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Sample records for retinopathy diabetes mellitus

  1. Radiation retinopathy in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.P.; Joshi, A.V.; Banerjee, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    A case of radiation retinopathy in a diabetic individual who received a total dose of 45 Gy for lymphoblastic lymphoma of the orbit is reported. The relationship between radiation retinopathy and diabetes mellitus is discussed. (Auth.)

  2. Correlation between glycemic excursion by CGMS and diabetic retinopathy among Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Li; Ji Ning; Zhu Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate correlation between glycemic excursion by CGMS and diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Used continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) to monitoring glycemic excursion within a day of twenty four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and inspect fundus photography, correlation was analyzed. Results: Glycemic excursion might reveal the risk for diabetic retinopathy better than HbA1c does. Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy may correlate with glycemic excursion. (authors)

  3. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

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    A. Bostak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of type II diabetes mellitus and carries with it the threat of blindness. Accurate information regarding the incidence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors is important in the prevention of its development and of the visual impairment caused by this complication. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We have also evaluated the association of diabetic retinopathy with clinical and biochemical variables. In a cross-sectional study, 152 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus were referred from two outpatient clinics in Tehran for ophthalmologic exam to detect retinopathy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed and data regarding risk factors were extracted from routine medical records. Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. The overall prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 13.8 %( 21 cases: three cases with microaneurysm only, 10 with mild, 5 with moderate and 2 with severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only one patient had advanced proliferative retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with age, duration of disease, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure. Diabetic retinopathy is common in newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus patients. Ophthalmologic consultation is essential at the time of diagnosis for all patients.

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Bhaskar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The study objective was to examine the effect of glycaemic control and variations on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR among the diabetes mellitus patients visiting Medicine and Ophthalmology OPD Sapthagiri Medical college, Bangalore. MATERIALS AND METHODS 10 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and 70 persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, visiting the Medicine OPD of Sapthagiri Medical College and referred to Ophthalmology department of the above to detect the Diabetic Retinopathy changes in a diabetes mellitus management programme conducted for 3 months in Bangalore, participated in the study. Patients who were followed up for 6 months the same above were also included in the study. Analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the risk factors, incidence and progression of Diabetic Retinopathy among Diabetes Mellitus patients and management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES To determine the risk factors associated with it, stage of retinopathy diagnosed at presentation, management of it, and final visual outcome. The prevention is by strict glycaemic control, prompt use of anti-diabetic drugs and regular exercises. These included age and gender-adjusted prevalence of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy, 1 and correlation of prevalence with history-based risk factors. RESULTS The three months cumulative incidence of DR was 58 %in type I diabetes mellitus and 42 % among type II Diabetes mellitus. After controlling for known risk factors for DR,1 a high baseline haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, ethnicity, age, type of diabetes mellitus, duration were associated with the incidence of referable DR in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence rate of diabetes in urban Bangalore 28.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], and the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in general population was 3.5% (95% CI. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the population with diabetes

  5. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in patients after ten years of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.A.; Yakta, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common and serious complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a leading cause of blindness not only in Pakistan but also worldwide. So we conducted this study to record the frequency of diabetic retinopathy in known diabetic patients ten years after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The study was conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan for a period of 1 year from January 2008 to January 2010. The study group comprised of 200 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus attending the medical clinic. All patients who were diagnosed as type 2 diabetes mellitus since ten years duration were included in the study. Retinopathy was graded into background, pre proliferative and proliferative retinopathy. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed using the WHO criteria. Statistical analysis was carried out using the SPSS-11. Results: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 25.5% of the total Type 2 patients after ten years of diagnosis, and of these 4% of patients had proliferative retinopathy. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetic patients should be screened as early as possible to prevent permanent visual loss by timely management of diabetic retinopathy because diabetes is one of most common preventable cause of blindness in the world. (author)

  6. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Jordan.

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    Bakkar, May M; Haddad, Mera F; Gammoh, Yazan S

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is considered an important factor for early diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness of diabetic retinopathy among a sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Jordan. The study period was from August to December 2015. The sample was selected randomly from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the general population in three main cities of Jordan (Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa). A questionnaire was distributed to 237 participants with diabetes to assess their awareness and knowledge of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. The questionnaire included questions to assess awareness about diabetic retinopathy, sources of knowledge about the disease, and patients' knowledge and compliance with available treatments and routine eye examinations. Patients were also questioned about the barriers that may interfere with early eye examination. A total of 237 participants (107 [45.1%] females and 130 [54.9%] males) with type 2 diabetes were interviewed. Mean age±SD for the study population was 54.51±10.28 years. Of the study population, 88.2% were aware that diabetes can affect the eyes and 81% reported that diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. Higher level of patients' awareness of diabetic retinopathy was related to higher level of formal education ( p diabetic retinopathy as reported by 47.3% patients was general practitioners. Patients' compliance with diabetes management was relatively high; however, their compliance with routine retinal assessment was poor, with only a total of 29.5% of participants having had an eye examination in the previous year. Awareness of the nature and consequences of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes in Jordan is relatively high. However, patients' motivation to undergo retinal assessment was poor in the sample, thus hindering early diagnosis and management.

  7. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

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    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  8. Visual Evoked Potential to Assess Retinopathy in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Hari Kumar, K V S; Ahmad, F M H; Sood, Sandeep; Mansingh, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated for early retinopathy using the visual evoked potential (VEP) in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. All patients with GDM and type 2 diabetes seen between June and October of 2014 were included in this cross-sectional, observational study. Patients with secondary diabetes, ocular or major illness were excluded from the study. VEP was recorded in both eyes to derive prominent positive peak latency (P100), amplitude and initial negative deflection (N75) latency. The data were compared with 10 gestational age-matched controls with normal glucose tolerance. Appropriate statistical methods were used for comparison among the 3 groups. The study participants (40 with GDM, 10 with type 2 diabetes, 10 with normal glucose tolerance) had a median (25th to 75th interquartile range) age of 26 (24.3, 30) years, a gestational age of 24.5 (21, 27) weeks and weights of 66.8 (63.4, 71.5) kg. The P100 latencies were comparable among the 3 groups (p=0.0577). However, patients with any diabetes (GDM and type 2 diabetes) had prolonged P100 latencies (p=0.0139) and low P100 amplitudes (p=0.0391) in comparison to controls. P100 latency showed a direct correlation with hyperglycemia (p=0.0118). Our data showed that VEP abnormalities are detectable even in the short-term hyperglycemia of GDM and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screening-detected diabetes mellitus: results from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS).

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    Ponto, Katharina A; Koenig, Jochem; Peto, Tunde; Lamparter, Julia; Raum, Philipp; Wild, Philipp S; Lackner, Karl J; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus may experience an asymptomatic period of hyperglycaemia, and complications may already be present at the time of diagnosis. We aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with newly diagnosed (screening-detected) type 2 diabetes. The Gutenberg Health Study is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 and 74 years. We determined the weighted prevalence of diabetic retinopathy by assessing fundus photographs. Screening-detected type 2 diabetes was defined as an HbA1c concentration of 6.5% (47.5 mmol/mol) or more, no medical diagnosis of diabetes and no intake of insulin or oral glucose-lowering agents. Of 14,948 participants, 1377 (9.2%) had diabetes mellitus. Of these, 347 (25.2%) had newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes detected by the screening. Overall, the weighted prevalence of screening-detected type 2 diabetes was 2.1%. Fundus photos were evaluable for 285 (82.1%) participants with newly diagnosed diabetes. The weighted prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screening-detected type 2 diabetes was 13.0%; 12% of participants had a mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.6% had a moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy was proliferative in 0.3%. No cases of severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy were found. Thirty (14.9%) of 202 and six (7.2%) of 83 individuals with and without concomitant arterial hypertension, respectively, had diabetic retinopathy (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.06, 7.14). Visual acuity did not differ between individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy . In this large European study, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screening-detected type 2 diabetes was 13%. Only a very small proportion of participants with detected diabetic retinopathy needed treatment.

  10. Metabolic factors in the development of retinopathy of juvenile-onset type I diabetes mellitus

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    Khosla P

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-five patients of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM were investigated for the effect of various metabolic factors on retinopathy. The severity of retinopathy increased with duration and age of onset of IDDM. Degree of glycaemia (fasting blood sugar, FBS was similar in patients with or without retinopathy. All IDDM patients as a group showed severe carbohydrate intolerance with lower basal and post glucose serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI levels and serum C-peptide radioimmunoreactivity (CPR as compared to controls. The insulin secretory response was similar in no retinopathy, mild retinopathy and severe retinopathy groups. Patients with retinopathy had higher incidence of hyperlipidemia but mean serum levels of cholesterol and triglyceride were similar. This study does not suggest a direct relationship between the various metabolic factors studied and retinopathy due to IDDM

  11. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy may have rapid onset or worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms and Detection What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and ... with diabetes protect their vision? Vision lost to diabetic retinopathy is ... However, early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness ...

  13. The relationship between MTHFR gene polymorphisms, plasma homocysteine levels and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙家忠; 徐焱成; 朱宜莲; 鲁红云; 邓浩华; 范幼筠; 孙苏欣; 张颖

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and plasma homocysteine levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods Total of 208 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 57 controls were recruited into the study. MTHFR genetic C677T polymorphisms were determined by PCR-RFLP. Plasma total homocysteine levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Results The frequencies of MTHFR TT homogeneous type, CT heterogeneous type and allele T (28.18%, 41.82%, 49.09%) were significantly higher in the type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy group than those without retinopathy (18.37%, 29.59%, 33.16%) and those of controls (17.54%, 28.07%, 31.58%). The presence of the T allele appeared to have a strong association with the development of diabetic retinopathy. The odds ratio was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.31-2.88. Moreover, plasma homocysteine levels were remarkably higher in patients with TT or CT genotype than in patients with the CC genotype. Conclusion MTHFR gene C677T mutation associated with a predisposition to increased plasma homocysteine levels may be considered as a genetic risk factor for diabetic microangiopathy (such as DR) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Association Of Serum Total Bilirubin Level With Diabetic Retinopathy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Ghaffar, Tahir; Marwat, Zahid Irfan; Ullah, Fahim; Khan, Salman; Hassan Aamir, Aziz Ul

    2016-01-01

    Serum bilirubin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunological properties. It is considered a protective substance against atherosclerotic and microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study was designed to find the association between total serum bilirubin concentration and diabetic retinopathy (DR). This case control study was conducted in the Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar. Type-2 DM patients more than 18 years of age of either gender with duration of T2DM more than 6 months were included and sub categorized in two groups. Cases (DM with DR) and Controls (DM without DR) while patients with acute and chronic liver diseases, haemolytic anaemia, history of chronic alcohol consumption, use of hepatotoxic drugs (anti-tuberculous, anti-epileptic), women on oral contraceptive pills were excluded. All participants underwent ophthalmic examination at diabetic retinopathy screening clinic followed by pre designed set of investigations. A total of 152 patients, 76 cases and 76 controls were included. Serum bilirubin concentration was found inversely and independently (p 0.000) associated and inversely co related (r -0.345and p 0.000) with prevalence of DR. Cases were concentrated in the lower quartiles of serum bilirubin concentration and vice versa. Low haemoglobin (p 0.00) and longer duration of DM (0.003) were independently and directly associated with prevalence of DR. Serum bilirubin concentration is inversely and independently associated and inversely correlated with the prevalence of DR and may predict progression of DR over time.

  15. Thickness of the retinal photoreceptor outer segment layer in healthy volunteers and in patients with diabetes mellitus without retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic macular edema

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    Abdullah Ozkaya

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The PROS layer at the foveal center was thinner in patients who had diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema than both the healthy volunteers and diabetic patients without retinopathy.

  16. Retinal neurodegeneration may precede microvascular changes characteristic of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Elliott H; van Dijk, Hille W; Jiao, Chunhua; Kok, Pauline H B; Jeong, Woojin; Demirkaya, Nazli; Garmager, Allison; Wit, Ferdinand; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; van Velthoven, Mirjam E J; DeVries, J Hans; Mullins, Robert F; Kuehn, Markus H; Schlingemann, Reinier Otto; Sonka, Milan; Verbraak, Frank D; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-10

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has long been recognized as a microvasculopathy, but retinal diabetic neuropathy (RDN), characterized by inner retinal neurodegeneration, also occurs in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). We report that in 45 people with DM and no to minimal DR there was significant, progressive loss of the nerve fiber layer (NFL) (0.25 μm/y) and the ganglion cell (GC)/inner plexiform layer (0.29 μm/y) on optical coherence tomography analysis (OCT) over a 4-y period, independent of glycated hemoglobin, age, and sex. The NFL was significantly thinner (17.3 μm) in the eyes of six donors with DM than in the eyes of six similarly aged control donors (30.4 μm), although retinal capillary density did not differ in the two groups. We confirmed significant, progressive inner retinal thinning in streptozotocin-induced "type 1" and B6.BKS(D)-Lepr(db)/J "type 2" diabetic mouse models on OCT; immunohistochemistry in type 1 mice showed GC loss but no difference in pericyte density or acellular capillaries. The results suggest that RDN may precede the established clinical and morphometric vascular changes caused by DM and represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of ocular diabetic complications.

  17. Association of serum total bilirubin level with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaffar, T.; Khan, S.; Aamir, A.U.H.; Marwat, Z.I.

    2016-01-01

    Serum bilirubin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunological properties. It is considered a protective substance against atherosclerotic and microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study was designed to find the association between total serum bilirubin concentration and diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods: This case control study was conducted in the Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar. Type-2 DM patients more than 18 years of age of either gender with duration of T2DM more than 6 months were included and sub categorized in two groups. Cases (DM with DR) and Controls (DM without DR) while patients with acute and chronic liver diseases, haemolytic anaemia, history of chronic alcohol consumption, use of hepatotoxic drugs (anti-tuberculous, anti-epileptic), women on oral contraceptive pills were excluded. All participants underwent ophthalmic examination at diabetic retinopathy screening clinic followed by pre designed set of investigations. Results: A total of 152 patients, 76 cases and 76 controls were included. Serum bilirubin concentration was found inversely and independently (p 0.000) associated and inversely co related (r -0.345 and p 0.000) with prevalence of DR. Cases were concentrated in the lower quartiles of serum bilirubin concentration and vice versa. Low haemoglobin (p 0.00) and longer duration of DM (0.003) were independently and directly associated with prevalence of DR. Conclusion: Serum bilirubin concentration is inversely and independently associated and inversely correlated with the prevalence of DR and may predict progression of DR over time. (author)

  18. Prevalence of type-II diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy: the gaddap study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, P.S.; Awan, Z.; Manzar, N.; Memon, S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of type-II Diabetes mellitus (DM) in the endogenous population of Gaddap town and also to evaluate the status of Diabetic retinopathy (DR) in this group. This community based study of subjects of either gender was carried out in the Gaddap town. Three primary eye care centres were established in the existing primary health care (PHC) facilities, to screen the target Population aged 30 years and above, and who met other inclusion criteria for DM and DR respectively. Patients requiring intervention were managed accordingly. Data was entered and analyzed using Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Access. Out of the cohort of 19211 subjects, 1677 patients were found Diabetic, giving the prevalence of DM in Gaddap town at 8.73%, with 1258 (6.55%) known and 419 (2.18%) newly diagnosed cases. DR was seen in 460 (27.43%) of the Diabetic cases with 126 (7.51%) patients requiring urgent intervention for vision threatening complications. The result validates the importance of early screening of DR in people suffering from DM for possible management and prevention of sight threatening complications in the early stage of the disease and advocates the inclusion of primary eye care as a part of PHC system. (author)

  19. Association between the number of natural teeth and diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes mellitus: The Korea national health and nutrition examination survey.

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    Song, Su Jeong; Han, Kyungdo; Lee, Seong-Su; Park, Jun-Beom

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the number of teeth and diabetic retinopathy among Korean population.This was a retrospective analysis using data of total 45,811 individuals who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008 to 2012. Among these, 2593 (5.7%) participants were identified as having type 2 diabetes mellitus. After excluding participants without ophthalmic evaluation or other variables, 2078 (80%) participants were included. Demographic factors including dental status were analyzed and compared between participants with and without diabetic retinopathy.Among the 2078 type 2 diabetes, 358 (17.2%) had diabetic retinopathy. Type 2 diabetes with fewer teeth were more likely to have diabetic retinopathy (P diabetes with diabetic retinopathy when compared with type 2 diabetes with ≥28 teeth (95% confidence interval: 2.69-28.3) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, drinking, exercise, hypertension, diabetes mellitus duration, and glycated hemoglobin level.The number of teeth was found to be an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. Thus, a comprehensive approach of dentists and ophthalmologists is needed to minimize the complications of diabetes mellitus. Whether the teeth number reflects microvascular changes of the retina among type 2 diabetes warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy in Filipino vs Caucasian Americans: a retrospective cross-sectional epidemiologic study of two convenience samples.

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    Sáles, Christopher S; Lee, Roland Y; Agadzi, Anthony K; Hee, Michael R; Singh, Kuldev; Lin, Shan C

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in Filipino and Caucasian Americans in two clinic populations. Retrospective cross-sectional epidemiologic study of two convenience samples. Five hundred twelve Filipino and 600 Caucasian patients aged 40 years or older examined by two community-based comprehensive ophthalmology clinics during a one-year period. The prevalence of self-reported type 2 diabetes mellitus among Filipino (F) and Caucasian Americans (C) was 40.6% and 24.8%, respectively (PFilipino; 149 Caucasian), there was a statistically insignificant higher prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among Filipino diabetics compared to Caucasians (F vs C: all forms of diabetic retinopathy, 24.5% vs 16.8%, P=.08; non-proliferative retinopathy, 17.3% vs 12.8%, P=.24; proliferative retinopathy, 7.2% vs. 4.0%, P=.21). In multivariate analyses of the diabetic subpopulation, Filipino ethnicity was not a significant predictor of diabetic retinopathy. Filipino Americans may have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy than Caucasian Americans. Among those with type 2 diabetes, however, Filipino Americans were not found to be more likely to show manifestations of diabetic retinopathy than Caucasian Americans.

  1. Role of early screening for diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus: An overview

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    Praveen Vashist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has emerged as a major public health problem in India. It is estimated that there were 40 million persons with diabetes in India in 2007 and this number is predicted to rise to almost 70 million by 2025. The impact of rapid urbanization, industrialization and lifestyle changes has led to an increasing trend in prevalence of diabetes and its associated complications such as neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases (cardiac, cerebral and peripheral and retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a important cause of avoidable blindness in India. Treatment interventions at early stages of diabetic retinopathy can reduce burden of blindness due to diabetic retinopathy. With the available cost-effective methods of early screening, appropriate strategies/models need to be developed. Such models need to have a well-developed mode for screening, diagnosis and referral at each hierarchal level beginning from primary health centers to specialized institutes for eye care. The National Program for Control of Blindness of India recommends opportunistic screening for identification of diabetic retinopathy. Every opportunity of contact with high-risk cases for diabetes and/or diabetic retinopathy should be utilized for screening, diagnosis and referral. All the stakeholders including the private sector will need to play a role. Along with this, awareness generation and behavior change amongst the diabetics and care support systems should also be part of the overall model. A major role can be played by community participation and improving the health seeking behavior among diabetics in order to reach a larger population and increasing the compliance for continued care.

  2. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  3. Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy with Retinal Neurodegeneration on the Background of Diabetes Mellitus. Overview of Recent Medical Studies with an Assessment of the Impact on Healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muc, Rafał; Saracen, Agnieszka; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is one of the biggest healthcare and financial problems worldwide. The disease is strongly associated with microvascular and macrovascular complications, causing co-existing diseases like Diabetic Retinopathy, Diabetic Neuropathy and Diabetic Nephropathy. Annual healthcare expenditures for diabetes treatment and complications prevention cost 727 billion USD in year 2017. Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Retinal Neuropathy are closely related diseases - originating from incorrectly controlled glycemia, blood pressure and lipid levels in the course of increasing resistance of the body tissues to insulin. Irrespectively of thorough programs for Diabetes Mellitus prevention and treatment, Diabetic Retinopathy management requires targeted treatment strategies for both microvasculopathy and retinal neurodegeneration, to delay disease severity course and risk of blindness. The study and conclusions in this article are based on web-available data and officially published articles related to the diabetes mellitus and associated diseases - Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Retinal Neuropathy. The articles have been reviewed and analyzed to assess mutual relations between the discussed diseases.

  4. C-reactive protein and diabetic retinopathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Xiu-Fen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP and diabetic retinopathy (DR in a cohort of Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. METHODS: Community-based observational cohort study. There were 1131 participants recruited from November 2009 to September 2011 in Desheng community in urban Beijing. Patients diagnosed T2DM were recruited and underwent a standardized evaluation consisting of a questionnaire, ocular and anthropometric examinations and laboratory investigation. The presence and severity of DR were assessed by seven fields 30° color fundus photographs. Subjects were then classified into groups with no DR, any DR, or vision-threatening DR. CRP was analyzed from serum of study subjects. RESULTS: A total of 1007 patients with T2DM were included for analysis, including 408 (40.5% men and 599 (59.5% women. The median CRP level was 1.5 mg/L for women and 1.1 mg/L for men (P=0.004, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.18-0.74. After adjusting for possible covariates, higher levels of CRP were associated with lower prevalence of any DR (P=0.02, OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35-0.89, but not associated with vision-threatening DR (P=0.62, OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.28-2.14. After stratification by sex, the inverse association between CRP and DR was found to be statistically significant in men (P=0.006, OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.16-0.73, but not in women (P=0.58, OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.29-1.16. CONCLUSION: The data drawn from a Chinese population with T2DM suggest that increasing CRP levels may be inversely associated with development of DR.

  5. CORRELATION OF HBA1C WITH SIGHT-THREATENING DIABETIC RETINOPATHY (STDR IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Ranjini Kotancher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness in the world with India being set to emerge as the diabetic capital of the world. Visual disability from diabetes is a significant health problem, but its morbidity is largely preventable and treatable. HbA1c (glycosylated haemoglobin is the best indicator of glycaemic control. It has long been known to predict the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Our aim is to evaluate the correlation of STDR in type 2 diabetes mellitus with HbA1c levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Ophthalmology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, among 250 randomly selected type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients and they were grouped into STDR, non-STDR and no diabetic retinopathy based on ophthalmoscopy. HbA1c level was estimated and its correlation was analysed using SPSS software version 17.0. Association of STDR with duration of diabetes and Body Mass Index (BMI were also studied. RESULTS Out of 250 patients studied, mean age was 58.98 with 126 males and 124 females and there was increased incidence of STDR in males. 104 patients with STDR had HbA1c value of more than 8, high incidence of STDR were noted with increasing levels of HbA1c and the correlation was statistically significant (p = 0.02. 74.1% of patients had STDR in the group with duration of diabetes 11 to 15 years, 90.90% in more than 21 years group compared to 43% in the 5 years group. Increase in duration of diabetes was found to be significantly associated with higher incidence of STDR (p = 0.01. Incidence of STDR were more in patients with normal BMI (p = 0.03. CONCLUSION Poor diabetic control as noted by high HbA1c level and longer duration of diabetes were significantly associated with sightthreatening diabetic retinopathy. Patients with STDR and high HbA1c levels have to be referred for appropriate evaluation and treatment at the earliest to prevent blindness.

  6. An estimation of the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy in adults in Timor-Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Rosie Claire Hewitt; Oliver, Genevieve Frances; Sharma, Manoj; Pinto, Basilio Martins; Jeronimo, Belmerio; Pereira, Bernadete; Magno, Julia; Motta, Lara Alexandra; Verma, Nitin; Shephard, Mark

    2015-06-18

    Once considered an affliction of people in high-income countries, diabetes mellitus is increasingly seen as a global epidemic. However, for many countries very little is known about the prevalence of diabetes and its complications. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy, in adults in Timor-Leste. From March 2013 to May 2014, adult patients being assessed for cataract surgery at the Sentru Matan Nasional (National Eye Centre) in Dili, Timor-Leste had a point-of-care HbA1c measurement performed on the DCA Vantage device (Siemens Ltd) under a quality framework. A diagnostic cut-off of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) HbA1c was used for diagnosis of diabetes. Ocular examination, blood pressure, demographic and general health data were also collected. Diabetic retinopathy assessment was carried out by ophthalmologists. A total of 283 people [mean age 63.6 years (range 20-90 years)] were tested and examined during the study period. Forty-three people (15.2%) were found to have diabetes, with a mean HbA1c of 9.5% (77 mmol/mol). Of these, 27 (62.9%) were newly diagnosed, with a mean HbA1c of 9.7% (83 mmol/mol) and a range of 6.6-14% (49-130 mmol/mol). Nearly half (48.1%) of people newly diagnosed with diabetes had an HbA1c over 10.0% (86 mmol/mol). Of those with known diabetes, only 68.8% were receiving any treatment. Mean HbA1c for treated patients was 9.9% (85 mmol/mol). Diabetic retinopathy was identified in 18.6% of people with diabetes, of whom half had no previous diagnosis of diabetes. This study estimates the prevalence of diabetes at 15% in adults in Timor-Leste, a substantial proportion of whom have evidence of diabetic retinopathy. This is consistent with regional estimates. With the majority of patients undiagnosed, and management of people known to have diabetes largely inadequate, point-of-care testing is a valuable tool to assist with diabetes case detection and management. Whilst only a preliminary estimate, our data provides

  7. Endocrinological disturbances in diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Shalaby, E.; Atia, H.; Abdel-Hafez, M.A.; Hammad, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus were extensively studied from various points of view. The aim was to elucidate the possible interaction of insulin, glucagon, prolactin, growth hormone, T 3 , and T 4 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Forty patients with diabetic retinopathy (group II) and twenty age-matched controls (group I) were investigated. Plasma levels of both insulin and glucagon were significantly elevated in group II versus group I, whereas other hormones were insignificantly changed. This shows the role that might be played by T 3 , T 4 , growth hormone, and prolactin in the established cases of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  8. Clinical Course and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seung Yun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated clinical course and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.MethodsA total of 759 patients with T2DM without DR were included from January 2001 to December 2004. Retinopathy evaluation was performed at least annually by ophthalmologists. The severity of the DR was classified into five categories according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scales.ResultsOf the 759 patients, 523 patients (68.9% completed the follow-up evaluation. During the follow-up period, 235 patients (44.9% developed DR, and 32 patients (13.6% progressed to severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR or proliferative DR (PDR. The mean duration of diabetes at the first diagnosis of mild NPDR, moderate NPDR, and severe NPDR or PDR were 14.8, 16.7, and 17.3 years, respectively. After adjusting multiple confounding factors, the significant risk factors for the incidence of DR risk in patients with T2DM were old age, longer duration of diabetes, higher mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and albuminuria. Even in the patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes for longer than 10 years at baseline, a decrease in HbA1c led to a significant reduction in the risk of developing DR (hazard ratio, 0.73 per 1% HbA1c decrement; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.91; P=0.005.ConclusionThis prospective cohort study demonstrates that glycemic control, diabetes duration, age, and albuminuria are important risk factors for the development of DR. More aggressive retinal screening for T2DM patients diagnosed with DR should be required in order to not miss rapid progression of DR.

  9. The 16-year incidence, progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy in a young population-based Danish cohort with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the long-term incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and associated risk factors in young Danish patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In 1987-89, a pediatric cohort involving approximately 75...... % of all children with Type 1 diabetes in Denmark diabetic parameters assessed. Of those, 185 (54.6 %) were evaluated again in 2011 for the same clinical parameters. All retinal images...... were graded using modified early treatment of DR study for 1995 and 2011. In 1995, mean age was 21.0 years and mean diabetes duration 13.5 years. The 16-year incidence of proliferative retinopathy, 2-step progression and 2-step regression of DR was 31.0, 64.4 and 0.0 %, respectively, while...

  10. Study on risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in South India

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    Senthilvel Vasudevan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To find the severities status of diabetic retinopathy(DRamong the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to determine the association of the severities of diabetic retinopathy with duration of DR, HbA1C levels, history of hypertension, age and gender in the study population.METHODS:Hospital based cross-sectional studies with sample of 100 patients with DR were selected by using simple random sampling technique with a structured questionnaire was conducted in May to June 2012. The study participants those who with DR aged ≥35 years were included in this study and an oral consent was also collected from the study participants. Descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis were performed. MS Excel spread sheet was used for data entry and data analysis was done by using SPSS 21.0 version. Statistical significance was taken as PRESULTS:Out of 100 patients, mean age of the patient was found as 53.16±10.81(range 35-78y. By univariate analysis, there was a positive relationship between diabetic retinopathy severity and age(PPPPP>0.05 by Mann Whitney u-test. All these factors were found as independent risk factors with the severity of DR except the factor age.CONCLUSION:This study was concluded that the duration of DM, HbA1C levels, family history of DM, History of hypertension and gender were independently associated with severity of DR. However, the factors like age and HDL weren't significant with severity of DR in multivariate analysis. Therefore, by using the availability of the existing treatments and controlling in time, which can prevent and free from the vision threatening diseases or delay the occurrence of DR in their life.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy in acromegaly

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    Said Azzoug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although growth hormone (GH has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR, DR is deemed to be rare in patients with GH excess. Our aim was to study its prevalence in subjects with acromegaly suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM, to analyze its characteristics, and to look for predictive factors such as age at diagnosis, GH concentration and duration, DM duration, DM control, and family background. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with acromegaly and DM (21 males, 19 females, median age = 50 years, underwent a systematic ophthalmological examination with dilated funduscopy to seek diabetic retinopathy. Results: Among this population, 05 (12.5% had DR. It was at an early stage or background retinopathy in 3 cases and at a more advanced stage or proliferative retinopathy in 2 cases. We did not find any correlation with age at diagnosis, GH levels and duration, DM duration and family history of DM, but poor glycemic control seems to play a role although statistical analysis showed borderline significance. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that prevalence of DR in patients with acromegaly is 12.5%, and it is slight or moderate. Among studied factors, only poor glycemic control seems to be implicated in its development.

  12. Frequency of different grades of retinopathy in type-2 diabetes mellitus patients at Military Hospital Rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.U.; Yasmeen, R.; Habib, M.

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the various types of retinopathy in individuals with type 2 DM. Design: Descriptive study. Place and duration of study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi from January 2010 to July 2010 Methods: One hundred and fifty patients with type 2 DM were studied into for different types of retinopathy, based on history, clinical examination (ophthalmological) and laboratory investigations. Results: Out of 150 patients who fulfilled the criteria for study, 93(62%) were male and 57(38%) were female patients, frequency of retinopathy was 28.67%. The duration of diabetes ranged from 5 to 30 years. The frequency of retinopathy was higher in males as compared to females. The mean age of the patients was 51.10 +- 8.33 years with range 36-77 years. Proliferative retinopathy was seen more in those diabetic patients whose duration of disease was more than 10 years. They also showed poor glycaemic control in the form of raised blood glucose and HbA1C levels. Conclusion: About twenty eight percent of our diabetic patients are suffering from diabetic retinopathy. This can be controlled by early detection and effective treatment both in terms of strict glycemic control and laser photocoagulation, thus decreasing the morbidity and mortality due to this chronic disease. (author)

  13. Frequency of retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus (dm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.A.; Kamran, S.M.; Qureshi, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    This study was to determine the frequency of retinopathy in newly diagnosed type-II Diabetics. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: It was conducted at Department of medicine, Military Hospital (MH), Rawalpindi from 1st Jan 2012 to 30 Jun 2012. Material and Methods: We included 200 patients of type-II DM from both genders diagnosed in last 03 months from both outdoor and indoor departments in the age range of 40 to 70 years by consecutive sampling. All patients having co morbidities affecting retina were excluded. Informed written consent was taken before enrollment. Formal approval of the study was taken from hospital ethical committee. Ocular Fundoscopy was performed with WelchAllyn Ophthalmoscope (REF 11470) as per standard protocols and both eyes were examined. The grade of DR (diabetic retinopathy) awarded as per highest changes in any of the two eyes. All tests were carried by a single person to avoid inter-observer variations. Findings of ocular fundoscopy were confirmed by ophthalmologist. All data was analyzed by using SPSS version 11. Results: Out of 200 subjects 63.5% were male and 36.5% were female. Age ranged from 40 to 70 years with mean age of 51.05+ 6.910 years. 29 (14.5%) subjects had Diabetic retinopathy. Out of 29 patients, 24 (82.8%) had preproliferative and 5 (17.2%) had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion: A significant proportion of diabetic patients have retinopathy at the time of diagnosis of their disease which is more common in males and with increasing age. It is recommended to thoroughly screen the newly diagnosed diabetics for early detection of diabetic retinopathy and its management involving early referral to eye specialist. (author)

  14. Association of dyslipidemia and other risk factors with diabetic retinopathy among patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasul, A.; Rashid, A.; Waheed, P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the association of diabetic retinopathy (DR) with dyslipidemia in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus and to evaluate other associated risk factors. Study Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Centre for Research in Experimental and Applied Medicine-1 (CREAM-1), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular biology Army Medical College, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) from Apr 2016 to Jun 2016. Material and Method: Total 180 subjects were enrolled in two groups. Group I comprised of 90 patients of diabetic retinopathy and group II of 90 healthy normal controls. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Fasting venous blood samples (5 ml) were drawn and checked for blood glucose, HbA1c and lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoproteins and low density lipoproteins). Data collected was analyzed by SPSS version 22. Results: Mean age of the patients was 56 ± 6 years and that of controls was 53 ± 7 years. Mean duration of DM was 14 ± 5 years. Mean systolic blood pressure of group-I was 146 ± 15 mm Hg compared to 127 ± mm Hg of group-II. Mean diastolic BP of patients was 93 ± 8 mm Hg while that of controls was 77 ± 6 mm Hg. Mean body mass index (BMI) of subjects of group-I was 28.8 ± 2.9 while for group-II, it was 25.1 ± 1.4. Mean fasting plasma glucose was 10.2 ± 3.4 mmol/l for group-I and 5.0 ± 0.6 mmol/l for group-II. HbA1c was also considerably higher for group-I with a mean of 7.2 ± 0.8 percent while for group-II, its mean was 5.2 ± 0.5. Total cholesterol (group-I 5.7 ± 0.9 mmol/l versus group-II 4.8 ± 0.6 mmol/l), triglycerides (group-I 3.7 ± 0.9 mmol/l and group-II 2.0 ± 0.2 mmol/l), and low density lipoproteins (group-I 3.08 ± 0.49 mmol/l and group-II 2.17 ± 0.3 mmol/l) of both the groups were compared and found significantly higher among patients of diabetic retinopathy. DR was positively

  15. Relação entre retinopatia diabética e dermopatia diabética em pacientes portadores de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Relation between diabetic retinopathy and diabetic dermopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Roberto Kurtz Lisboa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Dermopatia diabética é o marcador cutâneo mais comum de diabetes mellitus. Embora, a dermopatia e a retinopatia diabéticas sejam consideradas manifestações de microangiopatia diabética, poucos estudos foram publicados a respeito de uma possível associação. Este estudo pretendeu investigar a associação de retinopatia e dermopatia diabéticas e determinar a prevalência e os fatores de risco associados com retinopatia diabética em pacientes diabéticos do tipo 2 do Ambulatório de Diabetes da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Passo Fundo no Hospital de Ensino São Vicente de Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal de 90 pacientes diabéticos tipo 2, atendidos sucessivamente em um Ambulatório de Diabetes nos quais foi realizado exame físico dermatológico e oftalmológico. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de dermopatia diabética foi de 16,6% (n = 15 e a de retinopatia diabética foi de 34,4% (n = 31. Destes, 67,8% (n = 21 consistiam em retinopatia não-proliferativa e 32,2% (n = 10 em retinopatia proliferativa. Observou-se que a duração da doença maior do que 10 anos (p = 0,001 e idade maior que 50 anos (p = 0,014 estavam associadas à retinopatia. Não se encontrou associação entre hemoglobina glicada (p = 0,5 e glicemia de jejum (p = 0,8 com retinopatia diabética. A freqüência de retinopatia diabética em pacientes com dermopatia diabética não foi maior do que nos pacientes sem dermopatia (7,7%, 7 casos, p = 0,586. Não houve associação, estatisticamente significativa, entre retinopatia e dermopatia diabéticas. CONCLUSÃO: Não se encontrou associação entre dermopatia e retinopatia diabéticas entre estes indivíduos com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2. A presença de retinopatia diabética estava associada à duração da doença e à idade avançada dos pacientes.PURPOSE: Diabetic dermopathy is the most frequent cutaneous marker of diabetes mellitus. Although diabetic dermopathy and diabetic retinopathy are

  16. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  17. The Thai DMS Diabetes Complications (DD.Comp.) project: prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in Thai patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsareejit, Amporn; Potisat, Somkiat; Krairittichai, Udom; Sattaputh, Charnvate; Arunratanachote, Woranut

    2013-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Thailand and their associated risk factors. A cross-sectional, multi-sites, hospital-based study was carried out between June and December 2006. Diabetic patients from the outpatient department of seven public hospitals (3 tertiary, 2 secondary and 2 community hospital) in Thailand were performed by retinal specialist. One thousand seven of 1,120 diabetic patients received retinal examination using indirect ophthalmoscope. Patients were divided into two groups (absent and present DR). Most patients in both groups were female (72.7 and 68.0%). The prevalence of DR was 24.0% (n = 242), mild NPDR 9.4% (n = 95), moderate NPDR 10.5% (n = 106), severe NPDR 1.3% (n = 13), and proliferative (PDR) 2.8% (n = 28). Age at onset, duration of DM, systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, Triglyceride (TG), alcohol consumption, foot ulcer, and proteinuria were recorded. Metformin and insulin taking were statistically, significantly different among these groups. There is more prevalent NPDR and PDR in insulin-taking than non-insulin-taking groups. The grading of diabetic retinopathy is associated with the duration of diabetes. In multivariate regression analysis, associated risk factors of DR patients were the duration of DM, HbA1c levels, and proteinuria. Diabetic retinopathy was present in about one fourth of type 2 diabetic patients in this study. Associated risk factors of DR were the duration of DM, HbA1c levels, and proteinuria. Regular screening for DR especially in T2DM with associated risk factor should be done for early treatment.

  18. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  19. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  20. Diabetic Retinopathy.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    diabetic foot were significantly associated with DR. Within patients' practice, regular .... Major limb complications included foot ulcer, claudication .... Flat. 217 44.5 66 30.6. Family income / month (KD). 1500. 45 9.2 24 ...

  1. Albuminuria and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetic Study (SN-DREAMS, report 12

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    Rani Padmaja K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concordance of microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy (DR has been well reported in persons with type 1 diabetes; however, for type 2 diabetes, there is paucity of data especially from population-based studies. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of albuminuria (micro - and macroalbuminuria among persons with type 2 diabetes and determine its role as a risk factor for presence and severity of DR. Methods A population-based cross sectional study was conducted in cohort of 1414 subjects with type 2 diabetes from Chennai metropolis. All the subjects underwent comprehensive eye examination including 45 degrees four-field stereoscopic digital photography. DR was clinically graded using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scales. A morning urine sample was tested for albuminuria. Subjects were considered to have microalbuminuria, if the urinary albumin excretion was between 30 and 300 mg/24 hours, and macroalbuminuria at more than 300 mg/24 hours. The statistical software used was SPSS for Windows, Chicago, IL. Student t-test for comparing continuous variables, and χ2 test, to compare proportions amongst groups were used. Results The prevalence of microalbuminuria in the study subjects was 15.9% (226/1414, and that of macroalbuminuria, 2.7% (38/1414. Individuals with macroalbuminuria in comparison to micro- or normoalbuminuria showed a greater prevalence of DR (60.5% vs. 31.0% vs. 14.1%, p Conclusions Every 6th individual in the population of type 2 diabetes is likely to have albuminuria. Subjects with microalbuminuria were around 2 times as likely to have DR as those without microalbuminuria, and this risk became almost 6 times in the presence of macroalbuminuria.

  2. A socioeconomic and behavioral survey of patients with difficult-to-control type 2 diabetes mellitus reveals an association between diabetic retinopathy and educational attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emoto N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Naoya Emoto,1,2 Fumitaka Okajima,1,2 Hitoshi Sugihara,2 Rei Goto3 1Department of Endocrinology, Nippon Medical School Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, 2Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, 3Graduate School of Business Administration, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan Background: We have recently reported that the attitude of patients toward risk could be a factor in the progression of diabetic complications. In general, risk preference is closely related to socioeconomic status (SES, which includes factors such as age, sex, income, and educational attainment.Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of SES and behavioral propensity on the progress of diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Methods: We conducted a survey of 238 patients with difficult-to-control T2DM treated at a hospital in Japan using a modified behavioral economics questionnaire that included questions related to SES. The patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital because of poor metabolic control or unstable complications.Results: Educational attainment was significantly associated with progression of retinopathy in patients <65 years of age. Educational attainment of a high school diploma (12 years of education or lower was a significant risk factor, but there were no differences among levels of attainment beyond high school (13–16 years or more of education. Behavioral propensities were also weakly associated with complications, but not as much as educational attainment. Personal income level and economic status did not show an association with the retinopathy levels.Conclusion: Lower educational attainment is a strong risk factor for diabetic retinopathy, and it is independent of the economic status. The result suggests that cognitive function may play an important role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy in

  3. [Diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the prevalence and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dilated fundal photography was performed at approximately 10 and 28 gestational weeks in 58 and 18 women with type 1 and type...... 2 diabetes, respectively. Retinopathy was classified as five stages +/- macular oedema. Progression was defined as deterioration corresponding to at least one stage between the two examinations. Clinical parameters were obtained from the medical records. RESULTS: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 36...... (62%) women with type 1 and three (17%) with type 2 diabetes at the first examination. In 26 (34%) retinopathy progressed; four women developed proliferations, three macular oedema and three reduction of visual acuity >/=0.2 on Snellen's chart in at least one eye. HbA1c in early pregnancy was the only...

  4. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker.

  5. The Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Nigel M.; Giardini, Mario E.; Bastawrous, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Complications of diabetes mellitus, namely diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy, are the leading cause of blindness in working aged people. Sufferers can avoid blindness if identified early via retinal imaging. Systematic screening of the diabetic population has been shown to greatly reduce the prevalence and incidence of blindness within the population. Many national screening programs have digital fundus photography as their basis. In the past 5 years several techniques and adapters have been developed that allow digital fundus photography to be performed using smartphones. We review recent progress in smartphone-based fundus imaging and discuss its potential for integration into national systematic diabetic retinopathy screening programs. Some systems have produced promising initial results with respect to their agreement with reference standards. However further multisite trialling of such systems’ use within implementable screening workflows is required if an evidence base strong enough to affect policy change is to be established. If this were to occur national diabetic retinopathy screening would, for the first time, become possible in low- and middle-income settings where cost and availability of trained eye care personnel are currently key barriers to implementation. As diabetes prevalence and incidence is increasing sharply in these settings, the impact on global blindness could be profound. PMID:26596630

  6. Knowledge and awareness about diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy in suburban population of a South Indian state and its practice among the patients with diabetes mellitus: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rameez; Rajesh, Bindu; Giridhar, Anantharaman; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh; Sadasivan, Sanjai; James, Justin; Vijayan, Pradeep Padickal; John, Nelson

    2016-04-01

    Ocular complications due to diabetes mellitus (DM) were on the rise despite good literacy levels in South India. To assess the knowledge and attitude toward DM and diabetic retinopathy of the general population in a suburban town of South India. Door-to-door population survey in suburban town of South India in May 2013. A 30-point questionnaire was prepared and the data were collected and analyzed to determine statistically the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) scores of the general and diabetic population and also to determine significant demographic associations. In this study, 6211 people (3528 [56.8%] women and 2683 [43.2%] men) with a mean age of 55.6 ± 11.7 years (range 21-98 years) were included. Good knowledge and positive attitude were observed in 3457 (55.6%) and 3280 (52.8%) people. Among 1538 (25.4%) people known to have DM, only 619 (40.7%) had good knowledge, 828 (53.8%) had a positive attitude, and 886 (57.6%) had good practice patterns. Although half of them followed general diabetic care, only 9.6% had undergone screening for retinopathy. Literacy showed a significant association with good KAP (P knowledge (P < 0.001). Better literacy, especially among women, is contributory to better public awareness; however, the trend for poor practice patterns needs to be radically changed with aggressive public motivation emphasizing on the necessity of retinopathy screening and periodic follow-ups.

  7. Oxidative stress in diabetic patients with retinopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of acquired blindness. ... cataract. Chronic hyperglycemia and its associated ... microvascular disease. This may be ... as ulcers, neuropathy, and nephropathy which are ... 10 ml of venous blood was collected from the median.

  8. The relationship between insulin resistance/β-cell dysfunction and diabetic retinopathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Desheng Diabetic Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Yun; Yang, Xiu-Fen; Gu, Hong; Snellingen, Torkel; Liu, Xi-Pu; Liu, Ning-Pu

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between insulin resistance (IR)/β-cell dysfunction and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to explore further whether there were differences in the relationship among diabetic patients with higher and lower body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional study. A total of 1466 subjects with T2DM were recruited in a local Desheng Community of urban Beijing from November 2009 to June 2012 for the cohort of Beijing Desheng Diabetic Eye Study. Standardized evaluation was carried out for each participant, including questionnaire, ocular and anthropometric examinations, and laboratory tests. Seven fields 30° color fundus photographs were used for DR grading according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocols. Homeostatis Model Assessment (HOMA) method was employed for IR and β-cell function assessment. After excluding those participants who were treated with insulin ( n =352) or had missing data of fasting insulin ( n =96), and further excluding those with poor quality of retinal photographs ( n =10), a total of 1008 subjects were included for the final analysis, 406 (40.3%) were men and 602 (59.7%) were women, age ranging from 34 to 86 (64.87±8.28)y. Any DR (levels 14 and above) was present in 278 (27.6%) subjects. After adjusting for possible covariates, the presence of any DR did not correlate with HOMA IR [odds ratio (OR) 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87-2.61, P =0.14] or HOMA β-cell (OR 0.71, 95%CI 0.40-1.26, P =0.25). After stratification by BMI, the presence of any DR was associated positively with HOMA IR (OR 2.46, 95%CI: 1.18-5.12, P =0.016), and negatively with HOMA β-cell (OR 0.40, 95%CI: 0.19-0.87, P =0.021) in the group of patients with higher BMI (≥25 kg/m 2 ). In the group of patients with lower BMI (diabetic patients with higher BMI. However, this association is not statistically significant in diabetic patients with lower BMI.

  9. Body mass index and retinopathy in Asian populations with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, David; Lye, Weng Kit; Tan, Gavin; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Kumari, Neelam; Zheng, Ying Feng; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2015-02-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is an established risk factor for diabetes. However, the association between BMI and diabetic retinopathy (DR) has been inconclusive. We aimed to assess the association between BMI and DR in a large population-based sample of multi-ethnic Asian adults in Singapore. We examined 2,278 adults aged ≥40 years with diabetes who participated in three population-based studies conducted from 2004 to 2011: the Singapore Malay Eye Study, the Singapore Indian Eye Study, and the Singapore Chinese Eye Study. Retinal photographs taken from both eyes were graded for any and vision-threatening (VTDR) using the modified Airlie House Classification. BMI (kg/m(2)) was categorized into normal/underweight (<25), overweight (25-29.9), and obese (≥30). The prevalence rates of any and VTDR in the study population were 35.1 % and 9.1 %, respectively. The prevalence of any and VTDR decreased with increasing categories of BMI (P trend <0.001 and 0.005). In multivariable models adjusted for potential confounders, compared to those with normal weight, the odds ratio (95 % confidence interval) of any DR was 0.71 (0.57-0.88) for overweight and 0.70 (0.53-0.92) for obese. Corresponding estimates for VTDR were 0.84 (0.59-1.21) for overweight and 0.58 (0.35-0.94) for obese. The inverse association between BMI and any DR was consistently present when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable and in analyses stratified by ethnicity and age. In a population-based sample of multi-ethnic Asian adults, BMI levels were inversely associated with any DR and VTDR.

