represents an important fraction in dental interventions. According to other medical methods the question for scientific evidence for the effectiveness of these treatments arises. The question of the effectiveness is connected with the question what is understood as an effect. In principle, the effect of the intervention is understood on the basis of the occlusion or dental health, what disregards further functions of oral health. The generalization to oral health is therefore a necessary consideration in science now. If one appreciates this further development, then there is no one single randomised study available which examines the long-term effect of the orthodontic intervention or for the effects on the oral health. The question, whether the application of a fixed appliance in an orthodontic treatment causes a long-term improvement in oral health, cannot be answered at the present time. The scientific status is the definition of oral health at present. Also the question, whether in the long run the dental health can be improved by fixed appliances cannot be answered with a quality usually achieved by evidence-based medicine. Whether correction of a dental malposition is an effective prerequisite for the preservation of the natural teeth, cannot be answered. There is no generalizing study with sufficient scientific background for Europe or Germany to this topic. The risk for caries cannot be quantified. Caries is identified as a central topic in general but due to numerous factors influencing the risk it is not quantified. The question of the indications is completely open from the scientific literature. For the question of the therapy need or therapy priority some indexes were developed, which lead to a quantification. These indices however are fundamentally criticised by recent research in their meaning and the empirical relevance. There is an impression that there exists a big gap between the practical application

  9. Orthodontic treatment considerations in Down syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sianiwati Goenharto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Down syndrome is an easily recognized congenital disease anomaly, a common autosomal chromosomal anomaly with high prevalence of malocclusion. Orthodontic treatment demand should be high but it seems difficult to be done because of specific condition of disability. Purpose: The purpose of this literature review was to discribe the orthodontic problems found in Down syndrome patients and several consideration that shoud be done to treat them. Reviews: Many studies report the high prevalence of malocclusion among people with Down syndrome. There is a greater frequency of clas III relationship, crossbite, crowding and also open bite. Several problems might appear in the treatment because of dental, medical, mental, and behavioural factor. Conclusion: It is concluded that orthodonic treatment can be performed in Down syndrome patient, although several difficulties may appear. Good consideration in mental, behavior, medical and also dental condition will influence whether the treatment will success or not. Special care and facilities will support the orthodontic treatment.Latar belakang: Sindroma Down adalah suatu kelainan congenital yang mudah dikenali, merupakan kelaian kromosom autosomal yang cukup banyak terjadi, dengan prevalensi maloklusi cukup tinggi. Seharusnya permintaan akan perawatan ortodonti juga tinggi meskipun tampaknya sulit dilakukan karena adanya kondisi ketidakmampuan/cacat yang spesifik. Tujuan: Tujuan studi pustaka ini adalah untuk menggambarkan problem perawatan ortodonti pada penderita sindroma Down dan pertimbangan apa yang sebaiknya diambil untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut. Tinjauan pustaka: Banyak penelitian melaporkan tentang prevalensi maloklusi yang tinggi pada penderita sindroma Down. Maloklusi yang sering dijumpai adalah relasi klas III, gigitan silang, berdesakan dan juga gigitan terbuka. Problem dapat terjadi saat perawatan ortodonti karena adanya faktor dental, medis, mental dan tingkah laku penderita

  10. Metal release from simulated fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C J; Shin, J S; Cha, J Y

    2001-10-01

    Most orthodontic appliances and archwires are stainless steel or nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys that can release metal ions, with saliva as the medium. To measure metal released from the fixed orthodontic appliances currently in use, we fabricated simulated fixed orthodontic appliances that corresponded to half of the maxillary arch and soaked them in 50 mL of artificial saliva (pH 6.75 +/- 0.15, 37 degrees C) for 3 months. We used brackets, tubes, and bands made by Tomy (Tokyo, Japan). Four groups were established according to the appliance manufacturer and the type of metal in the .016 x .022-in archwires. Groups A and B were stainless steel archwires from Ormco (Glendora, Calif) and Dentaurum (Ispringen, Germany), respectively, and groups C and D were both NiTi archwires with Ormco's copper NiTi and Tomy's Bioforce sentalloy, respectively. Stainless steel archwires were heat treated in an electric furnace at 500 degrees C for 1 minute and quenched in water. We measured the amount of metal released from each group by immersion time. Our conclusions were as follows: (1) there was no increase in the amount of chromium released after 4 weeks in group A, 2 weeks in group B, 3 weeks in group C, and 8 weeks in group D; (2) there was no increase in the amount of nickel released after 2 weeks in group A, 3 days in group B, 7 days in group C, and 3 weeks in group D; and (3) there was no increase in the amount of iron released after 2 weeks in group A, 3 days in group B, and 1 day in groups C and D. In our 3-month-long investigation, we saw a decrease in metal released as immersion time increased.

  11. Integrating orthodontics for the optimal smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Frank K

    2008-08-01

    With the rapid and complex advancements in materials and technology in dentistry today, it has become difficult for the dental practitioner to stay current in one field, let alone more than one. In order to increase patient benefits and decrease the dentist's frustration, today's dental practice requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates the knowledge, skills, and experience of all the disciplines of dentistry and its associated fields. This article highlights the advantage of an interdisciplinary treatment approach and how knowledge of basic orthodontic techniques can help in producing a more comprehensive treatment plan.

  12. Dermatillomania: In patient undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatillomania is a disorder in which a person habitually picks their skin, and this is a form of self-injury. It can involve any part of the body, but usually involves the face, neck, arms and shoulders. Symptoms often follow an event that has caused severe emotional distress. A dermatillomania or compulsive skin picking episode may be a conscious response to anxiety or depression but is frequently done as an unconscious habit. In this case report, a patient undergoing orthodontic treatment was found to be suffering from dermatillomania and was treated using psychological counseling.

  13. The human capital crisis in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Marc Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The economics of dental practice are changing. The author reflects on the loss of a long-term, highly effective, and dedicated assistant in an orthodontic practice. Changes in technology, numbers of dentists, expected benefit levels, and a competitive workplace environment are combining to put pressures on the traditional model of oral health care. Whatever the solution turns out to be, the profession should take the lead in actively developing alternatives, and these will necessarily involve development of human capital in the dental practice.

  14. Orthodontic treatment in adults: restoring smile esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldino Capelozza Filho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The search for orthodontic treatment by adult patients is increasing. This demand may be explained by many reasons, but the most important was the change in the concept of normality, allowing the selection of simpler and more conservative and consistent therapeutic objectives. This conceptual evolution, combined with the technological advances allowed an improvement in orthodontic management, making it more effective, fast and comfortable. The promotion of awareness of the society on the advantages of this treatment and the increase in esthetic demands, with an increasingly longer and active social, affective and professional life, creates a context in which the need for Orthodontics is absolutely established for the adult individuals. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to report the nuances in diagnosis and orthodontic treatment of an adult patient, in a different perspective. Within this approach, the objective is to recover the shape, i.e. to establish occlusal conditions that would probably be present if the patient had been assisted at the proper time, namely during growth and tooth irruption.INTRODUÇÃO: a procura de tratamento ortodôntico por pacientes adultos é cada vez maior. Essa demanda pode ser justificada por vários fatores, mas o mais relevante foi a mudança do conceito de normal, permitindo a opção por metas terapêuticas mais conservadoras, simples e consistentes. Essa evolução conceitual, mais os avanços tecnológicos, permitiram melhora no manejo ortodôntico, tornando-o mais efetivo, rápido e confortável. A conscientização, por parte da sociedade, das vantagens desse tratamento e o aumento da exigência estética entre os adultos, com uma vida social, afetiva e profissional cada vez mais longa e ativa, cria um contexto onde fica absolutamente estabelecida a necessidade de uma Ortodontia para os indivíduos adultos. OBJETIVO: o objetivo desse artigo foi relatar as nuances de diagnóstico e

  15. The effect of photobiomodulation on root resorption during orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimeri G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghada Nimeri, Chung H Kau, Rachel Corona, Jeffery Shelly Department of Orthodontics, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Photobiomodulation is used to accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatments. The changes in root morphology in a group of orthodontic patients who received photobiomodulation were evaluated using the cone beam computed tomography technique. The device used is called OrthoPulse, which produces low levels of light with a near infrared wavelength of 850 nm and an intensity of 60 mW/cm2 continuous wave. Twenty orthodontic patients were recruited for these experiments, all with class 1 malocclusion and with Little's Irregularity Index (>2 mm in either of the arches. Root resorption was detected by measuring changes in tooth length using cone beam computed tomography. These changes were measured before the orthodontic treatment and use of low-level laser therapy and after finishing the alignment level. Little's Irregularity Index for all the patients was calculated in both the maxilla and mandible and patients were divided into three groups for further analysis, which were then compared to the root resorption measurements. Our results showed that photobiomodulation did not cause root resorption greater than the normal range that is commonly detected in orthodontic treatments. Furthermore, no correlation between Little's Irregularity Index and root resorption was detected. Keywords: photobiomodulation, root resorption, accelerate tooth movement, orthodontics, cone beam computed tomography

  16. [Effect of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghui, Peng; Jing, Kang; Xiao, Deng

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to probe the psychological factors adolescent orthodontic patients, the role of body image and self-esteem in the whole process of orthodontic treatment and the impact on the efficacy and satisfaction of orthodontic. Five hundred and twenty-eight patients were selected in this study. The Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) , Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Negative Physical Self-General (NPS-G) and other body analysis scale study after orthodontic lasted 18-24 months were used to investigate the role of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment. Esthetic evaluation of patients teeth after correction had been significantly improved, patient self-evaluation difference IOTN-AC doctor evaluation, Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire-tooth confidence, aesthetic concerns, psychological impact and social function were significantly improved. The improvement of the dental aesthetics component (T2 when doctors evaluate IOTN-AC) was positively correlated with the evaluation of the efficacy, and was significantly negatively correlated with the negative emotions of patients at baseline. Negative body image-dental dissatisfied-cognitive component and the affective component, the overall negative body image and negative emotions can predict patient satisfaction with treatment efficacy. Orthodontic treatment not only improves the self-aesthetic evaluation of adolescent patients, but also has a positive effect on the mental health of adolescent patients.

  17. Structure retrieval in HREM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribelyuk, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A new iteration method for direct structure retrieval starting from the exit plane-wave function Ψ e (r) is proposed and tested on models. The imaginary part of the potential cannot be retrieved. The effects of the limited resolution of Ψ e (r) as well as neglect of high-order Laue-zone effects and the choice of the starting potential on the result are discussed. The procedure is found to be preferable to that based on the subsequent approximation method with respect to a higher convergence rate. It is shown that an error as low as 10% may be obtained for the real part of the retrieved potential up to vertical strokeσV(r)tvertical stroke<5. (orig.)

  18. Interactive Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR) from a historical point of view. Further, the focus here is on evaluation, because much research in IR deals with IR evaluation methodology due to the core research interest in IR performance, system interaction...... and satisfaction with retrieved information. In order to position IIR evaluation, the Cranfield model and the series of tests that led to the Cranfield model are outlined. Three iconic user-oriented studies and projects that all have contributed to how IIR is perceived and understood today are presented......: The MEDLARS test, the Book House fiction retrieval system, and the OKAPI project. On this basis the call for alternative IIR evaluation approaches motivated by the three revolutions (the cognitive, the relevance, and the interactive revolutions) put forward by Robertson & Hancock-Beaulieu (1992) is presented...

  19. Introduction to information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Christopher D; Schütze, Hinrich

    2008-01-01

    Class-tested and coherent, this textbook teaches classical and web information retrieval, including web search and the related areas of text classification and text clustering from basic concepts. It gives an up-to-date treatment of all aspects of the design and implementation of systems for gathering, indexing, and searching documents; methods for evaluating systems; and an introduction to the use of machine learning methods on text collections. All the important ideas are explained using examples and figures, making it perfect for introductory courses in information retrieval for advanced un

  20. Information Retrieval Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation has always played a major role in information retrieval, with the early pioneers such as Cyril Cleverdon and Gerard Salton laying the foundations for most of the evaluation methodologies in use today. The retrieval community has been extremely fortunate to have such a well-grounded evaluation paradigm during a period when most of the human language technologies were just developing. This lecture has the goal of explaining where these evaluation methodologies came from and how they have continued to adapt to the vastly changed environment in the search engine world today. The lecture

  1. [Research on Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-ying; Zhao, Zhi-he; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Qian, Yu-fen; Li, Wei-ran; Xu, Tian-min

    2012-03-01

    To analyze the results of multiple Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome, to investigate the relevance of different experiment items and to explore the weight of each monomial material. As a randomized clinical trial, with six orthodontic treatment centers and Angle's classification being regarded as two stratification factors, it contained 108 cases with integrity data, which was random extracted from 2383 cases that received orthodontic treatment in six orthodontic treatment centers during the past five years, gathering post-treatment study casts, cephalometrics and photographs of 48 cases as the research subject. Similarly taking Angle's classification as a stratification factor, 108 cases were randomly divided into 9 groups. The randomization of sampling and grouping were both generated by a pseudo-random number generator. According to the monomial and combined subjects, 69 orthodontic specialists were regarded as the raters to rank the 12 cases in each group, and to judge whether the case was qualified. Correlation analysis: the Spearman r between Post-M + C and Post-M + C + P and the Spearman r between Post-M + P and Post-M + C + P were both greater than 0.950. The Spearman r between Post-M and Post-P and the Spearman r between Post-M and Post-C were about 0.300. The Spearman r between Post-P and Post-C was 0.505. Regression analysis: the linear regression results: M + C = 0.782M + 0.308C - 0.150, M + P = 0.804M + 0.233P - 0.091, M + C + P = 0.764M + 0.243P + 0.131C - 0.291. The r(2) of above three models was greater than 0.9. It was applicable to use M + C and M + P instead of M + C + P. Study casts could not replace cephalometrics or photographs when doing subjective evaluation. Cephalometrics and photographs could not substitute for each other either. In the combined materials evaluation, model accounted for the largest percentage. Based on the regression model, for the greater part, the integration of

  2. Orthodontic exposure of multiple lmpactions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munda-Lacson, Maridin C; Venugopal, Adith

    2014-01-01

    There are rare cases of impacted permanent central incisors with dilacerations, a dental deformity characterized by pronounced angulations of the longitudinal tooth axis. Impaction of maxillary canines is an orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted teeth to their ideal position in the dental arch. This is a case report of a 10-year-old patient with impacted and dilacerated right central incisor and impacted left maxillary canine, following surgical exposure and appropriate orthodontic traction, the impacted teeth were surgically exposed and aligned into the dental arch.

  3. Four Cases of Angular Cheilitis in Orthodontic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kafaie

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Contact dermatitis is an inflammatory reaction of the skin and mucosa to either external or internal factors. It can be divided to two forms of irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Nickel is one of the most common materials that causes allergic contact dermatitis and is widely used in orthodontic appliances. The inflammatory reaction to this metal in orthodontics is usually stomatitis and angular cheilitis is very rare. We report 4 cases of angular cheilitis in orthodontic patients and discuss about their causes and treatments.

  4. Paresthesia during orthodontic treatment: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, André da Costa; Martins, Renato Parsekian; Martins, Isabela Parsekian; Martins, Lídia Parsekian

    2011-10-01

    Paresthesia of the lower lip is uncommon during orthodontic treatment. In the present case, paresthesia occurred during orthodontic leveling of an extruded mandibular left second molar. It was decided to remove this tooth from the appliance and allow it to relapse. A reanatomization was then performed by grinding. The causes and treatment options of this rare disorder are reviewed and discussed. The main cause of paresthesia during orthodontic treatment may be associated with contact between the dental roots and inferior alveolar nerve, which may be well observed on tomography scans. Treatment usually involves tooth movement in the opposite direction of the cause of the disorder.

  5. Development of retrievability plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, P.J.

    1999-03-01

    It has become clear, from monitoring of many national programmes for siting of final repositories for radioactive waste disposal, that the potential or otherwise for retrievability of emplaced wastes is the one issue in particular which is repeatedly raised during public consultation and interaction. Although even those repositories which may be constructed over the next decades will operate for many decades more and be sealed only after a long-term monitoring phase, there is little operational pressure to finalise retrievability concepts. However, as siting processes require detailed conceptual designs to be developed, as do the associated safety assessment exercises, it is becoming increasingly recognised that the potential for retrieval must be examined now. This report is the culmination of a short project carried out for the Swedish National Co-ordinator for Nuclear Waste Disposal to examine the situation as regards the development and possible implementation of retrievability as an integral part of a disposal concept for nuclear waste. Because of the short work period involved, it can at best be only an overview, designed to provide a broad picture of current plans. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate has begun to examine the issue, and a report is due later in 1999. A major collaborative investigation, which began in March 1998, is also currently underway under the auspices of the EU, but only involves implementing agencies from the various Member States. This report is intended to serve as background to these other studies when they appear. Utilising currently available information, as well as personal contacts, those countries currently examining retrievability or reversibility of disposal in some form have been identified. Information regarding these proposals has been collated, and contact made with relevant agencies and national regulatory bodies where possible. The report includes some review of the technical aspects of retrievability, with especial

  6. Prevalence of hypodontia in Chinese orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pambudi Rahardjo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypodontia is a phenomenon of congenitally missing teeth in human. A thousand and twelve panoramic radiographs of Chinese orthodontic patients were examined for agenesis of permanent teeth including third molars. The patients with missing teeth were divided into four group: the patients with missing less than 4 molars, missing all third molars, hypodontia and oligodontia. The result revealed, 210 patients affected one or more teeth agenesis with a total of 455 teeth missing. The prevalence of tooth agenesis was maxillary third molar 259 (56.9%, mandibular third molar 143 (31.4%, mandibular second premolar 15 (3.3%, mandibular lateral incisors 13 (2.8%, maxillary lateral incisors 8 (1.7%, maxillary second premolars 7 (1.5%, other teeth 10 (2.2% respectively. Of the mesial mandibular first permanent molar, mandibular second premolars were the most frequent missing teeth. Although hypodontia did not represent a public health problem, from orthodontic point of view it might cause esthetic and masticatory function disorders as well as more complex mechanotherapy of a patient.

  7. Assessment of perceived orthodontic appliance attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziuchkovski, James P; Fields, Henry W; Johnston, William M; Lindsey, Delwin T

    2008-04-01

    To date, no studies have been published in the literature evaluating the esthetics of orthodontic appliances. The purpose of this study was to assess appliance variables, including appliance type, brand, wire, and ligature tie, for their relative attractiveness. Demographic factors were also evaluated. Appliances were placed in an adult, and digital images were captured, standardized, and incorporated into a computer-based survey. Subjects (n = 200) rated each image for attractiveness on a visual analog scale. The attractiveness ratings were analyzed by using factorial analysis of variance with repeated measures. Post-hoc testing was done with the Tukey-Kramer test (overall a appliances), ceramic, and all self-ligating/stainless steel appliances. No differences between brands in each appliance type were found. Ratings of some ceramic appliances were significantly affected by archwire and ligature tie, depending on several demographic interactions. Orthodontic appliance attractiveness varies by the following hierarchy of appliance types: alternative > ceramic > all stainless steel/self-ligating. Wire and tie selection can affect the appearance of ceramic appliances but have no impact on stainless steel or self-ligating appliances. Certain demographic factors have variable effects on attractiveness ratings.

  8. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of Lab Appliances in Orthodontic Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzansky, D P; Park, J H

    Lab appliances are an integral part of orthodontics, from active treatment to retention. The quality and fit of an appliance can affect the treatment result and stability. This study aims to determine common points of failure in orthodontic appliances, and suggest methods to reduce this rate. A survey consisting of 23 questions was distributed to active members of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) via Survey Monkey. The most common appliance to need an adjustment was the wrap-around retainer, with the Hawley retainer as a close second. The least common appliance needing adjustment was the Essix/clear retainer. Respondents were asked which component of each appliance was most commonly responsible for an ill-fit. For Hawley and wrap-around retainers, clasps were the most common problem at 50%, whereas spring aligners had two components - clasps and labial bows, both at 38%. Ill-fitting Essix/clear retainers had gingival impingement (52%) closely followed by poor posterior seating (43%). Communication between the orthodontist and lab technician can be improved by establishing a quality assurance protocol for outgoing and incoming cases. The labial bow of Hawley's, wrap-arounds and spring aligners should be clearly demarcated on the casts. Impressions should be free of distortion and casts should be inspected for accuracy. Clear retainers and positioner should be trimmed to avoid gingival impingement. The type of clasp should be selected based on the anatomy of the teeth, and bands should be checked for accuracy of fit.

  10. Orthodontic tooth movement with clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Carl T; McGorray, Susan P; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. every two weeks using clear aligners. A duplicate aligner was provided for the second week of each cycle. Weekly polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions were taken, and digital models were fabricated to measure OTM. Initial and final cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained to characterize OTM. Results were compared to data from a similar protocol, where subjects received a new aligner biweekly. No significant difference was found in the amount of OTM between the two groups, with mean total OTM of 1.11 mm. (standard deviation (SD) 0.30) and 1.07 mm. (SD 0.33) for the weekly aligner and biweekly control groups, respectively (P = 0.72). Over eight weeks, in two-week intervals, material fatigue does not play a significant role in the rate or amount of tooth movement.

  11. Corrosion of weldments in orthodontic appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, S.M.; Riesgo, O.; Duffo, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The study of corrosion-related problems of dental materials has undergone a considerable development in recent years in order to avoid the use of materials with insufficient corrosion resistance in patients mouth. The subject of the present work was to study a particular type of corrosion: galvanic corrosion. One of the most common case of galvanic couples in patients mouth are the orthodontic appliances. The materials studied in the present work were stainless steel strips and silver-copper wires, isolated and welded between them. The electrochemical tests were performed in a NaCl 0.1M and Lactic Acid 0.1 M solution (pH2.3), and after test, the specimens were observed using the optical and scanning electron microscope. The results show that when stainless steel is coupled with a silver solder, the last is the anode of the galvanic couple. As a consequence of this, the silver solder undergone a severe attack. Stainless steel orthodontic appliances with silver solder are feasibly destroyed due to a severe attack on the filler metal disjoining the welded parts. (author) 9 refs

  12. Moving towards precision orthodontics: An evolving paradigm shift in the planning and delivery of customized orthodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheon, A H; Oberoi, S; Solem, R C; Kapila, S

    2017-06-01

    Advances in precision medicine portend similar progress in orthodontics and will be increasingly harnessed to achieve customized treatment approaches and enhance treatment efficiencies. Our goal is to provide a background on emerging advances in computer technologies and biomedicine and highlight their current and likely future applications to precision orthodontics. A review of orthodontically relevant technologies and advances in pertinent biological research was undertaken. Innovations in computer hardware and software, and 3D imaging technologies offer the ability for customized treatment and biomechanical planning that will be more fully realized within the next few decades. These technologies combined with 3D printing are already being applied to customized appliance fabrication such as aligners and retainers. The future prospects for custom fabrication of orthodontic brackets of appropriate material properties and smart devices are highly desirable and compelling goals. Within biomedicine, the fundamental understanding of cartilage growth and bone biology is currently being tested in animal models to modify mandibular growth and modulate tooth movement, respectively. Some of these discoveries will ultimately have clinical applications in orthodontics including for growth modification, accelerating orthodontic tooth movement, and enhancing anchorage or retention of teeth. Additional genomic and proteomic information will add to further customization of orthodontic diagnosis and treatments. Over the coming decades, precision orthodontics will continue to benefit from advances in many fields and will require the integration of advances in technology, and biomedical and clinical research to deliver optimal, efficient, safe, and reproducible personalized orthodontic treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Foreign Body Retrieval Foreign ...

