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Sample records for retinal photic stimulation

  1. Resilience in migraine brains: decrease of coherence after photic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça-de-Souza, Mayara; Monteiro, Ubirakitan M.; Bezerra, Amana S.; Silva-de-Oliveira, Ana P.; Ventura-da-Silva, Belvânia R.; Barbosa, Marcelo S.; de Souza, Josiane A.; Criado, Elisângela C.; Ferrarezi, Maria C. M.; Alencar, Giselly de A.; Lins, Otávio G.; Coriolano, Maria das G. W. S.; Costa, Belmira L. S. A.; Rodrigues, Marcelo C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: During migraine attacks, patients generally have photophobia and phonophobia and seek for environments with less sensorial stimulation. Present work aimed to quantify cortical partial directed coherence (PDC) of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from migraine patients and controls in occipital, parietal, and frontal areas with or without photic stimulation. Our hypothesis is that migraine patients with visual aura might have neuronal networks with higher coherence than controls even in interictal periods due to a predisposition in sensory cortical processing. Methods: Eleven adult women with migraine with visual aura (at least 48 h without previous attacks) and seven healthy adult woman were submitted to EEG recording in basal state and during photic stimulation. Results: When compared to healthy volunteers, migraine patients show different coherence profiles. Migraine patients had greater coherence than controls during the basal period (without photic stimulation), showing predisposition for sensory processing in many frequency ranges. After photic stimulation, patients showed a decrease in cortical coherence while controls had an increase. Conclusions: When compared to healty subjects, migraineurs show increased cortical coherence before photic stimulation, but a decrease when stimulation starts. This may be the expression of a resilience mechanism that allows migraineurs the interictal period. The PDC analysis permits to address a patient coherence profile, or “coherence map,” that can be utilized for management of the headache disorder or following up treatments. PMID:22837743

  2. RESILIENCE IN MIGRAINE BRAINS: DECREASE OF COHERENCE AFTER PHOTIC STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara eMendoca-de-Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: During migraine attacks, patients generally have photophobia and phonophobia and seek for environments with less sensorial stimulation. Present work aimed to quantify cortical partial directed coherence (PDC of electroencephalographic (EEG recordings from migraine patients and controls in occipital, parietal and frontal areas with or without photic stimulation. Our hypothesis is that migraine patients with visual aura might have neuronal networks with higher coherence than controls even in interictal periods due to a predisposition in sensory cortical processing. Methods: Eleven adult women with migraine with visual aura (at least 48 hours without previous attacks and seven healthy adult woman were submitted to EEG recording in basal state and during photic stimulation. Results: When compared to healthy volunteers, migraine patients show different coherence profiles. Migraine patients had greater coherence than controls during the basal period (without photic stimulation, showing predisposition for sensory processing in many frequency ranges. After photic stimulation, patients showed a decrease in cortical coherence while controls had an increase. Conclusions: When compared to healty subjects, migraineurs show increased cortical coherence before photic stimulation, but a decrease when stimulation starts. This may be the expression of a resilience mechanism that allows migraineurs the interictal period. The PDC analysis permits to address a patient coherence profile, or coherence map, that can be utilized for management of the headache disorder or following up treatments.

  3. fMRI activation during spike and wave discharges evoked by photic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig R; Ahlgrimm, Nils

    2009-01-01

    intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) in a 3 T MR scanner. PPR was elicited in 6 subjects, four diagnosed with idiopathic generalised epilepsy and two with tension-type headache. Because PPR is preceded by synchronization of cortical gamma oscillations, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes...

  4. Burst-suppression is reactive to photic stimulation in comatose children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nita, Dragos A.; Moldovan, Mihai; Sharma, Roy

    2016-01-01

    -suppression in children with acquired brain injury. Methods: Intensive care unit electroencephalographic monitoring recordings containing burst-suppression were obtained from 5 comatose children with acquired brain injury of various etiologies. Intermittent photic stimulation was performed at 1 Hz for 1 min to assess...

  5. Rhythmical Photic Stimulation at Alpha Frequencies Produces Antidepressant-Like Effects in a Mouse Model of Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinheun Kim

    Full Text Available Current therapies for depression consist primarily of pharmacological agents, including antidepressants, and/or psychiatric counseling, such as psychotherapy. However, light therapy has recently begun to be considered as an effective tool for the treatment of the neuropsychiatric behaviors and symptoms of a variety of brain disorders or diseases, including depression. One methodology employed in light therapy involves flickering photic stimulation within a specific frequency range. The present study investigated whether flickering and flashing photic stimulation with light emitting diodes (LEDs could improve depression-like behaviors in a corticosterone (CORT-induced mouse model of depression. Additionally, the effects of the flickering and flashing lights on depressive behavior were compared with those of fluoxetine. Rhythmical flickering photic stimulation at alpha frequencies from 9-11 Hz clearly improved performance on behavioral tasks assessing anxiety, locomotor activity, social interaction, and despair. In contrast, fluoxetine treatment did not strongly improve behavioral performance during the same period compared with flickering photic stimulation. The present findings demonstrated that LED-derived flickering photic stimulation more rapidly improved behavioral outcomes in a CORT-induced mouse model of depression compared with fluoxetine. Thus, the present study suggests that rhythmical photic stimulation at alpha frequencies may aid in the improvement of the quality of life of patients with depression.

  6. Development of retinal projections and response to photic input in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of New Zealand White Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Meza, Enrique; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl; Caba, Mario

    2013-03-07

    In rabbit pups, nursing by the mother is the prevailing entraining signal for their circadian rhythms during at least the first two weeks of life. Therefore, they are considered a natural model of food anticipatory activity. However, the photic entrainment of the circadian system in rabbit pups during this developmental stage is not well understood. The present study examined the retinal projections to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the functional responses of the SCN to light exposure. Using the anterograde tracer cholera toxin-B, we examined the retinal projections to the SCN at postnatal days (PD) 1, 9, 19 and in adult animals. The results revealed that the retinal projections were present at PD1 with a bilateral symmetry, and with a contralateral tendency at PD19 and adults. We also explored the response of the SCN to a light pulse by assessing the induction of FOS protein, a marker of neuronal activation, at PD1, 12, 19 and in adults. Light-induced FOS was observed during day and night at PD1, but mainly during night at PD12, 19 and adults. We conclude that in the SCN there is a "gating" mechanism to FOS induction by light that develops several days after birth, as in other mammals, and in the rabbit is already present at PD12. Moreover, in contrast to other altricial mammals, the circadian visual system, although not essential for entraining the rhythm during first two weeks of life, is present and functional in rabbit pups from birth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intermittent 20-HZ-photic stimulation leads to a uniform reduction of alpha-global field power in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, R; Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    19-channel-EEGs were recorded from scalp surface of 30 healthy subjects (16m, 14f, mean age: 34 ys, SD: 11.7 ys) at rest and under IPS (Intermittent Photic Stimulation) at rates of 5, 10 and 20 Hertz (Hz). Digitalized data underwent spectral analysis with fast fourier transfomation (FFT) yielding the basis for the computation of global field power (GFP). For quantification GFP values in the frequency ranges of 5, 10 and 20 Hz at rest were divided by the corresponding data gained under IPS. While ratios from PDE data showed no stable parameter due to high interindividual variability, ratios of alpha-power turned out to be uniform in all subjects: IPS at 20 Hz always led to a suppression of alpha-power. Dividing alpha-GFP at rest by alpha-GFP under 20-Hz IPS thus resulted in a ratio paradigma.

  8. Cutaneous retinal activation and neural entrainment in transcranial alternating current stimulation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) applies exogenous oscillatory electric field potentials to entrain neural rhythms and is used to investigate brain-function relationships and its potential to enhance perceptual and cognitive performance. However, due to current spread tACS can cause cutaneous activation of the retina and phosphenes. Several lines of evidence suggest that retinal phosphenes are capable of inducing neural entrainment, making the contributions of central and peripheral stimulation to the effects in the brain difficult to disentangle. In this literature review, the importance of this issue is further illustrated by the fact that photic stimulation can have a direct impact on perceptual and cognitive performance. This leaves open the possibility that peripheral photic stimulation can at least in part explain the central effects that are attributed to tACS. The extent to which phosphene perception contributes to the effects of exogenous oscillatory electric fields in the brain and influence perception and cognitive performance needs to be examined to understand the working mechanisms of tACS in neurophysiology and behaviour.

  9. TCD study of hemodynamic changes in PCA response to photic stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑旭宁; 朱雄超; 徐秋芳; 黄一宁; 柳扬

    2003-01-01

    Obiectives:During visual stimulation,the elevated metabolism rate will couple wity increase of blood flow velocity(BFV) in posterior cerebral artery(PCA),This strudy with TCD was aimed to investigate whether the coupling might change according to the different vasoneuronal conditions.Methods:Ninety-nine volunteers including 24 hypertension(HT) patients and 2 patients suffering from both HT and diabetes mellitus (DM) were enrolled in this trial.BFV and pulse indexes(PI) in P2 segments of PCA on both sides were mon-itored during visual stimulation.Results:In all subjects,Mean BFV increased and PI went down in response to visual stimulation.The percentages of changtes(△V and △P) of both mean BFV and PI were larger in young group(<55 years old)than in old one(≥55 years old),There was significant positive correlation be-tween △V and △P.Multivariated regression analysis did not show HT and DM,but age related to △V(△P).We did not find significant difference of △V(△P) between left and right sides,Conclusions:Blood flow ve-locity in PCA P2 segment increased due to decreased cerebrovascular resistance during visual stimulation and the response weakened with aging of the patient.

  10. TCD study of hemodynamic changes in PCA response to photic stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑旭宁; 朱雄超; 徐秋芳; 黄一宁; 柳扬

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: During visual stimulation, the elevated metabolism rate will couple with increase of blood flow velocity(BFV) in posterior cerebral artery(PCA). This study with TCD was aimed to investigate whether the coupling might change according to the different vasoneuronal conditions. Methods: Ninety-nine volunteers including 24 hypertension(HT) patients and 2 patients suffering from both HT and diabetes mellitus(DM) were enrolled in this trial. BFV and pulse indexes(PI) in P2 segments of PCA on both sides were monitored during visual stimulation. Results: In all subjects, Mean BFV increased and PI went down in response to visual stimulation. The percentages of changes (ΔV and ΔP) of both mean BFV and PI were larger in young group(<55 years old) than in old one(≥55 years old). There was significant positive correlation between ΔV and ΔP. Multivariated regression analysis did not show HT and DM, but age related to ΔV(ΔP). We did not find significant difference of ΔV(ΔP) between left and right sides. Conclusions: Blood flow velocity in PCA P2 segment increased due to decreased cerebrovascular resistance during visual stimulation and the response weakened with aging of the patient.

  11. Spatially Patterned Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Resolution of Retinal Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Retinal prostheses electrically stimulate neurons to produce artificial vision in people blinded by photoreceptor degenerative diseases. The limited spatial resolution of current devices results in indiscriminate stimulation of interleaved cells of different types, precluding veridical reproduction of natural activity patterns in the retinal output. Here we investigate the use of spatial patterns of current injection to increase the spatial resolution of stimulation, using high-density multie...

  12. Assessment of brain cell function using {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT of cerebral blood flow and visual evoked potential by photic stimulation in normal and demented elderly subjects

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    Ogawa, Kimikazu; Takasaki, Masaru [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan); Katsunuma, Hideyo; Ishida, Hitoshi

    1999-09-01

    Cerebral blood flow was quantitatively measured using {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT by photic stimulation and visual evoked potential (VEPs) in normal and dementia subjects: 8 with Alzheimer-type dementia, 9 with cerebrovascular dementia and 7 normal elderly subjects were divided into the three groups based on the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) grade: Group I (CDR 0), Group II (CDR 0.5-1), Group III (CDR 2-3). The {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT measurement was conducted at rest with the eyes closed and also during photic stimulation. VEPs were measured simultaneously. The results reveal prolongation of the P2 latency of the VEPs prolonged in accordance with the increasing severity of the dementia, and quantitative cerebral blood flow was lower in Group II and Group III than in Group I at rest, while during photic stimulation it significantly increased in Group I and II, but showed no change in Group III. The results suggest that quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow using {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT by photic stimulation may enable more detailed assessment of brain cell function. (author)

  13. Retinal stimulation strategies to restore vision: Fundamentals and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lan; Weiland, James D; Roska, Botond; Humayun, Mark S

    2016-07-01

    Retinal degeneration, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is primarily characterized by the dysfunctional/degenerated photoreceptors that impair the ability of the retina to detect light. Our group and others have shown that bioelectronic retinal implants restore useful visual input to those who have been blind for decades. This unprecedented approach of restoring sight demonstrates that patients can adapt to new visual input, and thereby opens up opportunities to not only improve this technology but also develop alternative retinal stimulation approaches. These future improvements or new technologies could have the potential of selectively stimulating specific cell classes in the inner retina, leading to improved visual resolution and color vision. In this review we will detail the progress of bioelectronic retinal implants and future devices in this genre as well as discuss other technologies such as optogenetics, chemical photoswitches, and ultrasound stimulation. We will discuss the principles, biological aspects, technology development, current status, clinical outcomes/prospects, and challenges for each approach. The review will cover functional imaging documented cortical responses to retinal stimulation in blind patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of Retinal Spatial Interaction Using mfERG Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick H. W. Chu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adaptation is one of the key characteristic of our vision which can maximize the visual function. It applies to both spatial and temporal characteristics. The fast flickering stimulation characteristics of the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG can be applied to analyze retinal interactions between flashes and to investigate retinal temporal processing mechanism. Besides, its localized stimulus pattern can also be used as a tool for investigation of retinal spatial interaction. Methods: The mfERG recordings were obtained from 13 eyes of 9, normal, six-week-old Yorkshire pigs. The control mfERG was measured using the pattern consisting of 103 nonscaled hexagons, where each hexagon will follow a pre-set m-sequence. Nine isolated hexagons from the 103 nonscaled pattern were chosen in the masking mfERG stimulation, where the remaining hexagons were kept at constant luminance. First-order and the second-order kernel responses were analyzed, which represent the outer and inner retinal responses, respectively. Results: The second-order kernel response amplitude from the visual streak region showed a significant enhancement under the masking stimulation. Conclusions: The enhancement found under the masking condition indicates that the retinal signal will be suppressed under surrounding flicker stimulation, and this spatial inhibitory mechanism may originate from the inner retina.

  15. A CMOS active pixel sensor for retinal stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prydderch, Mark L.; French, Marcus J.; Mathieson, Keith; Adams, Christopher; Gunning, Deborah; Laudanski, Jonathan; Morrison, James D.; Moodie, Alan R.; Sinclair, James

    2006-02-01

    Degenerative photoreceptor diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the most common causes of blindness in the western world. A potential cure is to use a microelectronic retinal prosthesis to provide electrical stimulation to the remaining healthy retinal cells. We describe a prototype CMOS Active Pixel Sensor capable of detecting a visual scene and translating it into a train of electrical pulses for stimulation of the retina. The sensor consists of a 10 x 10 array of 100 micron square pixels fabricated on a 0.35 micron CMOS process. Light incident upon each pixel is converted into output current pulse trains with a frequency related to the light intensity. These outputs are connected to a biocompatible microelectrode array for contact to the retinal cells. The flexible design allows experimentation with signal amplitudes and frequencies in order to determine the most appropriate stimulus for the retina. Neural processing in the retina can be studied by using the sensor in conjunction with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programmed to behave as a neural network. The sensor has been integrated into a test system designed for studying retinal response. We present the most recent results obtained from this sensor.

  16. Study on the Characteristics of EEG Alpha Wave Induced by Photic Stimulation Based on the Complexity%基于复杂性测度的光诱发下alpha波脑电特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑杨; 钱志余; 李韪韬; 丁尚文

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Lempel-Ziv complexity algorithm is used to study on the characteristics of EEG alpha wave induced by photic stimulation.Methods: EEGs of 20 healthy volunteers (23.2 years old on average) induced by 12 Hz photic stimulation with eyes closed were recorded, and the changes of α rhythm EEG complexity were analyzed before and after photic stimulation.Results: The 12 Hz photic stimulation caused the complexity of 17 volunteers' α rhythm EEG a significant increase (P<0.05).The changes of α rhythm EEG complexity were obviously observed at the frontal, right central, top, occipital, right middle temporal, left and right posterior temporal region, and the changes are most obviously observed at the top and occipital region.After photic stimulation, the average complexities of left and right brain's α rhythm both increased, and the change of right brain's α rhythm complexity was more significant.Conclusions: The 12 Hz frequency photic stimulation can induce significant response of EEGs at the same frequency band.The conclusion is useful for studies on the characteristics of brain function induced by photic stimulation and for the exploration on how the external stimulation influence the human brain cognitive activities.%目的:利用Lempel-Ziv复杂度算法,研究光诱发下α波脑电特性.方法:记录20名正常受试者(平均年龄23.2岁)在闭眼状态下接受12Hz闪光刺激的脑电信号,分析光刺激前后α波脑电复杂度变化.结果:发现12Hz光刺激能够引起17名受试者α波脑电复杂度的显著增加(P<0.05);其中在额部、右中央、顶部、枕部、右中颞、左右后颞α波脑电复杂度变化较为显著,以顶部与枕部变化最为明显;光刺激后,左右半脑平均α波复杂度均出现增加,其中右脑区α波复杂度变化更为显著.结论:12Hz频率光诱发能够引起同频率段的脑波信号的显著响应,该结论有助于研究光诱发下的脑功能特性,且

  17. Patterned electrical stimulation of primate retina for the development of retinal prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Epiretinal prostheses are designed to restore vision to people blinded by retinal degenerations, using electrical stimulation with an array of electrodes implanted on the surface of the retina to convey artificial visual signals to the brain. Current clinical prostheses provide limited visual function, in part because the activity that they generate is different from natural retinal responses to visual stimuli. An ideal retinal prosthesis would stimulate the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a...

  18. Infrared laser stimulation of retinal and vestibular neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Fabrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Albert, Emmanuelle S.; Hamel, Christian; Dupeyron, Gérard; Chabbert, Christian; Marc, Isabelle; Dumas, Michel

    2011-03-01

    The study of laser-neuron interaction has gained interest over the last few years not only for understanding of fundamental mechanisms but also for medical applications such as prosthesis because of the non-invasive characteristic of the laser stimulation. Several authors have shown that near infrared lasers are able to stimulate neurons. It is suggested that a thermal gradient induced by the absorption of the laser radiation on cells is the primary effect but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We show in this work that infrared laser radiations provide a possible way for stimulating retinal and vestibular ganglion cells. We describe relevant physical characteristics allowing safe and reproducible neuron stimulations by single infrared pulses. Calcium fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological recordings have been used to measure ionic exchanges at the neuron membrane. The stimulation system is based on a pulsed laser diode beam of a few mW. Effects of three different wavelengths (from 1470 to 1875 nm) and stimulation durations have been investigated. Variations of the stimulation energy thresholds suggest that the main physical parameter is the water optical absorption. Measurements of the temperature at the cell membrane show that a constant temperature rise is required to stimulate neurons, suggesting a photothermal process.

  19. Strategies to improve stimulation efficiency for retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuluri, Navya S; Nimmagadda, Kiran; Petrossians, Artin; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D

    2016-08-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease of the retina that leads to vision loss. Retinal prostheses are being developed in order to restore functional vision in patients suffering from RP. We conducted in-vivo experiments in order to identify strategies to efficiently stimulate the retina. We electrically stimulated the retina and measured electrically evoked potentials (EERs) from the superior colliculus of rats. We compared the strength of EERs when voltage-controlled and current-controlled pulses of varying pulse width and charge levels were applied to the retina. In addition to comparing EER strength, we evaluated improvement in power efficiency afforded by a high surface area platinum-iridium material. Voltage-controlled pulses were more efficient than current-controlled pulses when the pulses have a short duration (<; 1 ms) and current-controlled pulses were more efficient than voltage-controlled pulses when the pulse width was greater than 1 ms. The high surface area platinum-iridium stimulation electrode consumed power significantly lower than a standard platinum-iridium electrode.

  20. Photic stimulation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus via the non-visual optic system. A gene expression study in the blind Crx (-/-) mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    photoreceptors. At zeitgeber time 16, the Crx (-/-) and wild-type mice were exposed to 1 h of light. This resulted in a strong up-regulation of the immediate early genes Nr4a1, Erg, and Rrad in the SCN of both genotypes. Light stimulation during the subjective night resulted in a strong up-regulation of c...... to light during the subjective night is an immediate expression of several early response genes in the SCN. We show, by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, that the amount of melanopsin mRNA in the retinal ganglion cells is preserved in the blind Crx (-/-) mouse with degenerated classic......-fos in both genotypes with a significantly higher up-regulation in the blind Crx (-/-) mouse. Expression of Grp and Vip, the genes for two classic peptides located in the SCN, was not influenced by light stimulation. The data strongly indicate the involvement of the melanopsin-based non-visual optic system...

  1. Controllable single photon stimulation of retinal rod cells

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Nam Mai; Bessarab, Dmitri A; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2013-01-01

    Retinal rod cells are commonly assumed to be sensitive to single photons [1, 2, 3]. Light sources used in prior experiments exhibit unavoidable fluctuations in the number of emitted photons [4]. This leaves doubt about the exact number of photons used to stimulate the rod cell. In this letter, we interface rod cells of Xenopus laevis with a light source based on Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC) [5], which provides one photon at a time. Precise control of generation of single photons and directional delivery enables us to provide unambiguous proof of single photon sensitivity of rod cells without relying on the statistical assumptions. Quantum correlations between single photons in the SPDC enable us to determine quantum efficiency of the rod cell without pre-calibrated reference detectors [6, 7, 8]. These results provide the path for exploiting resources offered by quantum optics in generation and manipulation of light in visual studies. From a more general perspective, this method offers the ult...

  2. The eyes of man as a photic bisensor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, F.J.; Fingal, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Non-patterned photic stimulation of the eyes of human subjects was obtained by homogeneous illumination of the closed eyes. The subjects perceived a difference between the stimulation intensity of the left and of the right eye as a field of view consisting of a bright and a dark half, adjoined acros

  3. The eyes of man as a photic bisensor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, F.J.; Fingal, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Non-patterned photic stimulation of the eyes of human subjects was obtained by homogeneous illumination of the closed eyes. The subjects perceived a difference between the stimulation intensity of the left and of the right eye as a field of view consisting of a bright and a dark half, adjoined acros

  4. 特色光刺激双眼对人体植物神经功能的影响%Influence of peculiar photic stimulation on function of vegetative nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅相平; 李安民; 张志文; 闫润民; 梁树立; 刘爱军; 易林华

    2003-01-01

    Aim To explore treatment of vegetative nerve dysfunction- related diseases and investigate the effect of peculiar photic stimulation on these diseases.Method 805 cases of migraine,vertigo,insomnia,neurasthenia and hypertension (302 males and 503 females) treated with window fiber- optic therapeutic equipment in many hospital were summed retrospectively.Results Mean therapeutic time was 20.6 min/time,mean therapeutic times were 6.25 times/case.Clinical cure rate was 66.5% and effective rate was 84.5% . Conclusion Peculiar photic stimulation on both eyes can relatively increase excitability of parasympathetic nervous system,antagonize sympathetic nerve,alleviate and treat vegetative nervous dysfunction- related disease.%目的探讨植物神经功能紊乱相关疾病的治疗 ,研究特色光刺激双眼对本病的影响及治疗作用.方法回顾性总结分析采用视窗光导治疗仪治疗偏头痛、眩晕症、失眠症、神经衰弱和原发性高血压共 805例 (男 302例,女 503例 )的临床资料.结果平均治疗时间为 20.6 min/次 ,平均治疗次数 6.25次 /例.临床治愈率 66.5% ,有效率 84.5%.结论采用特色光刺激双眼 ,可以相对提高副交感神经系统的兴奋性 , 拮抗交感神经 ,达到缓解和治疗植物神经功能紊乱相关疾病的目的.

  5. Chemical stimulation of rat retinal neurons: feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter-based prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat, Samsoon; Rountree, Corey M.; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2015-02-01

    Objective. No cure currently exists for photoreceptor degenerative diseases, which cause partial or total blindness in millions of people worldwide. Electrical retinal prostheses have been developed by several groups with the goal of restoring vision lost to these diseases, but electrical stimulation has limitations. It excites both somas and axons, activating retinal pathways nonphysiologically, and limits spatial resolution because of current spread. Chemical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using the neurotransmitter glutamate has been suggested as an alternative to electrical stimulation with some significant advantages. However, sufficient scientific data to support developing a chemical-based retinal prosthesis is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis and determine therapeutic stimulation parameters. Approach. We injected controlled amounts of glutamate into rat retinas from the epiretinal side ex vivo via micropipettes using a pressure injection system and recorded RGC responses with a multielectrode array. Responsive units were identified using a spike rate threshold of 3 Hz. Main results. We recorded both somal and axonal units and demonstrated successful glutamatergic stimulation across different RGC subtypes. Analyses show that exogenous glutamate acts on RGC synapses similar to endogenous glutamate and, unlike electrical prostheses, stimulates only RGC somata. The spatial spread of glutamate stimulation was ˜ 290 μm from the injection site, comparable to current electrical prostheses. Further, the glutamate injections produced spatially differential responses in OFF, ON, and ON-OFF RGC subtypes, suggesting that differential stimulation of the OFF and ON systems may be possible. A temporal resolution of 3.2 Hz was obtained, which is a rate suitable for spatial vision. Significance. We provide strong support for the feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter

  6. Peculiarities Analysis of Simultaneous EEG and fMRI Based on Low-Frequency Photic Stimulation%基于低频段光诱发的EEG和fMRI同步化特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁尚文; 钱志余; 李韪韬; 陶玲; 郑杨

    2012-01-01

    采用脑电和功能磁共振成像同步技术,研究低频段光(θ波段)诱发的脑电信号及脑局部激活分布的同步化特性,旨在探索脑功能激活区和脑电相关区域存在可能关联通过定量分析志愿者脑电θ波在刺激与静息2种状态下的功率谱,研究发现θ波功率在枕部(O2)、顶部(P4)、中央(C3)和颞部(T6)等区域均有较明显的增强.通过分析光刺激前后fMRI扫描图像序列,由Fixed effects模型分析发现志愿者枕叶(-3.42,-92.98,-4.77)、后扣带回(-8.00,-65.72,11.17)有较明显正激活,前额叶(7.97,42.21,39.63)、顶叶(-8.00,-54.36,49.87)、颞叶(-39.84,3.59,-22.98)、中脑(-3.42,-25.95,-7.04)等有明显的负激活.对EEG与fMRI信息的同步化特性初步分析表明光刺激脑电信号变化与局部脑激活局部区域(如枕叶)有较强的一致性.%Simultaneous EEG and fMRI were implemented to investigate theta potential power changes of EEG evoked by low frequent band photic stimulation (within theta wave band) and synchronization features of cerebral activation. The aim of this paper was mainly to explore correlation of the brain functional activation area with the EEG relative area. By quantitative analysis of changes about the power spectrum of the volunteers under the photic stimulation and resting state, in this study, it was found that the power of EEG theta waves in the occipital (O2), top (P4), central (C3) and temporal (T6) area obviously increased. By analyzing fMRI scan image sequences before and after photon stimulation according to fixing effects model, occipital lobe (-3.42, -92.98, -4.77), and posterior cingulate (-8.00, -65.72, 11.17) of volunteers were found to have a more significantly positive activation, while the prefrontal (7.97,42.21,39.63), the parietal (-8.00, -54.36,49.87), temporal lobe (-39.84,3.59, -22.98), and midbrain (-3.42, -25.95, -7.04) were found to have significantly negative activation. Preliminary results on synchronization

  7. Evaluation of Platinum-Black Stimulus Electrode Array for Electrical Stimulation of Retinal Cells in Retinal Prosthesis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Taiichiro; Kobayashi, Risato; Komiya, Ken; Fukushima, Takafumi; Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugano, Eriko; Kurino, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tetsu; Tamai, Makoto; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2007-04-01

    A retinal prosthesis system with a three-dimensionally (3D) stacked LSI chip has been proposed. We fabricated a new implantable stimulus electrode array deposited with Platinum-black (Pt-b) on a polyimide-based flexible printed circuit (FPC) for the electrical stimulation of the retinal cells. Impedance measurement of the Pt-b electrode-electrolyte interface in a saline solution was performed and the Pt-b electrode realized a very low impedance. The power consumption at the electrode array when retinal cells were stimulated by a stimulus current was evaluated. The power consumption of the Pt-b stimulus electrode array was 91% lower than that of a previously fabricated Al stimulus electrode array due to a convexo-concave surface. In the cytotoxicity test (CT), we confirmed that Pt implantation induced no cellular degeneration of the rat retina. In the animal experiments, electrically evoked potential (EEP) was successfully recorded using Japanese white rabbits. These results indicate that electrical stimulation using the Pt-b stimulus electrode array can restore visual sensation.

  8. Flicker stimulated retinal perfusion changes assessed with high-speed Doppler tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoll, Tilman; Singh, Amardeep S. G.; Frily, Karine; Blatter, Cedric; Villiger, Martin; Pache, Christoph; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    We developed a high speed Doppler tomography system together with flow extraction algorithms that provide a flexible tool to assess retinal perfusion. The aim of the present study is to stimulate perfusion by flickering with light of adjustable color and to measure changes depending on light frequency and flicker location. We observed relative changes in arterial flow velocity during flicker stimulation up to 50%. We found in arteries close to the optic nerve head the highest flicker response at a frequency of 8Hz. We believe that a multimodal functional imaging concept is of high value for an accurate and early diagnosis and understanding of retinal pathologies and pathogenesis.

  9. Mapping brain activity on the verge of a photically induced generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig R; Wolff, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In a photosensitive patient intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) accidentally provoked a generalized tonic-clonic seizure during simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Before seizure onset, IPS consistently induced generalized ph...

  10. Electrical stimulation via a biocompatible conductive polymer directs retinal progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, Rajiv; Cimetta, Elisa; Tandon, Nina; Zhou, Jing; Langer, Robert; Young, Michael; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Redenti, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to simulate in vitro the spontaneous electrical wave activity associated with retinal development and investigate if such biometrically designed signals can enhance differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells (mRPC). To this end, we cultured cells on an electroconductive transplantable polymer, polypyrrole (PPy) and measured gene expression and morphology of the cells. Custom-made 8-well cell culture chambers were designed to accommodate PPy deposited onto indium tin oxide-coated (ITO) glass slides, with precise control of the PPy film thickness. mRPCs were isolated from post-natal day 1 (P1) green fluorescent protein positive (GFP+) mice, expanded, seeded onto PPY films, allowed to adhere for 24 hours, and then subjected to electrical stimulation (100 µA pulse trains, 5 s in duration, once per minute) for 4 days. Cultured cells and non-stimulated controls were processed for immunostaining and confocal analysis, and for RNA extraction and quantitative PCR. Stimulated cells expressed significantly higher levels of the early photoreceptor marker cone-rod homebox (CRX, the earliest known marker of photoreceptor identity), and protein kinase-C (PKC), and significantly lower levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Consistently, stimulated cells developed pronounced neuronal morphologies with significantly longer dendritic processes and larger cell bodies than non-stimulated controls. Taken together, the experimental evidence shows that the application of an electrical stimulation designed based on retinal development can be implemented to direct and enhance retinal differentiation of mRPCs, suggesting a role for biomimetic electrical stimulation in directing progenitor cells toward neural fates.

  11. Characteristics of retinal reflectance changes induced by transcorneal electrical stimulation in cat eyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Morimoto

    Full Text Available Transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES activates retinal neurons leading to visual sensations. How the retinal cells are activated by TES has not been definitively determined. Investigating the reflectance changes of the retina is an established technique and has been used to determine the mechanism of retinal activation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reflectance changes elicited by TES in cat eyes. Eight eyes of Eight cats were studied under general anesthesia. Biphasic electrical pulses were delivered transcornealy. The fundus images observed with near-infrared light (800-880 nm were recorded every 25 ms for 26 s. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the images of 10 consecutive recordings were averaged. Two-dimensional topographic maps of the reflective changes were constructed by subtracting images before from those after the TES. The effects of different stimulus parameters, e.g., current intensity, pulse duration, frequency, and stimulus duration, on the reflective changes were studied. Our results showed that after TES, the reflective changes appeared on the retinal vessels and optic disc. The intensity of reflectance changes increased as the current intensity, pulse duration, and stimulation duration increased (P<0.05 for all. The maximum intensity of the reflective change was obtained when the stimulus frequency was 20 Hz. The time course of the reflectance changes was also altered by the stimulation parameters. The response started earlier and returned to the baseline later with higher current intensities, longer pulse durations, but the time of the peak of the response was not changed. These results showed that the reflective changes were due to the activation of retinal neurons by TES and might involve the vascular changes induced by an activation of the retinal neurons.

  12. Modeling the response of ON and OFF retinal bipolar cells during electric stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werginz, P; Benav, H; Zrenner, E; Rattay, F

    2015-06-01

    Retinal implants allowing blind people suffering from diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration to regain rudimentary vision are struggling with several obstacles. One of the main problems during external electric stimulation is the co-activation of the ON and OFF pathways which results in mutual impairment. In this study the response of ON and OFF cone retinal bipolar cells during extracellular electric stimulation from the subretinal space was examined. To gain deeper insight into the behavior of these cells sustained L-type and transient T-type calcium channels were integrated in the synaptic terminals of reconstructed 3D morphologies of ON and OFF cone bipolar cells. Intracellular calcium concentration in the synaptic regions of the model neurons was investigated as well since calcium influx is a crucial parameter for cell-to-cell activity between bipolar cells and retinal ganglion cells. It was shown that monophasic stimulation results in significant different calcium concentrations in the synaptic terminals of ON and OFF bipolar cells. Intracellular calcium increased to values up to fourfold higher in the OFF bipolar model neuron in comparison to the ON bipolar cell. Furthermore, geometric properties strongly influence the activation of bipolar cells. Monophasic, biphasic, single and repetitive pulses with similar lengths, amplitudes and polarities were applied to the two model neurons. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of the sodium channel band on retinal ganglion cell excitation during electric stimulation--a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werginz, P; Fried, S I; Rattay, F

    2014-04-25

    Electric stimulation using retinal implants allows blind people to re-experience a rudimentary kind of vision. The elicited percepts or so called 'phosphenes' are highly inconstant and therefore do not restore vision properly. The better knowledge of how retinal neurons, especially retinal ganglion cells, respond to electric stimulation will help to develop more sophisticated stimulation strategies. Special anatomic and physiologic properties like a band of highly dense sodium channels in retinal ganglion cells may help to achieve a focal activation of target cells and as a result better restoration of vision. A portion of retinal ganglion cell axons, about 40μm from the soma and between 25 and 40μm in length, shows a specific biophysical property. Electrode locations close to a band of highly dense sodium channels which were identified immunochemically show lowest thresholds during electric stimulation. The (modeled) thresholds for this kind of structure result in lowest thresholds as well. The influence on the location where action potentials are generated within the axon is far reaching. When a stimulating electrode is positioned far outside the actual band region the site of spike initiation still remains within the sodium channel band. These findings suggest to further examine the key mechanisms of activation for retinal ganglion cells because focal activation without influencing passing axons of neurons located far away can improve the outcome of electric stimulation and therefore the development of retinal implants. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Decoding of retinal ganglion cell spike trains evoked by temporally patterned electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang Baek; Ye, Jang Hee; Goo, Yong Sook; Kim, Chi Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2010-08-12

    For successful restoration of vision by retinal prostheses, the neural activity of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) evoked by electrical stimulation should represent the information of spatiotemporal patterns of visual input. We propose a method to evaluate the effectiveness of stimulation pulse trains so that the crucial temporal information of a visual input is accurately represented in the RGC responses as the amplitudes of pulse trains are modulated according to the light intensity. This was enabled by spike train decoding. The effectiveness of the stimulation was evaluated by the accuracy of decoding pulse amplitude from the RGC spike train, i.e., by the similarity between the original and the decoded pulse amplitude time series. When the parameters of stimulation were suitably determined, the RGC responses were reliably modulated by varying the amplitude of electrical pulses. Accordingly, the temporal pattern of pulse amplitudes could be successfully decoded from multiunit RGC spike trains. The range of pulse amplitude and the pulse rate were critical for accurate representation of input information in RGC responses. These results suggest that pulse amplitude modulation is a feasible means to encode temporal visual information by RGC spike trains and thus to implement stimulus encoding strategies for retinal prostheses.

  15. Quasi-Monopolar Stimulation: A Novel Electrode Design Configuration for Performance Optimization of a Retinal Neuroprosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In retinal neuroprostheses, spatial interaction between electric fields from various electrodes - electric crosstalk - may occur in multielectrode arrays during simultaneous stimulation of the retina. Depending on the electrode design and placement, this crosstalk can either enhance or degrade the functional characteristics of a visual prosthesis. To optimize the device performance, a balance must be satisfied between the constructive interference of crosstalk on dynamic range and power consu...

  16. Synchronized Firings in Retinal Ganglion Cells in Response to Natural Stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-Ying; XIAO Lei; LIU Wen-Zhong; GONG Hai-Qing; LIANG Pei-Ji

    2011-01-01

    The response of synchronously firing groups of population retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to natural movies (NMs)and pseudo-random white-noise checker-board flickering (CB, as control) are investigated using an informationtheoretic algorithm.The main results are: (1) the population RGCs tend to fire in synchrony far more frequently than expected by chance during both NM and CB stimulation; (2) more synchronous groups could be formed and each group contains more neurons under NM than CB stimulation; (3) the individual neurons also participate in more groups and have more distinct partners in NM than CB stimulation.All these results suggest that the synchronized firings in RGCs are more extensive and diverse, which may account for more effective information processing in representing the natural visual environment.%@@ The response of synchronously firing groups of population retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to natural movies (NMs) and pseudo-random white-noise checker-board flickering (CB, as control) are investigated using an information-theoretic algorithm.The main results are: (1) the population RGCs tend to fire in synchrony far more frequently than expected by chance during both NM and CB stimulation; (2) more synchronous groups could be formed and each group contains more neurons under NM than CB stimulation; (3) the individual neurons also participate in more groups and have more distinct partners in NM than CB stimulation.All these results suggest that the synchronized firings in RGCs are more extensive and diverse, which may account for more effective information processing in representing the natural visual environment.

  17. Efficacy of electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells with temporal patterns resembling light-evoked spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raymond C S; Garrett, David J; Grayden, David B; Ibbotson, Michael R; Cloherty, Shaun L

    2014-01-01

    People with degenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa lose most of their photoreceptors but retain a significant proportion (~30%) of their retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Microelectronic retinal prostheses aim to bypass the lost photoreceptors and restore vision by directly stimulating the surviving RGCs. Here we investigate the extent to which electrical stimulation of RGCs can evoke neural spike trains with statistics resembling those of normal visually-evoked responses. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from individual cat RGCs in vitro. We first recorded the responses of each cell to short sequences of visual stimulation. These responses were converted to trains of electrical stimulation that we then presented to the same cell via an epiretinal stimulating electrode. We then quantified the efficacy of the electrical stimuli and the latency of the evoked spikes. In all cases, spikes were evoked with sub-millisecond latency (0.55 ms, median, ON cells, n = 8; 0.75 ms, median, OFF cells, n = 6) and efficacy ranged from 0.4-1.0 (0.79, median, ON cells; 0.97, median, OFF cells). These data demonstrate that meaningful spike trains, resembling normal responses of RGCs to visual stimulation, can be reliably evoked by epiretinal prostheses.

  18. Versatile Stimulation Back-End With Programmable Exponential Current Pulse Shapes for a Retinal Visual Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, Mohammad Hossein; Sodagar, Amir M; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the design, implementation, and test of a stimulation back-end, for an implantable retinal prosthesis. In addition to traditional rectangular pulse shapes, the circuit features biphasic stimulation pulses with both rising and falling exponential shapes, whose time constants are digitally programmable. A class-B second generation current conveyor is used as a wide-swing, high-output-resistance stimulation current driver, delivering stimulation current pulses of up to ±96 μA to the target tissue. Duration of the generated current pulses is programmable within the range of 100 μs to 3 ms. Current-mode digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are used to program the amplitudes of the stimulation pulses. Fabricated using the IBM 130 nm process, the circuit consumes 1.5×1.5 mm(2) of silicon area. According to the measurements, the DACs exhibit DNL and INL of 0.23 LSB and 0.364 LSB, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the stimuli generator meets expected requirements when connected to electrode-tissue impedance of as high as 25 k Ω. Maximum power consumption of the proposed design is 3.4 mW when delivering biphasic rectangular pulses to the target load. A charge pump block is in charge of the upconversion of the standard 1.2-V supply voltage to ±3.3V.

  19. Quasi-monopolar stimulation: a novel electrode design configuration for performance optimization of a retinal neuroprosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Khalili Moghadam

    Full Text Available In retinal neuroprostheses, spatial interaction between electric fields from various electrodes - electric crosstalk - may occur in multielectrode arrays during simultaneous stimulation of the retina. Depending on the electrode design and placement, this crosstalk can either enhance or degrade the functional characteristics of a visual prosthesis. To optimize the device performance, a balance must be satisfied between the constructive interference of crosstalk on dynamic range and power consumption and its negative effect on artificial visual acuity. In the present computational modeling study, we have examined the trade-off in these positive and negative effects using a range of currently available electrode array configurations, compared to a recently proposed stimulation strategy - the quasi monopolar (QMP configuration - in which the return current is shared between local bipolar guards and a distant monopolar electrode. We evaluate the performance of the QMP configuration with respect to the implantation site and electrode geometry parameters. Our simulation results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of QMP are only significant at electrode-to-cell distances greater than the electrode dimensions. Possessing a relatively lower activation threshold, QMP was found to be superior to the bipolar configuration in terms of providing a relatively higher visual acuity. However, the threshold for QMP was more sensitive to the topological location of the electrode in the array, which may need to be considered when programming the manner in which electrode are simultaneously activated. This drawback can be offset with a wider dynamic range and lower power consumption of QMP. Furthermore, the ratio of monopolar return current to total return can be used to adjust the functional performance of QMP for a given implantation site and electrode parameters. We conclude that the QMP configuration can be used to improve visual information-to-stimulation

  20. Transcorneal electrical stimulation alters morphology and survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich-Noack, Petra; Voigt, Nadine; Prilloff, Sylvia; Fedorov, Anton; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-05-24

    Traumatic optic nerve injury leads to retrograde death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), but transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) can increase the cell survival rate. To understand the mechanisms and to further define the TES-induced effects we monitored in living animals RGC morphology and survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) in real time by using in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) of the retina. ONC was performed in rats and ICON was performed before crush and on post-lesion days 3, 7 and 15 which allowed us to repeatedly record RGC number and size. TES or sham-stimulation were performed immediately after the crush and on post-injury day 11. Three days after ONC we detected a higher percentage of surviving RGCs in the TES group as compared to sham-treated controls. However, the difference was below significance level on day 7 and disappeared completely by day 15. The death rate was more variable amongst the TES-treated rats than in the control group. Morphological analysis revealed that average cell size changed significantly in the control group but not in stimulated animals and the morphological alterations of surviving neurons were smaller in TES-treated compared to control cells. In conclusion, TES delays post-traumatic cell death significantly. Moreover, we found "responder animals" which also benefited in the long-term from the treatment. Our in vivo cellular imaging results provide evidence that TES reduces ONC-associated neuronal swelling and shrinkage especially in RGCs which survived long-term. Further studies are now needed to determine the differences of responders vs. non-responders.

  1. Inflammatory stimulation preserves physiological properties of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike eStutzki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Axonal injury in the optic nerve is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration and irreversible loss of vision. However, inflammatory stimulation (IS by intravitreal injection of Pam3Cys transforms RGCs into an active regenerative state enabling these neurons to survive injury and to regenerate axons into the injured optic nerve. Although morphological changes have been well studied, the functional correlates of RGCs transformed either into a de- or regenerating state at a sub-cellular level remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the signal propagation in single intraretinal axons as well as characteristic activity features of RGCs in a naive, a degenerative or a regenerative state in ex vivo retinae one week after either optic nerve cut alone (ONC or additional inflammatory stimulation (ONC+IS. Recordings of single RGCs using high-density microelectrode arrays demonstrate that the mean intraretinal axonal conduction velocity significantly decreased within the first week after ONC. In contrast, when ONC was accompanied by regenerative Pam3Cys treatment the mean intraretinal velocity was undistinguishable from control RGCs, indicating a protective effect on the proximal axon. Spontaneous RGC activity decreased for the two most numerous RGC types (ON- and OFF-sustained cells within one post-operative week, but did not significantly increase in RGCs after inflammatory stimulation. The analysis of light-induced activity revealed that RGCs in ONC animals respond on average later and with fewer spikes than control RGCs. IS significantly improved the responsiveness of the two studied RGC types.These results show that the transformation into a regenerative state by IS preserves, at least transiently, the physiological functional properties of injured RGCs.

  2. Neuroprotection by α2-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation after Excitotoxic Retinal Injury: A Study of the Total Population of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Distribution in the Chicken Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Harun-Or-Rashid, Mohammad; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effect of α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on the total excitotoxically injured chicken retinal ganglion cell population. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was intraocularly injected at embryonic day 18 and Brn3a positive retinal ganglion cells (Brn3a+ RGCs) were counted in flat-mounted retinas using automated routines. The number and distribution of the Brn3a+ RGCs were analyzed in series of normal retinas from embryonic day 8 to post-hatch day 11 retinas and in retinas 7 or 14 days post NMDA lesion. The total number of Brn3a+ RGCs in the post-hatch retina was approximately 1.9x106 with a density of approximately 9.2x103 cells/mm2. The isodensity maps of normal retina showed that the density decreased with age as the retinal size increased. In contrast to previous studies, we did not find any specific region with increased RGC density, rather the Brn3a+ RGCs were homogeneously distributed over the central retina with decreasing density in the periphery and in the region of the pecten oculli. Injection of 5–10 μg NMDA caused 30–50% loss of Brn3a+ cells and the loss was more severe in the dorsal than in the ventral retina. Pretreatment with brimonidine reduced the loss of Brn3a+ cells both 7 and 14 days post lesion and the protective effect was higher in the dorsal than in the ventral retina. We conclude that α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation reduced the impact of the excitotoxic injury in chicken similarly to what has been shown in mammals. Furthermore, the data show that the RGCs are evenly distributed over in the retina, which challenges previous results that indicate the presence of specific high RGC-density regions of the chicken retina. PMID:27611432

  3. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  4. Increased photic sensitivity for phase resetting but not melatonin suppression in Siberian hamsters under short photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, G L; Harrison, E M; Elliott, J A; Gorman, M R

    2014-03-01

    Light regulates a variety of behavioral and physiological processes, including activity rhythms and hormone secretory patterns. Seasonal changes in the proportion of light in a day (photoperiod) further modulate those functions. Recently, short (SP) versus long days (LP) were found to markedly increase light sensitivity for phase shifting in Syrian hamsters. To our knowledge, photoperiod effects on light sensitivity have not been studied in other rodents, nor is it known if they generalize to other circadian responses. We tested whether photic phase shifting and melatonin suppression vary in Siberian hamsters maintained under LP or SP. Select irradiances of light were administered, and shifts in activity were determined. Photic sensitivity for melatonin suppression was examined in a separate group of animals via pulses of light across a 4 log-unit photon density range, with post-pulse plasma melatonin levels determined via RIA. Phase shifting and melatonin suppression were greater at higher irradiances for both LP and SP. The lower irradiance condition was below threshold for phase shifts in LP but not SP. Melatonin suppression did not vary by photoperiod, and the half saturation constant for fitted sigmoid curves was similar under LP and SP. Thus, the photoperiodic modulation of light sensitivity for phase shifting is conserved across two hamster genera. The dissociation of photoperiod effects on photic phase shifting and melatonin suppression suggests that the modulation of sensitivity occurs downstream of the common retinal input pathway. Understanding the mechanistic basis for this plasticity may yield therapeutic targets for optimizing light therapy practices.

  5. Retinal degeneration 3 (RD3) protein inhibits catalytic activity of retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) and its stimulation by activating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Azadi, Seifollah; Molday, Laurie L; Molday, Robert S; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2011-11-08

    Retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) in the outer segments of vertebrate photoreceptors is controlled by guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs), responding to light-dependent changes of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. We present evidence that a different RetGC binding protein, retinal degeneration 3 protein (RD3), is a high-affinity allosteric modulator of the cyclase which inhibits RetGC activity at submicromolar concentrations. It suppresses the basal activity of RetGC in the absence of GCAPs in a noncompetitive manner, and it inhibits the GCAP-stimulated RetGC at low intracellular Ca(2+) levels. RD3 opposes the allosteric activation of the cyclase by GCAP but does not significantly change Ca(2+) sensitivity of the GCAP-dependent regulation. We have tested a number of mutations in RD3 implicated in human retinal degenerative disorders and have found that several mutations prevent the stable expression of RD3 in HEK293 cells and decrease the affinity of RD3 for RetGC1. The RD3 mutant lacking the carboxy-terminal half of the protein and associated with Leber congenital amaurosis type 12 (LCA12) is unable to suppress the activity of the RetGC1/GCAP complex. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of the G57V mutant implicated in cone-rod degeneration is strongly reduced. Our results suggest that inhibition of RetGC by RD3 may be utilized by photoreceptors to block RetGC activity during its maturation and/or incorporation into the photoreceptor outer segment rather than participate in dynamic regulation of the cyclase by Ca(2+) and GCAPs.