  10. The incidence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy in a population-based cohort study of people age 50 years and over in Nakuru, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastawrous, Andrew; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Wing, Kevin; Bastawrous, Madeleine; Rono, Hillary; Weiss, Helen A; Macleod, David; Foster, Allen; Peto, Tunde; Blows, Peter; Burton, Matthew; Kuper, Hannah

    2017-03-23

    The epidemic rise of diabetes carries major negative public health and economic consequences particularly for low and middle-income countries. The highest predicted percentage growth in diabetes is in the sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region where to date there has been no data on the incidence of diabetic retinopathy from population-based cohort studies and minimal data on incident diabetes. The primary aims of this study were to estimate the cumulative six-year incidence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and DR (Diabetic Retinopathy), respectively, among people aged ≥50 years in Kenya. Random cluster sampling with probability proportionate to size were used to select a representative cross-sectional sample of adults aged ≥50 years in 2007-8 in Nakuru District, Kenya. A six-year follow-up was undertaken in 2013-14. On both occasions a comprehensive ophthalmic examination was performed including LogMAR visual acuity, digital retinal photography and independent grading of images. Data were collected on general health and risk factors. The primary outcomes were the incidence of diabetes mellitus and the incidence of diabetic retinopathy, which were calculated by dividing the number of events identified at 6-year follow-up by the number of people at risk at the beginning of follow-up. Age-adjusted risk ratios of the outcomes (DM and DR respectively) were estimated for each covariate using a Poisson regression model with robust error variance to allow for the clustered design and including inverse-probability weighting. At baseline, 4414 participants aged ≥50 years underwent complete examination. Of the 4104 non-diabetic participants, 2059 were followed-up at six-years (50 · 2%). The cumulative incidence of DM was estimated at 61 · 0 per 1000 (95% CI: 50 · 3-73 · 7) in people aged ≥50 years. The cumulative incidence of DR in the sample population was estimated at 15 · 8 per 1000 (95% CI: 9 · 5-26 · 3) among those without DM at baseline

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  12. Investigation of relationship between serum C-peptide and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitusF%探究血清C肽与2型糖尿病视网膜病变的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范进绵; 高俊泽

    2015-01-01

    目的:对血清C肽与2型糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)的关系进行分析与探讨。方法120例2型糖尿病患者,根据患者病情将其分为三组,即:无糖尿病视网膜病变(NDR)组40例,非增殖性糖尿病视网膜病变(NPDR)组42例,增殖性糖尿病视网膜病变(PDR)组38例。以电化学发光法对所有患者空腹血清C肽进行测定。结果三组患者空腹血清C肽水平均呈现下降趋势,三组比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。血清C肽与2型糖尿病视网膜病变程度呈负相关。结论研究表明,在2型糖尿病视网膜病变中,血清C肽含量会由于病变程度的加深而逐渐降低,血清C肽水平是2型糖尿病视网膜病变进展的重要标志。%ObjectiveTo analyze and investigate the relationship between serum C-peptide and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus.MethodsA total of 120 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were divided by their illness condition into three groups, as non diabetic retinopathy (NDR) group with 40 cases, non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group with 42 cases, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) group with 38 cases. Electrochemiluminescence method was applied for detection of serum C-peptide in all patients.ResultsAll the three groups had decreased levels of fasting serum C-peptide, and the difference had statistical significance across the three groups (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between serum C-peptide and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.ConclusionThis study shows the content of serum C-peptide will decrease along with the development of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, therefore, serum C-peptide acts as an important indicator for progression of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin M Nentwich; Michael W Ulbig

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the mostfrequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitusand the most common cause of blindness in the workingagepopulation. In the next 15 years, the number ofpatients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected toincrease significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 millionpeople in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to besuffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people withdiabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts foran increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e. , exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema.

  14. The results of correction of endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with diabetic retinopathy and associated hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:Studying the dynamics of clinical functional and morphological status of the retina against the metabolic and antiischemic therapy of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes associated with hypertension based on indicators in the tear fluid and serum nitric oxide metabolites.Methods: Following a standard ophthalmologic examination of 50 patients, among which are the two groups are similar in age andsex. The main group (n = 37 with Cd 2, DR and DR I and II hypertension II, III stage, the average age was 62,2±1,2 years, antihypertensive therapy — an ACE inhibitor Prestarium (5 mg. Patients of the group were divided into two subgroups: the first subgroup (n = 19who underwent parabulbarnom Mildronate (10 injections, the second subgroup (n = 18, which the drug was administered intranasally Semaks (20 days. The control group (n = 13 healthy (n = 6, and patients with type 2 diabetes without DR and GB (n = 7. Quantitative determination of the stable NO metabolites was determined in biochemical method samples of serum and lacrimal fluid.Results: After completing a course of therapy for patients of the first subgroup marked decrease in retinal thickness (p ≤ 0,05 in f.centralis, temporal lobe, the upper and lower bands parafovea and temporal area perifovea, while in the second group — in 9 areas of the macular area (p ≤ 0.05. It is also noted a significant increase in sensitivity to light in the macular area in patients of both subgroups (MAIA. On the background of the treatment observed reduction of NOx in the lacrimal fluid and serum of patients in both clinical groups. Thus, reduction of NOx in the lacrimal fluid was statistically significant in the subgroup of patients receiving anti-ischemic therapy semaks (p <0,05. In both clinical subgroups after treatment revealed correlation between systolic blood pressure and the level of NOx in the serum (r = 0,4; p <0,05.Conclusion: The positive effect (p <0,05 antioxidant (Mildronat and

  15. Oxidative stress in diabetic patients with retinopathy | Kundu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to induce oxidative stress along with deranging various metabolisms; one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of acquired blindness. Poor glycemic control and oxidative stress have been attributed to the development of ...

  16. Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important. PMID:21635964

  17. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  18. Diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, M.; Gerdes, V. E.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Meesters, E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are over 740,000 patients with diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands, and this number will increase further in the coming years. Approximately 90% of patients has type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is often associated with obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol

  19. SERUM MAGNESIUM, LIPID PROFILE AND GLYCATED HAEMOGLOBIN IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Vusikala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus of long duration. Alterations in trace metals like magnesium and lipid profile was observed in diabetic retinopathy with hyperglycaemic status. AIM The study was taken up to assess the role of magnesium, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin in diabetic retinopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 subjects between 40-65 years were included in the study. Group 1 includes 20 age and sex matched healthy controls. Group 2 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus without retinopathy. Group 3 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus with retinopathy. RESULTS Magnesium was found to be significantly low in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Fasting and Postprandial plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels confirmed the glycaemic status of each of the groups. CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia was observed in diabetic retinopathy along with increased levels of glycated haemoglobin in our study.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy screening: global and local perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwani, R A; Lian, J X; McGhee, S M; Wong, D; Li, K Kw

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a global epidemic. It causes significant macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and stroke; as well as microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Diabetic retinopathy is known to be the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population and may be asymptomatic until vision loss occurs. Screening for diabetic retinopathy has been shown to reduce blindness by timely detection and effective laser treatment. Diabetic retinopathy screening is being done worldwide either as a national screening programme or hospital-based project or as a community-based screening programme. In this article, we review different methods of screening including grading used to detect the severity of sight-threatening retinopathy and the newer screening methods. This review also includes the method of systematic screening being carried out in Hong Kong, a system that has helped to identify diabetic retinopathy among all attendees in public primary care clinics using a Hong Kong-wide public patients' database.

  1. [Prevalence of the Diabetic Retinopathy and Genetic Factors Significance in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus type I and II in Slovakia (DIARET SK study). Overview of Actual Findings and Design of the Epidemiological DIARET SK Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krásnik, V; Štefaničková, J; Fabková, J; Bucková, D; Helbich, M

    2015-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the second most common microvascular complication and the most common cause of blindness in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Despite the ongoing research, the findings of diabetic retinopathy epidemiological and risk factors are, until now, not consistent. More finding may be revealed by epidemiological studies, consistently mapping DR epidemiology under the current possibilities of investigations and treatment of the DM. DIARET SK Study, with 5 000 enrolled patients with diabetes mellitus in the Slovak Republic, is, until now, the largest epidemiological study to set the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. The primary aim is to establish the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus type I and II, according to the duration of the disease. The secondary aim is to establish prevalence of the different stages of the DR and diabetic macular edema (DME) and analysis of the risk factors influence. Included are patients with DM type I and II regardless to the ocular complications history and the period of DM duration. Each enrolled patient has both complex diabetic and ophthalmic examinations.Projects to establish DR prevalence: Tens of projects concerned with diabetic retinopathy epidemiology with different approaches to establish the prevalence and with different patients population. Results from different studies vary significantly (from 12.3 % to 66.9 %). The results depend on the design of the study and the patients recruitment, used examination methods, specific patients population with regard to the geography, prevalence of risk factors, period of diabetes duration, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level, blood pressure, and is higher in type I diabetic patients. The most accurate results are from population epidemiological studies with well-controlled patient recruitment and uniform complex examination that are similar to the DIARET SK study. The DIARET SK study represents the largest epidemiological study

  2. New Therapeutic Approaches in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Relhan, Nidhi; Kishor, Krishna S.; Flynn Jr, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It affects a substantial proportion of US adults over age 40. The condition is a leading cause of visual loss. Much attention has been given to expanding the role of current treatments along with investigating various novel therapies and drug delivery methods. In the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), intravitreal pharmacotherapies, especially anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, have gained popularity. Currently, anti-VEGF agents are often used as first-line agents in center-involved DME, with recent data suggesting that among these agents, aflibercept leads to better visual outcomes in patients with worse baseline visual acuities. While photocoagulation remains the standard treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), recent FDA approvals of ranibizumab and aflibercept in the management of diabetic retinopathy associated with DME may suggest a potential for pharmacologic treatments of PDR as well. Novel therapies, including small interfering RNAs, chemokines, kallikrein-kinin inhibitors, and various anti-angiogenic agents, are currently being evaluated for the management of diabetic retinopathy and DME. In addition to these strategies, novel drug delivery methods such as sustained-release implants and refillable reservoir implants are either under active evaluation or have recently gained FDA approval. This review provides an update on the novel developments in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26676668

  3. Prospects for angiotensin receptor blockers in diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjølie, Anne Katrin

    2007-01-01

    Retinopathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, and is an important cause of blindness worldwide. Clinical trials have demonstrated that tight metabolic control inhibits the progression of retinopathy. Good blood pressure control has been shown to be protective...... in type 2 diabetes, and it may also reduce proliferative retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. However, such control is often difficult to achieve in clinical practice, and may be associated with problems such as hypoglycaemia. New therapies are therefore needed to reduce the risk of retinopathy....... There is growing evidence that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, and this has led to interest in RAS inhibitors as agents to prevent retinopathy. Several trials have suggested that ACE inhibitor therapy can inhibit progression of retinopathy...

  4. Failure to initiate early insulin therapy - A risk factor for diabetic retinopathy in insulin users with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: Sankara Nethralaya-Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS, Report number 35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Delhiwala, Kushal S; Raman, Rajiv P G; Sharma, Tarun; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran

    2016-06-01

    Insulin users have been reported to have a higher incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The aim was to elucidate the factors associated with DR among insulin users, especially association between duration, prior to initiating insulin for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and developing DR. Retrospective cross-sectional observational study included 1414 subjects having Type 2 DM. Insulin users were defined as subjects using insulin for glycemic control, and insulin nonusers as those either not using any antidiabetic treatment or using diet control or oral medications. The duration before initiating insulin after diagnosis was calculated by subtracting the duration of insulin usage from the duration of DM. DR was clinically graded using Klein's classification. SPSS (version 9.0) was used for statistical analysis. Insulin users had more incidence of DR (52.9% vs. 16.3%, P 1) and sight threatening DR (19.1% vs. 2.4%, P 1) in comparison to insulin nonusers. Among insulin users, longer duration of DM (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.25, P = 0.044) and abdominal obesity (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.02-1.29, P = 0.021) was associated with DR. The presence of DR was significantly associated with longer duration (≥5 years) prior to initiating insulin therapy, overall (38.0% vs. 62.0%, P = 0.013), and in subjects with suboptimal glycemic control (32.5% vs. 67.5%, P = 0.022). The presence of DR is significantly associated with longer duration of diabetes (>5 years) and sub-optimal glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin insulin users, abdominal obesity was found to be a significant predictor of DR; DR is associated with longer duration prior to initiating insulin therapy in Type 2 DM subjects with suboptimal glycemic control.

  5. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Skiadopoulos, Dionysios

    2013-01-01

    This theses on Diabetes Mellitus aims at giving an insight at various aspects of this chronic disease and the risk factors that lead to it; the varius ways it develops in the human body; the old and new approaches to treatment, both from a pharmacological and a non- pharmacologiacal point of view; ways to prevent and to manage the diabetes complications; how to improve the live of the diabetic patients who are faced with not only physical but also psychological problems; statistical data from...

  6. Structural neurodegeneration correlates with early diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Hansen, Rasmus Søgaard; Peto, Tunde

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine differences in structural and functional neurodegenerative measurements between patients with no and early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we examined 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 7-field fundus photographs acquired...... with Topcon TRC-NW6S, a single, certified grader determined the presence of DR according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale. Retinal neurodegeneration was evaluated by Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and by a RETI-scan multifocal...... electroretinography (mf-ERG) system in rings 1-6. RESULTS: Median age and duration of diabetes were 63.6 and 10 years, respectively, and 46% were men. Median HbA1c was 50 mmol/mol (6.7%), and ETDRS levels were 10 (41.7%, n = 43), 20 (35.0%, n = 36), and 35 (23.3%, n = 24). The duration of diabetes increased...

  7. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javeria Amin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area.

  8. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Javeria; Sharif, Muhammad; Yasmin, Mussarat

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area.

  9. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Javeria; Sharif, Muhammad; Yasmin, Mussarat

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper,...

  10. Relationship Between Diabetes Mellitus And Thyroid Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent findings have evidenced the intricate bond between subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus that contributes to major complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy. Insulin resistance has also been shown to play an indispensable role in connecting type 2 diabetes mellitus and thyroid dysfunction.

  11. Automatic diabetic retinopathy classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, María. A.; Arbeláez, Pablo A.

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a disease in which the retina is damaged due to augmentation in the blood pressure of small vessels. DR is the major cause of blindness for diabetics. It has been shown that early diagnosis can play a major role in prevention of visual loss and blindness. This work proposes a computer based approach for the detection of DR in back-of-the-eye images based on the use of convolutional neural networks (CNNs). Our CNN uses deep architectures to classify Back-of-the-eye Retinal Photographs (BRP) in 5 stages of DR. Our method combines several preprocessing images of BRP to obtain an ACA score of 50.5%. Furthermore, we explore subproblems by training a larger CNN of our main classification task.

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy Awareness among Diabetic Patients Attending COMS-TH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, P; Adhikari, H

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of blindness in Nepal. Objective The main objective of the study is to know the awareness of diabetic retinopathy among new cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) attending the college of medical science- teaching hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal. Method All the diabetic cases referred for ophthalmic consultation and also referred outpatient department cases from other departments to ophthalmic outpatient department was carried out. Detailed demographics of the subjects and their awareness of potential ocular problems from diabetes mellitus were noted. Result Total one hundred and thirty-one patients were enrolled during the study period from 15 November 2016 to 15 May 2017. Brahmin 39.69% and 19.08% Mongolian were the most predominant ethnical group. The predominant group of patients were housewives (41.22%) then followed by service (19.85%), business (13.74%), agriculture (12.21%), others (12.98%). Among 36.64% of the literate patients, 19.85% had passed school level, 9.92% had passed intermediate level, 88.55% were aware of Diabetic retinopathy. Among them majority 88.55% were referred by physician. Family history were present in 35.68% and fundus evaluation was done for the first time in almost half of diabetic cases (64.12%) and diabetic retinopathy was found in 32.06% of total cases in right eye and 30.53% of total cases in left eye. Conclusion Along with the awareness, routine dilated fundoscopy is mandatory for slight threating stage of retinopathy and to reduce the burden of blindness from diabetic retinopathy in Nepal.

  13. Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichiro; Ito, Chikako

    1992-01-01

    It is believed that the pancreas is low sensitive to radiation. In this chapter, the effect of radiation on the pancreas is discussed in the light of the radiosensitivity of the pancreas in animal experiments and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in A-bomb survivors. In an experiment on the whole-body irradiation with 800 rad using rats, a decrease in insulin secretion itself has not been noted, although a decrease in blood insulin and an increase in glucagon were associated with transiently increased blood glucose. In other studies, there was neither histologically nor endocrinologically abnormal findings due to several hundreds rad of radiation in the acute stage. For A-bomb survivors, blood levels of insulin tended to be slightly increased in the 40-59 age group of A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤1.5 km than those exposed at ≥3.0 km; and in the other age groups, there was no tendency for decreased blood levels of insulin. The ABCC-RERF Adult Health Study data (1958-1960) has revealed that there is no statistically significant correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and A-bomb radiation; nor has this been noted in any other study. Neither the prevalence of diabetes mellitus nor its complications is found to be independent upon distance from the hypocenter. (N.K.)

  14. Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Ferrannini, Ele; Groop, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an expanding global health problem, closely linked to the epidemic of obesity. Individuals with T2DM are at high risk for both microvascular complications (including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (such as cardiovascular...... that multiple antidiabetic agents, used in combination, will be required to maintain normoglycaemia. The treatment must not only be effective and safe but also improve the quality of life. Several novel medications are in development, but the greatest need is for agents that enhance insulin sensitivity, halt...

  15. Determining the association between retinopathy and metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus visiting Mayo Hospital, Lahore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, U; Niaz, Z; Cheema, T M; Abaidullah, S; Salman, S; Latif, F [King Edward Medical University, Mayo Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Diabetic Mellitus

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Diabetic retinopathy is common sequel of diabetes. Objective: To determine the frequency of retinopathy in patients of type 2 diabetes metabolic syndrome. Study Design; Descriptive study. This study was conducted in diabetic clinic of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from January 17, 2007 to July 16,2007. Methods; Three hundred and sixty patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for this study and divided into two groups. (Diabetes and with metabolic syndrome) Demographic data of each patient including age, sex, height and weight were collected. Each patient was interviewed about the duration, treatment and complications of diabetes. Data were analyzed by SPSS. P value was calculated by Chi Square test. Results; In group I, the mean height was 1.60 +- 0.08 meters, mean weight was 68.82 +- 7.36 kilograms and mean BMI was 26.38 +- 1.10 kg/m2 and In group II, the mean height was 1.56 +- 0.12 meters, mean weight was 81.58 +- 9.85 kilograms and mean BMI was 33.80 +- 3.61 kg/m/sup 2/. In group I micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 12.22% patients. In group II, micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 25% patients (p 0.0028). In group I, there were 10.56% patients in which cotton wool spots were found and in group II there were 11.67% patients in which cotton wool spots were found (p 0.0358). In group I, there were 2.78% patients in which new blood vessel formation were found and in group II there were 4.44% patients in which new blood vessel formation was found (p 0.625). Conclusion; It is concluded from this study that frequency of retinopathy is high in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. (author)

  16. Determining the association between retinopathy and metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus visiting Mayo Hospital, Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, U.; Niaz, Z.; Cheema, T.M.; Abaidullah, S.; Salman, S.; Latif, F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Diabetic retinopathy is common sequel of diabetes. Objective: To determine the frequency of retinopathy in patients of type 2 diabetes metabolic syndrome. Study Design; Descriptive study. This study was conducted in diabetic clinic of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from January 17, 2007 to July 16,2007. Methods; Three hundred and sixty patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for this study and divided into two groups. (Diabetes and with metabolic syndrome) Demographic data of each patient including age, sex, height and weight were collected. Each patient was interviewed about the duration, treatment and complications of diabetes. Data were analyzed by SPSS. P value was calculated by Chi Square test. Results; In group I, the mean height was 1.60 +- 0.08 meters, mean weight was 68.82 +- 7.36 kilograms and mean BMI was 26.38 +- 1.10 kg/m2 and In group II, the mean height was 1.56 +- 0.12 meters, mean weight was 81.58 +- 9.85 kilograms and mean BMI was 33.80 +- 3.61 kg/m/sup 2/. In group I micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 12.22% patients. In group II, micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 25% patients (p 0.0028). In group I, there were 10.56% patients in which cotton wool spots were found and in group II there were 11.67% patients in which cotton wool spots were found (p 0.0358). In group I, there were 2.78% patients in which new blood vessel formation were found and in group II there were 4.44% patients in which new blood vessel formation was found (p 0.625). Conclusion; It is concluded from this study that frequency of retinopathy is high in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. (author)

  17. Retinal changes in diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alina Gabriela; Istrate, Sinziana Luminita; Iancu, Raluca Claudia; Guta, Oana Maria; Ciuluvica, Radu; Voinea, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure retinal vessel caliber and to examine early changes in macular thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We evaluated to what extend vascular caliber and macular thickness differed between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without diabetic retinopathy compared with healthy individuals. 26 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy and 26 normal participants without any retinal and optic nerve diseases underwent ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, and OCT imaging. Temporal inferior retinal vessel diameters were measured using OCT. Also, we measured macular thickness in nine ETDRS subfields using Cirrus OCT. The mean age in the diabetic group was 61.5 years and in the control group, 55.5 years. Wider retinal arterioles and venules were found in patients with diabetes compared with healthy subjects (120 µm versus 96 µm, pdiabetes mellitus, central macular thickness was significantly thinner than that of control eyes (243.5 µm versus 269.9 µm, p value diabetes without diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Lipasin, a biomarker of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chen; Huang, Yun; Guo, Heming; Gao, Yan; Ji, Xiaoyan; Hu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    The present study recruited 74 participants with type 2 diabetes, among which 23 had retinopathy. Those with retinopathy had a longer duration of diabetes and higher levels of lipasin compared with those without retinopathy. Logistic regression revealed that lipasin was independently and significantly associated with retinopathy even after adjustments for confounders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among 13473 patients with diabetes mellitus in China: a cross-sectional epidemiological survey in six provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Song, Yifan; Tao, Liyuan; Qiu, Weiqiang; Lv, Huibin; Jiang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Mingzhou; Li, Xuemin

    2017-01-09

    To describe the prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and sight-threatening DR (STDR) among Chinese adults with diabetes. A cross-sectional epidemiological survey across Mainland China (N=13 473). Participants were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus by physicians and transferred to our screening clinics (1/3 from hospital patients, 1/3 from city residents, the other 1/3 from rural residents). 2 fundus photographs were taken of each eye with a colourful, non-mydriatic and non-stereoscopic camera and were graded according to the UK guidelines. The prevalence and severity of DR and STDR. Of the 13 473 participants with diabetes participating in the study, 4591 had DR and 1769 had STDR, for an overall prevalence of 34.08% (95% CI 33.28% to 34.88%) and 13.13% (95% CI 12.56% to 13.70%), respectively. Among these, gradable photographs were available for 12 780 participants (94.86%). Participants who were aged >65 years were less likely to suffer from DR or STDR (p0.05). Participants with STDR suffered from more severe visual impairment compared with those without STDR (pprevalence of DR and STDR in the northern region was higher than in the southern region (pprevalence of DR was closely related to duration of disease (OR 2.63; 95% CI 2.42 to 2.86; pdiabetes onset age (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.41; pprevalence of DR and STDR in Mainland China appeared a little high, and varied according to area. Non-proliferative DR was more common, but STDR needed prompt treatment, especially in economically less developed areas. This study highlights the necessity for DR screening and treatment in Mainland China. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Micronutrients and Diabetic Retinopathy A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Chee-Tin Christine; Gayton, Emma L.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; Flanagan, Declan W.; Adler, Amanda I.

    Background: We have evaluated the evidence for the association between intake and blood levels of micronutrients and diabetic retinopathy. Treatment for diabetic retinopathy requires significant clinical input and specialist ophthalmologic care. Micronutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin E, and

  1. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in hypertensive diabetic patients in a tertiary care hospital of Peshawar, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Khan, G.J.; Aamir, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, it can progress to serious visual disability. Coexistence of hypertension with diabetes has been described as another risk factor adding to the problem. We designed this study to assess the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in hypertensive diabetic patients of this region and to compare it with normotensive diabetic patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 200 previously diagnosed diabetic patients. Apart from routine examination and investigations, retinopathy and blood pressure assessment of each patient was done using standard techniques. Hypertensive diabetic subjects (Group-I, n=107) were compared with non-hypertensive diabetics (Group-II, n=93) for the presence of retinopathy. Results: Retinopathy and hypertension were observed in 51% and 53.5% of the total diabetic patients respectively. Hypertensive diabetic patients had significantly higher percentage of retinopathy compared to non-hypertensive diabetic patients (58 vs 43%; p<0.05). Conclusion: Retinopathy and hypertension are highly prevalent in our diabetic patients. The proportion of retinopathy is significantly more in hypertensive as compared to normotensive diabetics. (author)

  2. Lipoprotein(a Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atherogenic lipoproteins, such as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, are associated with progression of retinopathy. Aim. To evaluate the relationship between lipoprotein(a and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 145 diabetic consecutive patients (82 females, 63 males; mean age 66.8±12 years, mean duration of diabetes 9.4±6.8 years. Presence and severity of retinopathy were evaluated. Serum lipid profile, including Lp(a level, was assessed. Results. High Lp(a levels have been observed in 54 (78.3% subjects and normal levels in 13 (18.85% subjects as regards diabetic patients with retinopathy. Lp(a levels were high in 15 subjects (21.75% and normal in 63 subjects (91.35% as regards patients without retinopathy. Conclusions. Lp(a levels are increased in a significant percentage of patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy. The impact of Lp(a levels on diabetic retinopathy needs to be further investigated.

  3. Clinical features of diabetes retinopathy in elderly patients with type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective was to estimate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of diabetes retinopathy (DR) in elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northern Chinese. Materials and Methods: 595 eligible subjects (263 men, 332 women) assisted by the community health service center in Beijing, China ...

  4. Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1, and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

  5. Influence of VEGFA gene polymorphisms rs2010963 and rs699947 on clinical and laboratory indicators in diabetic retinopathy among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Gudz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. A key factor of neoangiogenesis deve­lopment in diabetic retinopathy (DR among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM is vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA. The important role of genetic polymorphisms of the VEGFA gene indicates a number of studies and meta-analyzes, that have shown their association with DR, especially with its proliferative variant, which varies in different populations. Accordingly, the purpose of this work was to find out the influence of the polymorphic genotypes rs2010963 and rs699947 of the VEGFA gene on clinical and laboratory parameters of DR in DM patients from Ukrainian population. Materials and methods. The study involved 302 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and DR. Diagnosis was established according to the international clinical classification adopted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (2003. The control group consisted of 98 people who did not have DM and DR, as well as other ophthalmic diseases. All patients were operated on cataract. In the intraocular fluid collected during the surgery, the VEGFA content was determined by the immunoassay method. Analysis of the polymorphic DNA loci of the VEGFA gene: rs2010963 and rs699947 was performed in a real time polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays (Thermo Fisher Scientific, USA. Results. An analysis of the study results showed that rs2010963 polymorphism had an effect on the intraocular fluid VEGFA level (maximum — under the C/C risk genotype. This polymorphism was related to the sex (the genotype C/C was more common in men than in women: 3 : 1, the presence of proliferative DR (most often was determined by the presence of the genotype C/C: 45.4 % and neovascularization of the optic disc (most often determined by the pre­sence of heterozygotes G/C: 21.4 %. Polymorphism rs699947 had an effect on the visual acuity (the minimum was available in the genotype C/C, the thickness of the retina (the maximum

  6. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications%2型糖尿病视网膜病变与糖尿病其他并发症的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑惠; 孟倩丽; 张敏; 郭海科; 刘清洋; 崔颖; 李达桔

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨2型糖尿病视网膜病变( diabetic retinopathy, DR)与糖尿病的全身并发症的相关性。方法:分析2型糖尿病住院患者702例,将其分为NDR组、DR组两组,DR组又分为非增生性糖尿病视网膜病变(non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy,NPDR)组和增生性糖尿病视网膜病变( proliferative diabetic retinopathy, PDR)组,分析DR与糖尿病大血管并发症、糖尿病肾病( diabetic nephropathy, DN )、糖尿病周围神经病变( diabetic peripheral neuropathy,DPN),糖尿病周围血管性疾病( peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus, PVD)、糖尿病足( diabetic foot,DF)、糖尿病酮症酸中毒( diabetic ketoacidosis,DKA)等糖尿病并发症的相关性。结果:DR的发生、发展与高血压、高血脂、颈部血管硬化、斑块,下肢动脉硬化、斑块, DN、DPN、DF及PVD等并发症有关。 PDR与高血压、DPN关系密切。结论:血管内皮损伤、微循环障碍是DR及糖尿病的全身大、小血管并发症的共同病理基础。糖尿病患者出现全身并发症时,DR的患病率增加,尤其是合并高血压、DPN时,PDR的患病率增加。所以糖尿病患者尤其是出现全身并发症者必需定期行眼底检查,以早期发现、早期治疗DR,降低致盲率。%Abstract•AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.• METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included.All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy ( NPDR ) and group proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy ( DN) , diabetic

  7. Diabetes Onset at 31?45 Years of Age is Associated with an Increased Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Wenjun; Ni, Lisha; Lu, Qianyi; Zou, Chen; Zhao, Minjie; Xu, Xun; Chen, Haibing; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This hospital-based, cross-sectional study investigated the effect of age of diabetes onset on the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. A total of 5,214 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to the Department of Ophthalmology at the Shanghai First People?s Hospital from 2009 to 2013 was eligible for inclusion. Diabetic retinopathy status was classified using the grading system of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDR...

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  9. Early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Baez, Maria Valeria; Marquez-Gonzalez, Horacio; Barcenas-Contreras, Rodolfo; Morales Montoya, Carlos; Espinosa-Garcia, Laura Fatima

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a strategy for early detection of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in Quintana Roo, México. Study transversal, observational, prospective, analytical, eight primary care units from Mexican Social Security Institute in the northern delegation of the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico were included. A program for early detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adult 376,169 was designed. Were diagnosed 683 cases of type 2 diabetes, in 105 patients randomized was conducted to direct ophthalmoscopy were subjected to a secondary hospital were assigned. Will determine the degree of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema was performed. In population were 55.2% female, mean age 48+11.1 years, 23.8 % had some degree of DR, 28.0% with mild non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy 48.0 % moderate 16.0% and severe and 8.0% showed proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Those over age 30 are 2.8 times more risk of developing DR, OR= 2.8; 95%CI: 0.42-18.0, and OR= 1.7; 95%CI: 1.02-2.95 women. The implementation of programs aimed at the early detection of debilitating conditions such as diabetic retinopathy health impact beneficiaries, effective links between primary care systems and provide second level positive health outcomes for patient diseases.

  10. Correlation between Retinal Vessel Calibre and Neurodegeneration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy (EUROCONDOR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Soegaard Hansen, Rasmus; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    .04). In a multivariable linear regression model, CRAE was associated with macular ganglion cell layer thickness (coefficient 0.27 per micrometre, p correlated with macular retinal thickness (coefficient -0.07 per micrometre, p = 0.04) and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness at the optic disc......PURPOSE: To investigate the correlation between retinal vessel calibre and measurements of neurodegeneration in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and no or early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: Baseline data on 440 patients with T2D from the EUROCONDOR clinical trial were used. DR was graded...... (coefficient 0.32 per micrometre, p

  11. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness worldwide. The associated loss of productivity and quality of life of the patients with diabetic retinopathy will lead to additional socioeconomic burden. This study aims to determine the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients. Materials ...

  12. duration diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... group, type of diabetes, age of onset and duration of diabetes), presence of retinopathy, markers of nephropathy and biochemical variables. ... type 2 diabetes and for each ethnic group. Results. ... time of diabetes diagnosis in blacks than Indians. In the type ... countries, minority groups and disadvantaged communities in.

  13. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nihat Sayin; Necip Kara; Gokhan Pekel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problemthat induces ernestful complications and it causessignificant morbidity owing to specific microvascularcomplications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy andneuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as,ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy.It can affect children, young people and adults and isbecoming more common. Ocular complications associatedwith DM are progressive and rapidly becoming theworld's most significant cause of morbidity and arepreventable with early detection and timely treatment.This review provides an overview of five main ocularcomplications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathyand papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surfacediseases.

  14. Prevalence of blindness and diabetic retinopathy in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Mansur M; Al Bdour, Muawyah D; Abu Ameerh, Mohammed A; Jadoon, Muhammed Z

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of blindness, visual impairment, diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy in north Jordan (Irbid) using the rapid assessment of avoidable blindness and diabetic retinopathy methodology. A multistage cluster random sampling technique was used to select participants for this survey. A total of 108 clusters were selected using probability proportional to size method while subjects within the clusters were selected using compact segment method. Survey teams moved from house to house in selected segments examining residents 50 years and older until 35 participants were recruited. All eligible people underwent a standardized examination protocol, which included ophthalmic examination and random blood sugar test using digital glucometers (Accu-Chek) in their homes. Diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients was assessed through dilated fundus examination. A total of 3638 out of the 3780 eligible participants were examined. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of blindness, severe visual impairment, and visual impairment with available correction were 1.33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.73), 1.82% (95% CI 1.35-2.25), and 9.49% (95% CI 8.26-10.74), respectively, all higher in women. Untreated cataract and diabetic retinopathy were the major causes of blindness, accounting for 46.7% and 33.2% of total blindness cases, respectively. Glaucoma was the third major cause, accounting for 8.9% of cases. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 28.6% (95% CI 26.9-30.3) among the study population and higher in women. The prevalence of any retinopathy among diabetic patients was 48.4%. Cataract and diabetic retinopathy are the 2 major causes of blindness and visual impairment in northern Jordan. For both conditions, women are primarily affected, suggesting possible limitations to access to services. A diabetic retinopathy screening program needs to proactively create sex-sensitive awareness and provide easily accessible screening services with prompt treatment.

  15. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Have Normoalbuminuria. R Karoli, J Fatima, V Shukla, P Garg, A Ali. Abstract. Background: Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor of retinopathy, so absence of microalbuminuria may tend clinician not to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  16. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes.......To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes....

  17. Screening for diabetic retinopathy | Rice | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Good glucose control and the treatment of hypertension and hyperlipidaemia remain the key strategies in preventing diabetic retinopathy and its progression. Unfortunately, some degree of retinopathy will eventually develop in almost all type 1 diabetics and over 60% of type 2 diabetics over a 20-year period.

  18. Risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients at teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abougalambou, Salwa Selim Ibrahim; Abougalambou, Ayman S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and it is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults aged 20-74. It is estimated that about 20% of patients with type 2 DM have evidence of diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis with diabetes. To evaluate the prevalence of DR and to determine risk factors related to diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients attending endocrinology clinics at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). The study design was observational prospective longitudinal follow-up study, the study was conducted with sample of 1077 type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatient recruited via attended the diabetes clinics at HUSM. Diagnosis of retinopathy is based on finding the diagnostic signs of retinopathy on eye exams by fundoscopy. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent variables that affect the development of retinopathy. The prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3%. It has been noticed from this study findings, that the progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is highly prevalent among type 2 DM. The progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is a serious diabetic complication and public health strategies are required in order to reduce its risk factors and decrease its prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Early diagnosis of sub-clinical stage of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Hui Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the early diagnosis of sub-clinic stage of diabetic retinopathy.METHODS: This was cross sectional study,multifocal retina electroretinogram(mf-ERG, contrast sensitivity(CSand central retinal artery color Doppler examination were recorded from 30 cases(30 eyesmatched control subjects, 35 cases(35 eyeswith type 2 diabetes mellitus(DMwithout diabetic retinopathy(NDRand 38 cases(38 eyeswith non-prolifera tive diabetic retinopathy(NPDR. One-way ANOVA and SNK-q test were used for data analysis.RESULTS: P1 response density of NDR patients were found decrease, N1 implicit time were delayed. Which were related with the degree of retinopathy(PPPP>0.05, The differences between normal group, NDR group and NPDR group were found statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: mf-ERG and CS are sensitive indexes for early evaluation of visual function in patients with diabetes mellitus, with development of the disease, CRA blood flow also appears to decline.

  20. Relationship between Dyslipidemia and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus%血脂异常与2型糖尿病视网膜病变的关系探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐琳; 赵魁彦; 龚惠红; 宋民喜

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)与血脂的关系.方法:将109例2型糖尿病患者按照有无糖尿病视网膜病变分为无视网膜病变(NDR)组56例,有视网膜病变(DR)组53例,DR组进一步分为背景型糖尿病视网膜病变(BDR)组38例和增殖型糖尿病视网膜病变(PDR)组15例,检测患者甘油三酯(TG)、总胆固醇(TC)、高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL-C)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)、糖化血红蛋白(HbA1c)、空腹血糖(FPG)水平,分析各组间上述指标的变化.结果:DR组患者病程、血清TG、TC、LDL-C、HbA1c水平显著高于NDR组(P<0.05);PDR组病程、血清TG、TC、LDL-C、HbA1c水平也显著高于BDR组(P<0.05).结论:DR的发生发展与血脂异常相关,检测血脂及治疗血脂异常对防止DR的发生发展有益.%Objective:To investigate the relationship between serum lipid and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: According to retinopathy examination, 109 cases with type 2 diabetes mellitus were divided into the non-DR group(56cases) and the DR group(53 cases) , the DR group was further divided into background diabetic retinopathy(BDR) group(38 cases) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR) group(15cases). The fasting serum triglyceride(TG) , total cholesterol ( TC) , high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ( HDL-C) , low-density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C) , HbAlc and fasting plasm glucose(FPG) were measured, and observed the changes in these indexs. Results:The course of disease,TG,TC, LDL-C,HbAlc in DR group were significantly higher than those in NDR group; The course of disease, TG, TC, LDL-C, HbAlc in PDR group were also significantly higher than those in BDR group(P<0. 05). Conclusion;The development and progression of DR relate to dyslipidemia. In order to avoid development and progression of DR caused by dyslipidemia, we should detect and control serum lipid in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Role of frequency doubling technology perimetry in screening of diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh Rajul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the ability of frequency-doubling technology perimetry (FDT to detect sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Method: Fifty-eight eyes of fifty-eight patients with established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy, fifty-five eyes of fifty-five diabetic patients without retinopathy, and forty-one eyes of forty-one normals underwent FDT and dilated stereo-biomicroscopic fundus examination. The sensitivity and specificity of FDT in identification of "sight-threatening retinopathy" (severe and very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema (CSME were determined. Results: For the detection of sight-threatening retinopathy, two abnormal adjacent points depressed to any level on the 20-1 screening program had a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 97.6%. At (assuming a 10% prevalence of sight-threatening retinopathy in a diabetic clinic, two abnormal adjacent points anywhere in the field depressed to any level has a positive predictive value (PPV of 48% with a negative predictive value of 98.8%. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CSME was poor. Conclusions: The 20-1 screening program of the FDT is useful in the detection of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (PPV 48%. A normal 20-1 test rules out sight-threatening retinopathy. FDT was not useful in the detection of CSME.

  2. Low Vision Rehabilitation and Diabetic Retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sarfaraz A.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is emerging as a major cause of blindness. Diabetic retinopathy calls for a multidisciplinary to the patients. Management of the patient requires a team work by the internist, diabetologist, dietician, ophthalmologist and low vision therapist. Diabetic retinopathy very often results in vision loss. It is important for ophthalmologist to recognize the importance of low vision rehabilitation in formulating appropriate treatment strategies. People with low vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy usually experience difficulty in daily life. Most people with diabetic retinopathy (who have remaining useful vision) can be helped with low vision devices. However, often one low vision device may not be suitable for all purposes. A comprehensive low vision evaluation is required to assess the person's current visual status, identify the goals and the visual needs, and then design an individualized vision rehabilitation program to meet these needs. (author)

  3. Diabetic retinopathy in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Burn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that between 2010 and 2030 there will be a 98% increase in the number of adults in sub-Saharan Africa with diabetes.1 This is just one aspect of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases facing sub-Saharan Africa, driven by urbanisation, ageing, and changes to lifestyle and environment. The diabetes epidemic poses a significant challenge to health services, as non-communicable conditions should be managed by multi-disciplinary teams, with prevention as a primary aim.

  4. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Norimasa; Sowa, Etsuji; Fujii, Satoru; Seki, Junichi; Wada, Masahisa

    1975-01-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75 Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75 Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75 Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  5. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, N; Sowa, E; Fujii, S; Seki, J; Wada, M [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-09-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200..mu..Ci of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arterioscl-erosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions.

  6. Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in Africa: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, P I; MacCormick, I J C; Harding, S P; Bastawrous, A; Beare, N A V; Garner, P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim To summarize findings from studies reporting the prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy in African countries in light of the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Methods Using a predefined search strategy, we systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation index and Conference Proceedings Citation index, African Index Medicus and the grey literature database ‘OpenSIGLE’ for studies published between January 1990 and February 2011. Included studies reported prevalence or incidence of diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy of subjects with diabetes resident in African countries. Results Sixty-two studies from 21 countries were included: three population-based surveys; two cohort studies; five case–control studies; 32 diabetes clinic-based, nine eye clinic-based and 11 other hospital-based surveys. Included studies varied considerably in terms of patient selection, method of assessing the eye and retinopathy classification. In population-based studies, the reported prevalence range in patients with diabetes for diabetic retinopathy was 30.2 to 31.6%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0.9 to 1.3%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 4.5%. In diabetes clinic-based surveys, the reported prevalence range for diabetic retinopathy was 7.0 to 62.4%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0 to 6.9%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 31.1%. No obvious association between prevalence and income level of the country was detected. Conclusions Large, community-based cross-sectional and cohort studies are needed to investigate rates and determinants of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, incidence and progression in Africa. Consensus is needed on the most appropriate methods of identification and classification of retinopathy for research and clinical practice. Estimates of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy are comparable with recent European and American studies. PMID:22817387

  7. Levels of serum vascular endothelial growth factor in type 2 diabetics with retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parveen, N.; Rahman, S.; Khan, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ischemic retina in diabetic patients releases a number of chemical substances including vascular endothelial growth factor which leads to retinal vascular proliferation and blindness following rupture and bleeding of vessels. Strategies to control this action can considerably halt this process. Objectives: To determine the relationship of various stages of diabetic retinopathy with the levels vascular endothelial growth factor in the serum of type 2 diabetic patients. Study type, settings and duration: This cross sectional analytical study was done over one year (2010-2011) in three major public sector hospitals of Peshawar. Patients and Methods: Adult patients of either gender having type 2 diabetes mellitus with proliferative or non proliferative retinopathy and those without retinopathy were selected for the study. Retinopathy was diagnosed on fundoscopy. Non-diabetic patients without retinopathy were selected as controls. Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor were done in patients and controls using ELISA. Results: Serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly higher in all cases having retinopathy as compared to controls. These levels progressively increased with the grades of retinopathy. Levels were higher in females. Conclusions: Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are raised in diabetic retinopathy and rising levels can alert the clinician in worsening of retinopathy so that preventive and therapeutic measures can be taken promptly. Policy message: Further larger scale studies are recommended on national level to pave way for the establishment of appropriate management paradigms for diabetic retinopathy through anti-VEGF treatment. (author)

  8. Serum Lipids and Diabetic Retinopathy in Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Shermin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic retinopathy is the commonest and usually the first observable vascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Along with hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia is a contributing factor for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. It is postulated that dyslipidaemia results in formation of hard exudate by increasing blood viscosity and altering the fibrinolytic system. A case control study was carried out in the department of Biochemistry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka during the period of January 2006 to December 2007 to evaluate the serum lipid profile in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects with diabetic retinopathy. Materials and Methods: Total 85 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects were included in this study, 40 were cases having retinopathy and 45 were age and sex matched controls without retinopathy. Serum triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were compared between cases and controls. Unpaired t-test and chi-square test were done between groups as tests of significance. Results: All the parameters of lipid profile showed dyslipidaemic trend both in cases and controls. In the cases TG was significantly higher and HDL-C was significantly lower than that of controls (p < 0.05 whereas no significant difference was found between cases and controls with respect to serum TC and LDL-C. Conclusion: It can be concluded that high TG and low HDL-C are associated with diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  9. Uveitis and diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothova, A.; Meenken, C.; Michels, R. P.; Kijlstra, A.

    1988-01-01

    Of 340 patients with anterior uveitis, 20 (6%) had diabetes mellitus. This is significantly higher than the prevalence of 1.4% in the normal Dutch population (P less than .001). Of 128 patients with idiopathic anterior uveitis, 16 (12.5%) had diabetes mellitus compared to only four (1.9%) of 212

  10. Diabetic Retinopathy Grading by Digital Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hajeb Mohammad Alipour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major complications of diabetes is diabetic retinopathy. As manual analysis and diagnosis of large amount of images are time consuming, automatic detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy are desired. In this paper, we use fundus fluorescein angiography and color fundus images simultaneously, extract 6 features employing curvelet transform, and feed them to support vector machine in order to determine diabetic retinopathy severity stages. These features are area of blood vessels, area, regularity of foveal avascular zone, and the number of micro-aneurisms therein, total number of micro-aneurisms, and area of exudates. In order to extract exudates and vessels, we respectively modify curvelet coefficients of color fundus images and angiograms. The end points of extracted vessels in predefined region of interest based on optic disk are connected together to segment foveal avascular zone region. To extract micro-aneurisms from angiogram, first extracted vessels are subtracted from original image, and after removing detected background by morphological operators and enhancing bright small pixels, micro-aneurisms are detected. 70 patients were involved in this study to classify diabetic retinopathy into 3 groups, that is, (1 no diabetic retinopathy, (2 mild/moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, (3 severe nonproliferative/proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and our simulations show that the proposed system has sensitivity and specificity of 100% for grading.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy screening using deep neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Nishanthan; Hong, Sheng Chiong; Sime, Mary J; Wilson, Graham A

    2017-09-07

    There is a burgeoning interest in the use of deep neural network in diabetic retinal screening. To determine whether a deep neural network could satisfactorily detect diabetic retinopathy that requires referral to an ophthalmologist from a local diabetic retinal screening programme and an international database. Retrospective audit. Diabetic retinal photos from Otago database photographed during October 2016 (485 photos), and 1200 photos from Messidor international database. Receiver operating characteristic curve to illustrate the ability of a deep neural network to identify referable diabetic retinopathy (moderate or worse diabetic retinopathy or exudates within one disc diameter of the fovea). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity. For detecting referable diabetic retinopathy, the deep neural network had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.901 (95% confidence interval 0.807-0.995), with 84.6% sensitivity and 79.7% specificity for Otago and 0.980 (95% confidence interval 0.973-0.986), with 96.0% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity for Messidor. This study has shown that a deep neural network can detect referable diabetic retinopathy with sensitivities and specificities close to or better than 80% from both an international and a domestic (New Zealand) database. We believe that deep neural networks can be integrated into community screening once they can successfully detect both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  12. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  13. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase's latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  14. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy in the Asia-Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jacqueline; Lim, Claire Xin Ying; Wong, Tien Yin; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common complication of diabetes mellitus, is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in middle-aged and elderly in the Asia-Pacific. It has been estimated that 51% of all those with blindness due to DR globally (n = 424,400) and 56% of those with visual impairment due to DR (2.1 million) come from the Asia-Pacific. Prevalence of DR among those with diabetes ranged from 10% in India to 43% in Indonesia within the Asia-Pacific. Awareness of DR among persons with diabetes ranged from 28% to 84%. Most common modifiable risk factors for DR in the Asia-Pacific were hyperglycemia, blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and obesity. Implementation of systematic screening programs for DR and advancement in telemedicine screening methods have increased patient coverage and cost-effectiveness, though there are still numerous factors impeding screening uptake in the low-middle income regions of the Asia-Pacific. Management and treatment of DR in the Asia-Pacific is mainly limited to traditional laser retinopexy, but it is suboptimal despite new clinical approaches such as use of intravitreal anti.vascular endothelial growth factor and steroids due to limited resources. Further research and data are required to structure a more cost-effective public healthcare program and more awareness-building initiatives to increase the effectiveness of DR screening programs. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  16. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the ... control, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age of the patient, duration of diabetes .... thus, the presence of one is believed to predict the development of the other.

  17. Periodontitis is associated with diabetic retinopathy in non-obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su Jeong; Lee, Seong-Su; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Jun-Beom

    2017-04-01

    Patients with diabetes retinopathy appear to show increased susceptibility to periodontal disease. This study was performed to assess the relationship between periodontitis and the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in a large probability sample of the Korean population. A subgroup analysis was performed using body mass index diabetic retinopathy in relation to demographic variables and anthropometric characteristics of the participants is presented as means with their standard errors. The presence of periodontitis and presence of retinopathy categorized by body mass index (diabetic retinopathy after adjustment with variables, including age, sex, smoking, drinking, exercise, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, HbA1c, and duration of diabetes mellitus. There was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of periodontitis in individuals who had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy were 1.193 [0.757-1.881] for the whole population after adjustments with confounding factors. Subgroup analysis after adjustments with confounding factors showed that the odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] of prevalence were 2.206 [1.114-4.366] and 0.588 [0.326-1.061] among participants with body mass index diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with the presence of periodontitis in non-obese diabetic Korean adults after adjustment with confounding variables. Our findings suggest that when a periodontist finds the presence of periodontitis in non-obese diabetic patients, timely evaluation of the patient's ophthalmic evaluation should be 44 recommended.