  14. Information Retrieval Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Göker, Ayse; Davies, John

    2009-01-01

    Many applications that handle information on the internet would be completely inadequate without the support of information retrieval technology. How would we find information on the world wide web if there were no web search engines? How would we manage our email without spam filtering? Much of the

  15. Energy Storage and Retrieval

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Energy Storage and Retrieval The Secondary Battery Route. A K Shukla P Vishnu Kamath.

  16. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Foreign Body Retrieval Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  17. Utah Text Retrieval Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollaar, L A

    1983-10-01

    The Utah Text Retrieval project seeks well-engineered solutions to the implementation of large, inexpensive, rapid text information retrieval systems. The project has three major components. Perhaps the best known is the work on the specialized processors, particularly search engines, necessary to achieve the desired performance and cost. The other two concern the user interface to the system and the system's internal structure. The work on user interface development is not only concentrating on the syntax and semantics of the query language, but also on the overall environment the system presents to the user. Environmental enhancements include convenient ways to browse through retrieved documents, access to other information retrieval systems through gateways supporting a common command interface, and interfaces to word processing systems. The system's internal structure is based on a high-level data communications protocol linking the user interface, index processor, search processor, and other system modules. This allows them to be easily distributed in a multi- or specialized-processor configuration. It also allows new modules, such as a knowledge-based query reformulator, to be added. 15 references.

  18. The Knowledge Retrieval Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    AbstractPrevious discussions of knowledge transfer within multinational corporations tended tofocus on the process as an isolated phenomenon and on the factors that impede the process.Less attention has been given to how the individual knowledge worker retrieves or identifies,and then decodes kno...

  19. Music Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J. Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Identifies MIR (Music Information Retrieval) computer system problems, historic influences, current state-of-the-art, and future MIR solutions through an examination of the multidisciplinary approach to MIR. Highlights include pitch; temporal factors; harmonics; tone; editorial, textual, and bibliographic facets; multicultural factors; locating…

  20. Information Retrieval in Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschman, Arthur

    Discussed in this paper are the information problems in physics and the current program of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) being conducted in an attempt to develop an information retrieval system. The seriousness of the need is described by means of graphs indicating the exponential rise in the number of physics publications in the last…

  1. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B

    2016-01-01

    Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  2. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Luiz Ulema Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. Objective: This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  3. Retrievability, ethics and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.; Westerlind, M.

    2000-01-01

    Ethics is always a social concern, an integrated part of laws and regulations. Treatment of ethics as a separate part in the decision making process is therefore always debatable. It cannot be introduced as an extraneous component to compensate for, or to improve, a morally flawed practice, and the margin for unethical practices is strongly circumscribed by regulation in the nuclear field, internationally. However, a discussion on different stakeholders and their different ethical concerns should always be welcome. One example is the implementer's views on ethics. Even if they are in complete parity with existing legal and regulatory goals, the goals may still represent the implementer's own motives and choices. Also, stakeholders may view the laws or regulations as unfair. In making the critique, the stakeholder simply formulates a separate political standpoint. Finally, an alternative discussion is to place existing regulations into an ethical perspective - adding a new dimension to the issues. Retrievability for high level waste repositories is often in focus in ethical discussions. Unfortunately, it is used in many ways and has become an unclear term. It may cover anything from planned recuperation to the property of waste being retrievable in years or tens of years, or in the distant time range of hundreds or thousands of years. The term retrievability is often proposed to cover mainly positive qualities such as the option of later changes to the repository or a new disposal concept. However, as ICRP and others have pointed out, it also implies the possibility of: i) operational exposures, ii) continuing risks of accidental releases, iii) financial provisions to cover operating costs and iv) continuing reliance on institutional control, thus imposing some burdens to future generations. In a certain sense, anything can be retrieved from any repository. There is therefore a need for a clear and operable definition of retrievability requirements, including the

  4. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages...

  5. Orthodontic Elastic Embedded in Gingiva for 7 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental materials especially orthodontic elastics often get embedded in gingival tissues due to iatrogenic factors. If retained for a long time, inflammatory response starts as asymptomatic crestal bone loss and may progress to severe periodontal abscess. Unsupported orthodontic elastics used for diastema closure may result in exfoliation of teeth, while elastic separators may get embedded in interdental gingiva if banding is performed without removing it. These cases of negligence are detrimental for survival of affected teeth. This paper highlights a case of orthodontic elastic embedded in interproximal gingiva of a 23-year-old healthy female for 7 years after completion of fixed orthodontic treatment. Surprisingly, there was no clinical sign of inflammation around elastic band and it was removed easily without any local anaesthesia. However, mild crestal bone loss was observed on periapical radiograph. The gingiva healed completely after sub gingival debridement.

  6. Orthodontic elastic separator-induced periodontal abscess: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Talia; Neronov, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Orthodontic elastic bands were proposed as being the source of gingival abscesses that can rapidly lead to bone loss and teeth exfoliation. We report an adolescent, otherwise, healthy patient whose periodontal status was sound. Shortly after undergoing preparations for orthodontic treatment consisting of orthodontic separators, he presented with a periodontal abscess for which there was no apparent etiology. A non-orthoradial X-ray was inconclusive, but an appropriate one revealed a subgingival orthodontic separator as the cause of the abscess. Removal of the separator and thorough scaling led to complete resolution of the abscess, but there was already residual mild damage to the alveolar bone. Summary. Failure to use appropriate imaging to reveal the cause of gingival abscesses can result in the delay of implementing treatment and halting irreversible alveolar bone loss. An inflammatory process restricted to the gingiva and refractive to conventional therapy should raise the possibility of a foreign body etiology.

  7. Enamel reduction techniques in orthodontics : a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Jongsma, A; Ren, Yijin

    2013-01-01

    Artificial abrasion of interproximal surfaces has been described for almost seventy years as orthodontic intervention for achievement and maintenance of ideal treatment outcome. A variety of terms and approaches have been introduced throughout this period implying a growing clinicians' interest.

  8. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of a skeletal class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Radha; Singh, G K; Mehrotra, Divya; Singh, Alka

    2010-07-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment option left. One indication for surgery obviously is a malocclusion too severe for orthodontics alone. It is possible now to be at least semiquantitative about the limits of orthodontic treatment, in the context of producing normal occlusion as the diagrams of the "envelope of discrepancy" indicate. In this case report we present orthognathic treatment plan of an adult female patient with skeletal class III malocclusion. Patient's malocclusion was decompensated by orthodontic treatment just before the surgery and then normal jaw relationship achieved by bilateral sagittal split osteotomy.

  9. Surgical–orthodontic treatment of a skeletal class III malocclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Radha; Singh, G. K.; Mehrotra, Divya; Singh, Alka

    2010-01-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment option left. One indication for surgery obviously is a malocclusion too severe for orthodontics alone. It is possible now to be at least semiquantitative about the limits of orthodontic treatment, in the context of producing normal occlusion as the diagrams of the “envelope of discrepancy” indicate. In this case report we present orthognathic treatment plan of an adult female patient with skeletal class III malocclusion. Patient's malocclusion was decompensated by orthodontic treatment just before the surgery and then normal jaw relationship achieved by bilateral sagittal split osteotomy. PMID:22442586

  10. Risk variables of external apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Feio Barroso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: External apical root resorption (EARR is an adverse outcome of the orthodontic treatment. So far, no single or associated factor has been identified as responsible for EARR due to tooth movement. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association of risk variables (age, gender, extraction for orthodontic treatment and Angle classification with EARR and orthodontic treatment. METHOD: The sample (n=72 was divided into two groups according to presence (n=32 or absence (n=40 of EARR in maxillary central and lateral incisors after orthodontic treatment. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in EARR according to age, gender, extraction or type of malocclusion (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: The risk variables examined were not associated with EARR in the study population.

  11. Taking stock: a critical perspective on contemporary orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon

    2004-08-01

    This essay briefly considers some underlying concerns about the direction of clinical research in orthodontics. The field is viewed from a personal perspective as things are now, as they are becoming, and as I believe they should be.

  12. Orthodontic Elastic Separator-Induced Periodontal Abscess: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia Becker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Orthodontic elastic bands were proposed as being the source of gingival abscesses that can rapidly lead to bone loss and teeth exfoliation. We report an adolescent, otherwise, healthy patient whose periodontal status was sound. Shortly after undergoing preparations for orthodontic treatment consisting of orthodontic separators, he presented with a periodontal abscess for which there was no apparent etiology. A non-orthoradial X-ray was inconclusive, but an appropriate one revealed a subgingival orthodontic separator as the cause of the abscess. Removal of the separator and thorough scaling led to complete resolution of the abscess, but there was already residual mild damage to the alveolar bone. Summary. Failure to use appropriate imaging to reveal the cause of gingival abscesses can result in the delay of implementing treatment and halting irreversible alveolar bone loss. An inflammatory process restricted to the gingiva and refractive to conventional therapy should raise the possibility of a foreign body etiology.

  13. Experiense with remineraling means in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanova Ye.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment using bracket-technology a high risk of caries development. The algorithm of preventive interventions for the prevention of hair demineralization of enamel of the teeth

  14. Orthodontic management by functional activator treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Ortu, Eleonora; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Pietropaoli, Davide; Giannoni, Mario; Monaco, Annalisa

    2017-12-02

    Managing orthodontic treatment is often very difficult for the orthodontist. Many devices are used during the orthopedic phase of orthodontic treatment, always with different functions. We describe a case of orthodontic management treated with the Equilibrator O.S.A. device (equilibrator designed by Ovidi, Santi, and Aprile for Eptamed SRL; Cesena, Italy; www.eptamed.com ). A healthy 10-year-old white boy presented with a skeletal class II, division 1 malocclusion, molar class II, exhibiting an overjet of 7 mm prior to treatment. For treatment, we only used the Equilibrator O.S.A. device. We successfully treated an orthopedic/orthodontic case with a particular device that we describe here.

  15. Digital Thickness Measurement of a Transparent Plastic Orthodontic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Hwan; Rhim, Sung-Han

    2018-05-01

    A transparent orthodontic device is used to move the teeth to the final calibration position to form a proper set of teeth. Because the uniform thickness of the device plays an important role in tooth positioning, the accuracy of the device's thickness profile is important for effective orthodontic treatment. However, due to the complexity of the device's geometry and the transparency of the device's material, measuring the complete thickness profile has been difficult. In the present study, a new optical scanning method to measure the thickness profile of transparent plastic orthodontic devices is proposed and evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The error of the new measurement method is less than ±18 μm. The new method can be used to measure the thickness of non-specific, multi-curved, transparent orthodontic devices.

  16. Digital lingual orthodontics and temporary anchorage devices for efficient biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment at all times present with an esthetic demand even during treatment. The lingual orthodontics, apart from its esthetic values, also presents several other advantages. Currently, it has become a complete system in itself, starting from an accurate diagnosis, treatment protocol, and laboratory procedure to placement of the appliance in the patient′s mouth. With the advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system, the lingual orthodontics is more evolved and made ease operators in respect to more efficient mechanics and reduced archwire adjustments. The present article presents two cases to show the efficiency of lingual orthodontics with temporary anchorage devices and anterior retraction hook.

  17. Orthodontic intrusion : Conventional and mini-implant assisted intrusion mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Belludi

    2012-01-01

    intrusion has revolutionized orthodontic anchorage and biomechanics by making anchorage perfectly stable. This article addresses various conventional clinical intrusion mechanics and especially intrusion using mini-implants that have proven effective over the years for intrusion of maxillary anteriors.

  18. the orthodontic management of an adult with sickle cell disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... a patient with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) needs ortho- dontic treatment ... Orthodontic Management. 215. Measures ... under strict control by the Dental Hygienists to avoid ... Ghana. Pediatrics 2008; 121 (suppl 2): 120-121. 2.

  19. The influence of cephalometrics on orthodontic treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, P.G.; Habets, L.L.M.H.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Zentner, A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Since its introduction, cephalometrics, i.e. cephalometric radiography and analysis, has been used for orthodontic treatment planning. However, the effectiveness of this diagnostic method remains questionable. A randomized crossover study was designed to assess the infl uence of

  20. Dental Hygiene and Orthodontics: Effect of Ultrasonic Instrumentation on Bonding Efficacy of Different Lingual Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Collesano, Vittorio; Tovt, Gaia; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Gandini, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Dental hygienists are often faced with patients wearing lingual orthodontic therapy, as ultrasonic instrumentation (UI) is crucial for oral health. As the application of external forces can lead to premature bonding failure, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UI on shear bond strength (SBS) and on adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different lingual orthodontic brackets. 200 bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups. Four different lingual (STB, Ormco; TTR, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics; Idea, Leone; 2D, Forestadent) and vestibular control (Victory, 3M) brackets were bonded. UI was performed in half of specimens, whereas the other half did not receive any treatment. All groups were tested with a universal testing machine. SBS and ARI values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed (significance: P = 0.05). TTR, Idea, and 2D lingual brackets significantly lowered SBS after UI, whereas for other braces no effect was recorded. Appliances with lower mesh area significantly reduced their adhesion capacity after UI. Moreover groups subjected to UI showed higher ARI scores than controls. UI lowered SBS of lingual appliances of small dimensions so particular care should be posed avoiding prolonged instrumentation around bracket base during plaque removal. Moreover, UI influenced also ARI scores.

  1. Role of Orthodontics in Forensic Odontology- A Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Giridhar; Reddy, Vinay P; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aggarwal, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontics like any other specialty has much to offer law enforcement in the detection and solution of crime or in civil proceedings. Forensic odontology often requires an interdisciplinary approach towards dentistry for the purpose of proper diagnosis of cases. In cases where the forensic odontologist has to establish a person’s identity, an orthodontist can be of great help at times. Teeth, with their anatomic/physiologic variations and therapy such as orthodontic treatment, restorations ...

  2. Management of post-orthodontic white spot lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonesson, Mikael; Bergstrand, Fredrik; Gizani, Sotiria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The management of post-orthodontic white spot lesions is based on remineralization strategies or a minimal-invasive camouflage of the lesions. AIM: The aim of this systematic review was to identify and assess the quality of evidence for the various clinical technologies......-orthodontic white spot lesions. Further well-performed controlled clinical trials with long-term follow-up are needed to establish best clinical practice....

  3. Using Little's Irregularity Index in orthodontics: outdated and inaccurate?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Macauley, Donal

    2012-12-01

    Little\\'s Irregularity Index (LII) was devised to objectively score mandibular incisor alignment for epidemiological studies but has been extended to assess the relative performance of orthodontic brackets, retainer or treatment modalities. Our aim was to examine the repeatability and precision of LII measurements of four independent examiners on the maxillary arch of orthodontic patients. The hypothesis was that the reproducibility of individual contact point displacement measurements, used to calculate the LII score, are inappropriate.

  4. The management of premolar supernumeraries in three orthodontic cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the incidence, etiology and location of supernumerary teeth with emphasis on premolar supernumeraries and examines the management of supernumerary premolars of three patients undergoing orthodontics. These cases demonstrate that the management of premolars is assessed individually and treatments based on potential complications, which may occur during the orthodontic and surgical management of the dentition. Progress and posttreatment radiographs are recommended for the assessment of late forming supernumerary teeth.

  5. Treatment with active orthodontic appliance in adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Radeska, Ana; Radeski, Josif; Zlatanovska, Katerina; Papakoca, Kiro; Zarkova, Julija

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Showing the efficiency of orthodontic mobile appliance in treatment of adult patient Case summary: The patient A.K. Age 25 years whit forced progenia, bilateral hypodontia of the maxillary incisors and cross bite of 2 mm in front. The patient was treated with active orthodontic appliance whit bitten ridge and down labial arch. The treatment lasted 18 months after which periods is reached normal occlusion with normal overlap in front and closed diastema mediana. The hypodontia of the m...

  6. Survey on the practice of lingual orthodontics in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lingual orthodontics provides an esthetic option of orthodontic treatment, especially for the adults. Lingual orthodontics being an important treatment modality requires extensive training and expertise for honest outcomes. In this study, we have composed a questionnaire to obtain the trend in the practice of lingual orthodontics in India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was composed of several aspects of lingual orthodontics. The survey instrument was hosted electronically on a secure website, www.typeform.com . The survey was optimized for presentation on tablets, mobiles, and laptops, which were the platforms used by participants to take the survey. The survey data were received and saved by the same secure website. Pearson Chi-square test was done using SPSS 17.0 version software to determine the correlation between treatment outcome and the use of laboratory for the initial setup. Results: A total of 248 orthodontists responded to the survey, 70% orthodontists said that they practice lingual orthodontics. Among the orthodontists who practice lingual orthodontics, 71% orthodontists treat extraction and nonextraction cases and 29% treat only nonextraction cases. Forty percent orthodontists said their final finishing of case is good, 16% said that final finishing is average, 26.5% said that final finishing is very good, and only 17.5% said that it is excellent. Statistically significant correlation exists (P = 0.004 between the treatment outcome and use of laboratory for initial setup. Conclusion: Many orthodontists are taking up lingual cases in India. Survey indicates that there is still room for betterment in terms of the final treatment outcome, and many orthodontists feel that there is need of formal training for expertise in lingual orthodontics.

  7. Diode lasers: A magical wand to an orthodontic practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Kumar Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available LASER (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation is a powerful source of light, which has innumerable applications in all the fields of science including medicine and dentistry. It is one such technology that has become a desirable and an inseparable alternative to many traditional surgical procedures being held in the field of dentistry, and orthodontics is no exception. The current article describes the uses of a diode laser as an indispensable tool in an orthodontic office.

  8. Pre- and Postsurgical Orthodontics in Patients with Moebius Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisabel Magnifico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a combined orthodontic-surgical correction of an adult patient’s malocclusion affected by Moebius Syndrome (MS. The treatment was conducted at the Dentistry Unit and the Maxillofacial Surgery Unit of the University Hospital of Parma. Treatment of malocclusion was performed after the correction of facial mimic mobility with smile surgery. The postoperative stability and orthodontic results were good and the correction of the morphological problems related to the syndrome was very satisfactory.

  9. Surgical-orthodontic correction of a Class III dentofacial deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, Raghu; Kakkirala, Neelima

    2010-04-01

    This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic treatment of a 26-year-old post-pubertal male patient with a Class III dentofacial deformity. In the pre-surgical orthodontic phase of treatment, a reverse overjet of 5.5 mm was created and arch compatibility was obtained. A mandibualr set back with BSSO was performed during surgery to restore ideal overjet, overbite, occlusion and optimal esthetics. After 1 year of treatment, the results remained stable.

  10. Orthodontic-surgical treatment of bilateral maxillary canine impaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year-old female patient reported with the chief complaint of irregular front teeth. She had a skeletal Class III and Angle's Class I malocclusion with hyperdivergent growth pattern and bilateral impaction of maxillary canines. Surgical exposure of the impacted teeth and orthodontic alignment was planned. The surgical exposure was done by a minimally invasive modified window technique. Orthodontic treatment of impacted canines without causing significant morbidity to the adjacent teeth an...

  11. Orthodontic treatment need in a Spanish young adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Company, José M.; Manzanera-Pastor, David; Almerich-Silla, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Orthodontic treatment need has often been assessed in child populations, but few studies employing internationally-recognized indices have been conducted in adult or young adult populations. The aim of this study was to determine the orthodontic treatment need of a young adult population in Spain by means of the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) and the need perceived by the patients. Study design: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in a broad, representative sample of 671 adults aged between 35 and 44 years using health centers in the Valencia Region of Spain, following the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). Results: Orthodontic treatment was required by 31.3% of the sample according to the DAI and 19.2% according to the IOTN (DHC). The orthodontic treatment need perceived by the patients was 21.1%. On relating treatment need to different variables, significant differences in patient perception were encountered by gender, as women perceived a greater need (23.9%) than men (14.4%). Significant differences in previous orthodontic treatment history were found between middle/high (15%) and low (9%) social class and between secondary/tertiary (14%) and primary (3.3%) education. Conclusions: There was no agreement between the treatment need assessed objectively by the indices and that perceived by the patient, or between the indices themselves. The decision to undergo orthodontic treatment can depend on socioeconomic and psychological factors and on values and principles that do not easily lend themselves to objective measurement. Key words:Orthodontics, epidemiology, adult, malocclusion. PMID:22322504

  12. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ODONTOGENIC BACTERAEMIA IN ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, O D; Sanu, O O; Utomi, I L; Nwaokorie, F O

    2016-01-01

    Various researches have investigated factors associated with the prevalence and intensity of bacteraemia following oral procedures including orthodontic procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age, gender, plaque and gingival indices on the occurrence of odontogenic bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures. Orthodontic Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos , Nigeria. Using the consecutive, convenience sampling method, a total of 100 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited for the study and peripheral blood was collected before and again within 2 minutes of completion of orthodontic procedures for microbiologic analysis using the BACTEC automated blood culture system and the lysis filtration methods of blood culturing. The subjects were randomly placed in one of four orthodontic procedures investigated: alginate impression making (Group I), separator placement (Group II), band cementation (Group III) and arch wire change (Group IV). Plaque and gingival indices were assessed using the plaque component of the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) (Greene & Vermillion) and Modified gingival index (Lobene) respectively before blood collection. Spearman Point bi-serial correlations and logistic regression statistics were used for statistical evaluations at p orthodontic treatment procedures of 16% and 28% were observed respectively using the BACTEC and lysis filtration methods. A statistically significant increase in the prevalence of bateraemia was observed following separator placement (p=0.016). An increase in age, plaque index scores and modified gingival index scores of the subjects were found to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures, with plaque index score showing the strongest correlation. Separator placement was found to induce significantly highest level of bacteraemia. Meticulous oral hygiene practice and the use of 0

  13. Surgical-orthodontic correction of a Class III dentofacial deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Devanna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic treatment of a 26-year-old post-pubertal male patient with a Class III dentofacial deformity. In the pre-surgical orthodontic phase of treatment, a reverse overjet of 5.5 mm was created and arch compatibility was obtained. A mandibualr set back with BSSO was performed during surgery to restore ideal overjet, overbite, occlusion and optimal esthetics. After 1 year of treatment, the results remained stable.