  6. Isorenieratene: Biomarker for Photic Layer Anoxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casford, J.

    2011-12-01

    The use of biomarkers is a relatively new and growing field and while these novel proxies hold the potential to revolutionise our understanding of past environments it is important that we fully understand the assumptions that underlie their use and the systems in which they operate. The use of the biomarker, isorenieratene to identify photic layer anoxia, particularly in marine systems is increasing. However recent papers have identified this carotenoid in settings that also show evidence of deep ventilation. This synthesis will assess the history and evidence for the use of this biomarker, focusing on the diagenesis of isorenieratene and the habitat of the Chlorobiaceae species that are its main producers. While it is clear this biomarker can be produced under euxinic condition in the photic layer I highlight evidence that: 1) The most common occurrence of these Chlorobiaceae species is photolithotropic and that even in marine systems it preferentially occurs at the sediment water interface rather than in pelagic conditions; 2) That these species are not the only source of this pigment and its products; and 3) These species can also operate in common micro - niches within more oxic environments.

  7. In vivo evaluation of an episcleral multielectrode array for stimulation of the retina with reduced retinal ganglion cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Timothy L; Morley, John W

    2008-05-01

    A visual prosthesis is an experimental device designed to activate residual functional neurons in the visual pathway to generate artificial vision for blind patients. Specifically, for photoreceptor disease, a microelectrode array applied to the surface of the sclera could potentially serve to stimulate the remaining interneurons in the retina to produce topographically mapped visual percepts. However, of those neurons spared in the disease process, the retinal ganglion cells (RGC), which represent the final output neurons of the retina, can be markedly reduced in number. Using an albino rabbit model with RGC deficits, acute recording of cortical electrical evoked potential was performed to ascertain whether such a stimulation strategy is feasible. By analyzing the strength-duration curve (current threshold vs. pulse duration) and cortical activation profiles, our results prove that bioelectrically safe and spatially differentiated stimulation of the retina is feasible notwithstanding the condition of markedly reduced RGC counts.

  8. Spontaneous oscillatory rhythms in the degenerating mouse retina modulate retinal ganglion cell responses to electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sook eGoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice, where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs. Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  9. The effects of photic and nonphotic stimuli in the 5-HT7 receptor knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardani, M; Biello, S M

    2008-03-03

    5-HT and agonists of the 5-HT receptor can modify the response of the mammalian pacemaker, which is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), to photic and nonphotic stimulation. Previous studies suggest that the 5-HT7 receptor is involved in the regulation of photic input, and the modulation of nonphotic circadian resetting of the circadian clock. The present study investigated the role of the 5-HT7 receptor by evaluating a wide variety of circadian parameters in mice lacking a functional allele for this receptor (5-HT7 knockout (KO)) compared with wild type (WT) animals that were bred on the same genetic background, including rate of entrainment, photic responsiveness and nonphotic response to a serotonergic agonist. No significant differences were detected in the average number of days 5-HT7 KO mice needed to reach entrainment to an advance of 6 h in the LD cycle compared with WT animals. Further, we investigated the acute responsiveness of both groups of mice to acute light stimulation at various times (circadian time (CT) 0, 6, 9, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22). A significant difference in the phase resetting response to light between the groups was revealed at CT22. Finally, as the 5-HT7 receptor has been associated with the modulation of nonphotic resetting in vitro, we examined the response of the 5-HT7 KO mice to systemic administration of a 5-HT(1A/7) agonist. The current study is the first to demonstrate the elimination of a nonphotic response to (+) 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) in mice lacking the 5-HT7 receptor compared with WT animals in vivo. Taken together, the present findings provide additional evidence that reform the established view on the role of the 5-HT7 in the photic regulation of retinohypothalamic (RHT) input, and support further the involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in the modulation of nonphotic resetting in circadian clock.

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells stimulate proliferation and neuronal differentiation of retinal progenitor cells.

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    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available During retina development, retinal progenitor cell (RPC proliferation and differentiation are regulated by complex inter- and intracellular interactions. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs are reported to express a variety of cytokines and neurotrophic factors, which have powerful trophic and protective functions for neural tissue-derived cells. Here, we show that the expanded RPC cultures treated with BMSC-derived conditioned medium (CM which was substantially enriched for bFGF and CNTF, expressed clearly increased levels of nuclear receptor TLX, an essential regulator of neural stem cell (NSC self-renewal, as well as betacellulin (BTC, an EGF-like protein described as supporting NSC expansion. The BMSC CM- or bFGF-treated RPCs also displayed an obviously enhanced proliferation capability, while BMSC CM-derived bFGF knocked down by anti-bFGF, the effect of BMSC CM on enhancing RPC proliferation was partly reversed. Under differentiation conditions, treatment with BMSC CM or CNTF markedly favoured RPC differentiation towards retinal neurons, including Brn3a-positive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and rhodopsin-positive photoreceptors, and clearly diminished retinal glial cell differentiation. These findings demonstrate that BMSCs supported RPC proliferation and neuronal differentiation which may be partly mediated by BMSC CM-derived bFGF and CNTF, reveal potential limitations of RPC culture systems, and suggest a means for optimizing RPC cell fate determination in vitro.

  11. A Suprachoroidal Electrical Retinal Stimulator Design for Long-Term Animal Experiments and In Vivo Assessment of Its Feasibility and Biocompatibility in Rabbits

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    J. A. Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a retinal stimulation system for long-term use in animal electrical stimulation experiments. The presented system consisted of an implantable stimulator which provided continuous electrical stimulation, and an external component which provided preset stimulation patterns and power to the implanted stimulator via a paired radio frequency (RF coil. A rechargeable internal battery and a parameter memory component were introduced to the implanted retinal stimulator. As a result, the external component was not necessary during the stimulation mode. The inductive coil pair was used to pass the parameter data and to recharge the battery. A switch circuit was used to separate the stimulation mode from the battery recharging mode. The implantable stimulator was implemented with IC chips and the electronics, except for the stimulation electrodes, were hermetically packaged in a biocompatible metal case. A polyimide-based gold electrode array was used. Surgical implantation into rabbits was performed to verify the functionality and safety of this newly designed system. The electrodes were implanted in the suprachoroidal space. Evoked cortical potentials were recorded during electrical stimulation of the retina. Long-term follow-up using OCT showed no chorioretinal abnormality after implantation of the electrodes.

  12. A suprachoroidal electrical retinal stimulator design for long-term animal experiments and in vivo assessment of its feasibility and biocompatibility in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J A; Woo, S J; Park, S I; Kim, E T; Seo, J M; Chung, H; Kim, S J

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a retinal stimulation system for long-term use in animal electrical stimulation experiments. The presented system consisted of an implantable stimulator which provided continuous electrical stimulation, and an external component which provided preset stimulation patterns and power to the implanted stimulator via a paired radio frequency (RF) coil. A rechargeable internal battery and a parameter memory component were introduced to the implanted retinal stimulator. As a result, the external component was not necessary during the stimulation mode. The inductive coil pair was used to pass the parameter data and to recharge the battery. A switch circuit was used to separate the stimulation mode from the battery recharging mode. The implantable stimulator was implemented with IC chips and the electronics, except for the stimulation electrodes, were hermetically packaged in a biocompatible metal case. A polyimide-based gold electrode array was used. Surgical implantation into rabbits was performed to verify the functionality and safety of this newly designed system. The electrodes were implanted in the suprachoroidal space. Evoked cortical potentials were recorded during electrical stimulation of the retina. Long-term follow-up using OCT showed no chorioretinal abnormality after implantation of the electrodes.

  13. Modeling electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cell with optimizing additive noises for reducing threshold and energy consumption.

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    Wu, Jing; Jin, Menghua; Qiao, Qingli

    2017-03-27

    Epiretinal prosthesis is one device for the treatment of blindness, which target retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by electrodes on retinal surface. The stimulating current of epiretinal prosthesis is an important factor that influences the safety threshold and visual perception. Stochastic resonance (SR) can be used to enhance the detection and transmission of subthreshold stimuli in neurons. Here, it was assumed that SR was a potential way to improve the performance of epiretinal prosthesis. The effect of noises on the response of RGCs to electrical stimulation and the energy of stimulating current was studied based on a RGC model. The RGC was modeled as a multi-compartment model consisting of dendrites and its branches, soma and axon. To evoke SR, a subthreshold signal, a series of bipolar rectangular pulse sequences, plus stochastic biphasic pulse sequences as noises, were used as a stimulus to the model. The SR-type behavior in the model was characterized by a "power norm" measure. To decrease energy consumption of the stimulation waveform, the stochastic biphasic pulse sequences were only added to the cathode and anode phase of the subthreshold pulse and the noise parameters were optimized by using a genetic algorithm (GA). When certain intensity of noise is added to the subthreshold signal, RGC model can fire. With the noise's RMS amplitudes increased, more spikes were elicited and the curve of power norm presents the inverted U-like graph. The larger pulse width of stochastic biphasic pulse sequences resulted in higher power norm. The energy consumption and charges of the single bipolar rectangular pulse without noise in threshold level are 468.18 pJ, 15.30 nC, and after adding optimized parameters's noise to the subthreshold signal, they became 314.8174 pJ, 11.9281 nC and were reduced by 32.8 and 22.0%, respectively. The SR exists in the RGC model and can enhance the representation of RGC model to the subthreshold signal. Adding the stochastic biphasic

  14. Ozonoterapia y electroestimulación en retinosis pigmentaria Ozone therapy and electrical stimulation in pigmentary retinitis

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    Lázaro Joaquín Pérez Aguiar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Profundizar en los efectos de la ozonoterapia y electroestimulación sobre la función visual de los pacientes que padecen retinosis pigmentaria. MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron 186 pacientes portadores de retinosis pigmentaria. Fueron agrupados atendiendo a los estadios clínicos de la clasificación cubana (4 grupos. Se aplicó ozonoterapia y electroestimulación, una sesión diaria de cada una durante 14 días. Se realizó un examen oftalmológico antes y después del tratamiento, para la agudeza visual se empleó cartilla de Snellen y para el campo visual cinético tipo Goldman. Los datos estadísticos se analizaron y compararon usando la prueba t de Student. Se consideró p OBJECTIVE: To analyze in depth the effects of ozone therapy and electrical stimulation on the visual function of patients suffering pigmentary retinitis. METHODS: One hundred and eighty six patients carrying pigmentary retinitis were studied. They were grouped according to the clinical staging of the Cuban classification (4 groups. Ozone therapy and electrical stimulations were applied daily for 14 days. An ophthalmologic test before and after the treatment was performed; Snellen´s charter for visual acuity and Goldman-type kinetic visual field. Statistical data were analyzed and compared using Student´s t test. The statistical significance was set at p<0,05. RESULTS: The corrected visual acuity remained the same in the 57 patients grouped in staging 1. Significant changes were observed in the visual field of 16 patients. Regarding the 66 patients in staging 2, corrected visual acuity remained the same in 48 whereas 29 patients experienced significant changes in their visual field. Forty nine patients were included in the staging 3 where corrected visual acuity kept the same value in 38 patients, but very significant changes in the visual field of 27 patients were observed. CONCLUSION: In the Cuban multitherapeutical strategy for the treatment of pigmentary retinitis

  15. Photic sensitivity ranges of hamster pupillary and circadian phase responses do not overlap.

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    Hut, Roelof A; Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Rieux, Camille; Cooper, Howard M

    2008-02-01

    Mammalian retinal photoreceptors form an irradiance detection system that drives many nonvisual responses to light such as pupil reflex and resetting of the circadian clock. To understand the role of pupil size in circadian light responses, pupil diameter was pharmacologically manipulated and the effect on behavioral phase shifts at different irradiance levels was studied in the Syrian hamster. Dose-response curves for steady-state pupil size and for behavioral phase shifts were constructed for 3 pupil conditions (dilated, constricted, and control). Retinal irradiance was calculated from corneal irradiance, pupil size, retinal surface area, and absorption of ocular media. The sensitivity of photic responses to retinal irradiance is approximately 1.5 log units higher than to corneal irradiance. When plotted against corneal irradiance, pharmacological pupil constriction reduces the light sensitivity of the circadian system, but pupil dilation has no effect. As expected, when plotted against retinal irradiance all dose-response curves superimposed, confirming that the circadian system responds to photon flux on the retina. Pupil dilation does not increase the circadian response to increasing irradiance, since the response of the circadian system attains saturation at irradiance levels lower than those required to induce pupil constriction. The main finding shows that due to the different response sensitivities, the effect of pupil constriction on the light sensitivity of the circadian system in the hamster under natural conditions is virtually negligible. We further suggest the existence of distinct modulating mechanisms for the differential retinal irradiance sensitivity of the pupil system and the circadian system, which enables the different responses to be tuned to their specific tasks while using similar photoreceptive input.

  16. In Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandagor, Vincent; Cela, Carlos J.; Sanders, Charlene A.; Greenbaum, Elias; Lazzi, Gianluca; Zhou, David D.; Castro, Richard; Gaikwad, Sanjay; Little, Jim

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model "eye," beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  17. Photic stimulation with physiological light driving intracranial electrodes in epilepsy patients and its pathological photo-effect%闪光刺激在癫痫病人脑内电极的生理光驱动及病理光效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐欣; Navarro V; Dinkelacker V; Dupont S; Adam C; 凌至培

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the response of an epilepsy patient to photic stimulation of intracranial electrodes. Methods A patient with refractory epilepsy was assessed with SEEG before operation. Electrodes were implanted into different sites of occipital-temporal lobes. The opened or closed eyes of the patient were stimulated with light source at the frequency of l-40Hz. Results All the significant contacts of physiological light-driven electrodes, located in the medial occipital lobe, were close to the calcarine fissure. The photo-effect was different at different contacts of intracranial electrodes due to different distances to the calcarine fissure. No pathological photo-effect was observed. Conclusion Much precise physiological information on the physiological visual system of epilepsy patients can be obtained by implanting electrodes into their brain, especially into the medial occipital lobe.%目的 报告1 例癫痫病人脑内电极对闪光刺激的反应.方法 1 例部分性难治性癫痫病人在术前评估时利用立体定向技术,在枕- 颞叶脑组织内不同部位置入电极,病人处于睁眼或闭眼状态,使用1-40Hz 频率的光源刺激.结果 出现明显生理性光驱动的电极接触点全部处于枕叶内侧面,靠近距状裂,但不同的电极接触点由于位于距状裂上下及距离其远近不同,出现生理光驱动的效果不同,未发现病理性光效应.结论 通过癫痫病人脑内电极的置入,特别是在枕叶内侧面置入脑内电极,可以得到确切的关于视觉系统的生理信息.

  18. Responses of retinal ganglion cells to extracellular electrical stimulation, from single cell to population: model-based analysis.

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    David Tsai

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, which survive in large numbers following neurodegenerative diseases, could be stimulated with extracellular electric pulses to elicit artificial percepts. How do the RGCs respond to electrical stimulation at the sub-cellular level under different stimulus configurations, and how does this influence the whole-cell response? At the population level, why have experiments yielded conflicting evidence regarding the extent of passing axon activation? We addressed these questions through simulations of morphologically and biophysically detailed computational RGC models on high performance computing clusters. We conducted the analyses on both large-field RGCs and small-field midget RGCs. The latter neurons are unique to primates. We found that at the single cell level the electric potential gradient in conjunction with neuronal element excitability, rather than the electrode center location per se, determined the response threshold and latency. In addition, stimulus positioning strongly influenced the location of RGC response initiation and subsequent activity propagation through the cellular structure. These findings were robust with respect to inhomogeneous tissue resistivity perpendicular to the electrode plane. At the population level, RGC cellular structures gave rise to low threshold hotspots, which limited axonal and multi-cell activation with threshold stimuli. Finally, due to variations in neuronal element excitability over space, following supra-threshold stimulation some locations favored localized activation of multiple cells, while others favored axonal activation of cells over extended space.

  19. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

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    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  20. Cutaneous retinal activation and neural entrainment in transcranial alternating current stimulation: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) applies exogenous oscillatory electric field potentials to entrain neural rhythms and is used to investigate brain-function relationships and its potential to enhance perceptual and cognitive performance. However, due to current spread tACS can

  1. Cutaneous retinal activation and neural entrainment in transcranial alternating current stimulation: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) applies exogenous oscillatory electric field potentials to entrain neural rhythms and is used to investigate brain-function relationships and its potential to enhance perceptual and cognitive performance. However, due to current spread tACS can cau

  2. Both electrical stimulation thresholds and SMI-32-immunoreactive retinal ganglion cell density correlate with age in S334ter line 3 rat retina.

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    Chan, Leanne L H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D

    2011-06-01

    Electrical stimulation threshold and retinal ganglion cell density were measured in a rat model of retinal degeneration. We performed in vivo electrophysiology and morphometric analysis on normal and S334ter line 3 (RD) rats (ages 84-782 days). We stimulated the retina in anesthetized animals and recorded evoked responses in the superior colliculus. Current pulses were delivered with a platinum-iridium (Pt-Ir) electrode of 75-μm diameter positioned on the epiretinal surface. In the same animals used for electrophysiology, SMI-32 immunolabeling of the retina enabled ganglion cell counting. An increase in threshold currents positively correlated with age of RD rats. SMI-32-labeled retinal ganglion cell density negatively correlated with age of RD rats. ANOVA shows that RD postnatal day (P)100 and P300 rats have threshold and density similar to normal rats, but RD P500 and P700 rats have threshold and density statistically different from normal rats (P < 0.05). Threshold charge densities were within the safety limits of Pt for all groups and pulse configurations, except at RD P600 and RD P700, where pulses were only safe up to 1- and 0.2-ms duration, respectively. Preservation of ganglion cells may enhance the efficiency and safety of electronic retinal implants.

  3. Proteomic Study of Retinal Proteins Associated with Transcorneal Electric Stimulation in Rats

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    Takashi Kanamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate how transcorneal electric stimulation (TES affects the retina, by identifying those proteins up- and downregulated by transcorneal electric stimulation (TES in the retina of rats. Methods. Adult Wistar rats received TES on the left eyes at different electrical currents while the right eyes received no treatment and served as controls. After TES, the eye was enucleated and the retina was isolated. The retinas were analyzed by proteomics. Results. Proteomics showed that twenty-five proteins were upregulated by TES. The identified proteins included cellular signaling proteins, proteins associated with neuronal transmission, metabolic proteins, immunological factors, and structural proteins. Conclusions. TES induced changes in expression of various functional proteins in the retina.

  4. A preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in vivo in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig-Silva, M S; Hathcock, C D; Hetling, J R

    2005-03-01

    A remaining challenge to the development of electronic prostheses for vision is improving the effectiveness of retinal stimulation. Electrode design and stimulus parameters need to be optimized such that the neural output from the retina conveys information to the mind's eye that aids the patient in interpreting his or her environment. This optimization will require a detailed understanding of the response of the retina to electrical stimulation. The identity and response characteristics of the cellular targets of stimulation need to be defined and evaluated. Described here is an in vivo preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in rat at the cellular level. The use of rat makes available a number of well-described models of retinal disease that motivate prosthesis development. Artificial stimulation can be investigated by adapting techniques traditionally employed to study the response of the retina to photic stimuli, such as recording at the cornea, single-cell recording, and pharmacological dissection of the response. Pilot studies include amplitude-intensity response data for subretinal and transretinal stimulation paradigms recorded in wild-type rats and a transgenic rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The ability to record single-unit ganglion cell activity in vivo is also demonstrated.

  5. Peroxidation stimulated by lipid hydroperoxides on bovine retinal pigment epithelium mitochondria: effect of cellular retinol-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasa, Ana M; Guajardo, Margarita H; Catalá, Angel

    2003-07-01

    This study analyzes the effect of cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), partially purified from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cytosol, on the non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation induced by fatty acid hydroperoxides of mitochondrial membranes isolated from bovine RPE. The effect of different amounts (50, 75 and 100 nmol) of linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LHP), arachidonic acid hydroperoxide (AHP) and docosahexaenoic acid hydroperoxide (DHP) on the lipid peroxidation of RPE mitochondria was studied; RPE mitochondria deprived of exogenously added hydroperoxide was utilized as control. The process was measured simultaneously by determining chemiluminescence as well as polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) degradation of total lipids isolated from RPE mitochondria. The addition of hydroperoxides to RPE mitochondria produces a marked increase in light emission that was hydroperoxide concentration dependent. The highest value of activation was produced by LHP. The major difference in the fatty acid composition of total lipids isolated from native and peroxidized RPE mitochondria incubated with and without hydroperoxides was found in the docosahexaenoic acid content, this decreased 40.90+/-3.01% in the peroxidized group compared to native RPE mitochondria. The decrease was significantly high: 86.32+/-2.57% when the lipid peroxidation was stimulated by 100 nmol of LHP. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation (decrease of chemiluminescence) was observed with the addition of increasing amounts (100-600 microg) of CRBP to RPE mitochondria. The inhibitory effect reaches the highest values in the presence of LHP.

  6. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor signaling augment glycated albumin-induced retinal microglial inflammation in vitro

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    Jiang Chun H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial activation and the proinflammatory response are controlled by a complex regulatory network. Among the various candidates, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is considered an important cytokine. The up-regulation of M-CSF and its receptor CSF-1R has been reported in brain disease, as well as in diabetic complications; however, the mechanism is unclear. An elevated level of glycated albumin (GA is a characteristic of diabetes; thus, it may be involved in monocyte/macrophage-associated diabetic complications. Results The basal level of expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R was examined in retinal microglial cells in vitro. Immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analyses revealed the up-regulation of CSF-1R in GA-treated microglial cells. We also detected increased expression and release of M-CSF, suggesting that the cytokine is produced by activated microglia via autocrine signaling. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that GA affects microglial activation by stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Furthermore, the neutralization of M-CSF or CSF-1R with antibodies suppressed the proinflammatory response. Conversely, this proinflammatory response was augmented by the administration of M-CSF. Conclusions We conclude that GA induces microglial activation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to the inflammatory pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. The increased microglial expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R not only is a response to microglial activation in diabetic retinopathy but also augments the microglial inflammation responsible for the diabetic microenvironment.

  7. A comparative efficacy study of photic driving brainwave entrainment technology with a novel form of more direct entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Thomas

    This exploratory study compared the efficacy of a novel brainwave electromagnetic (EM) entrainment technology against a more conventional technology utilizing the photic-driving technique. Both experimental conditions were also compared with a 7-minute control session that took place immediately before each stimulation session. The Schumann Resonance (SR) frequency was selected as the delivery signal and was chosen because of previous findings suggesting that entrainment to this frequency can often produce transpersonal if not paranormal, experiences in the entrainee, which sometimes resemble remote viewing or out-of-body experiences. A pilot study determined which of two novel entrainment modalities (a copper coil or a 16-solenoid headset) worked most effectively for use with the rest of the study. In the main study, an artificial SR signal at 7.8Hz was delivered during the photic-driving sessions, but a recording of the real-time SR was used to deliver the entrainment signal during sessions devoted to the electromagnetic entrainment modality. Sixteen participants were recruited from the local area, and EEG recordings were acquired via a 32-channel Deymed electroencephalography system. Comparative analyses were performed between the control and experimental portions of each session to assess for efficacy of the novel entrainment modality used, and, in the main study, between the electromagnetic and photic-driving sessions, to assess for differential entrainment efficacy between these groups. A follow-up study was additionally performed primarily to determine whether responders could replicate their entrainment effect from the main study. Results showed that EM entrainment appeared to be possible but is not nearly as robust or reliable as photic driving. Additionally, no profound transpersonal or paranormal experiences were elicited during the course of the study, and, when asked, participants were not able to determine with any degree of success, when the

  8. Topographic aspects of photic driving in the electroencephalogram of children and adolescents

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    Lazarev V.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The electroencephalogram amplitude spectra at 11 fixed frequencies of intermittent photic stimulation of 3 to 24 Hz were combined into driving "profiles" for 14 scalp points in 8 male and 7 female normal subjects aged 9 to 17 years. The driving response varied over frequency and was detected in 70 to 100% of cases in the occipital areas (maximum and in 27 to 77% of cases in the frontal areas (minimum using as a criterion peak amplitude 20% higher than those of the neighbors. Each subject responded, on average, to 9.7 ± 1.15 intermittent photic stimulation frequencies in the right occipital area and to 6.8 ± 1.97 frequencies in the right frontal area. Most of the driving responses (in relation to the previous background were significant according to the spectral F-test (a = 0.05, which also detected changes in some cases of low amplitude responses not revealed by the peak criterion. The profiles had two maxima in the alpha and theta bands in all leads. The latter was not present in the background spectra in the posterior areas and was less pronounced in the anterior ones. The weight of the profile theta maximum increased towards the frontal areas where the two maxima were similar, while the profile amplitudes decreased. The profiles repeated the shape of the background spectra, except for the theta band. The interhemispheric correlation between profiles was high. The theta driving detected in all areas recorded suggests a generalized influence of the theta generators in prepubertal and pubertal subjects.

  9. Photic Zone Euxinia During the Permian-Triassic Superanoxic Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Kliti; Cao, Changqun; Love, Gordon D.; Böttcher, Michael E.; Twitchett, Richard J.; Grosjean, Emmanuelle; Summons, Roger E.; Turgeon, Steven C.; Dunning, William; Jin, Yugan

    2005-02-01

    Carbon and sulfur isotopic data, together with biomarker and iron speciation analyses of the Hovea-3 core that was drilled in the Perth Basin, Western Australia, indicate that euxinic conditions prevailed in the paleowater column during the Permian-Triassic superanoxic event. Biomarkers diagnostic for anoxygenic photosynthesis by Chlorobiaceae are particularly abundant at the boundary and into the Early Triassic. Similar conditions prevailed in the contemporaneous seas off South China. Our evidence for widespread photic-zone euxinic conditions suggests that sulfide toxicity was a driver of the extinction and a factor in the protracted recovery.

  10. [Radiation preconditioning of mouse retina results in tolerance to MNU-induced degeneration and stimulates retinal recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronov, V A; Vinogradova, Yu V; Poplinskaya, V A; Nekrasova, E I; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous studies have revealed a non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxic effect of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non-cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In the present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate the adaptive response of the retina to proton irradiation and implication of glial Muller cells in this response. In this paper, we have shown that the recovery of the retina after exposure to genotoxic agents is associated with an increased efficiency of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptors.

  11. Regulation of molecular clock oscillations and phagocytic activity via muscarinic Ca2+ signaling in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikarashi, Rina; Akechi, Honami; Kanda, Yuzuki; Ahmad, Alsawaf; Takeuchi, Kouhei; Morioka, Eri; Sugiyama, Takashi; Ebisawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate eyes are known to contain circadian clocks, however, the intracellular mechanisms regulating the retinal clockwork remain largely unknown. To address this, we generated a cell line (hRPE-YC) from human retinal pigmental epithelium, which stably co-expressed reporters for molecular clock oscillations (Bmal1-luciferase) and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations (YC3.6). The hRPE-YC cells demonstrated circadian rhythms in Bmal1 transcription. Also, these cells represented circadian rhythms in Ca2+-spiking frequencies, which were canceled by dominant-negative Bmal1 transfections. The muscarinic agonist carbachol, but not photic stimulation, phase-shifted Bmal1 transcriptional rhythms with a type-1 phase response curve. This is consistent with significant M3 muscarinic receptor expression and little photo-sensor (Cry2 and Opn4) expression in these cells. Moreover, forskolin phase-shifted Bmal1 transcriptional rhythm with a type-0 phase response curve, in accordance with long-lasting CREB phosphorylation levels after forskolin exposure. Interestingly, the hRPE-YC cells demonstrated apparent circadian rhythms in phagocytic activities, which were abolished by carbachol or dominant-negative Bmal1 transfection. Because phagocytosis in RPE cells determines photoreceptor disc shedding, molecular clock oscillations and cytosolic Ca2+ signaling may be the driving forces for disc-shedding rhythms known in various vertebrates. In conclusion, the present study provides a cellular model to understand molecular and intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying human retinal circadian clocks. PMID:28276525

  12. Both systemic and local application of Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is neuroprotective after retinal ganglion cell axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietz Gunnar PH

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF plays a crucial role in controlling the number of neutrophil progenitor cells. Its function is mediated via the G-CSF receptor, which was recently found to be expressed also in the central nervous system. In addition, G-CSF provided neuroprotection in models of neuronal cell death. Here we used the retinal ganglion cell (RGC axotomy model to compare effects of local and systemic application of neuroprotective molecules. Results We found that the G-CSF receptor is robustly expressed by RGCs in vivo and in vitro. We thus evaluated G-CSF as a neuroprotectant for RGCs and found a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of G-CSF on axotomized RGCs when given subcutaneously. As stem stell mobilization had previously been discussed as a possible contributor to the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF, we compared the local treatment of RGCs by injection of G-CSF into the vitreous body with systemic delivery by subcutaneous application. Both routes of application reduced retinal ganglion cell death to a comparable extent. Moreover, G-CSF enhanced the survival of immunopurified RGCs in vitro. Conclusion We thus show that G-CSF neuroprotection is at least partially independent of potential systemic effects and provide further evidence that the clinically applicable G-CSF could become a treatment option for both neurodegenerative diseases and glaucoma.

  13. Non-photic modulation of phase shifts to long light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, Michael C; Sterniczuk, Roxanne; Smith, Victoria M; Hagel, Kimberly

    2007-12-01

    Circadian rhythms can be reset by both photic and non-photic stimuli. Recent studies have used long light exposure to produce photic phase shifts or to enhance non-photic phase shifts. The presence or absence of light can also influence the expression of locomotor rhythms through masking; light during the night attenuates locomotor activity, while darkness during the day induces locomotor activity in nocturnal animals. Given this dual role of light, the current study was designed to examine the relative contributions of photic and non-photic components present in a long light pulse paradigm. Mice entrained to a light/dark cycle were exposed to light pulses of various durations (0, 3, 6, 9, or 12 h) starting at the time of lights-off. After the light exposure, animals were placed in DD and were either left undisturbed in their home cages or had their wheels locked for the remainder of the subjective night and subsequent subjective day. Light treatments of 6, 9, and 12 h produced large phase delays. These treatments were associated with decreased activity during the nocturnal light and increased activity during the initial hours of darkness following light exposure. When the wheels were locked to prevent high-amplitude activity, the resulting phase delays to the light were significantly attenuated, suggesting that the activity following the light exposure may have contributed to the overall phase shift. In a second experiment, telemetry probes were used to assess what effect permanently locking the wheels had on the phase shift to the long light pulses. These animals had phase shifts fully as large as animals without any form of wheel lock, suggesting that while non-photic events can modulate photic phase shifts, they do not play a role in the full phase-shift response observed in animals exposed to long light pulses. This paradigm will facilitate investigations into non-photic responses of the mouse circadian system.

  14. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  15. Bystander effects elicited by single-cell photo-oxidative blue-light stimulation in retinal pigment epithelium cell networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masaaki; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2017-01-01

    ‘Bystander effect’ refers to the induction of biological effects in cells not directly targeted. The retinal pigment epithelium consists of hexagonal cells, forming a monolayer interconnected by gap junctions (GJs). Oxidative stress initiated in an individual cell by photostimulation (488 nm) triggered changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ψm). The Ca2+ signal was transmitted to neighboring cells slowly and non-uniformly; the ROS signal spread fast and radially. Increased Ca2+ levels were associated with a loss in ψm. GJ blockers prevented the spreading of the Ca2+, but not the ROS-related signal. The GJ-mediated Ca2+ wave was associated with cell death by 24 h, requiring endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria Ca2+ transfer. Ensuing cell death was correlated with baseline Ca2+ levels, and baseline Ca2+ levels were correlated with pigmentation. Hence, local oxidative stress in a donor cell can trigger changes in certain connected recipient cells, a signal that required GJ communication and an ROS-Ca2+ dual-hit. Finally, damage apparently occurred in susceptible cells, which correlated with baseline Ca2+ levels. PMID:28179989

  16. Melatonin attenuates photic disruption of circadian rhythms in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, N F; Kang, T; Heller, H C

    1997-10-01

    Body temperature (Tb) was recorded via a biotelemetry system from 28 adult male Siberian hamsters maintained in a light-dark (LD) cycle of 16 h light/day for several months. After Tb was recorded for 3 wk, the LD cycle was phase delayed by extending the light phase by 5 h for 1 day; animals remained on a 16:8 LD cycle for the remainder of the experiment. Hamsters were injected daily with melatonin or vehicle solution for several weeks, beginning either 2 mo after (experiment 1) or on the day of (experiment 2) the phase shift; injections occurred within 30 min of dark onset. In experiment 1, 75% of animals free ran with circadian periods >24 h, beginning on the day of the phase shift, and never reentrained to the LD cycle; no hamsters unambiguously entrained to daily injections. In contrast, 78% of animals in experiment 2 entrained to melatonin injections, and 71% of those animals subsequently reentrained to the photocycle when the injection regimen ended. No vehicle-treated animals entrained to the injection schedule. Melatonin had no effect on daily mean Tb and Tb rhythm amplitude in either experiment; however, melatonin doubled the duration of a hyperthermic response that occurred after each injection. Thus melatonin can prevent loss of entrainment induced by a phase shift of the LD cycle but cannot restore entrainment to free-running animals. Failure to reentrain in the presence of two appropriately coordinated entraining agents also suggests that a phase shift of the photocycle can diminish the sensitivity of the circadian system to both photic and nonphotic input.

  17. Retinal Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ophthalmologists and rheumatologists frequently miscommunicate in consulting on patients with retinal vasculitis. This report seeks to establish a common understanding of the term, retinal vasculitis, and to review recent papers on this diagnosis. Recent findings 1) The genetic basis of some rare forms of retinal vascular disease have recently been described. Identified genes include CAPN5, TREX1, and TNFAIP3; 2) Behçet’s disease is a systemic illness that is very commonly associated with occlusive retinal vasculitis; 3) retinal imaging including fluorescein angiography and other newer imaging modalities has proven crucial to the identification and characterization of retinal vasculitis and its complications; 4) although monoclonal antibodies to IL-17A or IL-1 beta failed in trials for Behçet’s disease, antibodies to TNF alpha, either infliximab or adalimumab, have demonstrated consistent benefit in managing this disease. Interferon treatment and B cell depletion therapy via rituximab may be beneficial in certain types of retinal vasculitis. Summary Retinal vasculitis is an important entity for rheumatologists to understand. Retinal vasculitis associated with Behçet’s disease responds to monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TNF, but the many other forms of non-infectious retinal vasculitis may require alternate therapeutic management. PMID:26945335

  18. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  19. Photic zone changes in the north-west Pacific Ocean from MIS 4–5e

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. A. Swann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to other sectors of the marine system, the palaeoceanography of the subarctic North Pacific Ocean is poorly constrained. New diatom isotope records of δ13C, δ18O, δ30Si (δ13Cdiatom, δ18Odiatom, and δ30Sidiatom are presented alongside existing geochemical and isotope records to document changes in photic zone conditions, including nutrient supply and the efficiency of the soft-tissue biological pump, between Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 4 and MIS 5e. Peaks in opal productivity in MIS 5b/c and MIS 5e are both associated with the breakdown of the regional halocline stratification and increased nutrient supply to the photic zone. Whereas the MIS 5e peak is associated with low rates of nutrient utilisation, the MIS 5b/c peak is associated with significantly higher rates of nutrient utilisation. Both peaks, together with other smaller increases in productivity in MIS 4 and 5a, culminate with a significant increase in freshwater input which strengthens/re-establishes the halocline and limits further upwelling of sub-surface waters to the photic zone. Whilst δ30Sidiatom and previously published records of diatom δ15N (δ15Ndiatom (Brunelle et al., 2007, 2010 show similar trends until the latter half of MIS 5a, the records become anti-correlated after this juncture and into MIS 4, suggesting a possible change in photic zone state such as may occur with a shift to iron or silicon limitation.

  20. Tracing carbon and nitrogen incorporation and pathways in the microbial community of a photic subtidal sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evrard, V.P.E.; Cook, P.; Veuger, B.; Huettel, M.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The pathways and fate of C and N in the microbial compartment of a coastal permeable sandy sediment in the photic zone were studied in a pulse-chase experiment. 13C-bicarbonate and 15N-nitrate were added to the water column on top of 5 sediment cores incubated in 4 transparent and 1 opaque laborator

  1. Retinal projections and neurochemical characterization of the pregeniculate nucleus of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ruthnaldo R M; Pinato, Luciana; Nascimento, Rayane B S; Engelberth, Rovena Clara G J; Nascimento, Expedito S Junior; Cavalcante, Judney C; Britto, Luiz R G; Costa, Miriam S M O; Cavalcante, Jeferson S

    2012-05-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) are the main components of the circadian timing system. The SCN is the site of the endogenous biological clock that generates rhythms and synchronizes them to environmental cues. The IGL is a key structure that modulates SCN activity and is responsible for the transmission of non-photic information to the SCN, thus participating in the integration between photic and non-photic stimuli. Both the SCN and IGL receive projections of retinal ganglion cells and the IGL is connected to the SCN through the geniculohypothalamic tract. Little is known about these structures in the primate brain and the pregeniculate nucleus (PGN) has been suggested to be the primate equivalent of the rodent IGL. The aim of this study was to characterize the PGN of a primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), and to analyze its retinal afferents. Here, the marmoset PGN was found to be organized into three subsectors based on neuronal size, pattern of retinal projections, and the distribution of neuropeptide Y-, GAD-, serotonin-, enkephalin- and substance P-labeled terminals. This pattern indicates that the marmoset PGN is equivalent to the IGL. This detailed description contributes to the understanding of the circadian timing system in this primate species considering the importance of the IGL within the context of circadian regulation.

  2. Retinal prosthesis for the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Eyal; Maia, Mauricio; Weiland, James D; Greenberg, Robert J; Fujii, Gildo Y; Torres, Gustavo; Piyathaisere, Duke V; O'Hearn, Thomas M; Liu, Wentai; Lazzi, Gianluca; Dagnelie, Gislin; Scribner, Dean A; de Juan, Eugene; Humayun, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Most of current concepts for a visual prosthesis are based on neuronal electrical stimulation at different locations along the visual pathways within the central nervous system. The different designs of visual prostheses are named according to their locations (i.e., cortical, optic nerve, subretinal, and epiretinal). Visual loss caused by outer retinal degeneration in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration can be reversed by electrical stimulation of the retina or the optic nerve (retinal or optic nerve prostheses, respectively). On the other hand, visual loss caused by inner or whole thickness retinal diseases, eye loss, optic nerve diseases (tumors, ischemia, inflammatory processes etc.), or diseases of the central nervous system (not including diseases of the primary and secondary visual cortices) can be reversed by a cortical visual prosthesis. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts of retinal and optic nerve prostheses. This article will begin with general considerations that are related to all or most of visual prostheses and then concentrate on the retinal and optic nerve designs. The authors believe that the field has grown beyond the scope of a single article so cortical prostheses will be described only because of their direct effect on the concept and technical development of the other prostheses, and this will be done in a more general and historic perspective.

  3. Retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartong, Dyonne T.; Berson, Eliot L.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary degenerations of the human retina are genetically heterogeneous, with well over 100 genes implicated so far. This Seminar focuses on the subset of diseases called retinitis pigmentosa, in which patients typically lose night vision in adolescence, side vision in young adulthood, and centra

  4. Photic driving in the electroencephalogram of children and adolescents: harmonic structure and relation to the resting state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Lazarev

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify latent bioelectrical oscillators, 15 normal subjects (aged 9-17 years, 8 males, 7 females were subjected to intermittent photic stimulation. The EEG amplitude spectra corresponding to the 11 fixed frequencies of stimulation presented (3-24 Hz were combined to form "profiles" of the driving reaction in the right occipital area. The driving response varied with frequency, and was demonstrable in 70-100% of cases (using as criterion peak amplitudes 20% larger than those of the neighbors. The strongest responses were observed at the frequency closest to the alpha peak of the resting EEG. A secondary profile maximum was in the theta band. In 10 subjects, this maximum exceeded half the alpha peak (with an average of 72.4% of the alpha peak, while in the resting spectra, theta amplitudes were much lower than the alpha maxima. This responsiveness in theta activity seems to be characteristic of prepubertal and pubertal subjects. The profiles and resting EEG spectra showed a highly significant Pearson's correlation, with the peak in the theta band of the profiles being the main difference observed between them. The correlation coefficient was significantly correlated with the ratio of the maxima in the theta and alpha bands (R = -0.77, P<0.001. The correlation coefficient between profile and resting spectrum may be a useful indicator in screening methods used to reveal latent cerebral oscillators. Profiles for the second and third harmonics were correlated with those of the first harmonic (fundamental frequency, when considering the corresponding EEG frequencies. Peak frequencies in all three profiles were close to those of the individual's background alpha rhythm, and peak amplitudes in higher harmonics were not much lower than those of the fundamental frequency (mean values of 84 and 63%, for second and third harmonics, respectively.

  5. Retinal functional imager (RFI): non-invasive functional imaging of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganekal, S

    2013-01-01

    Retinal functional imager (RFI) is a unique non-invasive functional imaging system with novel capabilities for visualizing the retina. The objective of this review was to show the utility of non-invasive functional imaging in various disorders. Electronic literature search was carried out using the websites www.pubmed.gov and www.google.com. The search words were retinal functional imager and non-invasive retinal imaging used in combination. The articles published or translated into English were studied. The RFI directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, metabolic responses to photic activation and generates capillary perfusion maps (CPM) that provides retinal vasculature detail similar to flourescein angiography. All of these parameters stand in a direct relationship to the function and therefore the health of the retina, and are known to be degraded in the course of retinal diseases. Detecting changes in retinal function aid early diagnosis and treatment as functional changes often precede structural changes in many retinal disorders.

  6. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema, and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis.

  7. Cocaine modulates pathways for photic and nonphotic entrainment of the mammalian SCN circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J David; Brager, Allison J; Stowie, Adam C; Prosser, Rebecca A

    2012-03-15

    Cocaine abuse is highly disruptive to circadian physiological and behavioral rhythms. The present study was undertaken to determine whether such effects are manifest through actions on critical photic and nonphotic regulatory pathways in the master circadian clock of the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Impairment of SCN photic signaling by systemic (intraperitoneal) cocaine injection was evidenced by strong (60%) attenuation of light-induced phase-delay shifts of circadian locomotor activity during the early night. A nonphotic action of cocaine was apparent from its induction of 1-h circadian phase-advance shifts at midday. The serotonin receptor antagonist, metergoline, blocked shifting by 80%, implicating a serotonergic mechanism. Reverse microdialysis perfusion of the SCN with cocaine at midday induced 3.7 h phase-advance shifts. Control perfusions with lidocaine and artificial cerebrospinal fluid had little shifting effect. In complementary in vitro experiments, photic-like phase-delay shifts of the SCN circadian neuronal activity rhythm induced by glutamate application to the SCN were completely blocked by cocaine. Cocaine treatment of SCN slices alone at subjective midday, but not the subjective night, induced 3-h phase-advance shifts. Lidocaine had no shifting effect. Cocaine-induced phase shifts were completely blocked by metergoline, but not by the dopamine receptor antagonist, fluphenazine. Finally, pretreatment of SCN slices for 2 h with a low concentration of serotonin agonist (to block subsequent serotonergic phase resetting) abolished cocaine-induced phase shifts at subjective midday. These results reveal multiple effects of cocaine on adult circadian clock regulation that are registered within the SCN and involve enhanced serotonergic transmission.

  8. Enhanced Ca(2+) response and stimulation of prostaglandin release by the bradykinin B2 receptor in human retinal pigment epithelial cells primed with proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalioto, Rose-Marie; Valenti, Claudio; Maggi, Carlo Alberto; Giuliani, Sandro

    2015-09-15

    Kallikrein, kininogen and kinin receptors are present in human ocular tissues including the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), suggesting a possible role of bradykinin (BK) in physiological and/or pathological conditions. To test this hypothesis, kinin receptors expression and function was investigated for the first time in human fetal RPE cells, a model close to native RPE, in both control conditions and after treatment with proinflammatory cytokines. Results showed that BK evoked intracellular Ca(2+) transients in human RPE cells by activating the kinin B2 receptor. Pretreatment of the cells with TNF-α and/or IL-1β enhanced Ca(2+) response in a time- and concentration-dependent additive manner, whereas the potency of BK and that of the selective B2 receptor antagonist, fasitibant chloride, both in the nanomolar range, remained unaffected. Cytokines have no significant effect on cell number and viability and on the activity of other GPCRs such as the kinin B1, acetylcholine, ATP and thrombin receptors. Immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence studies revealed that cytokines treatment was associated with an increase in both kinin B2 receptor and COX-2 expression and with the secretion of prostaglandin E1 and E2 into the extracellular medium. BK, through activation of the kinin B2 receptor, potentiated the COX-2 mediated prostaglandin release in cytokines-primed RPE cells while new protein synthesis and prostaglandin production contribute to the potentiating effect of cytokines on BK-induced Ca(2+) response. In conclusion, overall data revealed a cross-talk between the kinin B2 receptor and cytokines in human RPE in promoting inflammation, a key feature in retinal pathologies including diabetic retinopathy and macular edema.

  9. Hydrodynamic, non-photic modulation of biorhythms in the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, J.; Puig, P.; Company, J. B.

    2009-03-01

    Data on biological rhythms of the Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus (L.) are compared with new findings on inertial currents, a non-photic geophysical hydrodynamic fluctuation. Laboratory experiments on animal endogenous cardiac activity and locomotor rhythms using individuals from the middle slope (400-600 m depth) of the Mediterranean Sea revealed a consistent proportion of ultradian 18-h animals (20.6% and 12.0% of the studied cases for cardiac and locomotor tests, respectively). This characteristic, not reported in similar experiments with individuals from shallower depths (20-200 m) in the Atlantic Ocean, was initially considered meaningless from an ecological point of view. However, a close comparison with in situ oceanographic measurements over 1 year revealed a clear relationship between inertial current fluctuations and the observed 18-h behavioural and physiological rhythms. We propose a novel scenario involving potential non-photic (i.e. hydrodynamic) modulation of Nephrops biorhythms, and suggest that this may provide a paradigm for other benthic species in deep-water areas.

  10. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase or histone deacetylase protects retinal pigment epithelial cells from DNA damage induced by oxidative stress by the stimulation of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-04-05

    Epigenetic modifications influence DNA damage response (DDR). In this study we explored the role of DNA methylation and histone acetylation in DDR in cells challenged with acute or chronic oxidative stress. We used retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which natively are exposed to oxidative stress due to permanent exposure to light and high blood flow. We employed a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor - RG108 (RG), or a histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid (VA). ARPE-19 cells were exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide, an acute oxidative stress inducer, or glucose oxidase, which slowly liberates low-doses of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of glucose, creating chronic conditions. VA and RG reduced level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in ARPE-19 cells in normal condition and in oxidative stress. This protective effect of VA and RG was associated with the up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme genes: CAT, GPx1, GPx4, SOD1 and SOD2. RG decreased the number of cells in G2/M checkpoint in response to chronic oxidative stress. Neither RG nor VA changed the DNA repair or apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, certain epigenetic manipulations may protect ARPE-19 cells from detrimental effects of oxidative stress by modulation of antioxidative enzyme gene expression, which may be further explored in pharmacological studies on oxidative stress-related eye diseases.

  11. Reading visual braille with a retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A; Dorn, Jessy D; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  12. Reading visual Braille with a retinal prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zaccarin Lauritzen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual Braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 x 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the Braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual Braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 x 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera to create visual percepts of individual Braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual Braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  13. [Circulatory pattern under electro-stimulation-analgesia and neurolept-anaesthesia in the same patient. A comparative study during retinal and vitreous body operations (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, W; Sostegno, C; Gärtner, J; Frey, R

    1981-05-01

    The present paper reports a comparative study on circulatory conditions of patients who underwent both electro-stimulation- and neurolept anaesthesia. Investigations were carried out in 20 patients who had operations on the retina or vitreous body, either under neurolept or electro-stimulation anaesthesia, and who had to undergo a second of those, so that both types of anaesthesia were administered in each patient. 50% of the patients were showing polymorbidity which is often observed in elderly persons; 5 of the cases were patients suffering from hypertonia which had previously been treated unsatisfactory. As measure for judging the circulatory conditions under either anaesthetic method, the plain measurable values of systolic and diastolic pressure and heart rate were registered. A statistical evaluation of the anaesthetic records was carried out with special consideration of circulatory stability and each method of anaesthesia in the individual group of patients. Concerning circulatory changes, significant variations on 1%- level were found.

  14. Sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiate photic resetting of the master circadian clock in a diurnal rodent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar Jha, Pawan; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, A.; Challet, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light-dark cycle. However, non-photic factors, such as behavioural arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase-shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and/or reduce the synchronizing

  15. Mice lacking the PACAP type I receptor have impaired photic entrainment and negative masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, J.; Brabet, P.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2008-01-01

    The retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) is a retinofugal neuronal pathway which, in mammals, mediates nonimage-forming vision to various areas in the brain involved in circadian timing, masking behavior, and regulation of the pupillary light reflex. The RHT costores the two neurotransmitters glutamate...... and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP), which in a rather complex interplay are mediators of photic adjustment of the circadian system. To further characterize the role of PACAP/PACAP receptor type 1 (PAC1) receptor signaling in light entrainment of the clock and in negative masking behavior......, we extended previous studies in mice lacking the PAC1 receptor (PAC1 KO) by examining their phase response to single light pulses using Aschoff type II regime, their ability to entrain to non-24-h light-dark (LD) cycles and large phase shifts of the LD cycle (jet lag), as well as their negative...