  18. Detection of Glaucoma and Its Association With Diabetic Retinopathy in a Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwani, Rita A; McGhee, Sarah M; Lai, Jimmy S M; Chan, Christina K W; Wong, David

    2016-01-01

    To determine the type of glaucoma in subjects with diabetes mellitus detected during a diabetic retinopathy screening program and to determine any association between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma. This is a population-based prospective cross-sectional study, in which subjects with diabetes mellitus underwent screening for DR in a primary care outpatient clinic. Digital fundus photographs were taken and graded for presence/absence and severity of DR. During this grading, those fundus photographs showing increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) (≥0.6) were identified and these patients were referred to the specialist ophthalmology clinic for detailed examination. The presence of glaucoma was established based on CDR and abnormal visual field (VF) defects according to Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson's criteria. An elevation of intraocular pressure was not required for the diagnosis of glaucoma. The patients said to have definite glaucoma were those with vertical CDR>/=0.6, glaucomatous defects on VF examination, or retinal nerve fiber thinning if VF was unreliable. Of the 2182 subjects who underwent screening, 81 subjects (3.7%) had increased CDR and 40 subjects (1.8%) had confirmed glaucoma. Normal-tension variant of primary open-angle glaucoma was the most prevalent type (1.2%) We did not find any evidence that DR is a risk factor for glaucoma [odds ratio for DR vs. no DR=1.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-2.51)]. The overall prevalence of glaucoma in this diabetic population, based on finding increased cupping of optic disc in a teleretinal screening program was 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0).

  19. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber...... and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only...... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. The Department of Ophthalmology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, has a strong tradition of studying the retinal microvasculature in diabetic retinopathy. In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the retinal vasculature not only as predictors of long...

  20. Automated early detection of diabetic retinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abràmoff, M.D.; Reinhardt, J.M.; Russell, S.R.; Folk, J.C.; Mahajan, V.B.; Niemeijer, M.; Quellec, G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of automated diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection, using the algorithm that won the 2009 Retinopathy Online Challenge Competition in 2009, the Challenge2009, against that of the one currently used in EyeCheck, a large computer-aided early DR detection project.

  1. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its relationship with glomerular filtration rate and other risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain. DM2 HOPE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Maribel; Cos, Francesc Xavier; Álvarez-Guisasola, Fernando; Fuster, Eva

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working age population in developed countries. Albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been considered biomarkers for DR. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of DR and its relationship with eGFR and other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM) in Spain. A cross-sectional and descriptive study has been performed in 14,266 patients. Clinical records were reviewed. Demographic data, clinical diagnoses, clinical variables, and results from laboratory tests were recorded. Prevalence rates of DR were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was applied to assess predictors of the DR presence/absence. DR prevalence was 14.9%, being more prevalent in women (p = 0.0087) and in older patients (p < 0.0001). Duration of disease (OR = 5.3, IC95% = 3.8-7.4; p < 0.0001), eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (OR = 2.0, IC95% 1.6-2.4; p < 0.0001), levels of HbA1c ≥ 7% (OR = 1.9, IC95% = 1.5-2.3; p < 0.0001) and high blood pressure (OR = 1.6, IC95% = 1.2-2.1; p = 0.0032) were associated with higher risk of DR. DR was also more frequent in patients taking insulin (32,6% vs. 10,2%; p < 0.0001). Around one in seven patients with T2DM has DR after nine years since diagnosis. Time since diagnosis, insulin therapy, cardiovascular profile, and renal dysfunction are associated with DR in patients with T2DM in Spain.

  2. The Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Workflow: Potential for Smartphone Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Nigel M; Giardini, Mario E; Bastawrous, Andrew

    2015-11-23

    Complications of diabetes mellitus, namely diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy, are the leading cause of blindness in working aged people. Sufferers can avoid blindness if identified early via retinal imaging. Systematic screening of the diabetic population has been shown to greatly reduce the prevalence and incidence of blindness within the population. Many national screening programs have digital fundus photography as their basis. In the past 5 years several techniques and adapters have been developed that allow digital fundus photography to be performed using smartphones. We review recent progress in smartphone-based fundus imaging and discuss its potential for integration into national systematic diabetic retinopathy screening programs. Some systems have produced promising initial results with respect to their agreement with reference standards. However further multisite trialling of such systems' use within implementable screening workflows is required if an evidence base strong enough to affect policy change is to be established. If this were to occur national diabetic retinopathy screening would, for the first time, become possible in low- and middle-income settings where cost and availability of trained eye care personnel are currently key barriers to implementation. As diabetes prevalence and incidence is increasing sharply in these settings, the impact on global blindness could be profound. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  3. barriers to an effective diabetic retinopathy service in ibadan, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like UK and USA,6,7 barriers identified include fear of ... blindness as well as the cost of attending clinic. Diabetic retinopathy .... cost of treatment for diabetic retinopathy - laser treatment ..... harness compliance to diabetic care, treatment and.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  5. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğrul, Armağan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health problem. Its prevalence is 1.5-2 times higher in diabetic population than that in non-diabetic individuals. Its pathogenesis depends on diabetic nephropathy in type 1, whereas may be multifactorial in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In diabetics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are most widely preferred in the treatment of hypertension because of their numerous desirable effects. In this article, the most recent data are presented on the relationshi...

  6. Predicted impact of extending the screening interval for diabetic retinopathy: the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, H C; Nyangoma, S O; Cromie, D T; Olson, J A; Leese, G P; Philip, S; Black, M W; Doig, J; Lee, N; Briggs, A; Hothersall, E J; Morris, A D; Lindsay, R S; McKnight, J A; Pearson, D W M; Sattar, N A; Wild, S H; McKeigue, P; Colhoun, H M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to identify subgroups of patients attending the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening (DRS) programme who might safely move from annual to two yearly retinopathy screening. This was a retrospective cohort study of screening data from the DRS programme collected between 2005 and 2011 for people aged ≥12 years with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Scotland. We used hidden Markov models to calculate the probabilities of transitions to referable diabetic retinopathy (referable background or proliferative retinopathy) or referable maculopathy. The study included 155,114 individuals with no referable diabetic retinopathy or maculopathy at their first DRS examination and with one or more further DRS examinations. There were 11,275 incident cases of referable diabetic eye disease (9,204 referable maculopathy, 2,071 referable background or proliferative retinopathy). The observed transitions to referable background or proliferative retinopathy were lower for people with no visible retinopathy vs mild background retinopathy at their prior examination (respectively, 1.2% vs 8.1% for type 1 diabetes and 0.6% vs 5.1% for type 2 diabetes). The lowest probability for transitioning to referable background or proliferative retinopathy was among people with two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy, where the probability was <0.3% for type 1 and <0.2% for type 2 diabetes at 2 years. Transition rates to referable diabetic eye disease were lowest among people with type 2 diabetes and two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy. If such people had been offered two yearly screening the DRS service would have needed to screen 40% fewer people in 2009.

  7. Optical coherence tomography angiography discerns preclinical diabetic retinopathy in eyes of patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan; Yang, Dawei; Huang, Zhongning; Zeng, Yunkao; Wang, Jun; Hu, Yunyan; Zhang, Liang

    2018-05-01

    To investigate changes in retinal vascular plexuses and choriocapillaris in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) without diabetic retinopathy (DR) and healthy controls using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). A total of 71 DM2 and 67 healthy control subjects were included. All subjects underwent OCTA examination (RTVue-XR Avanti; Optovue, Fremont, CA, USA). Average vessel density in superficial capillary plexus (SCP), deep capillary plexus (DCP) and choriocapillaris, parafoveal vessel density in SCP and DCP, FAZ area (mm 2 ) in SCP, microaneurysms and capillary nonperfusion were taken into analysis. Parafoveal vessel density in both SCP and DCP decreased in the eyes without clinical DR compared to normal controls (p Diabetic patients with no signs of DR also had a significant reduction in average vessel density of SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris (p diabetic eyes, and capillary nonperfusion was noted in 18 of 71 diabetic eyes. We demonstrated that OCTA can identify preclinical DR before the manifestation of clinically apparent retinopathy in diabetic eyes. DM2 patients without DR have SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris impairment. Our results suggested that OCTA might be a promising tool for regular screening of diabetic eyes for DR.

  8. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progressi...

  9. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. RENOPROTECTION IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes mellitus (DM) (Table I).1 In response to the increasing threat ... formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); generation of advanced glycation ... There is sufficient evidence that certain therapies protect the kidneys from the long-term ...

  11. The Adenosinergic System in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vindeirinho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative and inflammatory environment that is prevalent in the diabetic eye is a key player in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The adenosinergic system is widely regarded as a significant modulator of neurotransmission and the inflammatory response, through the actions of the four types of adenosine receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R, and thus could be revealed as a potential player in the events unfolding in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we review the studies that explore the impact of diabetic conditions on the retinal adenosinergic system, as well as the role of the said system in ameliorating or exacerbating those conditions. The experimental results described suggest that this system is heavily affected by diabetic conditions and that the modulation of its components could reveal potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, particularly in the early stages of the disease.

  12. Frecuencia y características clínicas de la retinopatía diabética en un grupo de personas con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 de diagnóstico reciente Frequency and clinical characteristics of diabetic retinopathy in a group of persons recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Licea Puig

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años se le ha dedicado mayor atención a la presencia de complicaciones microangiopáticas en las personas con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM 2, y la retinopatía diabética (RD no es una excepción. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar la frecuencia y las características clínicas de la RD en un grupo de personas con DM 2 de diagnóstico reciente. Se estudiaron 110 pacientes (£ 6 meses con anticuerpos antiislotes pancreáticos (ICA y anti-descarboxilasa del ácido glutámico (AGAD negativos, atendidos consecutivamente en el Centro de Atención al Diabético (CAD, del Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología (INEN, y las variables utilizadas fueron: edad, sexo, hábito de fumar, índice de masa corporal (IMC, edad de debut de la DM 2, presencia de RD y de nefropatía diabética incipiente (NDI, así como la presión arterial. Se determinó ICA, AGAD, hemoglobina glucosilada (HbA1, glucemia en ayunas y posprandial 2 horas después del desayuno y 2 horas después del almuerzo y excreción urinaria de albúmina (EUA en orina de 24 horas. No se incluyó a pacientes con ND diabética clínica (EUA ³ 300 mg/L, ni con otras causas o condiciones de aumento de EUA. Se dividieron en 2 grupos atendiendo a la presencia o no de RD, así como a su severidad y fueron utilizados los criterios propuestos por L'Esperance. El 7 % de la totalidad de la serie presentó algún tipo de RD (7 no proliferativas y 1 proliferativa. La presión arterial sistólica fue de 127,84 ± 19,43 mmHg en aquellos sin RD y de 140 ± 15,27 mmHg , en los que presentaron RDNP (p 20 a In the last few years, great attention has been paid to microangiopathic complications occurred in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and diabetic retinopathy is not the exception. The objective of this paper is to determine the frequency and the clinical characteristics of diabetic retinopathy in a group of persons recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. One hundred ten

  13. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübsam, Anne; Parikh, Sonia; Fort, Patrice E.

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:29565290

  14. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rübsam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy.

  15. Fundus fluorescence Angiography in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuhui; Zuo, Yuqin; Wang, Ning; Tong, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the manifestation characteristics of fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and its values in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy through comparing direct ophthalmoscopy. Two hundred fifty patients (500 eyes) who were suspected as diabetic retinopathy and admitted to the hospital between February 2015 and December 2016 were selected. They underwent direct ophthalmoscopy and FFA. The manifestation characteristics of FFA in the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy were summarized. The two examination methods were compared. In the diagnosis with direct ophthalmoscopy, 375 eyes out of 500 eyes were diagnosed as diabetic retinopathy (75%); there were 74 eyes at stage I, 88 eyes at stage II, 92 eyes at stage III, 83 eyes of stage IV, 28 eyes of stage V and 10 eyes of stage VI. In the diagnosis with FFA, 465 eyes out of 500 eyes were diagnosed as diabetic retinopathy (93%); there were 94 eyes at stage I, 110 eyes at stage II, 112 at stage III, 92 eyes at stage IV, 41 eyes at stage V and 16 eyes at stage VI. The detection rate of diabetic retinopathy using FFA was significantly higher than that using direct ophthalmoscopy (Pretinopathy (67.96%), 75 eyes had pre-proliferative lesions (16.13%), 149 eyes had proliferative lesions (32.04%), 135 eyes had diabetic maculopathy (29.03%) and 31 eyes had diabetic optic disc lesions (6.67%). The detection rate of diabetic retinopathy using FFA is higher than that using direct ophthalmoscopy. FFA could accurately determine clinical stage. Therefore, it is an important approach in treatment efficacy evaluation and treatment guidance, suggesting a significant application value.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-related single nucleotide polymorphisms rs10738760 and rs6921438 are not associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR in Slovenian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifet Terzić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a complication of diabetes characterized by vascular permeability, increased tissue ischemia, and angiogenesis. One of the most important proteins involved in angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, also known as VEGFA. A previous study demonstrated that two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs6921438 and rs10738760, account for nearly half the variation in circulating VEGF levels. The aim of our study was to assess the association between rs6921438 and rs10738760 and DR in Slovenian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. This case-control study enrolled 1037 unrelated Slovenian individuals (Caucasians with T2DM. DR group included 415 T2DM patients with DR, while control group included 622 T2DM patients with no clinical signs of DR. The clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. The genotyping of rs6921438 and rs10738760 SNPs was carried out with real-time PCR assays. Significant differences were observed between patients with DR and controls in the duration of diabetes (p < 0.001, insulin therapy (p < 0.001, glycated hemoglobin (p = 0.001, body mass index (p = 0.002, total cholesterol (p = 0.002, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.001. However, we did not observe significant differences in the genotype and allele distribution of the two SNPs, between DR and control group (p < 0.05. Logistic regression analysis showed that rs6921438 and rs10738760 were not independent genetic risk factors for DR in the co-dominant model adjusted for the above-mentioned clinical and laboratory data. In conclusion, VEGF-related SNPs rs10738760 and rs6921438 are not associated with DR in our group of Slovenian patients (Caucasians with T2DM.

  17. DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AND THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYED ALWI SAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is associated with increased risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Although pregnancy does not have any long term effect on DR, progression of retinopathy changes occur in 50%-70% of cases. The greatest risk of worsening occurs during the second trimester and persists as long as 12 months postpartum. The other factors found to be associated with its progression include duration of the diabetes, severity of retinopathy at conception, hyperglycaemic control, anaemia and progression of coexisting hypertension. Because of the increased risk of progression of the disease inpregnancy, conception should be delayed till the ocular disease is treated and stabilized and laser photocoagulation should be promptly instituted in all cases of severe non-proliferative retinopathy and should not be delayed till the patient develops early proliferative changes. Good diabetic control before and during pregnancy can help prevent this increase in the progression and serious vision loss.

  18. Biochemical changes in diabetic retinopathy triggered by hyperglycaemia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solani D. Mathebula

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is now a global health problem which will lead to increasing incidence of macrovascular and microvascular complications that contribute to morbidity, mortality and premature deaths. Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a serious complication of DM, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. Diabetes mellitus is one of the fastest growing causes of visual impairment and blindness in the working-age population. Aim: The aim of this paper was to introduce the multiple interconnecting biochemical pathways that have been proposed and tested as key contributors in how the diabetic eye loses vision. Method: An extensive literature search was performed using the Medline database from 1970 to present. The search subjects included diabetes and eye, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic complications in the eye. The search was limited to the literature pertaining to humans and to English language. Preference was given to recent published papers. Results: Results were limited to human participants with publications in English. References of all included papers were also scrutinized to identify additional studies. Studies were selected for inclusion in the review if they met the following criteria: subjects with diabetes, pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion: Although the biochemical pathways involved in DR have been researched, to date the exact mechanism involved in the onset and progression of the disease is uncertain, which makes therapeutic interventions challenging. The aim of this review is to discuss the possible biochemical pathways and clinical and anatomical changes that occur during the onset and progression of DR that link hyperglycaemia with retinal tissue damage. An understanding of the biochemical and molecular changes may lead to health care practitioners advising patients with DR on events that lead to possible complications of the diseases.

  19. Delay in diabetic retinopathy screening increases the rate of detection of referable diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, P H; Aldington, S J; Stratton, I M

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether there is a relationship between delay in retinopathy screening after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and level of retinopathy detected. Patients were referred from 88 primary care practices to an English National Health Service diabetic eye screening programme. Data for screened patients were extracted from the primary care databases using semi-automated data collection algorithms supplemented by validation processes. The programme uses two-field mydriatic digital photographs graded by a quality assured team. Data were available for 8183 screened patients with diabetes newly diagnosed in 2005, 2006 or 2007. Only 163 with type 1 diabetes were identified and were insufficient for analysis. Data were available for 8020 with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Of these, 3569 were screened within 6 months, 2361 between 6 and 11 months, 1058 between 12 and 17 months, 366 between 18 and 23 months, 428 between 24 and 35 months, and 238 at 3 years or more after diagnosis. There were 5416 (67.5%) graded with no retinopathy, 1629 (20.3%) with background retinopathy in one eye, 753 (9.4%) with background retinopathy in both eyes and 222 (2.8%) had referable diabetic retinopathy. There was a significant trend (P = 0.0004) relating time from diagnosis to screening detecting worsening retinopathy. Of those screened within 6 months of diagnosis, 2.3% had referable retinopathy and, 3 years or more after diagnosis, 4.2% had referable retinopathy. The rate of detection of referable diabetic retinopathy is elevated in those who were not screened promptly after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus : prevention of macrovascular complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwisse-Pasterkamp, Susanne H; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that affects a rapidly increasing number of patients. Most patients with Type 2 diabetes will develop vascular complications. This may be microvascular disease, such as nephropathy, retinopathy or polyneuropathy, and also macrovascular disease, such as coronary

  1. Microvascular retinopathy in subjects without diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Kessel, Line; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:  Retinal vascular lesions such as microaneurysms and haemorrhages, while typical of diabetic retinopathy, are also seen in subjects without diabetes where they are associated with elevated cardiovascular mortality. In theory, these lesions could be a consequence of past hyperglycaemia. We...... examined the prevalence and risk factors for retinopathy, including lens fluorescence, a biomarker of cumulative life-time glycaemia in adults without diabetes. Methods:  Cross-sectional population-based study of 711 subjects without diabetes (WHO 1999 criteria) aged 30-60 years, including oral glucose...... tolerance testing, clinical and laboratory examinations, non-invasive ocular lens fluorometry and seven-field fundus photography. Results:  Retinopathy was present in 8.3% (CI(95) 6.3-10.3%) of subjects. Higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p = 0.032), increasing body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.014) and wider...

  2. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  3. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  4. Vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Peng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical effect of vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS: The clinical data of 55 cases(65 eyes, underwent vitrectomy, membrane peeling, endolaser photocoagulation and silicone oil or C3F8 injection, were retrospectively studied. During 6 months to 1 year follow-up period, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, retinal conditions and complications were observed.RESULTS: All 65 eyes received vitrectomy, of which silicone oil was tamponaded in 32 eyes, C3F8 was injected in 8 eyes, BBS was filled in 25 eyes. Visual improvement achieved in 42 eyes. Two eyes were manually vision, form count fingers to 0.05 in 18 eyes, >0.05-0.1 in 28 eyes, >0.1-0.3 in 12 eyes and >0.3 in 5 eyes. Retinal hole was occurred in 7 eyes, limitations fibrosis membrane remained in 8 eyes, retinal detachment appeared in 5 eyes, IOP increased in 18 eyes, vitreous hemorrhage relapsed in 12 eyes, 36 eyes received supplemental photocoagulation treatment 1-3 times after operation.CONCLUSION:Vitrectomy combined endophotocoagulation is an effective treatment for PDR. Silicone oil tamponade can limit the hemorrhage.

  5. VISUAL OUTCOME FOLLOWING PANRETINAL PHOTOCOAGULATION IN PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellaye Mani Sindhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus can be called as a noninfectious pandemic and the incidence of diabetic retinopathy is also uncontrollable. This vision-threatening complication can be treated by early diagnosis and effective treatment like panretinal photocoagulation. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of panretinal photocoagulation on visual acuity, colour vision, contrast sensitivity and severity of visual field changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective study of visual outcome following panretinal photocoagulation in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy conducted in Retina Clinic, RIO, Trivandrum, during the time period one year from April 2008. Inclusion Criteria- Eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, visual acuity better than or equal to 6/60, a follow up of at least 6 months after panretinal photocoagulation. Exclusion Criteria- Eyes with cataractous changes in the lens, eyes, which would be undergoing or have undergone focal photocoagulation eyes, which undergone barrage or sectoral retinal photocoagulation, patients with colour blindness, eyes with vitreous haemorrhage and macular preretinal haemorrhage, glaucomatous patients with peripheral field loss. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 52 years. Male patients (30 outnumbered the female patients (23. Mean duration of diabetes was 14.42 years. Though, there is a statistically significant reduction in visual acuity in the first followup, which was improved and stabilised by 6 months. There is a statistically significant reduction in the contrast sensitivity, which was stabilised after 3 months. Only, 9.5% patients had peripheral constrictions of visual field and no significant change in the colour vision. CONCLUSION We recommend panretinal photocoagulation for all patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Causes of visual disability among Central Africans with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvitu Muaka, M; Longo-Mbenza, B

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) remains a common and one of the major causes of blindness in the developed and western societies. The same situation is shown in emerging economic areas (5,6). In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) however, the issues of visual disability due to diabetes mellitus (DM) are overshadowed by the presence of the prevalent and common nutritional deficiency diseases and eye infections This clinic-based study was conducted to determine whether diabetic retinopathy is independently related to visual disability in black patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) from Kinshasa, Congo. A total of 299 urban patients with DM and low income including 108 cases of visual disability and matched for time admission and DM type to 191 controls, were assessed. Demographic, clinical, and ophthalmic data were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Age ≥60 years, female sex, presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), proliferative DR, shorter DM duration, glaucoma, macular oedema, diabetic nephropathy were the univariate risk factors of visual disability. Using logistic regression model, visual disability was significantly associated with female sex and diabetic retinopathy. The risk of visual disability is 4 times higher in patients with diabetic retinopathy and 2 times higher in females with DM. Therefore, to prevent further increase of visual disability, the Congolese Ministry of Health should prioritize the eye care in patients with DM.

  7. Multicolor Scanning Laser Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad S Z; Carrim, Zia Iqbal

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of blindness in individuals younger than 60 years. Screening for retinopathy is undertaken using conventional color fundus photography and relies on the identification of hemorrhages, vascular abnormalities, exudates, and cotton-wool spots. These can sometimes be difficult to identify. Multicolor scanning laser imaging, a new imaging modality, may have a role in improving screening outcomes, as well as facilitating treatment decisions. Observational case series comprising two patients with known diabetes who were referred for further examination after color fundus photography revealed abnormal findings. Multicolor scanning laser imaging was undertaken. Features of retinal disease from each modality were compared. Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior visualization of retinal anatomy and pathology, thereby facilitating risk stratification and treatment decisions. Multicolor scanning laser imaging is a novel imaging technique offering the potential for improving the reliability of screening for diabetic retinopathy. Validation studies are warranted.

  8. Progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2010-01-01

    We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes.......We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes....

  9. Pregnancy-induced sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in women with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestgaard, Marianne; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Laugesen, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the progression of diabetic retinopathy in pregnant women with diabetes offered tight glycaemic and blood pressure control.......To determine the progression of diabetic retinopathy in pregnant women with diabetes offered tight glycaemic and blood pressure control....

  10. Correlation between Retinopathy and Vibration Perception Threshold in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus%2型糖尿病视网膜病变与震动感觉阈值的相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊春霖

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨2型糖尿病视网膜病变与震动感觉阈值的相关性。方法将135例2型糖尿病患者按眼科检查结果分为糖尿病背景期视网膜病变组(BDR,n =45)、增殖期视网膜病变组(PDR,n =45)以及无视网膜病变组(NDR,n=45),3组均采用震动感觉阈值检测仪检测周围神经的震动感觉阈值(VPT),采用眼震电图描记法检测前庭功能及动眼系统功能损害情况,对比分析3组生化指标、VPT 检测结果、前庭功能损害及动眼系统功能损害发生率。结果FINS、2 h INS、TC、TG、HDL-C 以及 LDL-C 3组间比较差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),BDP 组与PDR 组周围神经 VPT 均高于 NDP 组(P <0.05),且 PDR 组周围神经 VPT 均显著高于 BDP 组(P <0.05),BDP组与 PDR 组患者前庭功能损害发生率以及动眼系统功能损害发生率均高于 NDP 组(P <0.05),且 PDR 组上述VPT 均显著高于 BDP 组(P <0.05)。结论2型糖尿病视网膜病变与震动感觉阈值具有相关性,可作为2型糖尿病视网膜病变的重要筛查指标。%Objective To investigate the correlation between retinopathy and vibration percep-tion threshold(VPT)in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM).Methods According to the results of ophthalmologic examination,135 T2DM patients were divided into three groups:background diabetic retinopathy(BDR,n=45)group,proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR,n=45)group,and non-diabetic retinopathy(PDR,n=45)group.The vibration threshold of peripher-al nerve was measured using VPT.The ocular motion threshold was detected using electronystag-mography.The biochemical indexes,VPT test results,vestibular dysfunction and oculomotor function damage were compared among the three groups.Results There were no significant differences in the levels of fasting insulin,2-hour postprandial insulin,total cholesterol,triglycer-ides,high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and

  11. Diabetes mellitus and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Polychronis, Sotirios; Wilson, Heather; Giordano, Beniamino; Ferrara, Nicola; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2018-05-08

    To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is associated with Parkinson-like pathology in people without Parkinson disease and to evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus on markers of Parkinson pathology and clinical progression in drug-naive patients with early-stage Parkinson disease. We compared 25 patients with Parkinson disease and diabetes mellitus to 25 without diabetes mellitus, and 14 patients with diabetes mellitus and no Parkinson disease to 14 healthy controls (people with no diabetes mellitus or Parkinson disease). The clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was confirmed by 2 consecutive fasting measurements of serum glucose levels >126 mL/dL. Over a 36-month follow-up period, we then investigated in the population with Parkinson disease whether the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with faster motor progression or cognitive decline. The presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with higher motor scores ( p Parkinson disease. In patients with diabetes but without Parkinson disease, the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with lower striatal dopamine transporter binding ( p Parkinson disease, the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with faster motor progression (hazard ratio = 4.521, 95% confidence interval = 1.468-13.926; p Parkinson-like pathology, and when present in patients with Parkinson disease, can induce a more aggressive phenotype. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Epidemiology of diabetes mellitus in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackard, W G; Omori, Yoshiaki; Freedman, L R

    1964-03-12

    The clinical and epidemiological features of diabetes mellitus in Japan have been compiled and compared with data from other countries. Diabetes is basically the same in Japan as elsewhere: however, consideration of important differences has led to the following conclusions: The rarity of ketoacidosis in Japan is due to the mild carbohydrate defect present in most diabetics. The mild carbohydrate intolerance in diabetics is probably in part due to a high carbohydrate intake. Diabetic retinopathy is more common in women than in men in Japan; there are limited and conflicting data from the West on this point, but retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy occur about as frequently in Japan as in the West. Because of marked dietary differences between Japan and Western countries, these findings suggest that dietary fat has no significance in the pathogenesis of these lesions. Peripheral gangrene is distinctly unusual in Japanese diabetics. This suggests that either: the responsible vascular lesions are different from those responsible for nephropathy and retinopathy; or that small vessel lesions are the same but the lack of large vessel atherosclerosis in the population accounts for the decreased incidence of gangrene. Men have diabetes 2 or 3 times as commonly as women in Japan. If sex-limited inheritance is discarded as a possible reason, it is likely that adult-onset diabetes is more common in men than women except in those countries (the West) where women gain relatively large amounts of weight. The rarity of juvenile diabetes in Japan is best explained by the infrequency of responsible genetic factors. As a consequence, it is likely that juvenile diabetes is caused by different or additional genetic factors which are not significant in adult-onset diabetes. Diabetes prevalance varies sufficiently between different localities in the same country to render the concept of national prevalance of doubtful usefulness. 55 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Clinical Observation on Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus(Hypertension : Pathophysiology and Treatment)

    OpenAIRE

    奈良, 芳則; 尾崎, 信紘; 山田, 彬; 浜, 斉; 谷, 長行; Nara, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Nobuhiro; Yamada, Akira; Hama, Hitoshi; Tani, Nagayuki

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension is approximately twice as common in patients with diabetes mellitus as it is in those without. Both hypertension and diabetes mellitus are major risk factors for arteriosclerotic diseases (cerebral infarction, cardiovascular disease etw). A positive correlation exists between the presence of hypertension and retinopathy or nephropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus. This article provides practical approach in the management of hypertension with diabetes melli...

  14. Quality assurance for diabetic retinopathy telescreening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Aldington, S J; Kohner, E M; Luzio, S; Owens, D R; Schmidt, V; Schuell, H; Zahlmann, G

    2005-06-01

    TOSCA was an EU-Commission supported international research project designed to develop telescreening services in diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper describes the quality assurance methods developed for the diabetic retinopathy telescreening service within the TOSCA project. The study was performed in 1895 patients with diabetes between 2000 and 2002 at diabetic retinopathy screening sites in five European countries. Data were analysed centrally. Patients attending each clinic's diabetic retinopathy screening service received standardized retinal photography. The images and associated data were transferred electronically to a remote location for grading. Each photographer uploading images and each grader downloading images for assessment was controlled by a systematic quality management approach. The quality assurance measures defined were image quality, intragrader reliability. A cockpit chart was developed for the management and presentation of relevant results and quality measures. For the intragrader reliability tests, 10% of the images were processed for a second grading. An algorithm for calculating differences between repeated gradings was developed. The assessment of image quality for the different sites showed that only 0-0.7% were unassessable. One hundred per cent agreement for both gradings was achieved in 50-85% of graded cases, depending on site and grader, and an agreement better than 95% in 71-100% of cases. A telemedicine-supported quality assurance process is practical and advantageous. The cockpit charts have proven to be useful tools when monitoring the performance of a telescreening service. Grader feedback showed high satisfaction with the quality assurance process.

  15. [Diabetic retinopathy: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) develops in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the major cause of vision loss and blindness in the working population. The main risk factor of DR is hyperglycemia accompanied by enhanced mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and hexosamines, increase in polyol metabolism of glucose. The severity of vascular injury depends on the individual genetic background and is modified by other epigenetic, metabolic and haemodynamic factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. In diabetes, damage to the retina occurs in the vasculature (endothelial cells and pericytes), neurons and glia, pigment epithelial cells and infiltrating immunocompetent cells: monocytes, granulocytes, lymfocytes. These activated cells change the production pattern of a number of mediators such as growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, vasoactive molecules, coagulation factors and adhesion molecules resulting in increased blood flow, increased capillary permeability, proliferation of extracellular matrix and thickening of basal membranes, altered cell turnover (apoptosis, proliferation, hypertrophy), procoagulant and proaggregant pattern, and finally in angiogenesis and tissue remodelling. Brain, liver, adipose tissue, GUT, skeletal muscle and other tissues could be another source of mediators. Therapeutic approaches used for patients with or at risk for diabetic retinopathy include drug therapy to reduce modifiable risk factors, laser photocoagulation, intravitreous administration of anti-VEGF agents/steroids and intraocular surgery. Screening plays an important role in early detection and intervention to prevent the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Described insights into pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for DR, could help in the development of more targeted approach for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy. anti

  16. The Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy and Its Relationship with Microalbuminuria in Type2 Diabetic Patients at Diabetes Center of Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eslami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in western developed countries and developing countries, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide. One of the vascular complications of diabetes is diabetic retinopathy. Given the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its complications in patients with type 2 diabetes, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of retinopathy in diabetic patients and to determine the relationship between microalbuminuria and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study in which 284 medical records of patients referred to the Diabetes Center of Hamadan were studied whose eye examinations were recorded and their laboratory tests have been measured at a laboratory center. Then, the data obtained from the average of experiments during the last year and examinations carried out were entered in the check list and the statistical results of the data were analyzed and the relationship between microalbuminuria and retinopathy was evaluated. Results: In our study, 284 patients were studied. 154 (54.22% of the patients in our study had retinopathy. In persons who had retinopathy, 36.36% of patients were with mild NPDR, 27.92% with moderate NPDR, 7.79% with severe NPDR and 27.92% had PDR. In our study, 32.04% of patients had microalbuminuria, and of these, 80.21% also had retinopathy. There was a significant relationship between retinopathy and microalbuminuria. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the prevalence of retinopathy in our study is about 54 percent, which is relatively a higher prevalence than that in other similar studies. Also, due to the strong correlation between the presence of microalbuminuria and retinopathy and also duration of diabetes, a closer look at diabetic patients for microalbuminuria in periodic eye examinations is recommended. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci . 2016

  17. Alteration of melatonin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy

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    Hikichi T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Taiichi Hikichi1, Naohiro Tateda2, Toshiaki Miura31Department of Ophthalmology, Ohtsuka Eye Hospital, Sapporo; 2Asahikawa National College of Technology, Asahikawa; 3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of plasma melatonin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy.Methods: Plasma melatonin levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in 56 patients. Patients were divided into a diabetic group (30 patients and a nondiabetic group (26 patients. The diabetic group was divided further into a proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR group (n = 14 and a nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group (n = 16. Plasma melatonin levels obtained at midnight and 3 am were compared between the groups.Results: Nighttime melatonin levels were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (P < 0.03 and lower in the PDR group than in the nondiabetic and NPDR groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.03, respectively, but no significant difference was found between the nondiabetic and NPDR groups. The daytime melatonin level did not significantly differ between the nondiabetic and diabetic groups or between the nondiabetic, NPDR, and PDR groups.Conclusion: The nighttime melatonin level is altered in patients with diabetes and PDR but not in diabetic patients without PDR. Although patients with PDR may have various dysfunctions that affect melatonin secretion more severely, advanced dysfunction of retinal light perception may cause altered melatonin secretion. Alteration of melatonin secretion may accelerate further occurrence of complications in diabetic patients.Keywords: circadian rhythm, diabetes, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, melatonin

  18. Update on the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Wilkinson-Berka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy is the most feared complication of diabetes, compromising quality of life in most sufferers. Almost all patients with type 1 diabetes will develop retinopathy over a 15- to 20-year period, and approximately 20–30% will advance to the blinding stage of the disease[1]. Greater than 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes will have retinopathy. This situation is highlighted by the frightening statistic that diabetic retinopathy (DR remains the most common cause of vision impairment in people of working age in Western society. With the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, this predicament is set to worsen as over 360 million people are projected to suffer from diabetes and its complications by 2030. Vision loss from diabetes is due to a number of factors, including haemorrhage from new and poorly formed blood vessels, retinal detachment due to contraction of deposited fibrous tissue, and neovascular glaucoma resulting in an increase in intraocular pressure. Diabetic macular oedema is now the principal cause of vision loss in diabetes and involves leakage from a disrupted blood-retinal barrier. In terms of treatment, there is clear evidence that strict metabolic and blood pressure control can lower the risk of developing DR and reduce disease progression. Laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy are effective in preventing severe vision loss in DR, particularly in the most advanced stages of the disease. However, both procedures have limitations. This review examines evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that shows that targeting inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids, protein kinase C, growth hormone, and advanced glycation end-products are potential treatments for DR.

  19. History of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Awad M

    2002-04-01

    Clinical features similar to diabetes mellitus were described 3000 years ago by the ancient Egyptians. The term "diabetes" was first coined by Araetus of Cappodocia (81-133AD). Later, the word mellitus (honey sweet) was added by Thomas Willis (Britain) in 1675 after rediscovering the sweetness of urine and blood of patients (first noticed by the ancient Indians). It was only in 1776 that Dobson (Britain) firstly confirmed the presence of excess sugar in urine and blood as a cause of their sweetness. In modern time, the history of diabetes coincided with the emergence of experimental medicine. An important milestone in the history of diabetes is the establishment of the role of the liver in glycogenesis, and the concept that diabetes is due to excess glucose production Claude Bernard (France) in 1857. The role of the pancreas in pathogenesis of diabetes was discovered by Mering and Minkowski (Austria) 1889. Later, this discovery constituted the basis of insulin isolation and clinical use by Banting and Best (Canada) in 1921. Trials to prepare an orally administrated hypoglycemic agent ended successfully by first marketing of tolbutamide and carbutamide in 1955. This report will also discuss the history of dietary management and acute and chronic complications of diabetes.

  20. Proteomic analysis of plasma proteins in diabetic retinopathy patients by two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-Tof-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Vidhya; Purushothaman, Parthiban; Bhaskar, Anusha

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a highly specific vascular complication of diabetes mellitus and progresses from mild non-proliferative abnormalities characterized by increased vascular permeability to moderate and severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy characterized by the growth of blood vessels on the retina. The aim of the study was to identify the differentially expressed proteins in diabetic retinopathy using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Blood sample was drawn from subjects with diabetes mellitus (without retinopathy) who served as controls and patients with diabetic retinopathy in tubes containing EDTA as anticoagulant. Albumin and immunoglobulin IgG collectively removed to enrich proteins of lower abundance. 2de was carried out to see if there are any differentially expressed proteins. Approximately 48 and 61 spots were identified in control and diabetic retinopathy respectively, of which three protein spots RBP1 (retinol-binding protein 1), NUD10 (Diphosphoinositol polyphosphohydrolase 3 alpha), NGB (neuroglobin) were down regulated and HBG2 (hemoglobin) and BY55 (CD 160 antigen) were upregulated in diabetic retinopathy. These five protein spots were excised and were subjected to in-gel tryptic digestion, and their identities were determined by ultraflex MALDI-TOF-MS. We report a comprehensive patient-based plasma proteomic approach to the identification of potential biomarkers for diabetic retinopathy screening and detection. We identified 5 different proteins that were differentially expressed in the plasma of control diabetic patients (without retinopathy). Among these five proteins the expression of neuroglobin (NGB) protein varied significantly and may be a potential biomarker in diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. Alhomida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.

  2. EVALUATION OF DRY EYES IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND According to the National Eye Institute, dry eye is a condition in which the eye does not produce tears properly. It can also involve tears not having the right consistency or evaporating too quickly. Tears are necessary to help maintain moisture on the surface of the eye and for clear vision. Diabetes is often associated with several significant ocular conditions such as retinopathy, refractive changes, cataracts, glaucoma and macular oedema. However, one of the most common ocular complications associated with diabetes is dry eye. The aim of the study is to study the prevalence of dry eyes in diabetes mellitus and to evaluate ocular and other risk factors relevant to diabetic dry eyes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based cross-sectional clinical study of 100 diabetic patients who presented to the Department of Ophthalmology, Santosh Medical College and Hospital, Ghaziabad, between January 2016 to June 2017 was conducted. Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of anterior segment via slit-lamp biomicroscopy was done. The examinations for dry eyes included Schirmer's test, tear breakup time, fluorescein and rose Bengal staining. RESULTS Sixty two (62% diabetic patients had dry eye. The prevalence in type I was 3% and prevalence in type II was 59%. Dry eye prevalence was maximum in those above 40 years of age. Symptoms like reduced corneal sensation (44% and meibomitis (20% were major attributable risk factors. Ocular surface damage was predominantly superficial punctate keratitis. Retinopathy was not statistically associated with the prevalence of dry eyes. CONCLUSION Diabetes and dry eye appears to be a common association. Reduction in the modifiable risk factors of dry eye is essential to reduce its prevalence. No significant statistical correlation was found between retinopathy and dry eyes. However, examination for dry eyes should be an integral part of the assessment of diabetic eye disease.

  3. Significance of serum homocysteine in patients with diabetes mellitus complicating proliferative retinopathy%血清同型半胱氨酸在糖尿病伴增殖性视网膜病变患者的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任静; 朱旭明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of serum homocysteine (HCY) in diabetes mellitus(DM ) complicating proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) .Methods 174 patients with DM were selected and divided into PDR ,non‐PDR(NPDR) and non‐dia‐betic retinopathy (NDR) groups .The serum HCY level was detected .Results Serum HCY levels in the PDR ,NPDR and NDR groups were (18 .20 ± 5 .60) ,(14 .40 ± 6 .70) and ,(12 .10 ± 6 .80)μmol/L respectively ,which was highest in the PDR group (P<0 .05) .Conclusion HCY could result in PDR generation possibly by injuring the retinal blood vessels .%目的:研究血清同型半胱氨酸(HCY)在糖尿病伴增殖性视网膜病变(PDR)的意义。方法选取174例糖尿病患者,分为PDR、非增殖性视网膜病变(NPDR)、非视网膜病变患者(非DR)3组,检测血清 HCY等项目水平。结果血清 HCY水平在PDR组、NPDR组、非DR组水平分别为(18.20±5.60)、(14.40±6.70)、(12.10±6.80)μmol/L ,PDR组水平最高(P<0.05)。结论 HCY可能通过损伤视网膜血管导致PDR的产生。

  4. Open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy at the Puerto Rico Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-lñigo, Yousef; Izquierdo, Natalio J; García, Omar; Pérez, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    The association of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) with diabetes mellitus remains controversial. We report on the frequency of open-angle glaucoma in patients having diabetic retinopathy in a population of the Puerto Rico Medical Center. A cross-sectional study of 1,442 patients was done. Only the chart of patients 40 years-of-age and older, with a diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and/or open-angle glaucoma were included. Descriptive analysis was done. Unadjusted and gender-adjusted logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk of developing open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy for each subsequent decade. 1,040 patients were diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy from July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2009. Also, 402 patients were diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2009. Of the 1,040 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 64 patients (6.15%) also had OAG. According to our gender-adjusted logistic regression analysis the estimated risk of developing open-angle glaucoma for patients 40 years-of-age with diabetic retinopathy increased for each subsequent decade until the seventh decade, odds ratio = 5.07 (95% confidence interval: 1.62-15.86). Thereafter, it decreased, odds ratio = 2.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.36-11.82). Our findings suggest that Puerto Rico patients between 40 to 79 years of age with diabetic retinopathy have an increased risk of developing open-angle glaucoma with each subsequent decade. Screening for open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy is of utmost importance in the aging Puerto Rico population to prevent blindness.

  5. Correlation between Common Carotid Artery Intima-media Thickness and Degree of Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus%2型糖尿病视网膜病变程度与颈总动脉内-中膜厚度的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶晶; 邓又斌; 杨顺实

    2011-01-01

    目的 评估2型糖尿病患者(diabetes mellitus,DM)视网膜病变程度与颈总动脉内-中膜厚度(common carotid artery inti-ma-media thickness,CCA IMT)的相关性,以期早期发现糖尿病视网膜病变(diabetic retinopathy,DR)并评估其病变程度.方法 筛选2型糖尿病患者84例.根据眼底荧光造影的结果分为糖尿病无视网膜病变(non-diabetic retinopathy,NDR)组、非增殖期糖尿病视网膜病变(non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy,NPDR)组及增殖期糖尿病视网膜病变(proliferative di-abetic retinopathy,PDR)组三组.记录各组病例的性别、年龄、糖尿病病程,测量其CCA IMT、空腹血糖(fasting blood glu-cose,FBG)、糖化血红蛋白(glycosylated hemoglobin,HbA1c)、血清甘油三脂(serum triglycerides,TG)、总胆固醇(totalcholesterol,TC)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(low-density lipoprotein cholestero,LDL-C)及高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(high-density lipo-protein cholesterol,HDL-C).结果 CCA IMT、FBG、HbA1c及糖尿病病程均同DR的程度具有正相关性(P<0.05);且排除了FBG、HbA1c及糖尿病病程的影响后,CCA IMT仍与DR程度相关(P<0.01).结论 2型糖尿病患者DR的程度同CCA IMT具有正相关性.%Objective To estimate the correlation between the degree of the diabetic retinopathy(DR)and the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA IMT)in type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM)for early detection of DR and the the extent of their lesions. Methods A total of 84 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus,according to the result of fundus fluorescein angiography,were divided into three groups:non-diabetic retinopathy(NDR)group,non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDR)group and proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR)group. In each group, gender, age and duration of diabetes were recorded, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness(CCA IMT), fasting blood glucose (FBG) ,glycosylated hemoglobin( HbAlc), serum triglycerides(TG), total cholesterol(TC), low

  6. Cardiovascular consequences of diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Baan (Caroline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDiabetes mellitus comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that have one common feature: abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood. The most common form is non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NlDDM); about 80-90% of all diabetic patients has

  7. The joint effect of the endothelin receptor B gene (EDNRB polymorphism rs10507875 and nitric oxide synthase 3 gene (NOS3 polymorphism rs869109213 in Slovenian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Bregar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that endothelin and nitric oxide synthase genes and their products exert biological effects on the vasculature via the nitric oxide or endothelin pathway. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of rs10507875 and rs869109213 (alone or in interaction with diabetic retinopathy (DR in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphism rs10507875 of the endothelin receptor B gene (EDNRB and variable number tandem repeats rs869109213 of the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene (NOS3 in 270 Slovenian patients with DR and T2DM and 256 controls with T2DM without clinical signs of DR. The genotyping was performed using either real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR or standard PCR. We found a significant association between the genotypes of NOS3 rs869109213 polymorphism and the risk of DR in the co-dominant model (4a4b genotype; 1.99-fold increased risk [1.09-3.65]; 95% confidence interval [CI]; p = 0.02, co-dominant model (4a4a genotype; 4.16-fold increased risk [1.03-16.74]; 95% CI; p = 0.04, and dominant model (4a4a and 4a4b genotypes; 2.22-fold increased risk [1.26-3.92]; 95% CI; p = 0.01 compared to the 4b4b genotype. Moreover, the joint effect of the two polymorphisms on DR risk was greater than the individual effect of each polymorphism in the analyzed genetic models. Additionally, adjusted odds ratio showed an increased risk in dominant × dominant (4.15-fold [1.40-12.26]; 95% CI; p = 0.01 and recessive × dominant (2.24-fold [1.25-4.01]; 95% CI; p = 0.02 genotype combinations of the two polymorphisms. In conclusion, our results indicate that NOS3 rs869109213 polymorphism alone or in a combination with EDNRB rs10507875 polymorphism may be associated with DR in Slovenian patients with T2DM.

  8. Fruit intake and incident diabetic retinopathy with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Yoshimura, Yukio; Kawasaki, Ryo; Kamada, Chiemi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Horikawa, Chika; Ohashi, Yasuo; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2013-03-01

    Antioxidants and dietary fiber are postulated to have preventive effects on diabetic retinopathy, but evidence is lacking. We investigated this association in a cohort with type 2 diabetes 40-70 years of age with hemoglobin (Hb)A1C ≥6.5%, originally part of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study. After excluding people who did not respond to a dietary survey and patients with diabetic retinopathy or a major ocular disease at baseline, we analyzed 978 patients. Baseline dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire based on food groups and 24-hour dietary records. Primary outcome was incident diabetic retinopathy determined using international severity scales. Mean fruit intake in quartiles ranged from 23 to 253 g/day, with increasing trends across quartiles of fruit intake for vitamin C, vitamin E, carotene, retinol equivalent, dietary fiber, potassium, and sodium. Mean energy intake ranged from 1644 to 1863 kcal/day, and fat intake was approximately 25%. HbA1C, body mass index, triglycerides, and systolic blood pressure were well controlled. During the 8-year follow-up, the numbers of incident cases of diabetic retinopathy from the first through the fourth quartiles of fruit intake were 83, 74, 69, and 59. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of fruit intake compared with the first quartile were 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.92), 0.59 (0.41-0.85), and 0.48 (0.32-0.71) (test for trend, P diabetes duration, overweight, smoking, and hypertension. Risk for diabetic retinopathy declined with increased intake of fruits and vegetables, vitamin C, and carotene. Increased fruit intake in ranges commonly consumed was associated with reduced incident diabetic retinopathy among patients adhering to a low-fat energy-restricted diet.