  14. Evaluation of an Experimental Adhesive Resin for Orthodontic Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, B. H.; Alkheraif, A. A.; Pavithra, D.; Hashem, M. I.; Alkhudhairy, F.; Elsharawy, M.; Divakar, D. D.; Vallittu, P. K.; Matinlinna, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of an experimental adhesive resin for orthodontic bonding by measuring some the chemical and mechanical properties. The resin demonstrated increased values of nanohardness and elastic modulus, but the differences were not significant compared with those for the Transbond XT adhesives. The experimental adhesive resin could be a feasible choice or a substitute for the traditional bis-GMA-based resins used in bonding orthodontic attachments.

  15. Mobile medical image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  16. Body dysmorphic disorder and orthodontics--an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Marshneil Trista; Farella, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Patients with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) often seek aesthetic medical treatment including orthodontics to correct their perceived physical defects. When the disorder pertains to the dentofacial region, it is important for orthodontists to be familiar with this condition. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on BDD and its relationship to orthodontics. PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were searched for publications relating to BDD and orthodontics. Further articles were sourced from the reference lists of the articles identified through the search. The literature recommends that orthodontic patients suspected of having BDD should be referred to a psychiatrist for a definitive diagnosis and subsequent management. However, this may be difficult to implement in clinical practice. Management by a psychiatrist could include pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy. There is still debate as to whether orthodontic treatment should be provided for these patients. As health care workers providing aesthetic treatment to patients, orthodontists should be aware of BDD and its implications. Risks include repeated requests for unnecessary treatment, dissatisfaction with the result and thus potential for litigation. BDD still remains a challenge to diagnose, and further research is needed to determine the appropriate management of orthodontic patients suffering from the disorder.

  17. Adult orthodontics: a quality assessment of Internet information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Siobhán Mary; Millett, Declan T

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the quality, reliability and readability of information on the Internet on adult orthodontics. A quality assessment of adult orthodontic websites. Postgraduate Orthodontic Unit, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Cork, Ireland. An Internet search using three search engines (Google, Yahoo and Bing) was conducted using the terms ('adult orthodontics' and 'adult braces'). The first 50 websites from each engine and under each search term were screened and exclusion criteria applied. Included websites were then assessed for quality using four methods: the HON seal, JAMA benchmarks, the DISCERN instrument and the LIDA tool. Readability of included websites was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES). Only 13 websites met the inclusion criteria. Most were of US origin (n = 8; 61%). The authors of the websites were dentists (n = 5; 39%), professional organizations (n = 2; 15%), past patients (n = 2; 15%) and unspecified (n = 4; 31%). Only 1 website displayed the HON seal and three websites contained all JAMA benchmarks. The mean overall score for DISCERN was 3.9/5 and the mean total LIDA score was 115/144. The average FRES score was 63.1/100. The number of informative websites on adult orthodontics is low and these are of moderate quality. More accurate, high-quality Internet resources are required on adult orthodontics. Recommendations are made as to how this may be achieved.

  18. Orthodontic treatment in patients with reduced periodontal insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Labayle Couhat Carraro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to investigate orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients. Periodontal disease causes loss of attachment that results in pathological dental migration Periodontal disease can affect young persons and adults, with a higher incidence in adults, so that the number of adults seeking orthodontic treatment has increased significantly. The periodontal disease must be controlled before the orthodontic treatment begins, and during the treatment it is important to keep the patient motivated as regards control of oral hygiene, with periodical reviews by the periodontist. With regard to assembly of the fixed appliance, special care is required not to place the accessories close to the gingival margin, in addition to using light forces porportional to the amount of periodontal attachment, and kept within the biological limits of movement. Correction of the poorly positioned teeth and controlled orthodontic movement can favor remodeling of the alveolar process in all directions. After orthodontic treatment it is important plan containment individually. Integrated orthodontic-periodontal teamwork is essential for reestablishing a healthy periodontium and satisfactory occlusion.

  19. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  20. The current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to investigate the current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics. The electronic database search was done on PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, EBSCOhost, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar reporting on appliance design, bonding, and laboratory setup, biomechanics, survey studies, case reports, and treatment outcomes to find the current evidence of lingual orthodontics. The evidence available on lingual orthodontics traces a very clear and predictable pattern. The 80′s was devoted to the limitation and progression of the concept; the 90′s to the comparison between labial and lingual and the evolution of laboratory technique and bracket system. The last decade focuses on innovations, the predictability of outcomes, the impact of white spot lesion, and the patient acceptability. This review also shows that biomechanical principles of lingual orthodontics are well understood and established today, any case that can be treated with labial orthodontic appliance, can also be treated effectively with lingual orthodontic appliance as the completely customized lingual appliance can provide predetermined treatment outcome.

  1. [Class III surgical patients facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-qi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Zou, Wei; Bai, Yun-yang; Jiang, Jiu-hui

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the treatment time and the anterior and posterior teeth movement pattern as closing extraction space for the Class III surgical patients facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment. There were 10 skeletal Class III patients in accelerated osteogenic orthodontic group (AOO) and 10 patients in control group. Upper first premolars were extracted in all patients. After leveling and alignment (T2), corticotomy was performed in the area of maxillary anterior teeth to accelerate space closing.Study models of upper dentition were taken before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after space closing (T3). All the casts were laser scanned, and the distances of the movement of incisors and molars were digitally measured. The distances of tooth movement in two groups were recorded and analyzed. The alignment time between two groups was not statistically significant. The treatment time in AOO group from T2 to T3 was less than that in the control group (less than 9.1 ± 4.1 months). The treatment time in AOO group from T1 to T3 was less than that in the control group (less than 6.3 ± 4.8 months), and the differences were significant (P 0.05). Accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment could accelerate space closing in Class III surgical patients and shorten preoperative orthodontic time. There were no influence on the movement pattern of anterior and posterior teeth during pre-surgical orthodontic treatment.

  2. Interactive Information Retrieval:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    IIR from the perspective of search dedication and task load in order to also include everyday life information seeking? With this presentation, the IIR community is invited to an exchange of ideas and is encouraged to engage in collaborations with the solving of these (and other) issues to our joint......This presentation addresses methodological issues of interactive information retrieval (IIR) evaluation in terms of what it entails to study users' use and interaction with IR systems, as well as their satisfaction with retrieved information. In particular, the presentation focuses on test design...... of the users to ensure a complete and realistic picture to enhance our understanding of IIR. The presentation also reflects on whether a re-thinking of the concept on an information need is necessary. One may ask whether it still makes sense to talk about types of information needs. Or should we rather study...

  3. Introduction to information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Christopher D; Schütze, Hinrich

    2008-01-01

    Class-tested and coherent, this textbook teaches classical and web information retrieval, including web search and the related areas of text classification and text clustering from basic concepts. It gives an up-to-date treatment of all aspects of the design and implementation of systems for gathering, indexing, and searching documents; methods for evaluating systems; and an introduction to the use of machine learning methods on text collections. All the important ideas are explained using examples and figures, making it perfect for introductory courses in information retrieval for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in computer science. Based on feedback from extensive classroom experience, the book has been carefully structured in order to make teaching more natural and effective. Slides and additional exercises (with solutions for lecturers) are also available through the book's supporting website to help course instructors prepare their lectures.

  4. JINR information retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaudov, D.D.; Govorun, N.N.

    1975-01-01

    The organization of the main files of the JINR Information Retrieval System is described. There are four main files in the System. They are as follows: MD file that consists of abstracts of documents; OMPOD file where the index records of documents are gathered; MZD file that consists of list heads, and OMD file- the file of descriptors. The last three files are considered in some detail. The System is realized in the COBOL language on the CDC computer

  5. Affective Music Information Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ju-Chiang; Yang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Hsin-Min

    2015-01-01

    Much of the appeal of music lies in its power to convey emotions/moods and to evoke them in listeners. In consequence, the past decade witnessed a growing interest in modeling emotions from musical signals in the music information retrieval (MIR) community. In this article, we present a novel generative approach to music emotion modeling, with a specific focus on the valence-arousal (VA) dimension model of emotion. The presented generative model, called \\emph{acoustic emotion Gaussians} (AEG)...

  6. Automated Medical Literature Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hawking

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The constantly growing publication rate of medical research articles puts increasing pressure on medical specialists who need to be aware of the recent developments in their field. The currently used literature retrieval systems allow researchers to find specific papers; however the search task is still repetitive and time-consuming. Aims In this paper we describe a system that retrieves medical publications by automatically generating queries based on data from an electronic patient record. This allows the doctor to focus on medical issues and provide an improved service to the patient, with higher confidence that it is underpinned by current research. Method Our research prototype automatically generates query terms based on the patient record and adds weight factors for each term. Currently the patient’s age is taken into account with a fuzzy logic derived weight, and terms describing blood-related anomalies are derived from recent blood test results. Conditionally selected homonyms are used for query expansion. The query retrieves matching records from a local index of PubMed publications and displays results in descending relevance for the given patient. Recent publications are clearly highlighted for instant recognition by the researcher. Results Nine medical specialists from the Royal Adelaide Hospital evaluated the system and submitted pre-trial and post-trial questionnaires. Throughout the study we received positive feedback as doctors felt the support provided by the prototype was useful, and which they would like to use in their daily routine. Conclusion By supporting the time-consuming task of query formulation and iterative modification as well as by presenting the search results in order of relevance for the specific patient, literature retrieval becomes part of the daily workflow of busy professionals.

  7. The Wikipedia Image Retrieval Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsikrika (Theodora); J. Kludas

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractThe wikipedia image retrieval task at ImageCLEF provides a testbed for the system-oriented evaluation of visual information retrieval from a collection of Wikipedia images. The aim is to investigate the effectiveness of retrieval approaches that exploit textual and visual evidence in the

  8. DORS: DDC Online Retrieval System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Songqiao; Svenonius, Elaine

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Dewey Online Retrieval System (DORS), which was developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), to experiment with classification-based search strategies in online catalogs. Classification structures in automated information retrieval are discussed; and specifications for a classification retrieval interface are…

  9. SURGICAL ORTHODONTICS: LITERATURE REVIEW AND CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush HEDA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery is a surgical procedure largely practiced throughout the world for the correction of various maxillofacial deformities. The procedure for correcting a particular deformity will be done after proper evaluation, which includes cephalometric, dental model analysis and photographs. The patient undergoes pre-surgical orthodontic correction for dental compensation, after which surgery is planned. During the last few decades, the profession has witnessed intense interest for the treatment of facial deformities, being widely practiced throughout the world. Orthognathic surgery has become an acceptable treatment plan for patients with various maxillofacial deformities, giving pleasing results. The present study reports the successful treatment method of Class II division 1 malocclusion through orthognathic surgery.

  10. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of orthodontic metallic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takashi; Oda, Hirotake; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Sano, Natsuki; Batbayar, Nomintsetseg; Terashima, Yukari; Sato, Soh; Terada, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Biocorrosion (microbiologically influenced corrosion; MIC) occur in aquatic habitats varying in nutrient content, temperature, stress and pH. The oral environment of organisms, including humans, should be one of the most hospitable for MIC. Corrosion of metallic appliances in the oral region is one cause of metal allergy in patients. In this study, an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer revealed elution of Fe, Cr and Ni from stainless steel (SUS) appliances incubated with oral bacteria. Three-dimensional laser confocal microscopy also revealed that oral bacterial culture promoted increased surface roughness and corrosion pits in SUS appliances. The pH of the supernatant was lowered after co-culture of appliances and oral bacteria in any combinations, but not reached at the level of depassivation pH of their metallic materials. This study showed that Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis which easily created biofilm on the surfaces of teeth and appliances, did corrode orthodontic SUS appliances.

  11. Evolution of esthetic considerations in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Patrick K

    2015-09-01

    The importance of facial esthetics to the practice of orthodontics has its origins at the beginning of our specialty. In 1900, Edward H. Angle believed that an esthetic or a "harmonious" face required a full complement of teeth, but many who came after him questioned this notion. In the 1930s, the development of cephalometrics laid the foundation for studying growth and development, treatment effects, facial forms, and esthetics. By the 1950s, the importance of diagnosing and planning treatment for an esthetic result was established, but the measurement of soft tissue variables was lacking, and this became an important area of research. In the 1970s, researchers were looking at the stability of hard tissue changes over time, and they were also interested in how the soft tissues change with age. Although the early studies of esthetics in orthodontic treatment focused on how clinicians viewed their patients, changing demographics and cultural attitudes led researchers to look more seriously at consumer preferences and the public's attitudes. Their findings--that consumers preferred fuller lips--led to a swing back toward nonextraction treatment. Expansion appliances and molar distalization techniques became popular, and surgical procedures to obtain more ideal esthetic results became more common. Since the 1990s, advances in computers and technology have allowed us to study, predict, and produce esthetic results previously thought unattainable. Today, more so than at any other time in our specialty, we have the ability to provide esthetic results to our patients. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An introduction to dento-legal issues and risks in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, A J; Willmot, D; Hunt, N P

    2015-02-16

    Orthodontic treatment is not without risk. This article aims to look at some of the dento-legal issues surrounding orthodontic treatment, the risks to both the clinician and the patient, and how some of these risks can be mitigated.

  13. Orthodontics for mentally handicapped patients [Orthodontie bij pati�nten met een verstandelijke handicap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelink, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The mentally handicapped exhibit a 3 times higher incidence of malocclusions and related functional problems than the general population. In contrast there is little available literature relating to the orthodontic treatment of handicapped patients. Based on published articles on orthodontic

  14. A cone-beam computed tomography study of orthodontic apical root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hong Yu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Results show that larger tooth movement after orthodontic treatment may be associated with increased severity of root resorption. This study has demonstrated that CBCT is a useful approach for evaluating apical root resorption after orthodontic treatment.

  15. Incidence and severity of root resorption in orthodontically moved premolars in dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maltha, J.C.; Leeuwen, E.J. van; Dijkman, G.E.H.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study treatment-related factors for external root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. DESIGN: An experimental animal study. SETTING AND SAMPLE POPULATION: Department of Orthodontics and Oral Biology, University Medical Centre Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Twenty-four young

  16. Orthodontic Forces Induce the Cytoprotective Enzyme Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, C.M.; Xie, R.; Lundvig, D.M.S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Uijttenboogaart, J.T.; Rheden, R.E.M. van; Maltha, J.C.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic forces disturb the microenvironment of the periodontal ligament (PDL), and induce craniofacial bone remodeling which is necessary for tooth movement. Unfortunately, orthodontic tooth movement is often hampered by ischemic injury and cell death within the PDL (hyalinization) and root

  17. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Factors that Affect Retrieval Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbuesch, Philipp, E-mail: philippgeisbuesch@gmx.de; Benenati, James F.; Pena, Constantino S.; Couvillon, Joseph; Powell, Alex; Gandhi, Ripal; Samuels, Shaun; Uthoff, Heiko [Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report and analyze the indications, procedural success, and complications of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCF) placement and to identify parameters that influence retrieval attempt and failure. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, a total of 200 patients (80 men, median age 67 years, range 11-95 years) received a rIVCF with the clinical possibility that it could be removed. All patients with rIVCF were prospectively entered into a database and followed until retrieval or a decision not to retrieve the filter was made. A retrospective analysis of this database was performed. Results: Sixty-one percent of patients had an accepted indication for filter placement; 39% of patients had a relative indication. There was a tendency toward a higher retrieval rate in patients with relative indications (40% vs. 55%, P = 0.076). Filter placement was technically successful in all patients, with no procedure-related mortality. The retrieval rate was 53%. Patient age of >80 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.056, P > 0.0001) and presence of malignancy (OR 0.303, P = 0.003) was associated with a significantly reduced probability for attempted retrieval. Retrieval failure occurred in 7% (6 of 91) of all retrieval attempts. A time interval of > 90 days between implantation and attempted retrieval was associated with retrieval failure (OR 19.8, P = 0.009). Conclusions: Patient age >80 years and a history of malignancy are predictors of a reduced probability for retrieval attempt. The rate of retrieval failure is low and seems to be associated with a time interval of >90 days between filter placement and retrieval.

  18. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Factors that Affect Retrieval Success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisbüsch, Philipp; Benenati, James F.; Peña, Constantino S.; Couvillon, Joseph; Powell, Alex; Gandhi, Ripal; Samuels, Shaun; Uthoff, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report and analyze the indications, procedural success, and complications of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCF) placement and to identify parameters that influence retrieval attempt and failure. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, a total of 200 patients (80 men, median age 67 years, range 11–95 years) received a rIVCF with the clinical possibility that it could be removed. All patients with rIVCF were prospectively entered into a database and followed until retrieval or a decision not to retrieve the filter was made. A retrospective analysis of this database was performed. Results: Sixty-one percent of patients had an accepted indication for filter placement; 39% of patients had a relative indication. There was a tendency toward a higher retrieval rate in patients with relative indications (40% vs. 55%, P = 0.076). Filter placement was technically successful in all patients, with no procedure-related mortality. The retrieval rate was 53%. Patient age of >80 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.056, P > 0.0001) and presence of malignancy (OR 0.303, P = 0.003) was associated with a significantly reduced probability for attempted retrieval. Retrieval failure occurred in 7% (6 of 91) of all retrieval attempts. A time interval of > 90 days between implantation and attempted retrieval was associated with retrieval failure (OR 19.8, P = 0.009). Conclusions: Patient age >80 years and a history of malignancy are predictors of a reduced probability for retrieval attempt. The rate of retrieval failure is low and seems to be associated with a time interval of >90 days between filter placement and retrieval.

  19. Kansal′s Retainer: A Removable, Tooth-Borne Orthodontic Retainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhanshu Kansal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate retention of a finished orthodontic patient can be the difference between a successful or an unsuccessful treatment. The acrylic portion of the conventional Hawley′s appliance causes a reduced compliance in many orthodontic patients. In an attempt to overcome the drawbacks of the previously used orthodontic retainers a tooth-borne orthodontic retainer was designed, also called the ′Kansal′s retainer′ (Patent pending.

  20. Guenter Tulip Filter Retrieval Experience: Predictors of Successful Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turba, Ulku Cenk; Arslan, Bulent; Meuse, Michael; Sabri, Saher; Macik, Barbara Gail; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Angle, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We report our experience with Guenter Tulip filter placement indications, retrievals, and procedural problems, with emphasis on alternative retrieval techniques. We have identified 92 consecutive patients in whom a Guenter Tulip filter was placed and filter removal attempted. We recorded patient demographic information, filter placement and retrieval indications, procedures, standard and nonstandard filter retrieval techniques, complications, and clinical outcomes. The mean time to retrieval for those who experienced filter strut penetration was statistically significant [F(1,90) = 8.55, p = 0.004]. Filter strut(s) IVC penetration and successful retrieval were found to be statistically significant (p = 0.043). The filter hook-IVC relationship correlated with successful retrieval. A modified guidewire loop technique was applied in 8 of 10 cases where the hook appeared to penetrate the IVC wall and could not be engaged with a loop snare catheter, providing additional technical success in 6 of 8 (75%). Therefore, the total filter retrieval success increased from 88 to 95%. In conclusion, the Guenter Tulip filter has high successful retrieval rates with low rates of complication. Additional maneuvers such as a guidewire loop method can be used to improve retrieval success rates when the filter hook is endothelialized.

  1. Angulation change of the third molar tooth in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiansyah S. Pawinru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Impaction of the third molar tooth mandibular is often found in patients with orthodontic treatment. In orthodontic treatment, extraction cases of impaction of the third molar tooth are usually performed, but the patients often refuse this extraction. Extraction of premolar has a good effect on the third molar mandibular angulation during treatment. Material and Methods : This study is a retrospective clinical study with descriptive analytic to find out the effect of the first mandibular premolar tooth extraction to angulation change of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with a standard edgewise method. Angulation change was performed by comparing the third molar mandibular angulation before and after orthodontic treatment with panoramic radiographs. Angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular was calculated from the angle formed between the long axis of the tooth with the reference line infraorbita. Results : The sample comprised 60 of impacted mandibular third molar region of the left and right regions of 30 patients who had been treated declared cured in clinic of orthodontic specialist of Dentistry Faculty Padjadjaran University. The sample was divided into three (3 groups of patients before treatment angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular under 300, 300 to 600 and above 60o, then measured change of angulation and observed whether it increased, fixed or decreased. Results were analyzed by T- test and Wilcoxon test showed that there was a significant change in angulation of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction. Conclusion : This study is that the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction affects the angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular after orthodontic treatment.

  2. The effect of mechanical vibration on orthodontically induced root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sumit; Dobie, Thomas; Assefnia, Amir; Kalajzic, Zana; Nanda, Ravindra

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effect of low-frequency mechanical vibration (LFMV) on orthodontically induced root resorption. Forty male CD1, 12-week-old mice were used for the study. The mice were randomly divided into five groups: group 1 (baseline)-no spring and no mechanical vibration, group 2-orthodontic spring but no vibration, group 3-orthodontic spring and 5 Hz of vibration applied to the maxillary first molar, group 4-orthodontic spring and 10 Hz of vibration applied to maxillary first molar, and group 5-orthodontic spring and 20 Hz of vibration applied to maxillary first molar. In the different experimental groups, the first molar was moved mesially for 2 weeks using a nickel-titanium coil spring delivering 10 g of force. LFMVs were applied at 5 Hz, 10 Hz, and 20 Hz. Microfocus X-ray computed tomography imaging was used to analyze root resorption. Additionally, to understand the mechanism, we applied LFMV to MC3T3 cells, and gene expression analyses were done for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Orthodontic tooth movement leads to decreased root volume (increased root resorption craters). Our in vivo experiments showed a trend toward increase in root volume with different frequencies of mechanical vibration. In vitro gene expression analyses showed that with 20 Hz of mechanical vibration, there was a significant decrease in RANKL and a significant increase in OPG expression. There was a trend toward decreased root resorption with different LFMVs (5 Hz, 10 Hz, and 20 Hz); however, it was not more statistically significant than the orthodontic-spring-only group.