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates photic signaling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jodi R; McKeown, Alex S; Davis, Jennifer A; Totsch, Stacie K; Mintz, Eric M; Kraft, Timothy W; Cowell, Rita M; Gamble, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a serine-threonine kinase that regulates mammalian circadian rhythms at the behavioral, molecular and neurophysiological levels. In the central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3 exhibits a rhythm across the 24 h day. We have recently shown that GSK3 is capable of influencing both the molecular clock and SCN neuronal activity rhythms. However, it is not known whether GSK3 regulates the response to environmental cues such as light. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that GSK3 activation mediates light-induced SCN excitability and photic entrainment. Immunofluorescence staining in the SCN of mice showed that late-night light exposure significantly increased GSK3 activity (decreased pGSK3β levels) 30-60 min after the light-pulse. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 blocked the expected light-induced excitability in SCN neurons; however, this effect was not associated with changes in resting membrane potential or input resistance. Behaviorally, mice with constitutively active GSK3 (GSK3-KI) re-entrained to a 6-h phase advance in the light-dark cycle in significantly fewer days than WT control animals. Furthermore, the behavioral and SCN neuronal activity of GSK3-KI mice was phase-advanced compared to WT, in both normal and light-exposed conditions. Finally, GSK3-KI mice exhibited normal negative-masking behavior and electroretinographic responses to light, suggesting that the enhanced photic entrainment is not due to an overall increased sensitivity to light in these animals. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that GSK3 activation contributes to light-induced phase-resetting at both the neurophysiological and behavioral levels. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Numerical simulation of neuronal spike patterns in a retinal network model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Shenquan Liu; Shanxing Ou

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized a neuronal compartment model and NEURON software to study the effects of external light stimulation on retinal photoreceptors and spike patterns of neurons in a retinal network. Following light stimulation of different shapes and sizes, changes in the spike features of ganglion cells indicated that different shapes of light stimulation elicited different retinal responses. By manipulating the shape of light stimulation, we investigated the effects of the large number of electrical synapses existing between retinal neurons. Model simulation and analysis suggested that interplexiform cells play an important role in visual signal information processing in the retina, and the findings indicated that our constructed retinal network model was reliable and feasible. In addition, the simulation results demonstrated that ganglion cells exhibited a variety of spike patterns under different light stimulation sizes and different stimulation shapes, which reflect the functions of the retina in signal transmission and processing.

  18. The response of human retinal pigmented epithelial cells in vitro to changes in nitric oxide concentration stimulated by low levels of red light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavey, Brent J.; Estlack, Larry E.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Wigle, Jeffrey C.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this project is to explore the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating the response of hTERT-RPE to low-level exposures to red light. Exposure to low-level red light has been shown to positively affect wound healing, reduce pain, and encourage cell proliferation. The current explanation for this effect is described as an interaction between the photons and cytochrome c oxidase (Cco), which plays a role in regulation of intracellular NO levels in addition to being the mitochondrial protein complex where reduction of oxygen occurs in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Exposure to 2.88 J/cm2 of 671-nm and 637-nm light shows a two-fold increase in NO immediately after exposure, and a 56% increase in ATP measured at ~5 h post exposure. Levels of NF-κB mRNA and protein were measured at six and 24 h, respectively, and found to increase six fold, correlating with increases in NO levels. Light-stimulated increased levels of NO also correlated with an 11-fold increase in Bcl-2 and a 70% decrease in Bax mRNA levels, relative to controls. NF-κB promotes cell growth and Bcl-2 is an apoptosis suppressor protein. Bax is a positive apoptotic effector protein. These results support the hypothesis that light-induced changes in the intracellular levels of NO play a role in the beneficial effects of low-level light photobiomodulation

  19. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the `image capturing' photoreceptors, while neurons in the `image-processing' inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating the surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems that deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation is produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations of 0.5-4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances of 0.2-10 mW mm-2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 µm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density.

  20. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-08-28

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation.

  1. Müller glia: Stem cells for generation and regeneration of retinal neurons in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkowski, Jenny R; Raymond, Pamela A

    2014-05-01

    Adult zebrafish generate new neurons in the brain and retina throughout life. Growth-related neurogenesis allows a vigorous regenerative response to damage, and fish can regenerate retinal neurons, including photoreceptors, and restore functional vision following photic, chemical, or mechanical destruction of the retina. Müller glial cells in fish function as radial-glial-like neural stem cells. During adult growth, Müller glial nuclei undergo sporadic, asymmetric, self-renewing mitotic divisions in the inner nuclear layer to generate a rod progenitor that migrates along the radial fiber of the Müller glia into the outer nuclear layer, proliferates, and differentiates exclusively into rod photoreceptors. When retinal neurons are destroyed, Müller glia in the immediate vicinity of the damage partially and transiently dedifferentiate, re-express retinal progenitor and stem cell markers, re-enter the cell cycle, undergo interkinetic nuclear migration (characteristic of neuroepithelial cells), and divide once in an asymmetric, self-renewing division to generate a retinal progenitor. This daughter cell proliferates rapidly to form a compact neurogenic cluster surrounding the Müller glia; these multipotent retinal progenitors then migrate along the radial fiber to the appropriate lamina to replace missing retinal neurons. Some aspects of the injury-response in fish Müller glia resemble gliosis as observed in mammals, and mammalian Müller glia exhibit some neurogenic properties, indicative of a latent ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Understanding the specific properties of fish Müller glia that facilitate their robust capacity to generate retinal neurons will inform and inspire new clinical approaches for treating blindness and visual loss with regenerative medicine.

  2. Stimulation of the retina with a multielectrode extraocular visual prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Vivek; Morley, John W; Coroneo, Minas T

    2005-08-01

    An extraocular approach to developing a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using electrodes placed on the outer surface of the eye is suggested. Experiments were carried out to determine the feasibility of this approach, and evaluate electrode configurations and parameters for stimulation. In anaesthetized cats, a 21-electrode extraocular retinal prosthesis (ERP) array was sutured to the sclera over the lateral surface of the eye. Electrically evoked potentials (EEP) were recorded at the visual cortex bilaterally in response to retinal stimulation with the electrode array. Bipolar stimulation of the ERP array electrodes in horizontal and vertical configurations and at different interelectrode separations was investigated with biphasic constant-current pulses. Electrical stimulation of the lateral retina with an ERP elicited EEP that were higher in the ipsilateral visual cortex. The threshold for bipolar retinal stimulation was 500 microA. EEP amplitude increased with increases in stimulus pulse duration and current intensity. Retinal stimulation was slightly more effective with electrodes in a vertical as opposed to horizontal orientation. A larger interelectrode separation resulted in a higher EEP amplitude. Retinal stimulation with a prototype ERP array is demonstrated. The thresholds for retinal excitation are below safe charge-density limits for chronic neural stimulation. Ipsilateral localization of the EEP suggests that localized retinal stimulation is occurring. An ERP is a new approach to retinal prosthesis research, and might lead to the development of a low-resolution visual prosthesis for blind patients.

  3. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  4. Photic desynchronization of two subgroups of circadian oscillators in a network model of the suprachiasmatic nucleus with dispersed coupling strengths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changgui Gu

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is the master circadian clock in mammals and is composed of thousands of neuronal oscillators expressing different intrinsic periods. These oscillators form a coupled network with a free-running period around 24 h in constant darkness and entrainable to the external light-dark cycle (T cycle. Coupling plays an important role in setting the period of the network and its range of entrainment. Experiments in rats have shown that two subgroups of oscillators within the SCN, a ventrolateral (VL subgroup that receives photic input and a dorsomedial (DM subgroup that is coupled to VL, can be desynchronized under a short (22-h T cycle, with VL entrained to the cycle and DM free-running. We use a modified Goodwin model to understand how entrainment of the subgroups to short (22-h and long (26-h T cycles is influenced by light intensity, the proportion of neurons that receives photic input, and coupling heterogeneity. We find that the model's critical value for the proportion of photically-sensitive neurons is in accord with actual experimental estimates, while the model's inclusion of dispersed coupling can account for the experimental observation that VL and DM desynchronize more readily under the 22-h than under the 26-h T cycle. Heterogeneous intercellular coupling within the SCN is likely central to the generation of complex behavioral patterns.

  5. Reconstructed ancestral enzymes suggest long-term cooling of Earth's photic zone since the Archean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Amanda K.; Schopf, J. William; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2017-05-01

    Paleotemperatures inferred from the isotopic compositions (δ18O and δ30Si) of marine cherts suggest that Earth’s oceans cooled from 70 ± 15 °C in the Archean to the present ˜15 °C. This interpretation, however, has been subject to question due to uncertainties regarding oceanic isotopic compositions, diagenetic or metamorphic resetting of the isotopic record, and depositional environments. Analyses of the thermostability of reconstructed ancestral enzymes provide an independent method by which to assess the temperature history inferred from the isotopic evidence. Although previous studies have demonstrated extreme thermostability in reconstructed archaeal and bacterial proteins compatible with a hot early Earth, taxa investigated may have inhabited local thermal environments that differed significantly from average surface conditions. We here present thermostability measurements of reconstructed ancestral enzymatically active nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs) derived from light-requiring prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs having widely separated fossil-based divergence ages. The ancestral environmental temperatures thereby determined for these photic-zone organisms--shown in modern taxa to correlate strongly with NDK thermostability--are inferred to reflect ancient surface-environment paleotemperatures. Our results suggest that Earth's surface temperature decreased over geological time from ˜65-80 °C in the Archean, a finding consistent both with previous isotope-based and protein reconstruction-based interpretations. Interdisciplinary studies such as those reported here integrating genomic, geologic, and paleontologic data hold promise for providing new insight into the coevolution of life and environment over Earth history.

  6. Restricted utility of aryl isoprenoids as indicators for photic zone anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Martin P.; Schouten, Stefan; Kohnen, Math E. L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1996-12-01

    In a North Sea oil, the carotenoid derivatives β-carotene, β-isorenieratane, and isorenieratane were identified, together with a series of aryl isoprenoids with a 2,3,6-trimethyl substitution pattern for the aromatic ring. The δ13C values of β-carotene and β-isorenieratane are similar, whereas isorenieratane is ca. 15% heavier. This suggests that β-isorenieratane is not derived from β-isorenieratane biosynthesised by Chlorobiaceae, but from aromatisation of β-carotene. This was confirmed by laboratory aromatisation of partially hydrogenated β-carotene, which yielded β-isorenieratane as the main product. The aryl isoprenoids, which can be formed by Csbnd C bond cleavage of both isorenieratane and β-isorenieratane, have a mixed isotopic signature in the oil. These results indicate that mere identification of aryl isoprenoids, without determination of their δ13C values, cannot be used to assess the presence of Chlorobiaceae, and, thus, photic zone anoxia in the depositional environment.

  7. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  8. Biophysical mechanism of transient retinal phototropism in rod photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Thapa, Damber; Wang, Benquan; Gai, Shaoyan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-03-01

    Oblique light stimulation evoked transient retinal phototropism (TRP) has been recently detected in frog and mouse retinas. High resolution microscopy of freshly isolated retinas indicated that the TRP is predominated by rod photoreceptors. Comparative confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed that the TRP predominantly occurred from the photoreceptor outer segment (OS). However, biophysical mechanism of rod OS change is still unknown. In this study, frog retinal slices, which open a cross section of retinal photoreceptor and other functional layers, were used to test the effect of light stimulation on rod OS. Near infrared light microscopy was employed to monitor photoreceptor changes in retinal slices stimulated by a rectangular-shaped visible light flash. Rapid rod OS length change was observed after the stimulation delivery. The magnitude and direction of the rod OS change varied with the position of the rods within the stimulated area. In the center of stimulated region the length of the rod OS shrunk, while in the peripheral region the rod OS tip swung towards center region in the plane perpendicular to the incident stimulus light. Our experimental result and theoretical analysis suggest that the observed TRP may reflect unbalanced disc-shape change due to localized pigment bleaching. Further investigation is required to understand biochemical mechanism of the observed rod OS kinetics. Better study of the TRP may provide a noninvasive biomarker to enable early detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other diseases that are known to produce retinal photoreceptor dysfunctions.

  9. Fast entrainment of human electroencephalogram to a theta-band photic flicker during successful memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Theta band power (4-8Hz in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG is thought to be stronger during memory encoding for subsequently remembered items than for forgotten items. According to simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measurements, the memory-dependent EEG theta is associated with multiple regions of the brain. This suggests that the multiple regions cooperate with EEG theta synchronization during successful memory encoding. However, a question still remains: What kind of neural dynamic organizes such a memory-dependent global network? In this study, the modulation of the EEG theta entrainment property during successful encoding was hypothesized to lead to EEG theta synchronization among a distributed network. Then, a transient response of EEG theta to a theta-band photic flicker with a short duration was evaluated during memory encoding. In the results, flicker-induced EEG power increased and decreased with a time constant of several hundred milliseconds following the onset and the offset of the flicker, respectively. Importantly, the offset response of EEG power was found to be significantly decreased during successful encoding. Moreover, the offset response of the phase locking index was also found to associate with memory performance. According to computational simulations, the results are interpreted as a smaller time constant (i.e., faster response of a driven harmonic oscillator rather than a change in the spontaneous oscillatory input. This suggests that the fast response of EEG theta forms a global EEG theta network among memory-related regions during successful encoding, and it contributes to a flexible formation of the network along the time course.

  10. Concurrent OCT imaging of stimulus evoked retinal neural activation and hemodynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that major retinal diseases involve distortions of the retinal neural physiology and blood vascular structures. However, the details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood. In this study, a multi-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system was developed to enable concurrent imaging of retinal neural activity and vascular hemodynamics. Flicker light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to evoke retinal neural responses and hemodynamic changes. The OCT images were acquired continuously during the pre-stimulation, light-stimulation, and post-stimulation phases. Stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) and hemodynamic changes were observed over time in blood-free and blood regions, respectively. Rapid IOSs change occurred almost immediately after stimulation. Both positive and negative signals were observed in adjacent retinal areas. The hemodynamic changes showed time delays after stimulation. The signal magnitudes induced by light stimulation were observed in blood regions and did not show significant changes in blood-free regions. These differences may arise from different mechanisms in blood vessels and neural tissues in response to light stimulation. These characteristics agreed well with our previous observations in mouse retinas. Further development of the multimodal OCT may provide a new imaging method for studying how retinal structures and metabolic and neural functions are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other diseases, which promises novel noninvasive biomarkers for early disease detection and reliable treatment evaluations of eye diseases.

  11. Electrical Stimulation of the Retina to Produce Artificial Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D; Walston, Steven T; Humayun, Mark S

    2016-10-14

    Retinal prostheses aim to restore vision to blind individuals suffering from retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. These devices function by electrically stimulating surviving retinal neurons, whose activation is interpreted by the brain as a visual percept. Many prostheses are currently under development. They are categorized as epiretinal, subretinal, and suprachoroidal prostheses on the basis of the placement of the stimulating microelectrode array. Each can activate ganglion cells through direct or indirect stimulation. The response of retinal neurons to these modes of stimulation are discussed in detail and are placed in context of the visual percept they are likely to evoke. This article further reviews challenges faced by retinal prosthesis and discusses potential solutions to address them.

  12. Retinal Prosthesis: A Potential Benefit for the Blind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-jie

    2009-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases may induce the degeneration of outer retina and in turn, blindness. Nevertheless, due to the maintenance of inner retina, the coding and processing of visual neurons responses are still able to be executed naturally. Therefore,an effective retinal prosthesis device may be developed by mimicking the function of outer retina: transferring the visual light into artificial stimulus and delivering the stimulus to the retina aiming to evoke the neural responses. As two main developing directions for current retinal prosthesis,epiretinal (ER) and subretinal (SR) prosthesis are both undergoing experimental stage and possessing advantages and limitations. Further investigations in power supply, biocompatibility, etc.are still required. Additionally, suprachoroidal transretinal stimulation (STS) and neurotransmitter-induced stimulation as some other alternatives in retinal prosthesis are also considered as promising research directions, although they are not mature enough to be applied commercially, either.

  13. Continuous retinal vessel diameter measurements: the future in retinal vessel assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmar, Rebekka; Blann, Andrew D; Cubbidge, Robert P; Lip, Gregory Y H; Gherghel, Doina

    2010-11-01

    To establish an alternative method, sequential and diameter response analysis (SDRA), to determine dynamic retinal vessel responses and their time course in serial stimulation compared with the established method of averaged diameter responses and standard static assessment. SDRA focuses on individual time and diameter responses, taking into account the fluctuation in baseline diameter, providing improved insight into reaction patterns when compared with established methods as delivered by retinal vessel analyzer (RVA) software. SDRA patterns were developed with measurements from 78 healthy nonsmokers and subsequently validated in a group of 21 otherwise healthy smokers. Fundus photography and retinal vessel responses were assessed by RVA, intraocular pressure by contact tonometry, and blood pressure by sphygmomanometry. Compared with the RVA software method, SDRA demonstrated a marked difference in retinal vessel responses to flickering light (P SDRA showed a strong relation between baseline retinal vessel diameter and subsequent dilatory response in both healthy subjects and smokers (P = 0.001). The RVA software was unable to detect this difference or to find a difference in retinal vessel arteriovenous ratio between smokers and nonsmokers (P = 0.243). However, SDRA revealed that smokers' vessels showed both an increased level of arterial baseline diameter fluctuation before flicker stimulation (P = 0.005) and an increased stiffness of retinal arterioles (P = 0.035) compared with those in nonsmokers. These differences were unrelated to intraocular pressure or systemic blood pressure. SDRA shows promise as a tool for the assessment of vessel physiology. Further studies are needed to explore its application in patients with vascular diseases.

  14. Object size, spatial-frequency content and retinal contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Recent interest in HDR scene capture and display has stimulated measurements of the usable range of contrast information for human vision. These experiments have led to a model that calculates the retinal contrast image. A fraction of the light from each scene pixel is scattered to all retinal pixels. The amount of scattered light decreases with distance from the other pixels. By summing the light falling on each retinal pixel from all the scene pixels we can calculate the retinal image contrast. As objects, such as text letters, get smaller, their retinal contrast gets lower, even though the scene contrast is constant. This paper studies the Landolt C data, a commonly used test targets for measuring visual acuity, using three frameworks. First, it compares the visual acuity measurements with the receptor mosaic dimension. Second, discusses the Campbell and Robson's experiments and the limits of the Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF). Third, the paper reports the calculated retinal stimulus after intraocular scatter of both Landolt C and Campbell and Robson's stimuli. These three different frameworks are useful in understanding limits of human vision. Each approach gives only one piece of the puzzle. Retinal contrast, CSF, and retinal cone spacing all influence our understanding of human vision limits. We have analyzed Landolt C and CSF using retinal contrast. Glare effect on Landolt C shows that retinal images are significantly different from target images. Veiling glare of the sine-wave stimuli used by Campbell and Robson to measure CSF, results in a retinal contrast decrease. This, above 3-4 cpd, correlates well with the data reported by them.

  15. Dorzolamide increases retinal oxygen tension after branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Michael Hove; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Scherfig, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs.......To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs....

  16. Visual, aberrometric, photic phenomena, and patient satisfaction after myopic wavefront-guided LASIK using a high-resolution aberrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Moussa, Alois K Dexl, Eva M Krall, Eva M Arlt, Günther Grabner, Josef Ruckhofer Department of Ophthalmology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visual, refractive, and aberrometric outcomes as well as the level of patient satisfaction and photic phenomena after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK surgery using wavefront-guided (WFG ablations based on measurements obtained with a high-resolution aberrometer. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective analysis including 253 eyes of 127 patients (aged between 19 years and 54 years undergoing WFG LASIK using the STAR S4 IR Excimer Laser System combined with the iDesign System and iFS Femtosecond Laser. Visual, refractive, and aberrometric outcomes during a 2-month follow-up as well as patient satisfaction and photic phenomena were evaluated by means of a questionnaire. Results: A total of 85% (215/253 and 99% (251/253 of eyes achieved a postoperative (Postop uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/16 and 20/20, respectively, and all eyes achieved an uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/25. Postop spherical equivalent values were within ±0.25 D and ±0.50 D in 97% and 100% of eyes, respectively. Likewise, manifest cylinder was <0.25 D in 97% (245/253 of eyes. A statistically significant reduction was found in the total root mean square (P<0.001 and in the level of primary spherical aberration (P=0.001. Postop difficulties related to vision were graded as minimal, with low levels of photic phenomena and high levels of patient satisfaction. The level of difficulty to perform daily activities and the level of glare perceived by patients while driving car were significantly decreased (P<0.001. Conclusion: WFG LASIK surgery using the technology evaluated is predictable and effective for the correction of myopia and leads to high levels of patient satisfaction. Keywords: LASIK, patient

  17. Virtual electrode design for increasing spatial resolution in retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizos, Kyle; Cela, Carlos; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    Retinal prostheses systems are currently used to restore partial vision to patients blinded by degenerative diseases by electrically stimulating surviving retinal cells. To obtain likely maximum resolution, electrode size is minimised, allowing for a large quantity on an array and localised stimulation regions. Besides the small size leading to fabrication difficulties and higher electrochemical charge density, there are challenges associated with the number of drivers needed for a large electrode count as well as the strategies to deliver sufficient power to these drivers wirelessly. In hopes to increase electrode resolution while avoiding these issues, the authors propose a new 'virtual electrode' design to increase locations of likely stimulation. Passive metallisation strategically placed between disk electrodes, combined with alternating surrounding stimuli, channel current into a location between electrodes, producing a virtual stimulation site. A computational study was conducted to optimise the passive metal element geometry, quantify the expected current density output, and simulate retinal ganglion cell activity due to virtual electrode stimulation. Results show that this procedure leads to array geometry that focuses injected current and achieves retinal ganglion cell stimulation in a region beneath the 'virtual electrode,' creating an alternate stimulation site without additional drivers.

  18. Diagenetic and catagenetic products of isorenieratene: Molecular indicators for photic zone anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Martin P.; Köster, Jürgen; Van Kaam-Peters, Heidy M. E.; Kenig, Fabien; Schouten, Stefan; Hartgers, Walter A.; de Leeuw, Jan W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1996-11-01

    therefore an excellent indication for photic zone anoxia in the depositional environment. Diagenetic and catagenetic products of isorenieratene are expected to find applications in reconstruction of palaeoenvironments and in oil-oil and oil-source rock correlation studies. Their presence in several petroleum source rocks suggests that anoxia is an important environmental parameter for the preservation of organic matter.

  19. Insulin analogues may accelerate progression of diabetic retinopathy after impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Abdullah; Kar, Taner; Aksoy, Yakup; Özalper, Veysel; Başbuğ, Barbaros

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy regresses after spontaneous infarction or surgical ablation of pituitary gland. Growth hormone deficiency seems to be a protective factor for development of diabetic retinopathy in dwarfs. Despite the same glycemic control, development of diabetic retinopathy is significantly higher in pubertal subjects than pre-pubertal subjects. These evidences indicate a strong relationship between growth hormone and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the most important mediator of effects of growth hormone (GH). It stimulates IGF-1 receptor. Insulin analogues also stimulate IGF-1 receptor. Therefore insulin analogues may show similar effects like growth hormone and deteriorate diabetic retinopathy. However we suggest that impairment degree of inner blood-retinal barrier should be considered for this claim. We hypothesize that insulin analogues have dual effects (beneficial and worsening) depending on stage of impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier. Insulin analogues protect pericytes and blood-retinal barrier by decreasing blood glucose level. Analogues may pass into the retinal tissue in very low amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier is intact. Therefore, insulin analogues may not deteriorate diabetic retinopathy but also have beneficial effect by protecting blood-retinal barrier at this stage. However, they may pass into the retinal tissue in much more amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier impairs. Analogues may deteriorate cellular composition of retina through stimulation of IGF-1 receptors. A number of different cell types, including glia, retinal pigment epithelial cells and fibroblast-like cells have been identified in diabetic epiretinal tissues. Insulin analogues may cause proliferation in these cells. A type of glial cell named Non-astrocytic Inner Retinal Glia-like (NIRG) cell was identified to be stimulated and proliferate by IGF-1. IGF has been reported to generate traction force in retinal

  20. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  1. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  2. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  3. Molecular pathogenesis of retinal and choroidal vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campochiaro, Peter A

    2015-11-01

    There are two major types of ocular neovascularization that affect the retina, retinal neovascularization (NV) and subretinal or choroidal NV. Retinal NV occurs in a group of diseases referred to as ischemic retinopathies in which damage to retinal vessels results in retinal ischemia. Most prevalent of these are diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusions. Subretinal and choroidal NV occur in diseases of the outer retina and Bruch's membrane, the most prevalent of which is age-related macular degeneration. Numerous studies in mouse models have helped to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV. There is considerable overlap because the precipitating event in each is stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) which leads to upregulation of several hypoxia-regulated gene products, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin 2, vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), and several others. Stimulation of VEGF signaling and suppression of Tie2 by angiopoietin 2 and VE-PTP are critical for sprouting of retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV, with perturbation of Bruch's membrane also needed for the latter. Additional HIF-1-regulated gene products cause further stimulation of the NV. It is difficult to model macular edema in animals and therefore proof-of-concept clinical trials were done and demonstrated that VEGF plays a central role and that suppression of Tie2 is also important. Neutralization of VEGF is currently the first line therapy for all of the above disease processes, but new treatments directed at some of the other molecular targets, particularly stabilization of Tie2, are likely to provide additional benefit for subretinal/choroidal NV and macular edema. In addition, the chronicity of these diseases as well as the implication of VEGF as a cause of retinal nonperfusion and progression of background diabetic retinopathy make sustained delivery approaches for VEGF

  4. Molecular Pathogenesis of Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campochiaro, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    There are two major types of ocular neovascularization that affect the retina, retinal neovascularization (NV) and subretinal or choroidal NV. Retinal NV occurs in a group of diseases referred to as ischemic retinopathies in which damage to retinal vessels results in retinal ischemia. Most prevalent of these are diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusions. Subretinal and choroidal NV occur in diseases of the outer retina and Bruch’s membrane, the most prevalent of which is age-related macular degeneration. Numerous studies in mouse models have helped to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV. There is considerable overlap because the precipitating event in each is stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) which leads to upregulation of several hypoxia-regulated gene products, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin 2, vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), and several others. Stimulation of VEGF signaling and suppression of Tie2 by angiopoietin 2 and VE-PTP are critical for sprouting of retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV, with perturbation of Bruch’s membrane also needed for the latter. Additional HIF-1-regulated gene products cause further stimulation of the NV. It is difficult to model macular edema in animals and therefore proof-of-concept clinical trials were done and demonstrated that VEGF plays a central role and that suppression of Tie2 is also important. Neutralization of VEGF is currently the first line therapy for all of the above disease processes, but new treatments directed at some of the other molecular targets, particularly stabilization of Tie2, are likely to provide additional benefit for subretinal/choroidal NV and macular edema. In addition, the chronicity of these diseases as well as the implication of VEGF as a cause of retinal nonperfusion and progression of background diabetic retinopathy make sustained delivery approaches for

  5. Time-Specific Fear Acts as a Non-Photic Entraining Stimulus of Circadian Rhythms in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, Blake A; Kim, Earnest; Reilly, Melissa; Kashima, James; Motch, Oleksiy; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Kim, Jeansok J

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all animals have endogenous clock mechanisms that "entrain" to the light-dark (LD) cycle and synchronize psychophysiological functions to optimal times for exploring resources and avoiding dangers in the environment. Such circadian rhythms are vital to human mental health, but it is unknown whether circadian rhythms "entrained" to the LD cycle can be overridden by entrainment to daily recurring threats. We show that unsignaled nocturnal footshock caused rats living in an "ethological" apparatus to switch their natural foraging behavior from the dark to the light phase and that this switch was maintained as a free-running circadian rhythm upon removal of light cues and footshocks. Furthermore, this fear-entrained circadian behavior was dependent on an intact amygdala and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Thus, time-specific fear can act as a non-photic entraining stimulus for the circadian system, and limbic centers encoding aversive information are likely part of the circadian oscillator network that temporally organizes behavior.

  6. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-12-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses.

  7. Evidence for phenotypic plasticity in response to photic cues and the connection with genes of risk in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Miller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous environmental factors have been identified as influential in the development of schizophrenia. Some are byproducts of modern life, yet others were present in our evolutionary past and persist to a lesser degree in the current era. The present study brings together published epidemiological data for schizophrenia and data on variables related to photic input for places of residence across geographical regions, using rainfall as an inverse, proxy measure for light levels. Data were gathered from the literature for two countries, the former Yugoslavia and Ireland, during a time in the early 20th century when mobility was relatively limited. The data for Yugoslavia showed a strong correlation between hospital census rates for schizophrenia (by place of birth and annual rain (r = 0.96, p= 0.008. In Ireland, the hospital census rates and first admissions for schizophrenia (by place of permanent residence showed a trend for correlation with annual rain, reaching significance for 1st admissions when the rainfall data was weighted by the underlying population distribution (r= 0.71, p= 0.047. In addition, across the years 1921-1945, birth-year variations in a spring quarter season-of-birth effect for schizophrenia in Ireland showed a trend for correlation with January-March rainfall (r= 0.80, p≤0.10. The data are discussed in terms of the effect of photoperiod on the gestation and behavior of offspring in animals, and the premise is put forth that vestigial phenotypic plasticity for such photic cues still exists in humans. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms of risk identified for psychotic disorders include genes modulated by photoperiod and sunlight intensity. Such a relationship between phenotypic plasticity in response to a particular environmental regime and subsequent natural selection for fixed changes in the environmentally responsive genes, has been well studied in animals and should not be discounted when considering human disease.

  8. Selective Distribution of Retinal Input to Mouse SCN Revealed in Analysis of Sagittal Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokshin, Maria; LeSauter, Joseph; Silver, Rae

    2015-06-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the locus of the master circadian clock, setting the daily rhythms in physiology and behavior and synchronizing these responses to the local environment. The most important of these phase-setting cues derive from the light-dark cycle and reach the SCN directly via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). The SCN contains anatomically and functionally heterogeneous populations of cells. Understanding how these neurons access information about the photic environment so as to set the phase of daily oscillation requires knowledge of SCN innervation by the RHT. While retinal innervation of the SCN has long been a topic of interest, the information is incomplete. In some instances, studies have focused on the caudal aspect of the nucleus, which contains the core region. In other instances, subregions of the nucleus have been delineated based on projections of where specific peptidergic cell types lie, rather than based on double or triple immunochemical staining of distinct populations of cells. Here, we examine the full extent of the mouse SCN using cholera toxin β (CTβ) as a tracer to analyze RHT innervation in triple-labeled sagittal sections. Using specific peptidergic markers to identify clusters of SCN cells, we find 3 distinct patterns. First is an area of dense RHT innervation to the core region, delineated by gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactive cells. Second is an area of moderate RHT fiber clusters, bearing arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-positive cells that lie close to the core. Finally, the outermost, shell, and rostral AVP-containing regions of the SCN have few to no detectable retinal fibers. These results point to a diversity of inputs to individual SCN cell populations and suggest variation in the responses that underlie photic phase resetting.

  9. Retinal Detachment in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado Renata Silva do

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is an obstetric disease of unknown cause that affects approximately 5% of pregnant women. The visual system may be affected with variable intensity, being the retinal detachment a rare complication. The retinal detachment in preeclampsia is usually bilateral and serous, and its pathogenesis is related to the choroidal ischemia secondary to an intense arteriolar vasospasm. The majority of patients have complete recovery of vision with clinical management, and surgery is unnecessary. This is a case report of a 27 year old patient who developed the severe form of preeclampsia on her first pregnancy. She had progressive blurred vision, until she could see only shadows. Ophthalmic examination diagnosed spread and bilateral retinal detachment. With blood pressure control at postpartum, the patient had her retina reattached, and recovery of vision.

  10. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  11. A method and technical equipment for an acute human trial to evaluate retinal implant technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Ralf; Laube, Thomas; Walter, Peter; Velikay-Parel, Michaela; Bornfeld, Norbert; Feucht, Matthias; Akguel, Harun; Rössler, Gernot; Alteheld, Nils; Lütke Notarp, Dietmar; Wyatt, John; Richard, Gisbert

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on methods and technical equipment to investigate the epiretinal stimulation of the retina in blind human subjects in acute trials. Current is applied to the retina through a thin, flexible microcontact film (microelectrode array) with electrode diameters ranging from 50 to 360 µm. The film is mounted in a custom-designed surgical tool that is hand-held by the surgeon during stimulation. The eventual goal of the work is the development of a chronically implantable retinal prosthesis to restore a useful level of vision to patients who are blind with outer retinal degenerations, specifically retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration.

  12. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-01-01

    Objective Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance During degeneration, physiological changes in retinal ganglion cells affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials. PMID:26905177

  13. Retinal flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, C; Veilleux, I; Lee, H; Pitsillides, C M; Côté, D; Lin, C P

    2007-12-01

    The in vivo flow cytometer is an instrument capable of continuous, real-time monitoring of fluorescently labeled cells in the circulation without the need to draw blood samples. However, the original system probes a single vessel in the mouse ear; the small sample volume limits the sensitivity of the technique. We describe an in vivo retinal flow cytometer that simultaneously probes five artery-vein pairs in the mouse eye by circularly scanning a small laser spot rapidly around the optic nerve head. We demonstrate that the retinal flow cytometer detects about five times more cells per minute than the original in vivo flow cytometer does in the ear.

  14. [Retinal pneumopexy in the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levai, L; Gavriş, Monica; Gábor, Radó; Bagosi, P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of retinal pneumopexy in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. This clinical prospective study unrolled between november 2010-june 2012 in the Ophthalmology Department of the Military Hospital in Cluj-Napoca and Satu Mare Emergency Hospital included 20 patients (20 eyes) with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Patients were treated with retinal pneumopexy followed by laser photocoagulation. Anatomical and functional results were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 19 months after treatment. In 17 eyes out of 20, we achieved retinal reattachment and visual recovery. Three cases yelded no success, these being further treated with posterior vitrectomy. Retinal pneumopexy is a minimally invasive treatment method of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with very good results in well selected cases.

  15. The functional performance of the Argus II retinal prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Visual prostheses are devices to treat profound vision loss by stimulating secondary nerve cells anywhere along the visual pathway, typically with electrical pulses. The Argus® II implant, developed by Second Sight Medical Products (SSMP, Sylmar, CA, USA), targets the retina and features 60 electrodes that electrically stimulate the surviving retinal neurons. Of the approximately 20 research groups that are actively developing visual prostheses, SSMP has the longest track record. The Argus II...

  16. Photodiode circuits for retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, J D; Cogan, S F; Mathieson, K; Sher, A; Palanker, D V

    2011-10-01

    Photodiode circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution retinal prostheses. While several of these systems have been constructed and some even implanted in humans, existing descriptions of the complex optoelectronic interaction between light, photodiode, and the electrode/electrolyte load are limited. This study examines this interaction in depth with theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Actively biased photoconductive and passive photovoltaic circuits are investigated, with the photovoltaic circuits consisting of one or more diodes connected in series, and the photoconductive circuits consisting of a single diode in series with a pulsed bias voltage. Circuit behavior and charge injection levels were markedly different for platinum and sputtered iridium-oxide film (SIROF) electrodes. Photovoltaic circuits were able to deliver 0.038 mC/cm(2) (0.75 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50- μm platinum electrodes, and 0.54-mC/cm(2) (11 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50-μ m SIROF electrodes driven with 0.5-ms pulses of light at 25 Hz. The same pulses applied to photoconductive circuits with the same electrodes were able to deliver charge injections as high as 0.38 and 7.6 mC/cm(2) (7.5 and 150 nC/phase), respectively. We demonstrate photovoltaic stimulation of rabbit retina in-vitro, with 0.5-ms pulses of 905-nm light using peak irradiance of 1 mW/mm(2). Based on the experimental data, we derive electrochemical and optical safety limits for pixel density and charge injection in various circuits. While photoconductive circuits offer smaller pixels, photovoltaic systems do not require an external bias voltage. Both classes of circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prostheses.

  17. Expression of novel opsins and intrinsic light responses in the mammalian retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5. Presence of OPN5 in the rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Nieto

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is known to contain three classes of photoreceptor cells: cones and rods responsible for vision, and intrinsically photoresponsive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs involved in diverse non-visual functions such as photic entrainment of daily rhythms and pupillary light responses. In this paper we investigated the potential intrinsic photoresponsiveness of the rat RGC line, RGC-5, by testing for the presence of visual and non-visual opsins and assessing expression of the immediate-early gene protein c-Fos and changes in intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization in response to brief light pulses. Cultured RGC-5 cells express a number of photopigment mRNAs such as retinal G protein coupled receptor (RGR, encephalopsin/panopsin (Opn3, neuropsin (Opn5 and cone opsin (Opn1mw but not melanopsin (Opn4 or rhodopsin. Opn5 immunoreactivity was observed in RGC-5 cells and in the inner retina of rat, mainly localized in the ganglion cell layer (GCL. Furthermore, white light pulses of different intensities and durations elicited changes both in intracellular Ca(2+ levels and in the induction of c-Fos protein in RGC-5 cell cultures. The results demonstrate that RGC-5 cells expressing diverse putative functional photopigments display intrinsic photosensitivity which accounts for the photic induction of c-Fos protein and changes in intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization. The presence of Opn5 in the GCL of the rat retina suggests the existence of a novel type of photoreceptor cell.

  18. Retinal locus for scanning text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T; Sharma, Manoj K; Grose, Susan A; Maino, Joseph H

    2006-01-01

    A method of mapping the retinal location of text during reading is described in which text position is plotted cumulatively on scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images. Retinal locations that contain text most often are the brightest in the cumulative plot, and locations that contain text least often are the darkest. In this way, the retinal area that most often contains text is determined. Text maps were plotted for eight control subjects without vision loss and eight subjects with central scotomas from macular degeneration. Control subjects' text maps showed that the fovea contained text most often. Text maps of five of the subjects with scotomas showed that they used the same peripheral retinal area to scan text and fixate. Text maps of the other three subjects with scotomas showed that they used separate areas to scan text and fixate. Retinal text maps may help evaluate rehabilitative strategies for training individuals with central scotomas to use a particular retinal area to scan text.

  19. Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that detect light). Photoreceptor cells capture and process light helping us to see. As these cells breakdown and die, patients experience progressive vision loss. The most common feature of all forms of RP is a ... cells that detect dim light) and cones (retinal cells that detect light and ...

  20. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  1. Retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of retinal vein occlusion. These measures include: Eating a low-fat diet Getting regular exercise Maintaining an ideal weight Not smoking Aspirin or other blood thinners may help prevent blockages in the other eye. Controlling diabetes may ...

  2. Retinal imaging with smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademola-Popoola, D S; Olatunji, V A

    2017-03-01

    The use of smartphones for various purposes among health professionals is increasing, especially with the availability of different applications. On account of cost, fundus cameras are not readily available in ophthalmic practice in developing countries. Since smartphones are readily available, easy to use and portable, they may present a cheap alternative in a resource-limited economy. to explore the use of smartphone (Blackberry Z-10) for retinal imaging in a resource-limited economy. A smartphone (Blackberry Z-10) was used to acquire retinal images with the use of +20D lens in patients with dilated pupils by activating the video mode of the camera. Clear retinal images were obtained in different clinical conditions in adults and children including branch retinal vein occlusion with fibrovascular proliferation, chorioretinal scarring from laser photocoagulation, presumed ocular toxoplasmosis, diabetic retinopathy, retinoblastoma, ocular albinism with fundus hypopigmentation. The ability to have low cost fundus imaging from readily available smartphones in an eye clinic in Nigeria presents a major boost to patient care and also offers an innovative role in research, education, and information sharing.

  3. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  4. Retinal Imaging with Smartphone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... Aim and Objectives: to explore the use of smartphone (Blackberry. Z-10) for retinal imaging in ... Samsung phones with additional apps/software such as the Filmic pro to ... in Nigeria also compared the iPhone with the Android.

  5. Focal Electrical Stimulation of Major Ganglion Cell Types in the Primate Retina for the Design of Visual Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of retinal neurons with an advanced retinal prosthesis may eventually provide high-resolution artificial vision to the blind. However, the success of future prostheses depends on the ability to activate the major parallel visual pathways of the human visual system. Electrical stimulation of the five numerically dominant retinal ganglion cell types was investigated by simultaneous stimulation and recording in isolated peripheral primate (Macaca sp.) retina using multi-el...

  6. Possibility of enhanced risk of retinal neovascularization in repeated blood donors: blood donation and retinal alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastmanesh R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reza RastmaneshDepartment of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Tehran, IranAbstract: Repeated blood donors manifest clinical, subclinical, and biochemical signs of iron deficiency anemia, have significantly higher erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentrations, and decreased tissue oxygen saturation, oxygenated tissue hemoglobin, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation. Erythropoietin and VEGF are potent retinal angiogenic factors which may initiate and promote the retinal angiogenesis process independently or simultaneously. Increases in circulating levels of erythropoietin and VEGF are proportionate to the levels of hematocrit, hypoxemia, and tissue hypoxia. It is suggested that higher erythropoietin production following iron deficiency anemia-induced chronic hypoxemia/hypoxia may, hypothetically, enhance the risk of retinal angiogenesis and/or neovascularization, possibly by inducing hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, which consequently upregulates genes stimulating angiogenesis, resulting in formation of a new vasculature, possibly by modulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in the retina. Implications of this hypothesis cover erythropoietin doping, chronic hypoxia, and hypoxemic situations, such as angiogenesis-related cardiac and pulmonary diseases.Keywords: repeated blood donation, erythropoietin, retinal neovascularization, vascular endothelial growth factor, hypoxia

  7. Duration of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment predicts recovery of retinal sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Rose

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The decision to treat a disease is often based on the presence or absence of symptoms, one prototype case being rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Detachment of the neural retina from the pigment epithelium is a major cause of anatomical and functional dysfunction of the retina, where retinal recovery is inversely related to duration of detachment. The purpose of retinal reattachment is to effect recovery of the photoreceptors and pigment epithelium from degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the critical duration of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment resulting in optimal retinal recovery after reattachment. A prospective study was conducted at a private hospital in Yogyakarta. Thirty five eyes were involved in this study. Three months after reattachment, central retinal recovery was measured by means of a Goldmann manual kinetic perimeter. The results showed that retinal recovery developed three months after surgery if the onset of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was less than 28 days before surgery. The results were not significant if the onset of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was more than 35 days. Although the Goldmann manual kinetic perimeter can efficiently detect central retinal sensitivity, it should be supported by more sensitive tools to evaluate the anatomy and function of the retina.

  8. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Progressive retinal nonperfusion in ischemic central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykoff, Charles C; Brown, David M; Croft, Daniel E; Major, James C; Wong, Tien P

    2015-01-01

    Serial wide-field fluorescein angiography was performed on eyes with preproliferative (ischemic) central retinal vein occlusion to evaluate retinal perfusion. Serial wide-field fluorescein angiography was performed on 12 preproliferative central retinal vein occlusion eyes in the 3-year Rubeosis Anti-VEGF (RAVE) trial using the Staurenghi lens (Ocular Staurenghi 230SLO Retina Lens) with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (Heidelberg HRA Spectralis). "Disk area" was defined anatomically for each eye. Mean total field of gradable retina was 290 disk areas (range, 178-452). All eyes demonstrated extensive areas of retinal nonperfusion; at baseline, mean area of retinal perfusion was 106 disk areas (range, 37-129), correlating with a mean of 46.5% perfused retinal area (range, 19.1-56.4%). The area of retinal nonperfusion increased in all eyes with a mean loss of approximately 8.1% of perfused retinal area per year (range, 4.3-12.4%), which corresponded to a mean 15-disk areas (range, 12-35) of retina evolving from perfused to nonperfused annually. The extent of baseline and final nonperfusion was not significantly different between eyes that developed neovascularization and eyes that did not. In this population of severe central retinal vein occlusion eyes, profound retinal nonperfusion was observed with wide-field fluorescein angiography at baseline and the extent of nonperfusion progressed while undergoing anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy.

  10. Satellite-Derived Photic Depth on the Great Barrier Reef: Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Water Clarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarla Weeks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Detecting changes to the transparency of the water column is critical for understanding the responses of marine organisms, such as corals, to light availability. Long-term patterns in water transparency determine geographical and depth distributions, while acute reductions cause short-term stress, potentially mortality and may increase the organisms’ vulnerability to other environmental stressors. Here, we investigated the optimal, operational algorithm for light attenuation through the water column across the scale of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR, Australia. We implemented and tested a quasi-analytical algorithm to determine the photic depth in GBR waters and matched regional Secchi depth (ZSD data to MODIS-Aqua (2002–2010 and SeaWiFS (1997–2010 satellite data. The results of the in situ ZSD/satellite data matchup showed a simple bias offset between the in situ and satellite retrievals. Using a Type II linear regression of log-transformed satellite and in situ data, we estimated ZSD and implemented the validated ZSD algorithm to generate a decadal satellite time series (2002–2012 for the GBR. Water clarity varied significantly in space and time. Seasonal effects were distinct, with lower values during the austral summer, most likely due to river runoff and increased vertical mixing, and a decline in water clarity between 2008–2012, reflecting a prevailing La Niña weather pattern. The decline in water clarity was most pronounced in the inshore area, where a significant decrease in mean inner shelf ZSD of 2.1 m (from 8.3 m to 6.2 m occurred over the decade. Empirical Orthogonal Function Analysis determined the dominance of Mode 1 (51.3%, with the greatest variation in water clarity along the mid-shelf, reflecting the strong influence of oceanic intrusions on the spatio-temporal patterns of water clarity. The newly developed photic depth product has many potential applications for the GBR from water quality monitoring to analyses of

  11. Sleep Deprivation and Caffeine Treatment Potentiate Photic Resetting of the Master Circadian Clock in a Diurnal Rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2017-04-19

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light/dark cycle. However, nonphotic factors, such as behavioral arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNs) and/or reduce the synchronizing effects of light in nocturnal rodents. In diurnal rodents, the role of arousal or insufficient sleep in these functions is still poorly understood. In the present study, diurnal Sudanian grass rats, Arvicanthis ansorgei, were aroused at night by sleep deprivation (gentle handling) or caffeine treatment that both prevented sleep. Phase shifts of locomotor activity were analyzed in grass rats transferred from a light/dark cycle to constant darkness and aroused in early night or late night. Early night, but not late night, sleep deprivation induced a significant phase shift. Caffeine on its own induced no phase shifts. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced phase delays and phase advances in response to a 30 min light pulse, respectively. Sleep deprivation in early night, but not late night, potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in the ventral SCN. Caffeine treatment in midnight triggered c-Fos expression in dorsal SCN. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in calbindin-containing cells of the ventral SCN in early and late night. These findings indicate that, in contrast to nocturnal rodents, behavioral arousal induced either by sleep deprivation or caffeine during the sleeping period potentiates light resetting of the master circadian clock in diurnal rodents, and activation of calbindin-containing suprachiasmatic cells may be involved in this effect.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Arousing stimuli have the ability to regulate circadian rhythms in mammals. Behavioral arousal in the sleeping period phase shifts the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and/or slows down the photic

  12. Peripapillary retinal thermal coagulation following electrical injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjari Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have presented the case report of a 20 year old boy who suffered an electric injury shock, following which he showed peripapillary retinal opacification and increased retinal thickening that subsequently progressed to retinal atrophy. The fluorescein angiogram revealed normal retinal circulation, thus indicating thermal damage to retina without any compromise to retinal circulation.

  13. [Optogenetics and prosthetic treatment of retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovskiy, M A

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of the current state of optogenetics-based research in the field of ophthalmology and physiology of vision. Optogenetics employs an interdisciplinary approach that amalgamates gene engineering, optics, and physiology. It involves exogenous expression of a light-activated protein in a very particular retinal cell enabling regulation (stimulation vs. inhibition) of its physiological activity. The experience with gene therapy came in very useful for optogenetics. However, unlike gene therapy, which is aimed at repairing damaged genes or replacing them with healthy ones, optogenetics is focused on protein genes delivery for further molecular control of the cell. In retina, the loss of photoreceptors is not necessarily followed by neuronal loss (at least ganglion cells remain intact), which determines the practicability of prosthetic treatment. Clinical trials can now be considered, owing to the first successful conversion of ganglion cells of mouse degenerative retinas into artificial photoreceptive cells with ON and OFF receptive fields, which is crucial for spatial vision. The following issues are reviewed here in detail: 1. Choice of cell targets within the degenerative retina. 2. Strategy of utilizing the existing light-sensitive agents and development of new optogenetic tools. 3. Gene delivery and expression in retinal cells. 4. Methods of evaluating the treatment success. 5. Selection criteria for optogenetic prosthetics. The conclusion discusses currently unsolved problems and prospects for optogenetic approaches to retinal prosthetics.

  14. Notch signaling induces retinal stem-like properties in perinatal neural retina progenitors and promotes symmetric divisions in adult retinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balenci, Laurent; van der Kooy, Derek

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating retinal stem cell (RSC) activity is fundamental for future stem cell-based therapeutic purposes. By combining gain and loss of function approaches, we addressed whether Notch signaling may play a selective role in retinal stem versus retinal progenitor cells in both developing and adult eyes. Inhibition of either Notch or fibroblast growth factor signaling reduced proliferation of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells, and inhibited RSC self-renewal. Conversely, exogenous Delta-like 3 and direct intrinsic Notch activation stimulated expansionary symmetric divisions in adult RSCs with the concomitant upregulation of Hes5. Knocking down Hes5 expression specifically decreased the numbers, but not the diameters, of adult RSC primary spheres, indicating that HES5 is the downstream effector of Notch receptor in controlling adult RSC proliferation. In addition, constitutive Notch activation induced retinal stem-like asymmetric self-renewal properties, with no expansion (no symmetrical division) in perinatal neural retina progenitor cells. These findings highlight central roles of Notch signaling activity in regulating the modes of division of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells.