  9. Physical activity and its correlation to diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praidou, Anna; Harris, Martin; Niakas, Dimitrios; Labiris, Georgios

    2017-02-01

    The lack of physical activity, along with obesity, smoking, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are considered as risk factors for the occurrence of diseases such as diabetes. Primary objective of the study was to investigate potential correlation between physical activity and diabetic retinopathy. Three hundred and twenty patients were included in the study: 240 patients with diabetes type 2 (80 patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 80 patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 80 ones with proliferative diabetic retinopathy) were compared with 80 non-diabetic patients (control group). Physical activity of patients was assessed by the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ, 2002). HbA1c and BMI were also measured in diabetic patients. Group comparisons were attempted for levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Total physical activity was decreased in patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy as compared to patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and to the control group (pdiabetic retinopathy and physical activity has been demonstrated (pdiabetic retinopathy, independent of the effects of HbA1c and BMI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retinopathy is associated with impaired myocardial function assessed by advanced echocardiography in type 1 diabetes patients – The Thousand & 1 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nouhravesh, Nina; Andersen, Henrik U; Jensen, Jan S

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Retinopathy and heart disease in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 DM) may be associated; however previous results have been conflicting. Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) and speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) quantify myocardial function not assessable by conventional echocardiography. We...... investigated the association between severity of retinopathy and early myocardial dysfunction using conventional echocardiography, TDI and STE in Type 1 DM patients. METHODS: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients without known heart disease were included from the Steno Diabetes Center. The cross sectional...... association between retinopathy and myocardial function was analyzed in uni-and multivariable models. Retinopathy was categorized as nil-, simplex- or proliferative retinopathy. RESULTS: A total of 1090 Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients were included, mean age was 49.6years and 53% were males. Left...

  11. Intravitreal Bevacizumab (Avastin) for Diabetic Retinopathy: The 2010 GLADAOF Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Sanchez, Juan G.; Lasave, Andres F.; Wu, Lihteh; Maia, Mauricio; Bonafonte, Sergio; Brito, Miguel; Alezzandrini, Arturo A.; Restrepo, Natalia; Berrocal, Maria H.; Saravia, Mario; Farah, Michel Eid; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; Morales-Canton, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates multiple benefits of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) on diabetic retinopathy (DR) including diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) at 24 months of followup. This is a retrospective multicenter interventional comparative case series of intravitreal injections of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab for DME, PDR without tractional retinal detachment (TRD), and patients who experienced the development or progression of TRD after an intravitreal injection of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for the management of PDR. The results indicate that IVB injections may have a beneficial effect on macular thickness and visual acuity (VA) in diffuse DME. Therefore, in the future this new therapy could complement focal/grid laser photocoagulation in DME. In PDR, this new option could be an adjuvant agent to panretina photocoagulation so that more selective therapy may be applied. Finally, TRD in PDR may occur or progress after IVB used as an adjuvant to vitrectomy. Surgery should be performed 4 days after IVB. Most patients had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus associated with elevated HbA1c, insulin administration, PDR refractory to panretinal photocoagulation, and longer time between IVB and vitrectomy. PMID:21584260

  12. Intravitreal Bevacizumab (Avastin for Diabetic Retinopathy: The 2010 GLADAOF Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fernando Arevalo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates multiple benefits of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB on diabetic retinopathy (DR including diabetic macular edema (DME and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR at 24 months of followup. This is a retrospective multicenter interventional comparative case series of intravitreal injections of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab for DME, PDR without tractional retinal detachment (TRD, and patients who experienced the development or progression of TRD after an intravitreal injection of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for the management of PDR. The results indicate that IVB injections may have a beneficial effect on macular thickness and visual acuity (VA in diffuse DME. Therefore, in the future this new therapy could complement focal/grid laser photocoagulation in DME. In PDR, this new option could be an adjuvant agent to panretina photocoagulation so that more selective therapy may be applied. Finally, TRD in PDR may occur or progress after IVB used as an adjuvant to vitrectomy. Surgery should be performed 4 days after IVB. Most patients had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus associated with elevated HbA1c, insulin administration, PDR refractory to panretinal photocoagulation, and longer time between IVB and vitrectomy.

  13. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and end‑stage renal disease respectively in adults of both ... Departments of Medicine, and 1Ophthalmology, Era's Lucknow Medical ... The collected data included age, gender, duration of diabetes and ..... also shown to be effective in preventing DR in individuals .... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema disease severity.

  14. Rationale and Methodology for a Community-Based Study of Diabetic Retinopathy in an Indonesian Population with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Jogjakarta Eye Diabetic Study in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasongko, Muhammad B; Agni, Angela N; Wardhana, Firman S; Kotha, Satya P; Gupta, Prateek; Widayanti, Tri W; Supanji; Widyaputri, Felicia; Widyaningrum, Rifa; Wong, Tien Y; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wang, Jie Jin; Pawiroranu, Suhardjo

    2017-02-01

    There are no available data about diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Indonesian population. This report summarizes the rationale and study design of the Jogjakarta Eye Diabetic Study in the Community (JOGED.COM), a community-based study to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of DR in persons with type 2 diabetes in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. The JOGED.COM aimed to examine a cross-sectional sample of 1200 persons with type 2 diabetes aged 30 years and older residing in the study area. We identified 121 community health centers (CHCs) in Jogjakarta and listed 35 CHCs with non-communicable diseases facilities. Multi-stage, clustered random sampling was used to select 22 CHCs randomly. We included CHCs with coverage population >30,000, and excluded those classified as 100% rural. Lists of persons with diabetes confirmed by their family physician were provided from each CHC. Examinations procedures included detailed interviews, general and eye examinations, anthropometry and body composition scan, and dilated fundus photography. We collaborated with local health authorities, family physicians, and local health practitioners in the recruitment phase. A total of 1435 invitations were distributed, and 1184 people (82.5%) with type 2 diabetes participated in this study, of whom 1138 (79.3%) had completed data with gradable retinal images. JOGED.COM is the first epidemiologic study of DR in an Indonesian population. This study will provide key information about the prevalence and risk factors of DR in the community. These data are very important for future health promotion programs to reduce the burden of DR in the population.

  15. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  16. Glycomic characterization of basal tears and changes with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun V; Kautto, Liisa; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H

    2015-03-01

    As a secreted fluid, the state of tear glycosylation is particularly important in the role of immunity of the ocular surface. Tears are a valuable source of non-invasive biomarkers for disease and there are continued efforts to characterize their components thoroughly. In this study, a small volume of basal tears (5 μL) was collected from healthy controls, patients with diabetes without retinopathy and patients with diabetes and retinopathy. The detailed N- and O-linked tear protein glycome was characterized and the relative abundance of each structure determined. Of the 50 N-linked glycans found, 89% were complex with 50% containing a bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, 65% containing a core fucose whilst 33% were sialylated. Of the 8 O-linked glycans detected, 3 were of cores 1 and 5 of core 2 type, with a majority of them being sialylated (90%). Additionally, these glycan structures were profiled across the three diabetic disease groups. Whilst the higher abundant structures did not alter across the three groups, only five low abundance N-linked glycans and 1 O-linked glycan did alter with the onset of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These results suggest the conservation of glycan types on basal tear proteins between individuals and point to only small changes in glycan expression on the proteins in tears with the development of diabetes and DR. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Outcomes of vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy at Groote ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Present limitations in primary and secondary prevention of diabetic retinopathy mean that many patients with diabetes present with advanced retinal complications, often requiring surgery (vitrectomy). Objectives. To determine the outcomes of vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy and to examine ...

  18. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.Y. Yau (Joanne W.); S.L. Rogers (Sophie); Y. Kawasaki; E.L. Lamoureux (Ecosse); J.W. Kowalski (Jonathan); T. Bek (Toke); S.-J. Chen (Shih-Jen); J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline); A.E. Fletcher (Astrid E.); J. Grauslund (Jakob); R.C.G. Haffner; U. Hamman (Ute); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); T. Kayama (Takamasa); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S. Krishnaiah (Sannapaneni); K. Mayurasakorn (Korapat); J.P. O'Hare (Joseph); T. Orchard; M. Porta; M. Rema (Mohan); M.S. Roy (Monique); T. Sharma (Tarun); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); H. Taylor (Hugh); J.M. Tielsch (James); D. Varma (Dhiraj); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); N. Wang (Ningli); S. West (Sheila); L. Zu (Liang); M. Yasuda (Maya); X. Zhang (Xinzhi); P. Mitchell (Paul); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A pooled analysis using individual participant data from population-based studies

  19. Disrupted subject-specific gray matter network properties and cognitive dysfunction in type 1 diabetes patients with and without proliferative retinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinkerken, Eelco; Ijzerman, Richard G.; Klein, Martin; Moll, Annette C.; Snoek, Frank J.; Scheltens, Philip; Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Tijms, Betty M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, especially with concomitant microvascular disease, such as proliferative retinopathy, have an increased risk of cognitive deficits. Local cortical gray matter volume reductions only partially explain these cognitive dysfunctions, possibly because volume

  20. Does emotional stress cause type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans; Kupper, Nina; Adriaanse, Marcel C

    2010-01-01

    and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results of longitudinal studies suggest that not only depression but also general emotional stress and anxiety, sleeping problems, anger, and hostility are associated with an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Conflicting results were found......According to the World Health Organization, approximately 220 million people worldwide have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes not only have a chronic disease to cope with, they are also at increased risk for coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, retinopathy......, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The exact causes of type 2 diabetes are still not clear. Since the 17th century, it has been suggested that emotional stress plays a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. So far, review studies have mainly focused on depression as a risk factor for the development...

  1. Verification of multimarkers for detection of early stage diabetic retinopathy using multiple reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunggon; Kim, Sang Jin; Han, Dohyun; Jin, Jonghwa; Yu, Jiyoung; Park, Kyong Soo; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes and 80% of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients whose DM duration is over 10 years can be expected to suffer with DR. The diagnosis of DR depends on an ophthalmological examination, and no molecular methods of screening DR status exist. Nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is the early DR which is hard to be noticed in early NPDR, showing significant cause of adult blindness in type 2 diabetes patients. Protein biomarkers have been valuable in the diagnosis of disease and the use of multiple biomarkers has been suggested to overcome the low specificity of single ones. For biomarker development, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) has been spotlighted as an alternative method to quantify target proteins with no need for immunoassay. In this study, 54 candidate DR marker proteins from a previous study were verified by MRM in plasma samples from NPDR patients in 3 stages (mild, moderate and severe; 15 cases each) and diabetic patients without retinopathy (15 cases) as a control. Notably, 27 candidate markers distinguished moderate NPDR from type 2 diabetic patients with no diabetic retinopathy, generating AUC values (>0.7). Specifically, 28 candidate proteins underwent changes in expression as type 2 diabetic patients with no diabetic retinopathy progressed to mild and moderate NPDR. Further, a combination of 4 markers from these 28 candidates had the improved specificity in distinguishing moderate NPDR from type 2 diabetic patients with no diabetic retinopathy, yielding a merged AUC value of nearly 1.0. We concluded that MRM is a fast, robust approach of multimarker panel determination and an assay platform that provides improved specificity compared with single biomarker assay systems.

  2. Classification of diabetic retinopathy using fractal dimension analysis of eye fundus image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safitri, Diah Wahyu; Juniati, Dwi

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder when pancreas produce inadequate insulin or a condition when body resist insulin action, so the blood glucose level is high. One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy which can lead to a vision problem. Diabetic retinopathy can be recognized by an abnormality in eye fundus. Those abnormalities are characterized by microaneurysms, hemorrhage, hard exudate, cotton wool spots, and venous's changes. The diabetic retinopathy is classified depends on the conditions of abnormality in eye fundus, that is grade 1 if there is a microaneurysm only in the eye fundus; grade 2, if there are a microaneurysm and a hemorrhage in eye fundus; and grade 3: if there are microaneurysm, hemorrhage, and neovascularization in the eye fundus. This study proposed a method and a process of eye fundus image to classify of diabetic retinopathy using fractal analysis and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN). The first phase was image segmentation process using green channel, CLAHE, morphological opening, matched filter, masking, and morphological opening binary image. After segmentation process, its fractal dimension was calculated using box-counting method and the values of fractal dimension were analyzed to make a classification of diabetic retinopathy. Tests carried out by used k-fold cross validation method with k=5. In each test used 10 different grade K of KNN. The accuracy of the result of this method is 89,17% with K=3 or K=4, it was the best results than others K value. Based on this results, it can be concluded that the classification of diabetic retinopathy using fractal analysis and KNN had a good performance.

  3. Prothrombogenic thrombocytic phenotype in patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Gudz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM have increased reactivity of thrombocytes (Tc, the causes of which remain unclear. The hypothesis of the dependence of Tc receptors functional activity on the individual reactivity of the organism is tested. The purpose of the study was to establish whether the individual reactivity of Tc differs in patients with diabetic nonproliferative retinopathy (DNPR. Materials and methods. The study included 19 patients (19 eyes with type 2 DM, who, according to the results of the clinical and instrumental examination and according to the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study classification, had mild DNPR. Ophthalmological examination was performed before the beginning of treatment and included the collection of anamnesis, visual acuity study with optimal optical correction, tonometry, gonioscopy, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography (Stratus OCT apparatus. Thrombocytes were isolated by centrifugation from citrated peripheral blood of patients. To activate Tc, agonists were used: adenosine diphosphate (2.5 μM, adrenaline (2.5 μM, angiotensin II (1.0 μM, platelet activating factor (75.0 μM and collagen (1.0 mg/ml. The Tc aggregation was evaluated by a spectrophotometric method on the ChronoLog aggregometer (USA. Results. The revealed individual reactivity of Tc in patients with DNPR was manifested by the features of thrombogenesis induction. A hyperreactivity of Tc to three agonists was detected: adrenaline, collagen and angiotensin II, which was characteristic of prothrombogenic phenotype. Depending on the functional activity of the investigated receptors, two main clusters of Tc receptors were identified, which were equal by the activity of α2-adrenoreceptors and angiotensin type 1 receptors, but differed by the response of Tc to collagen. Conclusions. Determination of the prothrombogenic phenotype and clusters of functionally active Tc receptors opens the

  4. Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM and osteoporotic fractures are major causes of mortality and morbidity in older subjects. Recent reports have revealed close association between fracture risk and DM types 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2, respectively. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of these diseases in the elderly and examine certain etiopathogenetic aspects of DM associated osteoporosis, which could be useful in management of diabetic patients. Materials and methods: We searched the Embase and PubMed databases using diabetes, osteoporosis, and bone mineral density (BMD as search terms and 1989-2009 as publication dates. Discussion: The risk of fractures seems to be increased in both types of DM although DM2 seems to be associated with normal-high BMDs compared with the normal population. This apparent paradox could reflect greater bone frailty in diabetic patients that are unrelated to adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia, deposition of advanced glycosylation end products in collagen, reduced serum IGF-1 levels, hypercalciuria, renal failure, microangiopathy, and/or inflammation. Diabetic patients’ propensity to fall and multiple comorbidities might also explain their higher fracture rates. The effects of drugs that inhibit bone resorption in diabetic patients are probably similar to those obtained in nondiabetics although there is little information on this issue. In general, effective treatment of diabetes has positive effects on bone metabolism. Metformin acts directly on bone tissue, reducing AGE accumulation, and insulin has direct effects on osteoclast activity. In contrast, the thiazolidinediones seem to have negative effects since they orient mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation toward adipose rather than bone tissue. Incretin therapy is a newer approach that appears to modify interactions between nutrition and bone turnover (e.g., postprandial suppression of bone resorption. Conclusions: Better understanding of how

  5. Nailfold capillaroscopy in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, G; Guerrero, R; Paredes, C; Ríos, C

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia states and the development of specific microvascular disorders such as retinopathy and nephropathy. Conventional methods are used to study the vascular compromise of this entity, however, the use of capillaroscopy for the evaluation of capillary microarchitecture is not frequently used. Observational and descriptive study of 65 patients with an established diagnosis of DM and a control group that underwent an initial capillaroscopy examination. The parameters considered were: Capillary diameter (ectasia and giant capillaries), cross-linked, tortuous, arborified capillaries, avascular zones, haemorrhages, dominant morphology, visibility of the subpapillary venous plexus (SPVP), cuticulitis and SD pattern. Capillaroscopy was performed in 65 patients, the findings were: tortous capillaries (63%), crosslinked capillaries (59%), avascular areas (48%), ectasias (39%), giant capillaries (11%). The capillaroscopic findings were evident in the majority of the studied population, 83%, compared to 17% who did not have capillaroscopic alterations. Significant capillaroscopic changes were demonstrated in patients with DM, in turn, we described a specific pattern consisting of: capillary dilatation, avascular zones and tortuous capillaries. Patients with more comorbidities and evolution of the disease showed greater microvascular damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy: Clinical Findings and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Murray McGavin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic abnormality in which there is a failure to utilise glucose and hence a state of hyperglycaemia can occur. If hyperglycaemia continues uncontrolled over time, it will lead to significant and widespread pathological changes, including involvement of the retina, brain and kidney.In industrialised countries, approximately 1% of the population is diabetic, and at least another 1% are undiagnosed diabetics. Insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM, accounts for approximately 10-15% of cases, the remainder being maturity onset or non-insulin dependent diabetics (NIDDM. Diabetes mellitus is an international public health problem with estimated prevalences ranging from 2.0% to 11.7% in studied populations across the world.

  7. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, H David; Jensen, Dorte M; Jensen, Richard C

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the prevalence and pregnancy outcomes related to elevated fasting venous plasma glucose (FVPG) in a Danish pregnancy cohort. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was an observational cohort study including 1,516 women without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by Danish criteria....... FVPG measured at 28 weeks' gestation was related to pregnancy outcomes. RESULTS: With use of the World Health Organization 2013 threshold of FVPG ≥5.1 mmol/L, 40.1% of the cohort qualified as having GDM. There was no evidence of excess fetal growth, hypertension in pregnancy, or caesarean delivery...

  8. Pharmacogenomics in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Dawed, Adem Y.

    2016-01-01

    . We highlight mechanistic insights from the study of adverse effects and the efficacy of antidiabetic drugs. The identification of extreme sulfonylurea sensitivity in patients with diabetes mellitus owing to heterozygous mutations in HNF1A represents a clear example of how pharmacogenetics can direct...... patient care. However, pharmacogenomic studies of response to antidiabetic drugs in T2DM has yet to be translated into clinical practice, although some moderate genetic effects have now been described that merit follow-up in trials in which patients are selected according to genotype. We also discuss how...

  9. Diabetes Mellitus and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Durmuş

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a condition of bone fragility resulting from micro-architectural deterioration and decreased bone mass. Studies on the presence of a generalized osteoporosis related to diabetes mellitus (DM are few and controversial. Factors associated with osteoporosis diabetes in which may account for the patogenesis of diabetic bone loss have been studied. This article will review the relevant litarature relating to diabetes and osteoporosis including cellular and animal models. These studies include vascular and neuropathic mechanism, poor glisemic control, abnormalities of calcium and vitamin D metabolism and hypercalciuria with secondary increase in parathyroid hormone secretion, the role of insülin and insülin like growth factor I. It appears that there is a great deal of variability in the bone mineral density and fracture rates in both type I and type II DM. This may reflect multiple factors such as the population, age, duration of diabetes and insülin use. There is need for further longitudinal studies, including the incidence and risk factors for osteoporosis in DM.

  10. Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in Urban Slums: The Aditya Jyot Diabetic Retinopathy in Urban Mumbai Slums Study-Report 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunita, Mohan; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Rogye, Ashwini; Sonawane, Manish; Gaonkar, Ravina; Srinivasan, Radhika; Natarajan, Sundaram; Stevens, Fred C J; Scherpbier, A J J A; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; McCarty, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and enumerate history-based risk factors in the urban slums of Western India. The population-based study was conducted in seven wards of Mumbai urban slums, where we screened 6569 subjects of ≥ 40 years age, with a response rate of 98.4%, for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) based on American Diabetes Association criteria. All subjects with T2DM underwent dilated 30° seven-field stereo-fundus-photography for DR severity grading based on modified Airlie House classification. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the correlation of DR with the history-based risk factors. The prevalence of DR in the general population of Mumbai urban slums was 1.41% (95% CI 0.59-2.23) and in the T2DM population it was 15.37% (95% CI 8.87-21.87). The positive associations with DR were the longer duration of DM (≥ 11 years: OR, 12.77; 95% CI 2.93-55.61) and male gender (OR, 2.05; 95% CI 1.08-3.89); increasing severity of retinopathy was also significantly associated with longer duration of DM (p Mumbai urban slums. Duration of DM and male gender were significantly associated with DR. The slums in Western India show the trends of urban lifestyle influences similar to the rest of urban India.

  11. Retinopathy and risk factors in diabetic patients from Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sisi A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed F El-Bab1, Nashaat Shawky2, Ali Al-Sisi3, Mohamed Akhtar31Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Faculty of Medicine, El-Mansoura University, El-Mansoura, Egypt; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Ohud Hospital, Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetes mellitus is accompanied by chronic and dangerous microvascular changes affecting most body systems, especially the eye, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy without appropriate management is emerging as one of the leading causes of blindness. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy, reduce the risk of blindness, and identify relevant risk factors.Methods: This descriptive study was designed to estimate the prevalence of retinopathy and its staging in diabetic patients attending the diabetes clinic at King Fahd Hospital in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from 2008 to 2010. Patients completed a questionnaire, underwent a full medical assessment carried out by the treating clinicians, and were examined for evidence of diabetic retinopathy using standard ophthalmic outpatient instruments.Results: In total, 690 randomly selected diabetic patients of mean age 46.10 ± 11.85 (range 16–88 years were included, comprising 395 men (57.2% of mean age 46.50 ± 11.31 years and 295 women (42.8% of mean age 45.55 ± 12.53 years. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 11.91 ± 7.92 years in the women and 14.42 ± 8.20 years in the men, and the mean total duration of known diabetes mellitus was 13.35 ± 8.17 years. Glycated hemoglobin was higher in men (8.53% ± 1.81% than in women (7.73% ± 1.84%, and this difference was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.0001. Of the 690 diabetic patients, 249 (36.1% had retinopathy. Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy was present in 13.6% of patients

  12. Determining diabetic retinopathy screening interval based on time from no retinopathy to laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Daniel; Nair, Sunil; Harvey, John N

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To determine the necessary screening interval for retinopathy in diabetic patients with no retinopathy based on time to laser therapy and to assess long-term visual outcome following screening. Methods In a population-based community screening programme in North Wales, 2917 patients were followed until death or for approximately 12 years. At screening, 2493 had no retinopathy; 424 had mostly minor degrees of non-proliferative retinopathy. Data on timing of first laser therapy and visual outcome following screening were obtained from local hospitals and ophthalmology units. Results Survival analysis showed that very few of the no retinopathy at screening group required laser therapy in the early years compared with the non-proliferative retinopathy group ( p retinopathy at screening group required laser therapy, and at three years 0.2% (cumulative), lower rates of treatment than have been suggested by analyses of sight-threatening retinopathy determined photographically. At follow-up (mean 7.8 ± 4.6 years), mild to moderate visual impairment in one or both eyes due to diabetic retinopathy was more common in those with retinopathy at screening (26% vs. 5%, p diabetes occurred in only 1 in 1000. Conclusions Optimum screening intervals should be determined from time to active treatment. Based on requirement for laser therapy, the screening interval for diabetic patients with no retinopathy can be extended to two to three years. Patients who attend for retinal screening and treatment who have no or non-proliferative retinopathy now have a very low risk of eventual blindness from diabetes.

  13. Diabetes mellitus in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Chentli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM frequency is a growing problem worldwide, because of long life expectancy and life style modifications. In old age (≥60–65 years old, DM is becoming an alarming public health problem in developed and even in developing countries as for some authors one from two old persons are diabetic or prediabetic and for others 8 from 10 old persons have some dysglycemia. DM complications and co-morbidities are more frequent in old diabetics compared to their young counterparts. The most frequent are cardiovascular diseases due to old age and to precocious atherosclerosis specific to DM and the most bothersome are visual and cognitive impairments, especially Alzheimer disease and other kind of dementia. Alzheimer disease seems to share the same risk factors as DM, which means insulin resistance due to lack of physical activity and eating disorders. Visual and physical handicaps, depression, and memory troubles are a barrier to care for DM treatment. For this, old diabetics are now classified into two main categories as fit and independent old people able to take any available medication, exactly as their young or middle age counterparts, and fragile or frail persons for whom physical activity, healthy diet, and medical treatment should be individualized according to the presence or lack of cognitive impairment and other co-morbidities. In the last category, the fundamental rule is "go slowly and individualize" to avoid interaction with poly medicated elder persons and fatal iatrogenic hypoglycemias in those treated with sulfonylureas or insulin.

  14. Free and total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-3 and their relationships to the presence of diabetic retinopathy and glomerular hyperfiltration in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); M.L. Jacobs (Marloes); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); R.F.A. Weber (Rob); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe existing literature on serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is conflicting. Free IGF-I may have greater physiological and clinical relevance than total IGF- I. Recently, a validated method has been developed to measure free

  15. Free and total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-3 and their relationships to the presence of diabetic retinopathy and glomerular hyperfiltration in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); M.L. Jacobs (Marloes); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); R.F.A. Weber (Robert); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe existing literature on serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is conflicting. Free IGF-I may have greater physiological and clinical relevance than total IGF-I. Recently, a validated method has

  16. Heritability of the severity of diabetic retinopathy: the FIND-Eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Nedal H; Freedman, Barry I; Adler, Sharon G; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily Y; Davis, Mathew D; Satko, Scott G; Bowden, Donald W; Duggirala, Ravi; Elston, Robert C; Guo, Xiuxing; Hanson, Robert L; Igo, Robert P; Ipp, Eli; Kimmel, Paul L; Knowler, William C; Molineros, Julio; Nelson, Robert G; Pahl, Madeleine V; Quade, Shannon R E; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Rotter, Jerome I; Saad, Mohammed F; Scavini, Marina; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Sedor, John R; Shah, Vallabh O; Zager, Philip G; Abboud, Hanna E

    2008-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) are serious microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Correlations between severity of DR and DN and computed heritability estimates for DR were determined in a large, multiethnic sample of diabetic families. The hypothesis was that (1) the severity of DR correlates with the presence and severity of nephropathy in individuals with diabetes mellitus, and (2) the severity of DR is under significant familial influence in members of multiplex diabetic families. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) was designed to evaluate the genetic basis of DN in American Indians, European Americans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. FIND enrolled probands with advanced DN, along with their diabetic siblings who were concordant and discordant for nephropathy. These diabetic family members were invited to participate in the FIND-Eye study to determine whether inherited factors underlie susceptibility to DR and its severity. FIND-Eye participants underwent eye examinations and had fundus photographs taken. The severity of DR was graded by using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Classification (ETDRS). Sib-sib correlations were calculated with the SAGE 5.0 program FCOR, to estimate heritability of retinopathy severity. This report summarizes the results for the first 2368 diabetic subjects from 767 families enrolled in FIND-Eye; nearly 50% were Mexican American, the largest single ethnicity within FIND. The overall prevalence of DR was high; 33.4% had proliferative DR; 7.5%, 22.8%, and 9.5% had severe, moderate, and mild nonproliferative DR, respectively; 26.6% had no DR. The severity of DR was significantly associated with severity of DN, both by phenotypic category and by increasing serum creatinine concentration (chi(2) = 658.14, df = 20; P FIND-Eye sample. These data confirm that the severity of DR parallels the presence and severity of nephropathy in individuals with diabetes

  17. Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria | Lawan | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria. ... Background: The aim of the study is to determine the pattern of retinopathy seen in diabetic patients attending the outpatient clinic in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, ... A screening program needs to be developed to facilitate early detection and prompt treatment.

  18. Characteristics of patients with diabetic retinopathy in Gaborone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (GLLAMMs) to account for the non-independence of the eye diabetic retinopathy outcome at the patient level (Rabe-Hesketh et al., 2000). This model allowed for analysis of a polytomous ordinal response on a set of predictors and computed the odds ratios (OR) of having a more severe diabetic retinopathy grade compared ...

  19. The worldwide epidemic of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR, a major microvascular complication of diabetes, has a significant impact on the world′s health systems. Globally, the number of people with DR will grow from 126.6 million in 2010 to 191.0 million by 2030, and we estimate that the number with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR will increase from 37.3 million to 56.3 million, if prompt action is not taken. Despite growing evidence documenting the effectiveness of routine DR screening and early treatment, DR frequently leads to poor visual functioning and represents the leading cause of blindness in working-age populations. DR has been neglected in health-care research and planning in many low-income countries, where access to trained eye-care professionals and tertiary eye-care services may be inadequate. Demand for, as well as, supply of services may be a problem. Rates of compliance with diabetes medications and annual eye examinations may be low, the reasons for which are multifactorial. Innovative and comprehensive approaches are needed to reduce the risk of vision loss by prompt diagnosis and early treatment of VTDR.

  20. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  1. Assessment of the Relationship between Diabetic Retinopathy and Nailfold Capillaries in Type 2 Diabetics with a Noninvasive Method: Nailfold Videocapillaroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyit Uyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Nailfold capillaroscopy is an easy and noninvasive technique used to investigate dermal microvasculature. Traditional investigations of vascularity do not detect changes until they are well-established in type 2 diabetics. The objective of the current study was to evaluate nailfold capillaries in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and to determine the association of retinopathy with changes in the nailfold capillaries. Materials and Methods. Capillaroscopic findings by nailfold capillaroscopy and fundoscopic examinations were assessed in 216 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 101 healthy controls included in this prospective study. Results. Retinopathy was detected in 43.05% of diabetic patients (n=93. Capillaroscopic findings including tortuosity (p<0.001, bushy capillary (p<0.001, neoformation (p<0.001, bizarre capillary (p<0.001, microhemorrhage (p=0.001, capillary ectasia (p=0.002, and aneurysm (p=0.004 were significantly higher in diabetic group than control group. In logistic regression analysis, only tortuosity was shown significant (OR, 2.16; p=0.036. There was also a significant relation between diabetes duration and most of the capillaroscopic findings. Conclusion. Capillaroscopic changes were found to be correlated with diabetic retinopathy, in particular with longer disease duration in our study. Capillaroscopic imaging could be a useful new technique for assessment of diabetic microvascular changes.

  2. Diabetic retinopathy is a neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Stephanie K; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2017-10-01

    Since 1875, controversy has ensued over whether ocular diabetic complications are primarily vasculopathic or neuropathic in nature. Here, we discuss the historical context by which diabetic retinopathy (DR) came to be considered a primary vasculopathy, in contrast to more recent data suggesting the importance of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration (DRN) as the primary manifestation of ocular diabetic damage. Unsurprisingly, DRN parallels other diabetic complications related to neuropathy. In general, there are three possible relationships between microvascular DR and DRN: i) microvasculopathy causes neurodegeneration; ii) neurodegeneration causes microvasculopathy or iii) they are mutually independent. The authors' group has recently produced experimental data showing that DRN precedes even the earliest manifestations of DR microvasculopathy. In combination with earlier studies showing that focal implicit time delays predicted future development of DR microvasculopathy in the same location, relationships i) and iii) are unlikely. As such, ii) is the most likely relationship: DRN is a cause of DR. Granted, additional studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis and elucidate the mechanism of diabetes-induced neurodegeneration. We conclude this review by proposing experimental approaches to test the hypothesis that DRN causes DR. If confirmed, this new paradigm may lead to earlier detection of ocular diabetic damage and earlier treatment of early DR, thereby preventing visual loss in people with diabetes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Adsani, Afaf M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes. Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes (n=165) attending the Diabetic Clinic at Al-sabah Hospital, Kuwait between October 2000 and March 2005 were screened for diabetic retinopathy. Any diabetic retinopathy was found in 40% while 20.6% had sight threatening retinopathy. Mild NPDR was present in 21.2%, moderate to severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) in 7.9%, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 3.0%. Maculopathy was present in 10.3% and 7.9 % pf patients were photocoagulated. Compared to those without retinopathy, diabetic patients with any retinopathy were significantly older (51.7+-10.3 versus 47.2+-9.5 years; p<0.005), had longer duration of diabetes (13.1+-6.3 versus 4.7 +-5.4 years; p<0.0001), higher systolic blood pressure (142.9+-23.0 versus 130.3+-20.2; p<0.0001) and poor glycemic control (Hemoglobin A1c=10.1+-2.4 versus 8.9+-2.3; p<0.005). The prevalence of hypertension and nephropathy was significantly higher in patients with any retinopathy than those without retinopathy (70.8% versus 49.5%; p<0.01 and 64.4% versus 30.8%; p<0.0001) respectively. Longer duration of diabetes and presence of nephropathy was the most significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy. Treatment with sulphonylurea or insulin, and poor glycemic control were other significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy. Longer duration of diabetes, presence of nephropathy, glycemic control and mode of treatment were the most significant independent factors of diabetic retinopathy. However, population-based study is warranted to identify the risk factors, as well as the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  4. General aspects of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Uazman; Asghar, Omar; Azmi, Shazli; Malik, Rayaz A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperglycemia due to an absolute or relative deficit in insulin production or action. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes mellitus is associated with end organ damage, dysfunction, and failure, including the retina, kidney, nervous system, heart, and blood vessels. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated an overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus to be 366 million in 2011, and predicted a rise to 552 million by 2030. The treatment of diabetes mellitus is determined by the etiopathology and is most commonly subdivided in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a greater propensity towards hyperglycemia in individuals with coexisting genetic predisposition or concomitant drug therapy such as corticosteroids. The screening for diabetes mellitus may either be in the form of a 2hour oral glucose tolerance test, or via HbA1c testing, as recently recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Strong associations have been shown in observational studies suggesting poor clinical outcomes both with chronic hyperglycemia and acutely in intensive care settings. However, tight glycemic control in this setting is a contentious issue with an increased incidence of hypoglycemia and possible increase in morbidity and mortality. In a critically ill patient a glucose range of 140-180mg/dL (7.8-10.0mmol/L) should be maintained via continuous intravenous insulin infusion.

  5. Relation between fasting glucose and retinopathy for diagnosis of diabetes: three population-based cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tien Y; Liew, Gerald; Tapp, Robyn J; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Zimmet, Paul; Shaw, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    The WHO and American Diabetes Association criteria for diagnosing diabetes mellitus assume the presence of a glycaemic threshold with high sensitivity for identifying retinopathy. However, this assumption is based on data from three previous studies that had important limitations in detecting retinopathy. We aimed to provide updated data for the relation between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and retinopathy, and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of current FPG thresholds in identifying both prevalent and incident retinopathy. We examined the data from three cross-sectional adult populations: those in the Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES, Australia, n=3162), the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab, Australia, n=2182), and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA, USA, n=6079). Retinopathy was diagnosed from multiple retinal photographs of each eye, and graded according to the modified Airlie House Classification system. Plasma glucose concentrations were measured from fasting venous blood samples. The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 11.5% in BMES (95% CI 10.4-12.6%), 9.6% in AusDiab (8.4-10.9), and 15.8% in MESA (14.9-16.7). However, we found inconsistent evidence of a uniform glycaemic threshold for prevalent and incident retinopathy, with analyses suggesting a continuous relation. The widely used diabetes FPG cutoff of 7.0 mmol/L or higher had sensitivity less than 40% (range 14.8-39.1) for detecting retinopathy, with specificity between 80.8% and 95.8%. The area under receiver operating characteristic curves for FPG and retinopathy was low and ranged from 0.56 to 0.61. We saw no evidence of a clear and consistent glycaemic threshold for the presence or incidence of retinopathy across different populations. The current FPG cutoff of 7.0 mmol/L used to diagnose diabetes did not accurately identify people with and without retinopathy. These findings suggest that the criteria for diagnosing diabetes could need reassessment.

  6. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from...... for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed....

  7. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of complications for mother and child. Along with the growing epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of gestational diabetes is expected to rise. With adequate and timely treatment, the risk of complications is reduced.

  8. A proposed new classification for diabetic retinopathy: The concept of primary and secondary vitreopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubey Arvind

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR require vitreous surgery despite complete regression of new vessels with pan retinal laser photocoagulation (PRP. Changes in the vitreous caused by diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy may continue to progress independent of laser regressed status of retinopathy. Diabetic vitreopathy can be an independent manifestation of the disease process. Aim: To examine this concept by studying the long-term behavior of the vitreous in cases of PDR regressed with PRP. Materials and Methods: Seventy-four eyes with pure PDR (without clinically evident vitreous traction showing fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA proven regression of new vessels following PRP were retrospectively studied out of a total of 1380 eyes photocoagulated between March 2001 and September 2006 for PDR of varying severity. Follow-up was available from one to four years. Results: Twenty-three percent of eyes showing FFA-proven regression of new vessels with laser required to undergo surgery for indications produced by vitreous traction such as recurrent vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment, secondary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and tractional macular edema within one to four years. Conclusion: Vitreous changes continued to progress despite regression of PDR in many diabetics. We identifies this as "clinical diabetic vitreopathy" and propose an expanded classification for diabetic retinopathy to signify these changes and to redefine the indications for surgery.

  9. Diabetic retinopathy in a remote Indigenous primary healthcare population: a Central Australian diabetic retinopathy screening study in the Telehealth Eye and Associated Medical Services Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazionis, L; Jenkins, A; Keech, A; Ryan, C; Brown, A; Boffa, J; Bursell, S

    2018-05-01

    To determine diabetic retinopathy prevalence and severity among remote Indigenous Australians. A cross-sectional diabetic retinopathy screening study of Indigenous adults with Type 2 diabetes was conducted by locally trained non-ophthalmic retinal imagers in a remote Aboriginal community-controlled primary healthcare clinic in Central Australia and certified non-ophthalmic graders in a retinal grading centre in Melbourne, Australia. The main outcome measure was prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Among 301 participants (33% male), gradable image rates were 78.7% (n = 237) for diabetic retinopathy and 83.1% (n = 250) for diabetic macular oedema, and 77.7% (n = 234) were gradable for both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. For the gradable subset, the median (range) age was 48 (19-86) years and known diabetes duration 9.0 (0-24) years. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 47% (n = 110) and for diabetic macular oedema it was 14.4% (n = 36). In the fully gradable imaging studies, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 16.2% (n = 38): 14.1% (n = 33) for clinically significant macular oedema, 1.3% (n = 3) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.9% (n = 2) for both. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy had been treated in 78% of detected cases. A novel telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening service detected a higher prevalence of 'any' diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in a remote primary care setting than reported in earlier surveys among Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Whether the observed high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was attributable to greater detection, increasing diabetic retinopathy prevalence, local factors, or a combination of these requires further investigation and, potentially, specific primary care guidelines for diabetic retinopathy management in remote Australia. Clinical Trials registration number: Australia and

  10. Role of macular xanthophylls in prevention of common neovascular retinopathies: retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoming; Rubin, Lewis P

    2015-04-15

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are important causes of blindness among children and working-age adults, respectively. The development of both diseases involves retinal microvascular degeneration, vessel loss and consequent hypoxic and inflammatory pathologic retinal neovascularization. Mechanistic studies have shown that oxidative stress and subsequent derangement of cell signaling are important factors in disease progression. In eye and vision research, role of the dietary xanthophyll carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, has been more extensively studied in adult onset macular degeneration than these other retinopathies. These carotenoids also may decrease severity of ROP in preterm infants and of DR in working-age adults. A randomized controlled clinical trial of carotenoid supplementation in preterm infants indicated that lutein has functional effects in the neonatal eye and is anti-inflammatory. Three multicenter clinical trials all showed a trend of decreased ROP severity in the lutein supplemented group. Prospective studies on patients with non-proliferative DR indicate serum levels of lutein and zeaxanthin are significantly lower in these patients compared to normal subjects. The present review describes recent advances in lutein and zeaxanthin modulation of oxidative stress and inflammation related to ROP and DR and discusses potential roles of lutein/zeaxanthin in preventing or lessening the risks of disease initiation or progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of different sized ocular surface vessels in diabetics and normal individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with contraction of larger vessels in the conjunctiva. Smaller vessels dilate with diabetic retinopathy. These findings may be useful in the photographic screening of diabetes mellitus and retinopathy.

  12. Patient preferences in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirostko B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Wirostko1, Kathleen Beusterien2, Jessica Grinspan2, Thomas Ciulla3, John Gonder4, Alexandra Barsdorf1, Andreas Pleil51Pfizer, New York, NY, USA; 2Oxford Outcomes, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Midwest Eye Institute, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Ivey Eye Institute, London, Ontario, Canada; 5Pfizer Inc, San Diego, CA, USAObjective: Accounting for patient preferences may be especially important in diabetes mellitus, given the challenge in identifying factors associated with treatment adherence. Although preference studies have been performed in diabetes, none have examined treatments used in diabetic retinopathy (DR. The objective of this study was to elicit patient preferences for attributes associated with antivascular endothelial growth factor, focal and panretinal laser, and steroid therapy used in DR management.Methods: A cross-sectional conjoint survey was administered to DR patients at three Canadian eye centers. The survey involved making tradeoffs among 11 DR treatment attributes, including the chance of improving vision and risks of adverse events over a 1-year treatment period. Attribute utilities were summed for each product profile to determine the most preferred treatment.Results: Based on the results from 161 patients, attributes affecting visual functioning, including improving visual acuity and reducing adverse events (eg, chance of cataracts, were more important than those not directly affecting vision (eg, administration. Overall, 52%, 20%, 17%, and 11% preferred the product profiles matching to the antivascular endothelial growth factor, steroid, focal laser, and panretinal laser therapies. Preferences did not vary substantially by previous treatment experience, age, or type of DR (macular edema, proliferative DR, both or neither, with the exception that more macular edema only patients preferred focal laser over steroid treatment (19% versus 14%, respectively.Conclusions: When considering the potential effects of treatment over a 1

  13. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among self-reported adult diabetics in districts of Eastern Nepal in a community based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Lalit T; Agarwal, Nisha

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness among working age adults around the world. Each year more and more people live with this condition, which can result in life-changing complications. To determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in a large community based screening programme, in order to estimate the future burden of the disease. A cross sectional community based study was conducted between 1st January and 31st December 2014 in a purposive sample of adults with selfreported diabetes mellitus (DM) from Morang and Sunsari district of Nepal. A structured questionnaire was used to collect patient data. Ophthalmological evaluation was done and fundus was examined for grading DR using direct and indirect ophthalmoscope. Among the 698 diabetic patients, mean age was 55.02±11.8 years (ranging from 24 to 91 years). 12.3% of diabetic were not under any treatment. Only 69.3% of patients had visited eye specialist for diabetic retinopathy screening. Prevalence of DR was found to be 15.3%; 13.9% had non-proliferative DR and 1.4% had proliferative DR. Prevalence of diabetic macular edema was 2.1%. In Morang district prevalence of DR was 14.2% and in Sunsari district it was 16.2%. In the binary-logistic regression analysis, duration of diabetes was associated with significantly increased risk of DR (OR: 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09 to 1.17; p<0.001). History of absence of arterial hypertension decreased the risk of DR (OR: 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.87; p=0.01). One sixth of the patients with diabetes in the Eastern region of Nepal have retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy risk increased with duration of diabetes and decreased with history of no co-existing arterial hypertension. © NEPjOPH.

  14. Ultra-wide-field imaging in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Tsui, Irena; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    Since 1991, 7-field images captured with 30-50 degree cameras in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were the gold standard for fundus imaging to study diabetic retinopathy. Ultra-wide-field images cover significantly more area (up to 82%) of the fundus and with ocular steering can in many cases image 100% of the fundus ("panretinal"). Recent advances in image analysis of ultra-wide-field imaging allow for precise measurements of the peripheral retinal lesions. There is a growing consensus in the literature that ultra-wide-field imaging improves detection of peripheral lesions in diabetic retinopathy and leads to more accurate classification of the disease. There is discordance among studies, however, on the correlation between peripheral diabetic lesions and diabetic macular edema and optimal management strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated multi-lesion detection for referable diabetic retinopathy in indigenous health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ramon; Carvalho, Tiago; Spurling, Geoffrey; Goldenstein, Siome; Wainer, Jacques; Luckie, Alan; Jelinek, Herbert F; Rocha, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes mellitus that affects more than one-quarter of the population with diabetes, and can lead to blindness if not discovered in time. An automated screening enables the identification of patients who need further medical attention. This study aimed to classify retinal images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples utilizing an automated computer-based multi-lesion eye screening program for diabetic retinopathy. The multi-lesion classifier was trained on 1,014 images from the São Paulo Eye Hospital and tested on retinal images containing no DR-related lesion, single lesions, or multiple types of lesions from the Inala Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care centre. The automated multi-lesion classifier has the potential to enhance the efficiency of clinical practice delivering diabetic retinopathy screening. Our program does not necessitate image samples for training from any specific ethnic group or population being assessed and is independent of image pre- or post-processing to identify retinal lesions. In this Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, the program achieved 100% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity in identifying bright lesions, while detection of red lesions achieved a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 95%. When both bright and red lesions were present, 100% sensitivity with 88.9% specificity was obtained. All results obtained with this automated screening program meet WHO standards for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  16. Automated multi-lesion detection for referable diabetic retinopathy in indigenous health care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Pires

    Full Text Available Diabetic Retinopathy (DR is a complication of diabetes mellitus that affects more than one-quarter of the population with diabetes, and can lead to blindness if not discovered in time. An automated screening enables the identification of patients who need further medical attention. This study aimed to classify retinal images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples utilizing an automated computer-based multi-lesion eye screening program for diabetic retinopathy. The multi-lesion classifier was trained on 1,014 images from the São Paulo Eye Hospital and tested on retinal images containing no DR-related lesion, single lesions, or multiple types of lesions from the Inala Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care centre. The automated multi-lesion classifier has the potential to enhance the efficiency of clinical practice delivering diabetic retinopathy screening. Our program does not necessitate image samples for training from any specific ethnic group or population being assessed and is independent of image pre- or post-processing to identify retinal lesions. In this Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, the program achieved 100% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity in identifying bright lesions, while detection of red lesions achieved a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 95%. When both bright and red lesions were present, 100% sensitivity with 88.9% specificity was obtained. All results obtained with this automated screening program meet WHO standards for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  17. Monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Oddmund Søvika; Henrik Underthun Irgens; Janne Molnes; Jørn V. Sagena; Lise Bjørkhaug; Helge Ræder; Anders Molveng; Pål R. Njølstad

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review data on monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway based on the Norwegian MODY Registry at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen. This registry comprises established or suspected cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) referred to our laboratory for genetic testing. We also present data on neonatal diabetes, another group of monogenic diabetes. To date, we have genetically diagnosed nearly 500 MODY cases in Norway. Mutations in the HNF1A gene (MODY3) were detected in a...

  18. Human Genetics of Diabetic Retinopathy: Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. K. Ng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a most severe microvascular complication which, if left unchecked, can be sight-threatening. With the global prevalence of diabetes being relentlessly projected to rise to 438 million subjects by 2030, DR will undoubtedly pose a major public health concern. Efforts to unravel the human genetics of DR have been undertaken using the candidate gene and linkage approaches, while GWAS efforts are still lacking. Aside from evidence for a few genes including aldose reductase and vascular endothelial growth factor, the genetics of DR remain poorly elucidated. Nevertheless, the promise of impactful scientific discoveries may be realized if concerted and collaborative efforts are mounted to identify the genes for DR. Harnessing new genetic technologies and resources such as the upcoming 1000 Genomes Project will help advance this field of research, and potentially lead to a rich harvest of insights into the biological mechanisms underlying this debilitating complication.