  3. Extraction protocols for orthodontic treatment: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnevi N Thirunavukkarasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Various extraction protocols have been followed for successful orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extraction protocols in patients who had previously undergone orthodontic treatment and also who had reported for continuing orthodontic treatment from other clinics. Materials and Methods: One hundred thirty eight patients who registered for orthodontic treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry were divided into 10 extraction protocols based on the Orthodontic treatment protocol given by Janson et al. and were evaluated for statistical significance. Results: The descriptive statistics of the study revealed a total of 40 (29% patients in protocol 1, 43 (31.2% in protocol 2, 18 (13% in protocol 3, 16 (11.6% in protocol 5, and 12 (8.7% in Type 3 category of protocol 9. The Type 3 category in protocol 9 was statistically significant compared to other studies. Midline shift and collapse of the arch form were noticed in these individuals. Conclusion: Extraction of permanent teeth such as canine and lateral incisors without rational reasons could have devastating consequences on the entire occlusion. The percentage of cases wherein extraction of permanent teeth in the crowded region was adopted as a treatment option instead of orthodontic treatment is still prevalent in dental practice. The shortage of orthodontists in Malaysia, the long waiting period, and lack of subjective need for orthodontic treatment at an earlier age group were the reasons for the patient's to choose extraction of the mal-aligned teeth such as the maxillary canine or maxillary lateral incisors.

  4. Gingival enlargement in orthodontic patients: Effect of treatment duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alice Souza; Alves, Luana Severo; Zenkner, Júlio Eduardo do Amaral; Zanatta, Fabrício Batistin; Maltz, Marisa

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to assess the effect of the duration of fixed orthodontic treatment on gingival enlargement (GE) in adolescents and young adults. The sample consisted of 260 subjects (ages, 10-30 years) divided into 4 groups: patients with no fixed orthodontic appliances (G0) and patients undergoing orthodontic treatment for 1 year (G1), 2 years (G2), or 3 years (G3). Participants completed a structured questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics and oral hygiene habits. Clinical examinations were conducted by a calibrated examiner and included the plaque index, the gingival index, and the Seymour index. Poisson regression models were used to assess the association between group and GE. We observed increasing means of plaque, gingivitis, and GE in G0, G1, and G2. No significant differences were observed between G2 and G3. Adjusted Poisson regression analysis showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment had a 20 to 28-fold increased risk for GE than did those without orthodontic appliances (G1, rate ratio [RR] = 20.2, 95% CI = 9.0-45.3; G2, RR = 27.0, 95% CI = 12.1-60.3; G3 = 28.1; 95% CI = 12.6-62.5). The duration of orthodontic treatment significantly influenced the occurrence of GE. Oral hygiene instructions and motivational activities should target adolescents and young adults undergoing orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Monetary rewards influence retrieval orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsband, Teresa M; Ferdinand, Nicola K; Bridger, Emma K; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-09-01

    Reward anticipation during learning is known to support memory formation, but its role in retrieval processes is so far unclear. Retrieval orientations, as a reflection of controlled retrieval processing, are one aspect of retrieval that might be modulated by reward. These processes can be measured using the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by retrieval cues from tasks with different retrieval requirements, such as via changes in the class of targeted memory information. To determine whether retrieval orientations of this kind are modulated by reward during learning, we investigated the effects of high and low reward expectancy on the ERP correlates of retrieval orientation in two separate experiments. The reward manipulation at study in Experiment 1 was associated with later memory performance, whereas in Experiment 2, reward was directly linked to accuracy in the study task. In both studies, the participants encoded mixed lists of pictures and words preceded by high- or low-reward cues. After 24 h, they performed a recognition memory exclusion task, with words as the test items. In addition to a previously reported material-specific effect of retrieval orientation, a frontally distributed, reward-associated retrieval orientation effect was found in both experiments. These findings suggest that reward motivation during learning leads to the adoption of a reward-associated retrieval orientation to support the retrieval of highly motivational information. Thus, ERP retrieval orientation effects not only reflect retrieval processes related to the sought-for materials, but also relate to the reward conditions with which items were combined during encoding.

  6. [Application of three-dimensional digital technology in the diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y X

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional(3D)digital technology has been widely used in the field of orthodontics in clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment and curative effect evaluation. 3D digital technology greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment, and provides effective means for personalized orthodontic treatment. This review focuses on the application of 3D digital technology in the field of orthodontics.

  7. The effect of buccal corticotomy on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement of maxillary canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Jahanbakhshi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on result of this study, corticotomy can accelerates the rate of orthodontic tooth movement about two times faster than conventional orthodontics and it is significant in early stages after surgical porsedure. Therefore Buccal corticotomy is a useful adjunct technique for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement.

  8. Clinical evaluation of a newly designed orthodontic tooth brush - A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Saimbi

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the newly designed orthodontic tooth brush is compared with an ordinary tooth brush. Results of this study show that the newly designed orthodontic tooth brush is superior in its cleaning efficiency as compared to the ordinary tooth brush. The results show that plaque removing capacity of orthodontic tooth brush is nearly 95-99%.

  9. Acceptability and attractiveness of intra- and extra-oral orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Karajeh, M A

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the acceptability of different intra-oral and extra-oral orthodontic appliances, to rank orthodontic appliances from the most to the least attractive and to investigate the factors that may affect the acceptance of orthodontic treatment. A random sample of 800 students (schoolchildren and university students) were invited to participate in this study and a total of 688 students were included (86%). A self-administrated structured questionnaire was constructed for the purpose of this study. More than one-half in each age group (53%) claimed that they would accept to have orthodontic treatment. Acceptance of the different orthodontic appliances was affected by gender, age and type of school. Removable appliance was reported as the most acceptable and facemask was reported as the least acceptable orthodontic appliances. Majority of subjects ranked ceramic and facemask appliances as the most and the least attractive orthodontic appliances, respectively. The predictor variables for the acceptance of orthodontic treatment were perceived demand for orthodontic treatment, perceived positive effect of orthodontic treatment and expected benefits from orthodontic treatment. Removable appliance was the most acceptable orthodontic appliance whereas ceramic appliance was ranked as the most attractive one. Facemask was the least acceptable and the least attractive option.

  10. Music retrieval in ICOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterle, Lutz; Fischer, Stephan; Rimac, Ivica; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we describe music retrieval in ICOR, a project of Darmstadt TU. It is the goal of ICOR to find new interfaces to support applications of music video and music CDs. Although the project consists of audio and video analysis we concentrate on a description of the audio algorithms in this paper. We describe our MPEG-7 like data structure to store meta information for music pieces and explain which algorithms we use to analyze the content of music pieces automatically. We currently use an applause detection to distinguish live music from studio recordings, a genre classifier to distinguish pieces with beats form classical music, and a singer recognition.

  11. Monitored retrievable storage status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a proposal for Congressional consideration of the inclusion of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility as part of the Federal Nuclear Waste Management System. The DOE plans to submit the proposal package to the Congress by January 15, 1986. The proposed preferred location of the MRS facility is the former Clinch River Breeder site in the state of Tennessee. If the Congress approves implementation of the MRS proposal, it is estimated that the facility could be licensed and operational in ten years

  12. Monitored retrievable storage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) established a national policy for the safe storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA requires that DOE... ''submit a proposal to Congress on the need for and feasibility of one or more Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facilities''... In subsequent evaluations of the commercial nuclear waste management system, DOE has identified important advantages in providing an MRS Facility as an integral part of the total system. The integral MRS Facility serves as an independent, centralized spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste handling and packaging facility with a safe temporary storage capacity

  13. Multimedia Information Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Rueger, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    At its very core multimedia information retrieval means the process of searching for and finding multimedia documents; the corresponding research field is concerned with building the best possible multimedia search engines. The intriguing bit here is that the query itself can be a multimedia excerpt: For example, when you walk around in an unknown place and stumble across an interesting landmark, would it not be great if you could just take a picture with your mobile phone and send it to a service that finds a similar picture in a database and tells you more about the building -- and about its

  14. Information, conservation and retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, T [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Norberg, E [National Swedish Archives, Stockholm (Sweden); Torbacke, J [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History; Jensen, M [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The seminar took place on the Swedish ship for transportation of radioactive wastes, M/S Sigyn, which at summer time is used for exhibitions. The seminar treated items related to general information needs in society and questions related to radioactive waste, i.e. how knowledge about a waste repository should be passed on to future generations. Three contributions are contained in the report from the seminar and are indexed separately: `Active preservation - otherwise no achieves`; `The conservation and dissemination of information - A democratic issue`; and, `Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories`.

  15. Information, conservation and retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.; Norberg, E.; Torbacke, J.

    1996-12-01

    The seminar took place on the Swedish ship for transportation of radioactive wastes, M/S Sigyn, which at summer time is used for exhibitions. The seminar treated items related to general information needs in society and questions related to radioactive waste, i.e. how knowledge about a waste repository should be passed on to future generations. Three contributions are contained in the report from the seminar and are indexed separately: 'Active preservation - otherwise no achieves'; 'The conservation and dissemination of information - A democratic issue'; and, 'Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories'

  16. Some comments on clinical studies in orthodontics and their applications to orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S

    1999-06-01

    This article indicates the origins and background of the current series of National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-funded, university-based clinical studies of orthodontic treatment. It suggests that future studies should be less focused on refining our estimates of mean changes during treatment and concentrate research on the systematic analysis of individual differences among patients' responses to treatment, and study how skilled clinicians make in-course corrections in response to unexpected changes in treatment conditions. Finally, some suggestions are made concerning optimization of decision making in the presence of uncertainty.

  17. Objectification of Orthodontic Treatment Needs: Does the Classification of Malocclusions or a History of Orthodontic Treatment Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozanecka, Anna; Sarul, Michał; Kawala, Beata; Antoszewska-Smith, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic classifications make it possible to give an accurate diagnosis but do not indicate an objective orthodontic treatment need. In order to evaluate the need for treatment, it is necessary to use such indicators as the IOTN. The aim of the study was to find (i) relationships between individual diagnosis and objective recommendations for treatment and (ii) an answer to the question whether and which occlusal anomalies play an important role in the objectification of treatment needs. Two hundred three 18-year-old adolescents (104 girls, 99 boys) were examined. In order to recognize occlusal anomalies, the classifications proposed by Orlik-Grzybowska and Ackerman-Proffit were used. The occlusal anomalies were divided into three categories: belonging to both classifications, typical of OrlikGrzybowska classification and typical of Ackerman-Proffit classification. In order to determine the objective need for orthodontic treatment, the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the IOTN was used. The occurrence of the following malocclusions covered by both classifications, namely abnormal overjet, crossbite and Angle's class, had a statistically significant (p 3). As for the classification by Orlik-Grzybowska, dental malpositions and canine class significantly affected the need for orthodontic treatment, while in the case of the Ackerman-Proffit scheme, it was asymmetry and crowding. There was no statistically significant correlation between past orthodontic treatment and current orthodontic treatment need. IOTN may be affected by a greater number of occlusal anomalies than it was assumed. Orthodontic treatment received in the past slightly reduces the need for treatment in 18-year-olds.

  18. Effectiveness of Biology-Based Methods for Inhibiting Orthodontic Tooth Movement. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas de Llano-Pérula, M; Yañez-Vico, R M; Solano-Reina, E; Palma-Fernandez, J C; Iglesias-Linares, A

    Several experimental studies in the literature have tested different biology-based methods for inhibiting or decreasing orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in humans. This systematic review investigated the effects of these interventions on the rate of tooth movement. Electronic [MedLine; SCOPUS; Cochrane Library; OpenGrey;Web of Science] and manual searches were conducted up to January 26th, 2016 in order to identify publications of clinical trials that compared the decreasing or inhibiting effects of different biology-based methods over OTM in humans. A primary outcome (rate of OTM deceleration/inhibition) and a number of secondary outcomes were examined (clinical applicability, orthodontic force used, possible side effects). Two reviewers selected the studies complying with the eligibility criteria (PICO format) and assessed risk of bias [Cochrane Collaboration's tool]. Data collection and analysis were performed following the Cochrane recommendations. From the initial electronic search, 3726 articles were retrieved and 5 studies were finally included. Two types of biology-based techniques used to reduce the rate of OTM in humans were described: pharmacological and low-level laser therapy. In the first group, human Relaxin was compared to a placebo and administered orally. It was described as having no effect on the inhibition of OTM in humans after 32 days, while the drug tenoxicam, injected locally, inhibited the rate of OTM by up to 10% in humans after 42 days. In the second group, no statistically significant differences were reported, compared to placebo, for the rate of inhibition of OTM in humans after 90 days of observation when a 860 nm continuous wave GaAlA slow-level laser was used. The currently available data do not allow us to draw definitive conclusions about the use of various pharmacological substances and biology-based therapies in humans able to inhibit or decrease the OTM rate. There is an urgent need for more sound well-designed randomized

  19. Ethics issues in retrievability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.; Larsson, C.M.; Norden, M.

    2000-01-01

    We can isolate some issues, which should not be unresolved for a longer period of time. Disputes over well-defined waste management options fall in this category. The concept of retrievability has a possibility to invoke a series of questions in the minds of both specialists and non-specialists. It is intrinsically vague, in that it may refer to different phases in the repository's life, and to both open and closed repositories in the long time frame. Requirements for retrievability opens a series of issues, including open-ended philosophical question, which may give the impressions that things are not properly taken care of, since the experts differ in opinion. If such disputes cannot be resolved by consulting the existing legal framework, efforts should be made to put them to trial in the proper forum, i.e. parliament and national or local government or authorities, depending on the problem. In contrast, the value of institutional controls can easily be seen as an ethical value, whether included in the regulation of not. It has the potential to deter human intrusion and to allow remedial action by carrying information about a repository. (author)

  20. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours.

  1. Mechanical properties of a new thermoplastic polymer orthodontic archwire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Velo, Marcos [Grupo de investigación en Ortodoncia, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Espinar, Eduardo; Llamas, Jose Maria [Grupo de investigación en Ortodoncia, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Rúperez, Elisa; Manero, Jose Maria [Dept. C. Materiales e Ing. Metalúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Centre de Recerca Nanoenginyeria, Member of Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain); Javier Gil, F., E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu [Dept. C. Materiales e Ing. Metalúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Centre de Recerca Nanoenginyeria, Member of Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained and extruded into wires with round and rectangular cross sections. We evaluated the potential of new aesthetic archwire: tensile, three point bending, friction and stress relaxation behaviour, and formability characteristics were assessed. Stresses delivered were generally slightly lower than typical beta-titanium and nickel-titanium archwires. The polymer wire has good instantaneous mechanical properties; tensile stress decayed about 2% over 2 h depending on the initial stress relaxation for up to 120 h. High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires. The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic conventional archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. This new polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. - Highlights: • A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained. • This polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. • The polymer has good mechanical properties as orthodontic wire coating. • The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. • High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires.

  2. Is there a consensus for CBCT use in Orthodontics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Daniela G; Calil, Louise Resti; Leal, Claudia Resende; Janson, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to discuss current evidence and recommendations for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in Orthodontics. In comparison to conventional radiograph, CBCT has higher radiation doses and, for this reason, is not a standard method of diagnosis in Orthodontics. Routine use of CBCT in substitution to conventional radiograph is considered an unaccepted practice. CBCT should be indicated with criteria only after clinical examination has been performed and when the benefits for diagnosis and treatment planning exceed the risks of a greater radiation dose. It should be requested only when there is a potential to provide new information not demonstrated by conventional scans, when it modifies treatment plan or favors treatment execution. The most frequent indication of CBCT in Orthodontics, with some evidence on its clinical efficacy, includes retained/impacted permanent teeth; severe craniofacial anomalies; severe facial discrepancies with indication of orthodontic-surgical treatment; and bone irregularities or malformation of TMJ accompanied by signs and symptoms. In exceptional cases of adult patients when critical tooth movement are planned in regions with deficient buccolingual thickness of the alveolar ridge, CBCT can be indicated provided that there is a perspective of changes in orthodontic treatment planning.

  3. Evolving concepts of heredity and genetics in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, David S

    2015-12-01

    The field of genetics emerged from the study of heredity early in the 20th century. Since that time, genetics has progressed through a series of defined eras based on a number of major conceptual and technical advances. Orthodontics also progressed through a series of conceptual stages over the past 100 years based in part on the ongoing and often circular debate about the relative importance of heredity (nature) and the local environment (nurture) in the etiology and treatment of malocclusion and dentofacial deformities. During the past 20 years, significant advancements in understanding the genomic basis of craniofacial development and the gene variants associated with dentofacial deformities have resulted in a convergence of the principles and concepts in genetics and in orthodontics that will lead to significant advancement of orthodontic treatments. Fundamental concepts from genetics and applied translational research in orthodontics provide a foundation for a new emphasis on precision orthodontics, which will establish a modern genomic basis for major improvements in the treatment of malocclusion and dentofacial deformities as well as many other areas of concern to orthodontists through the assessment of gene variants on a patient-by-patient basis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Media advertising effects on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daenya T; Shroff, Bhavna; Lindauer, Steven J; Fowler, Chad E; Tufekci, Eser

    2008-09-01

    To determine the effect of media advertising on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality. A survey instrument was designed to evaluate factors influencing consumer selection of an orthodontist and consumer perception of different forms of media advertising (radio, television, newspaper, magazine, direct mail, and billboard) by orthodontic practices. The surveys were distributed by eight orthodontic offices in and around the Richmond, Virginia area. The survey return rate was 97%. Respondents most often cited dentist and patient referrals as how they learned of the orthodontic practices they visited (50% to 57%). A caring attitude and good practitioner reputation were the top reasons influencing actual selection of an orthodontist (53% and 49%, respectively). Of respondents, 14% to 24% felt that advertising orthodontists would offer a lower quality of care than nonadvertising orthodontists. Newspaper, magazine, and direct mail advertisements were viewed more favorably than radio, television, and billboard advertisements. Chi-square analyses revealed few statistically significant differences in perception between different income and education groups. The majority of patients do not perceive advertising to reflect poorly on the quality of orthodontic care. However, patients with different income and education levels perceive media advertising differently.

  5. The effect of photobiomodulation on root resorption during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimeri, Ghada; Kau, Chung H; Corona, Rachel; Shelly, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    Photobiomodulation is used to accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatments. The changes in root morphology in a group of orthodontic patients who received photobiomodulation were evaluated using the cone beam computed tomography technique. The device used is called OrthoPulse, which produces low levels of light with a near infrared wavelength of 850 nm and an intensity of 60 mW/cm(2) continuous wave. Twenty orthodontic patients were recruited for these experiments, all with class 1 malocclusion and with Little's Irregularity Index (>2 mm) in either of the arches. Root resorption was detected by measuring changes in tooth length using cone beam computed tomography. These changes were measured before the orthodontic treatment and use of low-level laser therapy and after finishing the alignment level. Little's Irregularity Index for all the patients was calculated in both the maxilla and mandible and patients were divided into three groups for further analysis, which were then compared to the root resorption measurements. Our results showed that photobiomodulation did not cause root resorption greater than the normal range that is commonly detected in orthodontic treatments. Furthermore, no correlation between Little's Irregularity Index and root resorption was detected.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Changes in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Yamamoto, Zulham; Zainol Abidin, lntan Zarina; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya; Zainal Ariffin, Zaidah

    2011-01-01

    Tooth movement induced by orthodontic treatment can cause sequential reactions involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structures. To better understand the biological processes involved in orthodontic treatment, improve treatment, and reduce adverse side effects, several of these substances have been proposed as biomarkers. Potential biological markers can be collected from different tissue samples, and suitable sampling is important to accurately reflect biological processes. This paper covers the tissue changes that are involved during orthodontic tooth movement such as at compression region (involving osteoblasts), tension region (involving osteoclasts), dental root, and pulp tissues. Besides, the involvement of stem cells and their development towards osteoblasts and osteoclasts during orthodontic treatment have also been explained. Several possible biomarkers representing these biological changes during specific phenomenon, that is, bone remodelling (formation and resorption), inflammation, and root resorption have also been proposed. The knowledge of these biomarkers could be used in accelerating orthodontic treatment. PMID:22125437

  7. A novel biomechanical model assessing continuous orthodontic archwire activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Christopher; Larson, Matthew; Grauer, Dan; Sheats, Rose; Stevens, Clarke; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The biomechanics of a continuous archwire inserted into multiple orthodontic brackets is poorly understood. The purpose of this research was to apply the birth-death technique to simulate insertion of an orthodontic wire and consequent transfer of forces to the dentition in an anatomically accurate model. Methods A digital model containing the maxillary dentition, periodontal ligament (PDL), and surrounding bone was constructed from human computerized tomography data. Virtual brackets were placed on four teeth (central and lateral incisors, canine and first premolar), and a steel archwire (0.019″ × 0.025″) with a 0.5 mm step bend to intrude the lateral incisor was virtually inserted into the bracket slots. Forces applied to the dentition and surrounding structures were simulated utilizing the birth-death technique. Results The goal of simulating a complete bracket-wire system on accurate anatomy including multiple teeth was achieved. Orthodontic force delivered by the wire-bracket interaction was: central incisor 19.1 N, lateral incisor 21.9 N, and canine 19.9 N. Loading the model with equivalent point forces showed a different stress distribution in the PDL. Conclusions The birth-death technique proved to be a useful biomechanical simulation method for placement of a continuous archwire in orthodontic brackets. The ability to view the stress distribution throughout proper anatomy and appliances advances understanding of orthodontic biomechanics. PMID:23374936

  8. Prevalence of dental anomalies in Saudi orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jabaa, Aljazi H; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies and study the association of these anomalies with different types of malocclusion in a random sample of Saudi orthodontic patients. Six hundred and two randomly selected pretreatment records including orthopantomographs (OPG), and study models were evaluated. The molar relationship was determined using pretreatment study models, and OPG were examined to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies among the sample. The most common types of the investigated anomalies were: impaction followed by hypodontia, microdontia, macrodontia, ectopic eruption and supernumerary. No statistical significant correlations were observed between sex and dental anomalies. Dental anomalies were more commonly found in class I followed by asymmetric molar relation, then class II and finally class III molar relation. No malocclusion group had a statistically significant relation with any individual dental anomaly. The prevalence of dental anomalies among Saudi orthodontic patients was higher than the general population. Although, orthodontic patients have been reported to have high rates of dental anomalies, orthodontists often fail to consider this. If not detected, dental anomalies can complicate dental and orthodontic treatment; therefore, their presence should be carefully investigated during orthodontic diagnosis and considered during treatment planning.