  15. Retinal flow cytometer

    OpenAIRE

    Alt, C.; Veilleux, I.; H. Lee; Pitsillides, C. M.; Côté, D.; Lin, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo flow cytometer is an instrument capable of continuous, real-time monitoring of fluorescently labeled cells in the circulation without the need to draw blood samples. However, the original system probes a single vessel in the mouse ear; the small sample volume limits the sensitivity of the technique. We describe an in vivo retinal flow cytometer that simultaneously probes five artery–vein pairs in the mouse eye by circularly scanning a small laser spot rapidly around the optic nerv...

  16. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  17. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Arcinue

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls.Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness.Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior, the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308-6,872 cones/mm2. A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea. We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls.Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis.

  18. Mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruifeng; Butcher, Greg Q; Karelina, Kate; Arthur, J Simon; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The master circadian clock in mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is under the entraining influence of the external light cycle. At a mechanistic level, intracellular signaling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway appears to play a central role in light-evoked clock entrainment; however, the precise downstream mechanisms by which this pathway influences clock timing are not known. Within this context, we have previously reported that light stimulates activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase effector mitogen-stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) in the SCN. In this study, we utilised MSK1(-/-) mice to further investigate the potential role of MSK1 in circadian clock timing and entrainment. Locomotor activity analysis revealed that MSK1 null mice entrained to a 12 h light/dark cycle and exhibited circadian free-running rhythms in constant darkness. Interestingly, the free-running period in MSK1 null mice was significantly longer than in wild-type control animals, and MSK1 null mice exhibited a significantly greater variance in activity onset. Further, MSK1 null mice exhibited a significant reduction in the phase-delaying response to an early night light pulse (100 lux, 15 min), and, using an 8 h phase-advancing 'jet-lag' experimental paradigm, MSK1 knockout animals exhibited a significantly delayed rate of re-entrainment. At the molecular level, early night light-evoked cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, histone phosphorylation and Period1 gene expression were markedly attenuated in MSK1(-/-) animals relative to wild-type mice. Together, these data provide key new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which MSK1 affects the SCN clock.

  19. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  20. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation......, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell...... retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found...

  1. NMDA and PACAP receptor signaling interact to mediate retinal-induced scn cellular rhythmicity in the absence of light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C Webb

    Full Text Available The "core" region of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, a central clock responsible for coordinating circadian rhythms, shows a daily rhythm in phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (pERK. This cellular rhythm persists under constant darkness and, despite the absence of light, is dependent upon inputs from the eye. The neural signals driving this rhythmicity remain unknown and here the roles of glutamate and PACAP are examined. First, rhythmic phosphorylation of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit (pNR1, a marker for receptor activation was shown to coincide with SCN core pERK, with a peak at circadian time (CT 16. Enucleation and intraocular TTX administration attenuated the peak in the pERK and pNR1 rhythms, demonstrating that activation of the NMDA receptor and ERK in the SCN core at CT16 are dependent on retinal inputs. In contrast, ERK and NR1 phosphorylation in the SCN shell region were unaffected by these treatments. Intraventricular administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 also attenuated the peak in SCN core pERK, indicating that ERK phosphorylation in this region requires NMDA receptor activation. As PACAP is implicated in photic entrainment and is known to modulate glutamate signaling, the effects of a PAC1 receptor antagonist (PACAP 6-38 on SCN core pERK and pNR1 also were examined. PACAP 6-38 administration attenuated SCN core pERK and pNR1, suggesting that PACAP induces pERK directly, and indirectly via a modulation of NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that, in the absence of light, retinal-mediated NMDA and PAC1 receptor activation interact to induce cellular rhythms in the SCN core. These results highlight a novel function for glutamate and PACAP release in the hamster SCN apart from their well-known roles in the induction of photic circadian clock resetting.

  2. Microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae determine sediment organic matter composition in shallow photic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, A. K.; Canuel, E. A.; Anderson, I. C.; Tobias, C. R.; Veuger, B.; Waters, M. N.

    2013-08-01

    resulted in diminished buildup of bacterial biomass. By the final day of the experiment, principal component analysis revealed that sediment composition in treatments with macroalgae was more similar to dark treatments and less similar to light treatments without macroalgae. Overall, microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae fundamentally altered SOM quality and quantity, which may have notable ecological consequences for shallow-water systems such as increased hypoxia/anoxia, sulfide accumulation, enhanced mineralization and/or stimulated denitrification.

  3. Microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae determine sediment organic matter composition in shallow photic sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Hardison

    2013-02-01

    macroalgae, which reduced production of MPB. The presence of macroalgae decreased SOM lability as well, which resulted in diminished buildup of bacterial biomass. By the final day of the experiment, PCA analyses revealed that sediment composition in treatments with macroalgae were more similar to dark treatments and less similar to light treatments without macroalgae. Overall MPB and benthic macroalgae fundamentally altered SOM quality and quantity, which may have notable ecological consequences for shallow-water systems such as increased hypoxia/anoxia, sulfide accumulation, enhanced mineralization and/or stimulated denitrification.

  4. Microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae determine sediment organic matter composition in shallow photic sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Hardison

    2013-08-01

    well, which resulted in diminished buildup of bacterial biomass. By the final day of the experiment, principal component analysis revealed that sediment composition in treatments with macroalgae was more similar to dark treatments and less similar to light treatments without macroalgae. Overall, microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae fundamentally altered SOM quality and quantity, which may have notable ecological consequences for shallow-water systems such as increased hypoxia/anoxia, sulfide accumulation, enhanced mineralization and/or stimulated denitrification.

  5. Retinal detachment surgery without cryotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Chignell, A H; Markham, R H

    1981-01-01

    A series of cases of retinal detachment treated without the application of cryotherapy at the time of surgery has been studied. The omission of cryotherapy while not interfering with retinal reattachment, carries the risk of redetachment at a later date. Macular pucker may still occur in spite of the absence of cryotherapy.

  6. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  7. cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibition enhances photic responses and synchronization of the biological circadian clock in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago A Plano

    Full Text Available The master circadian clock in mammals is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and is synchronized by several environmental stimuli, mainly the light-dark (LD cycle. Light pulses in the late subjective night induce phase advances in locomotor circadian rhythms and the expression of clock genes (such as Per1-2. The mechanism responsible for light-induced phase advances involves the activation of guanylyl cyclase (GC, cGMP and its related protein kinase (PKG. Pharmacological manipulation of cGMP by phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibition (e.g., sildenafil increases low-intensity light-induced circadian responses, which could reflect the ability of the cGMP-dependent pathway to directly affect the photic sensitivity of the master circadian clock within the SCN. Indeed, sildenafil is also able to increase the phase-shifting effect of saturating (1200 lux light pulses leading to phase advances of about 9 hours, as well as in C57 a mouse strain that shows reduced phase advances. In addition, sildenafil was effective in both male and female hamsters, as well as after oral administration. Other PDE inhibitors (such as vardenafil and tadalafil also increased light-induced phase advances of locomotor activity rhythms and accelerated reentrainment after a phase advance in the LD cycle. Pharmacological inhibition of the main downstream target of cGMP, PKG, blocked light-induced expression of Per1. Our results indicate that the cGMP-dependent pathway can directly modulate the light-induced expression of clock-genes within the SCN and the magnitude of light-induced phase advances of overt rhythms, and provide promising tools to design treatments for human circadian disruptions.

  8. Fabrication of a carbon nanotube protruding electrode array for a retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Dai, Hongjie; Fishman, Harvey A.; Harris, James S.

    2005-01-01

    Implantable retinal prosthetic devices consisting of microelectrode arrays are being built in attempts to restore vision. Current retinal prostheses use metal planar electrodes. We are developing a novel electro-neural interface using carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles as flexible, protruding microelectrodes. We have synthesized vertically self-assembled, multi-walled CNT bundles by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Using conventional silicon-based micro-fabrication processes, these CNT bundles were integrated onto pre-patterned circuits. CNT protruding electrodes have significant potentials in providing safer stimulation for retinal prostheses. They could also act as recording units to sense electrical and chemical activities in neural systems for fundamental neuroscience research.

  9. Chitosan oligosaccharides attenuates oxidative-stress related retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Mo Fang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the therapeutic potential and mechanisms of chitosan oligosaccharides (COS for oxidative stress-induced retinal diseases. Retinal oxidative damage was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intravitreal injection of paraquat (PQ. Low-dose (5 mg/kg or high-dose (10 mg/kg COS or PBS was intragastrically given for 14 days after PQ injection. Electroretinograms were performed to determine the functionality of the retinas. The surviving neurons in the retinal ganglion cell layer and retinal apoptosis were determined by counting Neu N-positive cells in whole-mounted retinas and TUNEL staining, respectively. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was determined by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Retinal oxidative damages were assessed by staining with nitrotyrosine, acrolein, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Immunohistochemical studies were used to demonstrate the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 in retinas. An in vitro study using RGC-5 cells was performed to verify the results. We demonstrated COS significantly enhanced the recovery of retinal function, preserved inner retinal thickness, and decreased retinal neurons loss in a dose-dependent manner. COS administration demonstrated anti-oxidative effects by reducing luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminenscense levels and activating superoxide dismutase and catalase, leading to decreased retinal apoptosis. COS markedly reduced retinal NF-κB p65. An in vitro study demonstrated COS increased IκB expression, attenuated the increase of p65 and thus decreased NF-κB/DNA binding activity in PQ-stimulated RGC-5 cells. In conclusion, COS attenuates oxidative stress-induced retinal damages, probably by decreasing free radicals, maintaining the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, and inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  10. Spectrophotometric retinal oximetry in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Karlsson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the validity of spectrophotometric retinal oximetry, by comparison to blood gas analysis and intra-vitreal measurements of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). METHODS: Female domestic pigs were used for all experiments (n=8). Oxygen fraction in inspired air was changed using...... a mixture of room air, pure oxygen and pure nitrogen, ranging from 5% to 100% oxygen. Femoral arterial blood gas analysis and retinal oximetry was performed at each level of inspiratory oxygen fraction. Retinal oximetry was performed using a commercial instrument, the Oxymap Retinal Oximeter T1 (Oxymap ehf......, Reykjavik, Iceland). The device simultaneously acquires images at two wavelengths (570 nm and 600 nm) and specialized software automatically detects retinal blood vessels. In three pigs, invasive pO2-measurements were performed after the initial non-invasive measurements. RESULTS: Comparison of femoral...

  11. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhushanker, M; Topiwalla, Tasneem T; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Here we present a case of 59 year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4 weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular serous detachment in right eye and retinitis in left eye. Significant improvement in BCVA in right eye was observed after treatment with oral steroid with resolving retinitis lesions. Diagnosis of post typhoid immune mediated retinitis was made with good resolution following treatment. Immune mediated retinitis is a rare sequelae to typhoid infection which can be successfully treated with systemic steroids with good resolution of the lesions.

  12. Acute and Protracted Cell Death in Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in the Canine Model of Rhodopsin Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsan, Raghavi; Simone, Kristina M; Anderson, Nathan P; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Beltran, William A

    2017-01-01

    To characterize a light damage paradigm and establish structural and immunocytochemical measures of acute and protracted light-induced retinal degeneration in the rhodopsin (RHO) T4R dog model of RHO-autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Retinal light damage was induced in mutant dogs with a 1-minute exposure to various light intensities (0.1-1.0 mW/cm2) delivered with a Ganzfeld stimulator, or by fundus photography. Photoreceptor cell death was assessed by TUNEL assay, and alterations in retinal layers were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry 24 hours and 2 weeks after light exposure. Detailed topographic maps were made to document changes in the outer retinal layers of all four retinal quadrants 2 weeks post exposure. Twenty-four hours post light exposure, the severity of photoreceptor cell death was dose dependent. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed disruption of rod outer segments, focal loss of the RPE integrity, and an increase in expression of endothelin receptor B in Müller cells with the two highest doses of light and fundus photography. Two weeks after light exposure, persistence of photoreceptor death, thinning of the outer nuclear layer, and induction of Müller cell gliosis occurred with the highest doses of light. We have characterized outcome measures of acute and continuing retinal degeneration in the RHO T4R dog following light exposure. These will be used to assess the molecular mechanisms of light-induced damage and rescue strategies in this large animal model of RHO-ADRP.

  13. Acute retinal necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Hernán Ocampo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical features in a case of acute retinal necrosis are described as well as its diagnostic approach and response to early treatment. Methods: This is a descriptive and retrospective study case report of a 26 year old male patient who arrived to the emergency room with a three day history of sudden visual loss in the right eye (RE. At initial evaluation a visual acuity of hand movements in the RE, 20/15 in the left eye (LE and a right relative afferent pupillary defect were found. Fundoscopy revealed profuse soft exudates and hemorrhages involving posterior pole, inferior hemiretina and superotemporal periphery. Infectious workup and fluoresceinic angiography were made and positive serologies for herpes virus types 1 and 2, without HIV, were found. A diagnosis of acute retinal necrosis was made and treatment with intravenous valgancyclovir for two weeks and intra-vitreous triamcinolone for severe vasculitis, was given. Then a 3 months treatment with oral antiviral agents was prescribed. Results: Patient’s evolution showed improvement with treatment and at two and a half months of follow up, visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye, normal slit lamp examination, tonometry of 12 mm Hg and fundoscopy improved when compared to initial pictures.Conclusions: A high index of suspicion is needed for diagnosing ARN taking into account clinical findings. Prompt intravenous and intra-vitreous treatments are needed to achieve good clinical and functional outcomes and to avoid central nervous system complications.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Electrodes for Effective Interfacing with Retinal Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Shoval, Asaf; Adams, Christopher; David-Pur, Moshe; Shein, Mark; Hanein, Yael; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the use of carbon nanotube coated microelectrodes as an interface material for retinal recording and stimulation applications. Test devices were micro-fabricated and consisted of 60, 30 μm diameter electrodes at spacing of 200 μm. These electrodes were coated via chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes, resulting in conducting, three dimensional surfaces with a high interfacial area. These attributes are important both for the quality of the cell-surface coupling as...

  15. Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-29

    Distribution List (enclosed) bI’TF rruIoN STATEMEN A Approved for publi reljaso Disatbunon Unlimited TREATMENT OF LASER-INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES FINAL...suprathreshold retinal laser lesions II. Subthreshold retinal laser lesions III. Effect of steroid treatment on laser-induced retinal injury Discussion and...In the present study we investigated the effect of corticosteroid treatment of argon laser-induced retinal injury on vitreal accumulation of both

  16. Towards high-resolution retinal prostheses with direct optical addressing and inductive telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sohmyung; Khraiche, Massoud L.; Akinin, Abraham; Jing, Yi; Damle, Samir; Kuang, Yanjin; Bauchner, Sue; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Freeman, William R.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Despite considerable advances in retinal prostheses over the last two decades, the resolution of restored vision has remained severely limited, well below the 20/200 acuity threshold of blindness. Towards drastic improvements in spatial resolution, we present a scalable architecture for retinal prostheses in which each stimulation electrode is directly activated by incident light and powered by a common voltage pulse transferred over a single wireless inductive link. Approach. The hybrid optical addressability and electronic powering scheme provides separate spatial and temporal control over stimulation, and further provides optoelectronic gain for substantially lower light intensity thresholds than other optically addressed retinal prostheses using passive microphotodiode arrays. The architecture permits the use of high-density electrode arrays with ultra-high photosensitive silicon nanowires, obviating the need for excessive wiring and high-throughput data telemetry. Instead, the single inductive link drives the entire array of electrodes through two wires and provides external control over waveform parameters for common voltage stimulation. Main results. A complete system comprising inductive telemetry link, stimulation pulse demodulator, charge-balancing series capacitor, and nanowire-based electrode device is integrated and validated ex vivo on rat retina tissue. Significance. Measurements demonstrate control over retinal neural activity both by light and electrical bias, validating the feasibility of the proposed architecture and its system components as an important first step towards a high-resolution optically addressed retinal prosthesis.

  17. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated with Congenital Retinal Macrovessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Shinji; Endoh, Katsuhisa; Tampo, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a case of retinal microvascular abnormalities in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) associated with congenital retinal macrovessels. An abnormal retinal macrovessel, crossing the macula horizontally, was detected in the right eye. Additionally, retinal microvascular abnormalities were detected. Eight years after the initial visit, the retinal microvascular abnormalities were noted to have changed substantially. We speculate that retinal microvascular abnormalities in NF1 may change dynamically over the years. PMID:23781366

  18. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated with Congenital Retinal Macrovessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Makino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case of retinal microvascular abnormalities in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 associated with congenital retinal macrovessels. An abnormal retinal macrovessel, crossing the macula horizontally, was detected in the right eye. Additionally, retinal microvascular abnormalities were detected. Eight years after the initial visit, the retinal microvascular abnormalities were noted to have changed substantially. We speculate that retinal microvascular abnormalities in NF1 may change dynamically over the years.

  19. Bilateral patching in retinal detachment: fluid mechanics and retinal "settling".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William J

    2011-07-20

    When a patient suffers a retinal detachment and surgery is delayed, it is known clinically that bilaterally patching the patient may allow the retina to partially reattach or "settle." Although this procedure has been performed since the 1860s, there is still debate as to how such a maneuver facilitates the reattachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using commercially available analysis software are used to elucidate the influence of reduction in eye movement caused by bilateral patching on the flow of subretinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. It was found that by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, a physically consistent explanation of increased retinal detachment with eye movements can be found in the case of traction on the retinal hole. Large eye movements increase vitreous traction and detachment forces on the edge of the retinal hole, creating a subretinal vacuum and facilitating increased subretinal fluid. Alternative models, in which intraocular fluid flow is redirected into the subretinal space, are not consistent with these simulations. The results of these simulations explain the physical principles behind bilateral patching and provide insight that can be used clinically. In particular, as is known clinically, bilateral patching may facilitate a decrease in the height of a retinal detachment. The results described here provide a description of a physical mechanism underlying this technique. The findings of this study may aid in deciding whether to bilaterally patch patients and in counseling patients on pre- and postoperative care.

  20. Polymer optoelectronic structures for retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Vini; Narayan, K S

    2014-01-01

    This commentary highlights the effectiveness of optoelectronic properties of polymer semiconductors based on recent results emerging from our laboratory, where these materials are explored as artificial receptors for interfacing with the visual systems. Organic semiconductors based polymer layers in contact with physiological media exhibit interesting photophysical features, which mimic certain natural photoreceptors, including those in the retina. The availability of such optoelectronic materials opens up a gateway to utilize these structures as neuronal interfaces for stimulating retinal ganglion cells. In a recently reported work entitled "A polymer optoelectronic interface provides visual cues to a blind retina," we utilized a specific configuration of a polymer semiconductor device structure to elicit neuronal activity in a blind retina upon photoexcitation. The elicited neuronal signals were found to have several features that followed the optoelectronic response of the polymer film. More importantly, the polymer-induced retinal response resembled the natural response of the retina to photoexcitation. These observations open up a promising material alternative for artificial retina applications.

  1. AUTOMATIC RETINAL VESSEL TORTUOSITY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhal Khdhair El Abbadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vascular vessels have the role to indicate the retinal diseases and for systematic diseases when there are any abnormalities in retinal vascular pattern. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e., how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. In this study we suggest a novel mask filter to track the blood vessel along its course and measuring the blood vessels tortuosity over the entire human retinal vessel network in fundus eye image, by using the arc to chord ratio. The suggested algorithm tested with straight and curve hand drawing lines and gives high accurate results.

  2. [Retinal vasculitis in lupic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, P; Laroche, L; Krulik, M; Prier, A M; Saraux, H; Canuel, C; Debray, J

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of retinal vasculitis in SLE-type diseases are reported. The first was central retinal vein occlusion occurring during clinical remission of SLE in a 55 year old black female. Prednisone maintenance therapy was unchanged and visual loss rapidly regressed with heparin therapy. The second case was a 33 year old black female in whom SLE was discovered following relapsing bilateral optic neuritis. A progressive visual improvement was obtained with high dose of prednisone (1 mg/kg/day). The third cas was a 17 year old white girl with retinal vasculitis. She had an unclassified connective tissue disease inaugurated by optic neuritis at the age of 10. High dose prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was effective on the visual loss. Retinal vasculitis lesions in SLE and their therapy are reviewed.

  3. Concentration of chlorhophyll-a and the limit of the photic zone in the Third River reservoir (Córdoba-Argentina, using images from CBERS-2B satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maria Rodriguez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The satellite images provided by remote sensors represent an important tool for monitoring, controlling and administering water resources. The aim of this work was to model the spatial distribution of the concentration of chlorhophyll-a and the limit of the photic zone in the Rio Tercero reservoir (Córdoba-Argentina, using images from CBERS-2B satellite and a geographical information system (SIG. We selected 15 samples places wherefrom we measured physical, chemical and biological parameters during the fall of 2008. By using a georeferenced image from sensor CBERS-2B and performing an analysis of the principal components (ACP, we were able to identify associations between variables and reflectance values of the satellite bands. Based on these associations and with simple regression models, we were able to know the spatial distribution of the variables: concentration of chlorophyll-a (R2 = 0, 73 and the limit of the photic zone (R2 = 0, 78 in the reservoir as a whole. We may conclude thata there exists a negative correlation between the concentration of chlorophyll-a and the water transparency in reservoir Rio Tercero, as well as that the sensor used allows us to evaluate the quality of the water in a relative short time.

  4. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  5. Filling in the retinal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  6. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  7. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs, the reti......Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs......, the retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficients. Falconer's formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The mean......, the branching pattern of the retinal vessels demonstrated a higher structural similarity in monozygotic than in dizygotic twin pairs. The retinal vascular fractal dimension was mainly determined by genetic factors, which accounted for 54% of the variation. The genetically predetermination of the retinal...

  8. A simple method for screening photoelectric dyes towards their use for retinal prostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo T

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectric dyes absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. To test whether these dyes could be used for retinal prostheses, a simple in vitro screening system was developed. Retinal neurons were cultured from the eyes of chick embryos at the 10-day embryonic stage, at which time no retinal photoreceptor cells have yet developed. Intracellular calcium elevation was observed with Fluo-4 in cultured retinal neurons before and after photoelectric dye was applied at varying concentrations to the culture medium. Five of 7 photoelectric dyes tested in this in vitro system induced intracellular calcium elevation in cultured chick retinal neurons. The intracellular calcium elevation generated by the 5 photoelectric dyes was blocked by extracellular calcium depletion in the case of all 5 dyes, and, except for one dye, by the presence of voltage-gated calcium channel blockers. The photoelectric dyes absorbed light under an inverted microscope and stimulated retinal neurons. This simple in vitro system allows the screening of photoelectric dyes which can be used for retinal prostheses.

  9. Maternal enrichment during pregnancy accelerates retinal development of the fetus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sale

    Full Text Available The influence of maternal environment on fetal development is largely unexplored, the available evidence concerns only the deleterious effects elicited by prenatal stress. Here we investigated the influence of prenatal enrichment on the early development of the visual system in the fetus. We studied the anatomical development of the rat retina, by analyzing the migration of neural progenitors and the process of retinal ganglion cell death, which exerts a key role in sculpturing the developing retinal system at perinatal ages. The number of apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer was analyzed using two distinct methods: the presence of pyknotic nuclei stained for cresyl violet and the appearance of DNA fragmentation (Tunel method. We report that environmental enrichment of the mother during pregnancy affects the structural maturation of the retina, accelerating the migration of neural progenitors and the dynamics of natural cell death. These effects seem to be under the control of insulin-like growth factor-I: its levels, higher in enriched pregnant rats and in their milk, are increased also in their offspring, its neutralization abolishes the action of maternal enrichment on retinal development and chronic insulin-like growth factor-I injection to standard-reared females mimics the effects of enrichment in the fetuses. Thus, the development of the visual system is sensitive to environmental stimulation during prenatal life. These findings could have a bearing in orienting clinical research in the field of prenatal therapy.

  10. Wiring the retinal circuits activated by light during early development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bertolesi, Gabriel E; Hehr, Carrie L; McFarlane, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    ...) and non-image-forming (NIF) tasks. Among the NIF tasks, photic entrainment of circadian rhythms, the pupillary light reflex, and sleep are all associated with physiological responses, mediated mainly by a small group of melanopsin...

  11. Ethyl Pyruvate Prevents Methyglyoxal-Induced Retinal Vascular Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghyun Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate is an endogenous antioxidant substance. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of ethyl pyruvate (EP on retinal vascular injury in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate the protective effect of EP on vascular cell apoptosis and blood-retinal barrier (BRB breakage, we have used intravitreally methylglyoxal-(MGO- injected rat eyes. Apoptosis of the retinal vascular cell that was stimulated by the intravitreal injection of MGO was evidently attenuated by the EP treatment. EP exerts inhibitory effect on MGO-induced vascular cell apoptosis by blocking oxidative injury. In addition, EP treatment prevented MGO-induced BRB breakage and the degradation of occludin, an important tight junction protein. These observations suggest that EP acts through an antioxidant mechanism to protect against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in retinal vessels.

  12. Ultra-high photosensitivity silicon nanophotonics for retinal prosthesis: electrical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraiche, Massoud L; Lo, Yuhwa; Wang, Deli; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Freeman, William; Silva, Gabriel A

    2011-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as age related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), lead to the loss of the photoreceptor cells rendering the retina incapable of detecting light. Several engineering approaches have aimed at replacing the function of the photoreceptors by detecting light via an external camera or photodiodes and electrically stimulating the remaining retinal tissue to restore vision. These devices rely heavily on off-device processing to solve the computational challenge of matching the performance of the PRs. In this work, we present a unique ultra-high sensitivity photodetector technology with light sensitivity, signal amplification, light adaptation that shows signal transduction performance approaching those of the rods and cones in the mammalian retina. In addition, the technology offers nanoscale control over photodetectors topography with the potential to reproduce the visual acuity of the natural retina. This technology promises to drastically reduce the foot print, power consumption and computational needs of the current retinal prothesis, while reproducing high resolution vision.

  13. High-amplitude electrical stimulation can reduce elicited neuronal activity in visual prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Rivera, Alejandro; Guo, Tianruo; Yang, Chih-Yu; Abed, Amr Al; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H.; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal electrostimulation is promising a successful therapy to restore functional vision. However, a narrow stimulating current range exists between retinal neuron excitation and inhibition which may lead to misperformance of visual prostheses. As the conveyance of representation of complex visual scenes may require neighbouring electrodes to be activated simultaneously, electric field summation may contribute to reach this inhibitory threshold. This study used three approaches to assess the implications of relatively high stimulating conditions in visual prostheses: (1) in vivo, using a suprachoroidal prosthesis implanted in a feline model, (2) in vitro through electrostimulation of murine retinal preparations, and (3) in silico by computing the response of a population of retinal ganglion cells. Inhibitory stimulating conditions led to diminished cortical activity in the cat. Stimulus-response relationships showed non-monotonic profiles to increasing stimulating current. This was observed in vitro and in silico as the combined response of groups of neurons (close to the stimulating electrode) being inhibited at certain stimulating amplitudes, whilst other groups (far from the stimulating electrode) being recruited. These findings may explain the halo-like phosphene shapes reported in clinical trials and suggest that simultaneous stimulation in retinal prostheses is limited by the inhibitory threshold of the retinal ganglion cells. PMID:28209965

  14. Determination of retinal surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagra, Manbir; Gilmartin, Bernard; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Logan, Nicola S

    2017-09-01

    Previous attempts at determining retinal surface area and surface area of the whole eye have been based upon mathematical calculations derived from retinal photographs, schematic eyes and retinal biopsies of donor eyes. 3-dimensional (3-D) ocular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a more direct measurement, it can be used to image the eye in vivo, and there is no risk of tissue shrinkage. The primary purpose of this study is to compare, using T2-weighted 3D MRI, retinal surface areas for superior-temporal (ST), inferior-temporal (IT), superior-nasal (SN) and inferior-nasal (IN) retinal quadrants. An ancillary aim is to examine whether inter-quadrant variations in area are concordant with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Seventy-three adult participants presenting without retinal pathology (mean age 26.25 ± 6.06 years) were scanned using a Siemens 3-Tesla MRI scanner to provide T2-weighted MR images that demarcate fluid-filled internal structures for the whole eye and provide high-contrast delineation of the vitreous-retina interface. Integrated MRI software generated total internal ocular surface area (TSA). The second nodal point was used to demarcate the origin of the peripheral retina in order to calculate total retinal surface area (RSA) and quadrant retinal surface areas (QRSA) for ST, IT, SN, and IN quadrants. Mean spherical error (MSE) was -2.50 ± 4.03D and mean axial length (AL) 24.51 ± 1.57 mm. Mean TSA and RSA for the RE were 2058 ± 189 and 1363 ± 160 mm(2) , respectively. Repeated measures anova for QRSA data indicated a significant difference within-quadrants (P area/mm increase in AL. Although the differences between QRSAs are relatively small, there was evidence of concordance with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with PVD. The data allow AL to be converted to QRSAs, which will assist further

  15. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  16. Structure and function of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and cornea in the eye of Sardinella aurita (Clupeidae, Teleostei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ali Salem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and the cornea in the eye of a teleost, Sardinella aurita was examined by light and electron microscopy. The retinal pigment epithelium forms a single layer of cells joined laterally by cell junctions. Centrally in the retina these cells are columnar, while more peripherally they become cuboidal in shape. The basal (scleral border of the pigment epithelial cells is not infolded but is relatively smooth. Phagosomes containing lysosome-like bodies are also common features of the retinal pigment epithelium. Numerous melanosomes (pigment granules are abundant throughout the epithelial cells. These melanosomes probably absorb light which has passed through the photoreceptor layer. Four photoreceptor cells were identified; rods, long single cones, short single cones and double cones. The presence of these types suggests a diversity of photoreceptor function. Square mosaic pattern of cones and well-developed choroid gland are also main features of the eye. The inner segment of rods and cones were rich in organelles indicating much synthetic activity. Calycal processes projecting from cone outer segments are also observed. The cornea includes an epithelium with a complex pattern of surface microplicae, a basement membrane, dermal stroma, an iridescent layer, scleral stroma, Descemet’s membrane and endothelium. The autochthonous layer which is seen in some teleosts has not been observed in the cornea of this species. These and other observations were discussed in relation to the photic environment and habits of this fish.

  17. Central retinal vessel blood flow after surgical treatment for central retinal vein occlusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crama, N.; Gualino, V.; Restori, M.; Charteris, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radial optic neurotomy and retinal endovascular surgery on retinal blood flow velocity in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. METHODS: A prospective interventional case series. RESULTS: Six patients with a central retinal

  18. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerling, Christopher A; Huynh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Minh A; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S

    2015-11-22

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  20. Tyro3 Modulates Mertk-Associated Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, Douglas; Yasumura, Douglas; Benchorin, Gillie; Matthes, Michael T; Feng, Wei; Nguyen, Natalie M; Sedano, Cecilia D; Calton, Melissa A; LaVail, Matthew M

    2015-12-01

    Inherited photoreceptor degenerations (IPDs) are the most genetically heterogeneous of Mendelian diseases. Many IPDs exhibit substantial phenotypic variability, but the basis is usually unknown. Mutations in MERTK cause recessive IPD phenotypes associated with the RP38 locus. We have identified a murine genetic modifier of Mertk-associated photoreceptor degeneration, the C57BL/6 (B6) allele of which acts as a suppressor. Photoreceptors degenerate rapidly in Mertk-deficient animals homozygous for the 129P2/Ola (129) modifier allele, whereas animals heterozygous for B6 and 129 modifier alleles exhibit an unusual intermixing of degenerating and preserved retinal regions, with females more severely affected than males. Mertk-deficient mice homozygous for the B6 modifier allele display degeneration only in the far periphery, even at 8 months of age, and have improved retinal function compared to animals homozygous for the 129 allele. We genetically mapped the modifier to an approximately 2-megabase critical interval that includes Tyro3, a paralog of Mertk. Tyro3 expression in the outer retina varies with modifier genotype in a manner characteristic of a cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL), with the B6 allele conferring an approximately three-fold higher expression level. Loss of Tyro3 function accelerates the pace of photoreceptor degeneration in Mertk knockout mice, and TYRO3 protein is more abundant in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) adjacent to preserved central retinal regions of Mertk knockout mice homozygous for the B6 modifier allele. Endogenous human TYRO3 protein co-localizes with nascent photoreceptor outer segment (POS) phagosomes in a primary RPE cell culture assay, and expression of murine Tyro3 in cultured cells stimulates phagocytic ingestion of POS. Our findings demonstrate that Tyro3 gene dosage modulates Mertk-associated retinal degeneration, provide strong evidence for a direct role for TYRO3 in RPE phagocytosis, and suggest

  1. Tyro3 Modulates Mertk-Associated Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Vollrath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inherited photoreceptor degenerations (IPDs are the most genetically heterogeneous of Mendelian diseases. Many IPDs exhibit substantial phenotypic variability, but the basis is usually unknown. Mutations in MERTK cause recessive IPD phenotypes associated with the RP38 locus. We have identified a murine genetic modifier of Mertk-associated photoreceptor degeneration, the C57BL/6 (B6 allele of which acts as a suppressor. Photoreceptors degenerate rapidly in Mertk-deficient animals homozygous for the 129P2/Ola (129 modifier allele, whereas animals heterozygous for B6 and 129 modifier alleles exhibit an unusual intermixing of degenerating and preserved retinal regions, with females more severely affected than males. Mertk-deficient mice homozygous for the B6 modifier allele display degeneration only in the far periphery, even at 8 months of age, and have improved retinal function compared to animals homozygous for the 129 allele. We genetically mapped the modifier to an approximately 2-megabase critical interval that includes Tyro3, a paralog of Mertk. Tyro3 expression in the outer retina varies with modifier genotype in a manner characteristic of a cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL, with the B6 allele conferring an approximately three-fold higher expression level. Loss of Tyro3 function accelerates the pace of photoreceptor degeneration in Mertk knockout mice, and TYRO3 protein is more abundant in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE adjacent to preserved central retinal regions of Mertk knockout mice homozygous for the B6 modifier allele. Endogenous human TYRO3 protein co-localizes with nascent photoreceptor outer segment (POS phagosomes in a primary RPE cell culture assay, and expression of murine Tyro3 in cultured cells stimulates phagocytic ingestion of POS. Our findings demonstrate that Tyro3 gene dosage modulates Mertk-associated retinal degeneration, provide strong evidence for a direct role for TYRO3 in RPE phagocytosis

  2. Progress in artificial vision through suprachoroidal retinal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareket, Lilach; Barriga-Rivera, Alejandro; Zapf, Marc Patrick; Lovell, Nigel H.; Suaning, Gregg J.

    2017-08-01

    Retinal implants have proven their ability to restore visual sensation to people with degenerative retinopathy, characterized by photoreceptor cell death and the retina’s inability to sense light. Retinal bionics operate by electrically stimulating the surviving neurons in the retina, thus triggering the transfer of visual sensory information to the brain. Suprachoroidal implants were first investigated in Australia in the 1950s. In this approach, the neuromodulation hardware is positioned between the sclera and the choroid, thus providing significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, with the potential to maintain residual vision combined with the artificial input from the device. Here we review the latest advances and state of the art devices for suprachoroidal prostheses, highlight future technologies and discuss challenges and perspectives towards improved rehabilitation of vision.

  3. Carbon nanotube electrodes for effective interfacing with retinal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaf Shoval

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the use of carbon nanotube microelectrodes as an interface material for retinal recording and stimulation applications. Test devices were micro-fabricated and consisted of 60 pristine 30 um electrodes coated with chemical vapor deposited carbon nanotubes, resulting in conducting, three dimensional surfaces with a high effective interfacial area. These attributes are important both for the quality of the cell-surface coupling as well as for electro-chemical interfacing efficiency. The entire chip was packaged to fit a commercial multielectrode recording and stimulation system. Electrical recordings of spontaneous spikes from whole-mount neonatal mouse retinas were consistently obtained minutes after retinas were placed over the electrodes, exhibiting typical bursting and propagating waves. Most importantly, the signals obtained with carbon nanotube electrodes have exceptionally high signal to noise ratio, reaching values as high as 75. Moreover, spikes are marked by a conspicuous gradual increase in amplitude recorded over a period of minutes to hours, suggesting improvement in cell-electrode coupling. This phenomenon is not observed in conventional commercial electrodes. Electrical stimulation using carbon nanotube electrodes was also achieved. We attribute the superior performances of the carbon nanotube electrodes to their three dimensional nature and the strong neuro-carbon nanotube affinity. The results presented here show the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for retinal interfacing applications. Specifically, our results demonstrate a route to achieve a reduction in the electrode size down to few micrometers in order to achieve high efficacy local stimulation needed in retinal prosthetic devices.

  4. Carbon nanotube electrodes for effective interfacing with retinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoval, Asaf; Adams, Christopher; David-Pur, Moshe; Shein, Mark; Hanein, Yael; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the use of carbon nanotube coated microelectrodes as an interface material for retinal recording and stimulation applications. Test devices were micro-fabricated and consisted of 60, 30 mum diameter electrodes at spacing of 200 mum. These electrodes were coated via chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes, resulting in conducting, three dimensional surfaces with a high interfacial area. These attributes are important both for the quality of the cell-surface coupling as well as for electro-chemical interfacing efficiency. The entire chip was packaged to fit a commercial multielectrode recording and stimulation system. Electrical recordings of spontaneous spikes from whole-mount neonatal mouse retinas were consistently obtained minutes after retinas were placed over the electrodes, exhibiting typical bursting and propagating waves. Most importantly, the signals obtained with carbon nanotube electrodes have exceptionally high signal to noise ratio, reaching values as high as 75. Moreover, spikes are marked by a conspicuous gradual increase in amplitude recorded over a period of minutes to hours, suggesting improvement in cell-electrode coupling. This phenomenon is not observed in conventional commercial electrodes. Electrical stimulation using carbon nanotube electrodes was also achieved. We attribute the superior performances of the carbon nanotube electrodes to their three dimensional nature and the strong neuro-carbon nanotube affinity. The results presented here show the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for retinal interfacing applications. Specifically, our results demonstrate a route to achieve a reduction of the electrode down to few micrometers in order to achieve high efficacy local stimulation needed in retinal prosthetic devices.

  5. Distribution, markers and functions of retinal microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, L.; Yang, P.Z.; Kijlstra, A.

    2002-01-01

    Retinal microglia originate from hemopoietic cells and invade the retina from the retinal margin and the optic disc, most likely via the blood vessels of the ciliary body and iris, and the retinal vasculature, respectively. The microglial precursors that appear in the retina prior to vascularization

  6. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, J.A.; Joffe, L.; Guibor, P.

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  7. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, J A; Joffe, L; Guibor, P

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  8. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber and ...

  9. Exploring the retinal connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  10. Loss of Responses to Visual But Not Electrical Stimulation in Ganglion Cells of Rats With Severe Photoreceptor Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Retinal implants are intended to help patients with degenerative conditions by electrically stimulating surviving cells to produce artificial vision. However, little is known about how individual retinal ganglion cells respond to direct electrical stimulation in degenerating retina. Here we used a transgenic rat model to characterize ganglion cell responses to light and electrical stimulation during photoreceptor degeneration. Retinas from pigmented P23H-1 rats were compared with wild-type re...

  11. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  12. Reactive microglia and macrophage facilitate the formation of Müller glia-derived retinal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andy J; Zelinka, Christopher; Gallina, Donika; Scott, Melissa A; Todd, Levi

    2014-10-01

    In retinas where Müller glia have been stimulated to become progenitor cells, reactive microglia are always present. Thus, we investigated how the activation or ablation of microglia/macrophage influences the formation of Müller glia-derived progenitor cells (MGPCs) in the retina in vivo. Intraocular injections of the Interleukin-6 (IL6) stimulated the reactivity of microglia/macrophage, whereas other types of retinal glia appear largely unaffected. In acutely damaged retinas where all of the retinal microglia/macrophage were ablated, the formation of proliferating MGPCs was greatly diminished. With the microglia ablated in damaged retinas, levels of Notch and related genes were unchanged or increased, whereas levels of ascl1a, TNFα, IL1β, complement component 3 (C3) and C3a receptor were significantly reduced. In the absence of retinal damage, the combination of insulin and Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) failed to stimulate the formation of MGPCs when the microglia/macrophage were ablated. In addition, intraocular injections of IL6 and FGF2 stimulated the formation of MGPCs in the absence of retinal damage, and this generation of MGPCs was blocked when the microglia/macrophage were absent. We conclude that the activation of microglia and/or infiltrating macrophage contributes to the formation of proliferating MGPCs, and these effects may be mediated by components of the complement system and inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Changes in cortical grey matter density associated with long-standing retinal visual field defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucard, Christine C.; Hernowo, Aditya T.; Maguire, R. Paul; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Hooymans, Johanna M.M.; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal lesions caused by eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration can, over time, eliminate stimulation of parts of the visual cortex. This could lead to degeneration of inactive cortical neuronal tissue, but this has not been established in humans. Here, we used magnetic

  14. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  15. Angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis and retinal-choroidal anastomosis after treatments in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Saito,1 Tomohiro Iida,1,2 Mariko Kano,1 Kanako Itagaki11Department of Ophthalmology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis (RRA and retinal-choroidal anastomosis (RCA for eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab injections as monotherapy or intravitreal bevacizumab combined with photodynamic therapy.Methods: In this interventional, consecutive case series, we retrospectively reviewed five naïve eyes from four patients (mean age 80 years treated with three consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL injections as initial treatment, and followed up for at least 3 months. In cases with over 3 months of follow-up and having recurrence of RAP or leakage by fluorescein angiography, retreatment was performed with a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection and photodynamic therapy.Results: Indocyanine green angiography showed RRA in three eyes with subretinal neovascularization and RCA in two eyes with choroidal neovascularization at baseline. At 3 months after baseline (month 3, neither the RRA nor RCA was occluded in any eye on indocyanine green angiography. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy was performed in three eyes at months 3 (persistent leakage on fluorescein angiography, 6, and 7 (recurrence of RAP lesion, which achieved obvious occlusion of the RRA and RCA. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.13 to 0.21 at month 3 (P = 0.066. No complications or systemic adverse events were noted.Conclusion: Although intravitreal bevacizumab for RAP was effective in improving visual acuity during short-term follow-up, intravitreal bevacizumab could not achieve complete occlusion of RRA and RCA, which could

  16. Mice with early retinal degeneration show differences in neuropeptide expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown R Lane

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, the brain clock responsible for generating circadian rhythms is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Light entrainment of the clock occurs through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs whose axons project to the SCN via the retinohypothalamic tract. Although ipRGCs are sufficient for photoentrainment, rod and cone photoreceptors also contribute. Adult CBA/J mice, which exhibit loss of rod and cone photoreceptors during early postnatal development, have greater numbers of ipRGCs compared to CBA/N control mice. A greater number of photosensitive cells might argue for enhanced light responses, however, these mice exhibit attenuated phase shifting behaviors. To reconcile these findings, we looked for potential differences in SCN neurons of CBA/J mice that might underly the altered circadian behaviors. We hypothesized that CBA/J mice have differences in the expression of neuropeptides in the SCN, where ipRGCs synapse. The neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and vasopressin (VP are expressed by many SCN neurons and play an important role in the generation of circadian rhythms and photic entrainment. Methods Using immunohistochemistry, we looked for differences in the expression of VIP and VP in the SCN of CBA/J mice, and using a light-induced FOS assay, we also examined the degree of retinal innervation of the SCN by ipRGCs. Results Our data demonstrate greater numbers of VIP-and VP-positive cells in the SCN of CBA/J mice and a greater degree of light-induced FOS expression. Conclusions These results implicate changes in neuropeptide expression in the SCN which may underlie the altered circadian responses to light in these animals.

  17. Retinal Muller glia initiate innate response to infectious stimuli via toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    Full Text Available Ocular surgeries and trauma predispose the eye to develop infectious endophthalmitis, which often leads to vision loss. The mechanisms of initiation of innate defense in this disease are not well understood but are presumed to involve retinal glial cells. We hypothesize that retinal Muller glia can recognize and respond to invading pathogens via TLRs, which are key regulators of the innate immune system. Using the mouse retinal sections, human retinal Muller cell line (MIO-M1, and primary mouse retinal Muller cells, we show that they express known human TLR1-10, adaptor molecules MyD88, TRIF, TRAM, and TRAF6, and co-receptors MD2 and CD14. Consistent with the gene expression, protein levels were also detected for the TLRs. Moreover, stimulation of the Muller glia with TLR 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 agonists resulted in an increased TLR expression as assayed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Furthermore, TLR agonists or live pathogen (S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, & C. albicans-challenged Muller glia produced significantly higher levels of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8, concomitantly with the activation of NF-κB, p38 and Erk signaling. This data suggests that Muller glia directly contributes to retinal innate defense by recognizing microbial patterns under infectious conditions; such as those in endophthalmitis.

  18. [Progress of research in retinal image registration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lun; Wei, Lifang; Pan, Lin

    2011-10-01

    The retinal image registration has important applications in the processes of auxiliary diagnosis and treatment for a variety of diseases. The retinal image registration can be used to measure the disease process and the therapeutic effect. A variety of retinal image registration techniques have been studied extensively in recent years. However, there are still many problems existing and there are numerous research possibilities. Based on extensive investigation of existing literatures, the present paper analyzes the feature of retinal image and current challenges of retinal image registration, and reviews the transformation models of the retinal image registration technology and the main research algorithms in current retinal image registration, and analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of various types of algorithms. Some research challenges and future developing trends are also discussed.

  19. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindne

  20. [Surgical managment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritoglou, C; Wolf, A

    2015-05-01

    The detachment of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium can be related to breaks of the retina allowing vitreous fluid to gain access to the subretinal space, to exudative changes of the choroid such as tumours or inflammatory diseases or to excessive tractional forces exerted by interactions of the collagenous vitreous and the retina. Tractional retinal detachment is usually treated by vitrectomy and exudative detachment can be addressed by treatment of the underlying condition in many cases. In rhegmatogenous retinal detachment two different surgical procedures, vitrectomy and scleral buckling, can be applied for functional and anatomic rehabilitation of our patients. The choice of the surgical procedure is not really standardised and often depends on the experience of the surgeon and other more ocular factors including lens status, the number of retinal breaks, the extent of the detachment and the amount of preexisting PVR. Using both techniques, anatomic success rates of over 90 % can be achieved. Especially in young phakic patients scleral buckling offers the true advantage to prevent the progression of cataract formation requiring cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Therefore, scleral buckling should be considered in selected cases as an alternative surgical option in spite of the very important technical refinements in modern vitrectomy techniques. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Topographic prominence discriminator for the detection of short-latency spikes of retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Ahn, Jungryul; Park, Dae Jin; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Kwangsoo; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Senok, Solomon S.; Koo, Kyo-in; Goo, Yong Sook

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Direct stimulation of retinal ganglion cells in degenerate retinas by implanting epi-retinal prostheses is a recognized strategy for restoration of visual perception in patients with retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Elucidating the best stimulus-response paradigms in the laboratory using multielectrode arrays (MEA) is complicated by the fact that the short-latency spikes (within 10 ms) elicited by direct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) stimulation are obscured by the stimulus artifact which is generated by the electrical stimulator. Approach. We developed an artifact subtraction algorithm based on topographic prominence discrimination, wherein the duration of prominences within the stimulus artifact is used as a strategy for identifying the artifact for subtraction and clarifying the obfuscated spikes which are then quantified using standard thresholding. Main results. We found that the prominence discrimination based filters perform creditably in simulation conditions by successfully isolating randomly inserted spikes in the presence of simple and even complex residual artifacts. We also show that the algorithm successfully isolated short-latency spikes in an MEA-based recording from degenerate mouse retinas, where the amplitude and frequency characteristics of the stimulus artifact vary according to the distance of the recording electrode from the stimulating electrode. By ROC analysis of false positive and false negative first spike detection rates in a dataset of one hundred and eight RGCs from four retinal patches, we found that the performance of our algorithm is comparable to that of a generally-used artifact subtraction filter algorithm which uses a strategy of local polynomial approximation (SALPA). Significance. We conclude that the application of topographic prominence discrimination is a valid and useful method for subtraction of stimulation artifacts with variable amplitudes and shapes. We propose that our algorithm

  2. Retinal detachment in a patient with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muh-Shy; Ho, Tzyy-Chang; Chang, Ching-Chung; Hou, Ping-Kang

    2007-01-01

    We report extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers in a 42-year-old patient with retinal detachment. Fundus examination revealed a horseshoe-shaped tear near the temporal edge. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed and firm vitreo-retinal adhesion was noticed in the area of extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Following vitrectomy with silicone oil tamponade, the retina was reattached successfully. In conclusion, retinal detachment may develop in patients with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Vitrectomy may be performed to treat this condition.

  3. Retinal prosthesis that incorporates the organization of the nerve fibre layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGibbon, Thomas

    2017-01-30

    Recent efforts to restore partial vision in blind patients have made significant progress. Currently, prosthetic design concentrates on stimulating as many foveal retinal ganglion cells as possible but is hampered by stimulation of the nerve fibre layer. This results in a nonvisuotopic arrangement of phosphenes (stimulation percepts). This article suggests that by extending the stimulation area well beyond the fovea and stimulating the nerve fibre layer, axons from any remaining ganglion cells in more peripheral regions of the retina (low acuity) can be used to generate a visuotopic map. Stimulation of the fibre layer will generate a large number of stimulation percepts; however, it is unlikely that these will have sufficient topographic order to be immediately useful to the patient. Thus, it will be necessary to recreate an ordered visuotopic map by using appropriate computer algorithms and interactions between the patient and the clinician.