  19. Canonical Wnt signaling in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common eye complication of diabetes, and the pathogenic mechanism of DR is still under investigation. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays fundamental roles in embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt signaling regulates expression of multiple genes that control retinal development and eye organogenesis, and dysregulated Wnt signaling plays pathophysiological roles in many ocular diseases, including DR. This review highlights recent progress in studies of Wnt signaling in DR. We discuss Wnt signaling regulation in the retina and dysregulation of Wnt signaling associated with ocular diseases with an emphasis on DR. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of modulating Wnt signaling in DR. Continued studies in this field will advance our current understanding on DR and contribute to the development of new treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment effects of captopril on non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ning; ZHENG Zhi; JIN Hui-yi; XU Xun

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes.Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor is thought to play an important role in preventing and treating retinal diseases in animal models of DR.The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI,captopril) in the treatment of patients with non-proliferative DR.Methods Three hundred and seventeen type 2 diabetic patients (88.05% of participants) without or with mild to moderate non-proliferative retinopathy were randomly divided into captopril group (n=202) and placebo group (n=115).All subjects received 24-month follow-up.General clinical examinations,including blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin,as well as comprehensive standardized ophthalmic examinations were performed.Color fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to grade diabetic retinopathy and detect macular edema respectively.Results The levels of blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin in the two groups of patients remained within the normal range during the entire follow-up and no significant difference was found between the initial and last visits,suggesting that ACEI drugs play a protective role on the DR patients independent of its anti-blood pressure role.DR classification showed that 169 eyes (83.66%) remained unchanged and the DR grade of 33 eyes (16.34%) increased in captopril group,while 84 eyes (73.04%) remained unchanged and the grade of 31 eyes (26.96%) increased in placebo group (P=0.024).Captopril treatment improved macular edema in 55.45% eyes,which was significantly higher than the 37.39% improvement in placebo group (P=0.002).No significant difference was found in the visual acuity between the two groups (P=0.271).Conclusion Captopril can improve or delay the development of DR and macular edema,which can be used in the early treatment of DR patients with type 2 diabetic mellitus.

  1. Angiogenic Factors and Cytokines in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abcouwer, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening complication of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. The recent success of treatments inhibiting the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) demonstrates that specific targeting of a growth factor responsible for vascular permeability and growth is an effective means of treating DR-associated vascular dysfunction, edema and angiogenesis. This has stimulated research of alternative therapeutic targets involved in the control of retinal vascular function. However, additional treatment options and preventative measures are still needed and these require a greater understanding of the pathological mechanisms leading to the disturbance of retinal tissue homeostasis in DR. Although severe DR can be treated as a vascular disease, abundant data suggests that inflammation is also occurring in the diabetic retina.Thus, anti-inflammatory therapies may also be useful for treatment and prevention of DR. Herein, the evidence for altered expression of angiogenic factors and cytokines in DR is reviewed and possible mechanisms by which the expression of VEGF and cytokines may be increased in the diabetic retina are examined. In addition, the potential role for microglial activation in diabetic retinal neuroinflammation is explored. PMID:24319628

  2. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography characteristics in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Gella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the appearance of diabetic retinopathy lesions using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Materials and Methods: A total of 287 eyes of 199 subjects were included. All the subjects underwent complete ophthalmic examination including SD-OCT. Results: The appearance of various lesions of diabetic retinopathy and the retinal layers involved were reported. In subjects with macular edema the prevalence of incomplete PVD was 55.6%. Conclusion: SD-OCT brings new insights into the morphological changes of the retina in diabetic retinopathy.

  3. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS). Population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L.L.; Lervang, H.H.; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    Abstract Purpose: Several population based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of proliferativ retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy. Despite their importance, these studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore...... reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous era. Studies of the present diabetic population are therefore in demand. Methods: The present cross–section study included 656 type 1 and 328 type 2 diabetic subjects undergoing diabetic retinopathy screening. Crude prevalence rates...... for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, maculopathy, several specific lesions and non–ophthalmic findings were assessed together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The crude prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 5.6 % and 0.9 % for type 1...

  4. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTOR BLOCKERS ON DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy K

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic Retinopathy (DR is the most common microvascular complication of Diabetes Mellitus (DM and is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults of patients with type 1 and 2 DM. Large observational and randomised studies shown that optimal blood glucose and blood pressure control halt or regress the disease and limit the risk of progression to the proliferative stage and visual loss. Recently, evidence has also emerged that Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS inhibitors may electively prevent or delay progression of retinopathy by acting on local RAS. Thus, metabolic and blood pressure control by RAS inhibition is to prevent or limit the onset of retinopathy and its progression towards visual-threatening stages. The aim of the study is to categorise and analyse grading of DR who are on currently ACE and ARBs unchanged for at least 2 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS 178 patients with type 1 and 2 DM of both genders on ARBs and ACEI unchanged for at least 2 years are divided into two groups as follows- 1. ARB group, which includesa 28 patients on losartan (50 mg. b 32 patients on losartan (50 mg + hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg. c 28 patients on telmisartan (40 mg. d 32 patients on telmisartan (40 mg + hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg. 2. ACE inhibitor group includesa 30 patients on enalapril (5 mg. b 28 patients on ramipril (2.5 mg + hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg. Retinopathy grading assessed by indirect ophthalmoscope and comparison of retinopathy grading between ARBs and ACEI groups have done. Two-tailed Chi-square test, GraphPad Prism Software used for statistical calculations. RESULTS Losartan and telmisartan (ARB group showed significant protection from diabetic retinopathy than enalapril and ramipril (ACEI group (p<0.05. CONCLUSION ARBs help in preventing the progression of DR and vision loss in those belonging to mild and moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy patients.

  5. Combined determination of serum type IV collagen with urine Tamm-Horsfall protein and albumin for early diagnosis in diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hong; Zhang Aihua; Ren Yuguo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between changes of serum type IV collagen, urine Tamm-horsfall protein, albumin and development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Serum CIV, urine THP and Alb were determined with ELISA and RIA respectively in 76 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (NDR26, BDR26, PDR24) and 30 controls. Results: Values of the three markers were significantly different among the three groups of patients (p < 0.01; p < 0.01; p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusion: Serum type IV collagens, urine Tamm-Horsfall protein and albumin were sensitive indicators in predicting diabetic retinopathy

  6. Role of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vorobyeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The reason for the progressive vision reduction at diabetes mellitus (DM is diabetic retinopathy (DR. When type 2 diabetes combined with hypertension (Ht, it increases the risk of vision loss by 25 times. In the pathogenesis of DR is important to endothelial dysfunction and a variety of biochemical processes (an excess of intracellular sorbitol, non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, oxidative stress. there is a decrease in generation vasodilating factors, nitric oxide, with a simultaneous increase of endothelin, which causes vasoconstriction. Key processes underlying the development of DR, such as increased vascular permeability, edema, neovasculariza- tion, inflammation and associated with the effects of kallikrein-kinin system. In the pathogenesis of DR can be involved independent intraocular renin-angiotensin system, which is an important mediator of angiogenesis and increased vascular permeability. Damage to the endothelium of retinal vessels leads to ischemia of the retina. there is growth and development of newly formed blood vessels, which may provoke recurrent bleeding.

  7. Diabetes mellitus, maar welk type?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, J. B.; de Koning, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    In three patients with an unusual presentation of diabetes mellitus, the classification of their diabetes was troublesome. An adolescent male with slightly elevated blood-glucose levels turned out to have excellent glycaemic control on sulphonylurea derivatives only. When he was 40 years of age, his

  8. Role of direct funduscopy in screening for diabetic retinopathy in communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the application of direct funduscopy in screening for diabetic retinopathy in communities. METHODS:After mydriasis, 265 patients with diabetes mellitus(DMin communities were examined for fundus by direct funduscopy. The patients with diabetic retinopathy(DRwere further received fluorescence fundus angiography(FFAafter referral to superior hospitals.RESULTS:Within the 265 patients with DM, 79 patients were diagnosed as DR and the positive rate of DR was 29.8%. Among the patients with DR, there were 46 patients with non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand 33 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR; the positive rate was respectively 17.4% and 12.5%. All patients with DR were further diagnosed by FFA after referral. Three patients with NPDR were diagnosed with PDR, and 22 patients received laser treatment.CONCLUSION:Ordinary application of direct funduscopy in patients with DM in communities would early detect the DR. It is very necessary to master direct funduscopy for general practitioners.

  9. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes mellitus is known to occur more frequently in patients with pancreatic cancer than in the general population. At the time of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, more than 70% of patients taking the glucose tolerance test show diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (1). Relationship among diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer is vague but sure, although neither the nature nor the sequence of the possible cause – effect relationship has been established. The reason for the high frequency of glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatic cancer remains controversial. (author)

  10. Maternal immune system adaptation to pregnancy - a potential influence on the course of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Josip

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progression of diabetic retinopathy occurs at least temporarily during pregnancy. Although the cause of this progression is not entirely understood, the immune phenomenon and chronic inflammation may play a significant role. During pregnancy in order to avoid fetus rejection, certain components of the immune system that are knowingly implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy are activated including generalized leukocyte activation and an increase in certain cytokine plasma levels. Activated leukocytes with up regulated adhesion molecules have an increased potential to bind to the endothelium cells of blood vessels. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction and the consequent leukostasis with capillary occlusion, ischemia and vascular leakage have a substantial role in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, certain increased cytokines are known to cause blood-retinal-barrier breakdown whilst others promote angiogenic and fibrovascular proliferation and thereby can also be implicated in the pathogenesis of this diabetic complication. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesized that the activation of the immune system during gestation may have an influence on the course of retinopathy in pregnant diabetic women. Testing the hypothesis We suggest two prospective follow up studies conducted on women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The first study would include a group of non-pregnant women and a group of diabetic women undergoing normal pregnancy matched for age and duration of diabetes. In the second study pregnant women would be divided into two groups: one with normal pregnancy and the other with preeclampsia. The procedure and data collection in both studies will be identical: a complete ophthalmological examination, glycaemic control, blood pressure measurement and venous blood samples for the determination of plasma levels of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1

  11. Technology in the management of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Unnikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosive increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in resource-strapped regions of the world demands innovative solutions in healthcare. Advances in information technology, diagnostics and food technology have the potential to make diagnosis and treatment of diabetes simpler, cost-effective and patient-friendly. Newer methods of glucose testing such as the ambulatory glucose profile promise to make clinical decision-making easier and more robust. More advanced modes of insulin delivery are likely to help larger proportions of patients achieve their glycaemic goals with minimal risk of hypoglycaemia. Use of telemedicine and electronic medical records represents a significant advance in improving delivery of diabetes care and monitoring its outcomes. Efforts are also on to harness the wide penetrance of mobile phones in spreading awareness about diabetes and its prevention as well as in screening for retinopathy. Advances in technology also promise to favourably alter the food habits of the population, with the advent of the novel high-fibre white rice being a case in point. This narrative review aims to discuss some of the ways in which emerging technologies are making diabetes monitoring and treatment easier, more effective and pleasant for the patient.

  12. Relationship of 25-hydroxy vitamin D level and severity of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus%25-羟基维生素D水平与2型糖尿病视网膜病变严重程度的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晨; 周玲; 毛红; 赵湜

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨25-羟基维生素D[25(OH)D]水平与2型糖尿病视网膜病变严重程度的相关性。方法回顾性研究1474例2型糖尿病患者,依糖尿病视网膜病变程度由轻到重分为糖尿病无视网膜病变组(NDR组,n=640)、背景期糖尿病视网膜病变组(BDR组,n=494)及增殖期糖尿病视网膜病变组(PDR组,n=340),另入选同时期健康人群作为对照组(NDM组,n=640)。分别检测各组血清25(OH)D、糖化血红蛋白(HbA1c)、体重指数(BMI)、收缩压、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)水平,并比较各组间差异。结果病程及HbA1c水平方面,均有NDM组<NDR组<BDR组<PDR组(均P<0.05);收缩压方面,PDR组显著高于其余3组, BDR组显著高于NDM组(均P<0.05),但NDM组与NDR组间、NDR组与BDR组间均差异无统计学意义;LDL-C方面,NDM组显著低于其余3组(均P<0.05),但3组间差异无统计学意义;血清25(OH)D水平NDM组>NDR组>BDR组>PDR组(均P<0.05)。血清25(OH)D水平与病程及HbA1c呈负相关(P<0.001)。25(OH)D水平与糖尿病视网膜病变严重程度呈负相关(r=-0.855,P<0.001)。结论血清25(OH)D水平降低与2型糖尿病视网膜病变的严重程度密切相关,且其可能作为预测2型糖尿病视网膜病变严重程度的重要指标。%Objective To discuss the relationship between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D[25(OH)D] level and the severity of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods 1474 cases of type 2 diabetic patients were classified into three groups according to their severity of diabetic retinopathy, the non-diabetic retinopathy group(NDR group, n =640), the background diabetic retinopathy group(BDR group, n =494) and the proliferative diabetic retinopathy group(PDR group, n=340).640 healthy people with normal level of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) were

  13. Rapid assessment of avoidable blindness and diabetic retinopathy in Republic of Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatic, Tatiana; Bendelic, Eugen; Paduca, Ala; Rabiu, Mansour; Corduneanu, Angela; Garaba, Angela; Novac, Victoria; Curca, Cristina; Sorbala, Inga; Chiaburu, Andrei; Verega, Florentina; Andronic, Victoria; Guzun, Irina; Căpăţină, Olga; Zamă-Mardari, Iulea

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairment, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy among people aged ≥50 years in the Republic of Moldova using Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness plus Diabetic Retinopathy ('RAAB+DR') techniques. 111 communities of people aged ≥50 years were randomly selected. In addition to standard RAAB procedures in all people with diabetes (previous history of the disease or with a random blood glucose level >11.1 mm/L (200 mg/dL)), a dilated fundus examination was performed to assess the presence and the degree of diabetic retinopathy using the Scottish DR grading system. 3877 (98%) people out of the 3885 eligible people were examined. The prevalence of blindness was 1.4% (95% CI 1.0% to 1.8%). The major causes of blindness and severe visual impairment were untreated cataract (58.2%), glaucoma (10.9%), and other posterior segment causes (10.9%). The estimated prevalence of diabetes was 11.4%. Among all people with diabetes, 55.9% had some form of retinopathy, and sight threatening diabetic retinopathy affected 14.6%. The RAAB+DR survey in the Republic of Moldova established that untreated cataract is the major cause of avoidable blindness in rural areas. This needs to be tackled by expanding the geographical coverage of cataract surgical services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes attending rural primary healthcare facilities in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Tony; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Murhekar, Manoj V; Jayaraman, Yuvaraj; Kolandaswamy, K; Rao, Sudha Ramachandra; David, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    India has a high burden of diabetic retinopathy ranging from 12.2% to 20.4% among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A T2DM management programme was initiated in the public sector in Tamil Nadu. We estimated the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors. We did a cross-sectional survey among patients with T2DM attending two primary health centres for treatment and follow-up in Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu in January- March 2013. We did a questionnaire-based survey, and measured blood pressure and biochemical parameters (serum creatinine, plasma glucose, etc.) of the patients. We examined their eyes by direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and defined diabetic retinopathy using a modified classification by Klein et al. We calculated the proportion and 95% CI for the prevalence and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy. Among the 270 patients, the mean (SD) age was 54.5 (10) years. The median duration of T2DM was 48 months. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 29.6%. Overall, 65.9% of patients had hypertension, 14.4% had nephropathy (eGFR 5 years (AOR 6.5, 95% CI 3.6-11.7), poor glycaemic control (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), and nephropathy (AOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6). There was a high burden of undetected retinopathy and other comorbid conditions among patients with T2DM. Early detection of comorbid conditions and glycaemic control can be improved by training care-providers and educating patients.

  15. [Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Bello, Carlos; Capitão, Ricardo Miguel; Sequeira Duarte, João; Azinheira, Jorge; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2017-10-31

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common disease, affecting up to 13.1% of the Portuguese population. In addition to the known micro and macrovascular complications, drug side effects constitute a major concern, leading to changes in the treatment guidelines, which favor safety over efficacy. Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment for most patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, it has been associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in up to 30% of treated patients. The authors describe the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in a diabetic population and explore the possible underlying factors. Retrospective, observational study. Clinical and laboratory data of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients whose vitamin B12 status was evaluated in the last decade (2005 - 2016) were analyzed. Patients with known malabsorptive syndromes or having undergone bariatric surgery were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis of the data was done and the results were considered statistically significant at p values 2.2 years and 11 ± 10.4 years of type 2 diabetes mellitus duration. These patients had a high prevalence of complications: diabetic renal disease 47.7%, neuropathy 9.2%, retinopathy 14.9%, coronary artery disease 8.4%, cerebrovascular disease 10.9%, and peripheral arterial disease 5.5%. Vitamin B12 deficiency (21.4% of the population and this subgroup was older (68.4 vs 65.8 years, p = 0.006), had a longer type 2 diabetes mellitus duration (13.35 vs 10.36 years; p = 0.001), higher prevalence of retinopathy (20.9% vs 13.3%; p = 0.005) and thyroid dysfunction (34% vs 23.7%; p = 0.002). Vitamin B12 deficiency was also more frequent in patients treated with metformin (24.7% vs 15.8%; p = 0.017), antiplatelet agents (25.4% vs 16.2%, p 26.8% vs 18.2%; p = 0.001). After adjustment for possible confounders, the variables associated with B12 deficiency were: metformin, hypothyroidism, age and type 2 diabetes mellitus duration. Despite the retrospective design

  16. Argon laser in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (Preliminary communication)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saprykin, P.I.; Simonova, K.K.; Belyaeva, M.I.

    1974-01-01

    The complications observed in the photocoagulation treatment of diabetic angiopathy and retinopathy include the following conditions: tractional retinal detachment, accelerated development of proliferating retinitis and massive hemmorrhaging into the vitreous body. (V.A.P.)

  17. DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... COMMENTARY. DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES. MELLITUS ... contributions in diabetes mellitus and in various medical disorders. Hence dermatoglyphic .... female cases. These findings are similar to ...

  18. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yingfeng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM and diabetic retinopathy (DR in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR. Presenting visual impairment (VI was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1% English-speaking and 885 (27.9% Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p  Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations.

  19. Visual functions and disability in diabetic retinopathy patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Kaiti, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to find correlations between visual functions and visual disabilities in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 38 visually impaired diabetic retinopathy subjects at the Low Vision Clinic of B.P. Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic Studies, Kathmandu. The subjects underwent assessment of distance and near visual acuity, objective and subjective refraction, contrast sensitivity, color vision, and central a...

  20. Consumption of polyphenol-rich Morus alba leaves extract attenuates early diabetic retinopathy: the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ayman M; Abd El-Twab, Sanaa M; Abdel-Reheim, Eman S

    2017-06-01

    Beneficial effects of white mulberry against diabetes mellitus have been reported. However, the molecular mechanisms of how white mulberry can attenuate diabetic retinopathy remain poorly understood. Here, the mechanism underlying the protective effect of Morus alba leaves ethanolic extract on oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in diabetic retinopathy was investigated. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin. One week after, M. alba (100 mg/kg) was administrated to the rats daily for 16 weeks. Morus alba extract showed high content of polyphenolics and free radical scavenging activity. Oral M. alba administration significantly attenuated hyperglycemia and weight loss, and decreased sorbitol, fructose, protein kinase C, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress markers in retinas of the diabetic rats. Moreover, M. alba produced marked down-regulation of caspase-3 and Bax, with concomitant up-regulation of Bcl-2 in the diabetic retinas. M. alba also reduced the expression of VEGF in the retina. These results indicate that M. alba has protective effect on diabetic retinopathy with possible mechanisms of inhibiting hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, inflammation, polyol pathway activation, and VEGF expression in the retina.

  1. The Role of Microglia in Diabetic Retinopathy: Inflammation, Microvasculature Defects and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which appears in one third of all diabetic patients and is a prominent cause of vision loss. First discovered as a microvascular disease, intensive research in the field identified inflammation and neurodegeneration to be part of diabetic retinopathy. Microglia, the resident monocytes of the retina, are activated due to a complex interplay between the different cell types of the retina and diverse pathological pathways. The trigger for developing diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, accompanied by leukostasis and vascular leakages. Transcriptional changes in activated microglia, mediated via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways, results in release of various pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, caspases and glutamate. Activated microglia additionally increased proliferation and migration. Among other consequences, these changes in microglia severely affected retinal neurons, causing increased apoptosis and subsequent thinning of the nerve fiber layer, resulting in visual loss. New potential therapeutics need to interfere with these diabetic complications even before changes in the retina are diagnosed, to prevent neuronal apoptosis and blindness in patients. PMID:29301251

  2. Ocular pulse amplitude after panretinal photocoagulation in normotensive eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Marija M; Karadzic, Jelena B; Kovacevic, Igor M; Marjanovic, Ivan S

    2017-06-26

    To assess the effect of panretinal laser photocoagulation on ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) in normotensive eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Prospectively, we performed unilateral argon laser panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in 30 patients with diabetes mellitus type II and previously untreated bilateral proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Before and 7 and 30 days after the treatment, OPA was measured using dynamic contour tonometer. Compared with the untreated contralateral eyes, laser photocoagulation led to a reduction of OPA. Ocular pulse amplitude did not significantly differ in photocoagulated eyes 7 days after the treatment, but there was a significant difference in OPA 30 days after the treatment. The decrease in OPA values was 15% 7 days after PRP and 40% 30 days after PRP. Ocular pulse amplitude reduction after PRP indirectly informs us about choriocapillary closure, already reported in previous studies.

  3. Retrieving clinically relevant diabetic retinopathy images using a multi-class multiple-instance framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandakkar, Parag S.; Venkatesan, Ragav; Li, Baoxin

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a vision-threatening complication from diabetes mellitus, a medical condition that is rising globally. Unfortunately, many patients are unaware of this complication because of absence of symptoms. Regular screening of DR is necessary to detect the condition for timely treatment. Content-based image retrieval, using archived and diagnosed fundus (retinal) camera DR images can improve screening efficiency of DR. This content-based image retrieval study focuses on two DR clinical findings, microaneurysm and neovascularization, which are clinical signs of non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors propose a multi-class multiple-instance image retrieval framework which deploys a modified color correlogram and statistics of steerable Gaussian Filter responses, for retrieving clinically relevant images from a database of DR fundus image database.

  4. Diabetic Retinopathy in Nnewi, Nigeria | Nwosu | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to determine the incidence and pattern of diabetic retinopathy in a clinic population of diabetics in Nnewi. All consecutive new patients seen at the Diabetic Eye Clinic, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, between March 1997 and September 1998 were examined.

  5. Factors Associated With Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy, A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a progressive sight threatening diabetic complication. The prognosis seems to be related to largely modifiable risk factors. Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify factors that could be associated with progression of DR. among adult diabetic patients attending primary health ...

  6. 'Teaching corner': Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based interventions in three areas: primary prevention of retinopathy by optimum ... disease and management of established retinopathy to prevent or mitigate visual loss. ... of retinopathy and timely treatment all diminish the risk of ... types: macular oedema and macular ischaemia which may .... Variation in age of onset.

  7. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS): population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Loumann; Lervang, Hans-Henrik; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several population-based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy. These studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous...... era, suggesting new studies of the present population with diabetes. Aim and methods: This cross-section study included 656 people with type 1 diabetes and 328 with type 2 diabetes. Crude prevalence rates of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, clinically significant macular oedema and several specific...... retinal lesions were assessed, together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The point prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 0.8% and 0.3% for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Equivalent prevalence rates of clinically significant...

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY USING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Priya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is an eye disease caused by the complication of diabetes and we should detect it early for effective treatment. As diabetes progresses, the vision of a patient may start to deteriorate and lead to diabetic retinopathy. As a result, two groups were identified, namely non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR. In this paper, to diagnose diabetic retinopathy, three models like Probabilistic Neural network (PNN, Bayesian Classification and Support vector machine (SVM are described and their performances are compared. The amount of the disease spread in the retina can be identified by extracting the features of the retina. The features like blood vessels, haemmoraghes of NPDR image and exudates of PDR image are extracted from the raw images using the image processing techniques and fed to the classifier for classification. A total of 350 fundus images were used, out of which 100 were used for training and 250 images were used for testing. Experimental results show that PNN has an accuracy of 89.6 % Bayes Classifier has an accuracy of 94.4% and SVM has an accuracy of 97.6%. This infers that the SVM model outperforms all other models. Also our system is also run on 130 images available from “DIARETDB0: Evaluation Database and Methodology for Diabetic Retinopathy” and the results show that PNN has an accuracy of 87.69% Bayes Classifier has an accuracy of 90.76% and SVM has an accuracy of 95.38%.

  9. Assessing Progress in Retinopathy Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCaire, Tamara J.; Palta, Mari; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Wisconsin Diabetes Registry Study (WDRS) cohort consisted of patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the same geographic region as, but 8–34 years later than the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR) cohort, providing a unique opportunity to assess changes in complications. We estimated the current prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy at 20 years of diabetes duration, compared these between eras, and evaluated the influence of diabetes management. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-year examinations, including fundus photographs, were completed on 305 WDRS subjects during 2007–2011. A subgroup of the WESDR cohort participated in one of four study visits during 1980–1996, at similar diabetes duration (n = 583). Adjusted ordinal logistic regression with three retinopathy severity categories was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of more severe retinopathy with diagnosis during an earlier era. RESULTS Mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was lower in WDRS than in WESDR (8.0% vs. 9.3% [P < 0.001], and 93.4% vs. 21.3% [P < 0.001]) used ≥3 daily insulin injections or an insulin pump. In WDRS, 18% had vision-threatening levels of retinopathy vs. 43% in WESDR. The adjusted OR of more severe retinopathy in the earlier era (OR 3.0 [95% CI 2.2–4.0]) was reduced by including 20-year HbA1c in the model (OR 2.2 [1.6–3.0]). CONCLUSIONS Retinopathy severity at a diabetes duration of 20 years is lower in the more recent era of type 1 diabetes. Updated projections should be used when informing newly diagnosed individuals of prognosis and for health care cost assessments. Current glycemic control explained a limited amount of the difference. PMID:23193204

  10. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is associated with microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Boelter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in working-age individuals. Diabetic patients with proteinuria or those on dialysis usually present severe forms of diabetic retinopathy, but the association of diabetic retinopathy with early stages of diabetic nephropathy has not been entirely established. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1214 type 2 diabetic patients to determine whether microalbuminuria is associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in these patients. Patients were evaluated by direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and grouped according to the presence or absence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The agreement of diabetic retinopathy classification performed by ophthalmoscopy and by stereoscopic color fundus photographs was 95.1% (kappa = 0.735; P < 0.001. Demographic information, smoking history, anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, glycemic and lipid profile, and urinary albumin were evaluated. On multiple regression analysis, diabetic nephropathy (OR = 5.18, 95% CI = 2.91-9.22, P < 0.001, insulin use (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.47-4.31, P = 0.001 and diabetes duration (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07, P = 0.011 were positively associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and body mass index (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.86-0.96, P < 0.001 was negatively associated with it. When patients with macroalbuminuria and on dialysis were excluded, microalbuminuria (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.56-6.98, P = 0.002 remained associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Therefore, type 2 diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy more often presented renal involvement, including urinary albumin excretion within the microalbuminuria range. Therefore, all patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy should undergo an evaluation of renal function including urinary albumin measurements.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy pathogenesis and the ameliorating effects of melatonin; involvement of autophagy, inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdashtian, Ehsan; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Yousefi, Bahman; Hosseinzadeh, Azam; Reiter, Russel J; Safa, Majid; Ghaznavi, Habib; Naseripour, Masood

    2018-01-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), remains as one of the major causes of vision loss worldwide. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the adhesion of leukocytes to retinal capillaries are initial events in DR development. Inflammation, ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy are major causative factors involved in the pathogenesis of DR. Diabetes associated hyperglycemia leads to mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction culminating in a rise in ROS generation. Since mitochondria are the major source of ROS production, oxidative stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction also contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Autophagy increases in the retina of diabetic patients and is regulated by ER stress, oxidative stress and inflammation-related pathways. Autophagy functions as a double-edged sword in DR. Under mild stress, autophagic activity can lead to cell survival while during severe stress, dysregulated autophagy results in massive cell death and may have a role in initiation and exacerbation of DR. Melatonin and its metabolites play protective roles against inflammation, ER stress and oxidative stress due to their direct free radical scavenger activities and indirect antioxidant activity via the stimulation antioxidant enzymes including glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase. Melatonin also acts as a cell survival agent by modulating autophagy in various cell types and under different conditions through amelioration of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammation. Herein, we review the possible effects of melatonin on diabetic retinopathy, focusing on its ability to regulate autophagy processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Th1/Th2 cytokine expression in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y L; Zhang, F Q; Hao, F Q

    2016-07-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), an important complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is not well understood. T helper cell balance (Th1/Th2) is involved in various autoimmune diseases; however, its role in DR is not understood. This study explores changes in Th1 and Th2 cytokine expression during DR. Blood samples were collected from 25 healthy volunteers (normal control group), 35 patients with type 2 DM (T2DM group) without DR, and 30 cases of T2DM patients with DR (DR group). Real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of IL-2 and TNF-α, secreted from Th1 cells, and of IL-4 and IL-10, secreted from Th2 cells. We used ELISA to detect cytokine expression in serum to analyze the correlation between Th1 and Th2 cytokines. IL-2 and TNF-αmRNA and protein expression levels in the T2DM and DR groups were significantly higher than in the normal control group (P 0.05). IL-2 and TNF-αwere negatively correlated with IL-4 and IL-10 in the DR group, respectively. We found that Th1 cytokine secretion was higher and Th2 cytokines secretion was lower during DR, leading to a Th1/ Th2 imbalance, suggesting that Th1/Th2 imbalance is a side effect for DR occurrence and development.

  13. Quantitative assessment of early diabetic retinopathy using fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ning; Donaghue, Kim C; Liew, Gerald; Rogers, Sophie L; Wang, Jie Jin; Lim, Shueh-Wen; Jenkins, Alicia J; Hsu, Wynne; Li Lee, Mong; Wong, Tien Y

    2009-01-01

    Fractal analysis can quantify the geometric complexity of the retinal vascular branching pattern and may therefore offer a new method to quantify early diabetic microvascular damage. In this study, we examined the relationship between retinal fractal dimension and retinopathy in young individuals with type 1 diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 729 patients with type 1 diabetes (aged 12-20 years) who had seven-field stereoscopic retinal photographs taken of both eyes. From these photographs, retinopathy was graded according to the modified Airlie House classification, and fractal dimension was quantified using a computer-based program following a standardized protocol. In this study, 137 patients (18.8%) had diabetic retinopathy signs; of these, 105 had mild retinopathy. Median (interquartile range) retinal fractal dimension was 1.46214 (1.45023-1.47217). After adjustment for age, sex, diabetes duration, A1C, blood pressure, and total cholesterol, increasing retinal vascular fractal dimension was significantly associated with increasing odds of retinopathy (odds ratio 3.92 [95% CI 2.02-7.61] for fourth versus first quartile of fractal dimension). In multivariate analysis, each 0.01 increase in retinal vascular fractal dimension was associated with a nearly 40% increased odds of retinopathy (1.37 [1.21-1.56]). This association remained after additional adjustment for retinal vascular caliber. Greater retinal fractal dimension, representing increased geometric complexity of the retinal vasculature, is independently associated with early diabetic retinopathy signs in type 1 diabetes. Fractal analysis of fundus photographs may allow quantitative measurement of early diabetic microvascular damage.

  14. Social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Eva; Rees, Gwyn; Pesudovs, Konrad; Dirani, Mohamed; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Y; Lamoureux, Ecosse

    2012-01-01

    People with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are likely to experience enhanced social and emotional strain. Critically, those with both vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and psychosocial problems may have significantly reduced levels of functioning compared with psychologically healthy counterparts. This can cause inadequate compliance, increased strain on family functioning, worse diabetes control, increased progression of diabetic retinopathy and, consequently, further psychosocial stress resulting in a number of concerning implications for disease management, clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. However, the emotional and social health consequences of diabetic retinopathy have not yet been systematically explored. This information is crucial as it allows for a targeted approach to treatment and prevention and avoidance of the potentially detrimental implications described above. Therefore, this paper reviews the current qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and identifies directions for future research. Key search terms were applied to the electronic databases Pubmed, ISI Web of Science and Embase and the bibliographies of relevant papers were systematically reviewed for additional references. Overall, the evidence suggests that diabetic retinopathy and associated vision loss have several debilitating effects, including disruption of family functioning, relationships and roles; increased social isolation and dependence; and deterioration of work prospects resulting in increased financial strain. Adverse emotional responses include fear, anxiety, vulnerability, guilt, loss of confidence, anger, stress and self-perception issues. However, the research to date is largely qualitative in nature, with most quantitative studies being small, cross-sectional and somewhat outdated. Similarly, the outcome measures used in many studies to date are suboptimal in terms of content and validity

  15. Automated detection of fundus photographic red lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Godt, Jannik; Larsen, Nicolai; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Agardh, Elisabet; Kalm, Helle; Grunkin, Michael; Owens, David R

    2003-02-01

    To compare a fundus image-analysis algorithm for automated detection of hemorrhages and microaneurysms with visual detection of retinopathy in patients with diabetes. Four hundred fundus photographs (35-mm color transparencies) were obtained in 200 eyes of 100 patients with diabetes who were randomly selected from the Welsh Community Diabetic Retinopathy Study. A gold standard reference was defined by classifying each patient as having or not having diabetic retinopathy based on overall visual grading of the digitized transparencies. A single-lesion visual grading was made independently, comprising meticulous outlining of all single lesions in all photographs and used to develop the automated red lesion detection system. A comparison of visual and automated single-lesion detection in replicating the overall visual grading was then performed. Automated red lesion detection demonstrated a specificity of 71.4% and a resulting sensitivity of 96.7% in detecting diabetic retinopathy when applied at a tentative threshold setting for use in diabetic retinopathy screening. The accuracy of 79% could be raised to 85% by adjustment of a single user-supplied parameter determining the balance between the screening priorities, for which a considerable range of options was demonstrated by the receiver-operating characteristic (area under the curve 90.3%). The agreement of automated lesion detection with overall visual grading (0.659) was comparable to the mean agreement of six ophthalmologists (0.648). Detection of diabetic retinopathy by automated detection of single fundus lesions can be achieved with a performance comparable to that of experienced ophthalmologists. The results warrant further investigation of automated fundus image analysis as a tool for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  16. Ultrastructure of neurovascular changes in human diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, János; Taurone, Samanta; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Biró, Zsolt; Varsányi, Balázs; Scuderi, Gianluca; Orlando, Maria Patrizia; Turchetta, Rosaria; Micera, Alessandra; Artico, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The previous concept regarding diabetic retinopathy assigned a primary role to hyperglycemia-induced microvascular alterations, while neuronal and glial abnormalities were considered to be secondary to either ischemia or exudation. The aim of this study was to reveal the potential role of neuronal and glial cells in initial and advanced alterations of the retinopathy in human type 2 diabetes. Electron microscopy and histochemical studies were performed on 38 surgically removed human eyes (28 obtained from diabetic patients and 10 from non-diabetic patients). Morphometric analysis of basement membrane material and lipids was performed. An accumulation of metabolic by-products was found in the capillary wall with aging: this aspect was significantly more pronounced in diabetics. Müller glial cells were found to contribute to alterations of the capillary wall and to occlusion, as well as to the development of proliferative retinopathy and cystoid degeneration of the retina. Our results showed morphological evidence regarding the role of neuronal and glial cells in the pathology of diabetic retinopathy, prior and in addition to microangiopathy. These morphological findings support a neurovascular pathogenesis at the origin of diabetic retinopathy, thus the current treatment approach should be completed by neuroprotective measures.

  17. Monitoring of Diabetic Retinopathy in relation to Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Troels; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Svenningsen, Annette Lykke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the need for closer perioperative monitoring of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. METHODS: Prospective observational clinical study of 56 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. The patients were...... examined with 7-field fundus images and optical coherence tomography scans 2 weeks before and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Worsening was defined as a two-step change in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy scale or appearance or worsening of macular edema......%) of the 32 patients without preoperative diabetic retinopathy had a transient worsening at 6 months. No patients developed macular edema, but the whole cohort had a minor increase in center point foveal thickness that peaked 6 months postoperatively. The patients were required to have good glucose control...

  18. Automated microaneurysm detection algorithms applied to diabetic retinopathy retinal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akara Sopharak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is the commonest cause of blindness in working age people. It is characterised and graded by the development of retinal microaneurysms, haemorrhages and exudates. The damage caused by diabetic retinopathy can be prevented if it is treated in its early stages. Therefore, automated early detection can limit the severity of the disease, improve the follow-up management of diabetic patients and assist ophthalmologists in investigating and treating the disease more efficiently. This review focuses on microaneurysm detection as the earliest clinically localised characteristic of diabetic retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Algorithms used for microaneurysm detection from retinal images are reviewed. A number of features used to extract microaneurysm are summarised. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of reported methods used to automatically detect microaneurysms is presented and discussed. The performance of methods and their complexity are also discussed.

  19. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan, Futoshi; Takayuki, Masaki; Takahashi, Naohiko; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Eshima, Nobuoki; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction are associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. This preliminary study was therefore designed to test the hypothesis that DR is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients without insulin treatment. Seventy persons were diagnosed to have type 2 diabetes in the examination from June 2004 to May 2006. The study group consisted of 29 type 2 diabetic patients with DR (age: 58±6 years, mean±standard deviation (s.d.)) and 41 type 2 diabetic patients with no DR (NDR) (n=41, 58±5 years). Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentration and cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphic findings. DR patients had lower BRS, early and delayed 123 I-MIBG myocardial uptake values and higher percent washout rate (WR) of 123 I-MIBG than the NDR patients. With respect to metabolic findings, DR patients had higher fasting plasma insulin concentration (P 123 I-MIBG (P 123 I-MIBG are independently associated with DR in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. (author)

  20. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Desta, Semere Tekeste

    2017-01-01

    Høgskulen på Vestlandet Avdeling for helsefag for sykepleiere Tittel: Diabetes type 1 Bakgrunn for val av tema: I 2000 var det ca. 130 000 personer i Norge med diabetes, av disse hadde ca. 20 000 diabetes type 1. I dag er det ca. 230 000 personer som har diabetes i Norge. Av disse ca. 28 000 type 1 diabetes. Tallet viser hvor alvorlig sykdommen er, fordi det har vært og fortsatt er, en økning av antall diabetikere i Norge. Type 1 diabetes kan komme i alle aldersgrupper, men vanligvis...

  1. Serum TNF-Alpha Level Predicts Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Zorena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was identification of the immunologic markers of the damage to the eye apparatus at early stages of diabetes mellitus (DM type 1 children. One hundred and eleven children with DM type 1 were divided into two groups: those with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and without retinopathy. All the children had their daily urine albumin excretion, HbA1c, C-peptide measured, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, and ophthalmologic examination. Levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 in serum were measured by ELISA tests (Quantikine High Sensitivity Human by R&D Systems, Minneapolis, Minn, USA. The NPDR children demonstrated a significantly longer duration of the disease in addition to higher HbA1c, albumin excretion rate, C-reactive protein, systolic blood pressure, as well as TNF-α and IL-6 levels than those without retinopathy. The logistic regression revealed that the risk of NPDR was strongly dependent on TNF-α [(OR 4.01; 95%CI 2.01–7.96]. TNF-α appears to be the most significant predictor among the analyzed parameters of damage to the eye apparatus. The early introduction of the TNF-α antagonists to the treatment of young patients with DM type 1 who show high serum activity of the TNF-α may prevent them from development of diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Microaneurysm count as a predictor of long-term progression in diabetic retinopathy in young patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M L; Broe, R; Frydkjaer-Olsen, U

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate microaneurysm (MA) count as a predictor of long-term progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). METHODS: We examined 185 patients with T1DM at baseline (1995) and at follow-up (2011). At baseline, mean age and duration...... of diabetes were 20.6 and 12.9 years, respectively. Two-field (1995) and seven-field (2011) fundus photographs were taken in accordance with the European Diabetes Study Group (EURODIAB) and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) protocol, respectively. DR was graded in accordance to the ETDRS......), and incident diabetic macula edema (DME). RESULTS: We included 138 patients (138 eyes). Of these, 58 had no retinopathy and 80 had MAs only. At follow-up, rates of two-step progression of DR, progression to PDR and incident DME were 52.9, 21.7, and 10.1 %, respectively. In logistic regression models, MA count...

  3. The metabolic syndrome and severity of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available John J Chen,1,2,* Lucas J Wendel,1,3,* Emily S Birkholz,1 John G Vallone,4 Anne L Coleman,5,6 Fei Yu,7 Vinit B Mahajan1,3,8 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Vitreoretinal Service, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, 7Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: While metabolic syndrome has been strongly implicated as a risk factor for macrovascular diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease, its relationship with microvascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, has been less defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy.Methods: A retrospective case–control chart review at the University of Iowa ophthalmology and primary care clinics included 100 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, 100 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 100 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, and 100 nondiabetic patients who were randomly selected. Using the International Diabetes Foundation definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of metabolic syndrome were compared among these groups.Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes was 69.3%, which was significantly higher than that in patients without diabetes (27%; P<0.0001 (odds ratio [OR] =6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.76–10.49; P=0.0004. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between diabetics with and without diabetic retinopathy, with rates

  4. 82例糖尿病合并高血压患者发生视网膜病变的相关危险因素%Risk Factors of Retinopathy in 82 Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Complicated with Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾敏珊; 刘玉英; 龚晓薇; 于建新; 陈俊文

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors associated with 82 cases of diabetes and hypertension in patients with Retinopathy.Methods 2013 in our hospital were treated 82 cases of patients with diabetes and hypertension,Grouped according to the level of blood pressure as Borderline hypertension group,Mild hypertension group,Moderate hypertension group,Severe hypertension group,And all patients taking as Fasting plasma glucose,Triglycerides,Eye Detection kind of Detailed examination, Classified in accordance with international standards retinopathy grade,And the effects of different blood pressure rate of retinopathy,Study of risk factors for retinopathy.Results According to statistics that compare,Retinopathy risk factors can determine is Blood pressure,Duration of diabetes,Fasting plasma glucose,Glycated hemoglobin,Triglycerides,Microalbuminuria.Conclusion Diabetic retinopathy was a complex disease process,To prevent retinopathy should be for blood pressure,fasting glucose, triglycerides and other factors for effective control,the extent and speed reduction retinopathy.%目的:探讨82例糖尿病合并高血压患者发生视网膜病变的相关危险因素。方法选取本院2013年收治的82例糖尿病合并高血压患者,按照血压高低分为临界高血压组、轻度高血压组、中度高血压组、重度高血压组,并对所有患者进行空腹血糖、甘油三酯、眼部检测等相关详细的检查,按照国际相关标准划分视网膜病变等级,并比较不同血压对视网膜病变率的影响,研究视网膜病变的危险因素。结果据统计对比得知,影响视网膜病变的危险因素可以确定的有血压、糖尿病病程、空腹血糖、糖化血红蛋白、甘油三酯、尿微量蛋白以上六项。结论糖尿病视网膜病变是一种复杂的病变过程,要预防视网膜病变就应该针对血压、空腹血糖、甘油三酯等因素进行有效控制,消减视网膜病变的程度和速度。

  5. Changes in serum leptin level in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jing; Cao Huiling

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the regulation of changes in serum leptin level in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods: The 120 participating subjects were of four groups: healthy controls, diabetic patients without retinopathy, patients with NPDR and patients with PDR, each group consisted of 18 males and 12 females with comparable BMI. The levels of serum leptin, IVC, insulin and blood glucose of these patients were measured and the correlation between serum leptin level and other parameters was analysed. Results: The level of serum leptin in controls, diabetic patients without retinopathy, patients with NPDR and patients with PDR were 6.91 ± 1.87 μg/L, 7,83 ±2.11 μg/L, 9.56 ± 2.43 μg/L and 11.69 ± 2.57 μg/L respectively. The patients with PDR had higher serum leptin levels than patients with NPDR (t=2.15, p < 0.05), diabetic patients without retinopathy (t = 2.71, p < 0.01), and controls (t = 3.50, p < 0.001), the patients with NPDR had higher serum leptin levels than diabetic patients without retinopathy (t = 2.23, p < 0.05) and controls (t = 2.75, p < 0.01), while the difference in serum leptin was not significant between diabetic patients without retinopathy and controls. The serum level was positively correlated to BMI (r = 0.22, p < 0.05) and FINS (r = 0.28, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Serum leptin level is elevated in patients with diabetic retinopathy and is positively correlated to the severity of the disease

  6. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Olesen, Jesper; Jørgensen, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Within the last 20 years, the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been reported to be increasing worldwide in correlation with ethnic and geographic variations. The actual prevalence of GDM throughout all of Greenland remains unknown. Objective. The aim of this study...

  7. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; WANG Fang; JI Li-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment have greatly reduced the risk of blindness from this disease, but because diabetes is so common, diabetic retinopathy remains an important problem. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Totally 746 type 2 diabetic patients were selected for biochemical and clinical characteristics test and examined by the retina-camera for diabetic retinopathy and the average age was 55.9 years old.Results A total of 526 patients was classified as non-DR, 159 patients as non-proliferative-DR and 61 patients as proliferative-DR. Duration of diabetes [(66.09±72.51) months vs (143.71 ±93.27) months vs (174.30±81.91)months, P=0.00], systolic blood pressure [(131.95±47.20) mmHg vs (138.71 ±21.36) mmHg vs (147.58±24.10)mmHg, P=0.01], urine albumin [(32.79± 122.29) mg/L vs (190.96±455.65) mg/L vs (362.00±552.51) mg/L,P=0.00], glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) [(8.68 ± 2.26)% vs (9.42±1.84)% vs (9.42±1.96)%, P=0.04],C-reactive protein (CRP) [(3.19±7.37) mg/L vs (6.36± 23.59) mg/L vs (3.02±4.34) mg/L, P=0.03],high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [(1.23±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.33±0.35) mmol/L vs (1.24±0.33)mmol/L, P=0.01], uric acid (UA) [(288.51 ±90.85) mmol/L vs (300.29±101.98) mmol/L vs (337.57±115.09)mmol/L, P=0.00], creatinine (CREA) [(84.22±16.31) μmol/L vs (89.35±27.45) μmol/L vs (103.28±48.64)μmol/L, P=0.00], blood urine nitrogen (BUN) [(5.62± 1.62) mmol/L vs (6.55±2.74) mmol/L vs (8.11±3.60)mmol/L, P=0.00] were statistically different among the three groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that diabetic duration and urine albumin were two independent risk factors of DR (the OR values were 1.010 and 1.003 respectively).Conclusions Diabetic duration and urine albumin are two independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  8. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  9. Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and associated factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus cases are at higher risk for diabetic related complications. In low-income African countries, patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus account for 75% of diabetes cases. Psychiatric disorders have a greater impact on the global burden of diseases and disability associated with ...

  10. MicroRNA-126:a promising novel biomarker in peripheral blood for diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Li; Qin; Mei-Xia; An; Yan-Li; Liu; Han-Chun; Xu; Zhi-Qing; Lu

    2017-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the content of serum micro RNA-126(mi R-126) and its role in screening retinal endothelial injury and early diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.METHODS:The study included 184 serum samples,59 samples from healthy individuals,44 samples from diabetes mellitus(DM) patients without diabetic retinopathy(NDR),42 from non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDR) patients and 39 samples from proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR) patients.The expression of mi R-126 was evaluated using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS:The serum content of mi R-126 declined as the damage degree in the retina.There was significant difference between the two retinopathy groups(P0.05).Receiver operating characteristic curve(ROC) analyses indicated that serum mi R-126 had significant diagnostic value for PDR.It yielded an area under the curve(AUC) of ROC of 0.976 with 81.21% sensitivity and 90.34% specificity in discriminating PDR from healthy controls,and an AUC of ROC of 0.919 with 84.75% sensitivity and 94.41% specificity in discriminating NDR and NPDR from healthy controls.When the diagnostic threshold was greater than or equal to 8.43,there was an increase in the possibility of NPDR.When the content of mi R-126 was less than or equal to 5.02,the possibility of the occurrence of PDR increased.CONCLUSION:Serum mi R-126 can serve as a non-invasive biomarker for screening retinal endothelial injury and early diagnosis PDR.