  9. Mechanical properties of a new thermoplastic polymer orthodontic archwire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Velo, Marcos; Espinar, Eduardo; Llamas, Jose Maria; Rúperez, Elisa; Manero, Jose Maria; Javier Gil, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained and extruded into wires with round and rectangular cross sections. We evaluated the potential of new aesthetic archwire: tensile, three point bending, friction and stress relaxation behaviour, and formability characteristics were assessed. Stresses delivered were generally slightly lower than typical beta-titanium and nickel-titanium archwires. The polymer wire has good instantaneous mechanical properties; tensile stress decayed about 2% over 2 h depending on the initial stress relaxation for up to 120 h. High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires. The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic conventional archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. This new polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. - Highlights: • A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained. • This polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. • The polymer has good mechanical properties as orthodontic wire coating. • The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. • High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires

  10. ON THE NECESSITY OF MINOR ORAL SURGERY PRETREATMENT ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Zegan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of some minor oral surgery performed on both teeth and on the soft tissues, before any orthodontic treatment. The sample group included 587 patients (240 boys and 347 girls, divided into 3 categories. The data base was created wtih patient records, the statistical analyses being performed with the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. The frequency of malocclusions with minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics was of 24%, out of which the surgical interventions on teeth represented 85.41% (serial extractions – 21.87%, orthodontic extractions – 41.66%, enucleation of third molars – 18.75%, discovery of impacted teeth – 2.08% and teeth enucleation – 1.04% and the surgical interventions on the soft tissues represented 14.59% (labial frenectomy: 12.60%, lingual frenectomy: 1.04% and discovery of pericoronal tissues: 1.04% The minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics upon both teeth and soft tissues are not quite frequent, yet they are necessary for a partial preparation of the patient for orthodontic therapy.

  11. A Novel Method of Coating Orthodontic Archwires with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Shibli S; Kulkarni, Dinraj; Todkar, Rohit; Bagul, Ravikiran S; Parekh, Kreena; Bhujbal, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Background: The major hazard to the orthodontic tooth movement is the friction developing at the bracket wire interface. In the past, there have been various attempts to reduce this friction. We believe that coating the commercially available orthodontic wires with nanoparticles can result in a successful reduction of this friction. The objective of this study is to develop a novel method of coating orthodontic archwires with nanoparticles. Materials and Methods: Stainless steel (Ormco, CA, USA), titanium molybdenum alloy (Ormco, CA, USA) and nickel-titanium (G and H Wire Company, USA) orthodontic wires with a rectangular cross-section dimension of 0.019”× 0.025”, were selected. The wires were later coated with a uniform and smooth nanoparticle film using 100 ml nanocremics. The coating procedure described in this article is a sol-gel thin film dip coating method. Results: The coating procedure was verified by comparing the surface topography of nanocoated archwires with the commercially available archwires in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The ESEM images prove that the surface topography of the coated wires was found to be smoother with less surface deteriorations as compared to the commercially available wires. Conclusion: Commercially available orthodontic wires can be successfully coated using a novel method of sol-gel thin film dip coating method. PMID:26028899

  12. Unbiased quantitative testing of conventional orthodontic beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S

    1998-03-01

    This study used a preexisting database to test in hypothesis from the appropriateness of some common orthodontic beliefs concerning upper first molar displacement and changes in facial morphology associated with conventional full bonded/banded treatment in growing subjects. In an initial pass, the author used data from a stratified random sample of 48 subjects drawn retrospectively from the practice of a single, experienced orthodontist. This sample consisted of 4 subgroups of 12 subjects each: Class I nonextraction, Class I extraction, Class II nonextraction, and Class II extraction. The findings indicate that, relative to the facial profile, chin point did not, on average, displace anteriorly during treatment, either overall or in any subgroup. Relative to the facial profile, Point A became significantly less prominent during treatment, both overall and in each subgroup. The best estimate of the mean displacement of the upper molar cusp relative to superimposition on Anterior Cranial Base was in the mesial direction in each of the four subgroups. In only one extraction subject out of 24 did the cusp appear to be displaced distally. Mesial molar cusp displacement was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. Relative to superimposition on anatomical "best fit" of maxillary structures, the findings for molar cusp displacement were similar, but even more dramatic. Mean mesial migration was highly significant in both the Class II nonextraction and Class II extraction subgroups. In no subject in the entire sample was distal displacement noted relative to this superimposition. Mean increase in anterior Total Face Height was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. (This finding was contrary to the author's original expectation.) The generalizability of the findings from the initial pass to other treated growing subjects was then assessed by

  13. Orthodontic Treatment with Rapid Maxillary Expansion for Treating a Boy with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungrip Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This case report shows that orthodontic treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME is an effective treatment option for managing pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. An 11-year-old boy with severe pediatric OSA received comprehensive orthodontic treatment with RME. Four sleep studies were done: before orthodontic treatment, after RME, just after comprehensive orthodontic treatment and at the 2-year and 5-month follow-up. Polysomnographic findings showed that the orthodontic treatment with RME was successful for managing severe OSA in the patient.

  14. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-04-10

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

  15. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions

  16. Effects of chlorhexidine (gel) application on bacterial levels and orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazi, Samar M; Abbassy, Mona A; Bakry, Ahmed S; Merdad, Leena A; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of applying 0.50% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel using the dental drug delivery system (3DS) on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and on the surface topography of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. The study involved 20 orthodontic patients with high levels of salivary S. mutans. The patients were treated with professional mechanical tooth cleaning followed by application of 0.50% CHX using individual trays (3DS). Salivary S. mutans levels were repeatedly measured 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-treatment. In vitro study utilized forty ceramic and metallic brackets that were immersed in 0.50% CHX gel for 10 min, whereas another untreated forty brackets served as controls. The frictional resistances of stainless steel wires to the brackets before and after CHX treatment were recorded using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare changes in the surface topography of brackets. Statistical analyses were used to determine the effect of CHX on bacterial count and to evaluate the effect of CHX on frictional resistance. According to the results of this study, S. mutans levels were reduced significantly (P brackets before or after application of CHX. (J Oral Sci 58, 35-42, 2016).

  17. Drugs influencing orthodontic tooth movement: An overall review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamatchi Diravidamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment is based on the premise that when force is delivered to a tooth and thereby transmitted to the adjacent investing tissues, certain mechanical, chemical, and cellular events take place within these tissues, which allow for structural alterations and contribute to the movement of that tooth. Molecules present in drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients can reach the mechanically stressed paradental tissues through the circulation and interact with local target cells. The combined effect of mechanical forces and one or more of these agents may be inhibitory, additive, or synergistic. Current orthodontic research aims to develop methods of increasing the tissue concentration of molecules promoting tooth movement, while simultaneously decreasing the concentration of unwanted elements which can produce harmful side effects. This article discusses in detail the various possible drugs that can bring about alterations in the desired orthodontic tooth movement.

  18. [3D imaging benefits in clinical pratice of orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frèrejouand, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    3D imaging possibilities raised up in the last few years in the orthodontic field. In 2016, it can be used for diagnosis improvement and treatment planning by using digital set up combined to CBCT. It is relevant for orthodontic mechanic updating by creating visible or invisible customised appliances. It forms the basis of numerous scientific researches. The author explains the progress 3D imaging brings to diagnosis and clinics but also highlights the requirements it creates. The daily use of these processes in orthodontic clinical practices needs to be regulated regarding the benefit/risk ratio and the patient satisfaction. The command of the digital work flow created by these technics requires habits modifications from the orthodontist and his staff. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  19. [The role of occlusion and extraction in orthodontics. Historical overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsera, Agnes; Struhár, Gabriella

    2012-03-01

    Occlusion is important in each unit of dentistry. The authors describe not only the meaning of normal occlusion and dysgnathy but also the historical background focusing on the most important orthodontists, their achievements and literary works. This article gives an overview of the development of orthodontics from the very beginning (ancient times) to nowadays. The most important figures of these periods are: P. Fauchard, F. C. Kneisel, E. H. Angle, C. Case (dark ages); C. F. Ballard, P. R. Begg, C. H. Tweed (golden ages); L. F. Andrews and R. H. Roth (contemporary period). Along these three eras development and changing of the extraction-principles are shown. Nowadays the orthodontists still use Angle's classification and orthodontic treatment with extraction is also accepted. However it is not a separate treatment method, but only used as complement treatment. The authors stress on the importance of normal occlusion, which should be result of every orthodontic, but also prothetic and gnathological treatment.

  20. [Orthodontic treatment of Class III patients with mandibular asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yin-Zhong; Huo, Na; Chen, Lei; Chen, Xue-Peng; Lin, Yang

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the treatment outcome of Class III patients with dental, functional and mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry. Thirty-five patients (14 males and 21 females) with dental, functional and mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry were selected. The age range of the patients was 7 - 22 years with a mean age of 16.5 years. Dental mandibular asymmetry was treated with expansion of maxillary arch to help the mandible returning to normal position. Functional mandibular asymmetry was treated with activator or asymmetrical protraction and Class III elastics. Mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry was treated with camouflage treatment. Good occlusal relationships were achieved and facial esthetics was greatly improved after orthodontic treatment in patients with dental and functional mandibular asymmetry. However, patients with skeletal mandibular asymmetry should be treated with both extraction and genioplasty. Orthodontic treatment was suitable for patients with dental and functional mandibular asymmetry, while combined orthodontics and surgery could get good results in patients with skeletal mandibular asymmetry.

  1. Treatment outcomes in 4 modes of orthodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Donald; Vlaskalic, Vicki; Baumrind, Sheldon

    2005-03-01

    This study is a continuation of a previously published report on the outcome of orthodontic treatment provided in offices representing different modes of practice. The sample consisted of duplicate pretreatment (T1) and posttreatment (T2) dental casts of 348 patients from traditional private orthodontic practices (5 offices, 134 patients), company-owned practices (5 offices, 107 patients), offices associated with practice-management organizations (2 offices, 60 patients), and general dental practices (2 offices, 47 patients). Methods were used to obtain random, representative samples from each office, starting with lists of patients who were treated consecutively with full fixed orthodontic appliances. The dental casts were measured by 2 independent judges who used the unweighted PAR score. Good interjudge agreement was shown on the initial casts, but the agreement was not as strong on the final casts. The measurements showed that treatment outcomes were generally satisfactory, although some significant differences between offices and management modes were shown.

  2. Orthodontic treatment for oral rehabilitation after multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiki; Ogino, Tomoko Kuroiwa; Hirashita, Ayao

    2008-09-01

    We present the orthodontic treatment of a patient with occlusal dysfunction after plastic surgery for multiple maxillofacial bone fractures caused by a traffic accident. The patient had mandibular deviation to the right because of inappropriate repositioning and fixation of the fractured bone and complete avulsion of both mandibular central incisors. The bilateral mandibular incisors, canines, and premolars were also suspected of partial avulsion or alveolar bone fracture. Several tests, including percussion and dental computed tomography, were performed on these teeth to rule out ankylosis and confirm tooth movement. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was carried out with expansion of the maxillary arch, alignment of both arches, and space closure between the mandibular lateral incisors to improve the occlusion. Good occlusion and interdigitation were obtained. Orthodontic treatment is useful for the rehabilitation of occlusal dysfunction caused by multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

  3. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment of Severe Skeletal Class II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.; Al-Sebaei, Maisa O.; Afify, Ahmed R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an adult Saudi male patient who presented with a severe skeletal class II deformity. The case was managed with a combination of presurgical orthodontic treatment followed by a double jaw orthognathic surgery and then another phase of orthodontic treatment for final occlusal detailing. Extraction of the four first premolars was done during the presurgical orthodontic phase of treatment to decompensate upper and lower incisors and to give room for surgical setback of the maxillary anterior segment. Double jaw surgery was performed: bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy for 8 mm mandibular advancement combined with three-piece Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, 6 mm setback of the anterior segment, 8 mm impaction of the maxilla, and 5 mm advancement genioplasty. Although the anteroposterior discrepancy and the facial convexity were so severe, highly acceptable results were obtained, both esthetically as well as occlusally. PMID:23573428

  4. Partial pulp necrosis caused by excessive orthodontic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Young Kim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As the dental pulp is encased with a rigid, noncompliant shell, changes in pulpal blood flow or vascular tissue pressure can have serious implication for the health of pulp. Numerous studies have demonstrated that orthodontic force application may influence both blood flow and cellular metabolism, leading degenerative and/or inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. The aim of this case report is to present a case about tooth with chronic periapical abscess which showed normal vital responses. Excessive orthodontic force is thought to be the prime cause of partial pulp necrosis. Owing to remaining vital tissue, wrong dianosis can be made, and tooth falsely diagnosed as vital may be left untreated, causing the necrotic tissue to destroy the supporting tissuses. Clinician should be able to utilize various diagnostic tools for the precise diagnosis, and be aware of the endodontic-orthodontic inter-relationship.

  5. General characteristics of dental morbidity in children against orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovach I.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A wide spread of orthodontic treatment showed a fairly high risk of complications developed from the use of various devices. The aim of our study was to determine the general characteristics of dental morbidity in children with orthodontic treatment. According to the survey the most common pathologies in children with orthodontic problems are dental caries (87,8-92,9% and chronic catarrhal gingivitis (81.2-84.1%. The prevalence of different types of diseases of the mucous membrane and soft tissues of the oral cavity in children surveyed was 30.5-32.9%. Non-caries lesions of dental hard tissues occurred in 39.5-40.9% of the children surveyed, local enamel hypoplasia was observed in 42.9%, systemic enamel hypoplasia made up 17.8%, signs of hypersensitivity of enamel were found in 9.6%, and the wedge defects – in two children.

  6. [Orthodontic and oral surgery therapy in cleidocranial dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Gergely; Tarján, Ildikó; Balaton, Péter; Barabási, Zoltán; Gyulai Gál, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin; Vajó, Zoltán

    2007-02-01

    A cleidocranial dysplasia is an autosomal dominant inherited condition consisting of generalized skeletal disorder. Associated dental signs are present in 93,5%; failure of tooth eruption with multiple supernumerary teeth, dilaceration of roots, crown germination, microdontia, high arched palate, midface hypoplasia, high gonion angle. The molecular- genetic analysis revealed a missense mutation in the CBFA1 gene located on chromosome 6p21, which is considered to be etiological factor for CCD. Orthodontic and oral surgery therapy of a 13 year-old child with CCD was performed due to aesthetic and functional problems. The supernumerary germs were removed and the teeth were aligned with orthodontic appliances. Temporary functional rehabilitation was solved with partial denture. The presented case and the literature data support the importance of early diagnosis of CCD. The good collaboration of the orthodontic and maxillo-facial surgery specialists help achieve the correct rehabilitation of the patient.

  7. Challenges encountered during postgraduate program in orthodontics: An online survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanish Singh Shinh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics requires profound and disciplined training over a considerable period. Given the rigorous nature of the program, it is but logical to assume that the students can encounter some difficulties during the course. The aim of the present study was to gather detailed first-hand information from the postgraduate students of all the practical challenges they encounter in academic programme of orthodontics in India. Materials and Methods: Utilizing a descriptive, cross-sectional survey, conducted through a web-based self-administered questionnaire, the sample population consisted of 799 orthodontic postgraduate students in India and 39 questions were put forward to them. Conclusion: Results showed that even while keeping the basics intact, every course should aim at inputs to help make the academic climate productive, less stressful and student-centric. Change in teaching technology, methodology and structure is needed in training our postgraduate students, to promote a more congenial academic climate.

  8. Orthodontic management of impacted central incisor: A clinical challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Khera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple treatment options are available for patients who have impacted incisor. This paper shows a case in which orthodontic as well as surgical considerations in 10-year-old female child were presented in the management of impacted central incisor. The orthodontic treatment plan included three steps – creation of space, exposure of crown, and forced eruption. A unique and innovative technique for orthodontic traction (0.017 × 0.025 TMA wire with palatal extension was employed to move the maxillary incisor into arch, with minimum injury to neighboring soft tissue. After the successful management of impacted teeth, it is very important to periodically review the periodontal condition and stability.

  9. Is skeletal anchorage changing the limit of orthodontics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    The limits for orthodontic treatment are often set by the lack of suitable anchorage. The mini-implant is used where conventional anchorage cannot be applied; not as a replacement for conventional anchorage. In patients with lack of teeth and reduced periodontium, skeletal anchorage allows...... and can be loaded immediately. The course will be addressed the following topics: Are the mini-implants replacing conventional anchorage? Why are orthodontic mini-implants necessary? The development of the skeletal anchorage systems The biological basis for the skeletal anchorage systems...... The characteristics of the different skeletal anchorage systems The insertion procedure The indications for the use of orthodontic mini-implants Treatment planning in relation to the use of mini-implants Case presentations...

  10. Evaluation of the Stability After Orthodontic Treatment Using PAR Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitra Ramanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to establish the results using the scores obtained from the methodology that was applied for assessing the stability after 2 years post orthodontic treatment and stability in a sample of 69 individuals. After applying PAR index to the collected group of patients, a series of scores were obtained, which were then needed to be evaluated further to establish the results. The scores were evaluated using the nomogram. A comparison was done between the post treatment and the 2 years post treatment PAR weighting scores to determine if the results were stable after orthodontic treatment. The majority of the orthodontic patients were treated to a good standard and that the results appeared to be stable.

  11. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakathir, Manal A

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects myelinated axons, destroying the myelin and damaging axons to varying degrees. The course of MS is highly varied and unpredictable. Metals used during orthodontic treatment can negatively affect imaging techniques used to diagnose and monitor the progression of MS, while medications used to treat MS can negatively affect orthodontic tooth movement. The present case report highlights some of the challenges encountered during orthodontic treatment of a patient with MS and how to overcome them. The patient was a 20-year-old woman with complaints of diastema and spacing in the upper arch. Although closing the spaces was challenging due to some of the MS medications, she was treated successfully, without complications, within 20 months using closing loops. PMID:28717636

  12. A novel method to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, S. Kutalmış; Yavuz, Mustafa C.; Genc, Esra; Sunar, Oguzhan

    2018-01-01

    This clinical case report presents fixed orthodontic treatment of a patient with moderately crowded teeth. It was performed with a new technique called ‘discision’. Discision method that was described for the first time by the present authors yielded predictable outcomes, and orthodontic treatment was completed in a short period of time. The total duration of orthodontic treatment was 4 months. Class I molar and canine relationships were established at the end of the treatment. Moreover, crowding in the mandible and maxilla was corrected, and optimal overjet and overbite were established. No scar tissue was observed in any gingival region on which discision was performed. The discision technique was developed as a minimally invasive alternative method to piezocision technique, and the authors suggest that this new method yields good outcomes in achieving rapid tooth movement. PMID:29436571

  13. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Tensile properties of orthodontic elastomeric ligatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, F; Jalaly, T; Zebarjad, M

    2010-01-01

    Tensile properties of elastomeric ligatures become important when efficiency of orthodontic appliances is considered. The aim of this study was to compare tensile strength, extension to tensile strength, toughness and modulus of elasticity of elastomeric ligatures in both the as--received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. Furthermore, the changes that occurred in tensile properties of each brand of ligatures after 28 days were evaluated. Experimental-laboratory based. Elastomeric ligatures were obtained from different companies and their tensile properties were measured using Zwick testing machine in both the as-received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-tests, analysis of variance and Tukey tests. After 28 days, all the ligatures experienced a significant decrease in tensile strength, extension to tensile strength and toughness ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures in both conditions ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures, which should be considered during selection of these products.

  15. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Nakandakari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever on the Segmented Arch Technique (SAT concept. A 14.7-year-old female patient appeared at clinic complaining about the absence of the upper right permanent canine. The proposed treatment prioritized the traction of the upper right canine without changing the occlusion and aesthetics. For this, it only installed the upper fixed appliance (Roth with slot 0.018, opting for SAT in order to minimize unwanted side effects. The use of cantilever to the traction of the upper right canine has enabled an efficient and predictable outcome, because it is of statically determined mechanics.

  16. Class III Malocclusion Surgical-Orthodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Alves Furquim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present case report is to describe the orthodontic-surgical treatment of a 17-year-and-9-month-old female patient with a Class III malocclusion, poor facial esthetics, and mandibular and chin protrusion. She had significant anteroposterior and transverse discrepancies, a concave profile, and strained lip closure. Intraorally, she had a negative overjet of 5 mm and an overbite of 5 mm. The treatment objectives were to correct the malocclusion, and facial esthetic and also return the correct function. The surgical procedures included a Le Fort I osteotomy for expansion, advancement, impaction, and rotation of the maxilla to correct the occlusal plane inclination. There was 2 mm of impaction of the anterior portion of the maxilla and 5 mm of extrusion in the posterior region. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was performed in order to allow counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and anterior projection of the chin, accompanying the maxillary occlusal plane. Rigid internal fixation was used without any intermaxillary fixation. It was concluded that these procedures were very effective in producing a pleasing facial esthetic result, showing stability 7 years posttreatment.

  17. Patients' expectations of orthodontic treatment: part 2--findings from a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, M S; Newton, J T

    2007-03-01

    To describe patients' and their parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment. A questionnaire survey of 100 patients and their primary care-givers attending a new patient orthodontic consultant clinic, at a teaching hospital. GKT Orthodontic Department, King's College Dental Hospital, London, UK. The sample consisted of 100 participants who completed the questionnaire, including 50 patients aged 12-14 years who had been referred to the orthodontic department for treatment. One parent of each patient was also invited to participate. Participants completed a valid questionnaire measure of orthodontic expectations that was tested for reliability and validity. Descriptive analysis of the responses was undertaken, and comparisons of children's and parents' expectations, in addition to ethnicity, were made. Patients and parents have similar expectations of treatment, with the exception of expectations of duration of orthodontic treatment (Pexpectations of the initial orthodontic assessment visit, the likelihood of wearing headgear, the impact of orthodontic treatment on diet, and the reaction of peers to treatment (Pexpectations regarding the initial visit, headgear and dietary restrictions (Pparents share similar expectations of orthodontic treatment for most aspects of care, although parents are more realistic in their estimation of the duration of treatment and the initial visit. The expectations of patients differ from those of their parents with regard to dietary and drink restrictions in relation to orthodontic treatment. Ethnicity significantly influences expectations of orthodontic treatment, and this may relate to differences in the patients' and their parents' assessed outcome of care.