  4. Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorish, John F.

    2006-09-01

    There are several research projects going on around the world, which are attempting to develop a prosthetic device to restore sight to the blind. This paper describes the efforts of Second Sight of New York, Inc. The device being developed is called an Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP), which is basically a small optical computer that fits into the intraocular space of the eye. The AeRP is designed to draw light into the device by specially designed fibre optics. The light is ‘digitized’ by the fibre optic system and then directed to individual photodiode cells making up concentric cylinders thus providing several hundred photodiode cells in the device. The produced electrical stimulation from each cell is then delivered to the retinal ganglion cells by a specially designed delivery system utilizing electrically conducting polymer strands (ECP), which sit on an ‘umbrella’ at the back of the device. The retinal ganglion cells receive the electrical stimulation, which would then be transmitted through the visual system of the brain. There are several innovations in this approach as compared to the other projects. They include, first the design, which will allow for a high number of PC to produce electrical stimulation that will stimulate multiple RGC per PC; the use of the ECP strands has not been used in such an approach before this. Tests have revealed that nerve cells have a good affinity for the material of the ECP. The use of the ECP as well as the fact that the AeRP is completely photovoltaic, with no external power sources, implies that there will not be high heat build-up in the back of the eye, which might damage RGC. A smaller version of the AeRP called the Mini epi-Retinal Prosthesis (MeRP) is the subject of a complimentary paper. It is being built now and will be tested in cell culture studies to determine the efficacy of the design and materials. No actual implants have been performed yet.

  5. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  6. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RETINAL HEMORRHAGIC PATTERNS AND PERFUSION STATUS IN EYES WITH ACUTE CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral retinal hemorrhagic patterns in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion, and to explore their clinical relevance in differentiating for the retinal perfusion status, through a prospective, and cross-sectional study. Fifty eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion were included. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator and retinal perfusion status were evaluated by ultra-wide field fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Retinal perfusion was categorized as nonischemic in 29 eyes, ischemic in 18 eyes, and undeterminable in 3 eyes. None of the examined eyes had flame-shaped retinal hemorrhages in the periphery. All hemorrhages were rounded-dot or blot and were variable in size. Particle analysis was performed to quantify hemorrhage size, and showed higher values in eyes having larger blot hemorrhages, and lower values in eyes having dot or smaller blot hemorrhages. Mean size of maximum peripheral dot or blot hemorrhage was larger in eyes classified as ischemic (10,763.0 ± 5,946.3 pixels) than as nonischemic (2,839.9 ± 1,153.6 pixels, P retinal perfusion status, which was 0.963 (P retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion using particle analysis. The resulting hemorrhage size measurement was considered to be often useful in determining retinal perfusion status. Because they can be noninvasively evaluated with readily available equipment, peripheral hemorrhagic patterns might be good clinical markers of retinal perfusion.

  7. Simulation and assessment of bioinspired visual processing system for epi-retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurro, Milena; Baselli, Giuseppe; Orabona, Francesco; Sandini, Giulio

    2006-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis represents the best near-term hope for individuals with chronic blinding disease of the outer retina. However the small number of stimulating electrodes produces a poor, low resolution image. We propose a new preprocessing method for epi-retinal implants and validate it through a novel simulation of the implanted blind perception. Twenty-one normally sighted, untrained subjects performed a face recognition test. Three different electrodes grids were simulated: rectangular, hexagonal and log-polar. The results show that the proposed pre-processing method has a good and statistically significant performance improvement.

  8. Cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Shuang; YE Jun-jie; ZHAO Jia-liang; LI Tai-sheng; HAN Yang

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most severe intraocular complication that results in total retinal destruction and loss of visual acuity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to investigate the fundus characteristics, systemic manifestations and therapeutic outcomes of CMV retinitis associated with AIDS.Methods It was a retrospective case series. CMV retinitis was present in 39 eyes (25 patients). Best corrected visual acuities, anterior segment, fundus features, fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts of the patients with CMV retinitis associated with AIDS were analyzed. Intravitreal injections of ganciclovir (400 μg) were performed in 4 eyes (2 patients).Results Retinal vasculitis, dense, full-thickness, yellow-white lesions along vascular distribution with irregular granules at the border, and hemorrhage on the retinal surface were present in 28 eyes. The vitreous was clear or mildly opaque.Late stage of the retinopathy was demonstrated in 8 eyes characterized as atrophic retina, sclerotic and attenuated vessels, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, and optic nerve atrophy. Retinal detachment was found in 3 eyes. The average CD4+ T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood of the patients with CMV retinitis was (30.6±25.3) ×106/L (range,(0-85) × 106/L). After intravitreal injections of ganciclovir, visual acuity was improved and fundus lesions regressed.Conclusions CMV retinitis is the most severe and the most common intraocular complication in patients with AIDS. For the patients with yellow-white retinal lesions, hemorrhage and retinal vasculitis without clear cause, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology should be performed. Routine eye examination is also indicated in HIV positive patients.

  9. [Vitreo-retinal surgery for complicated retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Z

    1993-07-01

    93 eyes (93 patients) of complicated retinal detachment were treated with vitreo-retinal surgery. Among the series, 75 eyes were rhegmatogenous with PVR C3-D3 in 66 eyes (88.0%), while the remaining 18 eyes were traction induced. None of the cases had giant tears or complicating diabetes. On discharge from the hospital, the operation was effective in 62 cases (66.7%), in whom the retina was totally reattached or only a small amount of subretinal fluid remained. In a group of 40 eyes where the inert gas SF6 was used, the operation was effective in 30 cases (75.0%). 41 cases were followed up postoperatively for over 3 months, averaging 13.7 months, to find the operative results stable in 33 eyes (80.5%), with the visual acuity improved in 22 cases (66.7%), unchanged in 9 cases (27.3%), and decreased in 2 cases (6.0%). The operative procedures, the peeling of pre-retinal membrane, the effect of PVR severity on the operative results, and the promotion of operative efficacy by application of wide encircling buckle and inert gas tamponade were discussed.

  10. Cytotoxic effects of curcumin in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrit Hollborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as

  11. Cytotoxic Effects of Curcumin in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollborn, Margrit; Chen, Rui; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Backround Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM) and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM). The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. Conclusion It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM) has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as concomitant therapy of

  12. The Argus(®) II Retinal Prosthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yvonne Hsu-Lin; da Cruz, Lyndon

    2016-01-01

    The Argus(®) II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products) is the first prosthetic vision device to obtain regulatory approval in both Europe and the USA. As such it has entered the commercial market as a treatment for patients with profound vision loss from end-stage outer retinal disease, predominantly retinitis pigmentosa. To date, over 100 devices have been implanted worldwide, representing the largest group of patients currently treated with visual prostheses. The system works by direct stimulation of the relatively preserved inner retina via epiretinal microelectrodes, thereby replacing the function of the degenerated photoreceptors. Visual information from a glasses-mounted video camera is converted to a pixelated image by an external processor, before being transmitted to the microelectrode array at the macula. Elicited retinal responses are then relayed via the normal optic nerve to the cortex for interpretation. We reviewed the animal and human studies that led to the development of the Argus(®) II device. A sufficiently robust safety profile was demonstrated in the phase I/II clinical trial of 30 patients. Improvement of function in terms of orientation and mobility, target localisation, shape and object recognition, and reading of letters and short unrehearsed words have also been shown. There remains a wide variability in the functional outcomes amongst the patients and the factors contributing to these performance differences are still unclear. Future developments in terms of both software and hardware aimed at improving visual function have been proposed. Further experience in clinical outcomes is being acquired due to increasing implantation.

  13. Zika virus infects cells lining the blood-retinal barrier and causes chorioretinal atrophy in mouse eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Guest, John-Michael; Kanwar, Mamta; Gao, Nan; Juzych, Mark S.; Abrams, Gary W.; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an important pathogen that causes not only neurologic, but also ocular, abnormalities. Thus, it is imperative that models to study ZIKV pathogenesis in the eye are developed to identify potential targets for interventions. Here, we studied ZIKV interactions with human retinal cells and evaluated ZIKV’s pathobiology in mouse eyes. We showed that cells lining the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), the retinal endothelium, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were highly permissive and susceptible to ZIKV-induced cell death. Direct inoculation of ZIKV in eyes of adult C57BL/6 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) KO mice caused chorioretinal atrophy with RPE mottling, a common ocular manifestation of congenital ZIKV infection in humans. This response was associated with induced expression of multiple inflammatory and antiviral (IFNs) response genes in the infected mouse retina. Interestingly, ISG15 KO eyes exhibited severe chorioretinitis, which coincided with increased retinal cell death and higher ZIKV replication. Collectively, our study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that ZIKV causes retinal lesions and infects the cells lining the BRB and that ISG15 plays a role in retinal innate defense against ZIKV infection. Our mouse model can be used to study mechanisms underlying ZIKV-induced chorioretinitis and to gauge ocular antiviral therapies. PMID:28239662

  14. Advances in Retinal Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Viczian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous progress has been made in recent years to generate retinal cells from pluripotent cell sources. These advances provide hope for those suffering from blindness due to lost retinal cells. Understanding the intrinsic genetic network in model organisms, like fly and frog, has led to a better understanding of the extrinsic signaling pathways necessary for retinal progenitor cell formation in mouse and human cell cultures. This review focuses on the culture methods used by different groups, which has culminated in the generation of laminated retinal tissue from both embryonic and induced pluripotent cells. The review also briefly describes advances made in transplantation studies using donor retinal progenitor and cultured retinal cells.

  15. Automatic Vessel Segmentation on Retinal Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Yuan Yu; Chia-Jen Chang; Yen-Ju Yao; Shyr-Shen Yu

    2014-01-01

    Several features of retinal vessels can be used to monitor the progression of diseases. Changes in vascular structures, for example, vessel caliber, branching angle, and tortuosity, are portents of many diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and arterial hyper-tension. This paper proposes an automatic retinal vessel segmentation method based on morphological closing and multi-scale line detection. First, an illumination correction is performed on the green band retinal image. Next, the morphological closing and subtraction processing are applied to obtain the crude retinal vessel image. Then, the multi-scale line detection is used to fine the vessel image. Finally, the binary vasculature is extracted by the Otsu algorithm. In this paper, for improving the drawbacks of multi-scale line detection, only the line detectors at 4 scales are used. The experimental results show that the accuracy is 0.939 for DRIVE (digital retinal images for vessel extraction) retinal database, which is much better than other methods.

  16. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Niwa; Hitomi Aoki; Akihiro Hirata; Hiroyuki Tomita; Green, Paul G.; Akira Hara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insi...

  17. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary; E.PICKARD; Patricia; J.SOLLARS

    2010-01-01

    A new mammalian photoreceptor was recently discovered to reside in the ganglion cell layer of the inner retina.These intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells(ipRGCs) express a photopigment,melanopsin,that confers upon them the ability to respond to light in the absence of all rod and cone photoreceptor input.Although relatively few in number,ipRGCs extend their dendrites across large expanses of the retina making them ideally suited to function as irradiance detectors to assess changes in ambient light levels.Phototransduction in ipRGCs appears to be mediated by transient receptor potential channels more closely resembling the phototransduction cascade of invertebrate rather than vertebrate photoreceptors.ipRGCs convey irradiance information centrally via the optic nerve to influence several functions.ipRGCs are the primary retinal input to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus(SCN),a circadian oscillator and biological clock,and this input entrains the SCN to the day/night cycle.ipRGCs contribute irradiance signals that regulate pupil size and they also provide signals that interface with the autonomic nervous system to regulate rhythmic gene activity in major organs of the body.ipRGCs also provide excitatory drive to dopaminergic amacrine cells in the retina,providing a novel basis for the restructuring of retinal circuits by light.Here we review the ground-breaking discoveries,current progress and directions for future investigation.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...... retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks...... of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells....

  19. RETINAL VASCULITIS ASSOCIATED WITH NEUROMYELITIS OPTICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Mikel; Khan, Ayesha

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of retinal vasculitis in a patient with neuromyelitis optica. Clinical case report, imaging was obtained with photographs, fluorescein angiography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The aforementioned patient presented with urinary incontinence and spastic paraparesis. She was found to have a transverse myelitis on magnetic resonance imaging and positive anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) testing. She had no associated visual symptoms. Examination revealed a retinal vasculitis. There have been no previous reports of retinal vasculitis associated with neuromyelitis optica or neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Retinal vasculitis can be associated with neuromyelitis optica.

  20. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa de Hoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB, play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies.

  1. Retinal occlusive vasculer disorder and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Ortak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease that affected older women with many ocular manifestations. Also, these systemic diseases can cause retinal vein occlusion and arterial occlusion that lead to serious and permanent visual loss. Rheumatoid arthritis's the most common manifestation is that retinal vasculitis and retinal vascular complications are associated with this complication. In this review, retinal vascular occlusive diseases are presented to associated with rheumatoid arthritis in literature. Rheumatoid arthritis and its complications have been outlined and was made to create a new perspective. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 71-73

  2. Light-induced retinal injury enhanced neurotrophins secretion and neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate neurotrophins expression and neurotrophic effect change in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs under different types of stimulation. METHODS: Rats were exposed in 10,000 lux white light to develop light-induced retinal injury. Supernatants of homogenized retina (SHR, either from normal or light-injured retina, were used to stimulate MSCs. Quantitative real time for polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were conducted for analysis the expression change in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in MSCs after stimulation. Conditioned medium from SHR-stimulated MSCs and control MSCs were collected for evaluation their effect on retinal explants. RESULTS: Supernatants of homogenized retina from light-injured rats significantly promoted neurotrophins secretion from MSCs (p<0.01. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by light-injured SHR significantly reduced DNA fragmentation (p<0.01, up-regulated bcl-2 (p<0.01 and down-regulated bax (p<0.01 in retinal explants, displaying enhanced protective effect. CONCLUSIONS: Light-induced retinal injury is able to enhance neurotrophins secretion from mesenchymal stem cells and promote the neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells.

  3. Blue but not red light stimulation in the dark has antidepressant effect in behavioral despair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyilikci, Onur; Aydin, E; Canbeyli, R

    2009-10-12

    The present study investigated potential antidepressant effect of light exposure in the dark phase of a 12:12 L/D cycle on behavioral despair. In Exp.1, male Wistar rats were administered a single, 10 min broadband light pulse (1300lx) either 3h (ZT15) or 9h (ZT21) after dark onset (ZT12) and tested in two consecutive swim tests separated by 24 h. Photic stimulation at ZT21 but not ZT15 significantly reduced immobility in the second swim test relative to the first test compared to controls that were treated similarly except for light pulse administration (pblue or red end of the spectrum at ZT21 or were treated similarly except for photic exposure (controls). Exposure to blue light resulted in significantly reduced duration of immobility in the second swim test relative to that of the first test compared to the red light and control groups (pblue light stimulation for the melanopsin-containing ganglion cells in the retina that are sensitive to wavelengths in the blue but not red end of the visible spectrum.

  4. [Diagnostic significance of electrocortical responses to rhythmic and solitary photic stimuli in patients with hepato-portal encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, L G; Ershov, Iu A; Puchinskaia, L M; Gubskiĭ, L V; Lisina, G I

    1976-01-01

    In order to clarify some diagnostical criteria of latent hepato-portal encephalopathy in 57 patients with intrahepatic forms of portal hypertension the authors studied the character of driving response in photorhythmical stimulation. In 9 patients the development of evoked potentials depending upon the significance of the stimula was studied as well. The studies confirmed the prognostical significance of a slowing down the mean frequency of rhythms in the EEG in relation to the development of acute encephalopathy and a certain tendency to the shift in the spectrum of driving responses to low frequency and a worsening of driving responses in slowing down the medium rhythm frequency of EEG. In patients with changed resting activity in the Background EEG there was a drop in the amplitude of late components of evoked potentials.

  5. The functional performance of the Argus II retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronks, H Christiaan; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2014-01-01

    Visual prostheses are devices to treat profound vision loss by stimulating nerve cells anywhere along the visual pathway, typically with electrical pulses. The Argus II implant, developed by Second Sight Medical Products (SSMP, Sylmar, CA, USA), targets the retina and features 60 electrodes that electrically stimulate the surviving retinal neurons. Of the approximately 20 research groups that are actively developing visual prostheses, SSMP has the longest track record. The Argus II was the first visual prosthesis to become commercially available: it received the European conformity mark in 2011 and FDA approval was granted in early 2013 for humanitarian use in the USA. Meanwhile, the Argus II safety/benefit study has been extended for research purposes, and is still ongoing. In this review, we will discuss the performance of the Argus II in restoring sight to the blind, and we will shed light on its expected developments in the coming years.

  6. Cardiac Optogenetics: Enhancement by All-trans-Retinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinzhu; Chen, Kay; Lucero, Rachel V; Ambrosi, Christina M; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-11-16

    All-trans-Retinal (ATR) is a photosensitizer, serving as the chromophore for depolarizing and hyperpolarizing light-sensitive ion channels and pumps (opsins), recently employed as fast optical actuators. In mammalian optogenetic applications (in brain and heart), endogenous ATR availability is not considered a limiting factor, yet it is unclear how ATR modulation may affect the response to optical stimulation. We hypothesized that exogenous ATR may improve light responsiveness of cardiac cells modified by Channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), hence lowering the optical pacing energy. In virally-transduced (Ad-ChR2(H134R)-eYFP) light-sensitive cardiac syncytium in vitro, ATR supplements ≤2 μM improved cardiomyocyte viability and augmented ChR2 membrane expression several-fold, while >4 μM was toxic. Employing integrated optical actuation (470 nm) and optical mapping, we found that 1-2 μM ATR dramatically reduced optical pacing energy (over 30 times) to several μW/mm(2), lowest values reported to date, but also caused action potential prolongation, minor changes in calcium transients and no change in conduction. Theoretical analysis helped explain ATR-caused reduction of optical excitation threshold in cardiomyocytes. We conclude that cardiomyocytes operate at non-saturating retinal levels, and carefully-dosed exogenous ATR can enhance the performance of ChR2 in cardiac cells and yield energy benefits over orders of magnitude for optogenetic stimulation.

  7. Wireless link and microelectronics design for retinal prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wentai [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    This project focuses on delivering power and data to the artificial retinal implant inside the eye and the implant microstimulator electronics which delivers the current pulses to stimulate the retinal layer to elicit visual perception. Since the use of invasive means such as tethering wires to transmit power and data results in discomfort to the patients which could eventually cause infection due to the abrasion caused by the wire and contact of the internals of the eye to the external environment, a completely wireless approach is used to transfer both power and data. Power is required inside the eye for the microelectronic implant which uses a dual voltage supply scheme (positive and negative) to deliver biphasic (anodic and cathodic) current pulses. Data in the form of digital bits from the data transmitter external to the eye, carries information about the amplitude, phase width, interphase delay, stimulation sequence for each implant electrode. The data receiver unit decodes the digital stream and the microstimulator unit generates the appropriate current stimuli. Since the external unit consisting of the power transmitter can experience coupling a variation with the power receiver due to the patient’s movements, a closed loop approach is used which varies the transmitted power dynamically to automatically compensate for such movements. This report presents the salient features of this research activities and results.

  8. Photobiomodulation reduces photoreceptor death and regulates cytoprotection in early states of P23H retinal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Diana K.; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Schmitt, Heather; Abroe, Betsy; Stoehr, Michele; Dubis, Adam; Carroll, Joseph; Stone, Jonathan; Valter, Krisztina; Eells, Janis

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation by light in the far-red to near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (photobiomodulation, PBM) has been demonstrated to attenuate the severity of neurodegenerative disease in experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 670 nm PBM would protect against the loss of retinal function and improve photoreceptor survival in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa, the P23H transgenic rat. P23H rat pups were treated once per day with a 670 nm LED array (180 sec treatments at 50 mW/cm2; fluence 9 joules/cm2) (Quantum Devices Inc., Barneveld WI) from postnatal day (p) 16-20 or from p10-20. Sham-treated rats were restrained, but not exposed to NIR light. The status of the retina was determined at p22 by assessment of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cell death. In a second series of studies, retinal status was assessed at p30 by measuring photoreceptor function by ERG and retinal morphology by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). 670 nm PBM increased retinal mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity and upregulated the retina's production of the key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, MnSOD. PBM also attenuated photoreceptor cell loss and improved photoreceptor function. PBM protects photoreceptors in the developing P23H retina, by augmenting mitochondrial function and stimulating antioxidant protective pathways. Photobiomodulation may have therapeutic potential, where mitochondrial damage is a step in the death of photoreceptors.

  9. Caspase-dependent retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in the rat model of acute diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural apoptosis is generally believed to be mediated by two distinct pathways, caspase-dependant and caspase-independent pathways. This study investigated the apoptotic pathways involved in retinal ganglion ceils in acute diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Expression and localization of caspase-3 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) proteins in the retina of diabetic rats was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and immunofluorescent staining specific for caspase-3 and AIF were applied to analyze for apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. In addition, a caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-CHO was injected intravitreally to further determine the apoptotic pathways of retinal ganglion cells triggered in acute diabetes. Results Two weeks after induction of diabetes, a significant increase in caspase-3 protein expression and localization occurred in the nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and inner plexiform layer of the retina. Four weeks after the onset of diabetes, the increase in caspase-3 expression was profound eight weeks postinduction of diabetes (P<0.05). Meanwhile, no AIF protein expression was detected in this study. In addition, intravitreal administration of the caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-CHO reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells by its direct inhibitory action on caspase-3. Conclusion Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways may be the main stimulant of STZ-induced retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in acute diabetes.

  10. Retinal vessel tortuosity associated with central retinal vein occlusion: an optical coherence tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Kumagai, Kyoko; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Ogino, Ken; Murakami, Tomoaki; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-07

    We studied morphologic changes of the retinal vasculature in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) through the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Major retinal vessels in 35 eyes from 35 consecutive patients with acute CRVO were examined prospectively and longitudinally with sequential thin sectioning and circumpapillary scanning. Anteroposterior venous tortuosity associated with CRVO was quantified on longitudinal OCT images of a randomly selected major temporal vein. On OCT sections of a given vein, we identified the innermost and outermost points of the vessel wall. The degree of anteroposterior venous tortuosity was defined as the difference between the vertical distances from the retinal pigment epithelium to the center of the venous lumen at these two points. The OCT images revealed that the major retinal veins traveled tortuously through the swollen neurosensory retina from the inner retinal surface to the retinal pigment epithelium. The degree of anteroposterior venous tortuosity was correlated with poor visual acuity (r = 0.457, P = 0.017), increased mean foveal thickness (r = 0.671, P retinal detachment was detected around the optic disc, which correlated with anteroposterior venous tortuosity. In 14 (40%) eyes, elongated major retinal veins disrupted the boundary between retinal vessels and parenchyma, which resulted in juxtavenous splitting of the neurosensory retina. In eyes with CRVO, OCT can be used to visualize anteroposterior venous tortuosity and associated structural changes to the retinal parenchyma.

  11. Retinal vascular oximetry during ranibizumab treatment of central retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; la Cour, Morten; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of intravitreal injections of the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor ranibizumab on retinal oxygenation in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). METHODS: Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with CRVO was analysed using the Oxymap Retinal...... in eyes with CRVO than in the fellow eyes (95%±8% and 91%±3%, p=0.04). Mean visual acuity increased from 51±24 letters ETDRS at baseline to 66±24 and 69±20 letters ETRDS, respectively, at 3 months and 6 months treatment (mean±SD, pcentral retinal...... Oximeter P3, before and during 6 months of treatment with intravitreal injections of ranibizumab. RESULTS: At presentation, retinal venous oxygen saturation was lower in eyes with CRVO than in the healthy fellow eyes (32±13% vs 59±10%, respectively, p=0.001) whereas retinal arterial saturation was higher...

  12. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions.

  13. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gabai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundus autofluorescence (FAF is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications.

  14. RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSIONS - A CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadevi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion is the most common retinal occlusive disorder encountered by opthalmologists and is usually associated with a variable amount of visual loss.The study was conducted over a period of 22 months, we performed a combined analysis of risk factors, clinical presentation, management and complication of these 51 patients

  15. Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; de Bruin, J

    1981-11-01

    Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer in rabbit eyes is studied by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that retinal striations noted ophthalmoscopically in these eyes represent individual fiber bundles, Axon bundles are compartmentalized within tissue tunnels comprised of elongated processes of glial cell origin.

  16. Retinal ischemia and embolism. Causes and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijman, C.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The ocular fundus allows direct visualization of the retinal vasculature, blood vessels that are part of the cerebral circulation. Unraveling the causes of retinal ischemia may provide further insight in the pathophysiological processes that underlie cerebral ischemia. The primary aim of the studies

  17. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Niral Karia

    2010-01-01

    Niral KariaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Southend Hospital, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff on Sea, Essex, United KingdomAbstract: This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.Keywords: central, hemispheric, branch, retinal vein occlusion, visual loss

  18. Retinal artery occlusions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Wallis, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a case of RAO in a 13 year old girl with a preceding history of hyperextension of the neck at her hairdressers for a long duration and use of her mobile phone handset resting it against the side of her neck presumably exerting some pressure on carotids during the same time. Materials and methods of this study was reported as case report and review of literature. A 13 year-old girl presented with the left supero-nasal scotoma due to an inferior temporal branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO). She underwent extensive investigations and no underlying cause was discovered. She gave a history of cervical extension over a long period of time while having the hair coloured twice in the preceding week. She also mentioned that she was using her mobile phone more or less continuously during both these occasions keeping it against her neck. Given the above history it is possible that the pressure on the ipsilateral carotid arteries or the prolong neck extension may have been responsible for the formation of a platelet embolus resulting in the BRAO. In conclusion, although cerebro-vascular accidents due to 'beauty parlor stroke syndrome' (JAMA 269:2085-2086, 1993) have been reported previously it has not been reported in children to our knowledge. On the other hand, 'beauty parlor stroke syndrome' occurs due to a dissection of the vertebral arteries or due to mechanical compression of the vertebral arteries during the prolonged hyperextension of the neck. The central retinal artery originates from the internal carotid circulation and it is highly unlikely for an embolus to enter the retinal circulation from the vertebral arteries. Therefore, the authors favour the possibility that the compulsive use of a mobile phone exerting pressure on the carotid arteries for a long time may have led to the formation of an embolus and subsequent RAO in this case.

  19. Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, William F; Feldman, Kenneth W; Weiss, Avery H; Tencer, Alan F

    2002-04-01

    To define forces of youth soccer ball heading (headers) and determine whether heading causes retinal hemorrhage. Regional Children's Hospital, youth soccer camp. Male and female soccer players, 13 to 16 years old, who regularly head soccer balls. Dilated retinal examination, after 2-week header diary, and accelerometer measurement of heading a lofted soccer ball. Twenty-one youth soccer players, averaging 79 headers in the prior 2 weeks, and 3 players who did not submit header diaries lacked retinal hemorrhage. Thirty control subjects also lacked retinal hemorrhage. Seven subjects heading the ball experienced linear cranial accelerations of 3.7 +/- 1.3g. Rotational accelerations were negligible. Headers, not associated with globe impact, are unlikely to cause retinal hemorrhage. Correctly executed headers did not cause significant rotational acceleration of the head, but incorrectly executed headers might.

  20. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness.

  1. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F;

    2014-01-01

    of this study was to examine the prevalence and diagnostic spectrum of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study with data from the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry that comprises all patients in Denmark with generalized retinal....... RESULTS: Of the 5,602,628 Danish citizens on January 1, 2013, 1622 patients were registered as having a generalized retinal dystrophy and were alive and living in Denmark, corresponding to a prevalence of 1:3,454. In 28% of cases the eye condition was part of a syndrome, while the remaining 72% had eye...... disease only. Aside from simplex cases (45%), the most common hereditary pattern was autosomal recessive (23%). CONCLUSION: This epidemiological survey demonstrates that the prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population is 1:3454. Many of the dystrophies are the subjects of clinical...

  2. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhushanker, M.; Topiwalla, Tasneem T.; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Background Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Case presentation Here we present a case of 59?year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4?weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular ser...

  3. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  4. Bilateral Progressive Obliterative Retinal Vasculitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, 10 cases of a special type of retinal vasculitis are reported, which was characterized by progressive obliteration of vessels in both eyes, developed from the periphery to the posterior ploe, and was complicated by vitreous hemorrhage (5 eyes) and neovascular glaucoma (5 eyes) in later stage. The visual acuity was 0. 05 in 10 eyes (50%). Argon laser pho-tocoagulation seemed to be able to retard the natural course of the disease. Fundus changes, differential diagnosis and treatment etc are...

  5. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eAntal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS seems likely to open a new era of the field of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the human brain by directly interfering with cortical rhythms. It is expected to synchronize (by one single resonance frequency or desynchronize (e.g. by the application of several frequencies cortical oscillations. If applied long enough it may cause neuroplastic effects. In the theta range it may improve cognition when applied in phase. Alpha rhythms could improve motor performance, whereas beta intrusion may deteriorate them. TACS with both alpha and beta frequencies has a high likelihood to induce retinal phosphenes. Gamma intrusion can possibly interfere with attention. Stimulation in the ripple range induces intensity dependent inhibition or excitation in the motor cortex most likely by entrainment of neuronal networks, whereas stimulation in the low kHz range induces excitation by neuronal membrane interference. TACS in the 200 kHz range may have a potential in oncology.

  6. Prediction of cortical responses to simultaneous electrical stimulation of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halupka, Kerry J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Wong, Yan T.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Simultaneous electrical stimulation of multiple electrodes has shown promise in diversifying the responses that can be elicited by retinal prostheses compared to interleaved single electrode stimulation. However, the effects of interactions between electrodes are not well understood and clinical trials with simultaneous stimulation have produced inconsistent results. We investigated the effects of multiple electrode stimulation of the retina by developing a model of cortical responses to retinal stimulation. Approach. Electrical stimuli consisting of temporally sparse, biphasic current pulses, with amplitudes sampled from a bi-dimensional Gaussian distribution, were simultaneously delivered to the retina across a 42-channel electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of anesthetized cats. Visual cortex activity was recorded using penetrating microelectrode arrays. These data were used to identify a linear-nonlinear model of cortical responses to retinal stimulation. The ability of the model to generalize was tested by predicting responses to non-white patterned stimuli. Main results. The model accurately predicted two cortical activity measures: multi-unit neural responses and evoked potential responses to white noise stimuli. The model also provides information about electrical receptive fields, including the relative effects of each stimulating electrode on every recording site. Significance. We have demonstrated a simple model that accurately describes cortical responses to simultaneous stimulation of a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. Overall, our results demonstrate that cortical responses to simultaneous multi-electrode stimulation of the retina are repeatable and predictable, and that interactions between electrodes during simultaneous stimulation are predominantly linear. The model shows promise for determining optimal stimulation paradigms for exploiting interactions between electrodes to shape neural activity, thereby improving

  7. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  8. Demarcation laser photocoagulation induced retinal necrosis and rupture resulting in large retinal tear formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Carlos; Pieramici, Dante J; Matsui, Rodrigo; Rabena, Melvin; Graue, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Retinal tears after laser photocoagulation are a rare complication that occurs after intense laser. It is talked about among retina specialist occurring particularly at the end of a surgical case while applying endophotocoagulation; to the best our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of a large retinal tear induced after attempted in-office demarcation laser photocoagulation (DLP) that simulated a giant retinal tear. DLP has been employed in the management of selected cases of macula sparring rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Even though extension of the retinal detachment through the "laser barrier" is considered a failure of treatment, few complications have been described with the use of this less invasive retinal detachment repair technique. We describe a case of a high myopic woman who initially was treated with demarcation laser photocoagulation for an asymptomatic retinal detachment associated with a single horseshoe tear and a full thickness large retinal tear was created where the laser was placed. Intense laser photocoagulation resulted in abrupt laser induced retinal necrosis and rupture creating this large retinal break. Proper laser technique should reduce the risks associated with this procedure.

  9. Presumed toxoplasmic central retinal artery occlusion and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Haruka Arai,1 Tsutomu Sakai,1 Kiichiro Okano,1 Ranko Aoyagi,1 Ayano Imai,2 Hiroshi Takase,2 Manabu Mochizuki,2 Hiroshi Tsuneoka11Department of Ophthalmology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing are rare in ocular toxoplasmosis. We report a case of toxoplasmic CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. A healthy 83-year-old male developed left panuveitis. Funduscopic examination of the left eye showed a swollen optic disc and sheathing of the retinal artery with a dense vitreous haze and a white retinal lesion. Serum anti-toxoplasma antibodies were positive in a latex agglutination assay. Vitrectomy was performed to improve visualization of the retinal lesions and for examination of causative microorganisms. A postoperative fundus examination revealed CRAO with optic disc involvement and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. Qualitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction detected the Toxoplasma gondii B1 gene in ocular fluid from both the aqueous and vitreous humor. The presumed diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis was made and treatment was started with prednisone and acetylspiramycin with subsequent improvement. Two months later, the patient developed active retinochoroiditis in the left eye. After 6 weeks of anti-toxoplasma therapy, the disease involuted. Retinal vascular occlusions and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing are rare in toxoplasmosis. This is the first case report of toxoplasmic CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. The diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis should be considered in patients with retinal artery occlusions and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing associated with inflammation.Keywords: ocular toxoplasmosis, toxoplasma retinochoroiditis

  10. Intraspecific variability in the life histories of endemic coral-reef fishes between photic and mesophotic depths across the Central Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, M. S.; Taylor, B. M.; Franklin, E. C.

    2017-06-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) represent the lowest depth distribution inhabited by many coral reef-associated organisms. Research on fishes associated with MCEs is sparse, leading to a critical lack of knowledge of how reef fish found at mesophotic depths may vary from their shallow reef conspecifics. We investigated intraspecific variability in body condition and growth of three Hawaiian endemics collected from shallow, photic reefs (5-33 m deep) and MCEs (40-75 m) throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago and Johnston Atoll: the detritivorous goldring surgeonfish, Ctenochaetus strigosus, and the planktivorous threespot chromis, Chromis verater, and Hawaiian dascyllus, Dascyllus albisella. Estimates of body condition and size-at-age varied between shallow and mesophotic depths; however, these demographic differences were outweighed by the magnitude of variability found across the latitudinal gradient of locations sampled within the Central Pacific. Body condition and maximum body size were lowest in samples collected from shallow and mesophotic Johnston Atoll sites, with no difference occurring between depths. Samples from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands tended to have the highest body condition and reached the largest body sizes, with differences between shallow and mesophotic sites highly variable among species. The findings of this study support newly emerging research demonstrating intraspecific variability in the life history of coral-reef fish species whose distributions span shallow and mesophotic reefs. This suggests not only that the conservation and fisheries management should take into consideration differences in the life histories of reef-fish populations across spatial scales, but also that information derived from studies of shallow fishes be applied with caution to conspecific populations in mesophotic coral environments.

  11. Optical coherence tomography angiography in retinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Chalam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD, retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA. Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  12. Genomic analysis of mouse retinal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Blackshaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is comprised of seven major cell types that are generated in overlapping but well-defined intervals. To identify genes that might regulate retinal development, gene expression in the developing retina was profiled at multiple time points using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE. The expression patterns of 1,051 genes that showed developmentally dynamic expression by SAGE were investigated using in situ hybridization. A molecular atlas of gene expression in the developing and mature retina was thereby constructed, along with a taxonomic classification of developmental gene expression patterns. Genes were identified that label both temporal and spatial subsets of mitotic progenitor cells. For each developing and mature major retinal cell type, genes selectively expressed in that cell type were identified. The gene expression profiles of retinal Müller glia and mitotic progenitor cells were found to be highly similar, suggesting that Müller glia might serve to produce multiple retinal cell types under the right conditions. In addition, multiple transcripts that were evolutionarily conserved that did not appear to encode open reading frames of more than 100 amino acids in length ("noncoding RNAs" were found to be dynamically and specifically expressed in developing and mature retinal cell types. Finally, many photoreceptor-enriched genes that mapped to chromosomal intervals containing retinal disease genes were identified. These data serve as a starting point for functional investigations of the roles of these genes in retinal development and physiology.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  14. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  15. Fundus changes in central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh; Zimmerman, M Bridget

    2015-01-01

    To investigate systematically the retinal and optic disk changes in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and their natural history. This study comprised 562 consecutive patients with CRVO (492 nonischemic [NI-CRVO] and 89 ischemic CRVO [I-CRVO] eyes) seen within 3 months of onset. Ophthalmic evaluation at initial and follow-up visits included recording visual acuity, visual fields, and detailed anterior segment and fundus examinations and fluorescein fundus angiography. Retinal and subinternal limiting membrane hemorrhages and optic disk edema in I-CRVO were initially more marked (P retinal epithelial pigment degeneration, serous macular detachment, and retinal perivenous sheathing developed at a higher rate in I-CRVO than that in NI-CRVO (P retinal venous engorgement than NI-CRVO (P = 0.003). Fluorescein fundus angiography showed significantly more fluorescein leakage, retinal capillary dilatation, capillary obliteration, and broken capillary foveal arcade (P < 0.0001) in I-CRVO than NI-CRVO. Resolution time of CRVO was longer for I-CRVO than NI-CRVO (P < 0.0001). Characteristics and natural history of fundus findings in the two types of CRVO are different.

  16. Automatic diagnosis of retinal diseases from color retinal images

    CERN Document Server

    Jayanthi, D; SwarnaParvathi, S

    2010-01-01

    Teleophthalmology holds a great potential to improve the quality, access, and affordability in health care. For patients, it can reduce the need for travel and provide the access to a superspecialist. Ophthalmology lends itself easily to telemedicine as it is a largely image based diagnosis. The main goal of the proposed system is to diagnose the type of disease in the retina and to automatically detect and segment retinal diseases without human supervision or interaction. The proposed system will diagnose the disease present in the retina using a neural network based classifier.The extent of the disease spread in the retina can be identified by extracting the textural features of the retina. This system will diagnose the following type of diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Drusen.

  17. Time courses of MRI BOLD signals in prolonged visual stimulation. Comparison between colors and orders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikura, Kenichi; Fujita, Hideaki; Kershaw, J.B.; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Seki, Chie [Akita Laboratory, Japan Science and Technology Corp. (Japan); Kashikura, Akemi; Ardekani, B.A.; Kanno, Iwao

    1998-06-01

    We investigated: the BOLD signal response during 270 second photic stimulation using an EPI pulse sequence; the BOLD signal response for two different color checkerboards; and the BOLD signal response during six consecutive stimulation series. Ten healthy human subjects (age 25{+-}5.5 years) were studied with a 1.5 T MRI system (Siemens Vision, Erlangen, Germany). Black and white (BW) and red and white (RW) checkerboards alternating at 8 Hz were applied in turns for a total series of six. Stimulation timing was: 30 sec. off, 15 sec. on, 15 sec. off, 270 sec. on, 15 sec. off, 15 sec. on, 15 sec. off. Acquired data were analyzed according to color and/or order: color (without considering the order); color and order (1st BW vs. 1st RW, 2nd BW vs. 2nd RW, 3rd BW vs. 3rd RW); and order (without considering the color). A t-test (p<0.001) was used for obtaining the activated areas, and simple regression and two-way repeated-measures ANOVA were used for testing the statistical significance of the BOLD response. Results were: the BOLD signal responses during sustained photic stimulation maintained a constant level for the full duration and all series, suggesting stable levels of oxygen extraction and metabolism during cortical activation; the BOLD signal responses in two colors showed no significant difference in time response, suggesting that the neuronal populations perceiving black and red give a similar time response; and the effect of habituation or fatigue as observed by a signal decrease was not obtained, although the S.D. for each subject greatly increased with time and might be an indicator for evaluation fatigue or attention. (author)

  18. Focal electrical stimulation of major ganglion cell types in the primate retina for the design of visual prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Lauren H; Hottowy, Pawel; Mathieson, Keith; Gunning, Deborah E; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2013-04-24

    Electrical stimulation of retinal neurons with an advanced retinal prosthesis may eventually provide high-resolution artificial vision to the blind. However, the success of future prostheses depends on the ability to activate the major parallel visual pathways of the human visual system. Electrical stimulation of the five numerically dominant retinal ganglion cell types was investigated by simultaneous stimulation and recording in isolated peripheral primate (Macaca sp.) retina using multi-electrode arrays. ON and OFF midget, ON and OFF parasol, and small bistratified ganglion cells could all be activated directly to fire a single spike with submillisecond latency using brief pulses of current within established safety limits. Thresholds for electrical stimulation were similar in all five cell types. In many cases, a single cell could be specifically activated without activating neighboring cells of the same type or other types. These findings support the feasibility of direct electrical stimulation of the major visual pathways at or near their native spatial and temporal resolution.

  19. The trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells is mediated by IL-1β and TNF-α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles von-Held-Ventura, Juliana; Mázala-de-Oliveira, Thalita; Cândida da Rocha Oliveira, Amanda; Granja, Marcelo Gomes [Departamento de Neurobiologia, Programa de Neurociências, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n CEP: 24020-150, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire [Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacodinâmica, Av., no 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth, E-mail: egiestal@vm.uff.br [Departamento de Neurobiologia, Programa de Neurociências, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n CEP: 24020-150, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-09

    Ouabain is a steroid hormone that binds to the enzyme Na{sup +}, K{sup +} – ATPase and stimulates different intracellular pathways controlling growth, proliferation and cell survival. IL-1β and TNF-α are pleiotropic molecules, conventionally regarded as pro-inflammatory cytokines with well-known effects in the immune system. In addition, IL-1β and TNF-α also play important roles in the nervous system including neuroprotective effects. Previous data from our group showed that ouabain treatment is able to induce an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival kept in mixed retinal cell cultures. The aim of this work was to investigate if IL-1β and TNF-α could be mediating the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells. Our results show that the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cell was inhibited by either anti-IL-1β or anti-TNF-α antibodies. In agreement, IL-1β or TNF-α increased the retinal ganglion cells survival in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, ouabain treatment induces a temporal release of TNF-α and IL-1β from retinal cell cultures. Interestingly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulate each other intracellular levels. Our results suggest that ouabain treatment triggers the activation of TNF-α and IL-1β signaling pathways leading to an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines regulates the ouabain effect on RGC survival. • Ouabain treatment modulates the intracellular levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. • Ouabain induces the release of TNF-α and IL-1β in retinal cell cultures.

  20. Roller coaster-associated retinal detachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report two cases of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment noted immediately after roller coaster riding in an at-risk population. In separate incidents, a 35-year-old woman and a 45-year-old woman, both significantly myopic, presented with visual symptoms after riding roller coasters. Both patients were found to have acute rhegmatogenous retinal detachments associated with myopic degenerative changes. The pathology supported an acute, traumatic etiology for the detachments. Roller coaster riding should be considered an adjunct risk factor for retinal detachment in predisposed patients.

  1. Photostress Testing Device for Diagnosing Retinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Swan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retinal diseases such as Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD affect nearly one in three elderly patients. ARMD damages the central vision photoreceptors in the fovea. The Photostress Test is a simple technique for testing for the early effects of ARMD. Here, the illumination sources in a novel self-administered Photostress Testing device were modeled for safety and distribution in illumination software. After satisfying the design constraints in the model, a prototype of the illumination system was fabricated and tested to confirm the modeling results. The resultant prototype can be used to aid in the diagnosis of retinal disease and is well within retinal safety levels.

  2. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S; Gopal, L

    1996-12-01

    Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil), as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membranes adherent to the retina, manipulate retinal detachments and mechanically flatten detached retina. Over the longer term, silicone oil maintains intraocular tamponade. One should be cognizant of the potential uses, benefits and risks of each of these vitreous substitutes.

  3. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Sandeep

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil, as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membranes adherent to the retina, manipulate retinal detachments and mechanically flatten detached retina. Over the longer term, silicone oil maintains intraocular tamponade. One should be cognizant of the potential uses, benefits and risks of each of these vitreous substitutes.

  4. [New drug therapy for retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by nyctalopia, ring scotoma, and bone-spicule pigmentation of the retina. So far, no effective therapy has been found for RP. As a possible molecular etiology of RP, retina-specific gene deficits are most likely involved, but little has been identified in terms of intracellular mechanisms leading to retinal photoreceptor cell death at post-translational levels. In order to find an effective therapy for RP, we must look for underlying common mechanisms that are responsible for the development of RP, instead of designing a specific therapy for each of the RP types with different causes. Therefore, in the present study, several animal models with different causes of RP were studied, including (1)Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with a deficit of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function caused by rhodopsin mutation; (2) P23H rats, (3) S334ter rats, (4) photo stress rats, (5) retinal degeneration (rd) mice with a deficit of phosphodiesterase(PDE) function; and (6) cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) model rats with a deficit of recoverin-dependent photoreceptor adaptation function. In each of these models, the following assessments were made in order to elucidate common pathological mechanisms among the models: (1) retinal function assessed by electroretinogram (ERG), (2) retinal morphology, (3) retinoid analysis, (4) rhodopsin regeneration, (5) rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and (6) cytosolic cGMP levels. We found that unregulated photoreceptor adaptation processes caused by an imbalance of rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation caused retinal dysfunction leading to photoreceptor cell death. As possible candidate drugs for normalizing these retinal dysfunctions and stopping further retinal degeneration, nilvadipine, a Ca channel blocker, retinoid derivatives, and anthocyanine were chosen and tested to determine their effect on the above animal models with

  5. The cost-effectiveness of the Argus II retinal prosthesis in Retinitis Pigmentosa patients

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary genetic disease causing bilateral retinal degeneration. RP is a leading cause of blindness resulting in incurable visual impairment and drastic reduction in the Quality of life of the patients. Second Sight Medical Products Inc. developed Argus II, a retinal prosthesis system for treating RP. Argus II is the world’s first ever-commercial implant intended to restore some vision in the blind patients. The objective of this study was to assess...

  6. Long-term outcomes in patients undergoing vitrectomy for retinal detachment due to viral retinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida DRP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available David RP Almeida,1 Eric K Chin,1 Ryan M Tarantola,1 Elizabeth O Tegins,1 Christopher A Lopez,1 Herbert Culver Boldt,1 Karen M Gehrs,1 Elliott H Sohn,1 Stephen R Russell,1 James C Folk,1 Vinit B Mahajan1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: To determine the outcomes in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD secondary to viral retinitis. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive, noncomparative, interventional case series of 12 eyes in ten patients with RRD secondary to viral retinitis. Results of vitreous or aqueous biopsy, effect of antiviral therapeutics, time to retinal detachment, course of visual acuity, and anatomic and surgical outcomes were investigated. Results: There were 1,259 cases of RRD during the study period, with 12 cases of RRD secondary to viral retinitis (prevalence of 0.95%. Follow-up was available for a mean period of 4.4 years. Varicella zoster virus was detected in six eyes, herpes simplex virus in two eyes, and cytomegalovirus in two eyes. Eight patients were treated with oral valacyclovir and two patients with intravenous acyclovir. Lack of optic nerve involvement correlated with improved final visual acuity of 20/100 or greater. Pars plana vitrectomy (n=12, silicone-oil tamponade (n=11, and scleral buckling (n=10 provided successful anatomic retinal reattachment in all cases, with no recurrent retinal detachment and no cases of hypotony during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Varicella zoster virus was the most frequent cause of viral retinitis, and lack of optic nerve involvement was predictive of a favorable visual acuity prognosis. Vitrectomy with silicone-oil tamponade and scleral buckle placement provided stable anatomical outcomes. Keywords: viral retinitis, acute retinal necrosis, herpetic retinitis, vitrectomy, retinal detachment 

  7. Concurrent central retinal artery occlusion and branch retinal vein occlusion in giant cell arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Edward R.; Chen, Celia S

    2010-01-01

    Edward R Chu, Celia S ChenDepartment of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre and Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Ophthalmic involvement in giant cell arteritis can manifest in a number of ways. Central retinal artery occlusion is one of the common causes of visual loss in giant cell arteritis. On the contrary, branch retinal vein occlusion is rarely associated with the latter. We report an 89-year-old lady with acute left central retinal artery occlusion on a backg...

  8. Ephrin-a4 is involved in retinal neovascularization by regulating the VEGF signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Yu, Wenzhen; Huang, Lvzhen; Zhao, Min; Li, Xiaoxin

    2012-04-18

    Retinal neovascularization (NV) is a major cause of blindness. Recent research suggests that factors other than VEGF participate in this process. This study aimed to determine the role of ephrin-A4 in retinal NV. The expression and effect of ephrin-A4 was investigated in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and the RF/6A retina endothelial cell line. Ephrin-A4 expression and VEGF signaling pathway phosphorylation were determined by PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analyses. ShRNA was used to silence ephrin-A4 in vitro and in vivo. Retinal flat mounts and tube formation assays were performed to evaluate ephrin-A4 function in the NV process in vivo and in vitro. Ephrin-A4 was overexpressed in the retina of OIR mice and in RF/6A and RPE cells after CoCl₂ stimulation. In vitro, Ephrin-A4/Fc treatment significantly increased the tube number of RF/6A cells on a membrane preparation and the phosphorylation levels of VEGR2, Akt1, and ERK1/2 in RF/6A cells. Moreover, ephrin-A4 knockout markedly suppressed pathologic neovascularization in vivo and inhibited the proliferation and tube formation capacity of RF/6A cells in vitro. Furthermore, in the absence of ephrin-A4, the phosphorylation of VEGFR2, Akt1, and ERK1/2 was defective under VEGF₁₆₅ stimulation, and the proangiogenic function of VEGF₁₆₅ was also compromised. This study suggests that ephrin-A4 plays an important role in retinal NV and is a potential target against retinal NV. The proangiogenic function of ephrin-A4 may be linked to its crucial role in the VEGF signaling pathway.