  11. PLVAP in diabetic retinopathy: A gatekeeper of angiogenesis and vascular permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiśniewska-Kruk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, approximately 4 million people worldwide experience blindness or severe vision loss caused by diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a multifactorial disease that can progress from minor changes in vascular permeability, into a proliferative retinal disorder. The increasing

  12. Deep image mining for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quellec, Gwenolé; Charrière, Katia; Boudi, Yassine; Cochener, Béatrice; Lamard, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    Deep learning is quickly becoming the leading methodology for medical image analysis. Given a large medical archive, where each image is associated with a diagnosis, efficient pathology detectors or classifiers can be trained with virtually no expert knowledge about the target pathologies. However, deep learning algorithms, including the popular ConvNets, are black boxes: little is known about the local patterns analyzed by ConvNets to make a decision at the image level. A solution is proposed in this paper to create heatmaps showing which pixels in images play a role in the image-level predictions. In other words, a ConvNet trained for image-level classification can be used to detect lesions as well. A generalization of the backpropagation method is proposed in order to train ConvNets that produce high-quality heatmaps. The proposed solution is applied to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening in a dataset of almost 90,000 fundus photographs from the 2015 Kaggle Diabetic Retinopathy competition and a private dataset of almost 110,000 photographs (e-ophtha). For the task of detecting referable DR, very good detection performance was achieved: A z =0.954 in Kaggle's dataset and A z =0.949 in e-ophtha. Performance was also evaluated at the image level and at the lesion level in the DiaretDB1 dataset, where four types of lesions are manually segmented: microaneurysms, hemorrhages, exudates and cotton-wool spots. For the task of detecting images containing these four lesion types, the proposed detector, which was trained to detect referable DR, outperforms recent algorithms trained to detect those lesions specifically, with pixel-level supervision. At the lesion level, the proposed detector outperforms heatmap generation algorithms for ConvNets. This detector is part of the Messidor® system for mobile eye pathology screening. Because it does not rely on expert knowledge or manual segmentation for detecting relevant patterns, the proposed solution is a promising image

  13. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation the index of ophthalmic arteries in diabetic patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy using color Doppler ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghasem Hanafi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye complication in diabetic patients that early detection of this complication is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate ophthalmic artery index in diabetic retinopathy by Doppler ultrasound. . In this cross-sectional study, 64 patients were studied in 4 groups (healthy, diabetic without retinopathy, background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy. Resistance index (RI and Pulsatile Index (PI were assessed by color Doppler ultrasound. The obtained data were analyzed by ANOVA and chi-square test and ROC curve. RI in diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy has the highest mean (0.83 and the lowest mean was observed in healthy subjects (0.54 (P <0.001 as well as in PI, the highest rate was in diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy (1.41 and the lowest was in healthy subjects (0.92 (P <0.001. The results of our study showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and overall accuracy of RI and PI in diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy in the best cut-off points (0.645 and 1.0175 respectively were 100%.Ophthalmic artery index RI and PI was significantly increased in patients with diabetic retinopathy and the sensitivity and specificity for detection retinopathy was 100%. Color Doppler ultrasound method is more efficient for screening diabetic patients with retinopathy.

  15. Polymorphisms in the CTSH gene may influence the progression of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen U; Sandahl, Kristian; Nielsen, Lotte B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasing globally, and as a consequence, more patients are affected by microvascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). The aim of this study was to elucidate possible associations between diabetes-related single...... DR level between baseline and follow-up in the worst eye at baseline. Patients were graded on a modified version of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale, and 20 SNPs were genotyped in 130 of the 185 patients. RESULTS: We found the CTSH/rs3825932 variant (C > T) was associated...... with reduced risk of progression to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (OR [95 % CI] = 0.20 [0.07-0.56], p = 2.4 × 10(-3), padjust = 0.048) and ERBB3/rs2292239 variant (G > T) associated with increased risk of two-step progression (OR [95 % CI] = 2.76 [1.31-5.80], p = 7.5 × 10(-3), padjust = 0...

  16. Foot disorders in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Y. Tokmakova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF, by 2035 the number of diabetes patients will reach 592 million people. Various disorders of the structure and function of the soft tissues and skeleton of the lower extremities is the most common reason that patients seek medical care. The paper presents the modern concept of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapeutic and prevention tactics used in the specialized endocrinological and surgical clinics.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime E

    2015-01-01

    Peru is an upper medium-income developing country with an increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, including diabetes. To review and describe the epidemiology, drivers, and diabetes care plan in Peru. The medical literature was reviewed based on systematic searching of PubMed, Scielo, and various gray literature from the International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organization, and local Peruvian agencies. In Peru, diabetes affects 7% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 96.8% of outpatients visits with this condition. Type 1 diabetes has an incidence of 0.4/100,000 per year, and gestational diabetes affects 16% of pregnancies. The prevalence of glucose intolerance is 8.11% and that of impaired fasting glucose 22.4%. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in adults is 34.7%, 17.5%, and 25%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome prevalence is greater in women and the elderly and at urban and low-altitude locations. Diabetes is the eighth cause of death, the sixth cause of blindness, and the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease and nontraumatic lower limb amputation. In Peru, diabetes accounts for 31.5% of acute myocardial infarctions and 25% of strokes. Infections, diabetic emergencies, and cardiovascular disorders are the main causes for admissions, with a mortality rate Diabetes is a major health care issue in Peru that exposes difficult challenges and shortcomings. The national strategy for tackling diabetes includes promotion of healthy lifestyles; training primary care physicians and providing them with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, safe and effective medications, and tools for monitoring treatment; and, finally, construction of a comprehensive health care network for early referral in order to prevent, detect, and treat diabetic complications. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy in Digital Fundus Photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, M.

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common ocular complication of diabetes. It is the most frequent cause of blindness in the working population of the United States and the European Union. Early diagnosis, and treatment can prevent vision loss in the majority of cases. Yet only approximately 50% of people

  19. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave i sykepleie, 2014 Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturst...

  20. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  1. Axial Myopia and its Influence on Diabetic Retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayyab, H.; Haider, M. A.; Bukhari, S. A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between axial myopia and diabetic retinopathy. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Eye Department of Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore General Hospital, from August 2012 to February 2013. Methodology: A total of 258 participants suffering from type-2 diabetic retinopathy were included. Axial length was measured by two optometrists using contact type ultrasound biometer. Colored retinal photographs, red free retinal photographs and Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) were performed on all patients using standard fundus camera. All fundus photographs and angiograms were independently reviewed and graded by two qualified vitreoretinal fellows. Results: Out of 258 patients, 163 were males (63.2%) and 95 (36.8%) were females. Average age of patients was 56.30 +- 7.57 years. Average axial length of right and left eyes were 23.16 mm and 23.15 mm respectively. There was statistically significant negative correlation between axial length and severity of diabetic retinopathy in the right eye, (Spearman correlation = -0.511, p = 0.0001) as well as the left eye (Spearman correlation = -0.522, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: There is a protective influence of longer axial length of globe on the stage and severity of diabetic retinopathy. This study may help in modifying the screening protocol for diabetic retinopathy amongst patients of differing axial lengths. (author)

  2. Prevalence and Cardiovascular Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy and Maculopathy: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raum, Philipp; Lamparter, Julia; Ponto, Katharina A; Peto, Tunde; Hoehn, René; Schulz, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Wild, Philipp S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age. The purpose of this paper is to report the prevalence and cardiovascular associations of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (DMac) in Germany. The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 at 74 years from the city of Mainz and the district of Mainz-Bingen. We determined the weighted prevalence of DR and DMac by assessing fundus photographs of persons with diabetes from the GHS data base. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, known diagnosis diabetes mellitus or known diabetes medication. Furthermore, we analysed the association between DR and cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. Overall, 7.5% (1,124/15,010) of the GHS cohort had diabetes. Of these, 27.7% were unaware of their disease and thus were newly diagnosed by their participation in the GHS. The prevalence of DR and DMac was 21.7% and 2.3%, respectively among patients with diabetes. Vision-threatening disease was present in 5% of the diabetic cohort. In the multivariable analysis DR (all types) was associated with age (Odds Ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.97 [0.955-0.992]; p = 0.006) arterial hypertension (1.90 [1.190-3.044]; p = 0.0072) and vision-threatening DR with obesity (3.29 [1.504-7.206]; p = 0.0029). DR (all stages) and vision-threatening DR were associated with duration of diabetes (1.09 [1.068-1.114]; pdiabetic retinal disease in Germany [corrected].Prevalence of DR was lower in the GHS compared to East-Asian studies. Associations were found with age, arterial hypertension, obesity, and duration of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Evaluation of VEGF gene polymorphisms and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria C; Garcia-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Soberon-Ventura, Vidal R; Gonzalez, Victoria; Lechuga, Rodrigo; Garcia-Solis, Pablo; Garcia-Gutierrez, David G; Garcia-Solis, Marco Vinicio; Saenz de Viteri, Manuel; Solis-S, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    To assess if the included vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms rs3025035, rs3025021 and rs2010963 are associated to proliferative retinopathy in a Mexican population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A case-control study was conducted in adult individuals with T2DM associated to proliferative retinopathy or non-proliferative retinopathy from Oct. 2014 to Jun. 2015 from the Retina Department of the Asociation to Prevent Blindness in Mexico. The selected patients were adults with a diagnosis of T2DM ≥5y. All subjects had a comprehensive ocular examination and the classification of the retinopathy severity was made considering the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) standardization protocols. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole fresh blood. All samples were genotyped by qPCR for selected VEGF polymorphisms. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was calculated by comparing Chi-square values between the expected and the observed values for genotype counts. In total 142 individuals were enrolled, 71 individuals with T2DM and associated proliferative retinopathy and 71 individuals with non-proliferative retinopathy. One-sided Fisher's exact test was performed for rs3025021 [OR (95% CI)=0.44(0.08-2.2); P =0.25] and rs2010963 [OR (95% CI)=0.63(0.25-1.6); P =0.23]. The minor allelic frequencies obtained were 26% for rs3025021, 10% for rs3025035 and 61% for rs2010963. The pairwise linkage disequilibrium between the three SNP was assessed, and was as follows: rs3025021 vs rs3025035: D'=1.0, r 2 =0.1043, P ≤0.0001; rs3025021 vs rs2010963: D'=0.442, r 2 =0.0446, P =0.149; rs3025035 vs rs2010963: D'=0.505, r 2 =0.0214, P =0.142. This is the first analysis involving VEGF polymorphisms and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a Mexican population. A major finding of the present study is that none of the polymorphisms studied was significantly associated with proliferative retinopathy. Based on these results, we can infer that different populations

  4. Curcumin Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy in Experimental Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yu, Jinqiang; Ke, Feng; Lan, Mei; Li, Dekun; Tan, Ke; Ling, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kaili; Li, Dai

    2018-03-29

    the expression of Bax in the retina of diabetic rats. Taken together, these results suggest that curcumin may have great therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy which could be attributed to the hypoglycemic, antioxidant, VEGF-downregulating and neuroprotection properties of curcumin. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Physical activity and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskarabhatla, Krishna V; Birrer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic syndrome consisting of two main groups, type 1 and 2, is characterized by absolute or relative insulin deficiency or insulin resistance. Individuals with DM take part in physical activity for health promotion, disease management, and or recreational or competitive sports. Several studies confirm the beneficial role of physical activity in favorably altering the prognosis of DM. Exercise as a therapeutic strategy has potential risks, too. Hence, sports medicine physicians caring for athletes with diabetes have several important responsibilities. Diabetic education; pre-participatory evaluation for vascular, neurological, retinal or joint disease; diabetic status and control; promotion of blood glucose self-monitoring; and individualized dietary, medication, and physical activity plans are essential to achieve safe and enjoyable outcomes in individuals with diabetes who are embarking on physical activity.

  6. Study on the correlation between serum TSH level and diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus%2型糖尿病患者血清TSH水平与糖尿病视网膜病变的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁娟; 张松

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels .Methods :A total of 157 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were enrolled in this study . The degree of retinopathy in all patients was detected .The fundus examination was normal for non-DR patients ,and the patients were set to the control group (50 cases);the fundus examination was non-normal for DR patients ,and then according to the degree of retinal lesions .DR patients were divided into non-proliferativediabetic retinopathy group (NPDR ,57 cases) and hyperplastic diabetic retinopathy group (PDR ,50 cases) .The general data ,TSH level and thyroid function in three groups were recorded and compared .The correlation between TSH and DR was investi-gated .Results :①The difference of TSH lever between the control group and the NPDR group was statistically sig-nificant(P<0 .05);②Logistic regression equation was used to filter related factors ,and discovered that TSH was a risk factor for NPDR(B=0 .326 ,OR=1 .385);③In the NPDR group ,the TSH level in patients with stage Ⅰ dis-ease was significantly lower than that in stage Ⅲ (P<0 .05) .There was no significant difference between the two groups (P<0 .05) ) ,in addition ,in the first Ⅰ ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ lesions period ,the TSH levels in DR patients with were gradually increased .Conclusion:TSH is a risk factor for DR ,and TSH levels may be associated with the severity of non-proliferative retinopathy .%目的:探讨糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)与血清促甲状腺激素(TSH)水平间的关系.方法:选取2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者共157例,检测所有患者的视网膜病变程度,若眼底正常则视为非DR患者,设为对照组(50例),再根据视网膜病变程度,将DR患者分为非增生性糖尿病视网膜病变组(N PDR,57例)和增生性糖尿病视网膜病变组(PDR,50例),分别记录患者的一般资料、TSH水平和甲状腺功能等参数指标.比较三组患者各参

  7. Glycated albumin and direct low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  8. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy among dialysis patients and their awareness about the need for screening to prevent blindness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, I.; Hameed, A.; Akram, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe frequency and spectrum of diabetic retinopathy among patients undergoing haemodialysis and to assess the awareness of importance of ophthalmic screening among these patients. Study Design: Observational descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at Combined Military Hospital Kharian, from August 2011 to January 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 49 patients were included in the study who were under going maintenance hemodialysis during the observation period. All the patients were examined with ophthalmoscope after mydriasis. Patients who were not willing, irritable or in coma were not included in the study. Results: A total of 49 patients (n=49) were examined with 26 males and 13 females. Age of patients with diabetic retinopathy ranged from 45 years to 68 years, mean age of patients was 57.5 years. Nineteen patients (38.7%) were suffering from diabetes mellitus. Four had been operated for cataract out of which only one was advised regular follow up for effect of diabetes on vision. Only one patient who was UK national was aware of need and importance of regular eye examination to avoid preventable blindness and to monitor for end organ damage. Conclusion: These results indicate that hospital needs integrated diabetic clinics for patient awareness and management to prevent blindness due to diabetic retinopathy. In fact, Pakistan needs a national level retinopathy screening programme keeping in mind the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus. National programme for retinopathy is doable as fundus cameras are widely available and can be operated by optometrists and integrated care protocols between different departments to avoid financial burden of care for diabetic gerartric patients. (author)

  9. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Alan D; Philip, Sam; Goatman, Keith A; Williams, Graeme J; Olson, John A; Sharp, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy

  10. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Alan D [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Philip, Sam [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Goatman, Keith A [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Williams, Graeme J [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Olson, John A [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Sharp, Peter F [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-21

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alan D.; Philip, Sam; Goatman, Keith A.; Williams, Graeme J.; Olson, John A.; Sharp, Peter F.

    2007-12-01

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Anticardiolipin antibodies in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: An additional risk factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahin, Maha; ElDiasty, Amany M; Mabed, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    To report the prevalence of anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) having high-risk criteria (HRC). Diabetic patients having PDR with HRC and diabetics free of retinopathy were compared for the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies. Among the 34 patients, 6 (17.7%) of diabetics having PDR with HRC were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies. There was no significant association of aCL antibodies with sex or type of diabetes. Using Pearson's correlation test, no significant associations of aCL antibodies with duration of diabetes or age of patients were found. All patients who were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies had PDR with HRC. The difference was statistically significant. Presence of anticardiolipin antibodies may represent an additional risk factor for PDR. (author)

  13. Rates of progression in diabetic retinopathy during different time periods: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Klein, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviews rates of progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and/or severe visual loss (SVL) and temporal trends.......This meta-analysis reviews rates of progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and/or severe visual loss (SVL) and temporal trends....

  14. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  15. A review on exudates detection methods for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shilpa; Karule, P T

    2018-01-01

    The presence of exudates on the retina is the most characteristic symptom of diabetic retinopathy. As exudates are among early clinical signs of DR, their detection would be an essential asset to the mass screening task and serve as an important step towards automatic grading and monitoring of the disease. Reliable identification and classification of exudates are of inherent interest in an automated diabetic retinopathy screening system. Here we review the numerous early studies that used for automatic exudates detection with the aim of providing decision support in addition to reducing the workload of an ophthalmologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative Healthcare: Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Mohammed Ali

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the third in this series of ‘comparative healthcare’ medical practitioners explore the approach to diabetes inBangaldesh and Australia respectively. The social and medical consequences of this chronic conditionare highlighted through the approach to patients at various stages of the disease from two nationalperspectives. An astonishing 7% of the 153 million people are reported to have diabetes in Bangladesh. Manyremain undiagnosed. Delays in diagnosis or management of diabetes have life limiting consequences for thosewho can ill afford private health care in the poorer nation. Screening and early intervention appear to bedenied to many in the developing country. The context is very different with Australians very fortunate to havea coordinated primary health care sector. The outlook for Bangladeshis with uncontrolled diabetes or withtreatable sequela would be unacceptable in Australia. At every stage in the disease trajectory the doctorsemphasise the importance of life style modification, a particular challenge in affluent Australia with its growingincidence of life style related pre morbid conditions in an increasingly sedentary population. A corner stone ofthe support of people with diabetes is the role of nurses and allied health professionals. With a fundedcommitment to multidisciplinary care in the community people with diabetes in Australia have access tosupport closer to home whereas those in Bangladesh remain heavily dependent on specialist, hospital basedservices. One can only speculate how Bangladesh will cope as its population ages and there are an everincreasing proportion of people who require urgent and expensive medical interventions. At the very leastthere is a strong case for greater investment in primary care especially to limit the economic consequences ofdiabetes and other chronic conditions. Finally as in other articles in this series we would like to emphasise that,the views expressed are those of the authors and do

  17. Fibrous membranes in diabetic retinopathy and bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattwell, David M; Stappler, Theodor; Sheridan, Carl; Heimann, Heinrich; Gibran, Syed K; Wong, David; Hiscott, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the histopathologic characteristics of bevacizumab-treated human proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) membranes with particular regard to membrane vasculature as a step toward addressing the effects of the drug on PDR membranes. Intravitreous injection of bevacizumab, an antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, has recently been advocated as an adjunct in surgery for PDR. In this context, a clinically observed decrease in PDR epiretinal membrane vascularity (vascular regression) occurs from 24 hours to 48 hours after injection, but the exact mechanisms of drug action are unknown. A consecutive series of seven PDR membrane specimens that had been removed sequentially from seven bevacizumab-treated patients were studied retrospectively. The membrane specimens were examined using light microscopic methods, including immunohistochemistry. Five of the seven membranes were clinically avascular (one contained "ghost" vessels) and did not hemorrhage during excision. Of these 5 specimens, which included 1 removed 7 days after a total of 6 intravitreous injections of 1.25 mg bevacizumab, 4 contained histologically detectable capillaries (1 did not). These blood vessels were lined by endothelial cells as determined by immunohistochemistry for the endothelial markers CD31 and CD34. The two remaining membranes were clinically and histologically still vascularized despite bevacizumab treatment. All the specimens also contained smooth muscle actin-containing fibroblastic cells within the collagenous stroma. The findings do not support the concept that the clinical phenomenon of vascular regression in PDR membranes after bevacizumab injection in the vitreous is resulting from obliteration of the membrane blood vessels. Another mechanism appears to be involved in at least some patients, possibly a vasoconstrictive response. Such a mechanism might explain reversal of the effects of bevacizumab that has been reported

  18. [Motor vehicle driving and diabetes mellitus - medical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brož, Jan; Kriváňová, Lenka Syčová; Fedáková, Zuzana; Petrosyan, Lilit; Kvapil, Milan; Polák, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disease which may affect the eligibility to hold a driving license and increase the risk of a road accident. Hypoglycemia while driving is considered to be the most risky situation, with diabetes increasing the mentioned risk for instance due to impaired vision in the case of possible retinopathy. The group of drivers with diabetes being at the greatest risk as to accidents are those with a case history of severe hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia occurred while driving, or possibly of a road accident. Measuring glycaemia before driving and their knowledge how to prevent and treat hypoglycemia - those are the two crucial preventive elements indispensable for insulin treated diabetes patients in order to secure safe road traffic.

  19. Autoimmune Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigapathy, Jayakumar; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2017-07-15

    Antibodies against exogenous insulin are common in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. They can cause hypoglycemia, albeit uncommonly. A 14-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with recurrent hypoglycemia. High insulin, low C-peptide and raised insulin antibody levels documented during hypoglycemia. Plasmapheresis led to remission of hypoglycemia. Antibodies to exogenous insulin should be considered as a cause of recurrent refractory hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients.

  20. Hypertension og diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler; Gaede, Peter Haulund

    2009-01-01

    The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin aldoster......The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin...

  1. 76 FR 9854 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ...-0011] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  2. 78 FR 1923 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...-0350] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  3. 76 FR 9862 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ...-0025] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  4. 78 FR 1927 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...-0351] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  5. 76 FR 64165 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ...-0277] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM...

  6. 77 FR 533 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ...-0367] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM...

  7. 78 FR 38439 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ...-0020] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  8. 77 FR 40941 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ...-0163] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  9. 77 FR 46149 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...-0164] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  10. 77 FR 64181 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ...-0283] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  11. 78 FR 26419 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...-0018] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  12. 77 FR 52384 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ...-0218] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the...

  13. 77 FR 56258 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ...-0219] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  14. 78 FR 38435 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ...-0181] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  15. 76 FR 66120 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ...-0278] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  16. 78 FR 20381 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ...-0015] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  17. 77 FR 10612 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ...-0382] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  18. 78 FR 79062 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ...-0193] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

  19. Comparison between Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study 7-field retinal photos and non-mydriatic, mydriatic and mydriatic steered widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for assessment of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin L; Broe, Rebecca; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare non-mydriatic, mydriatic and steered mydriatic widefield retinal images with mydriatic 7-field Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS)-standards in grading diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: We examined 95 patients (190 eyes) with type 1 diabetes. A non...

  20. Hypertension og diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per; Hansen, Klavs; Gæde, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin aldoster...

  1. Segmentation of retinal blood vessels for detection of diabetic retinopathy: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezty Amalia Aras

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic detinopathy (DR is effect of diabetes mellitus to the human vision that is the major cause of blindness. Early diagnosis of DR is an important requirement in diabetes treatment. Retinal fundus image is commonly used to observe the diabetic retinopathy symptoms. It can present retinal features such as blood vessel and also capture the pathologies which may lead to DR. Blood vessel is one of retinal features which can show the retina pathologies. It can be extracted from retinal image by image processing with following stages: pre-processing, segmentation, and post-processing. This paper contains a review of public retinal image dataset and several methods from various conducted researches. All discussed methods are applicable to each researcher cases. There is no further analysis to conclude the best method which can be used for general cases. However, we suggest morphological and multiscale method that gives the best accuracy in segmentation.

  2. High-Resolution Imaging of Parafoveal Cones in Different Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Adaptive Optics Fundus Camera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Kamel Soliman

    Full Text Available To assess cone density as a marker of early signs of retinopathy in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.An adaptive optics (AO retinal camera (rtx1™; Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France was used to acquire images of parafoveal cones from patients with type II diabetes mellitus with or without retinopathy and from healthy controls with no known systemic or ocular disease. Cone mosaic was captured at 0° and 2°eccentricities along the horizontal and vertical meridians. The density of the parafoveal cones was calculated within 100×100-μm squares located at 500-μm from the foveal center along the orthogonal meridians. Manual corrections of the automated counting were then performed by 2 masked graders. Cone density measurements were evaluated with ANOVA that consisted of one between-subjects factor, stage of retinopathy and the within-subject factors. The ANOVA model included a complex covariance structure to account for correlations between the levels of the within-subject factors.Ten healthy participants (20 eyes and 25 patients (29 eyes with type II diabetes mellitus were recruited in the study. The mean (± standard deviation [SD] age of the healthy participants (Control group, patients with diabetes without retinopathy (No DR group, and patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR group was 55 ± 8, 53 ± 8, and 52 ± 9 years, respectively. The cone density was significantly lower in the moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and severe NPDR/proliferative DR groups compared to the Control, No DR, and mild NPDR groups (P < 0.05. No correlation was found between cone density and the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or the duration of diabetes.The extent of photoreceptor loss on AO imaging may correlate positively with severity of DR in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Photoreceptor loss may be more pronounced among patients with advanced stages of DR due to higher risk of macular edema and its sequelae.

  3. Diabetic Retinopathy Is Associated With Elevated Serum Asymmetric and Symmetric Dimethylarginines

    OpenAIRE

    Abhary, Sotoodeh; Kasmeridis, Nicholas; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kuot, Abraham; Whiting, Malcolm J.; Yew, Wai Ping; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Craig, Jamie E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and l-arginine directly influence nitric oxide production. Our objective was to test whether serum ADMA, SDMA, or l-arginine levels correlate with diabetic retinopathy subtype or severity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 162 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 343 with type 2 diabetes, of whom 329 subjects had no diabetic retinopathy, 27 had nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), 101 had proliferative...

  4. Current knowledge on diabetic retinopathy from humandonor tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessica H Eisma; Jennifer E Dulle; Patrice E Fort

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death, and diabetic retinopathy the leading cause of blindness in working age adults in the United States in 2010. Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia associated with either hypoinsulinemia or insulin resistance, and over time, this chronic metabolic condition may lead to various complications including kidney failure, heart attacks,and retinal degeneration. In order to better understandthe molecular basis of this disease and its complications,animal models have been the primary approach usedto investigate the effects of diabetes on various tissuesor cell types of the body, including the retina. However,inherent to these animal models are critical limitationsthat make the insight gained from these modelschallenging to apply to the human pathology. Thesedifficulties in translating the knowledge obtained fromanimal studies have led a growing number of researchgroups to explore the diabetes complications, especiallydiabetic retinopathy, on tissues from human donors.This review summarizes the data collected from diabeticpatients at various stages of diabetic retinopathy andclassifies the data based upon their relevance to themain aspects of diabetic retinopathy: retinal vasculaturedysfunction, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. Thisreview discusses the importance of those studies todiscriminate and establish the relevance of the findingsobtained from animal models but also the limitations ofsuch approaches.

  5. Vitreous advanced glycation endproducts and alpha-dicarbonyls in retinal detachment patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, Bernardina T.; Mulder, Douwe J.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Scheijen, Jean L.; Smit, Andries J.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and their precursors alpha-dicarbonyls are implicated in the progression of diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess AGEs and a-dicarbonyls in the vitreous of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with early stages or absence

  6. Diabetes mellitus and hypertension: a dual threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Ahmet Afşin; Akturk, Halis Kaan; Jahangir, Eiman

    2016-07-01

    The following is a review of the current concepts on the relationship between hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus with a focus on the epidemiology and cardiovascular prognostic implications of coexistent HTN and diabetes mellitus, shared mechanisms underlying both conditions and pathophysiology of increased risk of cardiovascular disease, treatment of HTN in individuals with diabetes mellitus, and effects of anti-diabetic medications on blood pressure (BP). Diabetes mellitus and HTN often coexist in the same individual. They share numerous risk factors and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, most important of which are insulin resistance and inappropriate activation of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Recently updated guidelines recommend a BP goal of 140/90 mmHg in most individuals with diabetes mellitus. A new class of anti-diabetic medications, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, has shown favorable effects on BP. HTN affects the majority of individuals with diabetes mellitus. Coexistence of diabetes mellitus and HTN, especially if BP is not well controlled, dramatically increases the risk of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. BP control is an essential part of management of patients with diabetes mellitus, because it is one of the most effective ways to prevent vascular complications and death.

  7. 77 FR 10607 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ...-2011-0367] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The...). [[Page 10608

  8. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-09

    detecting proliferative diabetic retinopathy . Telemedicine and e-Health. 2005;11: 641-651. MILESTONES AND DELIVERABLES: Completion of data...telemedicine system for comprehensive diabetes management and assessment of diabetic retinopathy that provides increased access for diabetic patients to...CDMP developed under this collaborative effort. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Joslin Vision Network, telemedicine, diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy

  9. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    teleophthalmology system as used by three federal healthcare agencies for detecting proliferative diabetic retinopathy . Telemedicine and e-Health. 2005;11: 641-651...a telemedicine system for comprehensive diabetes management andassessment of diabetic retinopathy that provides increased access for diabetic ...CDMP developed under this collaborative effort. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Joslin Vision Network, telemedicine, diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy

  10. The Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy Among Known Diabetic Population in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S K; Pant, B P; Subedi, P

    2016-01-01

    Background The worldwide prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) was found to be 34.6%. WHO estimates that DR is responsible for 4.8% of the 37 million cases of blindness throughout the world. In a study undertaken in urban population in Nepal, M.D. Bhattarai found the prevalence of diabetes among people aged 20 years and above to be 14.6% and the prevalence among people aged 40 years and above to be 19%. Studies on DR, to our knowledge, have mostly been hospital based in Nepal. Little information is available about prevalence of DR at the community level in Nepal. Objective To investigate the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors among known diabetic population of Nepal. Method A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among individuals aged 30 and more using cluster sampling method. The study sites were Kathmandu metropolitan city and Birgunj sub-metropolitan city. A sample size of 5400 was calculated assuming 5% prevalence rate with 95% confidence level, 5% worst acceptable level and 1.5 cluster sampling design effect. Study participants were interviewed, anthropometric measurements and fundus photograph was taken from participants with diabetes. Fundus photographs were used to grade retinopathy. Result Around 12% of the respondents were diabetic, mean age 55.43±11.86 years, of which slightly more than half were females (50.2%). Among these diabetic respondents 9.9% had some forms of diabetic retinopathy, mean age 54.08±10.34 years, 56.7% were male. When severe grade of retinopathy in any eye was considered as overall grade of retinopathy for the individual, prevalence of Non-proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy, Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and complete vision loss was found to be 9.1%, 0.5% and 0.3%. Prevalence of Diabetic Macular Edema was 5.5%. Duration of diabetes, family history of diabetes and blood pressure at the day of survey was found to be associated with having any retinopathy. Conclusion Diabetic retinopathy

  11. A link between diabetes mellitus and glaucoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, A.; Petrovski, B.E; Petrovski, G.

    2016-01-01

    -year follow-up period. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for glaucoma medication and anti-diabetic drugs. Comorbidities with diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy were identified using the ICD-10 classification......-diabetic drugs at any time during the study period had a significantly higher overall relative risk of glaucoma (RR = 5.11, p age, gender, diabetic retinopathies and calendar year-fixed effects (RR = 2.05, p ... of glaucoma overall, while treatment with β-blocker and RAS, in combination, are associated with a significantly lower risk (HR = 0.87). Conclusions Use of anti-diabetic drugs is strongly associated with use of anti-glaucomatous drugs. Diabetic complication as well as concomitant antihypertensive medications...

  12. Calcium homeostasis in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Ji-Houn; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2017-09-30

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is becoming a lifestyle-related pandemic disease. Diabetic patients frequently develop electrolyte disorders, especially diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. Such patients show characteristic potassium, magnesium, phosphate, and calcium depletion. In this review, we discuss a homeostatic mechanism that links calcium and DM. We also provide a synthesis of the evidence in favor or against this linking mechanism by presenting recent clinical indications, mainly from veterinary research. There are consistent results supporting the use of calcium and vitamin D supplementation to reduce the risk of DM. Clinical trials support a marginal reduction in circulating lipids, and some meta-analyses support an increase in insulin sensitivity, following vitamin D supplementation. This review provides an overview of the calcium and vitamin D disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. Such elucidation will help indicate potential pathophysiology-based precautionary and therapeutic approaches and contribute to lowering the incidence of DM.

  13. Rheumatological manifestations of diabetes mellitus - a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... strongly associated with diabetes mellitus including limited joint mobility, specific arthropathies of the hand (carpal tunnel syndrome, Dupytrens contracture, flexor tenosynovitis and diabetic sclerodactyly), shoulder (adhesive capsulitis-frozen shoulder, and calcific periarthritis) and spontaneous infarction of skeletal muscle.

  14. [Deficient prevention and late treatment of diabetic retinopathy in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Castañeda, René A; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Alfaro-Trujillo, Beatriz; Guerrero-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Chayet-Berdowsky, Arturo S

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy is a frequent complication of diabetes, causing visual impairment in 10% and blindness in 2% of diabetic patients. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical profile of diabetic patients in an ophthalmologic unit in Tijuana, México. Retrospective study of a random sample of 500 clinical charts of patients with diabetes who attended the Retina Service of "Fundación CODET para la Prevención de la Ceguera IBP" Ophthalmologic Center between 2006 and 2010. The main complaint of 58% of patients was decreased visual acuity in first evaluation. Only 6.2% of patients were referred by a health professional. Forty-six percent of the patients had a history of diabetes of at least 15 years. Thirty percent had clinically significant visual impairment at first visit, which was associated with a long history of diabetes and previous eye surgery. Twenty-five percent of these patients who were treated at our clinic experienced visual deterioration due to advanced retinopathy. Patients with diabetic retinopathy are referred to ophthalmological service tardily, when visual loss is usually severe and irreversible.

  15. Musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti P. Deshmukh; Asmita G. Akarte

    2017-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal complications of diabetes have been generally ignored and poorly treated as compared to other complications. Hence we carried out this study to find the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in type II diabetes mellitus and its correlation with age, BMI, duration of diabetes, and control of diabetes. Methods: 100 consecutive patients of type II diabetes were studied. Duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, and any musculoskeletal complaints were noted....

  16. Prevalence and risk factors associated with retinopathy in diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic retinopathy is the fifth leading cause of blindness worldwide accounting for nearly 5% of all blindness. However, most of the prevalence and incidence data is from developed countries, with very limited information from sub-Saharan Africa. The study sought to determine the prevalence of, and factors associated ...

  17. Automated detection of diabetic retinopathy lesions on ultrawidefield pseudocolour images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Jayadev, Chaitra; Nittala, Muneeswar G; Velaga, Swetha B; Ramachandra, Chaithanya A; Bhaskaranand, Malavika; Bhat, Sandeep; Solanki, Kaushal; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2018-03-01

    We examined the sensitivity and specificity of an automated algorithm for detecting referral-warranted diabetic retinopathy (DR) on Optos ultrawidefield (UWF) pseudocolour images. Patients with diabetes were recruited for UWF imaging. A total of 383 subjects (754 eyes) were enrolled. Nonproliferative DR graded to be moderate or higher on the 5-level International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy (ICDR) severity scale was considered as grounds for referral. The software automatically detected DR lesions using the previously trained classifiers and classified each image in the test set as referral-warranted or not warranted. Sensitivity, specificity and the area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) of the algorithm were computed. The automated algorithm achieved a 91.7%/90.3% sensitivity (95% CI 90.1-93.9/80.4-89.4) with a 50.0%/53.6% specificity (95% CI 31.7-72.8/36.5-71.4) for detecting referral-warranted retinopathy at the patient/eye levels, respectively; the AUROC was 0.873/0.851 (95% CI 0.819-0.922/0.804-0.894). Diabetic retinopathy (DR) lesions were detected from Optos pseudocolour UWF images using an automated algorithm. Images were classified as referral-warranted DR with a high degree of sensitivity and moderate specificity. Automated analysis of UWF images could be of value in DR screening programmes and could allow for more complete and accurate disease staging. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Photography or Ophthalmoscopy for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiden, Hendrik A. van; Moll, Annette C.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Abramoff, M.D.; Polak, Bettine C.P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.K. National Screening Committee recommended digital fundus photography as the screening method of choice for diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, concerns have been expressed about replacing ophthalmoscopy with slit-lamp biomicroscopy by digital photography. These concerns included the

  19. DETECTION OF MICROVASCULAR CHANGES IN EYES OF PATIENTS WITH DIABETES BUT NOT CLINICAL DIABETIC RETINOPATHY USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carlo, Talisa E; Chin, Adam T; Bonini Filho, Marco A; Adhi, Mehreen; Branchini, Lauren; Salz, David A; Baumal, Caroline R; Crawford, Courtney; Reichel, Elias; Witkin, Andre J; Duker, Jay S; Waheed, Nadia K

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography angiography to detect early microvascular changes in eyes of diabetic individuals without clinical retinopathy. Prospective observational study of 61 eyes of 39 patients with diabetes mellitus and 28 control eyes of 22 age-matched healthy subjects that received imaging using optical coherence tomography angiography between August 2014 and March 2015. Eyes with concomitant retinal, optic nerve, and vitreoretinal interface diseases and/or poor-quality images were excluded. Foveal avascular zone size and irregularity, vessel beading and tortuosity, capillary nonperfusion, and microaneurysm were evaluated. Foveal avascular zone size measured 0.348 mm² (0.1085-0.671) in diabetic eyes and 0.288 mm² (0.07-0.434) in control eyes (P = 0.04). Foveal avascular zone remodeling was seen more often in diabetic than control eyes (36% and 11%, respectively; P = 0.01). Capillary nonperfusion was noted in 21% of diabetic eyes and 4% of control eyes (P = 0.03). Microaneurysms and venous beading were noted in less than 10% of both diabetic and control eyes. Both diabetic and healthy control eyes demonstrated tortuous vessels in 21% and 25% of eyes, respectively. Optical coherence tomography angiography was able to image foveal microvascular changes that were not detected by clinical examination in diabetic eyes. Changes to the foveal avascular zone and capillary nonperfusion were more prevalent in diabetic eyes, whereas vessel tortuosity was observed with a similar frequency in normal and diabetic eyes. Optical coherence tomography angiography may be able to detect diabetic eyes at risk of developing retinopathy and to screen for diabetes quickly and noninvasively before the systemic diagnosis is made.

  20. Nondiabetic retinal pathology - prevalence in diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Nathan; Jackson, Claire; Spurling, Geoffrey; Cranstoun, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of photographic signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology in Australian general practice patients with diabetes. Three hundred and seven patients with diabetes underwent retinal photography at two general practices, one of which was an indigenous health centre. The images were assessed for signs of pathology by an ophthalmologist. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were detected in 31% of subjects with adequate photographs. Features suspicious of glaucoma were detected in 7.7% of subjects. Other abnormalities detected included signs of age related macular degeneration (1.9%), epiretinal membranes (2.4%), vascular pathology (9.6%), chorioretinal lesions (2.9%), and congenital disc anomalies (2.9%). Indigenous Australian patients were more likely to have signs of retinal pathology and glaucoma. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were frequently encountered. In high risk groups, general practice based diabetic retinopathy screening may reduce the incidence of preventable visual impairment, beyond the benefits of detection of diabetic retinopathy alone.

  1. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c 20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour.

  2. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c 20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour. PMID:25941647

  3. Hypertension og diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler; Gaede, Peter Haulund

    2009-01-01

    The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin...... aldosterone system. Reduction in albuminuria during antihypertensive treatment is indicative of renal and cardiovascular protection. Thus, if the level of albuminuria remains high, the treatment should be intensified, even in the light of achieved BP goals. Options for intensification are dual blockade......, supramaximal doses of ACE-I or ARB, or addition of aldosterone or renin-blocking agents. Long-term data are awaited regarding the optimal strategy for combination therapy. Patients on intensive antihypertensive treatment should be monitored regularly....

  4. Optimization of surgical treatment of cataract in patients with diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Lipatov, D.; Chistyakov, T.; Kuzmin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To compare different methods for surgical treatment of cataract in patients with diabetes melli-tus (DM) and substantiate the choice of its optimalmodality. Materials and methods. Analysis included data on 209 patients (221 eyes) treated from January 2008 to December 2009 in the Department ofRetinopathy and Ophthalmosurgey, Endocrinological Research Centre. Diabetic cataract was managed using UNIVERSAL-II, LEGACY EVEREST,and INFINITI phacoemulsifiers. Parameters studied inc...

  5. Clinical features of diabetes retinopathy in elderly patients with type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northern Chinese. Materials and .... of DM, medical history of DM, body weight, height, waist circumference ..... Globalization of diabetes: The role of diet, lifestyle, and genes. Diabetes .... Each image should be less than 4096 kb (4 MB) in size. The size of ...

  6. Knowledge of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy among rural populations in India, and the influence of knowledge of diabetic retinopathy on attitude and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Padmaja K; Raman, Rajiv; Subramani, Sarvanan; Perumal, Gnanamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Sharma, Tarun

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, particularly type II, is a major public health concern worldwide. While the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy cannot be prevented, with the provision of knowledge to sufferers, sight-threatening complications can be minimized. To report the results of a KAP (Knowledge, Attitude and Practice) study among a rural population in two areas: diabetes mellitus (DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). The level of knowledge was evaluated for both DM and DR; however, the influence of knowledge on practices and attitude was evaluated in only the DR group. In rural areas, 145 awareness meetings on DM and DR were conducted attended 28 347 individuals. Using systematic random sampling, the data were collected from every 14th individual. In total, 1938 individuals from a rural population were numbered for gaining their responses to the KAP questionnaire. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were performed to identify independent risk factors related to the knowledge of the disease and influence of this knowledge on attitude and practice. Of 1938 individuals, 966 (49.9%) had knowledge of DM and 718 (37.1%) had knowledge of DR. Knowledge about DM was more in women (OR=1.93; 95% CI: 1.55-2.39), in subjects who followed the Christian faith (OR=1.48; 95% CI: 1.07-2.04) and in those who belonged to the upper socioeconomic strata (OR=2.60; 95% CI: 1.84-3.67). The knowledge of DR was significantly higher among subjects who spoke the Malayalam language (OR=3.80; 95% CI: 2.03-7.13), who followed the Christian faith (OR=1.73; 95% CI: 1.27-2.35), and in those who belonged to the upper socioeconomic strata (OR=1.85; 95% CI: 1.32-2.58). Compared with those who had no knowledge of DR (n = 1220), significant percentages of individuals with knowledge (n = 718) had the right attitude - to go for regular eye examinations - (65.9% vs 93.3%) (pawareness models to educate rural populations on DM and DR.

  7. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Monogenic Diabetes (Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus & MODY) The most common forms of diabetes, ... from each parent. What are monogenic forms of diabetes? Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  8. Automated Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy - A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Mads Fonager; Grauslund, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Worldwide ophthalmologists are challenged by the rapid rise in the prevalence of diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication in diabetes, and possible consequences range from mild visual impairment to blindness. Repetitive screening for DR is cost...... related to mild DR with a low risk of progression within 1 year. Several studies reported missed cases of diabetic macular edema. A meta-analysis was not conducted as studies were not suitable for direct comparison or statistical analysis. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates that despite limited...

  9. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  10. [Lifestyle of elderly patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yuki; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2013-11-01

    In elderly people, glucose tolerance is deteriorated and the incidence of diabetes mellitus is increased, due to decreased muscle mass and physical activity, declining pancreatic beta cell function, and other factors. Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for arteriosclerosis development in the elderly. Precise diagnosis and adequate treatment are necessary to prevent cerebrovascular and ischemic heart diseases. Elderly patients with diabetes mellitus are characteristically afflicted with more complications, impaired activities of daily living, cognitive function decline, and family environment problems, as compared with young and middle-aged diabetics. Therefore, tailor-made rather than uniform therapy becomes important. Lifestyle modification is the basis of diabetes treatment. Herein, we describe "prevention and management" of diabetes mellitus, focusing on the lifestyles of elderly diabetics.

  11. Macular micropseudocysts in early stages of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Gemma; Pierro, Luisa; de Benedetto, Umberto; Margari, Sergio; Gagliardi, Marco; Maestranzi, Gisella; Calori, Giliola; Lorenzi, Mara; Lattanzio, Rosangela

    2011-01-01

    To identify by noninvasive means early retinal abnormalities that may predict diabetic macular edema. The authors analyzed retrospectively data from consecutive patients with Type 1 (n = 16) or Type 2 (n = 23) diabetes who presented for routine follow-up of early retinopathy, had no clinical signs or symptoms of diabetic macular edema, and were evaluated with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Age- and gender-matched nondiabetic subjects provided normative data. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed in the macular region of diabetic patients small hyporeflective areas (median diameter, 55 μm) contained within discrete retinal layers that we named micropseudocysts (MPCs). Micropseudocysts are associated with vascular leakage. The patients showing MPCs had more frequently systemic hypertension and increased central foveal thickness than those without MPCs. The association with increased central foveal thickness was only in the patients with Type 2 diabetes. Macular MPCs in patients with mild diabetic retinopathy appear to reflect leakage and can precede macular thickening. The association of MPCs with increased central foveal thickness in patients with Type 2 diabetes, but not in patients with Type 1 diabetes, points to a greater tendency to retinal fluid accumulation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Studies in larger cohorts will determine the usefulness of MPCs in strategies to abort diabetic macular edema.

  12. Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy Management in East Africa: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Hospital Staff in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupitz, David G; Fenwick, Eva; Kollmann, K H Martin; Holz, Frank G; Finger, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Good diabetes mellitus (DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) management depends largely on involved medical staff, prompting us to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices about DM and DR at a tertiary referral center in Kenya. The design for this study is exploratory qualitative using semistructured interviews. Data from eye and diabetes clinic staff were collected until thematic saturation was reached, transcribed, and iteratively analyzed for relevant themes based on the constant comparative method. Among 46 participants (mean age, 38 years; 54% females), most were physicians (n = 25, 54%), followed by nurses (n = 14, 30%) and clinical officers (n = 6, 13%). Diabetes mellitus and DR were seen as urgent health problems (n = 42, 91%), and regular ophthalmic screening of diabetic patients was universally recommended. Two thirds (n = 32, 70%) were unaware of DM and DR management guidelines at the hospital. Participants identified training of staff in diagnosing (n = 30, 65%), efficient detection and referral of diabetic patients (n = 24, 52%), and improved outreach services (n = 14, 30%) as most pressing areas of need. Communication among hospital departments was found to be suboptimal. Reported barriers to good DR management were lack of retinal laser treatment and costs. Management outcomes for DM and DR may be improved by implementing integrated service provision, direct ophthalmological involvement in diabetic clinics, endorsement and effective distribution of guidelines, an increase in screening capacity, and the introduction of ongoing medical education covering DM and DR.

  13. 78 FR 63285 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Mr. Van Gog understands diabetes management and monitoring, has stable control of his diabetes using...-0185] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs...

  14. Decreased Retinal Thickness in Type 1 Diabetic Children with Signs of Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ruiz-Ocaña

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The retina functions as a neurovascular unit. How early vascular alterations affect neuronal layers remains controversial; early vascular failure could lead to edema increasing retinal thicknesses, but alternatively neuronal loss could lead to reduced retinal thickness. Objective. To evaluate retinal thickness in a cohort of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (PwT1DM and to analyze differences according to the presence or absence of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, poor metabolic control, and diabetes duration. Patients and Methods. We performed retinographies and optical coherence tomography (OCT (TOPCON 3D1000® to PwT1DM followed at our center and healthy controls. Measurements of the control group served to calculate reference values. Results. 59 PwT1DM (age 12.51 ± 2.59 and 22 healthy controls (age 10.66 ± 2.51 volunteered. Only two PwT1DM, both adolescents with poor metabolic control, presented NPRD. Both showed decreased thicknesses and retinal volumes. The odds ratio of having decreased retinal thickness when signs of NPDR were present was 11.72 (95% IC 1.16–118.28; p=0.036. Conclusions. PwT1DM with NPDR have increased odds of decreased retinal thicknesses and volumes. Whether these changes are reversible by improving metabolic control or not remains to be elucidated.

  15. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  16. Monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddmund Søvika

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review data on monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway based on the Norwegian MODY Registry at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen. This registry comprises established or suspected cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY referred to our laboratory for genetic testing. We also present data on neonatal diabetes, another group of monogenic diabetes. To date, we have genetically diagnosed nearly 500 MODY cases in Norway. Mutations in the HNF1A gene (MODY3 were detected in about 50% of families with clinical MODY. GCK-MODY (MODY2 was the second most prevalent type, but may be underreported. We have also found mutations in the monogenic genes ABCC8, CEL, HNF1B, HNF4A, INS, KCNJ11 and NEUROD1. Based on genetic screening in the Norwegian MODY Registry and HUNT2, we estimate the number of MODY cases in Norway to be at least 2500-5000. Founder effects may determine the geographical distribution of MODY mutations in Norway. The molecular genetic testing of MODY and neonatal diabetes is mandatory for correct diagnosis and prognosis as well as choice of therapy

  17. Effect of pregnancy on diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irfan, S.; Arain, M.; Shahid, A.; Shaukat, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether pregnancy worsens renal function in women with diabetic nephropathy and the effect of pregnancy on diabetic retinopathy. Subject and Methods: Thirty-five patients (aged 20-36 years) identified with diabetic nephropathy and moderate to severe renal dysfunction (creatinine Cr) - > 1.4 mg/dl) at pregnancy onset by retrospective chart review. Alterations in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were estimated. An equal number of non-pregnant premenopausal type I diabetic women with similar degrees of renal dysfunction served as controls for non-pregnant rate of decline of renal function and potential contributing factors. Student's t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance were analyzed. Results: Mean serum Cr rose from 1.8 mg/dl pre pregnancy to 2.5 mg/dl in the third trimester. Renal function was stable in 27%, showed transient worsening in pregnancy in 27%, and demonstrated a permanent decline in 45%. Proteinuria increased in pregnancy in 79%. Exacerbation of hypertension or pre-eclampsia occurred in 73% and 71% of these showed acceleration of disease during the pregnancy. All the patients had diabetic retinopathy, though proliferative retinopathy was diagnosed and treated in only 54.5.% pre pregnancy. The retinopathy progressed, requiring laser therapy, in 45.4%. Macular edema was noted in 6 of the patients. Other diabetic complications included peripheral and autonomic neuropathy in 8 patients. Conclusion: Pregnancy induced progression is seen in the decline of renal functions. Patients with diabetic nephropathy were found to have a > 40% chance of accelerated progression of their disease as a result of pregnancy. Forty-five percent of the patients had permanent decline in GFR in association with pregnancy. (author)

  18. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Bøgelund Hansen, Morten; Abramoff, M. D.; Folk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased...... workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields...... predictive value of IDP versus the human grader as reference standard. Results Altogether 3,460 participants were included. 113 had DED, giving a prevalence of 3.3%(95% CI, 2.7-3.9%). Sensitivity of the IDP to detect DED as by the human grading was 91.0%(95% CI, 88.0-93.4%). The IDP ability to detect DED...