  18. Cicero, Retrieving the Honorable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Frank

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From Marcus Tullius Cicero’s philosophical writings, the author first draws out a modest network of ideas that informs his understanding of what it means to be a good man (vir bonus. Then, he finds in Cicero the idea of a befitting mutuality among four distinctively human capacities: a faculty for inquiry into and love for truth manifest in words and actions (reason; a disposition for the recognition of and attraction to things of worth beyond self-interest (the honorable; an acute sense of one own spheres of responsibility along with facility for speaking and acting appropriately within them (appropriate action, and fostering and extending the bonds of mutual personal relations grounded in justice and benevolence (society. Against the background of deep commitments in modernity to hedonism and autonomous individualism, the author proposes a retrieval of the virtue of the honorable as an attractive alternative.

  19. Retrievability: An international overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Using available information from the published literature and material obtained from a network of contacts, a short introductory overview of international developments in the field of retrievability of emplaced nuclear waste was produced for the Swedish National Siting Coordinator for Nuclear Waste Disposal. This examined the issue in terms of a number of basic questions: Definition, Need, Design Implications, Safeguards for Fissile Material, Public Acceptability and Safety Assessment. The report was submitted in February 1999, and acted as a catalyst for the organisation of an international seminar by KASAM, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste (these proceedings). This paper describes the report contents, and points to the invited papers at the seminar which expand on and update the limited descriptions in the original report. (author)

  20. Kinetics of salivary pH after acidic beverage intake by patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Silva, Carolina S; Bridi, Enrico C; Amaral, Flavia Lb; Franca, Fabiana Mg; Basting, Roberta T

    2015-01-01

    The saliva of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances can potentially present a delay in the diluting, clearing, and buffering of dietary acids due to an increased number of retention areas. The aim of this clinical trial was to compare salivary pH kinetics of patients with and without orthodontic treatment, following the intake of an acidic beverage. Twenty participants undergoing orthodontic treatment and 20 control counterparts had their saliva assessed for flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. There was no significant difference between salivary parameters in participants with or without an orthodontic appliance. Salivary pH recovery following acidic beverage intake was slower in the orthodontic subjects compared to controls. Patients with fixed orthodontic appliances, therefore, seem to be at higher risk of dental erosion, suggesting that dietary advice and preventive care need to be implemented during orthodontic treatment.

  1. Orthodontic aligners and root resorption: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaddaoui, Rajae; Qoraich, Halima Saadia; Bahije, Loubna; Zaoui, Fatima

    2017-03-01

    Root resorption is one of the leading problems in orthodontic treatment. Most earlier studies have assessed the incidence and severity of root resorption following orthodontic treatment using fixed appliances as well as associated factors. However, few studies have assessed these parameters in the context of orthodontic treatment using thermoplastic splints or aligners. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the incidence and severity of root resorption following orthodontic treatment using aligners and associated factors. A comparative analysis was also made with fixed multi-bracket treatments. The data bases consulted were: Medline, Embase, EBSCO Host, Cochrane Library and Science Direct. Our search included meta-analyses, randomized and non-randomized controled trials, cohort studies and descriptive studies published before December 2015 and evidencing a connection with the incidence and severity of root resorption following orthodontic treatment using aligners alone or compared with fixed multi-bracket treatments. Among the 93 selected references, only 3 studies met our selection criteria. The incidence of root resorption ranged between 0 and 46%, of which 6% were severe cases. Relative to fixed multi-bracket non-extraction treatments to correct the same malocclusions, the incidence of resorption ranged between 2% and 50%, of which 22% were severe cases. In both techniques, the incidence of resorption was higher for the maxillary incisors and was not influenced by either age or sex. In malocclusion cases not requiring extractions, orthodontic aligner treatment is possibly associated with a lower incidence of resorption than fixed multi-bracket treatment. Further research encompassing extraction cases is needed to better assess the incidence and severity of root resorption following the use of these removable appliances. Copyright © 2016 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The indications of polyethylene in the orthodontic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore Adelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND Our study aims to find multiple applications of the PETG foils in the orthodontic field and to evaluate the efficiency of aligner foils regarding strain values among different thickness categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS In office set-ups were fabricated for different orthodontic malocclusions. PETG foils, multi-layer foils, Clear Aligner expansion screws and acrylic components were used for the manufacturing of invisible appliances. Foil thickness and heat behavior, strain values, using special strain gauges and esthetics were taken into account. A 4 week recall was scheduled in order to observe the treatment progress regarding PETG appliances. Measurements were performed to determine to optimal foil thickness. RESULTS Dental alignment and expansion were observed in all cases. Regarding behavior to heat, the 1 mm foil presented only a small reduction in thickness compared to other foils and the strain values seem to be higher for the thinner aligners. CONCLUSIONS The orthodontic appliances made out of polyethylene provide good results due to rigidity and dimensional stability. We are still conducting continuous research in this area in order to obtain further data. Graphical abstract: The thermoplastic aligner with a Clear Aligner screw for dental expansion (an in-office set-up was used for the manufacturing of the aligner REFERENCES 1.Thukral R., Gupta A. Invisalign: Invisible Orthodontic Treatment- A Review. Journal of Advanced Medical and Dental Sciences Research. 2015;3:42-44 2. Hyo WA. A new type of clear orthodontic retainer incorporating multi-layer hybrid materials. Korean J Orthod. 2015;45: 268–272. 3. Szuhanek C, Grigore A, Fleser T. The applications of thermoplastic materials in the fabrication of orthodontic aligners. Materiale plastic. 2015;52:385- 387.

  3. Current state of orthodontic patients under Bisphosphonate therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are a common medication for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, but are also applied for tumor diseases. They affect bone metabolism, and therefore also orthodontic treatments, but how it does has yet not been definitively clarified. Therefore, the aim of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate the reported effects and the current state of scientific research regarding orthodontic treatment and bisphosphonate medication exclusively in humans. Material and methods A systematic research of the literature for selected keywords in the Medline database (Pubmed) as well as a manual search was conducted. The following search terms were used: ‘Bisphosphonate’ in combination with: orthodontic, orthodontic treatment, tooth movement. Findings To date, only nine reported patients (case reports/series) and one original article (retrospective cohort study) regarding orthodontic treatment under bisphosphonate medication in humans have been published. Decelerated tooth movement with increased side effects (especially in high-risk patients) and longer treatment duration was reported in some articles. Patients with initial spacing or extraction cases had a higher risk of incomplete space closure and poor root parallelism. Conclusions Orthodontic tooth movement under bisphosphonate medication is possible, especially in low-risk patients (low dose and short period of intake). But the treatment is still not predictable, especially in high-risk patients. Therefore, the altered bone metabolism and higher extent of side effects should be considered in treatment planning, especially in extraction cases or high-risk patients. Regardless, longer treatment duration, decelerated tooth movement, and more side effects, e.g., incomplete space closure and poor root parallelism, should be expected, especially in extraction cases or space closure. PMID:23556517

  4. Beyond information retrieval: information discovery and multimedia information retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Raieli

    2017-01-01

    The paper compares the current methodologies for search and discovery of information and information resources: terminological search and term-based language, own of information retrieval (IR); semantic search and information discovery, being developed mainly through the language of linked data; semiotic search and content-based language, experienced by multimedia information retrieval (MIR).MIR semiotic methodology is, then, detailed.

  5. Pyogenic granuloma: a rare side complication from an orthodontic appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Priti N; Gill, Daljit; Lloyd, Tim

    2011-12-01

    This case report discusses a rare side effect associated with the use ofa fixed quad helix orthodontic appliance. A 14-year-old healthy girl presented with a painful enlarging mass on her tongue, which was causing distress to both her and her parents. Investigations confirmed that the mass was a pyogenic granuloma and management involved surgical excision of the mass and removal of the quad helix appliance. At least once previous case associated with an orthodontic quad helix appliance has been reported in the literature.

  6. Speech and orthodontic appliances: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyu; Wan, Jia; You, Lun

    2018-01-23

    Various types of orthodontic appliances can lead to speech difficulties. However, speech difficulties caused by orthodontic appliances have not been sufficiently investigated by an evidence-based method. The aim of this study is to outline the scientific evidence and mechanism of the speech difficulties caused by orthodontic appliances. Randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials, and cohort studies focusing on the effect of orthodontic appliances on speech were included. A systematic search was conducted by an electronic search in PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases, complemented by a manual search. The types of orthodontic appliances, the affected sounds, and duration period of the speech disturbances were extracted. The ROBINS-I tool was applied to evaluate the quality of non-randomized studies, and the bias of RCT was assessed based on the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. No meta-analyses could be performed due to the heterogeneity in the study designs and treatment modalities. Among 448 screened articles, 13 studies were included (n = 297 patients). Different types of orthodontic appliances such as fixed appliances, orthodontic retainers and palatal expanders could influence the clarity of speech. The /i/, /a/, and /e/ vowels as well as /s/, /z/, /l/, /t/, /d/, /r/, and /ʃ/ consonants could be distorted by appliances. Although most speech impairments could return to normal within weeks, speech distortion of the /s/ sound might last for more than 3 months. The low evidence level grading and heterogeneity were the two main limitations in this systematic review. Lingual fixed appliances, palatal expanders, and Hawley retainers have an evident influence on speech production. The /i/, /s/, /t/, and /d/ sounds are the primarily affected ones. The results of this systematic review should be interpreted with caution and more high-quality RCTs with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are

  7. Lingual mandibular osteonecrosis after dental impressions for orthodontic study models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruto, Carmen; Ugolini, Alessandro; Cozzani, Mauro

    2018-03-01

    A 43-year-old man sought orthodontic treatment to close anterior diastemas. During the impression procedure for routine documentation, the orthodontic assistant exerted excessive pressure on the metallic tray; 2 days later, the patient reported the detachment of a small piece of mucosa overlying the mylohyoid crest and was referred to a maxillofacial surgeon with a diagnosis of lingual mandibular osteonecrosis. The etiology of bony osteonecrosis is discussed, together with the anatomic variations that can be present in the basal bone and that must be carefully checked before an impression is taken. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dental root periapical resorption caused by orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental root resorption especially in maxillary incisive region almost always happens simultaneously with orthodontic treatment, and it gained researchers attention, in particular after the use of periapical radiography. However, the fundamental etiology of dental root resorption is still dubious. Multifactoral causes are mentioned, among others are hormonal, nutritition, trauma, dental root form and dental root structure anomalies, genetic, while from treatment side are duration, types, strength scale and dental movement types. Based on these findings, orthodontic treatment was proven to cause dental root resorption in maxillary incisive teeth.

  9. MR imaging of the juvenile temporomandibular joint before orthodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.M.; Hans, M.G.; Rozencweig, G.; Goldberg, J.S.; Bellon, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the prevalence of internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TM) in a population of children prior to orthodontic therapy. Thirty-two children, aged 7-15 years, with a variety of orthodontic disorders underwent both MR imaging and physical examination to assess ID of the TMJ. With MR imaging, the disks were graded as normal, borderline anterior displaced, or anterior displaced. Fifty-nine TMJs in 32 patients were successfully imaged. Five TMJ MR examinations could not be interpreted because of patient motion. Fifty seven of the 59 joints (97%) were normal. One disk (1.7%) was anterior displaced, and one (1.7%) was considered borderline

  10. Orthodontic mechanics using mini-implant measured by FBG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trannin, Pamela G.; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Walmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-07-01

    The magnitude of the force generated during orthodontic mechanics anchored in mini-implant in a maxilla model was analyzed. Data was collected during the insertion of the mini-implant and at the moment of applying forces to the structure of the maxilla and dentition. To obtain quantitative results, the Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG) were inserted in an elastomeric material reproducing a maxilla model. It was observed levels of forces of approximately 3,78N next to the root of first premolar by the insertion of the mini-implant and different levels of the force to different orthodontic mechanics applied on the dental system.

  11. Intrinsic Hormone-Like Molecules and External Root Resorption During Orthodontic Tooth Movement. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis in Preclinical in-Vivo Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spoerri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: External root resorption constitutes an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to identify the effect of induced intrinsic/ hormone-like molecules such as prostaglandins, interleukins and others on external root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement in experimental animalsMethods: An electronic database search of the literature was performed (Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS, and Open Gray. Search terms included root resorption, tooth movement and animal type. Risk of bias assessment was made using the SYRCLE guidelines for animal studies and reporting quality was assessed through ARRIVE. Random effects meta-analysis was performed for the outcome root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement.Results: Of the 124 articles initially retrieved, 13 were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, while only 2 were included in the quantitative synthesis. Five studies investigated the effect of Prostaglandin E2, four studies the effect of Thyroxine, two the effect of Calcium ions (Ca++, while the rest investigated Misoprostol, Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-4. Risk of Bias in all studies was judged to be high overall, while reporting quality was suboptimal. According to the quantitative synthesis, there was no difference in root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement when Prostaglandin E2 coupled with Ca++ was administered in comparison to no substance administration (SMD: 0.48 mm2; 95% CI: −0.22, 1.19; p = 0.18.Conclusions: Overall, there was no evidence to suggest a variation in root resorption when Prostaglandin E2 and Ca++ were administered, while there is an overriding need for further high quality experimental studies to inform available evidence on the effect of intrinsic substances on external root resorption.

  12. Intrinsic Hormone-Like Molecules and External Root Resorption During Orthodontic Tooth Movement. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis in Preclinical in-Vivo Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerri, Andreas; Koletsi, Despina; Eliades, Theodore

    2018-01-01

    Background: External root resorption constitutes an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to identify the effect of induced intrinsic/ hormone-like molecules such as prostaglandins, interleukins and others on external root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement in experimental animals Methods: An electronic database search of the literature was performed (Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS, and Open Gray). Search terms included root resorption, tooth movement and animal type. Risk of bias assessment was made using the SYRCLE guidelines for animal studies and reporting quality was assessed through ARRIVE. Random effects meta-analysis was performed for the outcome root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement. Results: Of the 124 articles initially retrieved, 13 were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, while only 2 were included in the quantitative synthesis. Five studies investigated the effect of Prostaglandin E2, four studies the effect of Thyroxine, two the effect of Calcium ions (Ca++), while the rest investigated Misoprostol, Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-4. Risk of Bias in all studies was judged to be high overall, while reporting quality was suboptimal. According to the quantitative synthesis, there was no difference in root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement when Prostaglandin E2 coupled with Ca++ was administered in comparison to no substance administration (SMD: 0.48 mm 2 ; 95% CI: -0.22, 1.19; p = 0.18). Conclusions: Overall, there was no evidence to suggest a variation in root resorption when Prostaglandin E2 and Ca++ were administered, while there is an overriding need for further high quality experimental studies to inform available evidence on the effect of intrinsic substances on external root resorption.

  13. The Effect of Enamel Sandblasting on Enhancing Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Koletsi, Despina; Verna, Carlalberta

    2017-01-01

    terms included sandblasting, enamel abrasion, tooth surface, bond strength, bond failure, and adhesive remnant; data were extracted in standardized piloted forms. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, adapted for in vitro studies where necessary. RESULTS: Of the 81 articles......PURPOSE: To critically appraise the evidence regarding the effect of enamel sandblasting on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets on either the labial or lingual tooth surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic database search of published and unpublished literature was performed. Search...... initially retrieved, 13 were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. All of the latter were in vitro studies with unclear risk of bias primarily due to unclear reporting of blinding of outcome assessors. Eight studies assessed the combined effect of enamel sandblasting and etching, while only five...

  14. Contextual Bandits for Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.; Whiteson, S.; de Rijke, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give an overview of and outlook on research at the intersection of information retrieval (IR) and contextual bandit problems. A critical problem in information retrieval is online learning to rank, where a search engine strives to improve the quality of the ranked result lists it

  15. Retrieval Practice Benefits Deductive Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglington, Luke G.; Kang, Sean H. K.

    2018-01-01

    Retrieval practice has been shown to benefit learning. However, the benefit has sometimes been attenuated with more complex materials that require integrating multiple units of information. Critically, Tran et al. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22," 135-140 (2015) found that retrieval practice improves sentence memory but not the…

  16. Topology of Document Retrieval Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Daniel M.; Cater, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    Explains the use of a topological structure to examine the closeness between documents in retrieval systems and analyzes the topological structure of a vector-space model, a fuzzy-set model, an extended Boolean model, a probabilistic model, and a TIRS (Topological Information Retrieval System) model. Proofs for the results are appended. (17…

  17. Intelligent Information Retrieval: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauch, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the application of artificial intelligence to online information retrieval systems and describes several systems: (1) CANSEARCH, from MEDLINE; (2) Intelligent Interface for Information Retrieval (I3R); (3) Gausch's Query Reformulation; (4) Environmental Pollution Expert (EP-X); (5) PLEXUS (gardening); and (6) SCISOR (corporate…

  18. How to average logarithmic retrievals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Funke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of mean trace gas contributions from profiles obtained by retrievals of the logarithm of the abundance rather than retrievals of the abundance itself are prone to biases. By means of a system simulator, biases of linear versus logarithmic averaging were evaluated for both maximum likelihood and maximum a priori retrievals, for various signal to noise ratios and atmospheric variabilities. These biases can easily reach ten percent or more. As a rule of thumb we found for maximum likelihood retrievals that linear averaging better represents the true mean value in cases of large local natural variability and high signal to noise ratios, while for small local natural variability logarithmic averaging often is superior. In the case of maximum a posteriori retrievals, the mean is dominated by the a priori information used in the retrievals and the method of averaging is of minor concern. For larger natural variabilities, the appropriateness of the one or the other method of averaging depends on the particular case because the various biasing mechanisms partly compensate in an unpredictable manner. This complication arises mainly because of the fact that in logarithmic retrievals the weight of the prior information depends on abundance of the gas itself. No simple rule was found on which kind of averaging is superior, and instead of suggesting simple recipes we cannot do much more than to create awareness of the traps related with averaging of mixing ratios obtained from logarithmic retrievals.

  19. Vocabulary Control for Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, F. W.

    This book deals with properties of vocabularies for indexing and searching document collections; the construction, organization, display, and maintenance of these vocabularies; and the vocabulary as a factor affecting the performance of retrieval systems. Most of the text is concerned with vocabularies for post-coordinate retrieval systems, with…

  20. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation self-etching primer Xeno V with Xeno Ortho showed clinically acceptable SBS and the least amount of residual adhesive left on the

  1. Orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Brahmanta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correction of class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and unilateral free end right upper ridge in adult patient is one of difficult biomechanical case in orthodontics. Due to this case that needs proper anchorage for upper incisor retraction with missing teeth in the right posterior segment. Purpose: The aim of this study to find an effective therapy for correction of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free and ridge. Case: A female patient, 36 year old complaining for the difficulty of lip closure due to severe bimaxillary protrusion with incompetence lip. Case management: Firstly correction of the maxillary and mandibular incisor proclination were done by extraction of the mandibular first premolar, the maxillary second premolar on left side and finally placement of miniplates implant in the zygomatic process on right side as an absolut anchorage. Conclusion: Skeletal anchorage system (SAS can be considered as an effective therapy for corection of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free end ridge.Latar belakang: Koreksi dari maloklusi klas I dari penderita dewasa yang disertai protrusi bimaksiler dengan kehilangan gigi posterior pada regio kanan atas merupakan salah satu kasus sulit untuk dikerjakan terutama berhubungan dengan biomekanik pergerakan giginya dalam perawatan ortodonti. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penulisan artikel ini adalah untuk menemukan terapi yang efektif untuk perbaikan protrusi bimaksiler dan kehilangan gigi posterior pada satu sisi. Kasus: Seorang penderita wanita usia 35 tahun datang dengan keluhan utama kesulitan untuk menutup mulut oleh karena gigi rahang atas dan rahang bawahnya maju dan bibirnya tidak kompeten. Tatalaksana kasus: Koreksi pada gigi insisivus rahang atas dan insisivus rahang bawah yang protrusi dilakukan dengan melakukan pencabutan terlebih dahulu pada gigi premolar pertama dirahang bawah sisi kanan dan sisi kiri serta pencabutan pada gigi premolar kedua di rahang atas sisi

  2. The ideal smile and its orthodontic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgekar, Sujala Ganapati; K, Nagaraj; Naik, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    To determine the parameters for an ideal smile. Ten laypersons classified frontal photographs of 62 smiling individuals between 18 and 25 years of age into five categories: 1, poor; 2, fair; 3, good; 4, very good; and 5, excellent. The scores obtained for each smile were averaged. The five smiles with each the highest and lowest scores were analyzed for seven parameters: buccal corridor, smile index, smile symmetry, smile line ratio, upper lip line, smile arc, and upper lip curvature. The five smiles with the highest scores were symmetrical with an average upper lip line and a consonant smile arc. Three of the five had an upward upper lip curvature. The smile line ratio, buccal corridor, and smile index for all five subjects ranged from 1.0 to 1.3 mm, 9.0% to 11.0%, and 4.0 to 6.0 mm, respectively. Two of the five smiles with the lowest scores were asymmetrical and three had a high upper lip line and a downward curvature, but all five had a nonconsonant smile arc. The smile line ratio, buccal corridor, and smile index for all five subjects ranged from -1.0 to 1.3 mm, 18.0% to 22.0%, and 7.0 to 10.0 mm, respectively. The seven investigated smile parameters can define characteristics of an ideal smile. These smile components should be included in the orthodontic problem list to help clinicians select the appropriate mechanotherapy. © 2010 BY QUINTESSENCE PUBLISHING CO, INC.

  3. Bayesian aerosol retrieval algorithm for MODIS AOD retrieval over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipponen, Antti; Mielonen, Tero; Pitkänen, Mikko R. A.; Levy, Robert C.; Sawyer, Virginia R.; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Kolehmainen, Ville; Arola, Antti

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a Bayesian aerosol retrieval (BAR) algorithm for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over land from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In the BAR algorithm, we simultaneously retrieve all dark land pixels in a granule, utilize spatial correlation models for the unknown aerosol parameters, use a statistical prior model for the surface reflectance, and take into account the uncertainties due to fixed aerosol models. The retrieved parameters are total AOD at 0.55 µm, fine-mode fraction (FMF), and surface reflectances at four different wavelengths (0.47, 0.55, 0.64, and 2.1 µm). The accuracy of the new algorithm is evaluated by comparing the AOD retrievals to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) AOD. The results show that the BAR significantly improves the accuracy of AOD retrievals over the operational Dark Target (DT) algorithm. A reduction of about 29 % in the AOD root mean square error and decrease of about 80 % in the median bias of AOD were found globally when the BAR was used instead of the DT algorithm. Furthermore, the fraction of AOD retrievals inside the ±(0.05+15 %) expected error envelope increased from 55 to 76 %. In addition to retrieving the values of AOD, FMF, and surface reflectance, the BAR also gives pixel-level posterior uncertainty estimates for the retrieved parameters. The BAR algorithm always results in physical, non-negative AOD values, and the average computation time for a single granule was less than a minute on a modern personal computer.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF ROOT RESORPTION DEGREE OF INCISORS AFTER ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT IN ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Luchian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main iatrogenic effects associated with orthodontic treatment refer to: influence of orthodontic rings on the periodontal tissue; gum retractions; the effect of the orthodontic treatment on dental root (root resorption; the effect of the orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone height; mobility and pain associated with orthodontic treatment. AIM of the study: To assess the degree of root resorption of incisors, after orthodontic treatment, on a group of 48 adults with dental-maxillary abnormalities. Materials and method: The study included 48 young adult patients, 35 women and 13 men aged 18 to 30 years, who had received fixed orthodontic treatment. To assess the degree of root resorption (changes at root level and apical contour length, apical radiographies were taken in the maxillary incisors and jaw both at the beginning and end of the orthodontic treatment. Results: Out of the 239 incisors examined at the beginning of orthodontic treatment, 163 showed code 0, meaning 88.1%, and 50 showed a slight squash apex (code 1, respectively 10.9%. Only 1% of all incisors assessed presented mild and severe root resorption. Conclusions: The results of the study show that, generally, an adult orthodontic treatment, applied for functional and aesthetic objectives, may have clinically acceptable iatrogenic effects.