  9. Novel interfaces for light directed neuronal stimulation: advances and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bareket-Keren L

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lilach Bareket-Keren,1,2 Yael Hanein1,21School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, 2Tel-Aviv University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, IsraelAbstract: Light activation of neurons is a growing field with applications ranging from basic investigation of neuronal systems to the development of new therapeutic methods such as artificial retina. Many recent studies currently explore novel methods for optical stimulation with temporal and spatial precision. Novel materials in particular provide an opportunity to enhance contemporary approaches. Here we review recent advances towards light directed interfaces for neuronal stimulation, focusing on state-of-the-art nanoengineered devices. In particular, we highlight challenges and prospects towards improved retinal prostheses.Keywords: neuronal stimulation, light, retinal implant, prosthesis, quantum dots, conducting polymers, photoconductive

  10. Electric stimulation with sinusoids and white noise for neural prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Freeman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We are investigating the use of novel stimulus waveforms in neural prostheses to determine whether they can provide more precise control over the temporal and spatial pattern of elicited activity as compared to conventional pulsatile stimulation. To study this, we measured the response of retinal ganglion cells to both sinusoidal and white noise waveforms. The use of cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp recordings allowed the responses to be observed without significant obstruction from the stimulus artifact. Electric stimulation with sinusoids elicited robust responses. White noise analysis was used to derive the linear kernel for the ganglion cell’s spiking response as well as for the underlying excitatory currents. These results suggest that in response to electric stimulation, presynaptic retinal neurons exhibit bandpass filtering characteristics with peak response that occur 25ms after onset. The experimental approach demonstrated here may be useful for studying the temporal response properties of other neurons in the CNS.

  11. Retinal vascular oximetry during ranibizumab treatment of central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traustason, Sindri; la Cour, Morten; Larsen, Michael

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effect of intravitreal injections of the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor ranibizumab on retinal oxygenation in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with CRVO was analysed using the Oxymap Retinal Oximeter P3, before and during 6 months of treatment with intravitreal injections of ranibizumab. At presentation, retinal venous oxygen saturation was lower in eyes with CRVO than in the healthy fellow eyes (32±13% vs 59±10%, respectively, p=0.001) whereas retinal arterial saturation was higher in eyes with CRVO than in the fellow eyes (95%±8% and 91%±3%, p=0.04). Mean visual acuity increased from 51±24 letters ETDRS at baseline to 66±24 and 69±20 letters ETRDS, respectively, at 3 months and 6 months treatment (mean±SD, pcentral retinal thickness was reduced from 697±139 µm to 368±113 µm and 340±96 µm, respectively, from baseline to 3 months and 6 months treatment (pRetinal venous oxygen saturation was markedly reduced in untreated CRVO and was roughly halfway normalised during intravitreal ranibizumab treatment. Retinal artery oxygen saturation was not reduced in CRVO. NCT01360385. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Growth Stimulants

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Nyle J.

    1989-01-01

    A tiny pellet inserted under the skin of a calf's ear may increase weight gains as much as 15 to 20 percent. This same result would take years to accomplish through breeding and selection. These tiny pellets are growth stimulants. They are made of hormones that are constructed to slowly release minute amounts into the blood stream that stimulate the animal to produce natural body hormones. One of these hormones is a growth hormone. It regulates the rate of growth of the animal. Increasing the...

  13. Idiopathic pediatric retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manayath George

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO in a healthy young girl. An eight-year-old girl presented with sudden loss of vision in her left eye. She had a pale retina with macular edema consistent with extensive BRAO. A thorough workup was performed to determine any etiologic factor. All test results were within normal limits. Her visual acuity improved from finger counting to 20/40 over two weeks, on immediate treatment with intravenous steroids (methyl prednisolone. This case suggests that BRAO can occur in healthy children without any detectable systemic or ocular disorders and a dramatic improvement may be achieved with prompt treatment with intravenous steroids.

  14. Nanoparticles for retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2010-09-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber's congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Laminins and retinal vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Malia M; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation.

  16. Stimulus-specific oscillations in a retinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Garrett T; Travis, Bryan J; Theiler, James; George, John S; Stephens, Gregory J; Marshak, David W

    2004-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory potentials (HFOPs) in the vertebrate retina are stimulus specific. The phases of HFOPs recorded at any given retinal location drift randomly over time, but regions activated by the same stimulus tend to remain phase locked with approximately zero lag, whereas regions activated by spatially separate stimuli are typically uncorrelated. Based on retinal anatomy, we previously postulated that HFOPs are mediated by feedback from a class of axon-bearing amacrine cells that receive excitation from neighboring ganglion cells-via gap junctions-and make inhibitory synapses back onto the surrounding ganglion cells. Using a computer model, we show here that such circuitry can account for the stimulus specificity of HFOPs in response to both high- and low-contrast features. Phase locking between pairs of model ganglion cells did not depend critically on their separation distance, but on whether the applied stimulus created a continuous path between them. The degree of phase locking between spatially separate stimuli was reduced by lateral inhibition, which created a buffer zone around strongly activated regions. Stimulating the inhibited region between spatially separate stimuli increased their degree of phase locking proportionately. Our results suggest several experimental strategies for testing the hypothesis that stimulus-specific HFOPs arise from axon-mediated feedback in the inner retina.

  17. Integration of retinal image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  18. [Intraocular hypertension after retinal detachment surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachment, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy, internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who developed increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  19. [Retinal vein occlusion in a young patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Mihail; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Sarbu, Laura; Avram, Corina; Camburu, Raluca; Stamate, Alina

    2013-01-01

    We present a case report of a 27 years old pacient with central retinal vein occlussion and macular edema. The pacient has a significant reduction of the macular aedema with complete recovery of vision after the treatment.

  20. The treatment of bullous rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D; Chignell, A H; Inglesby, D V; Little, B C; Franks, W

    1992-01-01

    We describe the results of a consecutive series of 97 cases of bullous superior retinal detachment treated by conventional surgery. The retinal detachments were characterized by either a single retinal break or multiple retinal breaks confined within 1 clock hour and no proliferative vitreoretinopathy. The surgery involved sequential drainage of subretinal fluid, injection of air, cryotherapy and the application of local explant. All cases would otherwise be suitable for pneumatic retinopexy. The anatomical success rate was 85.5% with a single operation and 97% with further procedures. We report on the complications encountered and appraise the advantages and disadvantages of this operation. Forty-five of the 97 cases had detachment of the macula for less than 2 weeks, and 35 of the 45 (80%) achieved a visual acuity of 6/18 or better. These visual results challenge the assertion that better visual outcome might be attained with pneumatic retinopexy.

  1. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  2. Imaging retinal mosaics in the living eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E A; Chung, M; Dubra, A; Hunter, J J; Merigan, W H; Williams, D R

    2011-03-01

    Adaptive optics imaging of cone photoreceptors has provided unique insight into the structure and function of the human visual system and has become an important tool for both basic scientists and clinicians. Recent advances in adaptive optics retinal imaging instrumentation and methodology have allowed us to expand beyond cone imaging. Multi-wavelength and fluorescence imaging methods with adaptive optics have allowed multiple retinal cell types to be imaged simultaneously. These new methods have recently revealed rod photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, and the smallest retinal blood vessels. Fluorescence imaging coupled with adaptive optics has been used to examine ganglion cells in living primates. Two-photon imaging combined with adaptive optics can evaluate photoreceptor function non-invasively in the living primate retina.

  3. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs.

  4. [Treatment of retinal detachment with macular hole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikulski, Z; Nawrocki, J; Dziegielewski, K

    1993-01-01

    The methods and results of surgery in 6 cases of retinal detachment with macular hole are presented. In all 6 cases pars plana vitrectomy was performed, in 4 with subsequent SF6 and in 2 with silicone oil tamponade. Retinal attachment was achieved in 4 eyes. Visual acuity 1/50-2/50 was found after surgery in 5 cases. The follow-up ranged from 6 to 9 months.

  5. Complete Blood Count and Retinal Vessel Calibers

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Liew; Jie Jin Wang; Elena Rochtchina; Tien Yin Wong; Paul Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of hematological indices such as complete blood count on microcirculation is poorly understood. Retinal microvasculature can be directly visualized and vessel calibers are associated with a range of ocular and systemic diseases. We examined the association of complete blood count with retinal vessel calibers. METHODS: Cross-sectional population-based Blue Mountains Eye Study, n = 3009, aged 49+ years. Complete blood count was measured from fasting blood samples taken ...

  6. Branch retinal artery occlusion in Susac's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragão

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Susac's syndrome is a rare disease attribuited to a microangiopathy involving the arterioles of the cochlea, retina and brain. Encefalopathy, hearing loss, and visual deficits are the hallmarks of the disease. Visual loss is due to multiple, recurrent branch arterial retinal occlusions. We report a case of a 20-year-old women with Susac syndrome presented with peripheral vestibular syndrome, hearing loss, ataxia, vertigo, and vision loss due occlusion of the retinal branch artery.

  7. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    this grant, we sought to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the earliest events in cone photoreceptor development and to exploit this knowledge...the mRNA for three transcription factors promoted cone photoreceptor formation in retinal stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. These...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA-seq., transcription factors, and

  8. Current surgery of retinal detachment recurrence. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Zakharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available this review presents a detailed analysis and an experience of surgical treatment of retinal detachment recurrence associated with light silicone oil tamponade of vitreous cavity. Approaches and variants of treatment were described in the historical aspect and till now. there are considered general and particular issues in case of retinal detachment recurrence appearance, expediency and volume of intraoperative manipulations, time of operation and choice of temporary substitute of vitreous body for a purpose of postoperative tamponade of vitreous cavity.

  9. Current surgery of retinal detachment recurrence. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Zakharov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available this review presents a detailed analysis and an experience of surgical treatment of retinal detachment recurrence associated with light silicone oil tamponade of vitreous cavity. Approaches and variants of treatment were described in the historical aspect and till now. there are considered general and particular issues in case of retinal detachment recurrence appearance, expediency and volume of intraoperative manipulations, time of operation and choice of temporary substitute of vitreous body for a purpose of postoperative tamponade of vitreous cavity.

  10. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena Sandeep; Gopal Lingam

    1996-01-01

    Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil), as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membrane...

  11. Safety of iPhone retinal photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sheng Chiong; Wynn-Williams, Giles; Wilson, Graham

    2017-04-01

    With the advancement in mobile technology, smartphone retinal photography is becoming a popular practice. However, there is limited information about the safety of the latest smartphones used for retinal photography. This study aims to determine the photobiological risk of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus when used in conjunction with a 20Diopter condensing lens for retinal photography. iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus (Apple, Cupertino, CA) were used in this study. The geometrical setup of the study was similar to the indirect ophthalmoscopy technique. The phone was set up at one end of the bench with its flash turned on at maximal brightness; a 20 Dioptre lens was placed 15 cm away from the phone. The light that passes through the lens was measured with a spectroradiometer and an illuminance probe at the other end to determine the spectral profile, spatial irradiance, radiant power emitted by the phone's flash. Trigonometric and lens formula were applied to determine the field of view and retinal surface in order to determine the weighted retinal irradiance and weighted retinal radiant exposure. Taking ocular transmission and the distribution of the beam's spatial irradiance into account, the weighted retinal irradiance is 1.40 mW/cm(2) and the weighted retinal radiant exposure is 56.25 mJ/cm(2). The peak weighted foveal irradiance is 1.61 mW/cm(2). Our study concluded that the photobiological risk posed by iPhone 6 indirect ophthalmoscopy was at least 1 order of magnitude below the safety limits set by the ISO15004-2.2.

  12. Diagnostic imaging in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Nagasawa, Toshihiko; Katome, Takashi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Naito, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive inherited retinal disease, and patients with RP have reduced visual function caused by a degeneration of the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). At the end stage of RP, the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the fovea reduces central vision, and RP is one of the main causes of acquired blindness in developed countries. Therefore, morphological and functional assessments of the photoreceptors in the macula area can be useful in estimating the residual retinal function in RP patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well-established method of examining the retinal architecture in situ. The photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction is observed as a distinct, highly reflective line by OCT. The presence of the IS/OS junction in the OCT images is essential for normal visual function. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) results from the accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE cells and has been used to investigate RPE and retinal function. More than one-half of RP patients have an abnormally high density parafoveal FAF ring (AF ring). The AF ring represents the border between functional and dysfunctional retina. In this review, we shall summarize recent progress on diagnostic imaging in eyes with RP.

  13. Retinal Vascular Fractals and Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Ong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinal microvascular network changes have been found in patients with age-related brain diseases such as stroke and dementia including Alzheimer's disease. We examine whether retinal microvascular network changes are also present in preclinical stages of dementia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 300 Chinese participants (age: ≥60 years from the ongoing Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study who underwent detailed clinical examinations including retinal photography, brain imaging and neuropsychological testing. Retinal vascular parameters were assessed from optic disc-centered photographs using a semiautomated program. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered, and cognitive function was summarized as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND and dementia were diagnosed according to standard diagnostic criteria. Results: Among 268 eligible nondemented participants, 78 subjects were categorized as CIND-mild and 69 as CIND-moderate. In multivariable adjusted models, reduced retinal arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions were associated with an increased risk of CIND-mild and CIND-moderate. Reduced fractal dimensions were associated with poorer cognitive performance globally and in the specific domains of verbal memory, visuoconstruction and visuomotor speed. Conclusion: A sparser retinal microvascular network, represented by reduced arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions, was associated with cognitive impairment, suggesting that early microvascular damage may be present in preclinical stages of dementia.

  14. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delu eSong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD.

  15. Depression of the photic after discharge of flash evoked potentials by physostigmine, carbaryl and propoxur, and the relationship to inhibition of brain cholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Finley, Dana; Spivey, Christopher L; Graff, Jaimie E; Herr, David W

    2008-01-01

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physostigmine (s.c.) 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3mg/kg (free base), in an ascorbic acid/saline vehicle, carbaryl (p.o.) 0, 1, 3, 10, 30, 50 or 75 mg/kg, or propoxur (p.o.) 0, 0.3, 3, 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg in a corn oil vehicle. Physostigmine served as positive control based on literature data. Early (e.g. peak N(36)) and late FEP components (peak N(166) and PhAD) are related to the initial retino-geniculate afferent volley and higher cortical processing of visual information, respectively. Compared to controls, the PhAD duration decreased following treatment with 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg physostigmine, 7 5 mg/kg carbaryl or 30 mg/kg propoxur. Lesser changes were noted in FEP amplitudes or peak latencies. Treatment with 0.2 or 0.3 mg/kg physostigmine increased peak N(36) latency. Peak N(166) latency increased only following exposure to 40 mg/kg propoxur. None of the compounds altered peak N(36) or N(166) amplitudes. Hypothermia was observed at doses greater than 0.05 mg/kg physostigmine, at 30 or 50 mg/kg carbaryl, and after treatment with 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg propoxur. Inhibition of brain ChE activity occurred at dosages greater than 0.05 mg/kg physostigmine, 1mg/kg carbaryl, and 0.3 mg/kg propoxur. Linear regression analysis indicated that the decrease in PhAD duration correlated with decrease in brain ChE activity. The results indicate that at 30 min after treatment, inhibition of brain ChE activity did not affect cortical processing of the input from the retino-geniculate volley (evidenced by unaltered peak N(36) amplitude). However, the data suggest that disruption of cortical processing of visual signals related to FEP late components, as indicated by depression of the PhAD, was related to inhibition

  16. Correction-free remotely scanned two-photon in vivo mouse retinal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adi Schejter Bar-Noam; Nairouz Farah; Shy Shoham

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive fluorescence retinal imaging in small animals is an important requirement for an array of translational vision applications.The in vivotwo-photon imaging of the mouse retina may enable the long-term investigation of the structure and function of healthy and diseased retinal tissue.However,to date,this has only been possible using relatively complex adaptive-optics systems.Here,the optical modeling of the murine eye and of the imaging system is used to achieve correction-free two-photon microscopy through the pupil of a mouse eye to yield high-quality,optically sectioned fundus images.By remotely scanning the focus using an electronically tunable lens,high-resolution three-dimensional fluorescein angiograms and cellular-scale images are acquired,thus introducing a correction-free baseline performance level for two-photon in vivo retinal imaging.Moreover,the system enables functional calcium imaging of repeated retinal responses to light stimulation using the genetically encoded indicator,GCaMP6s.These results and the simplicity of the new add-on optics are an important step toward several structural,functional,and multimodal imaging applications that will benefit from the tight optical sectioning and the use of near-infrared light.

  17. An Intraocular Camera for Retinal Prostheses: Restoring Sight to the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Noelle R. B.; McIntosh, Benjamin P.; Nasiatka, Patrick J.; Hauer, Michelle C.; Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.; Tanguay, Armand R., Jr.

    Implantation of an intraocular retinal prosthesis represents one possible approach to the restoration of sight in those with minimal light perception due to photoreceptor degenerating diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. In such an intraocular retinal prosthesis, a microstimulator array attached to the retina is used to electrically stimulate still-viable retinal ganglion cells that transmit retinotopic image information to the visual cortex by means of the optic nerve, thereby creating an image percept. We describe herein an intraocular camera that is designed to be implanted in the crystalline lens sac and connected to the microstimulator array. Replacement of an extraocular (head-mounted) camera with the intraocular camera restores the natural coupling of head and eye motion associated with foveation, thereby enhancing visual acquisition, navigation, and mobility tasks. This research is in no small part inspired by the unique scientific style and research methodologies that many of us have learned from Prof. Richard K. Chang of Yale University, and is included herein as an example of the extent and breadth of his impact and legacy.

  18. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Resolving After Orbital Decompression in Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Seanna R; Yoon, Michael K

    A 49-year-old male presented with proptosis and was found to have optic nerve edema with peripapillary hemorrhages. Diagnostic testing showed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone. CT orbits showed homogenous tendon-sparing enlargement of the medial and inferior rectus muscles, characteristic of thyroid eye disease. Intravenous methylprednisolone was administered given the concern for compressive optic neuropathy. He initially had improvement of his symptoms, so orbital decompression was deferred. Subsequently he presented with worsening diplopia and right proptosis, a new afferent pupillary defect, and a cecocentral visual field defect. Dilated examination revealed significant optic nerve head edema and diffuse retinal hemorrhages in all 4 quadrants consistent with a central retinal vein occlusion. The patient underwent an urgent 3-wall orbital decompression on the right. Close follow up postoperatively showed resolution of the central retinal vein occlusion and the associated optic disc edema, peripapillary hemorrhages, and macular edema. Orbital decompression is known to improve many manifestations of thyroid eye disease, but this is the first report of orbital decompression resulting in resolution of a central retinal vein occlusion.

  19. Human neural progenitor cells promote photoreceptor survival in retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund-Johansson, Ulrica; Mohlin, Camilla; Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela; Ekström, Per; Johansson, Kjell

    2010-02-01

    Different types of progenitor and stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection in animal models of photoreceptor degeneration. The present study was conducted to investigate whether human neural progenitor cells (HNPCs) have neuroprotective properties on retinal explants models with calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death. In the first experiments, HNPCs in a feeder layer were co-cultured for 6 days either with postnatal rd1 mouse or normal rat retinas. Retinal histological sections were used to determine outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, and to detect the number of photoreceptors with labeling for calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL. The ONL thickness of co-cultured rat and rd1 retinas was found to be almost 10% and 40% thicker, respectively, compared to controls. Cell counts of calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL labeled photoreceptors in both models revealed a 30-50% decrease when co-cultured with HNPCs. The results represent significant increases of photoreceptor survival in the co-cultured retinas. In the second experiments, for an identification of putative survival factors, or a combination of them, a growth factor profile was performed on conditioned medium. The relative levels of various growth factors were analyzed by densitometric measurements of growth factor array membranes. Following growth factors were identified as most potential survival factors; granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), neurotrophic factor 3 (NT-3), placental growth factor (PIGF), transforming growth factors (TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-D). HNPCs protect both against calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in the rd1 mouse and against caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in normal rat retinas in vitro. The protective effect is possibly achieved by a variety of

  20. The Spatial Extent of Epiretinal Electrical Stimulation in the Healthy Mouse Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hosseinazdeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Retinal prostheses use electrical stimulation to restore functional vision to patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. A key detail is the spatial pattern of ganglion cells activated by stimulation. Therefore, we characterized the spatial extent of network-mediated electrical activation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the epiretinal monopolar electrode configuration. Methods: Healthy mouse RGC activities were recorded with a micro-electrode array (MEA. The stimuli consisted of monophasic rectangular cathodic voltage pulses and cycling full-field light flashes. Results: Voltage tuning curves exhibited significant hysteresis, reflecting adaptation to electrical stimulation on the time scale of seconds. Responses decreased from 0 to 300 µm, and were also dependent on the strength of stimulation. Applying the Rayleigh criterion to the half-width at half-maximum of the electrical point spread function suggests a visual acuity limit of no better than 20/946. Threshold voltage showed only a modest increase across these distances. Conclusion: The existence of significant hysteresis requires that future investigations of electrical retinal stimulation control for such long-memory adaptation. The spread of electrical activation beyond 200 µm suggests that neighbouring electrodes in epiretinal implants based on indirect stimulation of RGCs may be indiscriminable at interelectrode spacings as large as 400 µm.

  1. Central retinal vessel blood flow after surgical treatment for central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crama, Niels; Gualino, Vincent; Restori, Marie; Charteris, David G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radial optic neurotomy and retinal endovascular surgery on retinal blood flow velocity in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. A prospective interventional case series. Six patients with a central retinal vein occlusion of retinal endovascular surgery. Five patients had decreased central venous blood flow velocity compared with the fellow eye, and one patient had similar central venous blood flow in both eyes at baseline. All study eyes had decreased central venous blood flow velocity compared with the fellow eye at 24 weeks after treatment. Two patients had a further decrease in central venous blood flow during the study. Three patients had no minimal change in central venous blood flow, and 1 patient showed a minimal increase from 3 cm/s at baseline to 4 cm/s 24 weeks after surgery. Radial optic neurotomy and retinal endovascular surgery do not alter central retinal blood flow velocity. The place of these therapies in the treatment for central retinal vein occlusion should be questioned.

  2. Retinal oxygen saturation in relation to retinal thickness in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    to retinal thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 18 patients with DME that all had central retinal thickness (CRT) >300 µm and were free of active proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Optical coherence tomography (Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain OCT) was used...... for paracentral edema, the oxygen saturation in the upper and lower temporal arcade branches were compared to the corresponding upper and lower subfield thickness. Spearman’s rank was used to calculate correlation coefficients between CRT and retinal oximetry. Results: Median age and duration of diabetes was 59....... 92.3%, p=0.52). We found no correlation between CRT and retinal oxygen saturation, even when accounting for paracentral edema (p>0.05). Furthermore, there was no difference in retinal oxygen saturation between the macular hemisphere that was more or less affected by DME (p>0.05). Conclusion: Patients...

  3. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Avanesova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD is a severe ocular disorder which requires prompt treatment to prevent low vision and blindness. It is also a significant socio-economic problem as 84% of RDD patients are able-bodied. RRD grading systems (including current Machemer grading system, risk factors, and pathogenesis are reviewed. The role of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in RDD pathogenesis and recurrence is described. Macula involvement determines RDD outcome. Optical coherence tomography (OCT provides the study of retina anatomy and the analysis of parameters that affect post-op best corrected visual acuity, i.e., defects of the junction between inner segments and outer segments (IS/OS, the integrity of external (ELM and internal limiting membrane (ILM, outer nuclear layer thickness (ONLT etc. Fluorescent angiography allows to understand the reasons for low vision in anatomically successful RDD surgery. Scleral buckling, balloon buckling, pneumatic retinopexy, vitrectomy, cryopexy, and laser coagulation are important tools in surgical armamentarium. In recent years, vitrectomy is growing in popularity for RDD treatment. Criteria for procedure selection and surgical success rate in phakic and pseudophakic eyes are discussed. The outcomes of vitrectomy with air/gas and silicone oil tamponade are compared. Bimanual vitrectomy benefits are discussed. 

  4. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Avanesova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD is a severe ocular disorder which requires prompt treatment to prevent low vision and blindness. It is also a significant socio-economic problem as 84% of RDD patients are able-bodied. RRD grading systems (including current Machemer grading system, risk factors, and pathogenesis are reviewed. The role of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in RDD pathogenesis and recurrence is described. Macula involvement determines RDD outcome. Optical coherence tomography (OCT provides the study of retina anatomy and the analysis of parameters that affect post-op best corrected visual acuity, i.e., defects of the junction between inner segments and outer segments (IS/OS, the integrity of external (ELM and internal limiting membrane (ILM, outer nuclear layer thickness (ONLT etc. Fluorescent angiography allows to understand the reasons for low vision in anatomically successful RDD surgery. Scleral buckling, balloon buckling, pneumatic retinopexy, vitrectomy, cryopexy, and laser coagulation are important tools in surgical armamentarium. In recent years, vitrectomy is growing in popularity for RDD treatment. Criteria for procedure selection and surgical success rate in phakic and pseudophakic eyes are discussed. The outcomes of vitrectomy with air/gas and silicone oil tamponade are compared. Bimanual vitrectomy benefits are discussed. 

  5. Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using A New Topological Method

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel topological segmentation of retinal images represents blood vessels as connected regions in the continuous image plane, having shape-related analytic and geometric properties. This paper presents topological segmentation results from the DRIVE retinal image database.

  6. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doubal, F.N.; Hokke, P.E.; Wardlaw, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Lacunar strokes account for 25% of ischaemic strokes, but their precise aetiology is unknown. Similarities between the retinal and cerebral small vessels mean that clarification of the exact relationship between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, and particularly with stroke

  7. Neoplasia versus hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Steffen; Larsen, J.N.B.; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography......ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography...

  8. External Approach Microsurgery of Retinal Dialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Piqing Hu; Lixin Shun; Xuechun Zhu; Yingwu Yi; Wen Liu

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effect of external approach microsurgery in retinal dialysis.Methods: Consecutive 30 eyes of 28 patients with retinal dialysis were enrolled for this study. The progresses of the external approach microsurgery were following. Under the surgical microscopy, the preplacement of mattress sutures for buckling and/or encircling following retrobulbar anesthesia and scleral exposure, draining subretinal fluid, the cryotherapy of retinal breaks, checking the position of breaks on scleral buckle and gases injection were performed in turn.Results: After drainage of subretinal fluid, with scleral depression cryotherapy reaction around breaks could be observed clearly under the microscopy. All breaks were located on anterior slope of the buckle. Intraoperative complications were mild subretinal hemorrhage at drainage site and corneal epithelium exfoliation in 3 eyes, respectively.Postoperative complications were mainly secondary glaucoma and retinal redetachment.The one-operation reattachmentl rate was 96.7% (29 eyes), and the final reattachment rate was 100% after one eye had a second external approach microsurgery. The postoperative vision acuity (VA) was significantly better than the preoperative VA (X2=9.529, P< 0.01).Conclusion: External approach microsurgery has favourable effect on the surgery of retinal dialysis.

  9. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  10. Retinal haemorrhages in vacuum extraction deliveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahgat Mostafa

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and thirty eight newly born infants were subjected to fundus examination in the first 5 hours of labour then daily till discharge from the hospital then weekly till complete absorption of retinal haemorrhages The 238 infants were 23 delivered by caesarean section, 90 with spontaneous vaginal delivery,45 babies (over3.5 kgm delivered vaginallyand80 delivered by vacuum extraction. It was found that 37.39% of the newborns had retinal haemorrhages. The incidence, type and severity of retinal haemorrhages were related to the extent of obstetric trauma during birth. They were least with caesarean section. (4.35%, more in babies with spontaneous vaginal delivery (20%, more higher in infants over 3.5 kgm birth weight (33.33% and maximum in vacuum extraction deliveries (68.75%. A good correlation was made between the site and duration of cup application, level and rate of increase of negative pressure, the presence and size of cephalhematoma and the incidence and severity of retinal haemorrhages A good choice of cases as well as good control of the technique of vacuum extraction will minimize the incidence and severity of retinal haemorrhages in the new born.

  11. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  12. MR detection of retinal hemorrhages: correlation with graded ophthalmologic exam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavers, Angela J.; Allbery, Sandra M. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Stagner, Anna M.; Hejkal, Thomas W. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Omaha, NE (United States); Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Omaha, NE (United States); Lyden, Elizabeth R. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Public Health, Omaha, NE (United States); Haney, Suzanne B. [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Omaha, NE (United States); University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Dilated fundoscopic exam is considered the gold standard for detecting retinal hemorrhage, but expertise in obtaining this exam is not always immediately available. MRI can detect retinal hemorrhages, but correlation of the grade or severity of retinal hemorrhage on dilated fundoscopic exam with retinal hemorrhage visibility on MRI has not been described. To determine the value of standard brain protocol MRI in detecting retinal hemorrhage and to determine whether there is any correlation with MR detection of retinal hemorrhage and the dilated fundoscopic exam grade of hemorrhage. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 77 children <2 years old who were seen for head trauma from April 2007 to July 2013 and had both brain MRI and dilated fundoscopic exam or retinal camera images. A staff pediatric radiologist and radiology resident reviewed the MR images. Retinal hemorrhages were graded by a chief ophthalmology resident on a 12-point scale based on the retinal hemorrhage type, size, location and extent as seen on review of retinal camera images and detailed reports by ophthalmologists. Higher scores indicated increased severity of retinal hemorrhages. There was a statistically significant difference in the median grade of retinal hemorrhage examination between children who had retinal hemorrhage detected on MRI and children who did not have retinal hemorrhage detected on MRI (P = 0.02). When examination grade was categorized as low-grade (1-4), moderate-grade (5-8) or high-grade (>8) hemorrhage, there was a statistically significant association between exam grade and diagnosis based on MRI (P = 0.008). For example, only 14% of children with low-grade retinal hemorrhages were identified on MRI compared to 76% of children with high-grade hemorrhages. MR detection of retinal hemorrhage demonstrated a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 63%. Retinal hemorrhage was best seen on the gradient

  13. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Madeira, Maria H.; Raquel Boia; Santos, Paulo F.; António F. Ambrósio; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A bett...

  14. The porcine retinal vasculature accessed using an endovascular approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morén, Håkan; Undrén, Per; Gesslein, Bodil;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the retinal circulation in the pig can be accessed using interventional neuroradiology and to explore the possibility of creating occlusions that result in experimental retinal ischemia.......The aim of this study was to examine whether the retinal circulation in the pig can be accessed using interventional neuroradiology and to explore the possibility of creating occlusions that result in experimental retinal ischemia....

  15. Vision function testing for a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis: effects of image filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Nick; Scott, Adele F.; Lieby, Paulette; Petoe, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Chris; Stacey, Ashley; Ayton, Lauren N.; Sinclair, Nicholas C.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Lovell, Nigel H.; McDermott, Hugh J.; Walker, Janine G.; BVA Consortium,the

    2016-06-01

    Objective. One strategy to improve the effectiveness of prosthetic vision devices is to process incoming images to ensure that key information can be perceived by the user. This paper presents the first comprehensive results of vision function testing for a suprachoroidal retinal prosthetic device utilizing of 20 stimulating electrodes. Further, we investigate whether using image filtering can improve results on a light localization task for implanted participants compared to minimal vision processing. No controlled implanted participant studies have yet investigated whether vision processing methods that are not task-specific can lead to improved results. Approach. Three participants with profound vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa were implanted with a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. All three completed multiple trials of a light localization test, and one participant completed multiple trials of acuity tests. The visual representations used were: Lanczos2 (a high quality Nyquist bandlimited downsampling filter); minimal vision processing (MVP); wide view regional averaging filtering (WV); scrambled; and, system off. Main results. Using Lanczos2, all three participants successfully completed a light localization task and obtained a significantly higher percentage of correct responses than using MVP (p≤slant 0.025) or with system off (p\\lt 0.0001). Further, in a preliminary result using Lanczos2, one participant successfully completed grating acuity and Landolt C tasks, and showed significantly better performance (p=0.004) compared to WV, scrambled and system off on the grating acuity task. Significance. Participants successfully completed vision tasks using a 20 electrode suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. Vision processing with a Nyquist bandlimited image filter has shown an advantage for a light localization task. This result suggests that this and targeted, more advanced vision processing schemes may become important components of retinal prostheses

  16. Modelling the optical response of human retinal photoreceptors to plane wave illumination with the finite integration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlagh Moayed, Alireza; Dang, Shannon; Ramahi, Omar M.; Bizheva, Kostadinka K.

    2009-02-01

    The early stages of ocular diseases such as Diabetic Retinopathy are manifested by morphological changes in retinal tissue occurring on cellular level. Therefore, a number of ophthalmic diseases can be diagnosed at an early stage by detecting spatial and temporal variations in the scattering profile of retinal tissue. It was recently demonstrated that, OCT can be used to probe the functional response of retinal photoreceptors to external light stimulation [1]-[3]. fUHROCT measures localized differential changes in the retina reflectivity over time resulting from external light stimulation of the retina. Currently the origins of the observed reflectivity changes are not well understood. However, due to the complex nature of retinal physiology using purely experimental approaches in this case is problematic. For example fUHROCT is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index of biological tissue which as demonstrated previously, can result from a number of processes such as membrane hyperpolarization, osmotic swelling, metabolic changes, etc. In this paper, we present a computational model of interaction between photoreceptor cells and optical plane wave based on the Finite Integration Technique (FIT).

  17. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanie-Jahromi Fatemeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells with amniotic fluid (AF, RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Results Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1 confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  18. Retinal blood flow velocity in patients with active uveitis using the retinal function imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xing; Kedhar Sanjay; Bhoomibunchoo Chavakij

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest a link between macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity (RBFV).The effects of inflammation in the retinal blood vessels are not clearly understood.We want to evaluate the differences in retinal blood flow velocities of patients with active uveitis and healthy controls using the retinal function imager (RFI)and determine the correlation between retinal blood flow veiocity and central macular thickness in uveitis patients.Methods Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients with active anterior uveitis and 51 eyes of 51 normal control subjects were enrolled.Retinal blood flow velocities evaluated by RFI and central macular thickness evaluated by optical coherence tomography (SLO-OCT) were obtained.Differences among the groups were assessed using Stata statistical software.Results Ten eyes had uveitic cystoid macular edema (CME).Median (first quartile,third quartile) venous velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 2.09 (1.92,2.44),2.64 (2.32,2.86),and 2.82 (2.39,3.53) mm/s respectively.Median (first and quartile) arterial velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 3.79 (3.61,4.09),3.46 (2.86,4.12),and 3.93 (3.35,4.65) mm/s.Uveitic eyes with CME had significantly lower venous velocity than controls (P=0.044).There was a strong linear relationship between venous velocity and central retinal thickness (P=-0.007).Conclusions Retinal venous velocities were significantly decreased in eyes with uveitic CME relative to controls.Decreased venous velocity was correlated with increased central retinal thickness in uveitic eyes.

  19. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Booij (Judith); S. van Soest (Simone); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy

  20. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, J.C.; van Soest, S.; Swagemakers, S.M.A.; Essing, A.H.W.; Verkerk, A.J.M.H.; van der Spek, P.J.; Gorgels, T.G.M.F.; Bergen, A.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy hu

  1. Cholinesterase inhibition and depression of the photic after discharge of flash evoked potentials following acute or repeated exposures to a mixture of carbaryl and propoxur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Lyke, Danielle F; Hertzberg, Richard C; Haber, Lynne; Kohrman-Vincent, Melissa; Li, Ruosha; Pan, Yi; Lyles, Robert H; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Macmillan, Denise K; Zehr, R Dan; Swank, Adam E; Herr, David W

    2012-06-01

    Previously, we reported that acute treatment with propoxur or carbaryl decreased the duration of the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs). In the current studies, we compared the effects of acute or repeated exposure to a mixture of carbaryl and propoxur (1:1.45 ratio; propoxur:carbaryl) on the duration of the PhAD and brain ChE activity in Long Evans rats. Animals were exposed (po) either to a single dose (0, 3, 10, 45 or 75 mg/kg), or 14 daily dosages (0, 3, 10, 30, 45 mg/kg), of the mixture. Acute and repeated treatment with 3mg/kg (or greater) of the mixture produced dose-related inhibition of brain ChE activity. Compared to controls, the PhAD duration decreased after acute administration of 75 mg/kg or repeated treatment with 30 mg/kg of the mixture. The linear relationship between the percent of control brain ChE activity and the PhAD duration was similar for both exposure paradigms. Dose-response models for the acute and repeated exposure data did not differ for brain ChE activity or the duration of the PhAD. Repeated treatment with the mixture resulted in slightly less (13-22%) erythrocyte ChE inhibition than acute exposure. Both acute and repeated treatment resulted in dose-additive results for the PhAD duration and less than dose-additive responses (6-16%) for brain ChE activity for the middle range of dosages. Acute treatment resulted in greater than dose-additive erythrocyte ChE inhibition (15-18%) at the highest dosages. In contrast, repeated treatment resulted in less than dose-additive erythrocyte ChE inhibition (16-22%) at the middle dosages. Brain and plasma levels of propoxur and carbaryl did not differ between the acute and repeated dosing paradigms. In summary, a physiological measure of central nervous system function and brain ChE activity had similar responses after acute or repeated treatment with the carbamate mixture, and brain ChE showed only small deviations from dose-additivity. Erythrocyte ChE activity had

  2. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis.

  3. Enhancing retinal images by nonlinear registration

    CERN Document Server

    Molodij, Guillaume; Glanc, Marie; Chenegros, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Being able to image the human retina in high resolution opens a new era in many important fields, such as pharmacological research for retinal diseases, researches in human cognition, nervous system, metabolism and blood stream, to name a few. In this paper, we propose to share the knowledge acquired in the fields of optics and imaging in solar astrophysics in order to improve the retinal imaging at very high spatial resolution in the perspective to perform a medical diagnosis. The main purpose would be to assist health care practitioners by enhancing retinal images and detect abnormal features. We apply a nonlinear registration method using local correlation tracking to increase the field of view and follow structure evolutions using correlation techniques borrowed from solar astronomy technique expertise. Another purpose is to define the tracer of movements after analyzing local correlations to follow the proper motions of an image from one moment to another, such as changes in optical flows that would be o...

  4. Marfan Syndrome Presenting with Bilateral Retinal Detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Chakrabarti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder of the connective tissue. Marfan syndrome affects most organs and tissues, especially the skeleton, lungs, eyes, heart, and the large blood vessels. Eye involvement may be in the form of retinal detachment which is a potentially dangerous manifestation for its sight threatening nature .We report a case where a 17 year old male developed sudden blindness due to spontaneous bilateral retinal detachment. Examination revealed features of Marfan syndrome and was stamped as a case of Marfan syndrome by Ghent criteria . The point to stress upon is that a young male developing spontaneous retinal detachment, a diagnosis of underlying Marfan syndrome should be kept in mind if appropriate clinical stigmata are present. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(1.000: 104-105

  5. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Mauricio Garcia,; Luisa Mendon?a; Rodrigo Brant; Murilo Abud; Caio Regatieri; Bruno Diniz

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledgeabout stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinaldegeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell andinduced pluripotent stem cell has been growth inculture for a long time, and started to be explored inthe treatment of blinding conditions. The Food andDrug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trialsusing SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, asStargardt's dystrophy, and patients with geographicatrophy, providing good outcomes. This study'sintent is to overview the critical regeneration of thesubretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epitheliumtransplantation, with the goal of reestablish importantpathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of thebrain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotentquiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationshipwith a primary retinal injury, different techniques oftransplantation, management of immune rejection andtumorigenicity, its potential application in improvingpatients' vision, and, finally, approaching future directionsand challenges for the treatment of several conditions.

  6. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment.

  7. Integrated computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-05-01

    Successful retinal tracking subsystem testing results in vivo on rhesus monkeys using an argon continuous wave laser and an ultra-short pulse laser are presented. Progress on developing an integrated robotic retinal laser surgery system is also presented. Several interesting areas of study have developed: (1) 'doughnut' shaped lesions that occur under certain combinations of laser power, spot size, and irradiation time complicating measurements of central lesion reflectance, (2) the optimal retinal field of view to achieve simultaneous tracking and lesion parameter control, and (3) a fully digital versus a hybrid analog/digital tracker using confocal reflectometry integrated system implementation. These areas are investigated in detail in this paper. The hybrid system warrants a separate presentation and appears in another paper at this conference.

  8. Electromechanical tactile stimulation system for sensory vision substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Elani, Gal; Azoulay, Eli; Ilani, Dan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Belkin, Michael

    2013-02-01

    A sensory substitution device is developed in which nonretinal stimulus is used to generate input to the brain of blind people to substitute for damage or loss of retinal input. Although the final realization of this technology (direct stimulation of the corneal nerve endings) was not addressed, a device consisting of a contact lens delivering point mechanical or electrical stimulating of the corneal nerves and a camera mounted on a spectacles frame which wirelessly transmit processed image to the contact lens, translating the visual information into tactile sensation is expected to be constructed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the constructed image, the camera will also time multiplex, compress and encode the captured image before transmitting it to the stimulating contact lens. Preliminary devices performing tactile stimulation of the fingers and of the tongue by applying point electrical stimulations, were constructed and tested. Subjects were taught to "see" using the mechanical and the electrical tactile sensory.

  9. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion With Subsequent Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Zoë R; Wang, Xiaofei; DiLoreto, David A

    2016-09-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion with subsequent central retinal vein occlusion in the same eye is a rare entity. We present a 72-year-old man with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis who developed bilateral arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and a left central retinal artery occlusion. Subsequently, he developed a left central retinal vein occlusion within 2 weeks of his initial vision loss. His vision did not improve with corticosteroids.

  10. Retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Pankaj Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to determine the prevalence of retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH and any association between the retinal changes and age, parity, blood pressure, proteinuria, and severity of the disease. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: All the patients admitted with a diagnosis of PIH were included in this study. Age, gravida, gestation period, blood pressure, and proteinuria were noted from the case records. Fundus examination was done with a direct ophthalmoscope. The findings were noted and were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: A total of 150 patients of PIH were examined. The mean age of patients was 25.1 years. The gestation period ranged from 27 weeks to 42 weeks; 76 (50.67% were the primi gravida. 92 (61.33% patients had gestational hypertension, 49 (32.67% patients had preeclampsia, and 9 (6% had eclampsia. Retinal changes (hypertensive retinopathy were noted in 18 (12% patients - Grade 1 in 12 (8% and Grade 2 in 6 (4%. Hemorrhages or exudates or retinal detachment were not seen in any patient. There was statistically significant positive association of retinal changes and blood pressure (P = 0.037, proteinuria (P = 0.0005, and severity of the PIH (P = 0.004. Conclusions: Retinal changes were seen in 12% of patients with PIH. Occurrence of hypertensive retinopathy in PIH cases has been decreased due to better antenatal care and early detection and treatment of PIH cases. There is a greater chance of developing retinopathy with increase in blood pressure, severity of PIH, and proteinuria in cases of PIH.

  11. Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-02

    END 1.0 1.18 Yl(-ROCOPY Ri yjTuION If ’,! (HART !. UIH; iLruud @ N TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES (ANNUAL REPORT 00 DTIC Michael Belkin...NO. CCESSION NO _______________________________61102A I102BS1O0 CF 1i. 446 TITLE (Indude S*.curny Claifkaion) TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL... INJURIES PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M. BELKIN N. NAVEH a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Mont. D y) S. PAGE COUNT FROM Xaj& TO l 2Ann

  12. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ahmadinejad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite a reduced viral load and improved immune responses, may experience clinical deterioration. This so called "immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS" is caused by inflammatory response to both intact subclinical pathogens and residual antigens. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is common in HIV-infected patients on ART with a cluster differentiation 4 (CD4+ counts less than 50 cells/mm3. We reported a patient with blurred vision while receiving ART. She had an unmasking classic CMV retinitis after ART.

  13. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y.; Postnov, Dmitry D.; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.;

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full......-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor...

  14. [Binocular vision after treatment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowicz, Małgorzata; Raczyńska, Krystyna; Maksymowicz, Jarosław

    2003-01-01

    The study covered 79 patients after treatment of retinal detachment. Double vision, strabismus and disturbances of eyeballs motility were found. Up to 12 months after intervention, the deterioration of binocular vision was observed in 48.28 to 89.66% of patients, depending on the method used. The majority of disturbances were observed during the first 3 months with tendency to gradual subsidence during consecutive 9 months. A patient, after treatment of retinal detachment, can be qualified to return to work where stereopsis is needed under condition that ophthalmologic examination is done every three months during the first year after operation and than once a year.

  15. Retinal image analysis: preprocessing and feature extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrugo, Andres G; Millan, Maria S, E-mail: andres.marrugo@upc.edu [Grup d' Optica Aplicada i Processament d' Imatge, Departament d' Optica i Optometria Univesitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    Image processing, analysis and computer vision techniques are found today in all fields of medical science. These techniques are especially relevant to modern ophthalmology, a field heavily dependent on visual data. Retinal images are widely used for diagnostic purposes by ophthalmologists. However, these images often need visual enhancement prior to apply a digital analysis for pathological risk or damage detection. In this work we propose the use of an image enhancement technique for the compensation of non-uniform contrast and luminosity distribution in retinal images. We also explore optic nerve head segmentation by means of color mathematical morphology and the use of active contours.

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the neuroretina and retinal blood vessels after retinal ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Gisela; Gesslein, Bodil; Gustafsson, Lotta

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ischemia arises from circulatory failure. As the retinal blood vessels are key organs in circulatory failure, our aim was to study the retinal vasculature separately from the neuroretina to elucidate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α and 1β and vascular endothelial growth factor...

  17. Interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor induce expression of major histocompatibility complex antigen on rat retinal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Asrar, A M; Maimone, D; Morse, P H; Lascola, C; Reder, A T

    1991-08-01

    Cultured rat retinal astrocytes were tested by indirect immunofluorescence staining for their ability to express class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens under basal culture conditions and after three days of stimulation with two recombinant cytokines, rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Under basal culture conditions low levels of class I antigens were detected on a small percentage of cells, but there was no visible class II. IFN-gamma and TNF alpha stimulation enhanced class I expression. TNF alpha had no effect on class II expression, whereas IFN-gamma induced the expression of class II in a dose dependent manner. These findings suggest that retinal astrocytes might play a part in immunological events occurring in the retina.

  18. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Bilateral Retinal Haemorrhages with Multiple Retinal Infiltrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Priyanka Ramkrishna; Barot, Rakesh K; Gohel, Devadatta Jayantilal; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-05-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) causes retinopathy manifesting as venous dilation and tortuosity, perivascular sheathing, retinal haemorrhages, microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots and optic nerve infiltration. Retina is the most commonly involved intraocular structure in CML. However, retinal involvement is a rare form of presentation of CML and few cases have been reported. We report a case of CML presenting as unilateral sudden visual loss. Fundus showed multiple white centered retinal haemorrhages in both eyes with unilateral macular oedema. Blood work-up showed raised WBC count, high platelet count and low Haemoglobin. Cytological analysis of bone marrow biopsy confirmed Philadelphia chromosome. After a course of Imatinib, visual acuity improved and haemorrhages resolved with normalization of macular thickness. In our case, patient presented early, leading to early detection producing better visual prognosis. This highlights the importance of detailed hematological work up in patients with retinal involvement to rule out leukaemic retinopathy.

  19. Probing how initial retinal configuration controls photochemical dynamics in retinal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheves M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial retinal configuration and the active isomerization coordinate on the photochemistry of retinal proteins (RPs are assessed by comparing photochemical dynamics of two stable retinal ground state configurations (all-trans,15-anti vs. 13-cis,15-syn, within two RPs: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR and Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR. Hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy shows that photochemistry starting from 13-cis retinal in both proteins is 3-10 times faster than when started in the all-trans state, suggesting that the hastening is ubiquitous to microbial RPs, regardless of their different biological functions and origin. This may also relate to the known disparity of photochemical rates between microbial RPs and visual pigments. Importance and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed as well.

  20. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Contributes to a Shift in the Angioregulatory Activity of Retinal Glial (Müller) Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafai, Yousef; Iandiev, Ianors; Lange, Johannes; Yang, Xiu Mei; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Eichler, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with pro-angiogenic and neurotrophic effects. The angioregulatory role of this molecule may become especially significant in retinal neovascularization, which is a hallmark of a number of ischemic eye diseases. This study was undertaken to reveal expression characteristics of bFGF, produced by retinal glial (Müller) cells, and to determine conditions under which glial bFGF may stimulate the proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling detected bFGF in Müller cells of the rat retina and in acutely isolated Müller cells with bFGF levels, which increased after ischemia-reperfusion in postischemic retinas. In patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or myopia, the immunoreactivity of bFGF co-localized to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in surgically excised retinal tissues. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses indicated that cultured Müller cells produce bFGF, which is elevated under hypoxia or oxidative stress, as well as under stimulation with various growth factors and cytokines, including pro-inflammatory factors. When retinal endothelial cells were cultured in the presence of media from hypoxia (0.2%)-conditioned Müller cells, a distinct picture of endothelial cell proliferation emerged. Media from 24-h cultured Müller cells inhibited proliferation, whereas 72-h conditioned media elicited a stimulatory effect. BFGF-neutralizing antibodies suppressed the enhanced endothelial cell proliferation to a similar extent as anti-VEGF antibodies. Furthermore, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK−1/−2) in retinal endothelial cells was increased when the cells were cultured in 72-h conditioned media, while neutralizing bFGF attenuated the activation of this signaling pathway. These data provide evidence that retinal (glial) Müller cells are major sources of bFGF in the ischemic retina. Müller cells under

  1. Basic fibroblast growth factor contributes to a shift in the angioregulatory activity of retinal glial (Muller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Yafai

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is a pleiotropic cytokine with pro-angiogenic and neurotrophic effects. The angioregulatory role of this molecule may become especially significant in retinal neovascularization, which is a hallmark of a number of ischemic eye diseases. This study was undertaken to reveal expression characteristics of bFGF, produced by retinal glial (Müller cells, and to determine conditions under which glial bFGF may stimulate the proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling detected bFGF in Müller cells of the rat retina and in acutely isolated Müller cells with bFGF levels, which increased after ischemia-reperfusion in postischemic retinas. In patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or myopia, the immunoreactivity of bFGF co-localized to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive cells in surgically excised retinal tissues. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses indicated that cultured Müller cells produce bFGF, which is elevated under hypoxia or oxidative stress, as well as under stimulation with various growth factors and cytokines, including pro-inflammatory factors. When retinal endothelial cells were cultured in the presence of media from hypoxia (0.2%-conditioned Müller cells, a distinct picture of endothelial cell proliferation emerged. Media from 24-h cultured Müller cells inhibited proliferation, whereas 72-h conditioned media elicited a stimulatory effect. BFGF-neutralizing antibodies suppressed the enhanced endothelial cell proliferation to a similar extent as anti-VEGF antibodies. Furthermore, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1/-2 in retinal endothelial cells was increased when the cells were cultured in 72-h conditioned media, while neutralizing bFGF attenuated the activation of this signaling pathway. These data provide evidence that retinal (glial Müller cells are major sources of bFGF in the ischemic retina. Müller cells under

  2. Retinal changes in an ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Peter Aplin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG and optical coherence tomography (OCT. At 30 hours (n = 3 or 12 weeks (n = 3 post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labelled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 hours and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration.