  19. [Transcranial magnetotherapy for the correction of initial manifestations of diabetic retinopathy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, N V; Bolotova, N V; Kamenskikh, T G; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Kolbenev, I O; Luk'ianov, V F

    2009-01-01

    This study included 45 children at the age from 5 to 17 years with type I diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic retinopathy. All the patients showed retinal thickening at the macula and reduced amplitude of local electroretinogram suggesting compromised capillary circulation. The capillary blood flow was corrected by transcranial magnetotherapy with the use of an AMO-ATOS Ogolovie unit. The results of the treatment were evaluated from characteristics of laser Doppler flometry. A course of transcranial magnetotherapy comprising 10 daily seances resulted in a significant increase of microcirculation index, respiratory rhythm, and myogenic tone (by 1.64, 1.35, and 1.16 times respectively). In addition, morphometric and electrophysiological properties of the retina underwent positive changes. Transcranial exposure to the traveling magnetic field is recommended for the correction of intraocular microcirculation and prevention of diabetic macular oedema.

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus screening and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktün, Hale Lebriz; Uyan, Derya; Yorgunlar, Betül; Acet, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To verify the usefulness of the World Health Organization criteria for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women and its effectiveness in the prevention of maternal and neonatal adverse results in women younger than 35 years without apparent risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. This is a retrospective study based on population involving 1360 pregnant women who delivered and who were followed-up in a university hospital in Istanbul. All women underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test screening, usually in between the 24(th)-28(th) weeks of pregnancy. In all cases, the identification of gestational diabetes mellitus was determined in accordance with the World Health Organization criteria. Approximately 28% of the pregnant women aged younger than 35 years with no risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus were diagnosed with the oral glucose tolerance test in this study. In the gestational diabetes mellitus group, the primary cesarean section rate was importantly higher than that in the non-gestational diabetes mellitus group. Preterm delivery was also associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus was strongly associated with admittance to the neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal respiratory problems didn't showed any significant deviation between the groups. There was a moderate association between gestational diabetes mellitus and metabolic complications. Pregnant women with no obvious risk factors were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus using the World Health Organization criteria. The treatment of these women potentially reduced their risk of adverse maternal and neonatal hyperglycemia-related events, such as cesarean section, polyhydramnios, preterm delivery, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, large for gestational age, and higher neonatal weight.

  1. Association of Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-γ2 Gene and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qing Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the relationship between Prol2Ala polymorphism of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ2(PPAR-γ2gene and diabetic retinopathy(DRwith type 2 diabetic mellitus(T2DMof the Han nationality in Shanxi province. METHODS: Totally 90 patients with T2DM were selected into our research, who were at the age of 40 to 70 years old, diabetic duration from 10 to 20 years, blood pressure PPAR-γ2 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms(PCR-RFLPassay in all the patients. RESULTS: PCR results showed that there were 2 alleles and 3 genotypes in the groups. The frequency of genotype PP, PA, AA were 40.0%, 53.3%, 6.7% in NDR group, 70.0%, 30.0%, 0.0% in BDR group, 76.7%, 23.3%, 0% in PDR group, respectively. The allele frequency(χ2=10.208and gene frequency(χ2=10.351were statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: The alanine variant of Prol2Ala polymorphism of PPAR-γ2 gene is associated with DR in type 2 diabetes among the Hans in Shanxi area, and the Ala allele might be a protective factor for the development of diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Dry Fruits and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sohaib A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dry fruits are some of the essential foods a human body requires staying healthy. They are made after extracting water from them. These fruits are full of essential nutrients including minerals, vitamins, enzymes, fibers and protect the body from a number of different adversities. These fruits are also a source of healthy nutrition among diabetic people who are very concerned about what to eat and what not to eat. But besides their countless benefits, these dry fruits can cause a number of harms to the body and therefore, must be used in a balanced way. This article is based on healthy and unhealthy effects of dry fruits and their use in diabetes mellitus.

  3. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Tarzia, Olinda; Jovanovič, Lois; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the English and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in English and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes-related complications.

  4. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEGRATO, Carlos Antonio; TARZIA, Olinda; JOVANOVIČ, Lois; CHINELLATO, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. Objective: The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the english and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. Methods: This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in english and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. Results: This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Conclusions: The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes

  5. A Decision Support Framework for Automated Screening of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The early signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR are depicted by microaneurysms among other signs. A prompt diagnosis when the disease is at the early stage can help prevent irreversible damages to the diabetic eye. In this paper, we propose a decision support system (DSS for automated screening of early signs of diabetic retinopathy. Classification schemes for deducing the presence or absence of DR are developed and tested. The detection rule is based on binary-hypothesis testing problem which simplifies the problem to yes/no decisions. An analysis of the performance of the Bayes optimality criteria applied to DR is also presented. The proposed DSS is evaluated on the real-world data. The results suggest that by biasing the classifier towards DR detection, it is possible to make the classifier achieve good sensitivity.

  6. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy and the Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Zorena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main problem both in type 1 (T1DM and type 2 (T2DM diabetes is the development of chronic vascular complications encompassing micro- as well as macrocirculation. Chronic complications lower the quality of life, lead to disability, and are the cause of premature death in DM patients. One of the chronic vascular complications is a diabetic retinopathy (DR which leads to a complete loss of sight in DM patients. Recent trials show that the primary cause of diabetic retinopathy is retinal neovascularization caused by disequilibrium between pro- and antiangiogenic factors. Gaining knowledge of the mechanisms of action of factors influencing retinal neovascularization as well as the search for new, effective treatment methods, especially in advanced stages of DR, puts special importance on research concentrating on the implementation of biological drugs in DR therapy. At present, it is antivascular endothelial growth factor and antitumor necrosis factor that gain particular significance.

  7. Does renin-angiotensin system blockade have a role in preventing diabetic retinopathy? A clinical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjølie, A K; Dodson, P; Hobbs, F R R

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes management has increasingly focused on the prevention of macrovascular disease, in particular for type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy, one of the main microvascular complications of diabetes, is also an important public health problem. Much of the care invested in retinopathy relates...... the primary trial end-points were not met, there was a clear trend to less severe retinopathy with RAS blockade. A smaller trial, RASS, reported reduced retinopathy progression in type 1 diabetes from RAS blockade with both the ARB losartan and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril...

  8. Relationship between serum levels of oxidation and inflammatory factors in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy and its clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between serum levels of oxidation and inflammatory factors in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy and its clinical significance. METHODS: Totally 54 cases of patients with diabetic retinopathy was selected as subjects, including 31 patients with diabetes and non-proliferative retinopathy(NPDR groupand 23 patients with diabetes and proliferative retinopathy(PDR group. Another 30 cases of diabetes patients without DR(DM groupand 30 normal people(NC groupwas selected as control. The level of fasting blood glucose(FPG, 2h postprandial blood glucose(2hPG, glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c, serum malondialdehyde(MDAand heme oxygenase -1(HO-1, tumor necrosis factor α(TNF-αand interleukin-6(IL-6and C reactive protein(CRPwas detected, and variance test detect the difference between 4 groups, and SNK-Q was used to multiple comparison. Pearson correlation analysis was used to compare the correlation between oxidation markers(MDA and Ho-1and the level of inflammatory factors(TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP. COX multivariate analysis was used to investigate the risk and protective factors of diabetic retinopathy. RESULTS: The levels of FPG, 2hPG, HbA1c, MDA, TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP in DM group, PDR group and NPDR group were significantly higher than that in NC group(PPPPPPPPCONCLUSION: Oxidative stress is closely related to the expression of inflammatory factors in serum of patients with diabetes mellitus, and is an important risk factor of DR, and related indicators can be used as markers for DR diagnosis.

  9. Current Trends in the Monitoring and Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Raczyńska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR in young adults have significantly improved in recent years. Research methods have widened significantly, for example, by introducing spectral optical tomography of the eye. Invasive diagnostics, for example, fluorescein angiography, are done less frequently. The early introduction of an insulin pump to improve the administration of insulin is likely to delay the development of diabetic retinopathy, which is particularly important for young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. The first years of diabetes occurring during childhood and youth are the most appropriate to introduce proper therapeutic intervention before any irreversible changes in the eyes appear. The treatment of DR includes increased metabolic control, laserotherapy, pharmacological treatment (antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory treatment, enzymatic vitreolysis, and intravitreal injections, and surgery. This paper summarizes the up-to-date developments in the diagnostics and treatment of DR. In the literature search, authors used online databases, PubMed, and clinitrials.gov and browsed through individual ophthalmology journals, books, and leading pharmaceutical company websites.

  10. Prevalence and 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy among Danish type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Green, A; Sjølie, A K

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of retinopathy in long-surviving type 1 diabetic patients. It also investigated the 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy and associated risk factors in a Danish population-based cohort. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 727...... type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, was identified in 1973. In 1981-1982, baseline retinopathy was graded and other risk factors were assessed in 573 patients. Twenty-five years later, 308 patients were still alive. Of these, 201 (65.3%) were re-examined at follow-up in 2007......-2008. RESULTS: The median age and duration of diabetes at follow-up were 58.8 and 43 years, respectively. At follow-up, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 97.0%. Non-proliferative retinopathy was found in 45.8%, and 51.2% had proliferative retinopathy. The 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy...

  11. Correlative Analysis of Urinary Albumin Excretion with Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus%2型糖尿病患者尿白蛋白排泄量与视网膜病变的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 樊志强; 蒋成霞; 郭艳滟

    2016-01-01

    [Objective] To analyze the relationship between urinary albumin excretion and diabetic retinop‐athy in type 2 diabetics mellitus .[Methods] Two hundred and sixty patients with type 2 diabetics mellitus were divided into normal albuminuria group(NA ,n = 41 ,24h‐urinary albumin≤30mg) ,microalbuminuria group (MAU ,n =118 ,30mg<24h‐urinary albumin<300mg) and macroalbuminuria group(CAU ,n =101 , 24h‐urinary albumin≥300mg) .All the patients were measured in terms of 24h‐urinary albumin and examined by digital retinal photographs ,thus the relationship between urinary albumin excretion and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetics can be analyzed .[Results] The non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) detection rate in the NA group was 9 8.% ,and the detection rate of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was 4 8.% ;The detection rate of NPDR in the MAU group was 43 2.% ,and the detection rate of PDR was 16 1.% ;The detec‐tion rate of NPDR in the CAU group was 42 6.% ,and the detection rate of PDR was 34 7.% ;There were sig‐nificant differences in the detection rates of NPDR and PDR in each group ( P <0 0.5);Correlation analysis showed that urinary albumin excretion rate was positively correlated with the rate of DR in T2DM patients ( P<0 0.5)[.Conclusion] The urinary albumin excretion rate of T2DM patients is significantly correlated with the occurrence of DR .The above factors may have a common pathophysiological basis .%【目的】探讨2型糖尿病(T2DM )患者尿白蛋白排泄量与视网膜病变(DR)的相关性。【方法】260例T2DM患者,依据尿白蛋白排泄量分为正常白蛋白尿组41例(NA组,24 h尿白蛋白<30 mg)、微量白蛋白尿组118例(M A U组,24 h尿白蛋白30~300 m g )和大量白蛋白尿组101例(C A U组,24 h尿白蛋白>300 mg)。检测各组患者的24 h尿白蛋白定量并进行眼底检查,分析T2DM患者尿白蛋白排泄量与DR的相关性。【结果】NA组

  12. Does bariatric surgery prevent progression of diabetic retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Laybourne, J P; Sandinha, M T; de Alwis, N M W; Avery, P; Steel, D H

    2017-08-01

    PurposeTo assess the changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients post bariatric surgery and report on the risk factors that may be associated with it.Patients and methodsRetrospective observational study of T2DM patients who underwent bariatric surgery in a UK specialist bariatric unit between 2009 and 2015. Preoperative and postoperative weight, HbA1c, and annual DR screening results were collected from medical records. Patients with preoperative retinal screening and at least one postoperative retinal screening were eligible for analysis. Multivariate analysis was used to explore significant clinical predictors on postoperative worsening in DR.ResultsA total of 102 patients were eligible for analysis and were followed up for 4 years. Preoperatively, 68% of patients had no DR compared to 30% with background retinopathy, 1% pre-proliferative retinopathy, and 1% proliferative retinopathy. In the first postoperative visit, 19% of patients developed new DR compared to 70% stable and 11% improved. These proportions remained similar for each postoperative visit over time. Young age, male gender, high preoperative HbA1c, and presence of preoperative retinopathy were the significant predictors of worsening postoperatively.ConclusionBariatric surgery does not prevent progression of DR. Young male patients with pre-existing DR and poor preoperative glycaemic control are most at risk of progression. All diabetic patients should attend regular DR screening post bariatric surgery to allow early detection of potentially sight-threatening changes, particularly among those with identifiable risk factors. Future prospective studies with prolonged follow-up are required to clarify the duration of risk.

  13. Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kalpana; Mohan, Roshni; Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Panneerselvam, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes frequently use complimentary and alternative medications including Ayurvedic medications and hence it is important to determine their efficacy and safety. Objectives To assess the effects of Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library (issue 10, 2011), MEDLINE (until 31 August 2011), EMBASE (until 31 August 2011), AMED (until 14 October 2011), the database of randomised trials from South Asia (until 14 October 2011), the database of the grey literature (OpenSigle, until 14 October 2011) and databases of ongoing trials (until 14 October 2011). In addition we performed hand searches of several journals and reference lists of potentially relevant trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials of at least two months duration of Ayurvedic interventions for diabetes mellitus. Participants of both genders, all ages and any type of diabetes were included irrespective of duration of diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, comorbidity or diabetes related complications. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Risk of bias of trials was evaluated as indicated in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Intervention. Main results Results of only a limited number of studies could be combined, in view of different types of interventions and variable quality of data. We found six trials of proprietary herbal mixtures and one of whole system Ayurvedic treatment. These studies enrolled 354 participants ( 172 on treatment, 158 on controls, 24 allocation unknown). The treatment duration ranged from 3 to 6 months. All these studies included adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. With regard to our primary outcomes, significant reductions in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar (FBS) or both were observed with Diabecon, Inolter and Cogent DB compared to placebo or no additional treatment, while no significant hypoglycaemic response was found

  14. Evidence for current diagnostic criteria of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ritesh; Kumar[1; Lakshmana; Perumal; Nandhini[1; Sadishkumar; Kamalanathan[1; Jayaprakash; Sahoo[1; Muthupillai; Vivekanadan[1

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable metabolic derangement afflicting several millions of individuals globally. It is associated with several micro and macrovascular complications and is also a leading cause of mortality. The unresolved issue is that of definition of the diagnostic threshold for diabetes. The World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have laid down several diagnostic criteria for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes based on the accumulating body of evidence.This review has attempted to analyse the scientific evidence supporting the justification of these differing criteria. The evidence for diagnosing diabetes is strong, and there is a concordance between the two professional bodies.The controversy arises when describing the normal lower limit of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with little evidence favouring the reduction of the FPG by the ADA. Several studies have also shown the development of complications specific for diabetes in patients with prediabetes as defined by the current criteria though there is a significant overlap of such prevalence in individuals with normoglycemia. Large multinational longitudinal prospective studies involving subjects without diabetes and retinopathy at baseline will ideally help identify the threshold of glycemic measurements for future development of diabetes and its complications.

  15. Diabetic macular oedema: under-represented in the genetic analysis of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadgate, Suzanne; Kiire, Christine; Halford, Stephanie; Chong, Victor

    2018-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, is a complex disease and is one of the leading causes of blindness in adults worldwide. It can be divided into distinct subclasses, one of which is diabetic macular oedema. Diabetic macular oedema can occur at any time in diabetic retinopathy and is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the large number of genetic association studies that have been performed in cohorts of patients with type 2 diabetes and published in English-language journals up to February 2017. Many of these studies have produced positive associations with gene polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. However, this review highlights that within this large body of work, studies specifically addressing a genetic association with diabetic macular oedema, although present, are vastly under-represented. We also highlight that many of the studies have small patient numbers and that meta-analyses often inappropriately combine patient data sets. We conclude that there will continue to be conflicting results and no meaningful findings will be achieved if the historical approach of combining all diabetic retinopathy disease states within patient cohorts continues in future studies. This review also identifies several genes that would be interesting to analyse in large, well-defined cohorts of patients with diabetic macular oedema in future candidate gene association studies. © 2018 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Presence of chronic diabetic foot ulcers is associated with more frequent and more advanced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellman, A; Katzman, P; Andreasson, S; Löndahl, M

    2018-05-23

    To clarify the frequency and severity of diabetic retinopathy in a group of people with Type 2 diabetes and chronic diabetic foot ulcers, and to compare visual acuity, levels of retinopathy and clinical significant macular oedema with a matched control group of people with Type 2 diabetes without a history of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Visual acuity and fundus imaging were evaluated in 90 white people with at least 3 months' duration of full-thickness diabetic foot ulcers below the ankle and the results compared with those in 180 white people with Type 2 diabetes without a history of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (control group). Controls were matched for age, sex and duration of diabetes. Despite similar age and diabetes duration, severe non-proliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy was present in 41% of the people in the diabetic foot ulcer group as compared to 15% in the control group (Pdiabetic foot ulcer group was without any diabetic retinopathy as compared to 34% among controls. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy was more common in the diabetic foot ulcer group (31% vs 8%; Pdiabetic retinopathy did not differ between groups. Clinically significant macular oedema was more frequently present, and the diabetic foot ulcer group exhibited significantly worse results in best and worst eye visual acuity testing. In this northern European setting almost all people with Type 2 diabetes and chronic diabetic foot ulcers had diabetic retinopathy. Almost one-third had proliferative diabetic retinopathy as compared to diabetic retinopathy was linked to worse visual acuity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Sixteen-year incidence of diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a nationwide cohort of young Danish type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg; Peto, Tunde

    2013-01-01

    Design of study: Prospective cohort-study Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess long-term incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and associated risk factors in a Danish population-based cohort of young type 1 diabetic patients. Methods: Eighty...... percent of all Danish type 1 diabetic patients below the age of 18 (n=1033) were examined in 1986-89. In 1995, baseline retinopathy was graded and other risk factors were assessed in 324 patients (31.4% of the original cohort). Of these, 132 (40.7%) were re-examined at follow-up in 2011. At baseline two...... and diabetes duration. Results: The mean age and diabetes duration at baseline were 21.1±3.1 and 13.3±3.5 years, respectively. At baseline 31.8% had no retinopathy, 67.4% had non-PDR and 0.8% had PDR. At follow-up, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 96.9%. Thirty-eight patients with no DR at baseline...

  18. Basement membrane abnormalities in human eyes with diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J

    1996-01-01

    Vascular and parenchymal basement membranes (BMs) are thickened in diabetes, but alterations in individual BM components in diabetic eyes, especially in diabetic retinopathy (DR), are obscure. To identify abnormalities in the distribution of specific constituents, we analyzed cryostat sections...... of human eyes obtained at autopsy (seven normal, five diabetic without DR, and 13 diabetic with DR) by immunofluorescence with antibodies to 30 BM and extracellular matrix components. In non-DR eyes, no qualitative changes of ocular BM components were seen. In some DR corneas, epithelial BM was stained...... discontinuously for laminin-1, entactin/nidogen, and alpha3-alpha4 Type IV collagen, in contrast to non-DR corneas. Major BM alterations were found in DR retinas compared to normals and non-DR diabetics. The inner limiting membrane (retinal BM) of DR eyes had accumulations of fibronectin (including cellular...

  19. Retinopathy in youth with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of retinopathy in 517 youth with type 2 diabetes of 2–8 years duration enrolled in the TODAY study. Retinal photographs were graded centrally for retinopathy using established standards. Retinopathy was identified in 13.7% of subjects. Prev...

  20. Glycaemic threshold for diabetes-specific retinopathy among individuals from Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Portugal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas Peter; Handlos, Line Neerup; Vistisen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    We studied the glycaemic threshold and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screen-detected diabetes in Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Portugal. The prevalence of diabetes-specific retinopathy started to increase at an HbA1c level of 6-6.4% and in individuals with HbA1c >7.0% the prevalence was 6.0%....

  1. Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy by Preventing Retinal Inflammation and Tight Junction Protein Decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zengyang; Gong, Chenyuan; Lu, Bin; Yang, Li; Sheng, Yuchen; Ji, Lili; Wang, Zhengtao

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to observe the alleviation of the ethanol extract of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. (DC), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on DR and its engaged mechanism. After DC (30 or 300 mg/kg) was orally administrated, the breakdown of blood retinal barrier (BRB) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats was attenuated by DC. Decreased retinal mRNA expression of tight junction proteins (including occludin and claudin-1) in diabetic rats was also reversed by DC. Western blot analysis and retinal immunofluorescence staining results further confirmed that DC reversed the decreased expression of occludin and claudin-1 proteins in diabetic rats. DC reduced the increased retinal mRNA expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin- (IL-) 6, and IL-1β in diabetic rats. In addition, DC alleviated the increased 1 and phosphorylated p65, IκB, and IκB kinase (IKK) in diabetic rats. DC also reduced the increased serum levels of TNFα, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-12, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 in diabetic rats. Therefore, DC can alleviate DR by inhibiting retinal inflammation and preventing the decrease of tight junction proteins, such as occludin and claudin-1. PMID:25685822

  2. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in various ethnic groups: a worldwide perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Gupta, Bhaskar; Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne; Evans, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The alarming rise in diabetes prevalence is a global public health and economic problem. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common complication of diabetes and the leading cause of blindness among working-age populations in the Western world. Screening and prompt treatment of diabetic retinopathy are not top priorities in many regions of the world, because the impacts of other causes of preventable blindness remain an issue. Ethnicity is a complex, independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. Observations from white populations cannot be extrapolated fully to other ethnic groups. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy, and clinically significant macular edema are higher in people of South Asian, African, Latin American, and indigenous tribal descent compared to the white population. Although all ethnic groups are susceptible to the established risk factors of diabetic retinopathy-such as length of exposure and severity of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia-ethnic-specific risk factors also may influence these rates. Such risk factors may include differential susceptibility to conventional risk factors, insulin resistance, differences in anthropometric measurements, truncal obesity, urbanization, variations in access to healthcare systems, genetic susceptibility, and epigenetics. The rates of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy appear to be declining in the United States, supporting the observation that better medical management of diabetes and prompt treatment of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy substantially improve the long-term diabetic retinopathy incidence; studies from other parts of the world are limited and do not mirror this finding, however. We examine the ethnicity and region-based prevalence of diabetic retinopathy around the world and highlight the need to reinforce ethnicity-based screening and treatment thresholds in diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Prothrombotic changes in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Olivier; Jesel, Laurence; Abbas, Malak; Morel, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    Although our understanding of vascular pathology has greatly improved in recent years, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced thrombotic propensity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remain incompletely characterized. Detrimental interactions between activated vascular cells (i.e., platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells) and the vulnerable atheromatous plaque are a major determinant of the increased atherothrombotic burden in T2DM patients. Endothelial damage and accelerated senescence, impairment of the endothelial progenitor cell repair system, plaque neovascularization and inflammation, decreased clearance of detrimental molecules within the plaque, and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases may collectively contribute to intraplaque hemorrhage and subsequent rupture. Notably, recent data demonstrates the central importance of the tissue factor-microparticle-mediated pathway in diabetic thrombophilia and cardiovascular complications. Acting as detrimental amplifiers of various biological responses (including thrombogenicity and plaque remodeling), microparticles have also emerged as a key marker of global vascular damage in T2DM patients. Available evidence suggests that targeting the tissue factor-microparticle pathway may be a promising approach for reducing the burden of the atherosclerotic complications of diabetes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Prevalence of pre-diabetes and unreported diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unreported diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance have substantial clinical importance. Glucose intolerance precedes diabetes mellitus and it is associated with cardiovascular complications. Subjects with prediabetes have near normal glycated haemoglobin and may only be detected when oral glucose ...

  5. Blood Vessel Enhancement and Segmentation for Screening of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibaa Jamal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease caused by the increase of insulin in blood and it is one of the main cuases of blindness in idusterlized countries. It is a progressive disease and needs an early detection and treatment. Vascular pattern of human retina helps the ophthalmologists in automated screening and diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. In this article, we present a method for vascular pattern ehnacement and segmentation. We present an automated system which uses wavelets to enhance the vascular pattern and then it applies a piecewise threshold probing and adaptive thresholding for vessel localization and segmentation respectively. The method is evaluated and tested using publicly available retinal databases and we further compare our method with already proposed techniques.

  6. Effect of Behavioral Intervention on Dilated Fundus Examination Rates in Older African American Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David M; Casten, Robin J; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A; Murchison, Ann P; Johnson, Deiana; Stratford, Shayla; Henderer, Jeffrey; Rovner, Barry W; Haller, Julia A

    2015-09-01

    African American individuals are at high risk of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy but have suboptimal rates of dilated fundus examinations (DFEs). Early intervention is crucial for the prevention of diabetic retinopathy in this high-risk population. To test the efficacy of behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention on rates of DFEs in older African American individuals with diabetes mellitus. Masked randomized clinical trial at 2 urban medical centers from October 1, 2010, to May 31, 2014. Participants included 206 African American individuals 65 years and older with diabetes mellitus who had not obtained a DFE in the preceding 12 months. Participants were randomized to either behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention, a behavioral intervention designed to provide education, facilitate identifying and addressing health care barriers, and promote goal setting to improve rates of DFEs, or supportive therapy, a control condition. The primary outcome was medical documentation of a DFE at 6 months' follow-up. Secondary outcomes included the Risk Perceptions and Risk Knowledge Survey of Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetes Self-Care Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire 9, and National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire 25 scores and hemoglobin A1c levels. More participants in the behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention group (87.9%) obtained a DFE compared with those in the supportive therapy group (34.1%) by the 6-month follow-up assessment (P diabetic retinopathy prevention group were 2.5 times more likely to obtain a DFE compared with those in the supportive therapy group (risk ratio = 2.58; 95% CI, 1.91-3.48; P Knowledge Survey of Diabetes Mellitus or National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire 25 composite scores; however, both groups had improved adherence to diabetes mellitus self-care behaviors from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy

  7. Stress and adjustment in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, S; Singh, S B

    1999-01-01

    Stress and adjustment in diabetics is studied in order to know the influence of maladjustment and stress in the causation of the disease. The sample of study consists of 100 diabetics patients, 100 nonpsychosomatic and 100 normal person. Results obtained are discussed in detail. It is concluded that maladjustment and stress are important contributing factors in' diabetes mellitus.

  8. Retinal micropseudocysts in diabetic retinopathy: prospective functional and anatomic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Raimondo; Cennamo, Gilda; Finelli, Maria Luisa; Bonavolontà, Paola; Greco, Giovanni Maria; de Crecchio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, progression and functional predictive value of retinal micropseudocysts (MPCs) in diabetic patients. Prospective controlled observational study. From among all the type 2 diabetic patients evaluated during a period of 5 months between September 2009 and January 2010, we enrolled all patients with retinal MPCs at spectral-domain scanning laser ophthalmoscope/optical coherence tomography (SD-SLO/OCT) not previously treated for diabetic retinopathy. Forty diabetic patients without MPCs served as the control group. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal thickness (CRT), macular sensitivity and stability of fixation at SD-SLO/OCT microperimetry were measured monthly for 12 months. 22/156 patients with type 2 diabetes (14.1%, 32 eyes) met the inclusion criteria. The 95% confidence interval for the prevalence estimate of MPCs was 12.3-16.6%. Mean BCVA, CRT and central retinal sensitivity at baseline were 77.53 ± 2.2 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters, 242.31 ± 31.0 µm and 15.95 ± 0.61 dB, respectively. Fixation was stable in all cases. Compared to the control group, eyes with MPCs had similar BCVA but greater CRT (p = 0.01) and reduced macular sensitivity (p = 0.001) at baseline and at each follow-up visit. Over time, CRT remained stable in eyes with MPCs, whereas macular sensitivity progressively decreased. MPCs in diabetic retinopathy are associated, temporally or causally, with a progressive reduction of macular sensitivity despite a stable BCVA, CRT and fixation. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Clinical Significance of von Willebrand Factor and Antithrombin in Diabetes Mellitus with Retinopathy%血管性血友病因子与抗凝血酶在糖尿病视网膜病变中的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 汤荣华

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨糖尿病微血管视网膜病变患者血管性血友病因子(vWF)、抗凝血酶(AT)的变化及临床意义.方法 将100例2型糖尿病患者分为两组,糖尿病无微血管视网膜病变并发症组53例,糖尿病微血管视网膜病变并发症组47例,设健康人群对照组50例.所有人群入院或体检时即采集静脉血,进行vWF:Ag、AT:A检测.结果 2型糖尿病无微血管视网膜病变并发症组患者血浆vWF:Ag含量较正常对照组增高(P<0.05),2型糖尿病微血管视网膜病变并发症组患者血浆vWF:Ag含量与2型糖尿病无微血管视网膜病变并发症组及正常对照组相比有显著性差异(P<0.05);且2型糖尿病微血管视网膜病变并发症组中背景性病变和增殖性病变患者血浆vWF:Ag含量比较有显著性差异(P<0.05).2型糖尿病无微血管视网膜病变并发症组患者血浆AT活性与正常对照组相比无显著性差异(P>0.05),2型糖尿病微血管视网膜病变并发症组患者血浆AT活性与2型糖尿病无微血管视网膜病变并发症组及正常对照组相比有显著性差异(P<0.05);且2型糖尿病微血管视网膜病变并发症组中背景性病变和增殖性病变患者血浆AT活性比较有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论 血浆vWF:Ag、AT:A的变化与糖尿病微血管视网膜病变的发生、发展有密切关系,监测其水平与活性对糖尿病微血管并发症的治疗和预防有重要的临床意义.%Objective To explore the changes of von Willebrand factor(vWF) and antithrombin(AT) in diabetic patients with retinopathy and its clinical implications. Methods 100 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients were divided into 2 groups,one group included 53 T2DM patients without retinopathy,another group included 47 T2DM patients with retinopathy, 50 healthy peoples were enrolled as control group. Venous blood was collected from all groups and vWF:Ag, AT; A were determined. Results The level of vWF;Ag in T2DM

  10. [The German program for disease management guidelines: type 2 diabetes--diabetic retinopathy/maculopathy guideline 2006. Short review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina; Thole, Henning; Lelgemann, Monika

    2007-02-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus between six medical scientific associations on evidence-based recommendations for prevention and therapy of retinopathy/maculopathy in type 2 diabetes was reached in fall 2006. The recommendations' main sources are the NICE Retinopathy Guideline 2002, and existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline Type 2 Diabetes-Retinopathy/Maculopathy 2006 (www.diabetes.versorgungsleitlinien.de).

  11. Antioxidant plants and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM is increasing rapidly and it is expected to increase by 2030. Other than currently available therapeutic options, there are a lot of herbal medicines, which have been recommended for its treatment. Herbal medicines have long been used for the treatment of DM because of the advantage usually having no or less side-effects. Most of these plants have antioxidant activities and hence, prevent or treat hard curable diseases, other than having the property of combating the toxicity of toxic or other drugs. In this review other than presenting new findings of DM, the plants, which are used and have been evaluated scientifically for the treatment of DM are introduced.

  12. Skin, a mirror reflecting diabetes mellitus: A longitudinal study in a tertiary care hospital in Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahora, Roshni; Thakkar, Sejal; Marfatia, Yogesh

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common of the endocrine disorders. Mucocutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus are many and vary from trivial to life-threatening. Sometimes, mucocutaneous disorders may herald the onset of diabetes. To study the pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in diabetics and role of it in diagnosing diabetes mellitus and its complications. It was a longitudinal observational study of patients having diabetes with skin complaints attending skin outdoor department or admitted in wards for any reason in a tertiary care hospital. Total 300 patients were included in the study. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations were done to diagnose the mucocutaneous disorders, diabetes, and diabetic complications. The data was analyzed by using Epi info software. Demographic profile shown majority of cases (78.66%) in more than 40 years of age with almost equal male and female preponderance. Mucocutaneous manifestations as presenting feature of diabetes were observed in 21.67% cases. Infections were most common in 119 (39.66%) cases, followed by acanthosis nigricans in 46 (15.33%) cases. Various associated complications like hypertension, retinopathy, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, and diabetic ketoacidosis were observed in 160 (53.3%). Skin is the mirror, which reflects internal diseases; this aptly applies to skin and diabetes mellitus. Through awareness about cutaneous manifestations of DM, dermatologist can not only take credit for detecting DM but also facilitate early diagnosis of systemic complications of DM. This is immensely beneficial to patients in long run.

  13. Knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus among Registered Nurses in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus among Registered Nurses in Benin City. ... Although, nurses knew that diet plays a great role in management of diabetes mellitus, they were ... Keywords: Nurses, Health education, Understanding of diabetes.

  14. 77 FR 3549 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ...-0368] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM...

  15. 77 FR 5873 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ...-2011-0326] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The... diabetes exemption applications from fifteen individuals and requested comments from the public (76 FR...

  16. 78 FR 14406 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ...-0013] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM...

  17. 76 FR 61140 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ...-0194] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM...

  18. 77 FR 70530 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...-0348] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of applications for exemption from the diabetes... revision must provide for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with...

  19. 77 FR 65931 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ...-0347] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of applications from 12 individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes...

  20. Coordination Skills during Vitrectomy in Treatment of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehong Chen; Shanshan Luo; Yanchan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.To discuss effective nursing and coordination skills for vitrectomy in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Fifty patients (51 eyes) with diabetic retinopathy required vitrectomy were enrolled in this study..Individual nursing service was delivered by strengthening preoperative preparation, providing psychological nursing, and intraopera-tive observation of the severity of diseases by circulating nurses;meticulous nursing was given postoperatively. Results:All 50 patients underwent surgery successfully..Intra-operatively,.patients had stable physical signs..Five patients had postoperative visual acuity0.3..No complicated infection was seen. Conclusion: For patients diagnosed with proliferative diabetic retinopathy requiring vitrectomy,.full preparations should be made and psychological nursing should be delivered preopera-tively, the severity of diseases and clinical reactions should be closely observed intraoperatively,.and proper processing and nursing measures should be taken postoperatively,.which col-lectively enhance surgical success rate,.decrease surgical com-plications,.and attain favorable treatment efficacy.(Eye Science 2014; 29:55-58).

  1. The relationship between diabetic retinopathy and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne R; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Amiel, Stephanie; Forbes, Angus

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have shown an increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia in patients with diabetes. An association between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal microvasculature disease and cognitive impairment has been reported as potential evidence for a microvascular component to the cognitive impairment. It was hypothesized that severity of DR would be associated with cognitive impairment in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Three hundred eighty patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a population-based eye screening program and grouped by severity of DR as follows: no/mild DR (n=252) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (n=128). Each participant underwent psychosocial assessment; depression screening; ophthalmic and physical examination, including blood assays; and cognitive assessment with the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Mini-Cog. General linear modeling was used to examine severity of DR and cognitive impairment, adjusting for confounders. Severity of DR demonstrated an inverse relationship with cognitive impairment (fully adjusted R2=0.415, Pcognitive impairment scores on ACE-R (adjusted mean±SE 77.0±1.9) compared with the PDR group (82.5±2.2, Pcognitive impairment compared with 5% in the PDR group (n=6). Patients with minimal DR demonstrated more cognitive impairment than those with advanced DR. Therefore, the increased prevalence of cognitive impairment in diabetes may be associated with factors other than evident retinal microvascular disease.

  2. Role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and oxidative stress in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Ueda, Seiji; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Okuda, Seiya

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common and potentially devastating microvascular complication in diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness among the people of occupational age. However, current therapeutic options for the treatment of sight-threatening proliferative diabetic retinopathy such as photocoagulation and vitrectomy are limited by considerable side effects and far from satisfactory. Therefore, to develop novel therapeutic strategies that specifically target diabetic retinopathy is actually desired for most of the patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major initiator of diabetic retinopathy. However, recent clinical study has substantiated the concept of 'hyperglycemic memory' in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial-Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT-EDIC) Research, has revealed that the reduction in the risk of progressive retinopathy resulting from intensive therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes persisted for at least several years after the DCCT trial, despite increasing hyperglycemia. These findings suggest a long-term beneficial influence of early metabolic control on clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetic patients. Among various biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, the process of formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their mode of action are most compatible with the theory 'hyperglycemic memory'. Further, there is a growing body of evidence that AGEs-RAGE (receptor for AGEs) interaction-mediated oxidative stress generation plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. This article summarizes the role of AGEs and oxidative stress in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy and the therapeutic interventions that could prevent this devastating disorder. We also discuss here the pathological crosstalk between the AGEs-RAGE and the renin-angiotensin system in

  3. Result of 1.5a follow-up for epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy in community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yang Wu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the prevalence rate and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy(DRin type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DMin Fengyutan community in Shenyang.METHODS: Totally 457 community residents with T2DM were selected in 2011. Ninety-two of these people accepted the reexamination in 2013. Besides, there were 312 residents with T2DM joined in the study in the same year. Basic condition and life style were investigated, and diabetic retinopathy screening were performed. Logistic multiple regression was used to analyze related risk factors.RESULTS: The prevalence of DR were 15.8% and 41.2% in 2011 and 2013 respectively in the community. Compared with NDR group, age, family history of DM, duration of DM, fasting blood-glucose(FBG, 2h post-meal blood glucose(2hPG, hemoglobin A1c(HbA1c, total cholesterol(TC, serum creatinine(Scr, systolic blood pressure(SBP, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol(HDL-C, LDL-Cwere statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR in Fengyutan community was much higher than the other studies in northern China. It was primarily concerned with long duration of DM, poor glycemic control, inadequate concern with or even neglect of DM and the related oculopathy, hypertension and hyperlipidemia and so on.

  4. [Population-based study of diabetic retinopathy in Wolfsburg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, L; Grüsser, M; Hoffstadt, K; Jörgens, V; Hartmann, P; Kroll, P

    2001-11-01

    Since November 1997 the complete documentation of an ophthalmological examination of diabetics has been annually subsidized by the Volkswagen Corporation Health Maintenance Organization (VW-HMO). The results of an annual ophthalmological examination were recorded in a standardised history sheet developed by the Initiative Group for Early Detection of Diabetic Eye Diseases. These data included visual acuity, intraocular pressure, lens status and a description of fundus abnormalities. Within 26 months ophthalmological examinations of 2,801 patients were completed which represented 4.5% of all VW-HMO insured patients. On average, patients suffered from diabetes for 9.6 years (SD +/- 8.3), artificial intraocular lenses were present in 357 eyes (6.4%) and 1,216 eyes (12.0%) were diagnosed with cataract or posterior capsule opacification impairing visual acuity. Out of 263 patients younger than 40 years old, 18.8% had a mild or moderate and 3.3% a severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). A proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was found in 2.2% of the younger patients. Of 2,228 patients aged 40 years and older, 11.9% had a mild or moderate and 2.6% a severe NPDR. In 0.9% of this group PDR was diagnosed. An annual ophthalmological screening based on a survey sheet of the Initiative Group was successfully introduced. For the first time a population-based evaluation on the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was carried out for inhabitants of a German city. The prevalence of PDR was found to be lower than previously published in comparable studied.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... School of Biomedical and Laboratory. Sciences, College .... implementing quality control measures during the whole process .... Table 2: Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus by behavioral characteristics, clinical and.

  6. 139 PREVENTION AND SCREENING FOR DIABETES MELLITUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... PREVENTION AND SCREENING FOR DIABETES MELLITUS. *G.U. Eze ... Public Health is the science and art of preventing ... nutrition that targeted only healthy people with ... to such activities as Health education against.

  7. Survey on the awareness of diabetic retinopathy among people with diabetes in the Songnan community of Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigatethe prevalence and awareness of diabetic retinopathy(DR, as well as its influential factors, among patients with diabetes mellitus in the Songnan Community of Shanghai.METHODS: Residents with diabetes mellitus were randomly sampled in Shanghai's Songnan Community. These patients received full physical examinations. DR was diagnosed using non-mydriatic fundus photography. The patients completed a survey concerning their general knowledge and awareness of DR.RESULTS: A total of 1120 valid questionnaires and fundus photographs were collected. The incidence of DR among patients with diabetes was 23.6%; 17.1% had mild DR, 5.1% had moderate DR and 1.4% had severe DR. Of the survey participants, 14.1% received ophthalmic examinations over the last year, 71.5% knew their normal blood glucose levels, 85.7% were aware of the possibility of systemic complications caused by diabetes, 77.2% were aware of ocular complications, 47.9% were aware of the need for regular fundus examinations, 58.0% were aware that the early treatment of DR is an important measure to prevent visual impairment, and 59.9% were willing to participate in regular health education seminars. A univariate analysis indicated that the knowledge and awareness scores regarding DR were correlated with age, education level, type of medical insurance, duration of diabetes, diet control, blood glucose monitoring, fasting blood glucose level, exercise frequency and DR stage. A logistic regression analysis indicated that the factors affecting the DR awareness scores were age, education level, type of medical insurance, stage of diabetes, diet control, exercise frequency and DR stage.CONCLUSION: The patients with diabetes in the Songnan Community lacked sufficient awareness of DR prevention and treatment methods. The existing awareness of DR among the survey participants did not lead to effective prevention or treatment actions associated with this condition. It is necessary to

  8. Levels of adhesion molecules in peripheral blood correlat with stages of diabetic retinopathy and may serve as bio markers for microvascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Arnon; Pastukh, Nina; Socea, Dorina; Jabaly, Hanin

    2018-06-01

    Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is a devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, developing within 15 years in 50% of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and in 10% of patients with type 2 DM. The correlation between levels of inflammatory markers in the peripheral blood and retinopathy staging has not been studied yet, and the purpose of this prospective study was to find a possible association between inflammation and staging of diabetic retinopathy. A prospective (pilot) study that measured level of adhesion molecules in the peripheral blood of 10 healthy subjects and 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients were grouped by the degree of retinopathy: 10 without retinopathy, 10 with non-proliferative retinopathy [NPDR] and 10 with proliferative retinopathy [PDR]. After signing the consent form, an ophthalmologic examination was performed, and 10 mL of blood was drawn. In order to assess adhesion molecules' level serum samples were collected, frozen, and stored at a temperature of -80 °C until analysis was performed as one batch. 10 healthy volunteers and 30 patients were enrolled. Healthy volunteers were younger (36.6 ± 7.9 years) compared to patients (no retinopathy 64.5 ± 10.8 years, NPDR 71.4 ± 8.9 years, and PDR 63.3 ± 11.6 years) (p = .0003 for all groups of patients in comparison with the healthy subjects). VCAM-1 levels were increased by retinopathy staging - starting from 81.86 ± 3.80 ng/ml (healthy), 105.55 ± 1.37 ng/ml (no retinopathy), 111.78 ± 4.14 ng/ml (NPDR), and 123.45 ± 3.99 ng/ml (PDR), with a significant difference between healthy and patients without retinopathy (p = .03), between no retinopathy and NPDR (p = .001), and between NPDR and PDR (p < .0001). E selectin was increased in correlation with severity of the retinopathy, with a significant difference between groups of patients (p = .03 between healthy subjects and T2DM patients

  9. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a health facility in Karachi, Pakistan. ... Conclusion: DR is prevalent in the target population and, therefore, emphasis should be on the education of the local population of New Karachi Township on how to attain euglycemic state with regular medication, diet and ...

  10. 25-羟维生素D、甲状旁腺激素与2型糖尿病视网膜病变的相关性研究%Correlation Study of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D, Parathyroid Hormone and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩改玲

    2016-01-01

    ( LDL ) , serum total calcium and PTH levels of all subjects were detected with an empty stomach in the morning, and the 25 ( OH ) D levels and a straight line of all biochemical markers were analyzed. Results The HbA1C, and LDH, and FBG levels in the 4 group type 2 diabetes groups were significantly higher than the control group ( P 0. 05 ) but were significantly lower than patients with retinal lesions of type 2 diabetes ( P 0. 05 );the levels of HbA1C, and FBG and 25 ( OH ) d was negatively correlated ( P 0. 05 ) . Conclusion The severity of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus and 25 ( OH ) D is closely related, but PTH and 25 ( OH ) D have no significant correlation;25 ( OH ) D can in a certain degree predict the severity of diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy in pregnancy: a population-based study of women with pregestational diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, Aoife M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate screening and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes attending five antenatal centres along the Irish Atlantic seaboard. An adequate frequency of screening was defined as at least two retinal evaluations in separate trimesters. Progression was defined as at least one stage of deterioration of diabetic retinopathy and\\/or development of diabetic macular edema on at least one eye. Women with pregestational diabetes who delivered after 22 gestational weeks (n = 307) were included. In total, 185 (60.3%) had an adequate number of retinal examinations. Attendance at prepregnancy care was associated with receiving adequate screening (odds ratio 6.23; CI 3.39-11.46 (P < 0.001)). Among those who received adequate evaluations (n = 185), 48 (25.9%) had retinopathy progression. Increasing booking systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03, CI 1.01-1.06, P = 0.02) and greater drop in HbA1c between first and third trimesters of pregnancy (OR 2.05, CI 1.09-3.87, P = 0.03) significantly increased the odds of progression. A significant proportion of women continue to demonstrate retinopathy progression during pregnancy. This study highlights the role of prepregnancy care and the importance of close monitoring during pregnancy and identifies those patients at the highest risk for retinopathy progression.

  12. Is there any correlation between vitamin D insufficiency and diabetic retinopathy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shokoufeh; Bonakdaran; Nasser; Shoeibi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine a relation between vitamin D level,which is an inhibitor of angiogenesis, and diabetic retinopathy and its risk factorsMETHODS: In a clinic-based cross sectional study two hundred and thirty-five type 2 diabetic patients older than 20 y were selected. Patients were classified according to ophthalmologic examination as following:no diabetic retinopathy(NDR)(n =153), non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDR)(n =64) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR)(n =18). Study subjects were tested for fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1C(Hb A1C), lipid profile, microalbuminuria, Hs CRP,IGF1, insulin(in patients without history of insulin taking)and 25 hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH) D] levels. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined according to 25(OH) D level less than 30 ng/m L. The relationship between diabetic retinopathy and serum 25(OH) D insufficiency was evaluated.RESULTS: The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was34.8% in our patients. Long duration of diabetes,hypertension, poor glycemic control, diabetic nephropathy, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance were risk factors for diabetic retinopathy but 25(OH) D level was not significant different between NDR, NPDR and PDR groups. Correlation between 25(OH) D level and other known risk factors of diabetic retinopathy was not significant.CONCLUSION: This study did not find any association between diabetic retinopathy and its severity and vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D insufficiency is not related to risk factors of diabetic retinopathy.