  5. Design of an Orthodontic Torque Simulator for Measurement of Bracket Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, G. W.; Nobes, D. S.; Major, P. W.; Carey, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The design and testing of an orthodontic torque simulator that reproduces the effect of archwire rotation on orthodontic brackets is described. This unique device is capable of simultaneously measuring the deformation and loads applied to an orthodontic bracket due to archwire rotation. Archwire rotation is used by orthodontists to correct the inclination of teeth within the mouth. This orthodontic torque simulator will provide knowledge of the deformation and loads applied to orthodontic bracket that will aide clinicians by describing the effect of archwire rotation on brackets. This will also impact that design on new archwirebracket systems by providing an assessment of performance. Deformation of the orthodontic bracket tie wings is measured using a digital image correlation process to measure elastic and plastic deformation. The magnitude of force and moments applied to the bracket though the archwire is also measured using a six-axis load cell. Initial tests have been performed on two orthodontic brackets of varying geometry to demonstrate the measurement capability of the orthodontic torque simulator. The demonstration experiment shows that a Damon Q bracket had a final plastic deformation after a single loading of 0.022 mm while the Speed bracket deformed 0.071 mm. This indicates that the Speed bracket plastically deforms 3.2 times more than the Damon Q bracket for similar magnitude of applied moment. The demonstration experiment demonstrates that bracket geometry affect the deformation of orthodontic brackets and this difference can be detected using the orthodontic torque simulator.

  6. Alterations of papilla dimensions after orthodontic closure of the maxillary midline diastema: a retrospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Seok; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chang, Moontaek

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations of papilla dimensions after orthodontic closure of the diastema between maxillary central incisors. Sixty patients who had a visible diastema between maxillary central incisors that had been closed by orthodontic approximation were selected for this study. Various papilla dimensions were assessed on clinical photographs and study models before the orthodontic treatment and at the follow-up examination after closure of the diastema. Influences of the variables assessed before orthodontic treatment on the alterations of papilla height (PH) and papilla base thickness (PBT) were evaluated by univariate regression analysis. To analyze potential influences of the 3-dimensional papilla dimensions before orthodontic treatment on the alterations of PH and PBT, a multiple regression model was formulated including the 3-dimensional papilla dimensions as predictor variables. On average, PH decreased by 0.80 mm and PBT increased after orthodontic closure of the diastema (Porthodontic treatment influenced the alteration of PH. With respect to the alteration of PBT, the diastema width (P=0.045) and PBT (P=0.000) were found to be influential factors. PBT before the orthodontic treatment significantly influenced the alteration of PBT in the multiple regression model. PH decreased but PBT increased after orthodontic closure of the diastema. The papilla dimensions before orthodontic treatment influenced the alterations of PH and PBT after closure of the diastema. The PBT increased more when the diastema width before the orthodontic treatment was larger.

  7. Children's orthodontic utilization in the United States: Socioeconomic and surveillance considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniado, Nadia; Oliva, Stephanie; Matthews, Gregory J

    2017-11-01

    There has been no epidemiologic study of malocclusion prevalence and treatment need in the United States since the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted from 1988 to 1991. In this descriptive study, the authors sought to estimate orthodontic treatment prevalence by examining a nationally representative survey to assess current pediatric dental and orthodontic utilization. The 2009 and 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to categorize and compare all types of pediatric dental and orthodontic procedures in children and adolescents up to 20 years old. Descriptive variables included dental insurance, poverty level, and racial/ethnic background. Visits for orthodontic procedures constituted the third largest treatment category (14.5%) and were greatest among the uninsured and higher income populations. Children with public insurance had the fewest orthodontic visits (9.4%). Racial/ethnic disparities were most pronounced among orthodontic visits, with black and Hispanic children receiving the fewest orthodontic procedures (8.89% and 10.56%, respectively). Orthodontic treatment prevalence data suggest that significant disparities exist in orthodontic utilization based on race/ethnicity, poverty level, and insurance status. To establish the burden of malocclusion, describe populations in greatest need of interventions, and craft appropriate programs and policies, an active orthodontic surveillance system is essential. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anthropology and it′s relation to orthodontics: Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Verma Teja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the existence of man on this planet from a single-celled primitive creature to the multi-celled, highly specialized being that we are. More importantly, this article gives a description of the evolution of human dentition, temporomanibular joint and masticatory complex, and, in course of time, how the evolution has had its relevance in orthodontics.

  9. Compatibility of fixed orthodontic appliances with MR environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Starčuková, Jana; Linetskiy, I.; Bartušek, Karel; Krupa, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 19, Suppl. 1 (2006), EPOS 726:1-7 E-ISSN 1352-8661 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : orthodontic appliance * magnetic resonance * compatibility * dentistry * artifact Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 0.756, year: 2005 http://posters.webges.com/esmrmb/epos

  10. Effect of Orthodontic Tooth Movement on Salivary Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiven Adhitya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Aspartate aminotransferase is one of biological indicator in gingival crevicular fluid (CGF. Force orthodontic application could increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in CGF. However, the increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in saliva due to orthodontic force and its correlation between aspartate aminotransferase activity and tooth movement remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate application orthodontic force on the aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva based on the duration of force and finding correlation between tooth movement and aspartate aminotransferase activity. Methods: Twenty saliva samples collected before extraction of first premolar, at the time of force application for canine retraction and after force application. The canines retraction used 100 grams of interrupted force (module chain for thirty days. The collection of saliva and the measurement of tooth movement were carried out 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days after force application. The measurement of aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva was done using spectrophotometer. Results: Application of orthodontic force influences the salivary aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=25.290, p=0.000. Furthermore, tooth movement correlated with aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=0.429, p=0.000. Conclusion: Aspartate aminotransferase activity could be used as tooth movement indicator that related to the duration of force application.DOI : 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.128

  11. [The controversy of routine articulator mounting in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Han, Xianglong; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    Articulators have been widely used by clinicians of dentistry. But routine articulator mounting is still controversial in orthodontics. Orthodontists oriented by gnathology approve routine articulator mounting while nongnathologic orthodontists disapprove it. This article reviews the thoughts of orthodontist that they agree or disagree with routine articulator mounting based on the considerations of biting, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), periodontitis, and so on.

  12. Normative and Subjective Need for Orthodontic Treatment within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. Methods: One thousand and sixteen patients from seven different demographic regions of Turkey (Marmara, Black Sea, East Anatolia, Southeastern Anatolia, Mediterranean, Aegean,

  13. Genotoxicity of corrosion eluates obtained from orthodontic brackets in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Marcondes, Joao Paulo C; de Almeida, Danielle Cristina; Salvadori, Daisy M F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether corrosion eluates obtained from commercially available orthodontic brackets are able to induce genetic damage in vitro. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel (comet) assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The following orthodontic metallic brackets were used: Morelli (Sorocaba, Brazil); Abzil (São José do Rio Preto, Brazil); Dentaurum (Pforzheim, Germany); and 3M Unitek (Puchheim, Germany). Each dental bracket was submitted to a corrosion process in a solution containing equal amounts of acetic acid and sodium chloride at 0.1 M concentration for 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 70 days. CHO cells were exposed to eluates for 30 minutes at 37°C. The negative control was treated with the same solution used for corrosion process for 30 minutes at 37°C. Independent positive control was performed with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, Mo) at 1 ug/mL for 1 hour. None of the eluates was found to exhibit genotoxicity, regardless of the different commercial brands of orthodontic appliance used. In summary, our results indicate corrosion eluates obtained from orthodontic brackets do not induce genetic damage as assessed by single cell gel (comet) assay. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence-based Paradigm In Orthodontics | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need to integrate the accrued scientific evidence into clinical orthodontic practice is amongst the challenges facing orthodontists in the 21st century. The evidence-based health care approach aims to improve patient care based upon informed decision-making. This article therefore highlights the importance and ...

  15. Orthodontic intervention of an impacted upper left central incisor due ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fixed orthodontic appliance was used to facilitate traction and correction of malalignement of the impacted upper left central incisor.Treatment outcome: Successful removal of the odontoma, full exposure of the crown of upper left central incisor and good alignment on the arch were achieved. Crowding on the upper and ...

  16. Facial soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment | Aksakalli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To successfully meet expectations on facial esthetics, it is important to understand normal craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment thereon. To date, there have been few studies documenting changes in facial esthetics through photography. The objective of this study was to compare facial soft ...

  17. A Case-Based Learning Model in Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Francoise E.; Hendricson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A case-based, student-centered instructional model designed to mimic orthodontic problem solving and decision making in dental general practice is described. Small groups of students analyze case data, then record and discuss their diagnoses and treatments. Students and instructors rated the seminars positively, and students reported improved…

  18. Scientific use of the finite element method in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Luegya; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Marcia Regina Elisa Aparecida Schiavon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The finite element method (FEM) is an engineering resource applied to calculate the stress and deformation of complex structures, and has been widely used in orthodontic research. With the advantage of being a non-invasive and accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data on the physiological reactions possible to occur in tissues, applying the FEM can anticipate the visualization of these tissue responses through the observation of areas of stress created from applied orthodontic mechanics. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing and discussing the stages of the finite element method application and its applicability in Orthodontics. RESULTS: FEM is able to evaluate the stress distribution at the interface between periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and the shifting trend in various types of tooth movement when using different types of orthodontic devices. Therefore, it is necessary to know specific software for this purpose. CONCLUSIONS: FEM is an important experimental method to answer questions about tooth movement, overcoming the disadvantages of other experimental methods. PMID:25992996

  19. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  20. 3D workflows in orthodontics, maxillofacial surgery and prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher Jurjen

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of digital workflows in Orthodontics, Maxillofacial Surgery and Prosthodontics are discussed and, where possible, placed in a broader perspective thereby attempting to go both broader and deeper into the implications of the introduction of 3D digital technology in

  1. Efficient free-form surface representation with application in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamany, Sameh M.; El-Bialy, Ahmed M.

    1999-03-01

    Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry concerned with the study of growth of the craniofacial complex. The detection and correction of malocclusion and other dental abnormalities is one of the most important and critical phases of orthodontic diagnosis. This paper introduces a system that can assist in automatic orthodontics diagnosis. The system can be used to classify skeletal and dental malocclusion from a limited number of measurements. This system is not intended to deal with several cases but is aimed at cases more likely to be encountered in epidemiological studies. Prior to the measurement of the orthodontics parameters, the position of the teeth in the jaw model must be detected. A new free-form surface representation is adopted for the efficient and accurate segmentation and separation of teeth from a scanned jaw model. THe new representation encodes the curvature and surface normal information into a 2D image. Image segmentation tools are then sued to extract structures of high/low curvature. By iteratively removing these structures, individual teeth surfaces are obtained.

  2. Prevention and treatment of white spot lesions in orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decalcification of enamel, appearing as white spot lesions (WSLs, around fixed orthodontic appliances is a major challenge during and after fixed orthodontic treatment by considering the fact that the goal of orthodontic treatment is to enhance facial and dental esthetic appearance. Banded or bonded teeth exhibit a significantly higher rate of WSLs compared to the controls with no braces as fixed appliances and the bonding materials promote retention of biofilms. These lesions are managed in the first step by establishing good oral hygiene habits and prophylaxis with topical fluorides, including high-fluoride toothpastes, fluoride mouthwashes, gels, varnishes, fluoride-containing bonding materials, and elastic ligatures. Recently, other materials and methods have been recommended, including the application of casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate, antiseptics, probiotics, polyols, sealants, laser, tooth bleaching agents, resin infiltration, and microabrasion. This article reviews the currently used methods to manage enamel demineralization during and after orthodontic treatment and the risk factors and preventive measures based on the latest evidence.

  3. Visual application of the American Board of Orthodontics Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Steven A; Freer, Terry J

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of treatment outcomes has traditionally been accomplished using the subjective opinion of experienced clinicians. Reduced subjectivity in the assessment of orthodontic treatment can be achieved with the use of an occlusal index. To implement an index for quality assurance purposes is time-consuming and subject to the inherent error of the index. Quality assessment of orthodontic treatment on a routine basis has been difficult to implement in private practice. To investigate whether a clinician can accurately apply the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System by direct visual inspection instead of measuring individual traits. A random sample of 30 cases was selected, including pretreatment and post-treatment upper and lower study casts and panoramic radiographs. The cases were examined and scored with the standardized measuring gauge according to the protocol provided by the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). The records were re-examined 6 weeks later and the individual traits scored by visual inspection (VI). There were no significant differences between the pre- and post-treatment ABO gauge and VI scores. This study suggests that occlusal traits defined by the ABO Objective Grading System can be accurately assessed by visual inspection. The VI score provides a simple and convenient method for critical evaluation of treatment outcome by a clinician.

  4. Adverse effects of orthodontic treatment: A clinical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Nabeel F.

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment is associated with a number of adverse effects, such as root resorption, pain, pulpal changes, periodontal disease, and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Orthodontists should be aware of these effects and associated risk factors. Risk factors linked to root resorption include the duration of treatment, length, and shape of the root, trauma history, habits, and genetic predisposition. PMID:24151415

  5. Iatrogenic possibilities of orthodontic treatment and modalities of prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Nazeer Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of orthodontic treatment are numerous and in most cases, the benefits outweigh the possible disadvantages. Orthodontic treatment can play an important role in enhancing esthetics, function, and self-esteem in patients. However, it carries with it the risks of enamel demineralization, tissue damage, root resorption, open gingival embrasures in the form of triangular spaces, allergic reactions to nickel, and treatment failure in the form of relapse. These potential complications are easily avoidable by undertaking certain precautions and timely interventions by both the orthodontist and the patient. The orthodontist must ensure that the patient is aware of the associated risks and stress the importance of the patient's role in preventing these untoward outcomes. The decision whether to proceed with the orthodontic treatment is essentially a risk-benefit analysis, where the perceived benefits of commencing treatment outweigh the potential risks. This article provides an overview of the iatrogenic possibilities of orthodontic treatment and the role of the patient as well as the orthodontist in preventing the associated risks. PMID:24987646

  6. Orthodontic treatment in cherubism: an overview and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, Stefan; Cameron, Malcolm; Bister, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Cherubism is a rare hereditary disease that frequently manifests as a painless enlargement of the mandible and/or maxilla. The disease usually progresses rapidly during the first and second decades of life but it is self-limiting and often regresses. Although few orthodontic case reports describing cherubic patients exist, the timing and extent of surgical intervention is controversial. This present paper aims to review the treatment literature and provide a case report of a patient who underwent orthodontic/surgical management. The patient presented with severe cherubism in her late teenage years; her main complaint was poor facial and dental appearance. Multiple teeth were missing and those present demonstrated significant preoperative root resorption. Treatment consisted of orthodontic alignment of the upper anterior teeth and a recontouring osteotomy. Confirmed by the patient, the combination approach led to a significant improvement in facial aesthetics and better self-esteem. Tooth movement through the osseous lesions was uneventful and no further root resoption was observed. Orthodontic treatment may be undertaken in those affected by Cherubism even with pre-existing idiopathic root resorption, but patients need to be appropriately informed and consented.

  7. Orthodontic management of a dental concrescence: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Nicky David; Hosni, Sara; Morris, Tim

    2017-09-01

    Dental concrescence is a rare dental abnormality resulting in the joining of two teeth at the level of the cementum. This is the first reported case of the orthodontic management of a dental concrescence and the options for patient treatment are discussed. In this case, a compromised occlusal result was accepted with restorative masking of the affected teeth.

  8. A hazard of lingual orthodontic attachments: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Graham; Borumandi, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    A case is presented of an unusual trauma to the floor of mouth caused by an unused lingual orthodontic button. This resulted in a vein being stripped from the floor of mouth and was associated with severe pain and restricted tongue movement. Management was by ligation and excision of the loop of the vessel under local anaesthesia.

  9. Finite element modeling of superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naceur, Ines Ben; Charfi, Amin; Bouraoui, Tarak; Elleuch, Khaled

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, superelastic Ni–Ti wire alloys have been successfully used in orthodontic treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and evaluate the level of orthodontic force applied to the bracket and teeth in order to achieve tooth movement. In this study, three dimensional finite element models with a Gibbs-potential-based-formulation and thermodynamic principles were used. The aim was to evaluate the influence of possible intraoral temperature differences on the forces exerted by NiTi orthodontic arch wires with different cross sectional shapes and sizes. The prediction made by this phenomenological model, for superelastic tensile and bending tests, shows good agreement with the experimental data. A bending test is simulated to study the force variation of an orthodontic NiTi arch wire when it loaded up to the deflection of 3 mm, for this task one half of the arch wire and the 3 adjacent brackets were modeled. The results showed that the stress required for the martensite transformation increases with the increase of cross-sectional dimensions and temperature. Associated with this increase in stress, the plateau of this transformation becomes steeper. In addition, the area of the mechanical hysteresis, measured as the difference between the forces of the upper and lower plateau, increases.

  10. Cytokines and VEGF Induction in Orthodontic Movement in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontics is a branch of dentistry that aims at the resolution of dental malocclusions. The specialist carries out the treatment using intraoral or extraoral orthodontic appliances that require forces of a given load level to obtain a tooth movement in a certain direction in dental arches. Orthodontic tooth movement is dependent on efficient remodeling of periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, correlated with several biological and mechanical responses of the tissues surrounding the teeth. A periodontal ligament placed under pressure will result in bone resorption whereas a periodontal ligament under tension results in bone formation. In the primary stage of the application of orthodontic forces, an acute inflammation occurs in periodontium. Several proinflammatory cytokines are produced by immune-competent cells migrating by means of dilated capillaries. In this paper we summarize, also through the utilization of animal models, the role of some of these molecules, namely, interleukin-1β and vascular endothelial growth factor, that are some proliferation markers of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and the macrophage colony stimulating factor.

  11. Future Practice Plans of Orthodontic Postgraduate Residents in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjyot Singh Walia

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Indian Orthodontic programs would not find a shortage of full-time academicians in the future. Residents favor 35- to 36-month programs with a research-based component. Newer techniques, e.g. Digital Imaging, TAD, SLB are here to stay.

  12. Identification of a research protocol to study orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Dichicco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The orthodontic movement is associated with a process of tissue remodeling together with the release of several chemical mediators in periodontal tissues. Each mediator is a potential marker of tooth movement and expresses biological processes as: tissue inflammation and bone remodeling. Different amounts of every mediator are present in several tissues and fluids of the oral cavity. Therefore, there are different methods that allow sampling with several degrees of invasiveness. Chemical mediators are also substances of different molecular nature, and multiple kind of analysis methods allow detection. The purpose of this study was to draft the best research protocol for an optimal study on orthodontic movement efficiency. Methods: An analysis of the international literature have been made, to identify the gold standard of each aspect of the protocol: type of mediator, source and method of sampling and analysis method. Results: From the analysis of the international literature was created an original research protocol for the study and the assessment of the orthodontic movement, by using the biomarkers of the tooth movement. Conclusions: The protocol created is based on the choice of the gold standard of every aspect already analyzed in the literature and in existing protocols for the monitoring of orthodontic tooth movement through the markers of tooth movement. Clinical trials re required for the evaluation and validation of the protocol created.

  13. Pilot study on orthodontic space closure after guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christoph; Wenghöfer, Matthias; Götz, Werner; Jäger, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, the benefit of moving teeth into extraction sockets preserved by a bone substitute was evaluated. This was performed to determine whether this was advantageous for orthodontic space closure. Socket preservation employing the bony alveolus in patients presenting the orthodontic indication for premolar extraction therapy was performed. Analogue premolars were extracted in a split-mouth design. One extraction alveolus was filled with a silica matrix-embedded, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute, with the other acting as a control. The orthodontic space was then closed using NiTi closed coil springs (200 g). Photographs and X-rays were acquired for documentation. Space closure succeeded without complications, e.g., root resorptions or inflammations. Gingival invaginations occurred in two of the control sites. A difference in the velocity of extraction space closure in one patient was also observed. Orthodontic tooth movement using this bone replacement material is possible according to these study results. This technique, thus, warrants further investigation in future clinical trials focusing on preventive means to reduce the development of gingival invaginations.

  14. Prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in southern Italian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Letizia; Masucci, Caterina; Ferro, Fabrizia; Apicella, Davide; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-02-01

    The present survey was performed to determine orthodontic treatment need in a large sample (n = 703) of 12-year-old schoolchildren from the southern part of Italy. The sample comprised 331 males (47 per cent) and 372 females (53 per cent), all orthodontically untreated. Two examiners, who had been previously trained in the use of occlusal indices, screened all the schoolchildren. The prevalence rates for the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) as well as for occlusal features (Angle Class, overjet, overbite, crowding, posterior crossbite) were calculated for the total sample. The IOTN grades were statistically compared in the two genders using the chi-square test. The findings indicated that this southern Italian school population showed a rather low prevalence rate for objective need for treatment (grades 4 and 5; 27.3 per cent of the total sample). This prevalence rate is generally lower than those reported in northern and central European countries (Sweden, Germany, and UK) but slightly greater than those in France. No significant differences in the DHC grades of the IOTN were found between genders. Among the occlusal features diagnosed in the subjects examined, a high prevalence rate was found for crowding (45.9 per cent). Moreover, posterior crossbites and Class III malocclusions, which would presumably have benefited from early orthodontic intervention, were still present in 14.2 and 4.3 per cent of the students, respectively.

  15. The effect of orthodontic extraoral appliances on depression and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psychosocial consequences and post‑operative anxiety in patients after fixed orthodontic treatment are important parameters that must be evaluated by clinicians not to effect patient and their parent's psychosocial mood negatively. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in depression and ...

  16. Assessment of graduate orthodontic programs in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas; Orellana, Maria

    2013-04-01

    This study collected information on four main aspects of U.S. and Canadian orthodontic programs: demographic profiles of residents, requirements for graduation, graduate curriculum, and number of faculty and staff members. Program directors at seventy U.S. and Canadian orthodontic programs were invited to participate in a twenty-question survey and to distribute a ten-question survey to their residents. Twenty program directors and eighty-four residents completed the anonymous, online surveys on Qualtrics.com in July-August 2010. The average age of surveyed residents was 29.6 years of age; 73 percent were non-Hispanic white, with 14 percent Asian/Asian-American, 5 percent Hispanic, and 1 percent African American. A small percentage of residents (13 percent) were foreign-trained. The majority of residents (64 percent) were male. There was a wide variety of clinical and didactic requirements in the programs. Almost all programs emphasized treatment with functional appliances and clear aligners. An average of three full-time and ten part-time faculty members were dedicated to each residency program. This survey reveals a potential shortage of minority orthodontic residents currently being trained in orthodontic programs, in addition to several commonalities and differences among the programs' curricula, graduation requirements, and numbers of faculty and staff members. This preliminary survey will hopefully inspire measures to address the discrepancies revealed, particularly the lack of minority students and full-time faculty members.

  17. Apicotomy as Treatment for Failure of Orthodontic Traction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Berni Osório

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to present a case report that demonstrated primary failure in a tooth traction that was subsequently treated with apicotomy technique. Case Report. A 10-year-old girl had an impacted upper right canine with increased pericoronal space, which was apparent on a radiographic image. The right maxillary sinus showed an opacity suggesting sinusitis. The presumptive diagnosis was dentigerous cyst associated with maxillary sinus infection. The plan for treatment included treatment of the sinus infection and cystic lesion and orthodontic traction of the canine after surgical exposure and bonding of an orthodontic appliance. The surgical procedure, canine position, root dilaceration, and probably apical ankylosis acted in the primary failure of the orthodontic traction. Surgical apical cut of the displaced teeth was performed, and tooth position in the dental arch was possible, with a positive response to the pulp vitality test. Conclusion. Apicotomy is an effective technique to treat severe canine displacement and primary orthodontic traction failure of palatally displaced canines.

  18. Orthodontic Force Application in Correlation with Salivary Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Husin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement generate mechanical forces to periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The forces correlate with initial responses of periodontal tissues and involving many metabolic changes. One of the metabolic changes detected in saliva is lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between orthodontic interrupted force application, lactate dehydrogenase activity and the distance of tooth movement. Methods: upper premolar, pre-retraction of upper canine and 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-retraction of upper canine with 100g interrupted orthodontic force. Results: duration of force (F=11.926 p 14 and 28 days post-retraction of canine. The region of retraction correlated with the distance of tooth movement (F=7.377 p=0.007. The duration of force correlated with the distance of tooth movement (F=66.554 p=0.000. retraction of canine. Conclusion: This study concluded that orthodontic interrupted force application on canine could increase the distance of tooth movement and LDH activity in saliva.

  19. Orthodontic Research Output from Iran in International and National Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Samareh; Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Fard, Mohammad JavadKharrazi; Momeni, Nafiseh; Hedayati, Zohreh; Vakili, Vajihe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The number of scientific papers is a conventional metric to measure a country’s research performance in a particular area. The aim of this survey was to demonstrate statistical information about orthodontic research published in international and national journals. Materials and Methods: Pubmed as an international and IranMedex and SID as national databases were searched between1997 and 2012. The keyword searching method was used in English and Persian. Abstracts were reviewed and unrelated articles were omitted. Data were obtained and transferred to Microsoft Excel to survey the scintometric indicators. Results: According to the defined criteria, a total of 733 papers were found showing a considerable increase. Five hundred papers (68.2%) were published in domestic journals, and 233 (31.8%) were published in PubMed indexed journals. Most of the orthodontic articles originated from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (22.9%). The Journal of Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences published most of the national papers (27.8%) and the Australian Orthodontic Journal published the majority of international papers (9.9%) In terms of study design, 52.5% of the articles were observational and 39.4% were interventional. Conclusion: Orthodontic research production in Iran has made significant strides in the recent years and researchers should focus on the quality of the study in this field in order to apply research production in evidence base dentistry. PMID:24910678

  20. Patient’s and parents’ expectations of orthodontic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, R.; Bos, A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expectations of children and their primary care-givers towards orthodontic treatment and to compare the results with those of a UK sample. Design: A questionnaire survey of children and their primary care-givers attending for their first consultation. Setting: The

  1. The association of subjective orthodontic treatment need with oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragt, Lea; Jaddoe, Vincent; Wolvius, Eppo; Ongkosuwito, Edwin

    2017-08-01

    The existing body of evidence reports an inconsistent association between subjective and objective orthodontic treatment need. The concept of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) might help to explain the differences in subjective and objective orthodontic treatment need. Our aim was to investigate the association of subjective orthodontic treatment with OHRQoL in children. This cross-sectional study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study. OHRQoL and subjective orthodontic treatment need were assessed by parental questionnaires. Questionnaire items were individually compared among children with no, borderline and definite subjective orthodontic need. The association between subjective orthodontic treatment need and OHRQoL was investigated in multivariate regression analysis with weighted least squares. Differences by sex and levels of objective orthodontic treatment need were evaluated. In total, 3774 children were included in the analysis. Children with borderline subjective orthodontic treatment need and those with definite subjective orthodontic treatment need had significantly poorer OHRQoL based on the fully adjusted model (adjusted regression coefficient (aβ)=-0.49, 95% CI: -0.75, -0.30; (aβ)=-1.58, 95% CI: -1.81, -1.58, respectively). The association between subjective orthodontic treatment need and OHRQoL was stronger in girls than in boys and stronger in children with objective orthodontic treatment need than in those with none. Oral health-related quality of life is poorer in children with subjective orthodontic treatment need. This has not been investigated before in such a large-population-based study and clearly offers an explanation for the lack of concurrence between objective and subjective orthodontic treatment need. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Perception of orthodontic treatment need among Swedish children, adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Firas Nafi; Lindsten, Rune; Bågesund, Mats

    2017-08-01

    Perceptions of orthodontic treatment need and perceptions of dental aesthetics was investigated among subjects ages 10, 15 and 19. A total of 489 subjects completed a questionnaire after inspecting 10 photographs in the Aesthetic Component scale of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need to (i) reveal the lower limit for orthodontic treatment need and (ii) rate their dental aesthetics by selecting the most similar photo. The mean lower limit for orthodontic treatment need was significantly higher (and closer to literature-based standards) among subjects, age 10 (4.2 ± 1.5), than among subjects, age 15 (3.6 ± 1.2) (p = .0009), and subjects, age 19 (3.5 ± 1.2) (p = .00002). Among subjects ages 15 and 19, the lower limit for orthodontic treatment need was lower in groups with (i) self-perceived orthodontic treatment need (p = .002 and .001, respectively) and (ii) previous orthodontic treatment (p = .005 and .035, respectively). Self-perceived orthodontic treatment need was present in more than one-third of subjects, age 19, who had previously received orthodontic treatment. Subjects of foreign origin reported that their dental aesthetics were worse (p = .002) and those same subjects, age 19, set the lower limit for orthodontic treatment lower (p = .047) than Swedes, age 19. The lower limit for orthodontic treatment need among subjects, age 10, was higher - compared to subjects, ages 15 and 19 - and closer to literature-based standards. Subjects with self-perceived orthodontic treatment need, subjects with previous orthodontic treatment, and subjects age 19 of foreign origin, have higher aesthetic demands.

  3. Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Sona; Moles, David R; Cunningham, Susan J

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient's experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult

  4. Esthetic perception of orthodontic appliances by Brazilian children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Deise Caldas; Lima, Tatiana Araújo de; Duplat, Candice Belchior; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this present study was to understand how children and adolescents perceive esthetic attractiveness of a variety of orthodontic appliances. It also analyzed preferences according to patients' age, sex and socioeconomic status. A photograph album consisting of eight photographs of different orthodontic appliances and clear tray aligners placed in a consenting adult with pleasing smile was used. A sample of children or adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years old (n = 276) was asked to rate each image for its attractiveness on a visual analog scale. Comparisons between the appliances attractiveness were performed by means of nonparametric statistics with Friedman's test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison post-hoc test. Correlation between appliances and individuals' socioeconomic status, age, sex, and esthetic perception was assessed by means of Spearman's correlation analysis. Attractiveness ratings of orthodontic appliances varied nonsignificantly for children in the following hierarchy: traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures > traditional metallic brackets with gray elastomeric ligatures > sapphire esthetic brackets; and for adolescents, as follows: sapphire esthetic brackets > clear aligner without attachments > traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. The correlation between individuals' socioeconomic status and esthetic perception of a given appliance was negative and statistically significant for appliances such as the golden orthodontic brackets and traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. Metal appliances were considered very attractive, whereas aligners were classified as less attractive by children and adolescents. The correlation between esthetic perception and socioeconomic status revealed that individuals with a higher socioeconomic level judged esthetics as the most attractive attribute. For those with higher economic status, golden orthodontic brackets and

  5. Esthetic perception of orthodontic appliances by Brazilian children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Deise Caldas; de Lima, Tatiana Araújo; Duplat, Candice Belchior; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this present study was to understand how children and adolescents perceive esthetic attractiveness of a variety of orthodontic appliances. It also analyzed preferences according to patients' age, sex and socioeconomic status. Methods: A photograph album consisting of eight photographs of different orthodontic appliances and clear tray aligners placed in a consenting adult with pleasing smile was used. A sample of children or adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years old (n = 276) was asked to rate each image for its attractiveness on a visual analog scale. Comparisons between the appliances attractiveness were performed by means of nonparametric statistics with Friedman's test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison post-hoc test. Correlation between appliances and individuals' socioeconomic status, age, sex, and esthetic perception was assessed by means of Spearman's correlation analysis. Results: Attractiveness ratings of orthodontic appliances varied nonsignificantly for children in the following hierarchy: traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures > traditional metallic brackets with gray elastomeric ligatures > sapphire esthetic brackets; and for adolescents, as follows: sapphire esthetic brackets > clear aligner without attachments > traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. The correlation between individuals' socioeconomic status and esthetic perception of a given appliance was negative and statistically significant for appliances such as the golden orthodontic brackets and traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. Conclusion: Metal appliances were considered very attractive, whereas aligners were classified as less attractive by children and adolescents. The correlation between esthetic perception and socioeconomic status revealed that individuals with a higher socioeconomic level judged esthetics as the most attractive attribute. For those with higher

  6. Esthetic perception of orthodontic appliances by Brazilian children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Caldas Kuhlman

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this present study was to understand how children and adolescents perceive esthetic attractiveness of a variety of orthodontic appliances. It also analyzed preferences according to patients' age, sex and socioeconomic status. Methods: A photograph album consisting of eight photographs of different orthodontic appliances and clear tray aligners placed in a consenting adult with pleasing smile was used. A sample of children or adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years old (n = 276 was asked to rate each image for its attractiveness on a visual analog scale. Comparisons between the appliances attractiveness were performed by means of nonparametric statistics with Friedman's test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison post-hoc test. Correlation between appliances and individuals' socioeconomic status, age, sex, and esthetic perception was assessed by means of Spearman's correlation analysis. Results: Attractiveness ratings of orthodontic appliances varied nonsignificantly for children in the following hierarchy: traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures > traditional metallic brackets with gray elastomeric ligatures > sapphire esthetic brackets; and for adolescents, as follows: sapphire esthetic brackets > clear aligner without attachments > traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. The correlation between individuals' socioeconomic status and esthetic perception of a given appliance was negative and statistically significant for appliances such as the golden orthodontic brackets and traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. Conclusion: Metal appliances were considered very attractive, whereas aligners were classified as less attractive by children and adolescents. The correlation between esthetic perception and socioeconomic status revealed that individuals with a higher socioeconomic level judged esthetics as the most attractive attribute. For those

  7. Interactive Exploration for Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Fournier

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new version of our content-based image retrieval system RETIN. It is based on adaptive quantization of the color space, together with new features aiming at representing the spatial relationship between colors. Color analysis is also extended to texture. Using these powerful indexes, an original interactive retrieval strategy is introduced. The process is based on two steps for handling the retrieval of very large image categories. First, a controlled exploration method of the database is presented. Second, a relevance feedback method based on statistical learning is proposed. All the steps are evaluated by experiments on a generalist database.

  8. Rhetorical relations for information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Lu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    -called discourse structure has been applied successfully to several natural language processing tasks. This work studies the use of rhetorical relations for Information Retrieval (IR): Is there a correlation between certain rhetorical relations and retrieval performance? Can knowledge about a document’s rhetorical...... relations be useful to IR? We present a language model modification that considers rhetorical relations when estimating the relevance of a document to a query. Empirical evaluation of different versions of our model on TREC settings shows that certain rhetorical relations can benefit retrieval effectiveness...

  9. Emergencies in Orthodontics. Part 2: Management of Removable Appliances, Functional Appliances and other Adjuncts to Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsing, Paul; Murray, Alison; Sandler, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In the second of two papers, management of orthodontic emergencies involving appliances other than Fixed appliances will be detailed. Problems relating to removable appliances, as well as other orthodontic adjuncts, will be discussed. Unfortunately, orthodontic appliance breakage does occur, despite the clinicians giving clear and concise instructions to the patients and their parents at fitting. If general dental practitioners have a practical knowledge of how to diagnose problems and to provide appropriate advice or timely 'emergency' treatment, this will significantly reduce the inconvenience for all parties concerned. It should also ensure that treatment progresses in the most efficient and comfortable manner for their patients. In specific situations the early, accurate identification of the problem and instigation of its appropriate management can avoid more serious consequences. Clinical Relevance: Appropriate handling of an orthodontic 'emergency' by the dentist can, on many occasions, provide immediate relief to the patient. This will, in turn, allow treatment to continue in the right direction, thus allowing more efficient and effective use of valuable resources.

  10. Apical root resorption in orthodontically treated adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L

    1996-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship in orthodontically treated adults between upper central incisor displacement measured on lateral cephalograms and apical root resorption measured on anterior periapical x-ray films. A multiple linear regression examined incisor displacements in four directions (retraction, advancement, intrusion, and extrusion) as independent variables, attempting to account for observed differences in the dependent variable, resorption. Mean apical resorption was 1.36 mm (sd +/- 1.46, n = 73). Mean horizontal displacement of the apex was -0.83 mm (sd +/- 1.74, n = 67); mean vertical displacement was 0.19 mm (sd +/- 1.48, n = 67). The regression coefficients for the intercept and for retraction were highly significant; those for extrusion, intrusion, and advancement were not. At the 95% confidence level, an average of 0.99 mm (se = +/- 0.34) of resorption was implied in the absence of root displacement and an average of 0.49 mm (se = +/- 0.14) of resorption was implied per millimeter of retraction. R2 for all four directional displacement variables (DDVs) taken together was only 0.20, which implied that only a relatively small portion of the observed apical resorption could be accounted for by tooth displacement alone. In a secondary set of univariate analyses, the associations between apical resorption and each of 14 additional treatment-related variables were examined. Only Gender, Elapsed Time, and Total Apical Displacement displayed statistically significant associations with apical resorption. Additional multiple regressions were then performed in which the data for each of these three statistically significant variables were considered separately, with the data for the four directional displacement variables. The addition of information on Elapsed Time or Total Apical Displacement did not explain a significant additional portion of the variability in apical resorption. On the other hand, the addition of information on Gender to the

  11. Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A; Al-Sehaibany, Fares S

    2015-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) was treated orthodontically 24 months after the start of mechanical and antibiotic therapy in adjunct with periodontal treatment every 6 weeks. After achieving stable periodontal conditions, orthodontic treatment was commenced to correct the teeth position, facial profile, and maxillary protraction. Following the combination therapy and a failure to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from any site in the oral cavity, orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance was performed aside from creating space for eruption of permanent teeth. We found that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment of PLS may be successful with a complex interdisciplinary regimen and close follow up. This is a 2-year follow-up case report of a girl with PLS. Orthodontic and periodontic therapy were offered using combined treatments of orthodontic and periodontal with the benefit of prosthodontic consultation, resulting in a treatment plan.

  12. The orthodontic-periodontic interrelationship in integrated treatment challenges: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkantidis, N; Christou, P; Topouzelis, N

    2010-05-01

    Orthodontic treatment aims at providing an acceptable functional and aesthetic occlusion with appropriate tooth movements. These movements are strongly related to interactions of teeth with their supportive periodontal tissues. In recent years, because of the increased number of adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment, orthodontists frequently face patients with periodontal problems. Aesthetic considerations, like uneven gingival margins or functional problems resulting from inflammatory periodontal diseases should be considered in orthodontic treatment planning. Furthermore, in cases with severe periodontitis, orthodontics may improve the possibilities of saving and restoring a deteriorated dentition. In modern clinical practice, the contribution of the orthodontist, the periodontist and the general dentist is essential for optimized treatment outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review is to highlight the relationship between orthodontics and periodontics in clinical practice and to improve the level of cooperation between dental practitioners. Potentials and limitations that derive from the interdisciplinary approach of complex orthodontic-periodontal clinical problems are discussed.

  13. Topic structure for information retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, J.; Sanderson, M.; Zhai, C.; Zobel, J.; Allan, J.; Aslam, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In my research, I propose a coherence measure, with the goal of discovering and using topic structures within and between documents, of which I explore its extensions and applications in information retrieval.

  14. Ontology-based Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styltsvig, Henrik Bulskov

    In this thesis, we will present methods for introducing ontologies in information retrieval. The main hypothesis is that the inclusion of conceptual knowledge such as ontologies in the information retrieval process can contribute to the solution of major problems currently found in information...... retrieval. This utilization of ontologies has a number of challenges. Our focus is on the use of similarity measures derived from the knowledge about relations between concepts in ontologies, the recognition of semantic information in texts and the mapping of this knowledge into the ontologies in use......, as well as how to fuse together the ideas of ontological similarity and ontological indexing into a realistic information retrieval scenario. To achieve the recognition of semantic knowledge in a text, shallow natural language processing is used during indexing that reveals knowledge to the level of noun...

  15. Retrieving Balloon Data in Flight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program will soon make flights lasting up to 100 days. Some flights may generate high data rates and retrieving this data...

  16. Retrieval processes in social identification

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Alexander Ivor

    2015-01-01

    The utility of selective retrieval processes in our everyday lives is evident across the varied contexts we are subjected to as human beings. Memory is characterised by an unlimited storage capacity, but limited retrieval capacity. Subsequently, we are selective in what we remember in a given context in order to use memory in an adaptive manner. Previous theory places memory at the centre of deriving and maintaining a sense of self and personal identity. In contrast however, the extent to whi...

  17. The GRAPE aerosol retrieval algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol component of the Oxford-Rutherford Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC combined cloud and aerosol retrieval scheme is described and the theoretical performance of the algorithm is analysed. ORAC is an optimal estimation retrieval scheme for deriving cloud and aerosol properties from measurements made by imaging satellite radiometers and, when applied to cloud free radiances, provides estimates of aerosol optical depth at a wavelength of 550 nm, aerosol effective radius and surface reflectance at 550 nm. The aerosol retrieval component of ORAC has several incarnations – this paper addresses the version which operates in conjunction with the cloud retrieval component of ORAC (described by Watts et al., 1998, as applied in producing the Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE data-set.

    The algorithm is described in detail and its performance examined. This includes a discussion of errors resulting from the formulation of the forward model, sensitivity of the retrieval to the measurements and a priori constraints, and errors resulting from assumptions made about the atmospheric/surface state.

  18. [Orthodontic treatment need in school-age children in the Leningrad region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnenko, N M; Bagnenko, A S; Grebnev, G A; Madai, D Y

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology of dentoalveolar anomalies is undoubtedly important, but in terms of the organization of orthodontic care, greater interest are data on the needs in this type of treatment. In a situation of limited manpower and resources for the provision of orthodontic care information about needs in orthodontic treatment allows you to define a group of patients with the primary need for orthodontic treatment, and to identify priorities to optimize the organization of orthodontic care in the region. Such data can be obtained by using the Dental Aesthetics Index (DAI) and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). The aim of the study was to analyze the epidemiology of various forms of dentoalveolar anomalies school-age children of Kirishi district of Leningrad region, as well as their needs in orthodontic treatment in accordance with objective evaluation indices. The study involved 734 pupils of Kirishi lyceum №1 of Leningrad region. Analysis of the prevalence of dentoalveolar anomalies, as well as needs in the orthodontic treatment was conducted in three age groups: I mixed dentition period (6-9 years), II mixed dentition period (10-13 years), and permanent dentition (14-17). To determine the needs in the orthodontic treatment were used two most common international index (DAI and IOTN). In Kirishi district of Leningrad region dentoalveolar anomalies were found in 88.8% of children of school age, which is in accordance with the indices and IOTN DAI needs in orthodontic treatment is 38.8% and 54.5%, respectively. In order to reduce unnecessarily high load volume medical institutions orthodontic profile, optimize utilization of financial resources, as well as reducing social tension it is recommended to introduce the practice of doctors-orthodontists methodology for determining the needs in orthodontic treatment by objective indices.

  19. Inhibition of Apical Root Resorption by Calcium Hydroxide During Orthodontic Treatment: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Cinthia Mara da Fonseca; Pacheco, Daniela da Fonseca; Motta, Patrícia Gonçalves da

    2016-01-01

    Apical root resorption is a common outcome of orthodontic treatment. The present article reports a case of absence of apical root resorption in a left maxillary lateral incisor filled with calcium hydroxide paste throughout orthodontic movement. After orthodontic treatment was completed the tooth was subsequently obturatedwith gutta-percha and the patient followed for 18 months. The presence of a periapical lesion and the properties of calcium hydroxide as a root resorption inhibitor were dec...

  20. Orthodontic Treatment of Binder Syndrome: A Case Report With 5 Years of Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossellu, Gianguido; Biagi, Roberto; Faggioni, Giulia; Farronato, Giampietro

    2015-07-01

    We report here the case of orthodontic nonsurgical treatment in a patient with Binder syndrome. This rare syndrome (orthodontic-surgical protocol, which includes several invasive interventions such as LeFort I or II. In this patient and early diagnosis made it possible to intervene on an orthodontic level only, thus avoiding highly invasive surgical procedures (as of a 5-year follow-up).