  3. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppression: does venooclusive disease predispose to cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients already at risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welling JD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available John D Welling, Ahmad B Tarabishy, John ChristoforidisDepartment of Ophthalmology, Havener Eye Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis remains the most common opportunistic ocular infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients with immunocompromising diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, inherited immunodeficiency states, malignancies, and those on systemic immunosuppressive therapy, are known to be at risk. Recently, it has been suggested that patients undergoing intravitreal injection of immunosuppressive agents may also be predisposed. One previous case report speculated that there may be an additional risk for CMV retinitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with venoocclusive disease. This case study presents a case of CMV retinitis following central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppressants.Keywords: cytomegalovirus retinitis, central retinal vein occlusion, immunosuppression, solid organ transplant, venous stasis, risk factor

  4. Current Concepts in the Treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Musarella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal degenerations, including retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, affect 1 in 4000 individuals in the general population. A majority of the genes which are mutated in these conditions are expressed in either photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. There is considerable variation in the clinical severity of these conditions; the most severe being autosomal recessive LCA, a heterogeneous retinal degenerative disease and the commonest cause of congenital blindness in children. Here, we discuss all the potential treatments that are now available for retinal degeneration. A number of therapeutic avenues are being explored based on our knowledge of the pathophysiology of retinal degeneration derived from research on animal models, including: gene therapy, antiapoptosis agents, neurotrophic factors, and dietary supplementation. Technological advances in retinal implant devices continue to provide the promise of vision for patients with end-stage disease.

  5. Endovascular cannulation with a microneedle for central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Yamane, Shin; Arakawa, Akira; Inoue, Maiko; Yamakawa, Tadashi; Uchio, Eiichi; Yanagi, Yasuo; Amano, Shiro

    2013-06-01

    We developed a new surgical treatment in which a microneedle is used for retinal endovascular cannulation to treat eyes with central retinal vein occlusion by flushing thrombus out of the central retinal vein as it passes through the lamina cribrosa. The eyes of 12 consecutive patients (12 eyes) with central retinal vein occlusion were successfully treated using this novel treatment. At 24 weeks after surgery, 9 of 12 eyes had gained more than 15 letters in best-corrected visual acuity, and the mean decrease in central foveal thickness was 271.1 μm. Few complications were observed. The microneedle is stiff and sharp enough to facilitate retinal endovascular cannulation in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion. This new technique is a promising treatment of macular edema due to central retinal vein occlusion.

  6. Interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor induce expression of major histocompatibility complex antigen on rat retinal astrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Asrar, A M; Maimone, D.; Morse, P H; Lascola, C; Reder, A T

    1991-01-01

    Cultured rat retinal astrocytes were tested by indirect immunofluorescence staining for their ability to express class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens under basal culture conditions and after three days of stimulation with two recombinant cytokines, rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Under basal culture conditions low levels of class I antigens were detected on a small percentage of cells, but there was no visible clas...

  7. Aiding the Eye, Watching the Brain: James Weiland, IEEE Fellow, explores the unique challenges of retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    The retina is a sophisticated neural network that provides humans with high-resolution vision. And for those who suffer from retinal disease or deterioration, particularly age-related macular degeneration (the leading cause of blindness among people over the age of 50 in the United States), a better understanding of how to stimulate the retina or completely override its path to the area of the brain that processes vision may offer hope to restore sight.

  8. Differential regulation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in chicken retinal ganglion cells by light and circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Diego J; Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Díaz, Nicolás M; Silvestre, David C; Guido, Mario E

    2012-10-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) contain circadian clocks driving melatonin synthesis during the day, a subset of these cells acting as nonvisual photoreceptors sending photic information to the brain. In this work, the authors investigated the temporal and light regulation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity, a key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The authors first examined this activity in RGCs of wild-type chickens and compared it to that in photoreceptor cells (PRs) from animals maintained for 48 h in constant dark (DD), light (LL), or regular 12-h:12-h light-dark (LD) cycle. AA-NAT activity in RGCs displayed circadian rhythmicity, with highest levels during the subjective day in both DD and LL as well as in the light phase of the LD cycle. In contrast, AA-NAT activity in PRs exhibited the typical nocturnal peak in DD and LD, but no detectable oscillation was observed under LL, under which conditions the levels were basal at all times examined. A light pulse of 30-60 min significantly decreased AA-NAT activity in PRs during the subjective night, but had no effect on RGCs during the day or night. Intraocular injection of dopamine (50 nmol/eye) during the night to mimic the effect of light presented significant inhibition of AA-NAT activity in PRs compared to controls but had no effect on RGCs. The results clearly demonstrate that the regulation of the diurnal increase in AA-NAT activity in RGCs of chickens undergoes a different control mechanism from that observed in PRs, in which the endogenous clock, light, and dopamine exhibited differential effects.

  9. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in AIDS patients: a different appearance of varicella-zoster retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesio, C E; Mitchell, S M; Barton, K; Schwartz, S D; Towler, H M; Lightman, S

    1995-01-01

    Retinal infections caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) have been reported in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Two cases of a VZV-related retinitis are described with the characteristic features of the recently described progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome. Both patients suffered from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with greatly reduced peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts, and presented with macular retinitis without vitritis. The disease was bilateral in one case and unilateral in the other. The clinical course was rapidly progressive with widespread retinal involvement and the development of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with complete loss of vision in the affected eyes despite intensive intravenous antiviral therapy. VZV DNA was identified in vitreous biopsies, by molecular techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in both patients. At present, the use of very high-dose intravenous acyclovir may be the best therapeutic option in these patients for whom the visual prognosis is poor. Intravitreal antiviral drugs could also contribute to the management of these cases.

  10. Ground-state properties of the retinal molecule: from quantum mechanical to classical mechanical computations of retinal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhai, Sandor [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg

    2011-01-01

    Retinal proteins are excellent systems for understanding essential physiological processes such as signal transduction and ion pumping. Although the conjugated polyene system of the retinal chromophore is best described with quantum mechanics, simulations of the long-timescale dynamics of a retinal protein in its physiological, flexible, lipid-membrane environment can only be performed at the classical mechanical level. Torsional energy barriers are a critical ingredient of the classical force-field parameters. Here we review briefly current retinal force fields and discuss new quantum mechanical computations to assess how the retinal Schiff base model and the approach used to derive the force-field parameters may influence the torsional potentials.

  11. Nonsurgical management of diplopia after retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, David J

    2012-01-01

    For those who manage strabismus in adults, the patient with diplopia following retinal surgery presents a challenge. Mechanical and sensory factors may combine to preclude single binocular vision, and neutralizing the patient's strabismus may not be sufficient to permit resolution of their diplopia. This paper reviews the issues involved and discusses some potential solutions.

  12. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  13. Retinal oscillations carry visual information to cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Koepsell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic relay cells fire action potentials that transmit information from retina to cortex. The amount of information that spike trains encode is usually estimated from the precision of spike timing with respect to the stimulus. Sensory input, however, is only one factor that influences neural activity. For example, intrinsic dynamics, such as oscillations of networks of neurons, also modulate firing pattern. Here, we asked if retinal oscillations might help to convey information to neurons downstream. Specifically, we made whole-cell recordings from relay cells to reveal retinal inputs (EPSPs and thalamic outputs (spikes and then analyzed these events with information theory. Our results show that thalamic spike trains operate as two multiplexed channels. One channel, which occupies a low frequency band (<30 Hz, is encoded by average firing rate with respect to the stimulus and carries information about local changes in the visual field over time. The other operates in the gamma frequency band (40-80 Hz and is encoded by spike timing relative to retinal oscillations. At times, the second channel conveyed even more information than the first. Because retinal oscillations involve extensive networks of ganglion cells, it is likely that the second channel transmits information about global features of the visual scene.

  14. Multimodal Imaging in Hereditary Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this retrospective study we evaluated the multimodal visualization of retinal genetic diseases to better understand their natural course. Material and Methods. We reviewed the charts of 70 consecutive patients with different genetic retinal pathologies who had previously undergone multimodal imaging analyses. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped at the known locus for the different diseases. Results. The medical records of 3 families of a 4-generation pedigree affected by North Carolina macular dystrophy were reviewed. A total of 8 patients with Stargardt disease were evaluated for their two main defining clinical characteristics, yellow subretinal flecks and central atrophy. Nine male patients with a previous diagnosis of choroideremia and eleven female carriers were evaluated. Fourteen patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and 6 family members with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy were included. Seven patients with enhanced s-cone syndrome were ascertained. Lastly, we included 3 unrelated patients with fundus albipunctatus. Conclusions. In hereditary retinal diseases, clinical examination is often not sufficient for evaluating the patient’s condition. Retinal imaging then becomes important in making the diagnosis, in monitoring the progression of disease, and as a surrogate outcome measure of the efficacy of an intervention.

  15. Anterior segment complications of retinal photocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1975-03-01

    Seven patients had anterior segment complications following xenon arc retinal photocoagulation. Irreversible keratopathy was induced in two cases; all patients showed evidence of iris injury. The absorption of radiation by the iris was considered the main factor in producing overheating of the anterior segment.

  16. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard, X.; Garanto Iglesias, A.; Rozet, J.M.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several

  17. [Retinal detachment with retinoschisis--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, R; Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Coma, Corina; Gabej, Ioana; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 43 year old patient diagnosed with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and retinoschizis, a rare case of disease association. Surgery is recommended and we practice 23 gauge vitrectomy, laser retinopexy, criopexy in the periphery and internal heavy oil tamponade. Postoperatory evolution was favorable.

  18. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  19. [Pharmacological concepts to treat hereditary retinal degenerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloschek, C M; Jägle, H

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the current pharmacological strategies to treat inherited retinal degeneration. To date there is no causal therapy despite growing knowledge of the particular pathomechanisms. However, treatment is available for complications, such as cystic macular changes and cystoid macular edema. To reduce retinal thickness systemic or topical carboanhydrase inhibitors can be applied and in rare cases combined with steroids when indicated, however reduction of retinal thickness is not always accompanied by improvement of visual acuity. Regular follow-up with optical coherence tomography is required. In some cases, potentially neuroprotective agents (valproic acid, ciliary neurotrophic factor and Ca(2+ ) channel inhibitors) or food supplementation (vitamin A, lutein, synthetic retinoids and decosahexaenoic acid) may have a positive impact on disease progression (e.g. reduction in progression of visual field loss or individual electrophysiological parameters). However, beneficial effects and side effects, e.g. of vitamin A substitution, depend not only on the disease phenotype (such as retinitis pigmentosa) but also on the actual genotype. Furthermore, no data are available regarding the application of pharmaceuticals in the pediatric population.

  20. AUTOMATIC RETINAL VESSEL DETECTION AND TORTUOSITY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope Mapayi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As retinopathies continue to be major causes of visual loss and blindness worldwide, early detection and management of these diseases will help achieve significant reduction of blindness cases. However, an efficient automatic retinal vessel segmentation approach remains a challenge. Since efficient vessel network detection is a very important step needed in ophthalmology for reliable retinal vessel characterization, this paper presents study on the combination of difference image and K-means clustering for the segmentation of retinal vessels. Stationary points in the vessel center-lines are used to model the detection of twists in the vessel segments. The combination of arc-chord ratio with stationary points is used to compute tortuosity index. Experimental results show that the proposed K-means combined with difference image achieved a robust segmentation of retinal vessels. A maximum average accuracy of 0.9556 and a maximum average sensitivity of 0.7581 were achieved on DRIVE database while a maximum average accuracy of 0.9509 and a maximum average sensitivity of 0.7666 were achieved on STARE database. When compared with the previously proposed techniques on DRIVE and STARE databases, the proposed technique yields higher mean sensitivity and mean accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity. In a related development, a non-normalized tortuosity index that combined distance metric and the vessel twist frequency proposed in this paper also achieved a strong correlation of 0.80 with the expert ground truth.

  1. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  2. Connexin43 in retinal injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Zhang, Jie; Acosta, Monica L; Rupenthal, Ilva D; Green, Colin R

    2016-03-01

    Gap junctions are specialized cell-to-cell contacts that allow the direct transfer of small molecules between cells. A single gap junction channel consists of two hemichannels, or connexons, each of which is composed of six connexin protein subunits. Connexin43 is the most ubiquitously expressed isoform of the connexin family and in the retina it is prevalent in astrocytes, Müller cells, microglia, retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cells. Prior to docking with a neighboring cell, Connexin43 hemichannels have a low open probability as open channels constitute a large, relatively non-specific membrane pore. However, with injury and disease Connexin43 upregulation and hemichannel opening has been implicated in all aspects of secondary damage, especially glial cell activation, edema and loss of vascular integrity, leading to neuronal death. We here review gap junctions and their roles in the retina, and then focus in on Connexin43 gap junction channels in injury and disease. In particular, the effect of pathological opening of gap junction hemichannels is described, and hemichannel mediated loss of vascular integrity explained. This latter phenomenon underlies retinal pigment epithelium loss and is a common feature in several retinal diseases. Finally, Connexin43 channel roles in a number of retinal diseases including macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy are considered, along with results from related animal models. A final section describes gap junction channel modulation and the ocular delivery of potential therapeutic molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

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    Wendeson S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Wendeson S; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D C; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods.

  5. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  6. Laser photocoagulation for retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion (RVO is one of the leading causes of permanent vision loss. In adults, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO occurs in 1.8% while branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO occurs in 0.2%. Treatment strategy and disease prognosis are determined by RVO type (ischemic/non-ischemic. Despite numerous studies and many current CRVO and BRVO treatment approaches, the management of these patients is still being debated. Intravitreal injections of steroids (triamcinolone acetate, dexamethasone and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitors (bevacizumab, ranibizumab were shown to be fairly effective. However, it is unclear whether anti-VEGF agents are reasonable in ischemic RVOs. Laser photocoagulation remains the only effective treatment of optic nerve head and/or retinal neovascularization. Laser photocoagulation is also indicated for the treatment of macular edema. Both threshold and sub-threshold photocoagulation may be performed. Photocoagulation performed with argon (514 nm, krypton (647 nm, or diode (810 nm laser for macular edema provides similar results (no significant differences. The treatment may be complex and include medication therapy and/or surgery. Medication therapy includes anti-aggregant agents and antioxidants, i.e., emoxypine which may be used in acute RVO as well as in post-thrombotic retinopathy. 

  7. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christensen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin belong to a heterogenic population of RGCs which regulate the circadian clock, masking behavior, melatonin suppression, the pupillary light reflex and sleep/wake cycles. The different functions seem...

  8. Retinal breaks due to intravitreal ocriplasmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruwan A Silva, Darius M Moshfeghi, Theodore Leng Byers Eye Institute at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA Abstract: Ocriplasmin represents a new treatment option for numerous vitreoretinopathies involving an abnormal vitreomacular interface. While the drug may circumvent the traditional risks of surgical treatment, pharmacologic vitreolysis is not devoid of risk itself. This report presents two cases, one of vitreomacular traction syndrome and the other of a full-thickness macular hole, both of which were treated with an intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin. Notably, in both cases, vitreomacular traction of the macula appears to have been alleviated; however, failure to completely relieve vitreoretinal traction from the peripheral retina generated retinal breaks with one patient eventually developing a macula-involving retinal detachment. Thus, even in instances of ‘successful’ pharmacologic treatment of vitreomacular traction, continued follow-up evaluation is essential. Keywords: posterior vitreous detachment, retinal detachment, vitreomacular traction, ocriplasmin, retinal break, macular hole, laser retinopexy

  9. CERKL knockdown causes retinal degeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    Full Text Available The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration.

  10. Optimal management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Stewart

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael W StewartDepartment of Ophthalmology, Mayo School of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: Cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. CMV retinitis afflicted 25% to 42% of AIDS patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era, with most vision loss due to macula-involving retinitis or retinal detachment. The introduction of HAART significantly decreased the incidence and severity of CMV retinitis. Optimal treatment of CMV retinitis requires a thorough evaluation of the patient’s immune status and an accurate classification of the retinal lesions. When retinitis is diagnosed, HAART therapy should be started or improved, and anti-CMV therapy with oral valganciclovir, intravenous ganciclovir, foscarnet, or cidofovir should be administered. Selected patients, especially those with zone 1 retinitis, may receive intravitreal drug injections or surgical implantation of a sustained-release ganciclovir reservoir. Effective anti-CMV therapy coupled with HAART significantly decreases the incidence of vision loss and improves patient survival. Immune recovery uveitis and retinal detachments are important causes of moderate to severe loss of vision. Compared with the early years of the AIDS epidemic, the treatment emphasis in the post-HAART era has changed from short-term control of retinitis to long-term preservation of vision. Developing countries face shortages of health care professionals and inadequate supplies of anti-CMV and anti-HIV medications. Intravitreal ganciclovir injections may be the most cost effective strategy to treat CMV retinitis in these areas.Keywords: cytomegalovirus, AIDS, retinitis, immune recovery uveitis, retinal detachment, treatment

  11. Prospectives for gene therapy of retinal degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-08-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  12. Sincronização não-fótica: o efeito do exercício físico aeróbio Non-photic synchronization: the effect of aerobic physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Augustino Back

    2007-04-01

    by PE qualifies it as a synchronizer of the biological oscillators. The main synchronizer of the biological rhythm is the light/dark geophysical cycle. The day/night rotation which occurs through differences in the luminosity levels is perceived through photic ways by the CTS. These stimuli, called photic, provide temporal information to the CTS synchronizing hence the biological oscillators to this environmental cycle. Other stimuli are also capable to synchronize them and are called non-photic synchronizers. This review writes about the effect of PE over the temporization system as well as discusses the possible and probable chronobiological applications of the mentioned knowledge. PE may affect the CTS through non-photic ways, being hence able to benefit health of individuals in several situations, such as transmeridian flights, night shift tasks and sleep disturbs. Moreover, we highlight that further studies should be conducted on individuals' routine in order to better understand the relationship between different synchronizers as well as their contribution in a real context.

  13. Interactions of Prosthetic and Natural Vision in Animals With Local Retinal Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorach, Henri; Lei, Xin; Galambos, Ludwig; Kamins, Theodore; Mathieson, Keith; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prosthetic restoration of partial sensory loss leads to interactions between artificial and natural inputs. Ideally, the rehabilitation should allow perceptual fusion of the two modalities. Here we studied the interactions between normal and prosthetic vision in a rodent model of local retinal degeneration. Methods Implantation of a photovoltaic array in the subretinal space of normally sighted rats induced local degeneration of the photoreceptors above the chip, and the inner retinal neurons in this area were electrically stimulated by the photovoltaic implant powered by near-infrared (NIR) light. We studied prosthetic and natural visually evoked potentials (VEP) in response to simultaneous stimulation by NIR and visible light patterns. Results We demonstrate that electrical and natural VEPs summed linearly in the visual cortex, and both responses decreased under brighter ambient light. Responses to visible light flashes increased over 3 orders of magnitude of contrast (flash/background), while for electrical stimulation the contrast range was limited to 1 order of magnitude. The maximum amplitude of the prosthetic VEP was three times lower than the maximum response to a visible flash over the same area on the retina. Conclusions Ambient light affects prosthetic responses, albeit much less than responses to visible stimuli. Prosthetic representation of contrast in the visual scene can be encoded, to a limited extent, by the appropriately calibrated stimulus intensity, which also depends on the ambient light conditions. Such calibration will be important for patients combining central prosthetic vision with natural peripheral sight, such as in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26618643

  14. Endothelins Inhibit Osmotic Swelling of Rat Retinal Glial and Bipolar Cells by Activation of Growth Factor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Stefanie; Grosche, Antje; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Here, we show that endothelin-1 (ET-1) dose-dependently inhibits the hypoosmotic swelling of Müller cells in freshly isolated retinal slices of control and diabetic rats, with a maximal inhibition at 100 nM. Osmotic Müller cell swelling was also inhibited by ET-2. The effect of ET-1 was mediated by activation of ETA and ETB receptors resulting in transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, purinergic P2Y1, and adenosine A1 receptors. ET-1 (but not ET-2) also inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cells in retinal slices, but failed to inhibit the swelling of freshly isolated bipolar cells. The inhibitory effect of ET-1 on the bipolar cell swelling in retinal slices was abrogated by inhibitors of the FGF receptor kinase (PD173074) and of TGF-β1 superfamily activin receptor-like kinase receptors (SB431542), respectively. Both Müller and bipolar cells displayed immunoreactivities of ETA and ETB receptor proteins. The data may suggest that neuroprotective effects of ETs in the retina are in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial and bipolar cells. ET-1 acts directly on Müller cells, while the inhibitory effect of ET-1 on bipolar cell swelling is indirectly mediated, via stimulation of the release of growth factors like bFGF and TGF-β1 from Müller cells.

  15. BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION PRODUCED BY PROPOXUR AND DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propoxur is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response following stimulation of the visual system with flashes of light. They ar...

  16. Excitotoxic death of retinal neurons in vivo occurs via a non-cell-autonomous mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun-Julien, Frédéric; Duplan, Laure; Pernet, Vincent; Osswald, Ingrid; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Bourgeois, Philippe; Dickson, Kathleen; Bowie, Derek; Barker, Philip A; Di Polo, Adriana

    2009-04-29

    The central hypothesis of excitotoxicity is that excessive stimulation of neuronal NMDA-sensitive glutamate receptors is harmful to neurons and contributes to a variety of neurological disorders. Glial cells have been proposed to participate in excitotoxic neuronal loss, but their precise role is defined poorly. In this in vivo study, we show that NMDA induces profound nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in Müller glia but not in retinal neurons. Intriguingly, NMDA-induced death of retinal neurons is effectively blocked by inhibitors of NF-kappaB activity. We demonstrate that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) protein produced in Müller glial cells via an NMDA-induced NF-kappaB-dependent pathway plays a crucial role in excitotoxic loss of retinal neurons. This cell loss occurs mainly through a TNFalpha-dependent increase in Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors on susceptible neurons. Thus, our data reveal a novel non-cell-autonomous mechanism by which glial cells can profoundly exacerbate neuronal death following excitotoxic injury.

  17. Role of Bax in death of uninfected retinal cells during murine cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Juan; Marshall, Brendan; Covar, Jason; Zhang, Nancy Y; Smith, Sylvia B; Atherton, Sally S; Zhang, Ming

    2014-10-08

    Extensive death of uninfected bystander neuronal cells is an important component of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus retinitis. Our previous results have shown that caspase 3-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in death of uninfected bystander cells during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) retinitis and also that Bcl-2, an important inhibitor of apoptosis via the Bax-mediated mitochondrial pathway, is downregulated during this process. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bax-mediated mitochondrial damage has a significant role in the death of uninfected retinal cells. BALB/c mice, Bax(-/-) mice, or Bax(+/+) mice were immunosuppressed with methylprednisolone and infected with 5 × 10(3) plaque-forming units (PFU) of the K181 strain of MCMV via the supraciliary route. Injected eyes were analyzed by plaque assay, electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, TUNEL assay, Western blot (for caspase 3, caspase 12, Bax, receptor interacting protein-1 [RIP1] and receptor interacting protein-3 [RIP3]), as well as immunohistochemical staining for MCMV early antigen and cleaved caspase 3. Significantly more Bax was detected in mitochondrial fractions of MCMV-infected eyes than in mitochondrial fractions of mock-infected control eyes. Furthermore, the level of cleaved caspase 3 was significantly lower in MCMV-infected Bax(-/-) eyes than in MCMV-infected Bax(+/+) eyes. However, more caspase 3-independent cell death of uninfected bystander retinal cells and more cleaved RIP1 were observed in Bax(-/-) than in Bax(+/+) eyes. During MCMV retinitis, Bax is activated and has an important role in death of uninfected bystander retinal cells by caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. Although the exact mechanism remains to be deciphered, active Bax might also prevent death of some types of uninfected retinal cells by a caspase 3-independent pathway. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Inner retinal change in a novel rd1-FTL mouse model of retinal degeneration

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    Ursula eGreferath

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While photoreceptor loss is the most devastating result of inherited retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa, inner retinal neurons also undergo significant alteration. Detailing these changes has become important as many vision restorative therapies target the remaining neurons. In this study, the rd1-Fos-Tau-LacZ (rd1-FTL mouse model was used to explore inner retinal change at a late stage of retinal degeneration, after the loss of photoreceptor nuclei. The rd1-FTL model carries a mutation in the phosphodiesterase gene, Pde6b, and an axonally targeted transgenic beta galactosidase reporter system under the control of the c-fos promoter. Retinae of transgenic rd1-FTL mice and control FTL animals aged 2 to 12 months were processed for indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry. At 2 months of age, a time when the majority of photoreceptor nuclei are lost, there was negligible c-fos reporter (FTL expression, however, from 4 months, reporter expression was observed to increase within subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells within the central retina. These areas of inner retinal FTL expression coincided with regions that contained aberrant Müller cells. Specifically, these cells exhibited reduced glutamine synthetase and Kir4.1 immunolabelling, whilst showing evidence of proliferative gliosis (increased cyclinD1 and GFAP expression. These changes were limited to distinct regions where cone photoreceptor terminals were absent. Overall, these results highlight that distinct areas of the rd1-FTL central retina undergo significant glial alterations after cone photoreceptor loss. These areas coincide with up-regulation of the c-fos reporter in the inner retina, which may represent a change in neuronal function/plasticity. The rd1-FTL mouse is a useful model system to probe changes that occur in the inner retina at later stages of retinal degeneration.

  19. L-Satropane Prevents Retinal Neuron Damage by Attenuating Cell Apoptosis and Aβ Production via Activation of M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Lu; Tang, Ya-Bin; Song, Yun; Lu, Juan-Juan; Hou, Li-Na; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Cui, Yong-Yao

    2017-09-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists have been used to treat glaucoma due to their intraocular pressure-lowering effects. Recently, it has been reported that retinal mAChRs activation can also stimulate neuroprotective pathways. In our study, we evaluated the potential neuroprotective effect of L-satropane, a novel mAChR agonist, on retinal neuronal injury induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). CoCl2-induced hypoxia injury in cultured cell models and I/R-induced retinal neuronal damage in rats in vivo were used to evaluate the abilities of L-satropane. In detail, we measured the occurrence of retinal pathological changes including molecular markers of neuronal apoptosis and Aβ expression. Pretreatment with L-satropane protects against CoCl2-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 and primary retinal neuron (PRN) cells in a dose-dependent manner by increasing retinal neuron survival. CoCl2 or I/R-induced cell apoptosis by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2 expression, which resulted in an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and upregulating caspase-3 expression/activity was significantly reversed by L-satropane treatment. In addition, L-satropane significantly inhibited the upregulation of Aβ production in both retinal neurons and tissue. We also found that I/R-induced histopathological retinal changes including cell loss in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) and increased TUNEL positive retinal ganglion cells in GCL and thinning of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) were markedly improved by L-satropane. The effects of L-satropane were largely abolished by the nonselective mAChRs antagonist atropine and M1-selective mAChR antagonist pirenzepine. These results demonstrated that L-satropane might be effective in preventing retinal neuron damage caused by CoCl2 or I/R. The neuroprotective effects of L-satropane may be attributed to decreasing cell apoptosis and Aβ production through activation

  20. Canine and human visual cortex intact and responsive despite early retinal blindness from RPE65 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Aguirre

    2007-06-01

    .8 +/- 1.2 cm(3 compared to controls (29.7 +/- 8.3 cm(3, p < 0.001 when stimulated with lower intensity light. Unexpectedly, cortical response volume (41.2 +/- 11.1 cm(3 was comparable to normal (48.8 +/- 3.1 cm(3, p = 0.2 with higher intensity light stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Visual cortical responses dramatically improve after retinal gene therapy in the canine model of RPE65-LCA. Human RPE65-LCA patients have preserved visual pathway anatomy and detectable cortical activation despite limited visual experience. Taken together, the results support the potential for human visual benefit from retinal therapies currently being aimed at restoring vision to the congenitally blind with genetic retinal disease.

  1. Retinal research using the perfused mammalian eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, G

    2001-05-01

    The effort to isolate and maintain alive in vitro an intact mammalian eye is rewarded by the full control provided over the arterial input and exclusion of systemic regulatory or compensatory mechanisms. Electrical recording of typical light-evoked field potentials from retina and optic nerve can be complemented by single-cell recording. Thus, light-induced electrical activity reflects the function of the retinal pigment epithelium, of the layers of the retina and of the ganglion cells or their axons. Retinal function in vitro is documented by electrophysiological and morphological methods revealing subtle features of retinal information processing as well as optic nerve signals that approach-at threshold stimulus intensity-the human psychophysical threshold. Such sensitivity of third-order retinal neurons is described for the first time. This well controlled in vitro preparation has been used successfully for biophysical, metabolic and pharmacological studies. Examples are provided that demonstrate the marked sensibility of the rod system to changes in glucose supply. Moreover, histochemical identification of glycogen stores revealed labeling of the second- and third-order neurons subserving the rod system, in addition to labeling of Müller (glial) cells in the cat retina. The glycogen content of the cat retina is augmented by prolonged anesthesia, largely depleted by ischemia after enucleation and enhanced by insulin. Pharmacological experiments using agonists and antagonists of putative retinal neurotransmitters are summarized and outlined using the muscarinic cholinergic agonist QNB as an example. Actions and uptake of the neuromodulator adenosine are presented in detail, including inhibitory effects on physiologically characterized ganglion cells. Neuronal effects of adenosine are distinguished from those resulting from vasodilatation and from glycogenolysis induced by the neuromodulator. To open the blood-retina barrier, a hyperosmotic challenge can be

  2. Trophic factors GDNF and BDNF improve function of retinal sheet transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pamela B; Seiler, Magdalene J; Aramant, Robert B; Yan, Fengrong; Mahoney, Melissa J; Kitzes, Leonard M; Keirstead, Hans S

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) treatment of retinal transplants on restoration of visual responses in the superior colliculus (SC) of the S334ter line 3 rat model of rapid retinal degeneration (RD). RD rats (age 4-6 weeks) received subretinal transplants of intact sheets of fetal retina expressing the marker human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPAP). Experimental groups included: (1) untreated retinal sheet transplants, (2) GDNF-treated transplants, (3) BDNF-treated transplants, (4) none surgical, age-matched RD rats, (5) sham surgery RD controls, (6) progenitor cortex transplant RD controls, and (7) normal pigmented rat controls. At 2-8 months after transplantation, multi-unit visual responses were recorded from the SC using a 40 ms full-field stimulus (-5.9 to +1 log cd/m(2)) after overnight dark-adaptation. Responses were analyzed for light thresholds, spike counts, response latencies, and location within the SC. Transplants were grouped into laminated or rosetted (more disorganized) transplants based on histological analysis. Visual stimulation of control RD rats evoked no responses. In RD rats with retinal transplants, a small area of the SC corresponding to the position of the transplant in the host retina, responded to light stimulation between -4.5 and -0.08 log cd/m(2), whereas the light threshold of normal rats was at or below -5 log cd/m(2) all over the SC. Overall, responses in the SC in rats with laminated transplants had lower response thresholds and were distributed over a wider area than rats with rosetted transplants. BDNF treatment improved responses (spike counts, light thresholds and responsive areas) of rats with laminated transplants whereas GDNF treatment improved responses from rats with both laminated and rosetted (more disorganized) transplants. In conclusion, treatment of retinal transplants with GDNF and BDNF improved the restoration

  3. RETINAL DEEP CAPILLARY ISCHEMIA ASSOCIATED WITH AN OCCLUDED CONGENITAL RETINAL MACROVESSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Taiji; Ogata, Nahoko

    2017-01-01

    To report the case of a patient with an occluded congenital retinal macrovessel accompanied by retinal deep capillary ischemia. A 38-year-old woman presented with a 2-day history of a paracentral scotoma of her right eye. Fundus photograph showed a dilated congenital retinal macrovessel with arteriovenous anastomosis, an intravascular white region indicating the thrombus at arteriovenous anastomotic region, and an area of retinal whitening temporal to the fovea. The spectral domain optical coherence tomography images through the area of retinal whitening showed a thickening and highly reflectivity at the level of the inner nuclear layer, which is likely due to the deep capillary ischemia. After 6 weeks, spectral domain optical coherence tomography images through the same area demonstrated a thinning and atrophy of only the inner nuclear layer, and the patient's paracentral scotoma persisted. Acute capillary hemodynamic changes caused deep capillary ischemia. The spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed a highly reflective lesion at the level of the inner nuclear layer in the acute phase.

  4. Retinal tears and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after intravitreal injections: its prevalence and case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabag, Revan Yildirim; Parlak, Melih; Cetin, Gölgem; Yaman, Aylin; Osman Saatci, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the prevalence of postoperative retinal tear or rhegmatogenous retinal detachment secondary to intravitreal injections. Methods Surgical and medical records of patients who received intravitreal injections at the practice of a single retina specialist from January 2004 to May 2013 and who were followed for at least 6 months were investigated retrospectively. Results During the study period, a total of 3,907 intravitreal injections were performed in 1,049 eyes of 784 patients (416 males [47%]). The mean number of injections per eye was 3.72 ± 3.43 (range, 1–22). The mean age of the participants was 67.03 ± 13.56 (range, 5–94 years). The mean follow-up time was 31.98 ± 22.86 months (range, 6–144 months). Retinal break or rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurred in 3 injections of 3 eyes, yielding an overall prevalence of 0.077% per injection and 0.29% per eye. Conclusions Retinal tear and rhegmatogenous detachment are rare complications of intravitreal injection. Precautions should be taken especially in patients having predisposing conditions, such as high myopia, or any other vitreoretinal disorders. PMID:27330458

  5. Area of peripheral retinal nonperfusion and treatment response in branch and central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Michael; Tan, Colin S; Bell, Darren; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the extent of peripheral retinal nonperfusion in retinal vein occlusion and to determine its effect on the severity of macular edema and response to treatment. This prospective clinic-based cohort study included 32 consecutive patients with retinal vein occlusion and refractory macular edema evaluated using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and wide-field fluorescein angiography. Areas of ischemia were calculated as a percentage of the total visible retina (ischemic index), which was evaluated when macular edema was present (foveal central subfield >300 μm) and when edema had resolved (foveal central subfield ≤ 300 μm). Ischemic index was the main outcome measure. The mean ischemic index at study enrollment was 14.8% and was larger when macular edema was present compared with when edema had resolved (14.8 vs. 10.3%, P 10% had thicker mean foveal central subfield on optical coherence tomography (520.8 vs. 424.5 μm, P = 0.029) and worse visual acuity (56.3 vs. 59 letters) with the presence of macular edema and experienced greater decrease in optical coherence tomography (296.1 vs. 165.3 μm, P = 0.019) and gain in visual acuity (12.4 vs. 0.9 letters, P = 0.036) in response to treatment. The area of peripheral retinal nonperfusion is variable in patients with retinal vein occlusion and affects its clinical course and response to treatment.

  6. Peripheral retinal non-perfusion and treatment response in branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Abri Aghdam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the association between the size of peripheral retinal non-perfusion and the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with treatment-naive branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO and macular edema. METHODS: A total of 53 patients with treatment-naive BRVO and macular edema were included. Each patient underwent a full ophthalmologic examination including optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging and ultra wide-field fluorescein angiography (UWFA. Monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections were applied according to the recommendations of the German Ophthalmological Society. Two independent, masked graders quantified the areas of peripheral retinal non-perfusion. RESULTS: Intravitreal injections improved best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA significantly from 22.23±16.33 Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS letters to 36.23±15.19 letters (P<0.001, and mean central subfield thickness significantly reduced from 387±115 µm to 321±115 µm (P=0.01. Mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections was 3.61±1.56. The size of retinal non-perfusion correlated significantly with the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections (R=0.724, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: Peripheral retinal non-perfusion in patients with BRVO associates significantly with intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with BRVO and macular edema.

  7. Investigation of retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in a mouse model of retinal branch and central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebneter, Andreas; Agca, Cavit; Dysli, Chantal; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of visual impairment. Experimental models of this condition based on laser photocoagulation of retinal veins have been described and extensively exploited in mammals and larger rodents such as the rat. However, few reports exist on the use of this paradigm in the mouse. The objective of this study was to investigate a model of branch and central retinal vein occlusion in the mouse and characterize in vivo longitudinal retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Retinal veins were experimentally occluded using laser photocoagulation after intravenous application of Rose Bengal, a photo-activator dye enhancing thrombus formation. Depending on the number of veins occluded, variable amounts of capillary dropout were seen on fluorescein angiography. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were markedly elevated early and peaked at day one. Retinal thickness measurements with spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed significant swelling (pretinal vein occlusion model in the mouse carries several advantages over its use in other larger species, such as access to a vast range of genetically modified animals. Retinal changes after experimental retinal vein occlusion in this mouse model can be non-invasively quantified by spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and may be used to monitor effects of potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Five-Year Safety and Performance Results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D; Humayun, Mark S; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C; Ho, Allen C; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind as a result of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception resulting from end-stage RP. Prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the nonimplanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared with their vision with the Argus II. Thirty participants in 10 centers in the United States and Europe. The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by 3 computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively scored real-world tasks. Twenty-four of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years after implantation. Only 1 additional serious adverse event was experienced after the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the Argus II on than off on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. The 5-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind as a result of RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  10. Retinal vascular calibres are significantly associated with cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Hanno, T.; Bertelsen, G.; Sjølie, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    ) and retinal venular calibre (central retinal vein equivalent) were measured computer-assisted on retinal photographs. Data on blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and smoking were collected....... Association between retinal vessel calibre and the cardiovascular risk factors was assessed by multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses. Results: Retinal arteriolar calibre was independently associated with age, blood pressure, HbA1c and smoking in women and men, and with HDL cholesterol in men...... cardiovascular risk factors were independently associated with retinal vascular calibre, with stronger effect of HDL cholesterol and BMI in men than in women. Blood pressure and smoking contributed most to the explained variance....

  11. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment. METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark...... was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...... (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]). CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other...

  12. Detection and measurement of retinal blood vessel pulsatile motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Frost, Shaun; Vignarajan, Janardhan; An, Dong; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogi

    2016-03-01

    Retinal photography is a non-invasive and well-accepted clinical diagnosis of ocular diseases. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of retinal images is crucial in ocular diseases related clinical application. Pulsatile properties caused by cardiac rhythm, such as spontaneous venous pulsation (SVP) and pulsatile motion of small arterioles, can be visualized by dynamic retinal imaging techniques and provide clinical significance. In this paper, we aim at vessel pulsatile motion detection and measurement. We proposed a novel approach for pulsatile motion measurement of retinal blood vessels by applying retinal image registration, blood vessel detection and blood vessel motion detection and measurement on infrared retinal image sequences. The performance of the proposed methods was evaluated on 8 image sequences with 240 images. A preliminary result has demonstrated the good performance of the method for blood vessel pulsatile motion observation and measurement.

  13. Adaptive optics technology for high-resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2012-12-27

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging.

  14. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lombardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging.

  15. The Electroretinogram in Patients with Retinal Vascular Occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhou Huang; Lezheng Wu; Taiqing Luo; De-Zheng Wu; Futian Jiang; Guangwei Luo; Juanmei Ma

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: to measure and analyze the electroretinogram (ERG) in patients with retinal vascular occlusion. Method: fifty-eight cases (59 eyes) of retinal vascular occlusion and the fellow eyes of 47 cases were tested with Ganzfeld ERG. The scotopic and photopic ERG, and oscillatory potentials were tested according to the ERG standard of ISCEV. Results: The abnormal rates of Ops and b wave were higher in retinal vascular occlusion. The abnormal ERG appeared mostly in CRVO among four types of retinal vascular occlusion. The comparisons of some amplitudes and latencies between the fellow eyes and the affected eyes showed statistically significant difference. Conclusion: The oscillatory potentials and b waves have important roles in evaluating the retinal function of patients with retinal vascular occlusions. There are some clinical significance for comparing ERG between the affected eye and the fellow eye. Eye Science 2001; 17: 50 ~ 53.

  16. Preclinical models to investigate retinal ischemia: Advances and drawbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillipsie eMinhas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia is a frequent source of irreparable visual impairment affecting over a hundred million individuals in the world. It is associated with a wide range of retinal disorders like ischemic optic neuropathies, obstructive retinopathies, carotid occlusive disorders, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Compared to other tissues retina has a higher metabolic rate; any disruption in blood supply can have an effect on the supply of oxygen leading to retinal ischemia. If occlusion is not rescued the outcome is irreversible with ischemic and apoptotic cascades resulting in cell death. In addition to in-vitro models, animal models are necessary to further our understanding of the etiology, pathology, and evolution of retinal ischemia besides the evaluation, development, and improvement of therapeutic strategies. The various existing animal models of retinal ischemia are characterised by obstruction of retinal circulation that allows the study of neurovascular changes. In this review we provide an overview of major models and emerging preclinical therapeutic strategies.

  17. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suet Lee Shirley Ding

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  18. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria H. Madeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A better understanding of the events elicited and mediated by retinal microglia will contribute to the clarification of disease etiology and might open new avenues for potential therapeutic interventions. This review aims at giving an overview of the roles of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in major retinal degenerative diseases like glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Unexplained postoperative retinal hemorrhage after 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hisato Ohno, Kenji InoueInouye Eye Hospital, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: We report five cases of unexplained retinal hemorrhage after 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomy. A 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomy was performed for four cases of macular holes (MH and one case of macular hole retinal detachment (MHRD. Retinal hemorrhages were observed on the first day after surgery and disappeared within several months without leaving any recognizable damage. We speculate that the retinal hemorrhages might have resulted from repeated collapse of the globe through a cannula under air perfusion, but other causes such as retinal vein congestion by face-down positioning are also possible.Keywords: retinal hemorrhage, vitrectomy, postoperative, macular hole, sutureless surgery

  20. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  1. Novel Neuroprotective Strategies in Ischemic Retinal Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadfi, Krisztina; Mester, Laszlo; Reglodi, Dora; Kiss, Peter; Babai, Norbert; Racz, Boglarka; Kovacs, Krisztina; Szabo, Aliz; Tamas, Andrea; Gabriel, Robert; Atlasz, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ischemia can be effectively modeled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, which leads to chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The complex pathways leading to retinal cell death offer a complex approach of neuroprotective strategies. In the present review we summarize recent findings with different neuroprotective candidate molecules. We describe the protective effects of intravitreal treatment with: (i) urocortin 2; (ii) a mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel opener, diazoxide; (iii) a neurotrophic factor, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide; and (iv) a novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (HO3089). The retinoprotective effects are demonstrated with morphological description and effects on apoptotic pathways using molecular biological techniques. PMID:20386654

  2. Supervised retinal biometrics in different lighting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal Che; Kumar, Dinesh K; Sugavaneswaran, Lakshmi; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2011-01-01

    Retinal image has been considered for number of health and biometrics applications. However, the reliability of these has not been investigated thoroughly. The variation observed in retina scans taken at different times is attributable to differences in illumination and positioning of the camera. It causes some missing bifurcations and crossovers from the retinal vessels. Exhaustive selection of optimal parameters is needed to construct the best similarity metrics equation to overcome the incomplete landmarks. In this paper, we extracted multiple features from the retina scans and employs supervised classification to overcome the shortcomings of the current techniques. The experimental results of 60 retina scans with different lightning conditions demonstrate the efficacy of this technique. The results were compared with the existing methods.

  3. Ribozyme uses in retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, W W; Lewin, A S

    2000-11-01

    In this chapter we discuss the design, delivery and preclinical testing of mutation-specific ribozymes for the treatment of dominantly inherited retinal disease. We focus particular attention on the initial screening of ribozymes in vitro, because the activity of RNA enzymes in cell-free systems can be used to predict their suitability for animal experiments. Current techniques for delivering genes of interest to cells of the retina using viral vectors are then briefly surveyed emphasizing vector properties that best match to the needs of a ribozyme-based therapy. Using these considerations, analysis of ribozyme gene therapy for an autosomal dominant RP-like disease in a rodent model is outlined emphasizing the desirability of combining biochemical, morphological and electrophysiological measures of therapy. Finally, we describe alternative, perhaps more general, ribozyme approaches that have yet to be tested in the context of retinal disease.

  4. Identification of the CRB1 gene and analysis of its role in autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, Antonia Ingrid den

    2002-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies generally lead to severe visual impairment early in life. Most genes involved in retinal dystrophies are expressed exclusively or predominantly in the retina or the RPE. To identify candidate genes for inherited retinal dystrophies, we isolated

  5. Psychological and educational recommendations for working with young people with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacón López, Elena; Lopez-Justicia, M.D.; Vervloed, M.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the consequences of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a retinal degenerative disease with progressive reduction of the visual field, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and night blindness. Retinitis Pigmentosa is addressed from both a psychological and an educational standpoint, focusing

  6. Retinal arterial but not venous tortuosity correlates with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longmuir, Susannah Q.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Longmuir, Reid A.; Joshi, Vinayak; Olson, Richard J.; Abramoff, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease beginning with facial and shoulder girdle weakness with variable progression. Exudative retinal detachment, retinal vessel irregularities on fluorescein angiography, and retinal vessel tortuosity have been foun

  7. Retinal Biochemistry, Physiology and Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ricardo Luiz; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Chong, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The vitreous, the vasculature of the retina, macular pigments, phototransduction, retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the extracellular matrix, all play an important role in the normal function of the retina as well as in diseases. Understanding the pathophysiology allows us to target treatment. As ocular angiogenesis, immunity and inflammation are covered elsewhere, those subjects will not be discussed in this chapter. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Ultrashort Laser Retinal Damage Threshold Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Strickland and Mourou [1] introduced a technique called ‘‘chirped pulse amplification’’ to produce ultrashort laser pulses with extraordinary peak powers...photocoagula- tion of the retinal layers as had been seen in longer exposure studies. Thompson et al. [22] examined in detail the thermal response of...Gewebeveränderungen. Schlüsselwörter: Ultrakurz; Retina; Sicherheit; Femtosekunde; Melanin; Laserinduzierter Durchbruch; Ultraschnell References [1] Strickland D

  9. Adaptation to Retinal Injury and Visual Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-20

    foveal visual loss is associated reading andincreasedeye fixation duration (Rayner with retinal diseases like macular degeneration or and Bertera, 1979...to visual loss. ൖ. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Scotoma, Fovea, Vision, Rehabilitation , Laser, Human 16. PRICE CODE 17. 3ECLRITY...1990) further deter- might be used to explain the left right asymmetry, mined that macular disease scotomasof 5, 10,or2O such as, left-right biases from

  10. Automated retinal robotic laser system instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen, II; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1995-05-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory investigating the medical applications of lasers have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The ultimate goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Researchers at the USAF Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering have also become involved with this research due to similar interests. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Work is ongoing to build a prototype system to simultaneously control lesion depth and placement. The instrumentation aspects of the prototype subsystems were presented at SPIE Conference 1877 in January 1993. Since then our efforts have concentrated on combining the lesion depth control subsystem and the lesion placement subsystem into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both parameters. We have designed this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. An initial CALOSOS prototype design is provided. We have also investigated methods to improve system response time. The use of high speed non-standard frame rate CCD cameras and high speed local bus frame grabbers hosted on personal computers are being investigated. A review of system testing in vivo to date is provided in SPIE Conference proceedings 2374-49 (Novel Applications of Lasers and Pulsed Power, Dual-Use Applications of Lasers: Medical session).

  11. Photostress Testing Device for Diagnosing Retinal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Swan; Jim Schwiegerling; Gholam Peyman; Eniko Enikov

    2014-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) affect nearly one in three elderly patients. ARMD damages the central vision photoreceptors in the fovea. The Photostress Test is a simple technique for testing for the early effects of ARMD. Here, the illumination sources in a novel self-administered Photostress Testing device were modeled for safety and distribution in illumination software. After satisfying the design constraints in the model, a prototype of the illumination ...

  12. Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion and Its Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desmond; Archer

    1992-01-01

    The natural course of Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion is determined by the site and completeness of the occlusion, the integrity of arterial perfusion to the affected sector and the efficiency of the developing collateral circulation. Most patients with tributary vein occlusion have some capillary fall out and microvascular incompetence in the distribution of the affected retina and vision is significantly compromised in over 50% of patients who have either chronic macular oedema or ischemia involving the...

  13. Interconnection between brain and retinal neurodegenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The eye is a special sensory organ, which is basically an extension of the brain. Both are derived from neural tube and consist of neurons. Therefore, diseases of both the brain and eye should have some similarity. Neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the world. Amyloid deposition in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal region is the basic pathology in AD. But along with it, there are various changes that take place in the eye, i.e., abnormal pupillary reaction, decreased vision, decreased contrast sensitivity, visual field changes, loss of retinal ganglionic cells and retinal fiber layer, peripapillary atrophy, increased cup-disk ratio, retinal thinning, tortuosity of blood vessels, and deposition of Aβ-like substance in the retina. And these changes are present in the early part of the disease when only mild cognitive impairment is there. As the brain is covered by a hard bony skull which makes it difficult to directly visualize the changes occurring in the brain at molecular levels, finer details of disease progression are not available with us. But the eye is the window of the brain; with advanced modern techniques, we can directly visualize the changes in the retina at a very fine level. Therefore, by depicting neurodegenerative changes in the eye, we can diagnose and manage AD at very early stages. Along with it, retinal neurodegenerations like glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) are the major cause of loss of vision, and still, there are no effective treatment modalities for these blinding conditions. So if we can understand its pathogenesis and progression by correlating with brain neurodegenerations, we can come up with a better therapy for glaucoma and ARMD.

  14. Bietti’ Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Şahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’ crystalline retinal dystrophy (BCD is a rare, auto­somal, recessively inherited disorder, characterized by the deposition of yellow crystals in the corneal limbus and retina. In this paper we aimed to present a pediatric case with BCD, with clinical, electrophysiological and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings and discuss BCD with the light of the literature. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 94-97

  15. Retinal Drug Delivery System, Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy. Intraocular injection can place the drug directly into the vitreous cavity but is not recommended...drugs for treatment of other ocular diseases such as retinal tumors, diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and cytomegalovirus...with the changes in mobile phase as indicated in each section. Data was collected for 10 min and the peak area was analyzed using the standard

  16. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  17. Objective detection of retinal vessel pulsation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Morgan

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Retinal venous pulsation detection is a subjective sign, which varies in elevated intracranial pressure, venous obstruction and glaucoma. To date no method can objectively measure and identify pulsating regions. METHOD: Using high resolution video-recordings of the optic disk and retina we measured fluctuating light absorption by haemoglobin during pulsation. Pulsation amplitude was calculated from all regions of the retinal image video-frames in a raster pattern. Segmented retinal images were formed by objectively selecting regions with amplitudes above a range of threshold values. These were compared to two observers manually drawing an outline of the pulsating areas while viewing video-clips in order to generate receiver operator characteristics. RESULTS: 216,515 image segments were analysed from 26 eyes in 18 research participants. Using data from each eye, the median area under the receiver operator curve (AU-ROC was 0.95. With all data analysed together the AU-ROC was 0.89. We defined the ideal threshold amplitude for detection of any pulsating segment being that with maximal sensitivity and specificity. This was 5 units (95% confidence interval 4.3 to 6.0 compared to 12 units before any regions were missed. A multivariate model demonstrated that ideal threshold amplitude increased with increased variation in video-sequence illumination (p = 0.0119, but between the two observers (p = 0.0919 or other variables. CONCLUSION: This technique demonstrates accurate identification of retinal vessel pulsating regions with no areas identified manually being missed with the objective technique. The amplitude values are derived objectively and may be a significant advance upon subjective ophthalmodynamometric threshold techniques.

  18. Temporal properties of network-mediated responses to repetitive stimuli are dependent upon retinal ganglion cell type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Maesoon; Fried, Shelley I.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. To provide artificially-elicited vision that is temporally dynamic, retinal prosthetic devices will need to repeatedly stimulate retinal neurons. However, given the diversity of physiological types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) as well as the heterogeneity of their responses to electric stimulation, temporal properties of RGC responses have not been adequately investigated. Here, we explored the cell type dependence of network-mediated RGC responses to repetitive electric stimulation at various stimulation rates. Approach. We examined responses of ON and OFF types of RGCs in the rabbit retinal explant to five consecutive stimuli with varying inter-stimulus intervals (10-1000 ms). Each stimulus was a 4 ms long monophasic sinusoidal cathodal current, which was applied epiretinally via a conical electrode. Spiking activity of targeted RGCs was recorded using a cell-attached patch electrode. Main results. ON and OFF cells had distinct responses to repetitive stimuli. Consistent with earlier studies, OFF cells always generated reduced responses to subsequent stimuli compared to responses to the first stimulus. In contrast, a new stimulus to ON cells suppressed all pending/ongoing responses from previous stimuli and initiated its own response that was remarkably similar to the response from a single stimulus in isolation. This previously unreported ‘reset’ behavior was observed exclusively and consistently in ON cells. These contrasts between ON and OFF cells created a range of stimulation rates (4-7 Hz) that maximized the ratio of the responses arising in ON versus OFF cells. Significance. Previous clinical testing reported that subjects perceive bright phosphenes (ON responses) and also prefer stimulation rates of 5-7 Hz. Our results suggest that responses of ON cells are weak at high rates of stimulation (> ˜7 Hz) due to the reset while responses of OFF cells are strong at low rates (cells more closely match physiological patterns (Im and Fried 2015

  19. Scleral buckling for retinal detachment in patients with retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzney, S.M.; Pruett, R.C.; Regan, C.D.; Walton, D.S.; Smith, T.R.

    1984-10-15

    Three children (two girls and one boy) with bilateral retinoblastoma each developed a presumed rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in one eye. All three eyes had previously received radiation and cryotherapy. In each case the retinal detachment responded promptly to conventional surgical methods via scleral buckling in the area of treated retinoblastoma and presumed retinal break. All three eyes have retained useful vision for follow-up periods of 3.5 to 12 years.

  20. An unusual central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, O A; Ozbek, Z; Köse, S; Durak, I; Kavukçu, S

    2000-06-01

    A number of ichthyosis syndromes may have retinal abnormalities such as the retinitis pigmentosa-like diffuse rod-cone dystrophy in Refsum's syndrome and the maculopathy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. We present two sisters who have an unusual, almost identical, bilaterally symmetric central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris in the absence of other systemic disorders. We believe that this dystrophy has not been previously described in patients with any of the known varieties of ichthyosis.

  1. Carotenoid Antenna Binding and Function in Retinal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    REPORT Carotenoid antenna binding and function in retinal proteins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Xanthorhodopsin, a proton pump from the...eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, is a unique dual chromophore system that contains, in addition to retinal, the carotenoid salinixanthin as a light... carotenoid ring near the retinal ring. Substitution of the small glycine with bulky tryptophan in this site eliminates binding. The second factor is the 4

  2. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Coisy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report: A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion: VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  3. Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer in primate eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L

    1980-09-01

    Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer is studied in the eyes of three primate species. Measurements are made at various points throughout the fundus, including the peripapillary, arcuate, macular (area centralis), equatorial, and peripheral parts of the retina. Anatomic findings are compared with the clinical appearance of retinal light reflexes in these way. It is proposed that the nature of this light reflex is, in part, determined by the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

  4. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Froger; Lucia Cadetti; Henri Lorach; Joao Martins; Alexis-Pierre Bemelmans; Elisabeth Dubus; Julie Degardin; Dorothée Pain; Valérie Forster; Laurent Chicaud; Ivana Ivkovic; Manuel Simonutti; Stéphane Fouquet; Firas Jammoul; Thierry Léveillard

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was inc...

  5. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie A. Joondeph; Brian C. Joondeph

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  6. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Joondeph

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  7. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie A. Joondeph; Joondeph, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  8. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joondeph, Stephanie A; Joondeph, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  9. Spontaneous resorption of sub-retinal cortical lens material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil S Gadkari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of retained sub-retinal cortical material, which underwent spontaneous resorption. Patient presented with a left eye traumatic retinal detachment with a large retinal tear and posteriorly dislocated cataractous lens. Vitrectomy, lensectomy, silicone oil injection, and endolaser were performed. A good visual result was achieved. The report draws attention to this condition and highlights possible technique for minimizing risk of this complication in similar cases.

  10. Retinal stem/progenitor cells in the ciliary marginal zone complete retinal regeneration: a study of retinal regeneration in a novel animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Ayumi; Araki, Masasuke

    2014-07-01

    Our research group has extensively studied retinal regeneration in adult Xenopus laevis. However, X. laevis does not represent a suitable model for multigenerational genetics and genomic approaches. Instead, Xenopus tropicalis is considered as the ideal model for these studies, although little is known about retinal regeneration in X. tropicalis. In the present study, we showed that a complete retina regenerates at approximately 30 days after whole retinal removal. The regenerating retina was derived from the stem/progenitor cells in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), indicating a novel mode of vertebrate retinal regeneration, which has not been previously reported. In a previous study, we showed that in X. laevis, retinal regeneration occurs primarily through the transdifferentiation of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. RPE cells migrate to the retinal vascular membrane and reform a new epithelium, which then differentiates into the retina. In X. tropicalis, RPE cells also migrated to the vascular membrane, but transdifferentiation was not evident. Using two tissue culture models of RPE tissues, it was shown that in X. laevis RPE culture neuronal differentiation and reconstruction of the retinal three-dimensional (3-D) structure were clearly observed, while in X. tropicalis RPE culture neither ßIII tubulin-positive cells nor 3-D retinal structure were seen. These results indicate that the two Xenopus species are excellent models to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms of retinal regeneration, as these animals have contrasting modes of regeneration; one mode primarily involves RPE cells and the other mode involves stem/progenitor cells in the CMZ.

  11. Non-Coding RNAs in Retinal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hindges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal development is dependent on an accurately functioning network of transcriptional and translational regulators. Among the diverse classes of molecules involved, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play a significant role. Members of this family are present in the cell as transcripts, but are not translated into proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small ncRNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators. During the last decade, they have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, including the development of the nervous system. On the other hand, long-ncRNAs (lncRNAs represent a different class of ncRNAs that act mainly through processes involving chromatin remodeling and epigenetic mechanisms. The visual system is a prominent model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis or circuit formation and function, including the differentiation of retinal progenitor cells to generate the seven principal cell classes in the retina, pathfinding decisions of retinal ganglion cell axons in order to establish the correct connectivity from the eye to the brain proper, and activity-dependent mechanisms for the functionality of visual circuits. Recent findings have associated ncRNAs in several of these processes and uncovered a new level of complexity for the existing regulatory mechanisms. This review summarizes and highlights the impact of ncRNAs during the development of the vertebrate visual system, with a specific focus on the role of miRNAs and a synopsis regarding recent findings on lncRNAs in the retina.

  12. Subretinal transplantation of mouse retinal progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caihui Jiang; Maonian Zhang; Henry Klassen; Michael Young

    2011-01-01

    The development of cell replacement techniques is promising as a potential treatment for photoreceptor loss. However, the limited integration ability of donor and recipient cells presents a challenge following transplantation. In the present study, retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were harvested from the neural retinas of enhanced green fluorescent protein mice on postnatal day 1, and expanded in a neurobasal medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum without endothelial growth factor. Using a confocal microscope, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that expanded RPCs in vitro maintain retinal stem cell properties and can be differentiated into photoreceptor cells. Three weeks after transplantation, subretinal transplanted RPCs were found to have migrated and integrated into the outer nuclear layer of recipient retinas with laser injury, some of the integrated cells had differentiated into photoreceptors, and a subpopulation of these cells expressed photoreceptor specific synaptic protein, appearing to form synaptic connections with bipolar cells. These results suggest that subretinal transplantation of RPCs may provide a feasible therapeutic strategy for the loss of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  13. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  14. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  15. Enhancing retinal images by nonlinear registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodij, G.; Ribak, E. N.; Glanc, M.; Chenegros, G.

    2015-05-01

    Being able to image the human retina in high resolution opens a new era in many important fields, such as pharmacological research for retinal diseases, researches in human cognition, nervous system, metabolism and blood stream, to name a few. In this paper, we propose to share the knowledge acquired in the fields of optics and imaging in solar astrophysics in order to improve the retinal imaging in the perspective to perform a medical diagnosis. The main purpose would be to assist health care practitioners by enhancing the spatial resolution of the retinal images and increase the level of confidence of the abnormal feature detection. We apply a nonlinear registration method using local correlation tracking to increase the field of view and follow structure evolutions using correlation techniques borrowed from solar astronomy technique expertise. Another purpose is to define the tracer of movements after analyzing local correlations to follow the proper motions of an image from one moment to another, such as changes in optical flows that would be of high interest in a medical diagnosis.

  16. Neural differentiation and synaptogenesis in retinal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-Juan; Li, Xue; Yao, Huan-Ling; Deng, Jie-Xin; Liu, Hong-Liang; Cui, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Ping; Deng, Jin-Bo

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the pattern of neural differentiation and synaptogenesis in the mouse retina, immunolabeling, BrdU assay and transmission electron microscopy were used. We show that the neuroblastic cell layer is the germinal zone for neural differentiation and retinal lamination. Ganglion cells differentiated initially at embryonic day 13 (E13), and at E18 horizontal cells appeared in the neuroblastic cell layer. Neural stem cells in the outer neuroblastic cell layer differentiated into photoreceptor cells as early as postnatal day 0 (P0), and neural stem cells in the inner neuroblastic cell layer differentiated into bipolar cells at P7. Synapses in the retina were mainly located in the outer and inner plexiform layers. At P7, synaptophysin immunostaining appeared in presynaptic terminals in the outer and inner plexiform layers with button-like structures. After P14, presynaptic buttons were concentrated in outer and inner plexiform layers with strong staining. These data indicate that neural differentiation and synaptogenesis in the retina play important roles in the formation of retinal neural circuitry. Our study showed that the period before P14, especially between P0 and P14, represents a critical period during retinal development. Mouse eye opening occurs during that period, suggesting that cell differentiation and synaptic formation lead to the attainment of visual function.

  17. Idiopathic juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis: A current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowilaty Sawsan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis (IJFT, also known as parafoveal telangiectasis or idiopathic macular telangiectasia, refers to a heterogeneous group of well-recognized clinical entities characterized by telangiectatic alterations of the juxtafoveolar capillary network of one or both eyes, but which differ in appearance, presumed pathogenesis, and management strategies. Classically, three groups of IJFT are identified. Group I is unilateral easily visible telangiectasis occurring predominantly in males, and causing visual loss as a result of macular edema. Group II, the most common, is bilateral occurring in both middle-aged men and women, and presenting with telangiectasis that is more difficult to detect on biomicroscopy, but with characteristic and diagnostic angiographic and optical coherence tomography features. Vision loss is due to retinal atrophy, not exudation, and subretinal neovascularization is common. Group III is very rare characterized predominantly by progressive obliteration of the perifoveal capillary network, occurring usually in association with a medical or neurologic disease. This paper presents a current review of juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis, reviewing the classification of these entities and focusing primarily on the two most common types encountered in clinical practice, i.e., groups I and II, describing their clinical features, histopathology, natural history, complications, latest results from imaging modalities and functional studies, differential diagnosis, and treatment modalities.

  18. Corneal topographic changes following retinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey RM

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the effect of retinal/ vitreoretinal surgeries on corneal elevations. Methods Patients who underwent retinal/ vitreoretinal surgeries were divided into 3 groups. Scleral buckling was performed in 11 eyes (Group 1. In 8 (25% eyes, vitreoretinal surgery was performed along with scleral buckling (Group 2. In 12 eyes, pars plana vitrectomy was performed for vitreous hemorrhage (Group 3. An encircling element was used in all the eyes. The parameters evaluated were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, change in axial length, and corneal topographic changes on Orbscan topography system II, preoperative and at 12 weeks following surgery. Results There was a statistically significant increase in anterior corneal elevation in all the three groups after surgery (p = 0.003, p = 0.008 & p = 0.003 respectively. The increase in posterior corneal elevation was highly significant in all the three groups after surgery (p = 0.0000, p = 0.0001 & p = 0.0001 respectively. The increase in the posterior corneal elevation was more than the increase in the anterior elevation and was significant statistically in all the three groups (group I: p = 0.02; group II: p = 0.01; group III: p = 0.008. Conclusions Retinal/ vitreoretinal surgeries cause a significant increase in the corneal elevations and have a greater effect on the posterior corneal surface.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. Specific laboratory investigations and fluorescein angiography excluded the presence of vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, hypercoagulable state and antiphospholipid syndrome. Conclusion. The patient met all the five of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria for the metabolic syndrome: hypertension, abnormal lipid profile, abnormal glucose metabolism, obesity and hyperuricemia. Measurement of C-reactive protein is useful for the assessment of therapeutic systemic effect on any abnormality in the metabolic syndrome. Individual therapy for all risk factors in the metabolic syndrome is necessary to prevent complications such as cardiovascular, retinal vascular diseases and stroke.

  20. RAGE and its ligands in retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, Gaetano R; Schmidt, Ann M

    2007-12-01

    RAGE, the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), is a multiligand signal transduction receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. These diverse biologic disorders reflect the multiplicity of ligands capable of cellular interaction via RAGE that include, in addition to AGEs, amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, the S100/calgranulin family of proinflammatory cytokines, and amphoterin, a member of the High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) DNA-binding proteins. In the retina, RAGE expression is present in neural cells, the vasculature, and RPE cells, and it has also been detected in pathologic cellular retinal responses including epiretinal and neovascular membrane formation. Ligands for RAGE, in particular AGEs, have emerged as relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular disease. While the understanding of RAGE and its role in retinal dysfunction with aging, diabetes mellitus, and/or activation of pro-inflammatory pathways is less complete compared to other organ systems, increasing evidence indicates that RAGE can initiate and sustain significant cellular perturbations in the inner and outer retina. For these reasons, antagonism of RAGE interactions with its ligands may be a worthwhile therapeutic target in such seemingly disparate, visually threatening retinal diseases as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  1. Gene replacement therapy for retinal CNG channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2013-10-01

    Visual phototransduction relies on the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor outer segment plasma membranes. The role of these ion channels is to translate light-triggered changes in the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3'-5'-monophosphate levels into an electrical signal that is further processed within the retinal network and then sent to higher visual centers. Rod and cone photoreceptors express distinct CNG channels. The rod photoreceptor CNG channel is composed of one CNGB1 and three CNGA1 subunits, whereas the cone channel is formed by one CNGB3 and three CNGA3 subunits. Mutations in any of these channel subunits result in severe and currently untreatable retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa or achromatopsia. In this review, we provide an overview of the human diseases and relevant animal models of CNG channelopathies. Furthermore, we summarize recent results from preclinical gene therapy studies using adeno-associated viral vectors and discuss the efficacy and translational potential of these gene therapeutic approaches.

  2. Optimal retinal cyst segmentation from OCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ipek; Zhang, Li; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and reproducible segmentation of cysts and fluid-filled regions from retinal OCT images is an important step allowing quantification of the disease status, longitudinal disease progression, and response to therapy in wet-pathology retinal diseases. However, segmentation of fluid-filled regions from OCT images is a challenging task due to their inhomogeneous appearance, the unpredictability of their number, size and location, as well as the intensity profile similarity between such regions and certain healthy tissue types. While machine learning techniques can be beneficial for this task, they require large training datasets and are often over-fitted to the appearance models of specific scanner vendors. We propose a knowledge-based approach that leverages a carefully designed cost function and graph-based segmentation techniques to provide a vendor-independent solution to this problem. We illustrate the results of this approach on two publicly available datasets with a variety of scanner vendors and retinal disease status. Compared to a previous machine-learning based approach, the volume similarity error was dramatically reduced from 81:3+/-56:4% to 22:2+/-21:3% (paired t-test, p << 0:001).

  3. Blood-retinal barrier permeability versus diabetes duration and retinal morphology in insulin dependent diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsaa, B; Lund-Andersen, H; Mehlsen, J;

    1987-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier permeability to fluorescein was quantitated in 54 patients (22 females and 32 males) with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) of different duration. Correlation was demonstrated between permeability and diabetes duration. A normal permeability was measured...... the pattern. However, the pathologically increased permeability after ten years duration of the disease could not be demonstrated in diabetics with onset of the disease after the age of 30 years. The permeability of the blood-retinal barrier correlated well with changes in retinal morphology as seen...... in patients with up to ten years diabetes duration. A pathologically increased permeability was measured with ten to 15 years diabetes duration and during the next decade the permeability increased rapidly to 5-10 times the normal value. Onset of diabetes in the decade before and after puberty did not change...

  4. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyde David R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO, subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease.

  5. Functional analysis of retinal microglia and their effects on progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Debra A; Balasubramaniam, Balini; Dick, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    The identification of stem/progenitor cells within the retinal neural environment has opened up the possibility of therapy via cellular replacement and/or reprogramming of resident cell populations. Within the neuro-retinal niche, following injury or in disease states (including inflammation and degeneration), cellular responses affect tissue homeostasis, reduce cell density, disrupt tissue architecture, and produce scar formation. Microglia (resident retinal immune cell tissue macrophage) are key to the maintenance of retinal homeostasis and are implicated in responses that may influence the control and behavior of retinal progenitors. Factors to consider in the generation of a transplantable cell resource with good migratory and integrative capacity include their yield, purity, and functional viability. Utilizing human postmortem retina, we have created a research platform to isolate, culture, and characterize adult retinal microglia as well as analyze their effect on retinal progenitors. Here, we describe techniques using magnetic labeled bead cell separation to isolate pure populations of retinal CD133(+) precursor cells and CD11b(+) microglia from primary adult retinal cell suspensions (RCSs), enabling flow cytometric cell phenotypic and qPCR genotypic analysis, as well as functional analysis by real-time ratiometric calcium imaging.

  6. Retinal detachment secondary to ocular perforation during retrobulbar Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Lingam

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics and the retinal breaks associated with rhegmatogenous retinal detachments secondary to accidental globe perforation during local infiltration anaesthesia in five highly myopic eyes are presented. Retinal detachment was total with variable proliferative vitreoretinopathy. The pattern of retinal breaks was rather typical and predictable. Management involved vitreous surgery with internal tamponade by silicone oil in four eyes and perfluoropropane gas in one eye. At the last follow-up, all eyes had attached retina. One eye did not recover useful vision due to possible concurrent optic nerve damage.

  7. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  8. Radiation Retinopathy Associated with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; Liu; FengWen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of radiation retinopathy associated with central retinal vein occlusion.Methods: The clinical features and fundus fluorescein angiography of this case were analyzed.Results: The patient had been treated with radiotherapy for her nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and presented with sudden visual loss in the left eye. The funduscopic examination and fluorescein angiography showed the features of radiation retinopathy in both eyes, and central retinal vein occlusion in the left eye.Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy can be associated with central retinal vein occlusion in the same eye, and it seems that the endothelial cell loss caused by radiation retinopathy may lead to retinal vein occlusion.

  9. RETINAL HAEMORRHAGE IN PLASMODIUM VIVAX PATIENTS- 2 RARE CASE REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Retinal haemorrhage is commonly detected during opht halmoscopic examination of patients with Plasmodium falciparum infections. Ho wever, it is observed very rarely in Plasmodium vivax infections. Only six cases of reti nal haemorrhage have been reported so far in Plasmodium vivax infections. We review the literatu re and discuss two such cases of retinal haemorrhage that presented at our hospital. It is sug gested that retinal haemorrhage be routinely ruled out in all malaria patients, and Pla smodium vivax infection be considered in patients with unexplained retinal haemorrhage and fev er.

  10. Specific inhibition of TRPV4 enhances retinal ganglion cell survival in adult porcine retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Signaling through the polymodal cation channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been implicated in retinal neuronal degeneration. To further outline the involvement of this channel in this process, we here explore modulation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) activity on neuronal health and glial activation in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration. For this purpose, adult porcine retinal explants were cultured using a previously established standard protocol for up to 5 days with specific TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A (GSK), or specific antagonist RN-1734, or culture medium only. Glial and neuronal cell health were evaluated by a battery of immunohistochemical markers, as well as morphological staining. Specific inhibition of TRPV4 by RN-1734 significantly enhanced ganglion cell survival, improved the maintenance of the retinal laminar architecture, reduced apoptotic cell death and attenuated the gliotic response as well as preserved the expression of TRPV4 in the plexiform layers and ganglion cells. In contrast, culture controls, as well as specimens treated with GSK, displayed rapid remodeling and neurodegeneration as well as a downregulation of TRPV4 and the Müller cell homeostatic mediator glutamine synthetase. Our results indicate that TRPV4 signaling is an important contributor to the retinal degeneration in this model, affecting neuronal cell health and glial homeostasis. The finding that pharmacological inhibition of the receptor significantly attenuates neuronal degeneration and gliosis in vitro, suggests that TRPV4 signaling may be an interesting pharmaceutical target to explore for treatment of retinal degenerative disease.

  11. Photovoltaic Pixels for Neural Stimulation: Circuit Models and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinagrov, David; Lei, Xin; Goetz, Georges; Kamins, Theodore I; Mathieson, Keith; Galambos, Ludwig; Harris, James S; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Photovoltaic conversion of pulsed light into pulsed electric current enables optically-activated neural stimulation with miniature wireless implants. In photovoltaic retinal prostheses, patterns of near-infrared light projected from video goggles onto subretinal arrays of photovoltaic pixels are converted into patterns of current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. We describe a model of these devices and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic circuits, including the electrode-electrolyte interface. Characteristics of the electrodes measured in saline with various voltages, pulse durations, and polarities were modeled as voltage-dependent capacitances and Faradaic resistances. The resulting mathematical model of the circuit yielded dynamics of the electric current generated by the photovoltaic pixels illuminated by pulsed light. Voltages measured in saline with a pipette electrode above the pixel closely matched results of the model. Using the circuit model, our pixel design was optimized for maximum charge injection under various lighting conditions and for different stimulation thresholds. To speed discharge of the electrodes between the pulses of light, a shunt resistor was introduced and optimized for high frequency stimulation.

  12. Controlled exosome release from the retinal pigment epithelium in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina J; Congrove, Nicole R; Dismuke, W Michael; Bowen, Trent J; Stamer, W Daniel; McKay, Brian S

    2014-12-01

    Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells (RPE) express both GPR143 and myocilin, which interact in a signal transduction-dependent manner. In heterologous systems, activation of GPR143 with ligand causes transient recruitment of myocilin to internalized receptors, which appears to be the entry point of myocilin to the endocytic pathway. In some but not all cells, myocilin also traffics through the multivesicular body (MVB) and is released on the surface of exosomes in a signal transduction-dependent fashion. Little is known regarding the role of exosomes in RPE, but they likely serve as a mode of communication between the RPE and the outer retina. In this study, we used posterior poles with retina removed from fresh human donor eyes as a model to test the relationship between GPR143, myocilin, and exosomes in an endogenous system. We isolated exosomes released by RPE using differential centrifugation of media conditioned by the RPE for 25 min, and then characterized the exosomes using nanoparticle tracking to determine the number and size of the exosomes. Next, we tested whether ligand stimulation of GPR143 using l-DOPA altered RPE exosome release. Finally, we investigated whether myocilin was present on the exosomes released by RPE and whether l-DOPA stimulation of GPR143 caused recruitment of myocilin to the endocytic pathway, as we have previously observed using cultured cells. Activation of GPR143 halted RPE exosome release, while simultaneously recruiting myocilin to the endocytic compartment. Together, our results indicate that GPR143 and myocilin function in a signal transduction system that can control exosome release from RPE.

  13. Features of electroretinogram on rat under different color stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Lin Cao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To research the feature of normal SD rat and retinal cone dysfunction(RCDrat electroretinogram(ERGunder different color stimulation and to explore its possible diagnostic value. METHODS: Six male SD rats and six RCD rats were used, all of which were mature rats. They were stimulated by red, white, blue and green light and the ERG was recorded. The wavelength of red, green and blue light were 625nm, 525nm and 470nm respectively and the white light was mixed by three color light.RESULTS: The response of ERG in normal SD rat under green and blue light stimulation were stronger than under red and white stimulation. The dark-adapted ERG of RCD rat responsed to color stimulation was similar to the ERG of normal SD rat, but the amplitude under each color stimulation was lower than that of normal SD rat. Light-adapted ERG response was hardly detected waveform.CONCLUSION: Rat is sensitive to blue and green light, which can be used as a suggested light stimulation in the ERG recording. The ERG of RCD rat is not specific for color stimulation, and at present we could not use color ERG as a diagnostic indicator.

  14. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina.

  15. The close interrelationship between increased vascular retinal permeability and blood pressure level. Evidence from retinal fluorangiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelli, P T; Brancato, R; Menchini, U; Santoro, P; Lamanna, S

    1977-01-01

    A long-term study was done by means of interative fluorangiography on microvascular retinal permeability versus the blood pressure control carried out in 11 patients with a diastolic blood pressure of greater than or equal to 130 mm Hg and with retinal exudates, haemorrhages and oedema. No matter what the original disease was (i.e., essential, renovascular, endocrine hypertension or chronic nephropathy with terminal renal failure) the increased permeability appeared to be critically connected with the blood pressure level. Our results confirm that hypertension per se might be the cause of vascular permeability changes.

  16. Retinal Waves Modulate an Intraretinal Circuit of Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, David A; Kirkby, Lowry A; Feller, Marla B

    2016-06-29

    Before the maturation of rod and cone photoreceptors, the developing retina relies on light detection by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) to drive early light-dependent behaviors. ipRGCs are output neurons of the retina; however, they also form functional microcircuits within the retina itself. Whether ipRGC microcircuits exist during development and whether they influence early light detection remain unknown. Here, we investigate the neural circuit that underlies the ipRGC-driven light response in developing mice. We use a combination of calcium imaging, tracer coupling, and electrophysiology experiments to show that ipRGCs form extensive gap junction networks that strongly contribute to the overall light response of the developing retina. Interestingly, we found that gap junction coupling was modulated by spontaneous retinal waves, such that acute blockade of waves dramatically increased the extent of coupling and hence increased the number of light-responsive neurons. Moreover, using an optical sensor, we found that this wave-dependent modulation of coupling is driven by dopamine that is phasically released by retinal waves. Our results demonstrate that ipRGCs form gap junction microcircuits during development that are modulated by retinal waves; these circuits determine the extent of the light response and thus potentially impact the processing of early visual information and light-dependent developmental functions. Light-dependent functions in early development are mediated by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Here we show that ipRGCs form an extensive gap junction network with other retinal neurons, including other ipRGCs, which shapes the retina's overall light response. Blocking cholinergic retinal waves, which are the primary source of neural activity before maturation of photoreceptors, increased the extent of ipRGC gap junction networks, thus increasing the number of light-responsive cells. We

  17. Surgical management of retinal diseases: proliferative diabetic retinopathy and traction retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Iñigo, Yousef J; Acabá, Luis A; Berrocal, Maria H

    2014-01-01

    Current indications for pars plana vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) include vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment (TRD), combined tractional and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (CTRRD), diabetic macular edema associated with posterior hyaloidal traction, and anterior segment neovascularization with media opacities. This chapter will review the indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincision surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for PDR, TRD, and CTRRD. With the availability of new microincision vitrectomy technology, wide-angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from PDR.

  18. A general principle governs vision-dependent dendritic patterning of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Ping; Sun, Jin Hao; Tian, Ning

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic arbors of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) collect information over a certain area of the visual scene. The coverage territory and the arbor density of dendrites determine what fraction of the visual field is sampled by a single cell and at what resolution. However, it is not clear whether visual stimulation is required for the establishment of branching patterns of RGCs, and whether a general principle directs the dendritic patterning of diverse RGCs. By analyzing the geometric structures of RGC dendrites, we found that dendritic arbors of RGCs underwent a substantial spatial rearrangement after eye-opening. Light deprivation blocked both the dendritic growth and the branch patterning, suggesting that visual stimulation is required for the acquisition of specific branching patterns of RGCs. We further showed that vision-dependent dendritic growth and arbor refinement occurred mainly in the middle portion of the dendritic tree. This nonproportional growth and selective refinement suggest that the late-stage dendritic development of RGCs is not a passive stretching with the growth of eyes, but rather an active process of selective growth/elimination of dendritic arbors of RGCs driven by visual activity. Finally, our data showed that there was a power law relationship between the coverage territory and dendritic arbor density of RGCs on a cell-by-cell basis. RGCs were systematically less dense when they cover larger territories regardless of their cell type, retinal location, or developmental stage. These results suggest that a general structural design principle directs the vision-dependent patterning of RGC dendrites.

  19. Microelectronic Stimulator Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-09

    retinal prosthesis test device. Figure 3b shows an enlarged view of a nano-channel glass (NCG) electrode array. Figure 4 shows a conceptual layout (floor...against a visual cortex. 10 This involves invasive brain surgery through the cranium . From a surgical point of view, the intra ocular approach is

  20. Diosmin alleviates retinal edema by protecting the blood-retinal barrier and reducing retinal vascular permeability during ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianting Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Retinal swelling, leading to irreversible visual impairment, is an important early complication in retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Diosmin, a naturally occurring flavonoid glycoside, has been shown to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects against I/R injury. The present study was performed to evaluate the retinal microvascular protective effect of diosmin in a model of I/R injury. METHODS: Unilateral retinal I/R was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 110 mm Hg for 60 min followed by reperfusion. Diosmin (100 mg/kg or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. Rats were evaluated for retinal functional injury by electroretinogram (ERG just before sacrifice. Retinas were harvested for HE staining, immunohistochemistry assay, ELISA, and western blotting analysis. Evans blue (EB extravasation was determined to assess blood-retinal barrier (BRB disruption and the structure of tight junctions (TJ was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Diosmin significantly ameliorated the reduction of b-wave, a-wave, and b/a ratio in ERG, alleviated retinal edema, protected the TJ structure, and reduced EB extravasation. All of these effects of diosmin were associated with increased zonular occluden-1 (ZO-1 and occludin protein expression and decreased VEGF/PEDF ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of TJ integrity and reduced permeability of capillaries as well as improvements in retinal edema were observed with diosmin treatment, which may contribute to preservation of retinal function. This protective effect of diosmin may be at least partly attributed to its ability to regulate the VEGF/PEDF ratio.

  1. Investigation of retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in a mouse model of retinal branch and central retinal vein occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Ebneter

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of visual impairment. Experimental models of this condition based on laser photocoagulation of retinal veins have been described and extensively exploited in mammals and larger rodents such as the rat. However, few reports exist on the use of this paradigm in the mouse. The objective of this study was to investigate a model of branch and central retinal vein occlusion in the mouse and characterize in vivo longitudinal retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Retinal veins were experimentally occluded using laser photocoagulation after intravenous application of Rose Bengal, a photo-activator dye enhancing thrombus formation. Depending on the number of veins occluded, variable amounts of capillary dropout were seen on fluorescein angiography. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were markedly elevated early and peaked at day one. Retinal thickness measurements with spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed significant swelling (p<0.001 compared to baseline, followed by gradual thinning plateauing two weeks after the experimental intervention (p<0.001. Histological findings at day seven correlated with spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging. The inner layers were predominantly affected by degeneration with the outer nuclear layer and the photoreceptor outer segments largely preserved. The application of this retinal vein occlusion model in the mouse carries several advantages over its use in other larger species, such as access to a vast range of genetically modified animals. Retinal changes after experimental retinal vein occlusion in this mouse model can be non-invasively quantified by spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and may be used to monitor effects of potential therapeutic interventions.

  2. In vitro differentiation of retinal pigment epithelium from adult retinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruta, Claudia; Giordano, Francesca; De Marzo, Anna; Comitato, Antonella; Raposo, Graça; Nandrot, Emeline F; Marigo, Valeria

    2011-02-01

    One of the limitations in molecular and functional studies of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been the lack of an in vitro system retaining all the features of in vivo RPE cells. Retinal pigment epithelium cell lines do not show characteristics typical of a functional RPE, such as pigmentation and expression of specific markers. The present study was aimed at the development of culture conditions to differentiate, in vitro, retinal stem cells (RSC), derived from the adult ciliary body, into a functional RPE. Retinal stem cells were purified from murine eyes, grown as pigmented neurospheres and induced to differentiate into RPE on an extracellular matrix substrate using specific culture conditions. After 7-15 days of culture, pigmented cells with an epithelial morphology showed a polarized organization and a capacity for phagocytosis. We detected different stages of melanogenesis in cells at 7 days of differentiation, whereas RPE at 15 days contained only mature melanosomes. These data suggest that our protocol to differentiate RPE in vitro can provide a useful model for molecular and functional studies.

  3. RISK OF MULTIPLE RECURRING RETINAL DETACHMENT AFTER PRIMARY RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT REPAIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Philip; Schick, Tina; Schaub, Friederike; Kemper, Carolin; Fauser, Sascha

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate functional and anatomical outcomes of patients with retinal redetachments (re-RD) after surgery for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Medical records of eyes with re-RD after rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery between 1999 and 2014 at the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Germany, were retrospectively evaluated. Data included preoperative and postoperative clinical findings, best-corrected visual acuity, presence and grade of proliferative vitreoretinopathy, surgical procedures, and complication rates. Three hundred and twenty-eight eyes of 2,457 developed a re-RD (13.3%). Of these 328 eyes, 242 eyes (73.8%) had only one re-RD, whereas 86 eyes (26.2%) had 2 or more re-RDs. Visible presence of proliferative vitreoretinopathy during first redetachment surgery increased risk of re-RD with relative risk ratio of 1.46 (P = 0.05). Best-corrected visual acuity deteriorated with every additional re-RD (P < 0.001). Two hundred and thirty-seven eyes received oil endotamponde at least once. In 91 cases, oil endotamponade was left for long-term until last follow-up. Multiple re-RD (≥2 re-RDs) is an infrequent complication after rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery. After a first re-RD occurred, risk for multiple re-RD doubles compared with the risk of a first redetachment. Mean functional outcome is unfavorable, whereas predictability remains nevertheless poor because of the wide range of interindividual postoperative best-corrected visual acuity.

  4. Choroidal melanoma with massive retinal fibrosis and spontaneous regression of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, R E; Awan, K J; Yanoff, M

    1976-01-01

    An unusual case of choroidal malignant melanoma with heterochromia iridis, massive subretinal hemorrhage and fibrosis, spontaneously resolving retinal detachment, and subretinal seeding is reported. Clinical and pathological findings are presented and discussed. The unusual aspects of the case are further considered by Drs. Andrew Ferry and Mark Tso.

  5. Aquaporin-1 Expression in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Overlying Retinal Drusen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Bek, Toke; la Cour, Morten

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In the outer retina, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) results in reduced hydraulic conductivity in Bruch's membrane, possibly leading to altered water transport in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. We hypothesize that RPE cells may express aquaporin-1 (AQP1) to compensate...

  6. Detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects in retinal fundus images using Gabor filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Hatanaka, Yuji; Aoyama, Akira; Kakogawa, Masakatsu; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD) is one of the most important findings for the diagnosis of glaucoma reported by ophthalmologists. However, such changes could be overlooked, especially in mass screenings, because ophthalmologists have limited time to search for a number of different changes for the diagnosis of various diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and glaucoma. Therefore, the use of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system can improve the results of diagnosis. In this work, a technique for the detection of NFLDs in retinal fundus images is proposed. In the preprocessing step, blood vessels are "erased" from the original retinal fundus image by using morphological filtering. The preprocessed image is then transformed into a rectangular array. NFLD regions are observed as vertical dark bands in the transformed image. Gabor filtering is then applied to enhance the vertical dark bands. False positives (FPs) are reduced by a rule-based method which uses the information of the location and the width of each candidate region. The detected regions are back-transformed into the original configuration. In this preliminary study, 71% of NFLD regions are detected with average number of FPs of 3.2 per image. In conclusion, we have developed a technique for the detection of NFLDs in retinal fundus images. Promising results have been obtained in this initial study.

  7. RETINAL BLOOD FLOW CORRELATES TO AQUEOUS VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR IN CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshihisa; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Makiko; Tsuiki, Eiko; Fujikawa, Azusa; Harada, Takafumi; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    As laser speckle flowgraphy can measure blood flow distribution in the ocular fundus, the authors analyzed the relationship between retinal blood flow and aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration in central retinal vein occlusion. This prospective observational study examined 45 eyes of 45 patients with central retinal vein occlusion before treatment. Blood flow in large vessels around and at the optic disk, aqueous VEGF concentration, and arteriovenous passage time were examined. Blood flow was evaluated as mean blur rate by laser speckle flowgraphy. Fluorescein angiography found 20 ischemic and 25 nonischemic type eyes. Aqueous VEGF concentration in the ischemic type was significantly higher than that in the nonischemic type (P = 0.01). Arteriovenous passage time was significantly correlated to the logarithm of the aqueous VEGF concentration (P = 0.0001). Mean blur rate of the affected eye/mean blur rate of the unaffected eye of the ischemic type was significantly lower than the nonischemic type (P = 0.039). Additionally, mean blur rate was significantly correlated both to the logarithm of the aqueous VEGF concentration (P central retinal vein occlusion.

  8. Anti-VEGF treatment and peripheral retinal nonperfusion in patients with central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abri Aghdam, Kaveh; Reznicek, Lukas; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Klingenstein, Annemarie; Kernt, Marcus; Seidensticker, Florian

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the size of peripheral retinal nonperfusion and the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with treatment-naïve central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Fifty-four patients with treatment-naïve CRVO and macular edema were included. Each patient underwent a full ophthalmologic examination including optical coherence tomography imaging and ultrawide-field fluorescein angiography. Monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections were applied according to the recommendations of the German Ophthalmologic Society. Two ophthalmologists quantified the areas of peripheral retinal nonperfusion (group 1= less than five disc areas, group 2= more than five disc areas). Correlation analyses between the size of nonperfusion with best-corrected visual acuity, central subfield thickness, and the number of intravitreal injections were performed. Best-corrected visual acuity improved significantly after intravitreal injections (Pcentral subfield thickness after treatment did not significantly differ between both groups (P=0.92, P=0.96, respectively). Mean number of injections in group 1 and group 2 was 4.12±2.73 and 9.32±3.84, respectively (Pretinal nonperfusion in patients with CRVO correlates significantly with the number of needed intravitreal ranibizumab injections. Ultrawide-field fluorescein angiography is a useful tool for detection of peripheral retinal ischemia, which may have direct implications in the diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment of these patients.

  9. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  10. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Lavik, Erin B;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs.......To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs....

  11. Retinal Remodeling: Concerns, Emerging Remedies, and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhyasankar eKrishnamoorthy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deafferentation results not only in sensory loss, but also in a variety of alterations in the postsynaptic circuitry. These alterations may have detrimental impact on potential treatment strategies. Progressive loss of photoreceptors in retinal degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, leads to several changes in the remnant retinal circuitry. Müller glial cells undergo hypertrophy and form a glial seal. The second- and third-order retinal neurons undergo morphological, biochemical and physiological alterations. A result of these alterations is that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, the output neurons of the retina, become hyperactive and exhibit spontaneous, oscillatory bursts of spikes. This aberrant electrical activity degrades the signal-to-noise ratio in RGC responses, and thus the quality of information they transmit to the brain. These changes in the remnant retina, collectively termed retinal remodeling, pose challenges for genetic, cellular and bionic approaches to restore vision. It is therefore crucial to understand the nature of retinal remodeling, how it affects the ability of remnant retina to respond to novel therapeutic strategies, and how to ameliorate its effects. In this article, we discuss these topics, and suggest that the pathological state of the retinal output following photoreceptor loss is reversible, and therefore, amenable to restorative strategies.

  12. Spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Piotr; Fält, Pauli; Penttinen, Niko; Ylitepsa, Pasi; Laaksonen, Lauri; Lensu, Lasse; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Retinal photography is a standard method for recording retinal diseases for subsequent analysis and diagnosis. However, the currently used white light or red-free retinal imaging does not necessarily provide the best possible visibility of different types of retinal lesions, important when developing diagnostic tools for handheld devices, such as smartphones. Using specifically designed illumination, the visibility and contrast of retinal lesions could be improved. In this study, spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy lesion visualization are implemented using a spectrally tunable light source based on digital micromirror device. The applicability of this method was tested in vivo by taking retinal monochrome images from the eyes of five diabetic volunteers and two non-diabetic control subjects. For comparison to existing methods, we evaluated the contrast of retinal images taken with our method and red-free illumination. The preliminary results show that the use of optimal illuminations improved the contrast of diabetic lesions in retinal images by 30-70%, compared to the traditional red-free illumination imaging.

  13. Quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular characteristics and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol Y; Tay, Wan T; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie J; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong L; Lau, Qiangfeng P; Zhu, Ai L; Klein, Ronald; Saw, Seang M; Wong, Tien Y

    2011-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of blood pressure on a spectrum of quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular signs. Retinal photographs from the Singapore Malay Eye Study, a population-based cross-sectional study of 3280 (78.7% response) persons aged 40-80 years, were analyzed. Quantitative changes in the retinal vasculature (branching angle, vascular tortuosity, fractal dimension, and vascular caliber) were measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. Qualitative signs, including focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN), arteriovenous nicking (AVN), opacification of the arteriolar wall (OAW), and retinopathy (e.g., microaneurysms, retinal hemorrhages), were assessed from photographs by trained technicians. After excluding persons with diabetes and ungradable photographs, 1913 persons provided data for this analysis. In multivariable linear regression models controlling for age, sex, BMI, use of antihypertensive medication, and other factors, retinal arteriolar branching asymmetry ratio, arteriolar tortuosity, venular tortuosity, fractal dimension, arteriolar caliber, venular caliber, FAN, AVN, and retinopathy were independently associated with mean arterial blood pressure. In contrast, arteriolar/venular branching angle, venular branching asymmetry ratio and OAW were not related to blood pressure. Retinal arteriolar caliber (sβ = -0.277) and FAN (sβ = 0.170) had the strongest associations with mean arterial blood pressure, and higher blood pressure levels were associated with increasing number of both quantitative and qualitative retinal vascular signs (P trend qualitative retinal vascular signs, with the number of signs increasing with higher blood pressure levels.

  14. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  15. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Pozdeyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of optical coherence tomography («RTVue-100,» USA. The fundography was carried out using a Nikon NF505‑AF (Japan fundus camera. All patients were examined with a Goldmann lens.Results: Optical coherence tomography was used to evaluate different kinds of peripheral retinal degenerations, such as lattice and snail track degeneration, isolated retinal tears, cystoid retinal degeneration, pathological hyperpigmentation, retinoschisis and cobblestone degeneration. The following morphometric data were studied: dimensions of the lesion (average length, retinal thickness along the edge of the lesion, retinal thickness at the base of the lesion and the vitreoretinal interface.Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a promising in vivo visualization method which is useful in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions and tractions. It also provides a comprehensive protocolling system and monitoring. It will enable ophthalmologists to better define laser and surgical treatment indications and evaluate therapy effectiveness.

  16. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Pozdeyeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of optical coherence tomography («RTVue-100,» USA. The fundography was carried out using a Nikon NF505‑AF (Japan fundus camera. All patients were examined with a Goldmann lens.Results: Optical coherence tomography was used to evaluate different kinds of peripheral retinal degenerations, such as lattice and snail track degeneration, isolated retinal tears, cystoid retinal degeneration, pathological hyperpigmentation, retinoschisis and cobblestone degeneration. The following morphometric data were studied: dimensions of the lesion (average length, retinal thickness along the edge of the lesion, retinal thickness at the base of the lesion and the vitreoretinal interface.Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a promising in vivo visualization method which is useful in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions and tractions. It also provides a comprehensive protocolling system and monitoring. It will enable ophthalmologists to better define laser and surgical treatment indications and evaluate therapy effectiveness.

  17. Quantification of retinal tangential movement in epiretinal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Mads; la Cour, Morten

    2012-01-01

    To describe a technique of quantifying retinal vessel movement in eyes with epiretinal membrane (ERM) and correlate the retinal vessel movement with changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT), and patients' subjective reports about experienced symptoms (symptoms)....

  18. Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with systemic hypoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Arvidsson, Henrik Sven

    2011-01-01

    To assess spectrophotometric oximetry across a broad range of arterial saturation levels and to study the effect of chronic systemic hypoxemia on retinal oxygen extraction.......To assess spectrophotometric oximetry across a broad range of arterial saturation levels and to study the effect of chronic systemic hypoxemia on retinal oxygen extraction....

  19. Effect of combination antiretroviral therapy on cytomegalovirus retinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banker Alay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the various changes in the course of cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis following combination antiretroviral treatment. Methods: Combination antiretroviral treatment was given to 12 patients with active CMV retinitis following which all anti-CMV medications were discontinued once the CD4 cell counts were> 100/mm3 for 3 months. Results: The median CD4 cell count increased from 36.5/mm3 (range, 3-74/mm3 at baseline to 175.5/mm3 (range, 97-410/mm3 at 3 months. No patient had reactivation of CMV retinitis or developed extraocular CMV infection during median follow-up of 16.7 months. In one patient with peripheral active CMV retinitis, the retinitis resolved completely and remained so throughout the follow-up period without specific anti-CMV treatment. Five (41.7% patients had immune recovery vitritis. Conclusion: Patients receiving combination antiretroviral treatment following treatment for CMV retinitis have better control of CMV retinitis but immune recovery vitritis is a common sequelae. Reactivation of CMV retinitis is common in patients who discontinue combination antiretroviral treatment

  20. Quality control for retinal OCT in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippling, S; Balk, Lj; Costello, F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) permits quantification of retinal layer atrophy relevant to assessment of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurement artefacts may limit the use of OCT to MS research. OBJECTIVE: An expert task force convened with the aim to pr...