  13. Association of statin use and hypertriglyceridemia with diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoo-Ri; Park, Sung Wook; Choi, Shin-Young; Kim, Seung Woo; Moon, Ka Young; Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Kihwang

    2017-01-07

    To investigate the effects of dyslipidemia and statin therapy on progression of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes. The medical records of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (70 statin users and 40 non-users) were retrospectively reviewed. The two outcome measures were progression of diabetic retinopathy by two or more steps on the early treatment diabetic retinopathy study scale and diabetic macular edema based on optical coherence tomography. Serum lipid profiles were analyzed from 6 months prior to diagnosis of diabetic macular edema. Diabetic retinopathy progressed in 23% of statin users and 18% of non-users (p = 0.506), but diabetic macular edema was present in 23% of statin users and 48% of non-users (p = 0.008). Statins reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with and without diabetic macular edema (p = 0.043 and p = 0.031, respectively). Among statin users, patients with diabetic macular edema had higher levels of triglycerides (p = 0.004) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.033) than those without diabetic macular edema. Logistic regression analysis showed that statin use significantly lowered the risk of diabetic macular edema [odds ratio (OR): 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.91, p = 0.032]. Hypertriglyceridemia at 6 months prior to development of macular edema was significantly associated with central retinal thickness (OR: 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02, p = 0.005). Lipid lowering therapy with statins protected against the development of diabetic macular edema and progression of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypertriglyceridemia could be used as a surrogate marker for diabetic macular edema.

  14. Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in a Clinic Population from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Neisha M; Aguilar, Stephanie

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a preventable or treatable cause of blindness in the adult population. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Puerto Ricans is the highest among Hispanics. This study evaluated the prevalence of DR in a screening program of DM subjects in a clinic system in Puerto Rico. A retrospective cross-sectional health records study of DM patients referred by primary care physicians for dilated retinal evaluation to the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Juana Diaz Eye Institute Clinic between 2001 and 2009 was performed. All subjects underwent a complete eye evaluation including fundus photography. Photographs were graded following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocols. A total of 411 randomly selected health records of DM subjects older than 30 years were included. The estimated prevalence of DR among all subjects is 37.7%. DR was more common in males (47.2%) than females (33.7%). The age range with higher frequency of DR is among ages 60 to 69 (34.8%) and the lowest between ages 30 and 39 (3.9%). The average number of years since initial DM diagnosis was 12.48. Probability of developing DR increases with longer duration of DM (p Puerto Ricans. Mild stage retinopathy was most prevalent and there exists an increase in probability to develop DR with duration of DM. The prevalence of DR in total population may be different than the findings presented in this paper. Comprehensive studies are needed to understand and estimate the progression and impact of DR in this population.

  15. Comparing carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetes between patients with and without retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naroi Nejad M

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy seems to be associated with increased intima-media thickness of carotid arteries in T2DM. It may be a common denominator of pathogene-sis of microvascular complications and atherosclerosis in T2DM. Evaluations of carotid arteries are to be done by non-invasive methods such as color Doppler sonography for screening and preventing prospective cereberovascular accidents in patients with diabetic retinopathy, especially proliferative retinopathy, in routine ophthalmological examination of patients with T2DM.

  16. Association analysis of nine candidate gene polymorphisms in Indian patients with type 2 diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindarajan Gowthaman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR is classically defined as a microvasculopathy that primarily affects the small blood vessels of the inner retina as a complication of diabetes mellitus (DM.It is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of a set of nine candidate genes with the development of diabetic retinopathy in a South Indian cohort who have type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods Seven candidate genes (RAGE, PEDF, AKR1B1, EPO, HTRA1, ICAM and HFE were chosen based on reported association with DR in the literature. Two more, CFH and ARMS2, were chosen based on their roles in biological pathways previously implicated in DR. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and one dinucleotide repeat polymorphism, previously reported to show association with DR or other related diseases, were genotyped in 345 DR and 356 diabetic patients without retinopathy (DNR. The genes which showed positive association in this screening set were tested further in additional sets of 100 DR and 90 DNR additional patients from the Aravind Eye Hospital. Those which showed association in the secondary screen were subjected to a combined analysis with the 100 DR and 100 DNR subjects previously recruited and genotyped through the Sankara Nethralaya Hospital, India. Genotypes were evaluated using a combination of direct sequencing, TaqMan SNP genotyping, RFLP analysis, and SNaPshot PCR assays. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze the genotype and allele frequencies. Results Among the nine loci (15 polymorphisms screened, SNP rs2070600 (G82S in the RAGE gene, showed significant association with DR (allelic P = 0.016, dominant model P = 0.012, compared to DNR. SNP rs2070600 further showed significant association with DR in the confirmation cohort (P = 0.035, dominant model P = 0.032. Combining the two cohorts gave an allelic P HTRA1, rs11200638 (G>A, showed marginal

  17. A needs assessment of people living with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Claudette E; Hall, Anthony B; Kok, Gerjo; Mallya, Joyse; Courtright, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Kilimanjaro Diabetic Programme was initiated in response to the needs of people living with diabetes (PWLD) to identify barriers to uptake of screening for diabetic retinopathy, to improve management of diabetes, and establish an affordable, sustainable eye screening and treatment programme for diabetic retinopathy. Intervention Mapping was used as the framework for the needs assessment. A mixed methods approach was used. Five psychometric measures, Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire, Diabetes Health Beliefs, Self-Efficacy scale, Problem Areas in Diabetes scale, and Hopkins Scale Checklist-25 and a structured interview relating to self-efficacy, addressing disclosure of living with diabetes and life-style changes were used to triangulate the quantitative findings. These were administered to 26 PWLD presenting to rural district hospitals. The interviewees demonstrated low levels of perceived stigma regarding disclosure of living with diabetes and high levels of self-efficacy in raising community awareness of diabetes, seeking on going treatment from Western medicine over traditional healers and in seeking care on sick days. Self-efficacy was high for adjusting diet, although comprehensive dietary knowledge was poor. Negative emotions expressed at diagnosis, changes in life style and altered quality of life were reflected in high levels of anxiety and depression. Low levels of stigma surrounding living with diabetes were linked to a desire to raise community awareness of diabetes, help others live with diabetes and to secure social support to access hospital services. Confusion over what constituted a healthy diet showed the importance of comprehensive, accessible diabetes education, essential to ensuring good glycaemic control, and preventing diabetic complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Low levels of self-efficacy along with high levels of anxiety and depression may have a negative impact on the uptake of screening for Diabetic Retinopathy. The findings

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione-s-transferase M1 and T1 genes with risk of diabetic retinopathy in Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Moasser

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the contributions of GST genetic variants to the risk of diabetic retinopathy in an Iranian population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether sequence variation in glutathione S-transferase gene (GSTM1 and GSTT1 is associated with development of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 605 subjects were investigated in this case-control study; Study groups consisted of 201 patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR, 203 subjects with no clinically significant signs of DR and a group of 201 cases of healthy volunteers with no clinical evidence of diabetes mellitus or any other diseases. The GSTM1 and GSTT1 were genotyped by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (multiplex-PCR analysis in all 404 T2DM patients and 201 healthy individuals served as control. Results: Increased odds ratio showed that GSTM1-null genotype had a moderately higher occurrence in T2DM patients (OR=1.43, 95% CI=1.01–2.04; P=0.03 than in healthy individuals. However, the frequency of GSTT1 genotype (OR=1.41; 95% CI=0.92-2.18; P=0.09 was not significantly different comparing both groups. Although, regression analysis in T2DM patients showed that GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes are not associated with T2DM retinopathy development. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes might not be involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus retinopathy in the Southern Iranian population. However, further investigations are needed to confirm these results in other larger populations.

  19. Low dose radiation and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Gong Shouliang; Cai Lu

    2006-01-01

    Induction of hormesis and adaptive response by low-dose radiatio (LDR) has been extensively indicated. It's mechanism may be related with the protective protein and antioxidants that LDR induced, which take effects on the diabetes mellitus (DM) and other diseases. This review will summarize available dat with emphasis on three points: the preventive effect of LDR on the development of diabetes, the therapeutic effect of LDR on diabetic complications and possible mechanisms by which LDR prevents the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Finally, the perspectives of LDR clinical, diabetes-related implication are discussed. (authors)

  20. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes for Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Celia

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease affecting approximately 9% of the United States population. Successful management of diabetes demands constant self-management on the part of the patient. The patient has to balance diabetes medications, blood glucose monitoring, food intake, physical activity, and management of diabetes-related acute and chronic complications. The patient is often bombarded with misinformation from friends, relatives, and such sources as the Internet and social media. This article discusses the current recommendations for diabetes self-management education and skills including medical nutrition therapy, physical activity, smoking cessation, and assessment for diabetes distress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenetic Modifications and Potential New Treatment Targets in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Perrone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy is a debilitating vascular complication of diabetes. As with other diabetic complications, diabetic retinopathy (DR is characterized by the metabolic memory, which has been observed both in DR patients and in DR animal models. Evidences have provided that after a period of poor glucose control insulin or diabetes drug treatment fails to prevent the development and progression of DR even when good glycemic control is reinstituted (glucose normalization, suggesting a metabolic memory phenomenon. Recent studies also underline the role of epigenetic chromatin modifications as mediators of the metabolic memory. Indeed, epigenetic changes may lead to stable modification of gene expression, participating in DR pathogenesis. Moreover, increasing evidences suggest that environmental factors such as chronic hyperglycemia are implicated DR progression and may also affect the epigenetic state. Here we review recent findings demonstrating the key role of epigenetics in the progression of DR. Further elucidation of epigenetic mechanisms, acting both at the cis- and trans-chromatin structural elements, will yield new insights into the pathogenesis of DR and will open the way for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets to prevent DR progression.

  2. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael W Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy(DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema(DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation(PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies.

  3. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; W; Stewart[1

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered.The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era.Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients,but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision.New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy in sub-Saharan Africa: meeting the challenges of an emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Philip I; Msukwa, Gerald; Beare, Nicholas A V

    2013-07-02

    Sub-Saharan Africa faces an epidemic of diabetes. Diabetes causes significant morbidity including visual loss from diabetic retinopathy, which is largely preventable. In this resource-poor setting, health systems are poorly organized to deliver chronic care with multiple system involvement. The specific skills and resources needed to manage diabetic retinopathy are scarce. The costs of inaction for individuals, communities and countries are likely to be high. Screening for and treatment of diabetic retinopathy have been shown to be effective, and cost-effective, in resource-rich settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, clinical services for diabetes need to be expanded with the provision of effective, integrated care, including case-finding and management of diabetic retinopathy. This should be underpinned by a high quality evidence base accounting for differences in diabetes types, resources, patients and society in Africa. Research must address the epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy in Africa, strategies for disease detection and management with laser treatment, and include health economic analyses. Models of care tailored to the local geographic and social context are most likely to be cost effective, and should draw on experience and expertise from other continents. Research into diabetic retinopathy in Africa can drive the political agenda for service development and enable informed prioritization of available health funding at a national level. Effective interventions need to be implemented in the near future to avert a large burden of visual loss from diabetic retinopathy in the continent. An increase in visual loss from diabetic retinopathy is inevitable as the diabetes epidemic emerges in sub-Saharan Africa. This could be minimized by the provision of case-finding and laser treatment, but how to do this most effectively in the regional context is not known. Research into the epidemiology, case-finding and laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy in sub

  5. Treatment of 98 Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy by Combined Acupuncture and Herbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢桂霞; 肖元春

    2010-01-01

    @@ Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a difficult condition in which microvascular tumor,edema,effusion,hemorrhage or neovascularization develops in the eyeground in diabetics,subsequently leading to the vision diminishment.

  6. The course of diabetic retinopathy during treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of normalization of blood sugar regulation by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) on the course of diabetic retinopathy in insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic patients. Zie: Summary

  7. Vascular Changes and Neurodegeneration in the Early Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Karoline Boegeberg; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Grauslund, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Neurodegeneration is an early component of diabetic retinopathy (DR). It is unclear whether neurodegeneration is an independent factor or a consequence of damaged retinal vasculature. The aims of this study were to review the literature concerning neurodegeneration in diabetic...

  8. [Position statement: surgery and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, Peter; Huber, Joakim; Clodi, Martin; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This position statement reflects the opinion of the Austrian Diabetes Association concerning the perioperative management of patients with diabetes mellitus based on the available scientific evidence. The paper covers necessary preoperative examinations from an internal/diabetological point of view as well as the perioperative metabolic control by means of oral antidiabetics and/or insulin therapy.

  9. Study of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangdu; Chu Qiaomei

    2002-01-01

    To study the change and the correlation of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sV-CAM-1) levels with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients, serum sVCAM-1 levels were measured in duplicate by ELISA in 85 type 2 diabetic patients; fundus examination was performed by an ophthalmologist using ophthalmoscope or fundus fluorescein angiography, and the findings were graded as: no signs of diabetic retinopathy (NDR), background diabetic retinopathy (BDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Serum sVCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in the PDR and BDR groups than those in the control and NDR groups respectively (P<0.01). NDR group showed significantly increased serum sVCAM-levels compared with control group (P<0.01). In contrast, serum sVCAM-1 levels were not related to the presence of blood glucose, serum insulin levels or known diabetic duration. Authors' results suggest that serum sVCAM-1 might be implicated in the development of the diabetic retinopathy, and could assess the severity of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of serum sVCAM-1 levels in 2 type diabetic patients may be clinically useful for early diagnosis or treatment of diabetic retinopathy

  10. Changing trends in diabetes mellitus in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalifeh, A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify any changing trends in the incidence and caesarean section (CS) rate of pre-gestational diabetes mellitus (DM) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) over a 10- year period, between 1999 and 2008. Although the incidence of pre-gestational DM has not significantly changed over the course of the last 10 years, there is an obvious rising trend in the incidence of GDM. Despite an increase in the overall CS rate during this time period, a parallel increase in the CS rate has not been observed among women whose pregnancies are complicated either by gestational or by pre-gestational diabetes (PGD).

  11. Diabetes mellitus in a toco toucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, E M

    1981-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is rarely diagnosed in avian species. The majority of reported cases have occurred in small birds, such as the parakeet and canary. A major complicating factor in the diagnosis of diabetes in birds is the lack of accepted normal blood glucose values, which can be highly variable among avian species. In the case to be reported here a Toco Toucan (Ramphastos toco) was affected. The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in this instance was based on the history, clinical signs, and response to therapy.

  12. Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus: a modern viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    N A Molitvoslovova; G R Galstyan

    2013-01-01

    The interrelationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and bone disorder is still not fully understood. Whereas type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by decrease in bone density, a number of studies failed to discover such phenomenon in type 2 diabetes mel- litus (T2DM), – or even uncovered some evidence for higher density, as measured against groups of control. At the very same time both types of DM are associated with elevated risk of bone fracture, which points out at some deterio...

  13. Study of diabetic retinopathy and Bone Mineral Density in type 2 Diabetes patient%2型糖尿病患者视网膜病变与骨密度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春香; 赵全良

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨2型糖尿病患者视网膜病变( DR)与骨密度( BMD)的关系。方法:检查了63例2型糖尿病患者视网膜,分为A组即正常组、B组单纯性视网膜病变组、C组增殖性视网膜病变组,并分别测定其L2~4椎体、双侧股骨Ward 区BMD 。结果:除A组患者BMD与对照组无明显差异( p >0.05);B、C组患BMD与对照组差异明显( p <0.01);糖尿病患者中, C组BMD明显低于A组( p <0.01)。结论:糖尿病视网膜病变患者BMD 比正常人低,增殖性视网膜病变组BMD较其它组显著下降。%Objective:To study the relationship between diabetic retinopathy and bone mineral density with type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM) .Methods:Dual energy X -ray absorptiometry was used to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spines(L2 -4) , Ward's triangle in 63 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 55 cases of normal control group .According to diabetic retinopathy were divided into groups with normal retina (group A), nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (group B) and proliferative diabetic retinopa-thy ( group C) .Results:No significant differences were found in BMD between normal retina l diabetic patients and normal control group ( p >0.05) .BMD was significantly lower in diabetes patient with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy group and proliferative diabetic retinopathy than the normal control group .In diabetes patient BMD was significantly lower in proliferative diabetic retinopathy group than in normal control groups ( p <0.01) .Conclusion:BMD in diabetes patient with nephropathy should be lower than normal control group.BMD in diabetes patient might be more remarkable in the group with proliferative diabetic retinopathy than in the groups with nor -mal retina and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy .

  14. Knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, F.; Afridi, A.K.; Rahim, F.; Ashfaq, M.; Khan, S.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Results: Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 ± 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 ± 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Conclusions: Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus. (author)

  15. KNOWLEDGE OF DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Fahim; Afridi, Ayesha Khan; Rahim, Fawad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Khan, Sheema; Shabbier, Ghulam; Rahman, Sadiq Ur

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 +/- 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 +/- 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus.

  16. Association of Metformin Treatment with Reduced Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate effects of long-term metformin on the severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR in high-risk type 2 diabetic (T2D patients. Methods. A retrospective chart review study was conducted involving 335 DR patients with T2D ≥ 15 years from 1990 to 2013. The severity of DR was determined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. The associations between metformin and DR severity were evaluated. Comparison with stratification for the use of sulfonylurea and insulin was performed to identify possible confounding effects. Results. Severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (SNPDR/PDR was more often diagnosed in nonmetformin users (67/142, 47% versus metformin users (48/193, 25% (p<0.001, regardless of gender and race of the patients. The odds ratio of metformin associated with SNPDR/PDR was 0.37 in all cases (p<0.001, 0.35 in sulfonylurea use cohort (p<0.05, 0.45 in nonsulfonylurea use cohorts (p<0.01, and 0.42 in insulin use cohort (p<0.01. Insulin users had a higher rate of SNPDR/PDR. Metformin had no influence on the occurrence of clinical significant diabetic macular edema. Conclusions. Long-term use of metformin is independently associated with a significant lower rate of SNPDR/PDR in patients with type 2 diabetes ≥ 15 years.

  17. Scleredema Diabeticorum in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scleredema adultorum, a connective tissue disorder of unknown aetiology, is characterized by a thickening of the reticular dermis in the upper back of the body that may decrease the mobility of the affected tissues. It has been reported in diabetic patients with poor metabolic control. Therapeutic options are limited with generally poor results. Case Report. 53-year-old white male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was referred to our department for evaluation of incipient nephropathy and retinopathy. On examination, he presented erythematous, indurated, painless and ill-defined plaque on the skin of the upper back with limited movement of shoulders. A biopsy was done revealing scleredema. PUVA treatment and physiotherapy were started with the amelioration of mobility and acquiring some elasticity of the upper back. Discussion. The development of scleredema in diabetic patients has been related to prolonged exposure to chronic hyperglycaemia. Our patient has had diabetes for 20 years with an acceptable glucose control, however he developed the scleredema 10 years ago. Conclusions. Scleredema is a rare connective disorder that seems to appear most frequently in diabetic subjects. Good metabolic control seems not to preclude its development. PUVA treatment and physiotherapy are therapeutic options that seem to be of some help.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of posttransplant diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancia, P; Adam de Beaumais, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E

    2017-06-01

    Many factors (physiological, pathological, environmental or genetic) are associated with variability in drug effect. Most patients respond to a standard treatment but the drug may be ineffective or toxic. In this review, we focused on genetic markers of posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) after renal transplantation, a frequent complication of immunosuppressive therapy and important risk factor of graft loss and mortality. An initial literature search identified 100 publications and among them 32 association studies were retrieved under 'Pharmacogenetics and PTDM'. Thirty-five variants in 25 genes with an impact on insulin secretion, disposition or effect were significantly associated with PTDM. The population studied, immunosuppressive regimen, follow-up, PTDM diagnostic and genetic variations tested were highly variable between studies. Although pharmacogenetic biomarkers are key tools of great promise for preventing toxicities and improving event-free survival rates, replication studies are required to select validated biomarkers linked to the occurrence of PTDM and select appropriate immusuppressive treatment to improve renal graft and patient outcome.

  19. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in karachi, pakistan: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhairy, S.; Rasheed, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes patients presenting to the National Institute of Diabetes and Eye out patient department of Dow University Hospital (Ohja campus), Dow University of Health Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study in which known diabetics were recruited between the period of 1st July 2011 till 31st July 2012.They were then referred to the Ophthalmology unit for eye examination. Subjective refraction was done with Snellens chart, anterior segment examination and fundus examined was done using a TopCon PS-61E Slit lamp BioMicroscope. All patients were dilated with eye drop tropicamide 1% instilled every ten minutes for thirty minutes and the fundus was examined with Volk 90D lens. Classification of diabetic retinopathy was done using the International clinical diabetic retinopathy disease severity scale study. The data was analyzed using Statistical package for social Science (SPSS version 20) and a p value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: There were a total number of 570 patients included in this study. Amongst them 325 were males and 245 were females. Out of these patients those that who were found to have diabetic retinopathy were 315 (55.3%).The age range was between 25 and 75 years and the mean age was 52.30 ± 9.333.Patients that were found to have mild non proliferative diabetic retinopathy were 231(40.5% ) while 33 (5.8%) had moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy,11(1.9%) had severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 40 (7.0)% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Maculopathy was seen in a total number of 72(12.6%) of patients. Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is highly prevalent in Karachi, Pakistan thus it is vital to detect as well as manage the disease early so as to prevent the onset of blindness in relation to it. (author)

  20. Comparison of film and digital fundus photographs in eyes of individuals with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Almukhtar, Talat; Glassman, Adam R

    2011-01-01

    To compare grading of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from stereoscopic film versus stereoscopic digital photographs obtained from a subset of Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) participants.......To compare grading of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from stereoscopic film versus stereoscopic digital photographs obtained from a subset of Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) participants....

  1. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  2. Diabetes mellitus in newborns and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P S; Khatwa, U A

    2000-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is uncommon in infancy and newborn period. The two common forms seen are the transient and permanent forms of diabetes mellitus of the newborn. They have to be differentiated from the transient hyperglycemic states (Blood sugar > 125 mg/dl) seen in newborns who receive parenteral glucose infusions and in those with septicemia and CNS disorders. Transient diabetes mellitus of the newborn (TDNB) is defined as hyperglycemia occurring within the first month of life lasting at least 2 weeks and requiring insulin therapy. Most of these cases resolve spontaneously by 4 months. It has a reported incidence of 1 in 45,000 to 60,000 live births. The most likely etiology is a maturational delay of cAMP mediated insulin release. The clinical features include small for datedness, proneness for birth asphyxia, open-eye alert facies, dehydration, emaciation, polyuria and poydipsia. These children are prone to septicemia and urinary tract infections. They have hyperglycemia, glucosuria, absent or mild ketonuria, low basal insulin, C-peptide and IGF-1 levels. Treatment consists of hydration and judicious administration of insulin with close monitoring. Thirty percent of these children are likely to develop permanent neonatal diabetes. Compared to transient form, permanent diabetes mellitus is uncommon. It is usually due to pancreatic dysgenesis often associated with other malformations and rarely due to type 1 diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis is based on the demonstration of both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic dysfunction. These children are managed as type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are prone to develop the vascular complications of diabetes at an earlier date.

  3. Association between diabetic retinopathy and subclinical atherosclerosis in China: Results from a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Teng, Xiangyu; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association of diabetic retinopathy with subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged and elderly Chinese with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional community-based study was performed among 1607 patients aged 40 years or older in Shanghai. Non-mydriatic digital fundus photography examination was used in diabetic retinopathy detection. Presence of elevated carotid intima-media thickness or carotid plaque was defined as subclinical atherosclerosis. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 15.1% in total patients. Patients with diabetic retinopathy were more likely to have elevated carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque and subclinical atherosclerosis than those without diabetic retinopathy (37.9% vs 30.7%, 57.6% vs 49.6% and 64.6% vs 57.1%, respectively). The presence of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with increased odds of subclinical atherosclerosis (odds ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-3.60) after full adjustments. The presence of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged and elderly patients with type 2 diabetics in China. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o'clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with Waardenburg syndrome and diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Validation of Smartphone Based Retinal Photography for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Arulmalar, Subramanian; Usha, Manoharan; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Kareemuddin, Khaji Syed; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of "fundus on phone' (FOP) camera, a smartphone based retinal imaging system, as a screening tool for diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection and DR severity in comparison with 7-standard field digital retinal photography. Single-site, prospective, comparative, instrument validation study. 301 patients (602 eyes) with type 2 diabetes underwent standard seven-field digital fundus photography with both Carl Zeiss fundus camera and indigenous FOP at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. Grading of DR was performed by two independent retina specialists using modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading system. Sight threatening DR (STDR) was defined by the presence of proliferative DR(PDR) or diabetic macular edema. The sensitivity, specificity and image quality were assessed. The mean age of the participants was 53.5 ±9.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 12.5±7.3 years. The Zeiss camera showed that 43.9% had non-proliferative DR(NPDR) and 15.3% had PDR while the FOP camera showed that 40.2% had NPDR and 15.3% had PDR. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting any DR by FOP was 92.7% (95%CI 87.8-96.1) and 98.4% (95%CI 94.3-99.8) respectively and the kappa (ĸ) agreement was 0.90 (95%CI-0.85-0.95 p<0.001) while for STDR, the sensitivity was 87.9% (95%CI 83.2-92.9), specificity 94.9% (95%CI 89.7-98.2) and ĸ agreement was 0.80 (95%CI 0.71-0.89 p<0.001), compared to conventional photography. Retinal photography using FOP camera is effective for screening and diagnosis of DR and STDR with high sensitivity and specificity and has substantial agreement with conventional retinal photography.

  6. Deregulation of ocular nucleotide homeostasis in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukovaara, Sirpa; Sandholm, Jouko; Aalto, Kristiina; Liukkonen, Janne; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Yegutkin, Gennady G

    2017-02-01

    Clear signaling roles for ATP and adenosine have been established in all tissues, including the eye. The magnitude of signaling responses is governed by networks of enzymes; however, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of purinergic signaling in the eye. By employing thin-layer chromatographic assays with 3 H-labeled substrates, this study aimed to evaluate the role of nucleotide homeostasis in the pathogenesis of vitreoretinal diseases in humans. We have identified soluble enzymes ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73, adenylate kinase-1, and nucleoside diphosphate kinase in the vitreous fluid that control active cycling between pro-inflammatory ATP and anti-inflammatory adenosine. Strikingly, patients with proliferative form of diabetic retinopathy (DR) had higher adenylate kinase activity and ATP concentration, when compared to non-proliferative DR eyes and non-diabetic controls operated for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, macular hole, and pucker. The non-parametric correlation analysis revealed positive correlations between intravitreal adenylate kinase and concentrations of ATP, ADP, and other angiogenic (angiopoietins-1 and -2), profibrotic (transforming growth factor-β1), and proteolytic (matrix metalloproteinase-9) factors but not erythropoietin and VEGF. Immunohistochemical staining of postmortem human retina additionally revealed selective expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 on the rod-and-cone-containing photoreceptor cells. Collectively, these findings provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanisms that influence purinergic signaling in diseased eye and open up new possibilities in the development of enzyme-targeted therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenylate kinase-1 circulate in human vitreous fluid. Adenylate kinase activity is high in diabetic eyes with proliferative retinopathy. Diabetic eyes display higher intravitreal ATP/ADP ratio than non-diabetic controls. Soluble adenylate

  7. Validation of Smartphone Based Retinal Photography for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Rajalakshmi

    Full Text Available To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of "fundus on phone' (FOP camera, a smartphone based retinal imaging system, as a screening tool for diabetic retinopathy (DR detection and DR severity in comparison with 7-standard field digital retinal photography.Single-site, prospective, comparative, instrument validation study.301 patients (602 eyes with type 2 diabetes underwent standard seven-field digital fundus photography with both Carl Zeiss fundus camera and indigenous FOP at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. Grading of DR was performed by two independent retina specialists using modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading system. Sight threatening DR (STDR was defined by the presence of proliferative DR(PDR or diabetic macular edema. The sensitivity, specificity and image quality were assessed.The mean age of the participants was 53.5 ±9.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 12.5±7.3 years. The Zeiss camera showed that 43.9% had non-proliferative DR(NPDR and 15.3% had PDR while the FOP camera showed that 40.2% had NPDR and 15.3% had PDR. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting any DR by FOP was 92.7% (95%CI 87.8-96.1 and 98.4% (95%CI 94.3-99.8 respectively and the kappa (ĸ agreement was 0.90 (95%CI-0.85-0.95 p<0.001 while for STDR, the sensitivity was 87.9% (95%CI 83.2-92.9, specificity 94.9% (95%CI 89.7-98.2 and ĸ agreement was 0.80 (95%CI 0.71-0.89 p<0.001, compared to conventional photography.Retinal photography using FOP camera is effective for screening and diagnosis of DR and STDR with high sensitivity and specificity and has substantial agreement with conventional retinal photography.

  8. The role of retinopathy distribution and other lesion types for the definition of examination intervals during screening for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ometto, Giovanni; Erlandsen, Mogens; Hunter, Andrew; Bek, Toke

    2017-06-01

    It has previously been shown that the intervals between screening examinations for diabetic retinopathy can be optimized by including individual risk factors for the development of the disease in the risk assessment. However, in some cases, the risk model calculating the screening interval may recommend a different interval than an experienced clinician. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of factors unrelated to diabetic retinopathy and the distribution of lesions for discrepancies between decisions made by the clinician and the risk model. Therefore, fundus photographs from 90 screening examinations where the recommendations of the clinician and a risk model had been discrepant were evaluated. Forty features were defined to describe the type and location of the lesions, and classification and ranking techniques were used to assess whether the features could predict the discrepancy between the grader and the risk model. Suspicion of tumours, retinal degeneration and vascular diseases other than diabetic retinopathy could explain why the clinician recommended shorter examination intervals than the model. Additionally, the regional distribution of microaneurysms/dot haemorrhages was important for defining a photograph as belonging to the group where both the clinician and the risk model had recommended a short screening interval as opposed to the other decision alternatives. Features unrelated to diabetic retinopathy and the regional distribution of retinal lesions may affect the recommendation of the examination interval during screening for diabetic retinopathy. The development of automated computerized algorithms for extracting information about the type and location of retinal lesions could be expected to further optimize examination intervals during screening for diabetic retinopathy. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Proliferative retinopathy and proteinuria predict mortality rate in type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Green, A; Sjølie, A K

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of diabetic retinopathy on 25 year survival rate among a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark. METHODS: In 1973 all diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark with onset before the age of 30 years as of 1 July 1973...... were identified (n=727). In 1981, only 627 patients were still alive and resident in Denmark. Of these, 573 (91%) participated in a clinical baseline examination, in which diabetic retinopathy was graded and other markers of diabetes measured. Mortality rate was examined in a 25 year follow....../INTERPRETATION: Proliferative retinopathy and proteinuria predict mortality rate in a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients. In combination they act even more strongly. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy did not affect survival rate....

  10. Automated detection of diabetic retinopathy in three European populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Hansen, Morten B.; Tang, H L

    2016-01-01

    photocoagulation (PRP) in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Method: Forty eyes from 38 newly diagnosed patients with PDR were included and followed for 6 months. All patients received standard PRP treatment by a navigated laser (NAVILAS®; OD-OS GmbH, Berlin, Germany) at baseline...... to month 6 (group 1 p=0.71, group 2 p=0.62). Conclusion: In our cohort, retinal vascular fractal dimension does not seem to be a valid marker for prediction of activity in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy 6 months after panretinal photocoagulation....... of diabetes were 52±14 years and 21±11 years, respectively, and 75% were male. HbA1c was 68 ±16 mmol/mol, and the mean blood pressure was 183/84 mmHg. Groups 1 and 2 did not differ according to the mean number of laser spots (1581 vs. 1573, p=0.84) or the total laser energy delivered (13.67 joule vs. 13...

  11. Prevalence of cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Muhammad, Z.; Qayum, I.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycaemia due to absolute or relative insulin deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus of this area. This descriptive study was conducted in medical out patient door of District Headquarter Hospital Battgram from January 2008 to July 2008. A total of 350 diabetic (types 1 and 2) patients over 15 years of age attending the medical OPD of DHQ Hospital were examined in detail for skin manifestations of the disease. Three hundred and fifty diabetic (type-1 and type-2) patients (193 females and 157 males) enrolled in this study. Mean age of the patients was 54+-8.53 years. Duration of diabetes was between 1-12 years; 320 patients had type-2 and 30 patients had type-1 diabetes mellitus. Patients with uncontrolled disease were 327 and 23 patients showed adequate glycaemic control. Seventy-six percent of patients had cutaneous manifestations. The skin manifestations observed were: skin infections 30.9%, foot gangrene and ulcers 12.9%, pruritus 7.1%, vitiligo 5.7%, yellow skin 4.2%, diabetic dermopathy 4.2%, skin tags 3.7%, acanthosis nigricans 2.9%, eruptive xanthomas 2.6%, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum 1.4%, diabetic bullae 0.6%, and pigmented purpuras in 0.3% patients. Cutaneous manifestations were quite Common in the diabetics of this area. (author)

  12. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashima T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Kashima, Hideo Akiyama, Shoji KishiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma 371-8511, JapanAbstract: A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o’clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of

  13. Diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus (WS 331-2011)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Medical Service Specialty Standard Committee of Mi

    2012-01-01

    The criteria provide the screening and diagnosis for gestational diabetes mellitus and it should be applied to all medical institutions and health care practitioners for gestational diabetes mellitus (DM) diagnosis in China.

  14. RNCR3 knockdown inhibits diabetes mellitus-induced retinal reactive gliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Chao-peng; Wang, Jia-Jian; Shan, Kun; Liu, Xin; Yan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Retinal reactive gliosis is an important pathological feature of diabetic retinopathy. Identifying the underlying mechanisms causing reactive gliosis will be important for developing new therapeutic strategies for treating diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we show that long noncoding RNA-RNCR3 knockdown significantly inhibits retinal reactive gliosis. RNCR3 knockdown leads to a marked reduction in the release of several cytokines. RNCR3 knockdown alleviates diabetes mellitus-induced retinal neurodegeneration, as shown by less apoptotic retinal cells and ameliorative visual function. RNCR3 knockdown could also decrease Müller glial cell viability and proliferation, and reduce the expression of glial reactivity-related genes including GFAP and vimentin in vitro. Collectively, this study shows that RNCR3 knockdown may be a promising strategy for the prevention of diabetes mellitus-induced retinal neurodegeneration. - Highlights: • RNCR3 knockdown inhibits retinal reactive gliosis. • RNCR3 knockdown causes a significant change in cytokine profile. • RNCR3 knockdown alleviates diabetes mellitus-induced retinal neurodegeneration. • RNCR3 knockdown affects Müller glial cell function in vitro.

  15. Psychosocial determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, S.; Amin, M.K.; Ahmad, I.; Amer, H.; Shoaib, H.; Ibrahim, H.; Tayyab, M.; Hassan, M.; Javaid, M.A.; Rehman, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus type 2 , formerly non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes, is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency1. The development of Diabetes Mellitus type 2 is associated with multiple risk factors, co-morbid medical conditions as well as psychosocial determinants. These psychosocial factors, which differ from population to population, can be identified and controlled to reduce the incidence of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Objective: To identify various psychosocial factors associated with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Design: Case-control study. Place and Duration: Diabetic clinic and Medical Units Mayo Hospital Lahore . July to December, 2012. Subjects and Methods: A population based case-control study with 1:1 case to control ratio was conducted. A total of 100 subjects (50 cases and 50 controls) having age above 35 years were recruited in the study. Selection was made on laid down criteria from patients coming to Mayo Hospital Lahore after taking consent. Interviews were conducted through a pretested questionnaire. Data was collected, compiled and analyzed through IBM SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 100 study subjects 67% were males and 33% were females. Among cases of Diabetes mellitus type 2, 64% were males, 70% in the age group 35-50 years, 96% were married, 36% were illiterates. Mean age was found 49.24, standard deviation 10.915. In bivariate analysis, Diabetes Mellitus type II was found significantly associated with Anxiety(OR: 5.348, 95% CI: 2.151-13.298) Depression(OR: 5.063, 95% CI: 1.703-15.050), High fat diet, (OR: 2.471, 95% CI: 1.100-5.547) Sedentary Lifestyle(OR: 4.529, 95% CI: 1.952-10.508) and Psychological Stress(OR:4.529, 95% CI: 1.952-10.508). However, in multivariate analysis while controlling all other risk factors, Anxiety(OR: 6.066, 95% CI: 1.918-19.191), High fat diet(OR: 3.648, 95% CI: 1

  16. Semaglutide, reduction in HbA1c and the risk of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Bain, Stephen C; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate diabetic retinopathy data from across the SUSTAIN clinical trial programme. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The SUSTAIN clinical trial programme evaluated the efficacy and safety of semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In SUSTAIN 6...... - a 2-year, preapproval cardiovascular outcomes trial - semaglutide was associated with a significant increase in the risk of diabetic retinopathy complications (DRC) versus placebo. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) data from across the SUSTAIN trials were evaluated and post hoc analyses of the SUSTAIN 6 data...

  17. Clues to duration of undiagnosed disease from retinopathy and maculopathy at diagnosis in type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John D; Zvandasara, Tafadzwa; Leese, Graham; McAlpine, Ritchie; Macewen, Caroline J; Baines, Paul S; Crombie, Iain; Morris, Andrew D

    2011-09-01

    To extrapolate, from the proportion of subjects with observable retinopathy at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in routine clinical practice, the mean duration of undiagnosed diabetes. On 1 October 1999, there were 4313 patients with type 2 diabetes in the 41 participating practices in the Tayside region (registered with one of 166 GPs). 501 (12%; 95% CI 11 to 13%) patients were selected using a pseudo-random number allocation algorithm, and practice lists checked for recently deceased, non-residents (45 exclusions). Retinopathy was graded by validated slit lamp biomicroscopy and four-field stereo photography. Date of first diagnosis of diabetes was ascertained from the regional diabetes register created using multiple source data capture. Of living Tayside resident patients, 295 from 456 invited type 2 patients (65%) were examined. 14.68% (95% CI 12.48 to 16.88%) were found to have retinopathy at diagnosis. Assuming a linear model, these data suggest that the onset of detectable retinopathy occurs 5.77 years (95% CI 4.6 to 7 years) before diagnosis. Comparison using the log rank test with survival to onset of sight threatening retinopathy/maculopathy in 291 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus also examined from the same population cohort showed the 95% CIs of length of preclinical diabetes to be between 3.0 and 9.4 years. There is accumulating evidence to question the assumption of linearity as a model of choice. The authors' understanding of a distinct glycaemic threshold for retinal change is also overly simplistic and consequently the bounds of uncertainty concerning the preclinical duration of disease are considerable.

  18. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress is associated with severity of diabetic retinopathy and retinal structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shashi; Saxena, Sandeep; Srivastav, Khushboo; Shukla, Rajendra K; Mishra, Nibha; Meyer, Carsten H; Kruzliak, Peter; Khanna, Vinay K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine plasma nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in diabetic retinopathy and its association with severity of disease. Prospective observational study. A total of 60 consecutive cases and 20 healthy controls were included. Severity of retinopathy was graded according to early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) classification. Photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid band (ISel) disruption and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) alteration were graded using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Data were statistically analyzed. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, NO assay and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured using standard protocol. Increased severity of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with increase in plasma levels of LPO (P diabetic retinopathy. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that increased plasma LPO, NO and decreased GSH levels are associated with in vivo structural changes in inner segment ellipsoid and RPE. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  19. Digital tool for detecting diabetic retinopathy in retinography image using gabor transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Y.; Nuñez, R.; Suarez, J.; Torres, C.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a chronic disease and is the leading cause of blindness in the population. The fundamental problem is that diabetic retinopathy is usually asymptomatic in its early stage and, in advanced stages, it becomes incurable, hence the importance of early detection. To detect diabetic retinopathy, the ophthalmologist examines the fundus by ophthalmoscopy, after sends the patient to get a Retinography. Sometimes, these retinography are not of good quality. This paper show the implementation of a digital tool that facilitates to ophthalmologist provide better patient diagnosis suffering from diabetic retinopathy, informing them that type of retinopathy has and to what degree of severity is find . This tool develops an algorithm in Matlab based on Gabor transform and in the application of digital filters to provide better and higher quality of retinography. The performance of algorithm has been compared with conventional methods obtaining resulting filtered images with better contrast and higher.

  20. Pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus: actual problems of pathogenesis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rebrov А.P.; Kunitsyna М.А.; Kashkina E.I.; Arkhangelskaya Е.Е.

    2012-01-01

    We have presented the review of literature devoted to the problem of pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus. We have found up that prevalence of pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus needs to be adjusted. In analyzed literature the influence of localization of structural changes of pancreatic tissue on risk of diabetes mellitus development is studied insufficiently. In the result of our literature analysis we have detected that treatment of pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus up to date is not unified and ...

  1. Endothelin-1 is associated with fibrosis in proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, William; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the relationship between endothelin-1 and fibrosis in epiretinal membranes in proliferative diabetic retinopathy and explore the role of endothelial-mesenchymal transition in these membranes. Membranes were obtained from eyes undergoing pars plana vitrectomy for complicated proliferative diabetic retinopathy or idiopathic epiretinal membrane. Through standard immunohistochemical techniques, we labeled membranes to explore the distribution of endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor B, comparing proliferative diabetic retinopathy and idiopathic epiretinal membranes. In addition, membranes were also labeled with markers for fibroblasts, endothelial, and glial cells and studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The intensity of endothelin-1 labeling was quantified using standard image analysis software. Fourteen membranes were included in the analysis, nine from eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and five idiopathic membranes. Flatmount diabetic membranes showed co-localization of endothelin-1 with S100A4 and CD31. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative analysis of cross-sectional membranes showed significantly higher endothelin-1 labeling in proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes compared to idiopathic membranes (pmembranes showed more elements staining positive for S100A4 compared to idiopathic membranes. Epiretinal membrane formation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy involves higher tissue levels of endothelin-1 and fibroblastic activity. Furthermore, endothelin-1, endothelial and fibroblastic staining appear to be correlated, suggestive of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Study on the changes of three renal functional parameters in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rong; Li Sumei; Zhang Li; Ye Shandong; Jin Chunyan; Ren An; Chen Ruoping; Chen Chao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and changes of urinary albumin (UAlb),urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), 24 hours UAlb, ACR, radionuclide renal dynamic imaging (for GFR determination) and bilatera1 retinal photography were examined in 124 patients with type 2 diabetes. Of them 51 were without diabetic retinopathy(group A), 50 were with simple retinopathy(group B) and 23 were complicated with proliferate retinopathy(group C). Results: The UAlb, ACR in the patients with complicated diabetic retinopathy were significantly higher than those in the other two groups, while the GFR was significantly lower (P<0.05). Correlationship studies revealed that UAlb, ACR and GFR were independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion: The severity of type 2 diabetes retinopathy is closely linked with the increase of UAlb, ACR and the decrease of GFR. Radionuclide renal dynamic imaging is helpful for the diagnosis of early stage of diabetic nephropathy (DN). (authors)

  3. Genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Pedersen, Oluf

    2005-01-01

    Throughout the last decade, molecular genetic studies of non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus have contributed significantly to our present understanding of this disease's complex aetiopathogenesis. Monogenic forms of diabetes (maturity-onset diabetes of the young, MODY) have been identified...... and classified into MODY1-6 according to the mutated genes that by being expressed in the pancreatic beta-cells confirm at the molecular level the clinical presentation of MODY as a predominantly insulin secretory deficient form of diabetes mellitus. Genomewide linkage studies of presumed polygenic type 2...... diabetic populations indicate that loci on chromosomes 1q, 5q, 8p, 10q, 12q and 20q contain susceptibility genes. Yet, so far, the only susceptibility gene, calpain-10 (CAPN10), which has been identified using genomewide linkage studies, is located on chromosome 2q37. Mutation analyses of selected...

  4. MANIFESTASI RONTGENOGRAFI DIABETES MELLITUS DI RONGGA MULUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trelia Boel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common disease, described as a systemic disease of carbohydrate metabolism caused by a realtive or absolute deficiency of insulum. This condition is characterized by hyperglyecemia, glucosuria, polyuria, polydipsia, pruritis, and weight loss. Diabetes mellitus in itself does not cause periodontal disease, however diabetes or patients with an increased blood glucose concentration (>200mg/dl tend to gave increased incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Patient with diabetics above 50 years old (3 cases radiographically can be seen as alveolar bone loss in maxilla and mandible. Alveolar bone loss is seen larger in the posterior maxilla region. The vascular alteration in diabetics may enhance the susceptibility of periodontium to become periodontitis and serve as an etiology factor in pathologic bone resorption.

  5. TPL2 (Therapeutic Targeting Tumor Progression Locus-2)/ATF4 (Activating Transcription Factor-4)/SDF1α (Chemokine Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-α) Axis Suppresses Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, De-Wei; Lin, Keng-Hung; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Lee, Maw-Rong; Chen, Chung-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jane; Hung, Yi-Wen; Shen, Chin-Chang; Chung, Tsung-Ju; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Sheu, Meei-Ling

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by vasopermeability, vascular leakage, inflammation, blood-retinal barrier breakdown, capillary degeneration, and neovascularization. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes mellitus and progression retinopathy remain unclear. TPL2 (tumor progression locus 2), a serine-threonine protein kinase, exerts a pathological effect on vascular angiogenesis. This study investigated the role of N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine, a major advanced glycation end products, and the involved TPL2-related molecular signals in diabetic retinopathy using models of in vitro and in vivo and human samples. Serum N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine levels and TPL2 kinase activity were significantly increased in clinical patients and experimental animals with diabetic retinopathy. Intravitreal administration of pharmacological blocker or neutralizing antibody inhibited TPL2 and effectively suppressed the pathological characteristics of retinopathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animal models. Intravitreal VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) neutralization also suppressed the diabetic retinopathy in diabetic animal models. Mechanistic studies in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells from streptozotocin-diabetic rats, db/db mice, and samples from patients with diabetic retinopathy revealed a positive parallel correlation between N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine and the TPL2/chemokine SDF1α (stromal cell-derived factor-α) axis that is dependent on endoplasmic reticulum stress-related molecules, especially ATF4 (activating transcription factor-4). This study demonstrates that inhibiting the N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine-induced TPL2/ATF4/SDF1α axis can effectively prevent diabetes mellitus-mediated retinal microvascular dysfunction. This signaling axis may include the therapeutic potential for other diseases involving pathological neovascularization or macular edema. © 2017

  6. La diabetes mellitus y las complicaciones cardiovasculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Pereira Despaigne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades cardiovasculares en las personas con diabetes mellitus son más precoces, y suelen presentarse con síntomas y signos atípicos. Igualmente, se ha demostrado que la hiperglucemia es un importante factor de riesgo para las complicaciones microangiopáticas y macroangiopáticas en la diabetes mellitus, y la hiperglucemia posprandial, con glucemia en ayunas normal, es una condición clínica frecuente y un factor de riesgo cardiovascular independiente. Así, en el presente trabajo se exponen algunas consideraciones relacionadas con el control de las dislipidemias, la hipertensión arterial y la antiagregación plaquetaria en el paciente con diabetes mellitus

  7. Postprandial hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia and type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Poon, Myra; Hussain, Khalid

    2009-01-01

    A patient with severe postprandial hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (PPHH) for 4 years developed type 1 diabetes mellitus. She had no insulin or insulin receptor antibodies but was positive for islet cell and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. PPHH prior to the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been previously described and may be a prodrome of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  8. 76 FR 44650 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ...-2011-0143] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the...

  9. 76 FR 53707 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ...-2011-0145] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the...

  10. 77 FR 25227 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ...-2011-0383] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The... the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants...

  11. 78 FR 50486 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ...-0182] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... revision must provide for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with...

  12. 76 FR 79756 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ...-0326] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM...).\\1\\ The revision must provide for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be...

  13. 78 FR 37273 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ...-2013-0016] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... achieved by complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving... mellitus currently requiring insulin for control'' (49 CFR 391.41(b)(3)). FMCSA established its diabetes...

  14. 77 FR 75493 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ...-2012-0282] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  15. 77 FR 532 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ...-2011-0300] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The... included in this notice. Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The Agency established...

  16. 78 FR 26422 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...-2013-0012] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... achieved by complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving... mellitus currently requiring insulin for control'' (49 CFR 391.41(b)(3)). FMCSA established its diabetes...

  17. 77 FR 65929 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ...-2012-0219] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  18. 77 FR 48587 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ...-0217] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in section 4018 of the...

  19. 77 FR 70529 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...-2012-0281] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  20. 77 FR 75492 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ...-2012-0283] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  1. 77 FR 38383 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...-2012-0107] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  2. 78 FR 35088 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ...-2013-0015] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... would be achieved by complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and... of diabetes mellitus currently requiring insulin for control'' (49 CFR 391.41(b)(3)). FMCSA...

  3. 77 FR 59447 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ...-0281] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in section 4018 of the...

  4. 77 FR 64585 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ...-2012-0218] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  5. 78 FR 50482 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes