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Sample records for retinal dystrophies including

  1. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F

    2014-01-01

    of this study was to examine the prevalence and diagnostic spectrum of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study with data from the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry that comprises all patients in Denmark with generalized retinal......PURPOSE: Generalized retinal dystrophy is a frequent cause of visual impairment and blindness in younger individuals and a subject of new clinical intervention trials. Nonetheless, there are few nation-wide population-based epidemiological data of generalized retinal dystrophy. The purpose...... and chorioretinal dystrophies from the 19th century to the present. Among 3076 registered cases, the primary diagnosis of generalized retinal dystrophy was assessed by chart review, including fundus photographs and electroretinograms. Demographic data on the Danish population were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...

  2. Retinal pigment epithelial dystrophy in Briard dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, R M; Cabral, L; Gooch, L; Bedford, P G; Boulton, M E

    1996-01-01

    The eyes of normal Briard dogs, Briards affected with inherited retinal pigment epithelial dystrophy (RPED) and a range of normal crossbred and beagle dogs were examined and the histopathology of RPED in the Briard was compared with the histopathological features of ageing in the normal canine retina. RPED was characterised by the accumulation of auto-fluorescent lipofuscin-like inclusions in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which initially involved only non-pigmented RPE cells overlying the tapetum but subsequently spread to all pigmented RPE cells. Secondary neuro-retinal degeneration was characterised by a gradual loss of the outer nuclear layer and the subsequent atrophy and degeneration of the inner retina. The loss of primary photoreceptors in the peripheral retina was accompanied by the migration of photoreceptor nuclei and appeared to resemble severe changes due to ageing. Intra-vitreal radiolabelled leucine was used to examine the rate of turnover of the outer segments of the rods in some Briards, but no significant variations were found. The activity of acid phosphatase in RPE was assayed in vitro and showed comparable regional variations in Briard and crossbred dogs. The results suggest that RPED in the Briard is unlikely to be due either to an increased rate of turnover of rod outer segments (and thus an increased phagocytic load) or to a primary insufficiency of lysosomal enzyme.

  3. Understanding the impact of genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Ryan; McAllister, Marion; Payne, Katherine; Lowndes, Jo; Devery, Sophie; Webster, Andrew R; Downes, Susan M; Moore, Anthony T; Ramsden, Simon; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    The capability of genetic technologies is expanding rapidly in the field of inherited eye disease. New genetic testing approaches will deliver a step change in the ability to diagnose and extend the possibility of targeted treatments. However, evidence is lacking about the benefits of genetic testing to support service planning. Here, we report qualitative data about retinal dystrophy families' experiences of genetic testing in United Kingdom. The data were part of a wider study examining genetic eye service provision. Twenty interviewees from families in which a causative mutation had been identified by a genetic eye clinic were recruited to the study. Fourteen interviewees had chosen to have a genetic test and five had not; one was uncertain. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted allowing a thorough exploration of interviewees' views and experiences of the benefits of genetic counselling and testing. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Both affected and unaffected interviewees expressed mainly positive views about genetic testing, highlighting benefits such as diagnostic confirmation, risk information, and better preparation for the future. Negative consequences included the burden of knowledge, moral dilemmas around reproduction, and potential impact on insurance. The offer of genetic testing was often taken up, but was felt unnecessary in some cases. Interviewees in the study reported many benefits, suggesting genetic testing should be available to this patient group. The benefits and risks identified will inform future evaluation of models of service delivery. This research was part of a wider study exploring experiences of families with retinal dystrophy.

  4. Bilateral nanophthalmos and pigmentary retinal dystrophy--an unusual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Helena; Castanheira-Dinis, A; Monteiro-Grillo, M

    2006-09-01

    To report the clinical picture of the rare association of nanophthalmos and pigmentary retinal dystrophy and its cataract surgery outcome. We report a case of a 60-year-old female who presented with bilateral slowly progressive visual loss. The patient presented with bilateral light perception visual acuity, exotropia, brunescent cataract hindering fundus examination and hypodontia. Ultrasonography revealed bilateral nanophthalmos. A visual-evoked potential was also performed preoperatively. Cataract surgery with +40D IOL implantation was uneventful. Postoperative fundus examination revealed pigmentary retinal dystrophy, confirmed by electrophysiologic tests. Glycosaminoglycan urinary excretion was normal. Congenital bilateral nanophthalmos may rarely be associated with pigmentary retinal dystrophy. We suggest thorough preoperative evaluation in nanophthalmic eyes for the exclusion of significant features concerning visual prognosis.

  5. Prevalence and Diagnostic Spectrum of Generalized Retinal Dystrophy in Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The aim of the present population-based cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and diagnostic spectrum of generalized retinal dystrophy in Danish children. Methods: The Danish Registry for the Blind and Partially Sighted Children comprises all visually impaired......: Of the 1,204,235 Danish children aged 0-17 years on 1 October 2011, 2017 children were registered as visually impaired. Of these, 153 cases were attributed to generalized retinal dystrophy, corresponding to a prevalence of 13 per 100,000 children. The age-specific prevalence increased prominently...... children residing in Denmark aged 0-17 years. Among registered children, the primary diagnosis of generalized retinal dystrophy was assessed by chart review, including fundus photographs and electroretinograms. Age-specific data for live children in Denmark were retrieved from Statistics Denmark. Results...

  6. The prevalence of Usher syndrome and other retinal dystrophy-hearing impairment associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, T; Haim, M; Hauch, A M; Parving, A

    1997-05-01

    The study was undertaken to procure population-based prevalence data on the various types of Usher syndrome and other retinal dystrophy-hearing impairment associations. The medical files on 646 patients with a panretinal pigmentary dystrophy aged 20-49 years derived from the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) register were scrutinised. The data were supplemented by a prior investigation on hearing ability in a part of the study population. After exclusion of patients with possibly extrinsic causes of hearing impairments, 118 patients, including 89 cases of Usher syndrome were allocated to one of five clinically defined groups. We calculated the following prevalence rates: Usher syndrome type I: 1.5/100,000, Usher syndrome type II: 2.2/100,000, and Usher syndrome type III: 0.1/100,000 corresponding to a 2:3 ratio between Usher syndrome type I and II. The overall prevalence rate of Usher syndrome was estimated to 5/100,000 in the Danish population, devoid of genetic isolates. The material comprised 11 cases with retinal dystrophy, hearing impairment, and additional syndromic features. Finally, 18 subjects with various retinal dystrophy-hearing impairment associations without syndromic features were identified, corresponding to a prevalence rate of 0.8/100,000. This group had a significant overrepresentation of X-linked RP, including two persons harboring a mutation in the retinitis pigmentosa GTP-ase regulator (RPGR) gene.

  7. Recent Advancements in Gene Therapy for Hereditary Retinal Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Öner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary retinal dystrophies (HRDs are degenerative diseases of the retina which have marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Common presentations among these disorders include night or colour blindness, tunnel vision, and subsequent progression to complete blindness. The known causative disease genes have a variety of developmental and functional roles, with mutations in more than 120 genes shown to be responsible for the phenotypes. In addition, mutations within the same gene have been shown to cause different disease phenotypes, even amongst affected individuals within the same family, highlighting further levels of complexity. The known disease genes encode proteins involved in retinal cellular structures, phototransduction, the visual cycle, and photoreceptor structure or gene regulation. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been proposed as potentially efficacious therapies. Because of its favorable anatomical and immunological characteristics, the eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in animal models of HRDs and some of them have been relayed to the clinic. The results from the first clinical trials for a congenital form of blindness have generated great interest and have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of intraocular administrations of viral vectors in humans. This review summarizes the clinical development of retinal gene therapy.

  8. Retro-mode imaging and fundus autofluorescence with scanning laser ophthalmoscope of retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Battaglia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal dystrophies display a considerably wide range of phenotypic variability, which can make diagnosis and clinical staging difficult. The aim of the study is to analyze the contribution of retro-mode imaging (RMI and fundus autofluorescence (FAF to the characterization of retinal dystrophies. Methods Eighteen consecutive patients affected by retinal dystrophies underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including best corrected visual acuity with ETDRS charts, blue-light fundus autofluorescence, (BL-FAF, near-infrared fundus autofluorescence (NIR-FAF, and RMI. The primary outcome was the identification of abnormal patterns on RMI. The secondary outcome was the correlation with the findings on BL-FAF and NIR-FAF. Results Overall, the main feature of RMI is represented by a pseudo-3D pattern of all the lesions at the posterior pole. More specifically, any accumulation of material within the retina appears as an area of elevation of different shape and size, displaying irregular and darker borders. No precise correlations between RMI, BL-AF, and NIR-AF imaging was found. Conclusions RMI and FAF appear to be useful tools for characterizing retinal dystrophies. Non-invasive diagnostic tools may yield additional information on the clinical setting and the monitoring of the patients.

  9. Socio-economic characteristics of patients with generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Linneberg, Allan; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry and 228,500 control subjects matched by age and gender. Demographic and socio-economic data were retrieved from Statistics Denmark. Differences between cases and controls were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: On 1 January 2012, 2285 patients......PURPOSE: To examine socio-economic characteristics of patients with generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark. METHODS: Cross-sectional population-based study with analysis of socio-economic characteristics including income, education, employment status and civil status in 2285 patients from...... with a Danish civil registration number were registered as having a generalized retinal dystrophy. At the age of 40 years, less patients than controls had a high education (odds ratio (OR), 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI95), 0.41-0.62), a high income (OR, 0.21; CI95, 0.17-0.26) and were married (OR, 0.39; CI...

  10. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  11. CRB2 acts as a modifying factor of CRB1-related retinal dystrophies in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, L.P.; Lundvig, D.M.S.; Tanimoto, N.; Klooster, J.; Vos, R.M.; Richard, F.; Sothilingam, V.; Garrido, M. Garcia; Bivic, A. le; Seeliger, M.W.; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene lead to retinal dystrophies ranging from Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP), due to developmental defects or loss of adhesion between photoreceptors and Muller glia cells, respectively. Whereas over 150 mutations have been found, no

  12. CRB2 acts as a modifying factor of CRB1-related retinal dystrophies in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Klooster, J.; Vos, Rogier M; Richard, Fabrice; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Le Bivic, André; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene lead to retinal dystrophies ranging from Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP), due to developmental defects or loss of adhesion between photoreceptors and Müller glia cells, respectively. Whereas over 150 mutations have been found, no

  13. Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Arai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

  14. Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuuki; Maeda, Akiko; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ishigami, Chie; Kosugi, Shinji; Mandai, Michiko; Kurimoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

  15. Genetic testing for retinal dystrophies and dysfunctions: benefits, dilemmas and solutions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenekoop, R.K.; Lopez, I.; Hollander, A.I. den; Allikmets, R.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human retinal dystrophies have unparalleled genetic and clinical diversity and are currently linked to more than 185 genetic loci. Genotyping is a crucial exercise, as human gene-specific clinical trials to study photoreceptor rescue are on their way. Testing confirms the diagnosis at the molecular

  16. Mutation Detection in Patients with Retinal Dystrophies Using Targeted Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisschuh, Nicole; Mayer, Anja K; Strom, Tim M

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) constitute a group of blinding diseases that are characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. The different nonsyndromic and syndromic forms of RD can be attributed to mutations in more than 200 genes. Consequently, next generation sequencing...

  17. Reliability of kinetic visual field testing in children with mutation-proven retinal dystrophies: Implications for therapeutic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Vaidehi S; Liu, Jerry Y; Schlegel, Dana; Andrews, Chris A; Branham, Kari; Khan, Naheed W; Musch, David C; Heckenlively, John R; Jayasundera, K Thiran

    2018-01-01

    Kinetic visual field testing is used to monitor disease course in retinal dystrophy clinical care and treatment response in treatment trials, which are increasingly recruiting children. This study investigates Goldmann visual field (GVF) changes in young children with mutation-proven retinal dystrophies as they age and with progression of the retinal degeneration. Retrospective review of children ≤ 17 years old with a mutation-proven retinal dystrophy. Objective clinical disease activity was assessed by a retinal degeneration specialist masked to GVF results. Digital quantification of GVF area was performed. Twenty-nine children (58 eyes), ages 5-16, were identified. GVF area increased with age despite progression in 20 children and clinical stability in nine children. Mean ± standard error increase in GVF area/year was 333 ± 130 mm 2 (I4e, p = 0.012), 720 ± 155 mm 2 (III4e, p children with mutation-proven retinal dystrophies, there is a significant increase in GVF area with age, particularly those children with retinal dystrophies can be an unreliable measure of response to treatment and on which to base appropriate counseling about visual impairment.

  18. Phenotypic diversity in autosomal-dominant cone-rod dystrophy elucidated by adaptive optics retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongxin; Rossi, Ethan A; Stone, Edwin; Latchney, Lisa; Williams, David; Dubra, Alfredo; Chung, Mina

    2018-01-01

    Several genes causing autosomal-dominant cone-rod dystrophy (AD-CRD) have been identified. However, the mechanisms by which genetic mutations lead to cellular loss in human disease remain poorly understood. Here we combine genotyping with high-resolution adaptive optics retinal imaging to elucidate the retinal phenotype at a cellular level in patients with AD-CRD harbouring a defect in the GUCA1A gene. Nine affected members of a four-generation AD-CRD pedigree and three unaffected first-degree relatives underwent clinical examinations including visual acuity, fundus examination, Goldmann perimetry, spectral domain optical coherence tomography and electroretinography. Genome-wide scan followed by bidirectional sequencing was performed on all affected participants. High-resolution imaging using a custom adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was performed for selected participants. Clinical evaluations showed a range of disease severity from normal fundus appearance in teenaged patients to pronounced macular atrophy in older patients. Molecular genetic testing showed a mutation in in GUCA1A segregating with disease. AOSLO imaging revealed that of the two teenage patients with mild disease, one had severe disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic while the other had a normal cone mosaic. AOSLO imaging demonstrated variability in the pattern of cone and rod cell loss between two teenage cousins with early AD-CRD, who had similar clinical features and had the identical disease-causing mutation in GUCA1A . This finding suggests that a mutation in GUCA1A does not lead to the same degree of AD-CRD in all patients. Modifying factors may mitigate or augment disease severity, leading to different retinal cellular phenotypes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Hyperosmolarity response of ocular standing potential as a clinical test for retinal pigment epithelium activity. Chorioretinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, D; Kawasaki, K; Madachi-Yamamoto, S

    1984-05-30

    The hyperosmolarity response of the standing potential was recorded in retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes), fundus albipunctatus (8 eyes), and Stargardt's disease (or fundus flavimaculatus) (14 eyes). The light peak/dark trough ratio (the L/D ratio) and the Diamox response were also determined. The hyperosmolarity response was greatly suppressed (less than M-4SD; M and SD indicate respectively the mean and the standard deviation in normal control subjects) in all examined eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes) including retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (8 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), and pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes). The L/D ratio was larger than 1.26 (M-2.5 SD) in the half of the eyes with the above-described diseases. The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in 4 of 8 eyes with fundus albipunctatus. The L/D ratio was normal in all 8 eyes. The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in all 14 eyes with Stargardt's disease or fundus flavimaculatus. The L/D ratio was abnormal in 5 of these 14 eyes. The hyperosmolarity response was more frequently abnormal than the L/D ratio in the chorioretinal dystrophies mentioned above, and hence is useful particularly for early diagnosis of these disorders.

  20. Unravelling the Complexity of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies Molecular Testing: Added Value of Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Bernardis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the clinical utility of targeted Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS for the diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRDs, a total of 109 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 88 IRD affected probands and 21 healthy relatives. Clinical diagnoses included Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA, Stargardt Disease (STGD, Best Macular Dystrophy (BMD, Usher Syndrome (USH, and other IRDs with undefined clinical diagnosis. Participants underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination followed by genetic counseling. A custom AmpliSeq™ panel of 72 IRD-related genes was designed for the analysis and tested using Ion semiconductor Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS. Potential disease-causing mutations were identified in 59.1% of probands, comprising mutations in 16 genes. The highest diagnostic yields were achieved for BMD, LCA, USH, and STGD patients, whereas RP confirmed its high genetic heterogeneity. Causative mutations were identified in 17.6% of probands with undefined diagnosis. Revision of the initial diagnosis was performed for 9.6% of genetically diagnosed patients. This study demonstrates that NGS represents a comprehensive cost-effective approach for IRDs molecular diagnosis. The identification of the genetic alterations underlying the phenotype enabled the clinicians to achieve a more accurate diagnosis. The results emphasize the importance of molecular diagnosis coupled with clinic information to unravel the extensive phenotypic heterogeneity of these diseases.

  1. Mutation Detection in Patients with Retinal Dystrophies Using Targeted Next Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Weisschuh

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies (RD constitute a group of blinding diseases that are characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. The different nonsyndromic and syndromic forms of RD can be attributed to mutations in more than 200 genes. Consequently, next generation sequencing (NGS technologies are among the most promising approaches to identify mutations in RD. We screened a large cohort of patients comprising 89 independent cases and families with various subforms of RD applying different NGS platforms. While mutation screening in 50 cases was performed using a RD gene capture panel, 47 cases were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. One family was analyzed using whole genome sequencing. A detection rate of 61% was achieved including mutations in 34 known and two novel RD genes. A total of 69 distinct mutations were identified, including 39 novel mutations. Notably, genetic findings in several families were not consistent with the initial clinical diagnosis. Clinical reassessment resulted in refinement of the clinical diagnosis in some of these families and confirmed the broad clinical spectrum associated with mutations in RD genes.

  2. Genetic testing for retinal dystrophies and dysfunctions: benefits, dilemmas and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenekoop, Robert K; Lopez, Irma; den Hollander, Anneke I; Allikmets, Rando; Cremers, Frans P M

    2007-07-01

    Human retinal dystrophies have unparalleled genetic and clinical diversity and are currently linked to more than 185 genetic loci. Genotyping is a crucial exercise, as human gene-specific clinical trials to study photoreceptor rescue are on their way. Testing confirms the diagnosis at the molecular level and allows for a more precise prognosis of the possible future clinical evolution. As treatments are gene-specific and the 'window of opportunity' is time-sensitive; accurate, rapid and cost-effective genetic testing will play an ever-increasing crucial role. The gold standard is sequencing but is fraught with excessive costs, time, manpower issues and finding non-pathogenic variants. Therefore, no centre offers testing of all currently 132 known genes. Several new micro-array technologies have emerged recently, that offer rapid, cost-effective and accurate genotyping. The new disease chips from Asper Ophthalmics (for Stargardt dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis [LCA], Usher syndromes and retinitis pigmentosa) offer an excellent first pass opportunity. All known mutations are placed on the chip and in 4 h a patient's DNA is screened. Identification rates (identifying at least one disease-associated mutation) are currently approximately 70% (Stargardt), approximately 60-70% (LCA) and approximately 45% (Usher syndrome subtype 1). This may be combined with genotype-phenotype correlations that suggest the causal gene from the clinical appearance (e.g. preserved para-arteriolar retinal pigment epithelium suggests the involvement of the CRB1 gene in LCA). As approximately 50% of the retinal dystrophy genes still await discovery, these technologies will improve dramatically as additional novel mutations are added. Genetic testing will then become standard practice to complement the ophthalmic evaluation.

  3. Pupillometer-based objective chromatic perimetry in normal eyes and patients with retinal photoreceptor dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Alon; Sher, Ifat; Kolker, Andrew; Elyasiv, Sivan; Rosenfeld, Elkana; Mhajna, Mohamad; Melamed, Shlomo; Belkin, Michael; Rotenstreich, Ygal

    2013-04-17

    To evaluate a novel objective perimetry using multifocal chromatic pupil light reflex in normal participants and patients with photoreceptor dysfunction, and to relate this new technique with subjective dark-adapted chromatic Goldmann perimetry. Thirty-two eyes of 17 retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or cone-rod dystrophy patients and 20 eyes of 12 healthy individuals were tested. A computerized infrared video pupillometer was used to record changes in pupil diameter in response to short- and long-wavelength stimuli (peak 485 and 640 nm, respectively; light intensity 40 cd/m(2)) at 13 different points of the 30° visual field (VF), under background illumination of 2.7 cd/m(2). The pupillary response (PR) of patients was compared with PR obtained from normal control participants. In 11 patients, the pupillary responses were also compared with their findings on dark-adapted chromatic Goldmann perimetry. Significantly reduced pupillary responses were obtained in RP patients in response to the short-wavelength stimulus in nearly all perimetric locations (P chromatic Goldmann perimetry. In all patients that were tested by the chromatic Goldmann, minimal PR was recorded in areas that were nondetected in the chromatic Goldmann perimetry. This study demonstrates the potential feasibility of using pupillometer-based chromatic perimetry for objectively assessing VF defects and retinal function in patients with retinal dystrophies. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01021982.).

  4. Correction of the retinal dystrophy phenotype of the RCS rat by viral gene transfer of Mertk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, D; Feng, W; Duncan, J L; Yasumura, D; D'Cruz, P M; Chappelow, A; Matthes, M T; Kay, M A; LaVail, M M

    2001-10-23

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is a widely studied animal model of retinal degeneration in which the inability of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to phagocytize shed photoreceptor outer segments leads to a progressive loss of rod and cone photoreceptors. We recently used positional cloning to demonstrate that the gene Mertk likely corresponds to the retinal dystrophy (rdy) locus of the RCS rat. In the present study, we sought to determine whether gene transfer of Mertk to a RCS rat retina would result in correction of the RPE phagocytosis defect and preservation of photoreceptors. We used subretinal injection of a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus encoding rat Mertk to deliver the gene to the eyes of young RCS rats. Electrophysiological assessment of animals 30 days after injection revealed an increased sensitivity of treated eyes to low-intensity light. Histologic and ultrastructural assessment demonstrated substantial sparing of photoreceptors, preservation of outer segment structure, and correction of the RPE phagocytosis defect in areas surrounding the injection site. Our results provide definitive evidence that mutation of Mertk underlies the RCS retinal dystrophy phenotype, and that the phenotype can be corrected by treatment of juvenile animals. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of complementation of both a functional cellular defect (phagocytosis) and a photoreceptor degeneration by gene transfer to the RPE. These results, together with the recent discovery of MERTK mutations in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa, emphasize the importance of the RCS rat as a model for gene therapy of diseases that arise from RPE dysfunction.

  5. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eJiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dystrophy (CORD. The late onset GCAP1(L151F-CORD mimics the dystrophy observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Subretinal injection of scAAV2/8 carrying shRNA expression cassettes specific for bovine or mouse GCAP1 showed strong expression at one week post-injection. In both allele-specific (GCAP1(Y99C-RP and nonallele-specific (GCAP1(L151F-CORD models of dominant retinal dystrophy, RNAi-mediated gene silencing enhanced photoreceptor survival, delayed onset of degeneration and improved visual function. Such results provide a proof of concept toward effective RNAi-based gene therapy mediated by scAAV2/8 for dominant retinal disease based on GCAP1 mutation. Further, nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 may prove generally applicable toward the rescue of any human GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy.

  6. Is there a relationship between outer retinal destruction and choroidal changes in cone dystrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Ayyildiz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of the present study was to use enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT to investigate choroidal changes in patients with cone dystrophy (CD and to correlate these findings with clinical and electroretinography (ERG findings. Methods: This case-control study included 40 eyes of 20 patients with CD and 40 eyes of 40 age- and refraction-matched healthy individuals. Choroidal thickness (CT measurements were obtained under the foveal center and at 500 and 1,500 μm from the nasal and temporal regions to the center of the fovea, respectively. EDI-OCT and ERG data were analyzed, and the correlations of CT with the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and the central foveal thickness (CFT were evaluated. Results: The mean subfoveal CTs in the CD and control groups were 240.70 ± 70.78 and 356.18 ± 48.55 μm, respectively. The subfoveal CT was significantly thinner in patients with CD than in the controls (p<0.001. The patients with CD also had significantly thinner choroids than the controls at each measurement location relative to the fovea (p<0.001. The subfoveal CT in the CD group correlated with CFT (p=0.012, but no significant correlation was found between the subfoveal CT and BCVA or photopic ERG responses. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated a significant thinning of the choroid in patients with CD. EDI-OCT is a useful technique for describing the choroidal changes occurring in CD. Future studies investigating the association between choroidal changes and outer retinal destruction or the disease stage may provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of CD.

  7. Is there a relationship between outer retinal destruction and choroidal changes in cone dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Ozge, Gokhan; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; Ozgonul, Cem; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to use enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) to investigate choroidal changes in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and to correlate these findings with clinical and electroretinography (ERG) findings. This case-control study included 40 eyes of 20 patients with CD and 40 eyes of 40 age- and refraction-matched healthy individuals. Choroidal thickness (CT) measurements were obtained under the foveal center and at 500 and 1,500 μm from the nasal and temporal regions to the center of the fovea, respectively. EDI-OCT and ERG data were analyzed, and the correlations of CT with the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the central foveal thickness (CFT) were evaluated. The mean subfoveal CTs in the CD and control groups were 240.70 ± 70.78 and 356.18 ± 48.55 μm, respectively. The subfoveal CT was significantly thinner in patients with CD than in the controls (p<0.001). The patients with CD also had significantly thinner choroids than the controls at each measurement location relative to the fovea (p<0.001). The subfoveal CT in the CD group correlated with CFT (p=0.012), but no significant correlation was found between the subfoveal CT and BCVA or photopic ERG responses. The present study demonstrated a significant thinning of the choroid in patients with CD. EDI-OCT is a useful technique for describing the choroidal changes occurring in CD. Future studies investigating the association between choroidal changes and outer retinal destruction or the disease stage may provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of CD.

  8. [From gene to disease: from the ABCA4 gene to Stargardt disease, cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, F.P.M.; Maugeri, A.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Mutations in ABCA4 are also found in two-thirds of cases with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy, and a small fraction of patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Patients with autosomal recessive

  9. Novel Insights Into the Phenotypical Spectrum of KIF11-Associated Retinopathy, Including a New Form of Retinal Ciliopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtel, Johannes; Gliem, Martin; Mangold, Elisabeth; Tebbe, Lars; Spier, Isabel; Müller, Philipp L; Holz, Frank G; Neuhaus, Christine; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bolz, Hanno J; Charbel Issa, Peter

    2017-08-01

    This study sought to characterize the ophthalmic and extraocular phenotype in patients with known and novel KIF11 mutations. Four patients (3, 5, 36, and 38 years of age, on father-daughter constellation) from three unrelated families were characterized by retinal examination including multimodal retinal imaging, investigation for syndromic disease manifestations, and targeted next-generation sequencing. The subcellular localization of Kif11 in the retina was analyzed by light and electron microcopy. There was considerable interindividual and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity of KIF11-related retinopathy. Two patients presented with a progressive retinal dystrophy, one with chorioretinal dysplasia and one with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) in one eye and thinning of the photoreceptor layer in the fellow eye. Obvious syndromic disease manifestations were present only in the youngest patient, but minor signs (e.g. reduced head circumference) were present in the three other individuals. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated Kif11 localization in the inner segment and ciliary compartments of photoreceptor cells and in the retinal pigment epithelium. Progressive retinal degeneration in KIF11-related retinopathy indicates a role for KIF11 not only in ocular development but also in maintaining retinal morphology and function. The remarkable variability of the ocular phenotype suggests four different types of retinopathy which may overlap. KIF11 should be considered in the screening of patients with retinal dystrophies because other syndromic manifestations may be subtle. Evaluation of head circumference may be considered as a potential shortcut to the genetic diagnosis. The localization of Kif11 in photoreceptor cells indicates a retinal ciliopathy.

  10. Outcome of ABCA4 disease-associated alleles in autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies: retrospective analysis in 420 Spanish families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Zernant, Jana; Aguirre-Lamban, Jana; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Gimenez, Ascension; Lopez-Molina, Maria-Isabel; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Corton, Marta; Tatu, Sorina; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria-Jose; Ramos, Carmen; Allikmets, Rando; Ayuso, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of all detected mutations in the ABCA4 gene in Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal disorders, including Stargardt's disease (arSTGD), cone-rod dystrophy (arCRD), and retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), and to assess genotype-phenotype correlation and disease progression in 10 years by considering the type of variants and age at onset. Case series. A total of 420 unrelated Spanish families: 259 arSTGD, 86 arCRD, and 75 arRP. Spanish families were analyzed through a combination of ABCR400 genotyping microarray, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and high-resolution melting scanning. Direct sequencing was used as a confirmation technique for the identified variants. Screening by multiple ligation probe analysis was used to detect possible large deletions or insertions in the ABCA4 gene. Selected families were analyzed further by next generation sequencing. DNA sequence variants, mutation detection rates, haplotypes, age at onset, central or peripheral vision loss, and night blindness. Overall, we detected 70.5% and 36.6% of all expected ABCA4 mutations in arSTGD and arCRD patient cohorts, respectively. In the fraction of the cohort where the ABCA4 gene was sequenced completely, the detection rates reached 73.6% for arSTGD and 66.7% for arCRD. However, the frequency of possibly pathogenic ABCA4 alleles in arRP families was only slightly higher than that in the general population. Moreover, in some families, mutations in other known arRP genes segregated with the disease phenotype. An increasing understanding of causal ABCA4 alleles in arSTGD and arCRD facilitates disease diagnosis and prognosis and also is paramount in selecting patients for emerging clinical trials of therapeutic interventions. Because ABCA4-associated diseases are evolving retinal dystrophies, assessment of age at onset, accurate clinical diagnosis, and genetic testing are crucial. We suggest that ABCA4 mutations may be associated with a

  11. Nuclear receptor TLX prevents retinal dystrophy and recruits the corepressor atrophin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Li; Zou, Yuhua; Yu, Ruth T; Gage, Fred H; Evans, Ronald M

    2006-05-15

    During mammalian embryogenesis, precise coordination of progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation is essential for proper organ size and function. The involvement of TLX (NR2E1), an orphan nuclear receptor, has been implicated in ocular development, as Tlx-/- mice exhibit visual impairment. Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we show that TLX modulates retinal progenitor cell proliferation and cell cycle re-entry by directly regulating the expression of Pten and its target cyclin D1. Additionally, TLX finely tunes the progenitor differentiation program by modulating the phospholipase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and the expression of an array of cell type-specific transcriptional regulators. Consequently, Tlx-/- mice have a dramatic reduction in retina thickness and enhanced generation of S-cones, and develop severe early onset retinal dystrophy. Furthermore, TLX interacts with atrophin1 (Atn1), a corepressor that is involved in human neurodegenerative dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and that is essential for development of multiple tissues. Together, these results reveal a molecular strategy by which an orphan nuclear receptor can precisely orchestrate tissue-specific proliferation and differentiation programs to prevent retinal malformation and degeneration.

  12. An epidemiological approach for the estimation of disease onset in Central Europe in central and peripheral monogenic retinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofyeva, Elena; Wilke, Robert; Lotz, Gunnar; Troeger, Eric; Strasser, Torsten; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2009-07-01

    To study clinical patterns of disease onset in monogenic retinal dystrophies (MRD), using an epidemiological approach. Records of patients with MRD, seen at the University Eye Hospital Tuebingen from 1994 to 1999, were selected from a database and retrospectively reviewed. For analysis, patients were divided into 2 groups by predominant part of visual field (VF) involvement: group 1 (predominantly central involvement) included Stargardt disease (ST), macular dystrophy (MD), and central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD), and group 2 (predominantly peripheral involvement) included Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBD), Usher syndrome (USH) I and II, and choroideremia (CHD). Age, sex, age of first diagnosis, age of visual acuity (VA) decrease and VF emergence, night blindness and photophobia onset, types of VF defects and age of its onset, color discrimination defects and best corrected VA were analyzed. Records of 259 patients were studied. Men were more prevalent than women. Mean age of the patients was 47.2 (SD = 15.6) years old. Forty-five patients in the first group and 40 in the second were first diagnosed between 21 and 30 years of age. Ninety-four patients in the first group had VA decrease before 30 years of age; in the second group, 68 patients had VA decrease onset between 21 and 40 years of age. Forty-four patients in the first group noticed VF at an age between 21 and 30 years, and 74 patients between 11 and 30 years in the second group. Central scotoma was typical for the first group, and was detected in 115 patients. Concentric constriction was typical for the second group, and was found in 81 patients. Half of patients in both groups preserved best-corrected VA in the better eye at a level of 20/40 or better; 7% in the first group and 6% in the second group were registered as legally blind according to WHO criteria, having VA <1/50 or VF <5 degrees . Diagnosis frequency was USH I and II-34%, ST-31%, MD-18%, CHD-14%, BBD-5%. An epidemiological approach to the

  13. Use of placental extract for the treatment of myopic and senile chorio-retinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, G; Malinverni, W

    1982-01-01

    After an examination of the literature, the authors evaluate the activity of placenta extract in 34 subjects suffering from chorio-retinal dystrophy of different types (myopic and senile) and of different degrees of anatomo-functional alteration. The parameters used for this study were visual acuity, the luminous sense, the visual field and the electrophysiological activity of the retina. The aqueous solution was administered by intramuscular route at a daily dose of 3 ml (equivalent to 1,80 g of fresh organ) during 20 days; the parameters were tested before and at the end of the treatment. The results obtained during this study show that the parameters were improved, in different degrees, by the administration of the placenta extract. This is clearly demonstrated by the significant improvement in the luminous sense.

  14. Exome sequencing of index patients with retinal dystrophies as a tool for molecular diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Corton

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies (RD are a group of hereditary diseases that lead to debilitating visual impairment and are usually transmitted as a Mendelian trait. Pathogenic mutations can occur in any of the 100 or more disease genes identified so far, making molecular diagnosis a rather laborious process. In this work we explored the use of whole exome sequencing (WES as a tool for identification of RD mutations, with the aim of assessing its applicability in a diagnostic context.We ascertained 12 Spanish families with seemingly recessive RD. All of the index patients underwent mutational pre-screening by chip-based sequence hybridization and resulted to be negative for known RD mutations. With the exception of one pedigree, to simulate a standard diagnostic scenario we processed by WES only the DNA from the index patient of each family, followed by in silico data analysis. We successfully identified causative mutations in patients from 10 different families, which were later verified by Sanger sequencing and co-segregation analyses. Specifically, we detected pathogenic DNA variants (∼50% novel mutations in the genes RP1, USH2A, CNGB3, NMNAT1, CHM, and ABCA4, responsible for retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, achromatopsia, Leber congenital amaurosis, choroideremia, or recessive Stargardt/cone-rod dystrophy cases.Despite the absence of genetic information from other family members that could help excluding nonpathogenic DNA variants, we could detect causative mutations in a variety of genes known to represent a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes in 83% of the patients analyzed. Considering the constant drop in costs for human exome sequencing and the relative simplicity of the analyses made, this technique could represent a valuable tool for molecular diagnostics or genetic research, even in cases for which no genotypes from family members are available.

  15. Macular hole-associated retinal detachment in Best vitelliform dystrophy: Series of two cases and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ruchir; Kumar, Vinod; Ravani, Raghav; Dubey, Devashish; Chandra, Parijat; Kumar, Atul

    2018-01-01

    Two eyes of 2 patients with macular hole-associated retinal detachment in clinically diagnosed vitelliruptive stage of Best vitelliform dystrophy were surgically managed by 25-gauge sutureless pars plana vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling with inverted ILM flap, and short-acting (SF6) gas tamponade. The patients were assessed with respect to best-corrected visual acuity, color fundus photographs, shortwave fundus autofluorescence, and swept source optical coherence tomography. Surgical intervention led to Type 1 closure of macular hole, resolution of retinal detachment, and improvement in vision in both patients. PMID:29676326

  16. Macular hole-associated retinal detachment in Best vitelliform dystrophy: Series of two cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchir Tewari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two eyes of 2 patients with macular hole-associated retinal detachment in clinically diagnosed vitelliruptive stage of Best vitelliform dystrophy were surgically managed by 25-gauge sutureless pars plana vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling with inverted ILM flap, and short-acting (SF6 gas tamponade. The patients were assessed with respect to best-corrected visual acuity, color fundus photographs, shortwave fundus autofluorescence, and swept source optical coherence tomography. Surgical intervention led to Type 1 closure of macular hole, resolution of retinal detachment, and improvement in vision in both patients.

  17. Simultaneous Presence of Macular Corneal Dystrophy and Retinitis Pigmentosa in Three Members of a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Nejat

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Macular corneal dystrophy (MCD is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease. In most cases, various mutations in carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 (CHST6 gene are the main cause of MCD. These mutations lead to a defect in keratan sulfate synthesis. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is another eye disorder with nyctalopia as its common symptom. It has been shown that more than 65 genes have been implicated in different forms of RP. Herein, we report on a 9-member family with 2 girls and 5 boys. Both parents, one of the girls and one of the boys had normal eye vision and another boy had keratoconus. Other children (1 girl and 2 boys suffered from both MCD and RP. Corneal transplantation and medical supplements were used for MCD and RP during the follow-up period, respectively. Based on the family tree, it seems that the inheritance of both diseases is autosomal recessive. Based on our search of databases, there is no report on the simultaneous presence of MCD and RP. To the best of our knowledge, the present article is the first case report on this topic. Molecular genetic investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism of concurrent MCD and RP.

  18. Microarray-based mutation analysis of the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene in autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klevering, B.J.; Ijzer, S.; Rohrschneider, K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Allikmets, R.; Born, L.I. van den; Maugeri, A.; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCA4 gene have been associated with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We employed a recently developed genotyping microarray, the ABCR400-chip, to search for known ABCA4 mutations in patients with isolated or

  19. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.; Krebs, M.P.; Schoenmaker, F.E.; Hicks, W.; Yu, M.; Shi, L.; Rowe, L.; Collin, G.B.; Charette, J.R.; Letteboer, S.J.; Neveling, K.; Moorsel, T.W. van; Abu-Ltaif, S.; Baere, E. De; Walraedt, S.; Banfi, S.; Simonelli, F.; Cremers, F.P.; Boon, C.J.; Roepman, R.; Leroy, B.P.; Peachey, N.S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Nishina, P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the CTNNA1 gene (encoding alpha-catenin 1) in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment

  20. A Report on Molecular Diagnostic Testing for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies by Targeted Genetic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Hema L; Gudiseva, Harini V; Kishaba, Kameron T; Suk, John J; Verma, Rohan; Tadimeti, Keerti; Thorson, John A; Ayyagari, Radha

    2017-02-01

    To test the utility of targeted sequencing as a method of clinical molecular testing in patients diagnosed with inherited retinal degeneration (IRD). After genetic counseling, peripheral blood was drawn from 188 probands and 36 carriers of IRD. Single gene testing was performed on each patient in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) certified laboratory. DNA was isolated, and all exons in the gene of interest were analyzed along with 20 base pairs of flanking intronic sequence. Genetic testing was most often performed on ABCA4, CTRP5, ELOV4, BEST1, CRB1, and PRPH2. Pathogenicity of novel sequence changes was predicted by PolyPhen2 and sorting intolerant from tolerant (SIFT). Of the 225 genetic tests performed, 150 were for recessive IRD, and 75 were for dominant IRD. A positive molecular diagnosis was made in 70 (59%) of probands with recessive IRD and 19 (26%) probands with dominant IRD. Analysis confirmed 12 (34%) of individuals as carriers of familial mutations associated with IRD. Thirty-two novel variants were identified; among these, 17 sequence changes in four genes were predicted to be possibly or probably damaging including: ABCA4 (14), BEST1 (2), PRPH2 (1), and TIMP3 (1). Targeted analysis of clinically suspected genes in 225 subjects resulted in a positive molecular diagnosis in 26% of patients with dominant IRD and 59% of patients with recessive IRD. Novel damaging mutations were identified in four genes. Single gene screening is not an ideal method for diagnostic testing given the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity among IRD cases. High-throughput sequencing of all genes associated with retinal degeneration may be more efficient for molecular diagnosis.

  1. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-13

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  2. Terapia gênica em distrofias hereditárias de retina Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Côco

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As distrofias hereditárias de retina abrangem um amplo número de doenças caracterizadas por lenta e progressiva degeneração da retina. São o resultado de mutações em genes expressos em fotorreceptores e no epitélio pigmentado da retina. A herança pode ser autossômica dominante, autossômica recessiva, ligada ao X recessiva, digênica ou herança mitocondrial. Atualmente não há tratamento para essas doenças e os pacientes convivem com a perda progressiva da visão. O aconselhamento genético e o suporte para reabilitação têm indicação nestes casos. Pesquisas envolvendo a base molecular e genética dessas doenças está continuamente em expansão e ampliam as perspectivas para novas formas de tratamento. Dessa forma, a terapia gênica, que consiste na inserção de material genético exógeno em células de um indivíduo com finalidade terapêutica, tem sido a principal forma de tratamento para as distrofias hereditárias de retina. O olho é um órgão peculiar para a terapia gênica, pois é anatomicamente dividido em compartimentos, imunologicamente privilegiado e com meios transparentes. A maioria das doenças oculares tem defeitos em genes conhecidos. Além disso, há modelo animal bem caracterizado para algumas condições. Propostas para pesquisa clínica em terapia gênica nas degenerações retinianas hereditárias com defeito no gene RPE65, recentemente tiveram aprovação ética e os resultados preliminares obtidos trouxeram grandes expectativas na melhora da qualidade de vida dos pacientes.The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these

  3. Photobiomodulation reduces photoreceptor death and regulates cytoprotection in early states of P23H retinal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Diana K.; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Schmitt, Heather; Abroe, Betsy; Stoehr, Michele; Dubis, Adam; Carroll, Joseph; Stone, Jonathan; Valter, Krisztina; Eells, Janis

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation by light in the far-red to near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (photobiomodulation, PBM) has been demonstrated to attenuate the severity of neurodegenerative disease in experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 670 nm PBM would protect against the loss of retinal function and improve photoreceptor survival in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa, the P23H transgenic rat. P23H rat pups were treated once per day with a 670 nm LED array (180 sec treatments at 50 mW/cm2; fluence 9 joules/cm2) (Quantum Devices Inc., Barneveld WI) from postnatal day (p) 16-20 or from p10-20. Sham-treated rats were restrained, but not exposed to NIR light. The status of the retina was determined at p22 by assessment of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cell death. In a second series of studies, retinal status was assessed at p30 by measuring photoreceptor function by ERG and retinal morphology by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). 670 nm PBM increased retinal mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity and upregulated the retina's production of the key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, MnSOD. PBM also attenuated photoreceptor cell loss and improved photoreceptor function. PBM protects photoreceptors in the developing P23H retina, by augmenting mitochondrial function and stimulating antioxidant protective pathways. Photobiomodulation may have therapeutic potential, where mitochondrial damage is a step in the death of photoreceptors.

  4. Translational read-through as an alternative approach for ocular gene therapy of retinal dystrophies caused by in-frame nonsense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Möller, Fabian; Penner, Inessa; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    The eye has become an excellent target for gene therapy, and gene augmentation therapy of inherited retinal disorders has made major progress in recent years. Nevertheless, a recent study indicated that gene augmentation intervention might not stop the progression of retinal degeneration in patients. In addition, for many genes, viral-mediated gene augmentation is currently not feasible due to gene size and limited packaging capacity of viral vectors as well as expression of various heterogeneous isoforms of the target gene. Thus, alternative gene-based strategies to stop or delay the retinal degeneration are necessary. This review focuses on an alternative pharmacologic treatment strategy based on the usage of translational read-through inducing drugs (TRIDs) such as PTC124, aminoglycoside antibiotics, and designer aminoglycosides for overreading in-frame nonsense mutations. This strategy has emerged as an option for up to 30-50% of all cases of recessive hereditary retinal dystrophies. In-frame nonsense mutations are single-nucleotide alterations within the gene coding sequence resulting in a premature stop codon. Consequently, translation of such mutated genes leads to the synthesis of truncated proteins, which are unable to fulfill their physiologic functions. In this context, application of TRIDs facilitates the recoding of the premature termination codon into a sense codon, thus restoring syntheses of full-length proteins. So far, clinical trials for non-ocular diseases have been initiated for diverse TRIDs. Although the clinical outcome is not analyzed in detail, an excellent safety profile, namely for PTC124, was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, recent data demonstrated sustained read-through efficacies of nonsense mutations causing retinal degeneration, as manifested in the human Usher syndrome. In addition, a strong retinal biocompatibility for PTC124 and designer aminoglycosides has been demonstrated. In conclusion, recent progress emphasizes the

  5. Exome sequencing identifies DYNC2H1 mutations as a common cause of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome) without major polydactyly, renal or retinal involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Miriam; Arts, Heleen H; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yap, Zhimin; Oud, Machteld M; Antony, Dinu; Duijkers, Lonneke; Emes, Richard D; Stalker, Jim; Yntema, Jan-Bart L; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Forsythe, Elisabeth; Lausch, Ekkehart; Veltman, Joris A; Roeleveld, Nel; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Kutkowska-Kazmierczak, Anna; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Elçioğlu, Nursel; van Maarle, Merel C; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Smithson, Sarah F; Wellesley, Diana; Verbeek, Nienke E; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kayserili, Hulya; Scambler, Peter J; Beales, Philip L; Knoers, Nine VAM; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2013-01-01

    Background Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) is a rare, often lethal, recessively inherited chondrodysplasia characterised by shortened ribs and long bones, sometimes accompanied by polydactyly, and renal, liver and retinal disease. Mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes cause JATD, including the IFT dynein-2 motor subunit gene DYNC2H1. Genetic heterogeneity and the large DYNC2H1 gene size have hindered JATD genetic diagnosis. Aims and methods To determine the contribution to JATD we screened DYNC2H1 in 71 JATD patients JATD patients combining SNP mapping, Sanger sequencing and exome sequencing. Results and conclusions We detected 34 DYNC2H1 mutations in 29/71 (41%) patients from 19/57 families (33%), showing it as a major cause of JATD especially in Northern European patients. This included 13 early protein termination mutations (nonsense/frameshift, deletion, splice site) but no patients carried these in combination, suggesting the human phenotype is at least partly hypomorphic. In addition, 21 missense mutations were distributed across DYNC2H1 and these showed some clustering to functional domains, especially the ATP motor domain. DYNC2H1 patients largely lacked significant extra-skeletal involvement, demonstrating an important genotype–phenotype correlation in JATD. Significant variability exists in the course and severity of the thoracic phenotype, both between affected siblings with identical DYNC2H1 alleles and among individuals with different alleles, which suggests the DYNC2H1 phenotype might be subject to modifier alleles, non-genetic or epigenetic factors. Assessment of fibroblasts from patients showed accumulation of anterograde IFT proteins in the ciliary tips, confirming defects similar to patients with other retrograde IFT machinery mutations, which may be of undervalued potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:23456818

  6. Microarray-based mutation analysis of the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene in autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevering, B Jeroen; Yzer, Suzanne; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Zonneveld, Marijke; Allikmets, Rando; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Maugeri, Alessandra; Hoyng, Carel B; Cremers, Frans P M

    2004-12-01

    Mutations in the ABCA4 gene have been associated with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We employed a recently developed genotyping microarray, the ABCR400-chip, to search for known ABCA4 mutations in patients with isolated or autosomal recessive CRD (54 cases) or RP (90 cases). We performed detailed ophthalmologic examinations and identified at least one ABCA4 mutation in 18 patients (33%) with CRD and in five patients (5.6%) with RP. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and subsequent DNA sequencing revealed four novel missense mutations (R24C, E161K, P597S, G618E) and a novel 1-bp deletion (5888delG). Ophthalmoscopic abnormalities in CRD patients ranged from minor granular pigmentary changes in the posterior pole to widespread atrophy. In 12 patients with recordable electroretinogram (ERG) tracings, a cone-rod pattern was detected. Three patients demonstrated progression from a retinal dystrophy resembling STGD1 to a more widespread degeneration, and were subsequently diagnosed as CRD. In addition to a variable degree of atrophy, all RP patients displayed ophthalmologic characteristics of classic RP. When detectable, ERG recordings in these patients demonstrated rod-cone patterns of photoreceptor degeneration. In conclusion, in this study, we show that the ABCA4 mutation chip is an efficient first screening tool for arCRD.

  7. Putative digenic inheritance of heterozygous RP1L1 and C2orf71 null mutations in syndromic retinal dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Bosch, Daniëlle G.M.; Siemiatkowska, Anna M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common cause of inherited retinal degeneration and can occur in non-syndromic and syndromic forms. Syndromic RP is accompanied by other symptoms such as intellectual disability, hearing loss, or congenital abnormalities. Both forms are known to ex...

  8. Distrofias retinianas da infância: análise retrospectiva Retinal dystrophies in childhood: retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Andrade Maestrini

    2004-12-01

    distrofias retinianas da infância são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças que se manifestam por meio de sintomas inespecíficos. Uma análise cuidadosa dos sintomas, o exame oftalmológico completo e os exames complementares, principalmente ERG, testes de visão de cores e campo visual, podem ser úteis em seu diagnóstico.PURPOSE: To describe the clinical features and the results of diagnostic methods in all patients with diagnosis of one of the following retinal dystrophies: Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, achromatopsia, cone distrophy or cone-rod distrophy, examined at the Low Vision Department of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, in the period of 1992 to 2003. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of charts of 40 patients. Ten had LCA, 17 had achromatopsia, 6 had cone distrophy and 7 had cone-rod distrophy. RESULTS: Visual acuity was extremely low in patients with LCA, ranging from 20/710 to light perception. The mean value for achromatopsia was 20/200, 20/280 for cone distrophy and 20/260 for cone-rod distrophy. High hyperopia was the most common refractional error in LCA patients. Hyperopia was more frequent in cases of achromatopsia and cone distrophy, while in cone-rod distrophy myopia predominated. Fundoscopy was altered in most cases of LCA, cone distrophy and rod-cone distrophy, and normal in most cases of achromatopsia. Oculodigital sign and enophtalmus were found only in LCA patients while photofobia and color vision defects prevailed in other groups. Nistagmus and strabismus were frequent findings in all groups. There was a high incidence of delayed neuro-psycho-motor development in LCA patients. Two of them had also associated genetic syndromes. Patients presented symptoms very early in life in LCA and achromatopsia, while in cone and cone-rod distrophies symptoms appeared later, but never after the age of 10. Consanguinity and positive familial history were strongly associated in all groups. The ERG was extinct in LCA, showed reduced photopic response in

  9. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Marina; Fontrodona, Laura; Albert, Silvia; Ramirez, Diana Mora; Seriola, Anna; Salas, Anna; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ramos, David; Villegas-Perez, Maria Paz; Zapata, Miguel Angel; Raya, Angel; Ruberte, Jesus; Veiga, Anna; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD. PMID:27006969

  10. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies (RD are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD.

  11. LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF RETINAL DEGENERATIVE DISORDER TREATMENT WITH PEPTIDE BIOREGULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze long-term outcomes and efficacy of retinal degeneration treatment with Retinalamin.Patients and methods. Group I included 20 patients (40 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (15 patients, 30 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (5 patients, 10 eyes who received treatment with Retinalamin for 5‑7 years. Group II included 11 patients (22 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (9 patients, 18 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (2 patients, 4 eyes who received treatment with Retinalamin for 23‑25 years. Group III (controls included 15 patients (30 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (11 patients, 22 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (4 patients, 8 eyes who received traditional treatment (vasodilators, angioprotectors, antisclerotic agents, vitamins for 25 years. Standard ophthalmological examination, i.e., visual acuity measurement, visual field test, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, was performed.Results. First course of treatment with Retinalamin improved vision in 58.1 % of retinal degeneration patients. Visual fields improved in 64.5 % of cases. Repeated treatment courses (1‑2 times a year for 23‑25 years preserved residual vision in 55.6 % of patients and object vision in 11.1 % of cases. In retinal abiotrophy patients, residual vision preserved in 100 % of cases.Conclusions. In retinal degenerations, Retinalamin improves vision and visual fields and decreases total area of absolute scotomas even after the first treatment course as well as preserves vision in prolonged use. 

  12. Exome analysis identified a novel mutation in the RBP4 gene in a consanguineous pedigree with retinal dystrophy and developmental abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Cukras

    Full Text Available Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP is a common form of retinal degeneration characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE atrophy causing loss of visual field and acuities. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous splice site variant (c.111+1G>A in the gene encoding retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4. This change segregated with early onset, progressive, and severe autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in an eight member consanguineous pedigree of European ancestry. Additionally, one patient exhibited developmental abnormalities including patent ductus arteriosus and chorioretinal and iris colobomas. The second patient developed acne from young age and extending into the 5(th decade. Both patients had undetectable levels of RBP4 in the serum suggesting that this mutation led to either mRNA or protein instability resulting in a null phenotype. In addition, the patients exhibited severe vitamin A deficiency, and diminished serum retinol levels. Circulating transthyretin levels were normal. This study identifies the RBP4 splice site change as the cause of RP in this pedigree. The presence of developmental abnormalities and severe acne in patients with retinal degeneration may indicate the involvement of genes that regulate vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism.

  13. Exome analysis identified a novel mutation in the RBP4 gene in a consanguineous pedigree with retinal dystrophy and developmental abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Gaasterland, Terry; Lee, Pauline; Gudiseva, Harini V; Chavali, Venkata R M; Pullakhandam, Raghu; Maranhao, Bruno; Edsall, Lee; Soares, Sandra; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Sieving, Paul A; Ayyagari, Radha

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a common form of retinal degeneration characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy causing loss of visual field and acuities. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous splice site variant (c.111+1G>A) in the gene encoding retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4). This change segregated with early onset, progressive, and severe autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in an eight member consanguineous pedigree of European ancestry. Additionally, one patient exhibited developmental abnormalities including patent ductus arteriosus and chorioretinal and iris colobomas. The second patient developed acne from young age and extending into the 5(th) decade. Both patients had undetectable levels of RBP4 in the serum suggesting that this mutation led to either mRNA or protein instability resulting in a null phenotype. In addition, the patients exhibited severe vitamin A deficiency, and diminished serum retinol levels. Circulating transthyretin levels were normal. This study identifies the RBP4 splice site change as the cause of RP in this pedigree. The presence of developmental abnormalities and severe acne in patients with retinal degeneration may indicate the involvement of genes that regulate vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism.

  14. Variation in healthcare services for specialist genetic testing and implications for planning genetic services: the example of inherited retinal dystrophy in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark; Birch, Stephen; Eden, Martin; Ramsden, Simon; Farragher, Tracey; Payne, Katherine; Hall, Georgina; Black, Graeme Cm

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to identify and quantify the extent of current variation in service provision of a genetic testing service for dominant and X-linked retinal dystrophies in the English National Health Service (NHS). National audit data (all test requests and results (n = 1839) issued between 2003 and 2011) and survey of English regional genetic testing services were used. Age- and gender-adjusted standardised testing rates were calculated using indirect standardisation, and survey responses were transcribed verbatim and data collated and summarised. The cumulative incidence rate of testing in England was 4.5 per 100,000 population for males and 2.6 per 100,000 population for females. The standardised testing rate (STR) varied widely between regions of England, being particularly low in the North-east (STR 0.485), with half as many tests as expected based on the size and demographic distribution of the population and high in the South-east (STR 1.355), with 36 % more tests than expected. Substantial and significantly different rates of testing were found between regional populations. Specific policy mechanisms to promote, monitor and evaluate the regional distribution of access to genetic and genomic testing are required. However, commissioners will require information on the scope and role of genetic services and the population at risk of the conditions for which patients are tested.

  15. [Functional results of cryosurgical procedures in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment including macula region - our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapek, O; Sín, M; Jirková, B; Jarkovský, J; Rehák, J

    2013-10-01

    Aim of this study is to evaluate retrospectively functional results of cryosurgical treatment of uncomplicated, idiopathic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment including macula region in phakic patients operated on at the Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty Hospital, Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic, E.U., during the period 2002 -2013, and to evaluate the significance of the macula detachment duration for the final visual acuity. In the study group were included 56 eyes of 56 patients operated in the years 2003 - 2012 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty Hospital, Palacký University, Olomouc. All patients were phakic and in all of them, the retinal detachment including the macula region was diagnosed. The mean follow-up period of the patients was 8,75 months. The initial and final visual acuity testing were performed. Comparing the initial and final visual acuity we rated the level of the visual acuity change. The result was stated as improved, if the visual acuity improved by 1 or more lines on the ETDRS chart. The result was rated as stabilized, if the visual acuity remained the same or it changed by 1 line of the ETDRS chart only. The result was evaluated as worsened, if the visual acuity decreased by 1 or more lines of the ETDRS chart. In the followed-up group, the authors compared visual acuity levels in patients with the macula detachment duration 10 days and 11 days. For the statistical evaluation of achieved results, the Mann - Whitney U test was used. The visual acuity improved in 49 (87 %), did not changed in 5 (9 %) and worsened in 2 (4 %) patients. The patients with macula detachment duration 10 days achieved statistically significant better visual acuity than patients with macula detachment duration 11 days. Patients with macula detachment duration 10 days have better prognosis for functional result than patients with macula detachment duration 11 days.

  16. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertus, S.; Bax, N.M.; Fakin, A.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Klevering, B.J.; Moore, A.T.; Michaelides, M.; Webster, A.R.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Hoyng, C.B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options-including gene therapy-are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt

  17. Epiretinal membrane: a treatable cause of visual disability in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Child, Nicholas; Polkinghorne, Philip J; Frampton, Chris; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of ocular abnormalities have been documented to occur in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. The objectives of this study were to investigate the macular and optic nerve morphology using optical coherence tomography in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A total of 30 myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients and 28 controls were recruited for participation. All participants underwent a thorough ophthalmologic examination, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of the macula and retinal nerve fibre layer. Images were reviewed by a retinal specialist ophthalmologist, masked to the diagnosis of the participants. Average macular thickness was significantly greater in the myotonic dystrophy group compared to controls [327.3 μm vs. 308.5 μm (p Visual acuity was reduced due to the presence of epiretinal membrane in six patient eyes and none of the control eyes. The presence of an epiretinal membrane was significantly correlated with increasing age in the patient group. We report an increased prevalence of epiretinal membrane in the myotonic dystrophy type 1 group. This may be a previously under-recognised form of visual impairment in this group. Epiretinal membranes can be treated surgically. We suggest that, in addition to a comprehensive clinical examination, optical coherence tomography examination is implemented as part of an ophthalmological assessment for the myotonic dystrophy type 1 patient with reduced visual acuity.

  18. Variations in the ultrastructure of human nasal cilia including abnormalities found in retinitis pigmentosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Arden, G B

    1980-01-01

    The electron microscopic structure of cilia from the inferior turbinate of the nose was studied in 12 adults, four with chronic sinusitis, one with allergic rhinitis, two with bronchiectasis, three with deviated nasal septum, and two normals. The changes are compared with those found in nasal cilia in 14 patients with retinitis pigmentosa. There were compound cilia in the seven cases with chronic sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, and bronchiectasis but, apart from this, the structure of the cilia...

  19. Variations in the ultrastructure of human nasal cilia including abnormalities found in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Arden, G B

    1980-01-01

    The electron microscopic structure of cilia from the inferior turbinate of the nose was studied in 12 adults, four with chronic sinusitis, one with allergic rhinitis, two with bronchiectasis, three with deviated nasal septum, and two normals. The changes are compared with those found in nasal cilia in 14 patients with retinitis pigmentosa. There were compound cilia in the seven cases with chronic sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, and bronchiectasis but, apart from this, the structure of the cilia was similar in all 12 cases. There were variations in the microtubular pattern in about 4% of cilia, dynein arms were not seen in 4%, and in the rest an average of 5-6 dynein arms were seen in each cilium. The orientation of the cilia was 0 to 90 degrees. In the retinitis pigmentosa patients there was a highly significant increase in cilial abnormalities. The establishment on a quantitative basis of the variations in normal structure of nasal cilila facilitated the recognition of an association between cilial abnormalities and retinitis pigmentosa and should help in the identification of associations that may exist between cilial abnormalities and other diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:7400333

  20. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... degenerate. Forms of RP and related diseases include Usher syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome, among ...

  1. Prenatal growth restriction, retinal dystrophy, diabetes insipidus and white matter disease: expanding the spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Dupuis, Lucie; Blaser, Susan; Heon, Elise; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Marshall, Christian R.; Paton, Tara; Scherer, Stephen W.; Roelofsen, Jeroen; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Boycott, Kym; Friedman, Jan; Michaud, Jacques; Bernier, Francois; Brudno, Michael; Fernandez, Bridget; Knoppers, Bartha; Samuels, Mark; Scherer, Steve; Marcadier, Janet; Beaulieu, Chandree

    2015-01-01

    PRPS1 codes for the enzyme phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRS-1). The spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders associated with reduced activity includes Arts syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5 (CMTX5) and X-linked non-syndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN2). We describe a novel phenotype

  2. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema, and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis.

  3. What Are the Types of Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscular dystrophy? There are more than 30 forms of muscular dystrophy (MD), with information on the primary types included in the table below. 1 Duchenne (DMD) What It Is Common Symptoms How It ...

  4. Non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, S.K. (Sanne K.); R.A.C. van Huet (Ramon A. C.); C.J.F. Boon (Camiel); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); R.W.J. Collin (Rob); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hoyng (Carel); R. Roepman (Ronald); B.J. Klevering (Jeroen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractRetinitis pigmentosa (RP) encompasses a group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by the primary degeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors. RP is a leading cause of visual disability, with a worldwide prevalence of 1:4000. Although the majority of RP cases are non-syndromic,

  5. Macular pattern dystrophy and homonymous hemianopia in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel; Grana-Pérez, María Del Mar; García-Campos, Jose Manuel

    2015-03-12

    We report an unusual association of a pattern dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and homonymous hemianopia in a woman diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Further delineation of spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with cone-rod dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, Sérgio B.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Hall, Christine; Hall, Bryan D.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2008-01-01

    There are several entities that combine a skeletal dysplasia with a retinal dystrophy. Recently, another possibly autosomal recessive entity was added to this group characterized by a specific spondylometaphyseal dysplasia and a cone-rod dystrophy, without other significant impairments. The entity

  7. Results at 2 Years after Gene Therapy for RPE65-Deficient Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Severe Early-Childhood-Onset Retinal Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weleber, Richard G; Pennesi, Mark E; Wilson, David J; Kaushal, Shalesh; Erker, Laura R; Jensen, Lauren; McBride, Maureen T; Flotte, Terence R; Humphries, Margaret; Calcedo, Roberto; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Stout, J Timothy

    2016-07-01

    To provide an initial assessment of the safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing RPE65 (rAAV2-CB-hRPE65) in adults and children with retinal degeneration caused by RPE65 mutations. Nonrandomized, multicenter clinical trial. Eight adults and 4 children, 6 to 39 years of age, with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) or severe early-childhood-onset retinal degeneration (SECORD). Patients received a subretinal injection of rAAV2-CB-hRPE65 in the poorer-seeing eye, at either of 2 dose levels, and were followed up for 2 years after treatment. The primary safety measures were ocular and nonocular adverse events. Exploratory efficacy measures included changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), static perimetry central 30° visual field hill of vision (V30) and total visual field hill of vision (VTOT), kinetic perimetry visual field area, and responses to a quality-of-life questionnaire. All patients tolerated subretinal injections and there were no treatment-related serious adverse events. Common adverse events were those associated with the surgical procedure and included subconjunctival hemorrhage in 8 patients and ocular hyperemia in 5 patients. In the treated eye, BCVA increased in 5 patients, V30 increased in 6 patients, VTOT increased in 5 patients, and kinetic visual field area improved in 3 patients. One subject showed a decrease in BCVA and 2 patients showed a decrease in kinetic visual field area. Treatment with rAAV2-CB-hRPE65 was not associated with serious adverse events, and improvement in 1 or more measures of visual function was observed in 9 of 12 patients. The greatest improvements in visual acuity were observed in younger patients with better baseline visual acuity. Evaluation of more patients and a longer duration of follow-up will be needed to determine the rate of uncommon or rare side effects or safety concerns. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  9. Cone rod dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Christian P

    2007-01-01

    Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs) (prevalence 1/40,000) are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP), also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs) resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7). Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far). The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs), CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs), and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs). It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is always advised. Currently

  10. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  11. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surveillance Tracking and Research Network , known as MD STAR net . Learn more about CDC’s other muscular dystrophy ... for Disease Control and Prevention Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  12. Muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are no known cures for the various muscular dystrophies. The goal of treatment is to control symptoms. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength and function. Leg braces and a wheelchair ...

  13. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lambertus, Stanley; Bax, Nathalie M.; Fakin, Ana; Groenewoud, Joannes M. M.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Moore, Anthony T.; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R.; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Hoyng, Carel B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options-including gene therapy-are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date) and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including vari...

  14. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lambertus, S.; Bax, N. M.; Fakin, A.; Groenewoud, J. M. M.; Klevering, B. J.; Moore, A. T.; Michaelides, M.; Webster, A. R.; van der Wilt, G. J.; Hoyng, C. B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options—including gene therapy—are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date) and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including ...

  15. Retinal Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ophthalmologists and rheumatologists frequently miscommunicate in consulting on patients with retinal vasculitis. This report seeks to establish a common understanding of the term, retinal vasculitis, and to review recent papers on this diagnosis. Recent findings 1) The genetic basis of some rare forms of retinal vascular disease have recently been described. Identified genes include CAPN5, TREX1, and TNFAIP3; 2) Behçet’s disease is a systemic illness that is very commonly associated with occlusive retinal vasculitis; 3) retinal imaging including fluorescein angiography and other newer imaging modalities has proven crucial to the identification and characterization of retinal vasculitis and its complications; 4) although monoclonal antibodies to IL-17A or IL-1 beta failed in trials for Behçet’s disease, antibodies to TNF alpha, either infliximab or adalimumab, have demonstrated consistent benefit in managing this disease. Interferon treatment and B cell depletion therapy via rituximab may be beneficial in certain types of retinal vasculitis. Summary Retinal vasculitis is an important entity for rheumatologists to understand. Retinal vasculitis associated with Behçet’s disease responds to monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TNF, but the many other forms of non-infectious retinal vasculitis may require alternate therapeutic management. PMID:26945335

  16. High-resolution optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence, and infrared reflectance imaging in Sjögren reticular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauwvlieghe, Pieter-Paul; Torre, Kara Della; Coppieters, Frauke; Van Hoey, Anneleen; De Baere, Elfride; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Leroy, Bart P; Brodie, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    To describe the phenotype of three cases of Sjögren reticular dystrophy in detail, including high-resolution optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence imaging, and near-infrared reflectance imaging. Two unrelated teenagers were independently referred for ophthalmologic evaluation. Both underwent a full ophthalmologic workup, including electrophysiologic and extensive imaging with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence imaging, and near-infrared reflectance imaging. In addition, mutation screening of ABCA4, PRPH2, and the mitochondrial tRNA gene was performed in Patient 1. Subsequently, the teenage sister of Patient 2 was examined. Strikingly similar phenotypes were present in these three patients. Fundoscopy showed bilateral foveal pigment alterations, and a lobular network of deep retinal, pigmented deposits throughout the posterior pole, tapering toward the midperiphery, with relative sparing of the immediate perifoveal macula and peripapillary area. This network is mildly to moderately hyperautofluorescent on autofluorescence and bright on near-infrared reflectance imaging. Optical coherence tomography showed abnormalities of the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch membrane complex, photoreceptor outer segments, and photoreceptor inner/outer segment interface. The results of retinal function test were entirely normal. No molecular cause was detected in Patient 1. Imaging suggested that the lobular network of deep retinal deposits in Sjögren reticular dystrophy is the result of accumulation of both pigment and lipofuscin between photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium, as well as within the retinal pigment epithelium.

  17. Can Vitamin A be Improved to Prevent Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Stargardt Disease and Other Retinal Dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Leonide; Washington, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how an imperfect visual cycle results in the formation of vitamin A dimers, thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases, and summarize how slowing vitamin A dimerization has been a therapeutic target of interest to prevent blindness. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of vitamin A dimerization, an alternative form of vitamin A, one that forms dimers more slowly yet maneuvers effortlessly through the visual cycle, was developed. Such a vitamin A, reinforced with deuterium (C20-D3-vitamin A), can be used as a non-disruptive tool to understand the contribution of vitamin A dimers to vision loss. Eventually, C20-D3-vitamin A could become a disease-modifying therapy to slow or stop vision loss associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease and retinal diseases marked by such vitamin A dimers. Human clinical trials of C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001) are underway.

  18. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sets of muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the most severe ... can walk independently. Prednisone If a child has Duchenne muscular ... to help slow the rate of muscle deterioration. By doing so, the child may be ...

  19. Low Vision Rehabilitation of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Practice Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundquist, John

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a rod-cone dystrophy, commonly genetic in nature. Approximately 60-80% of those with retinitis pigmentosa inherit it by an autosomal recessive transmission (Brilliant, 1999). There have been some reported cases with no known family history. The symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa are decreased acuity, photophobia, night…

  20. Retinal detachment and retinal holes in retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaky, K; Olk, R J; Mahl, C F; Bloom, S M

    1991-01-01

    Retinal detachment and retinal holes in two family members with retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento are reported. We believe these are the first such cases reported in the literature. We describe the presenting symptoms and management, including cryotherapy, scleral buckling procedure, and sulfur hexafluoride injection (SF6), resulting in stable visual acuity in one case and retinal reattachment and improved visual acuity in the other case.

  1. NMNAT1 variants cause cone and cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Benjamin M; Symes, Richard; Goel, Himanshu; Dinger, Marcel E; Bennetts, Bruce; Grigg, John R; Jamieson, Robyn V

    2018-03-01

    Cone and cone-rod dystrophies (CD and CRD, respectively) are degenerative retinal diseases that predominantly affect the cone photoreceptors. The underlying disease gene is not known in approximately 75% of autosomal recessive cases. Variants in NMNAT1 cause a severe, early-onset retinal dystrophy called Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). We report two patients where clinical phenotyping indicated diagnoses of CD and CRD, respectively. NMNAT1 variants were identified, with Case 1 showing an extremely rare homozygous variant c.[271G > A] p.(Glu91Lys) and Case 2 compound heterozygous variants c.[53 A > G];[769G > A] p.(Asn18Ser);(Glu257Lys). The detailed variant analysis, in combination with the observation of an associated macular atrophy phenotype, indicated that these variants were disease-causing. This report demonstrates that the variants in NMNAT1 may cause CD or CRD associated with macular atrophy. Genetic investigations of the patients with CD or CRD should include NMNAT1 in the genes examined.

  2. [Fundus autofluorescence in patients with inherited retinal diseases : Patterns of fluorescence at two different wavelengths.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, T.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) may be excited and measured at different wavelengths. In the present study we compared short wavelength and near-infrared FAF patterns of retinal dystrophies. METHODS: We analysed both eyes of 108 patients with diverse retinal dystrophies. Besides colour

  3. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments for retinitis pigmentosa, including the use of DHA, which is an omega-3 fatty acid. Other ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 630. ...

  4. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies. PMID:26197217

  5. Morphology and function of the retina in children and young adults with Stargardt dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Jarc Vidmar

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: In young patients with Stargardt dystrophy central retinal atrophy was shown by OCT and AF. The shift of fixation to the PRL was seen in all the patients. MfERG showed central cone dysfunction in all the patients.

  6. [Progress in research on pathogenic genes and gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Cao, Cong; Sun, Jiji; Gao, Tao; Liang, Xiaoyang; Nie, Zhipeng; Ji, Yanchun; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Minxin

    2017-02-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), including retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Cone-Rod degenerations, inherited macular dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common and severe types of hereditary ocular diseases. So far more than 200 pathogenic genes have been identified. With the growing knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of IRDs, a number of gene therapeutic strategies have been developed in the laboratory or even entered clinical trials. Here the progress of IRD research on the pathogenic genes and therapeutic strategies, particularly gene therapy, are reviewed.

  7. Mutations in CEP78 Cause Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Hearing Loss Associated with Primary-Cilia Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikopoulos, K.; Farinelli, P.; Giangreco, B.; Tsika, C.; Royer-Bertrand, B.; Mbefo, M.K.; Bedoni, N.; Kjellstrom, U.; El Zaoui, I.; Di Gioia, S.A.; Balzano, S.; Cisarova, K.; Messina, A.; Decembrini, S.; Plainis, S.; Blazaki, S.V.; Khan, M.I.; Micheal, S.; Boldt, K.; Ueffing, M.; Moulin, A.P.; Cremers, F.P.; Roepman, R.; Arsenijevic, Y.; Tsilimbaris, M.K.; Andreasson, S.; Rivolta, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cone-rod degeneration (CRD) belongs to the disease spectrum of retinal degenerations, a group of hereditary disorders characterized by an extreme clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It mainly differentiates from other retinal dystrophies, and in particular from the more frequent disease retinitis

  8. Mitochondrial Protection by Exogenous Otx2 in Mouse Retinal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Tai Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OTX2 (orthodenticle homeobox 2 haplodeficiency causes diverse defects in mammalian visual systems ranging from retinal dysfunction to anophthalmia. We find that the retinal dystrophy of Otx2+/GFP heterozygous knockin mice is mainly due to the loss of bipolar cells and consequent deficits in retinal activity. Among bipolar cell types, OFF-cone bipolar subsets, which lack autonomous Otx2 gene expression but receive Otx2 proteins from photoreceptors, degenerate most rapidly in Otx2+/GFP mouse retinas, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of the imported Otx2 protein. In support of this hypothesis, retinal dystrophy in Otx2+/GFP mice is prevented by intraocular injection of Otx2 protein, which localizes to the mitochondria of bipolar cells and facilitates ATP synthesis as a part of mitochondrial ATP synthase complex. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a mitochondrial function for Otx2 and suggest a potential therapeutic application of OTX2 protein delivery in human retinal dystrophy.

  9. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between...... retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic...... retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found...

  10. Distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica (DRORE associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos (SCAF. Parte II: Genética Scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy (SFWRD associated with loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS. Part II: Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Teruo Sato

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Propor complementação da atual classificação do eletrorretinograma (ERG com a inclusão deste novo tipo de onda, discutir os possíveis mecanismos para a distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica (DRORE associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos (SCAF e análise do heredograma da família estudada. MÉTODO: Foram descritos na parte I deste trabalho. RESULTADOS: A análise do heredograma da família demonstrou tratar-se de herança autossômica recessiva com expressão parcial no heterozigoto; outros resultados foram descritos na parte I deste trabalho. CONCLUSÕES: Por se tratar do primeiro relato na literatura, os achados descritos sugerem fortemente que a distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos pode ser uma nova entidade nosológica. Neste trabalho propomos uma classificação inédita de todas as distrofias maculares e degenerações retinianas associadas a distúrbios capilares no grupo B das displasias ectodérmicas.PURPOSE: To propose the complementation of present classification of the electroretinogram (ERG with the inclusion of this new kind of wave, to discuss the possible mechanisms for the scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy (SFWRD associated with the loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS and to analyze the pedigree of the studied family. METHODS: Were described in part I of this study. RESULTS: The pedigree analysis of the family showed to be an autosomal recessive form of inheritance with partial expression in the heterozygote; other results were described in part I of this study. CONCLUSION: Being the first account in the literature, the described finding strongly suggests that scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy associated with the loose anagen hair syndrome can be a new nosological entity. In this study, we propose an unpublished classification of all macular dystrophies and retinal degenerations associated with hair disorders in group B

  11. Therapeutic avenues for hereditary forms of retinal blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannabiran, Chitra; Mariappan, Indumathi

    2018-03-01

    Hereditary retinal diseases, known as retinal degenerations or dystrophies, are a large group of inherited eye disorders resulting in irreversible visual loss and blindness. They develop due to mutations in one or more genes that lead to the death of the retinal photoreceptor cells. Till date, mutations in over 200 genes are known to be associated with all different forms of retinal disorders. The enormous genetic heterogeneity of this group of diseases has posedmany challenges in understanding the mechanisms of disease and in developing suitable therapies. Therapeutic avenues that are being investigated for these disorders include gene therapy to replace the defective gene, treatment with neurotrophic factors to stimulate the growth of photoreceptors, cell replacement therapy, and prosthetic devices that can capture light and transmit electrical signals through retinal neurons to the brain. Several of these are in process of human trials in patients, and have shown safety and efficacy of the treatment. A combination of approaches that involve both gene replacement and cell replacement may be required for optimum benefit.

  12. Retinitis-pigmentosa-like tapetoretinal degeneration in a rabbit breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, A; Baar, U

    1985-08-15

    By chance, we found a rabbit strain with retinal dystrophy. The eyes of these rabbits were examined by ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography, histology, and cytology--the latter after retina dissociation with papaine. The results suggest this rabbit strain to be a possible animal model for human retinitis pigmentosa.

  13. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Takkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD. METHODS: Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS: Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033 with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION: Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD.

  14. Mutations in REEP6 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arno, Gavin; Agrawal, Smriti A; Eblimit, Aiden; Bellingham, James; Xu, Mingchu; Wang, Feng; Chakarova, Christina; Parfitt, David A; Lane, Amelia; Burgoyne, Thomas; Hull, Sarah; Carss, Keren J; Fiorentino, Alessia; Hayes, Matthew J; Munro, Peter M; Nicols, Ralph; Pontikos, Nikolas; Holder, Graham E; Asomugha, Chinwe; Raymond, F Lucy; Moore, Anthony T; Plagnol, Vincent; Michaelides, Michel; Hardcastle, Alison J; Li, Yumei; Cukras, Catherine; Webster, Andrew R; Cheetham, Michael E; Chen, Rui

    2016-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most frequent form of inherited retinal dystrophy. RP is genetically heterogeneous and the genes identified to date encode proteins involved in a wide range of functional pathways, including photoreceptor development, phototransduction, the retinoid cycle, cilia, and outer segment development. Here we report the identification of biallelic mutations in Receptor Expression Enhancer Protein 6 (REEP6) in seven individuals with autosomal-recessive RP from five unrelated families. REEP6 is a member of the REEP/Yop1 family of proteins that influence the structure of the endoplasmic reticulum but is relatively unstudied. The six variants identified include three frameshift variants, two missense variants, and a genomic rearrangement that disrupts exon 1. Human 3D organoid optic cups were used to investigate REEP6 expression and confirmed the expression of a retina-specific isoform REEP6.1, which is specifically affected by one of the frameshift mutations. Expression of the two missense variants (c.383C>T [p.Pro128Leu] and c.404T>C [p.Leu135Pro]) and the REEP6.1 frameshift mutant in cultured cells suggest that these changes destabilize the protein. Furthermore, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene editing was used to produce Reep6 knock-in mice with the p.Leu135Pro RP-associated variant identified in one RP-affected individual. The homozygous knock-in mice mimic the clinical phenotypes of RP, including progressive photoreceptor degeneration and dysfunction of the rod photoreceptors. Therefore, our study implicates REEP6 in retinal homeostasis and highlights a pathway previously uncharacterized in retinal dystrophy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Early therapeutic trials for retinitis pigmentosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufier, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Non syndromic forms of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) constitute a collection of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited retinal degenerative diseases. They are characterized by a bilateral progressive visual loss susceptible to cause blindness. These diseases are transmitted through pedigrees according to all known modes of inheritance. They are bilateral and usually start during infancy. However, very early clinical presentations exist, such as those observed in children affected by Leber Congenital Amaurosis, as well as late onset autosomal dominant forms of retinitis pigmentosa. The characteristic clinical aspect of the rod-cone RP dystrophies is marked by alterations of the peripheral retina associated with a night blindness and a progressive narrowing of the visual field. The ophthalmoscopic examination of RP patients commonly reveals thin retinal arteries and scattered pigmentary accumulations. In contrast, there are cone rod retinal dystrophies whose onset is marked by a decreased visual acuity before the appearance of any visual field alteration. Some forms of RPs display an ocular fundus devoid of any pigmentary alteration. Syndromic forms of RPs are not uncommon. The association of deafness with RP is detected in nearly 30% of the patients. Other associations with RP can include mental deficiency, facial dysmorphy, microcephaly, obesity, kidney deficiency, immune deficiencies, metabolic disorders. The existence of such syndromic forms of RP localizes RPs at the crossroad of several medical specialties. A long lasting collaboration between our department of ophthalmology and the department of medical genetics of the Necker-Sick Children Hospital has allowed us to establish numerous genotype-phenotype correlations, especially in LCA and Stargardt's disease. ABCR gene mutations cause Stargardt disease. ABCR mutations may also cause some types of Ages Related Macular Degenerations (AMD). Nowadays, there is no known efficient therapy available for

  16. Granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I (GrI) and Reis-Bücklers' corneal dystrophy (R-B). One entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, H U

    1989-12-01

    This paper maintains that Reis-Bücklers' corneal dystrophy and granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I are one and the same disease. Included are some of the technically best photographs of Reis-Bücklers' dystrophy found in the literature, and these are compared with photographs from patients with granular corneal dystrophy examined by the author. It is argued that most of the histological and ultrastructural findings on Reis Bücklers' dystrophy described in the literature are either congruent with what is found in granular corneal dystrophy or unspecific.

  17. Pharmacotherapy of retinal disease with visual cycle modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rehan M; Gregori, Ninel Z; Ciulla, Thomas A; Lam, Byron L

    2018-04-01

    Pharmacotherapy with visual cycle modulators (VCMs) is under investigation for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Stargardt macular dystrophy (SMD) and nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD), all blinding diseases that lack effective treatment options. Areas covered: The authors review investigational VCMs, including oral retinoids, 9-cis-retinyl-acetate (zuretinol) and 9-cis-β-carotene, which restore 11-cis-retinal levels in RP and LCA caused by LRAT and RPE65 gene mutations, and may improve visual acuity and visual fields. Therapies for SMD aiming to decrease accumulation of toxic Vitamin A dimers and lipofuscin in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) include C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001), isotretinoin, VM200, emixustat, and A1120. Mouse models of SMD show promising data for these treatments, though proof of efficacy in humans is currently lacking. Fenretinide and emixustat are investigational VCMs for dry AMD, though neither has been shown to reduce geographic atrophy or improve vision in human trials. A1120 prevents retinol transport into the RPE and may spare the side effects typically seen in VCMs (nyctalopia and chromatopsia) per mouse studies. Expert opinion: Oral VCMs may be feasible treatment options for degenerative retinal diseases based on pre-clinical and some early clinical studies. Further trials are warranted to assess their efficacy and safety in humans.

  18. Sleep disturbances in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, Paul; Lam, Erek M.; St. Louis, Erik K.; Dominik, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are common and include sleep disordered breathing (SDB), hypersomnia, and fatigue. Little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disturbance in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2). We hypothesized that DM2 patients may frequently harbor sleep disorders. We reviewed medical records of all genetically confirmed cases of DM2 seen at our sleep center between 1997 and 2010 for demographic, laboratory, overnight oximetry, and polysomnography (PSG) ...

  19. Radiographic features of Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumitt, Jason W; Essman, Stephanie C; Kornegay, Joe N; Graham, John P; Weber, William J; Berry, Clifford R

    2006-01-01

    Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy is an inherited, degenerative myopathy due to the absence of dystrophin and is used as a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy of young boys. This report describes the radiographic abnormalities of Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy in 26 dogs. The thoracic abnormalities included diaphragmatic asymmetry (18/26), diaphragmatic undulation (18/26), and gastro-esophageal hiatal hernia (6/26). Pelvic abnormalities included narrowing of the body of the ilia (14/19), ventral deviation and curvature of the tuber ischii (14/19), elongation of the obturator foramen with a decrease in opacity of the surrounding bone (12/19), and lateral flaring of the wings of the ilia (12/19). Abdominal abnormalities consisted of hepatomegaly (14/22) and poor serosal detail (12/22). The unique thoracic abnormalities were a consistent finding in affected Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. The diagnosis of muscular dystrophy should be included in the differential list if the combination of diaphragm undulation and asymmetry, and gastro-esophageal hiatal hernia are identified. These diaphragmatic abnormalities are related to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the diaphragm. Additionally, the skeletal changes of pelvic tilt, elongation of the pelvis, widening of the obturator foramina and thinning of the ischiatic tables appear to be specific to Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy in dogs. These pelvic abnormalities are most likely secondary to bone remodeling associated with the progressive skeletal myopathy and subsequent contracture/fibrosis.

  20. Sector retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Woerkom, Craig; Ferrucci, Steven

    2005-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common hereditary retinal dystrophies and causes of visual impairment affecting all age groups. The reported incidence varies, but is considered to be between 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 7,000. Sector retinitis pigmentosa is an atypical form of RP that is characterized by regionalized areas of bone spicule pigmentation, usually in the inferior quadrants of the retina. A 57-year-old Hispanic man with a history of previously diagnosed retinitis pigmentosa came to the clinic with a longstanding symptom of decreased vision at night. Bone spicule pigmentation was found in the nasal and inferior quadrants in each eye. He demonstrated superior and temporal visual-field loss corresponding to the areas of the affected retina. Clinical measurements of visual-field loss, best-corrected visual acuity, and ophthalmoscopic appearance have remained stable during the five years the patient has been followed. Sector retinitis pigmentosa is an atypical form of RP that is characterized by bilateral pigmentary retinopathy, usually isolated to the inferior quadrants. The remainder of the retina appears clinically normal, although studies have found functional abnormalities in these areas as well. Sector RP is generally considered a stationary to slowly progressive disease, with subnormal electro-retinogram findings and visual-field defects corresponding to the involved retinal sectors. Management of RP is very difficult because there are no proven methods of treatment. Studies have shown 15,000 IU of vitamin A palmitate per day may slow the progression, though this result is controversial. Low vision rehabilitation, long wavelength pass filters, and pedigree counseling remain the mainstay of management.

  1. Pattern Dystrophy of the Macula in a Case of Steinert Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Esteves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myotonic dystrophies are typically associated with ocular complications like ptosis, weakness of the ocular muscle and cataracts, but also with less recognized retinal changes. Case Report: A 41-year-old female with type 1 myotonic dystrophy complained of progressive vision loss. Slit lamp examination revealed the presence of typical bilateral polychromatic cataract with posterior subcapsular component. Dilated fundus examination was remarkable for bilateral macular depigmented changes. Multimodal imaging analysis of the macula suggested the presence of a butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy. Discussion: In cases of myotonic dystrophies it is of great relevance to analyze the presence of retinal changes that might limit the visual improvement following cataract extraction.

  2. Focal retinal phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Quan V; Freund, K Bailey; Klancnik, James M; Sorenson, John A; Cunningham, Emmett T; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    To report three cases of solitary, focal retinal phlebitis. An observational case series. Three eyes in three patients were noted to have unilateral decreased vision, macular edema, and a focal retinal phlebitis, which was not at an arteriovenous crossing. All three patients developed a branch retinal vein occlusion at the site of inflammation. These patients had no other evidence of intraocular inflammation, including vitritis, retinitis, retinal vasculitis, or choroiditis, nor was there any systemic disorder associated with inflammation, infection, or coagulation identified. Focal retinal phlebitis appears to be an uncommon and unique entity that produces macular edema and ultimately branch retinal vein occlusion. In our patients, the focal phlebitis and venous occlusion did not occur at an arteriovenous crossing, which is the typical site for branch retinal venous occlusive disease. This suggests that our cases represent a distinct clinical entity, which starts with a focal abnormality in the wall of a retinal venule, resulting in surrounding exudation and, ultimately, ends with branch retinal vein occlusion.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with mental retardation Muscular dystrophy, congenital, Fukuyama type Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with central nervous system involvement Polymicrogyria with muscular dystrophy Related Information How ...

  4. Good Epidemiologic Practice in Retinitis Pigmentosa: From Phenotyping to Biobanking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizzolini, Marzio; Galan, Alessandro; Milan, Elisabeth; Sebastiani, Adolfo; Costagliola, Ciro; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), include a group of relatively rare hereditary diseases caused by mutations in genes that code for proteins involved in the maintenance and function of the photoreceptor cells (cones and rods). The different forms of RP consist of progressive neurodegenerative disorders which are generally related to various and severe limitations of visual performances. In the course of typical RP (rod-cone dystrophy), the affected individuals first experience night-blindness and/or visual field constriction (secondary to rod dysfunctions), followed by variable alterations of the central vision (due to cone damages). On the other hand, during the atypical form of RP (cone-rod dystrophy), the cone’s functionalities are prevalently disrupted in comparison with the rod’s ones. The basic diagnosis of RP relies upon the documentation of unremitting loss in photoreceptor activity by electroretinogram and/or visual field testing. The prevalence of all RP typologies is variably reported in about one case for each 3000-5000 individuals, with a total of about two millions of affected persons worldwide. The inherited retinal dystrophies are sometimes the epiphenomenon of a complex framework (syndromic RP), but more often they represent an isolated disorder (about 85-90 % of cases). Although 200 causative RP mutations have been hitherto detected in more than 100 different genes, the molecular defect is identifiable in just about the 50% of the analyzed patients with RP. Not only the RP genotypes are very heterogeneous, but also the patients with the same mutation can be affected by different phenotypic manifestations. RP can be inherited as autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked trait, and many sporadic forms are diagnosed in patients with no affected relatives. Dissecting the clinico-genetic complexity of RP has become an attainable objective by means of large-scale research projects, in which the collaboration

  5. Retinal Detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Riaz, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 58-year-old female presented to the emergency department reporting six days of progressive, atraumatic left eye vision loss. Her symptoms started with the appearance of dark spots and “spider webs,” and then progressed to darkening of vision in her left eye. She reports mild pain since yesterday. Her review of symptoms was otherwise negative. Ocular physical examination revealed normal external appearance, intact extraocular movements, and visual acuities of 20/25 OD and light/dark sensitivity OS. Fluorescein uptake was negative and slit lamp exam was unremarkable. Significant findings: Bedside ocular ultrasound revealed a serpentine, hyperechoic membrane that appeared tethered to the optic disc posteriorly with hyperechoic material underneath. These findings are consistent with retinal detachment (RD and associated retinal hemorrhage. Discussion: The retina is a layer of organized neurons that line the posterior portion of the posterior chamber of the eye. RD occurs when this layer separates from the underlying epithelium, resulting in ischemia and progressive photoreceptor degeneration, with potentially rapid and permanent vision loss if left untreated.1 Risk factors include advanced age, male sex (60%, race (Asians and Jews, and myopia and lattice degeneration.2 Bedside ultrasound (US performed by emergency physicians provides a valuable tool that has been used by ophthalmologists for decades to evaluate intraocular disease.1,3 Findings on bedside ultrasound consistent with RD include a hyperechoic membrane floating in the posterior chamber. RD usuallyremain tethered to the optic disc posteriorly and do not cross midline, a feature distinguishing them from posterior vitreous detachments. Associated retinal hemorrhage, seen as hyperechoic material under the retinal flap, can often be seen.1,2 US can also distinguish between “mac-on” and “mac-off” detachments. If the retina is still attached to the

  6. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  7. Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  8. Optical coherence tomography of the photoreceptor layer in the healthy eye and in eyes with hereditary macular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stur, M.; Hermann, B.; Drexler, W.; Unterhuber, A.; Sattmann, H.; Ergun, E.; Wirtitsch, M.

    2007-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography is primarily used for the evaluation of pronounced alterations of the retinal architecture, such as in macular holes, epiretinal gliosis, intra- and subretinal fluid accumulation as well as retinal atrophy. Ultrahigh resolution OCT devices also allow the assessment of discrete alterations of the photoreceptor layer and the retinal pigment epithelium. On the basis of cases from two different macular dystrophies, the importance of the evaluation of the photoreceptor layer and its correlation with visual acuity is demonstrated.(author) [de

  9. Muscular Dystrophy (MD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients may need assisted ventilation to treat respiratory muscle weakness and a pacemaker for cardiac abnormalities. View Full Treatment Information Definition The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of more than 30 ...

  10. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There is no known cure for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Treatments are given to control symptoms and improve quality of life. Activity is encouraged. Inactivity such as bedrest can make the muscle disease worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle ...

  11. Lattice degeneration of the retina and retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semes, L P

    1992-01-01

    Lattice retinal degeneration is considered the most significant peripheral retinal disorder potentially predisposing to retinal breaks and retinal detachment. Lattice degeneration affects the vitreous and inner retinal layers with secondary changes as deep as the retinal pigment epithelium and perhaps the choriocapillaris. Variations in clinical appearance are the rule; geographically, lattice lesions favor the vertical meridians between the equator and the ora serrata. Lattice degeneration begins early in life and has been reported in sequential generations of the same family. Along with its customary bilateral occurrence, lattice shares other characteristics of a dystrophy. The association between the vitreous and retina in lattice lesions may be responsible for the majority of lattice-induced retinal detachments. The tumultuous event of posterior vitreous separation in the presence of abnormally strong vitreoretinal adherence is the trigger for a retinal tear that, in turn, may lead to retinal detachment. Although retinal holes in young patients with lattice degeneration may play a role in the evolution of retinal detachment, the clinical course of lattice degeneration seems to be one of dormancy rather than of progressive change. This discussion outlines the pathophysiology of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship of pathophysiology to clinical presentation. The epidemiology of lattice degeneration is summarized, as are the possible precursors to retinal detachment. A clinical characterization of the natural history of lattice degeneration is offered, and interventions for complications are described. To conclude, management strategies from a primary-care standpoint are reviewed.

  12. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  13. Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  14. Rhabdomyolysis featuring muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoria, Rajat; Milone, Margherita

    2016-02-15

    Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life threatening condition of various etiology. The association between rhabdomyolysis and muscular dystrophies is under-recognized in clinical practice. To identify muscular dystrophies presenting with rhabdomyolysis at onset or as predominant feature. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of patients with a genetically confirmed muscular dystrophy in whom rhabdomyolysis was the presenting or main clinical manifestation. Thirteen unrelated patients (males=6; females=7) were identified. Median age at time of rhabdomyolysis was 18 years (range, 2-47) and median duration between the first episode of rhabdomyolysis and molecular diagnosis was 2 years. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) muscular dystrophy (n=6) was the most common diagnosis, followed by anoctaminopathy-5 (n=3), calpainopathy-3 (n=2) and dystrophinopathy (n=2). Four patients experienced recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Eight patients were asymptomatic and 3 reported myalgia and exercise intolerance prior to the rhabdomyolysis. Exercise (n=6) and fever (n=4) were common triggers; rhabdomyolysis was unprovoked in 3 patients. Twelve patients required hospitalization. Baseline CK levels were elevated in all patients (median 1200 IU/L; range, 600-3600). Muscular dystrophies can present with rhabdomyolysis; FKRP mutations are particularly frequent in causing such complication. A persistently elevated CK level in patients with rhabdomyolysis warrants consideration for underlying muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein. Often these boys are classified as having Becker muscular dystrophy. Genetic testing (looking at the body's genetic instructions) ... National Library of Medicine Web site Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy [ghr.nlm.nih.gov] From Genetics Home Reference ...

  16. Genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Rylie M; Alexander, Matthew S

    2018-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is defined as the progressive wasting of skeletal muscles that is caused by inherited or spontaneous genetic mutations. Next-generation sequencing has greatly improved the accuracy and speed of diagnosis for different types of muscular dystrophy. Advancements in depth of coverage, convenience, and overall reduced cost have led to the identification of genetic modifiers that are responsible for phenotypic variability in affected patients. These genetic modifiers have been postulated to explain key differences in disease phenotypes, including age of loss of ambulation, steroid responsiveness, and the presence or absence of cardiac defects in patients with the same form of muscular dystrophy. This review highlights recent findings on genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies based on animal and clinical studies. These genetic modifiers hold great promise to be developed into novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Muscle Nerve 57: 6-15, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [12-year observation of atypical retinitis pigmentosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszczyńska-Kowalska, A; Dróbecka-Brydakowa, E

    1990-07-01

    Analysis of the clinical course of retinal degeneration in 40 patients in whom one suspected a retinal dystrophy "sine pigmento", a sector or unilateral dystrophy or a mixed conerod form. Eventually the diagnosis was possible only after performing a complex of investigations: the visual acuity, visual field, adaptation, the ERG and in some cases also the fluorescein angiography. No exact correlation between the results of a particular test could be established but the degree of abnormality of some of them was decisive for the moment of the first reference of the patient for examination by an ophthalmic specialist. In the course of observation the progress of the condition was evident but the dynamics of it was not the same and it was dependent on many factors.

  18. Median nail dystrophy involving the thumb nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahulkrishna Kota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy.

  19. Clinical Characteristics and Current Therapies for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307–316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod–cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone–rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  20. Occult Macular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Sayman Muslubaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occult macular dystrophy is an inherited macular dystrophy characterized by a progressive decline of bilateral visual acuity with normal fundus appearance, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram. This case report presents a 20-year-old female patient with bilateral progressive decline of visual acuity for six years. Her visual acuity was 3-4/10 in both eyes. Anterior segment and fundus examination, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram were normal. She could read all Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates. Fundus autofluorescence imaging was normal. There was a mild central hyporeflectance on fundus infrared reflectance imaging in both eyes. Reduced foveal thickness and alterations of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction were observed by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. Central scotoma was also found by microperimetry and reduced central response was revealed by multifocal electroretinogram in both eyes. These findings are consistent with the clinical characteristics of occult macular dystrophy

  1. Phenotypic variability in Meesmann's dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Niels; Hjortdal, Jesper; Nielsen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    symptoms often include blurred vision and ocular irritation. Typical cases may be entirely free of complaints. Intermittent pain episodes, such as occur in recurrent erosion syndrome, are not the rule. Genetic sequencing indicated a familial relationship with the originally described Meesmann family......'s dystrophy occurs worldwide. The largest family described is the original German one, now supplemented with a Danish branch. Despite the presence of an identical genetic defect, the clinical phenotype varies. This suggests that non-KRT12-related mechanisms are responsible for the variation....

  2. Retinal vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Herbort, Carl P; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2005-12-01

    Retinal vasculitis is a sight-threatening intraocular inflammation affecting the retinal vessels. It may occur as an isolated ocular condition, as a manifestation of infectious or neoplastic disorders, or in association with a systemic inflammatory disease. The search for an underlying etiology should be approached in a multidisciplinary fashion based on a thorough history, review of systems, physical examination, and laboratory evaluation. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious etiologies of retinal vasculitis is important because their treatment is different. This review is based on recently published articles on retinal vasculitis and deals with its clinical diagnosis, its link with systemic diseases, and its laboratory investigation.

  3. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Venkata R M; Khan, Naheed W; Cukras, Catherine A; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-05-15

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5(+/-)) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5(+/-) mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies.

  4. Nonmuscular involvement in merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Tanke, R.B.; Vingerhoets, D.M.; Zwarts, M.J.; Verrips, A.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The spectrum of nonmuscular involvement in six children with merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy is described. In all children, biochemical, neuroradiologic, cardiac, and neurophysiologic studies were performed. Cerebral structures that were myelinated at gestation, including internal

  5. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.; Theelen, T.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Keunen, J.E.E.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and to evaluate genotype-phenotype and histopathologic correlations. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients with BVMD who underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected Snellen visual

  6. CLINICAL AND MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF BEST VITELLIFORM MACULAR DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, Camiel J. F.; Theelen, Thomas; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Keunen, Jan E. E.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Hoyng, Carel B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the phenotype of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and to evaluate genotype-phenotype and histopathologic correlations. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with BVMD who underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected Snellen visual

  7. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is very similar to Duchenne, except kids with Becker MD may not have problems until much later, when they're teenagers or adults. It takes a long time for their muscles to become weak. How Does a Kid Get Muscular Dystrophy? MD is not contagious (say: con-TAY-juss), ...

  8. Macular Pigment and Lutein Supplementation in ABCA4-associated Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Swider, Malgorzata; Chico, John D.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pantelyat, Alexander Y.; Duncan, Keith G.; Gardner, Leigh M.; Emmons, Jessica M.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine macular pigment (MP) optical density (OD) in patients with ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations (ABCA4-RD) and the response of MP and vision to supplementation with lutein. METHODS Stargardt disease or cone-rod dystrophy patients with foveal fixation and with known or suspected disease-causing mutations in the ABCA4 gene were included. MPOD profiles were measured with heterochromatic flicker photometry. Serum carotenoids, visual acuity, foveal sensitivity and retinal thickness were quantified. Changes in MPOD and central vision were determined in a subset of patients receiving oral supplementation with lutein for 6 months. RESULTS MPOD in patients ranged from normal to markedly abnormal. As a group, ABCA4-RD patients had reduced foveal MPOD and there was strong correlation with retinal thickness. Average foveal tissue concentration of MP, estimated by dividing MPOD by retinal thickness, was normal in patients whereas serum concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin was significantly lower than normal. After oral lutein supplementation for 6 months, 91% of the patients showed significant increases in serum lutein and 63% of the patient eyes showed a significant augmentation in MPOD. The retinal responders tended to be female, and have lower serum lutein and zeaxanthin, lower MPOD and greater retinal thickness at baseline. Responding eyes had significantly lower baseline MP concentration compared to non-responding eyes. Central vision was unchanged after the period of supplementation. CONCLUSIONS MP is strongly affected by the stage of ABCA4 disease leading to abnormal foveal architecture. MP could be augmented by supplemental lutein in some patients. There was no change in central vision after 6 months of lutein supplementation. Long-term influences on the natural history of this supplement on macular degenerations require further study. PMID:17325179

  9. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Applications in Retinal Degenerative Diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Yiming; Enzmann Volker; Ildstad Suzanne T

    2011-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases that target photoreceptors or the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration (RD) is found in many different forms of retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma. Effective treatment for retinal degeneration has been widely investigated. Gene-replacement therapy has been shown to improve visual function in inheri...

  10. Ultrastructural and ERG findings in progressive rod-cone dystrophy in a litter of Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitta, C; Kommonen, B; Ulshafer, R; Karhunen, U

    1991-02-01

    Early ultrastructural findings of a progressive photoreceptor dystrophy and corresponding ERG findings are reported in 3 Labrador Retrievers from a litter of 7 pups bred from 2 dogs clinically and electroretinographically affected with generalized progressive retinal dystrophy. The pups were euthanized at 5, 11 and 15 months post partum. The most prominent ultrastructural finding was photoreceptor dystrophy. At 5 months the outer nuclear layer (ONL) consisted of 8-10 layers and seemed reduced in thickness, pyknotic nuclei were seen in this layer. The receptor outer segments (OS) were short and swollen. Some disorientation of OS discs occurred. In the 11-months specimen 7-8 ONL layers were identified. Overall thinning of the neuro-retina had occurred and fewer receptors compared to the 5-months specimen were present. By 15 months the ONL was further reduced to about 4 layers. Enlarged internuclear spaces were present in the ONL as well as around inner segments (IS). Phagocytic cells were frequent among remains of OS. The pigment epithelium appeared normal. The dark adapted ERG b-wave amplitudes and photopic 30 Hz flicker responses were low in comparison to controls of the same breed, and decreased with age. The condition represents a progressive rod-cone dystrophy which shares similarities with primary receptor dystrophy in man such as retinitis pigmentosa.

  11. Ocular hemodynamics in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Zavgorodnya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In case of retinal detachment atrophic processes lead to irreversible loss of functions within 4–6 days, it happens on underlying low ocular blood flow. In order to evaluate the degree of violation of regional hemodynamics in patients with retinal detachment two groups of patients were examined: the main group (52 patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and the control group (24 myopic patients with lattice form of peripheral chorioretinal dystrophy. Methods and results. Doppler and reography results had been compared, significant decrease of blood flow in patients with retinal detachment was found. No differences between affected and fellow eye in these patients, close negative correlation between the level of ocular blood flow and the degree of myopia in the control group. Conclusion. This demonstrates the feasibility of actions to improve regional blood flow in patients operated on for retinal detachment.

  12. Pulmonary Endpoints in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A Workshop Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finder, Jonathan; Mayer, Oscar Henry; Sheehan, Daniel; Sawnani, Hemant; Abresch, R Ted; Benditt, Joshua; Birnkrant, David J; Duong, Tina; Henricson, Erik; Kinnett, Kathi; McDonald, Craig M; Connolly, Anne M

    2017-08-15

    Development of novel therapeutics for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has led to clinical trials that include pulmonary endpoints that allow assessment of respiratory muscle status, especially in nonambulatory subjects. Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) convened a workshop in Bethesda, Maryland, on April 14 and 15, 2016, to summarize published respiratory data in DMD and give guidance to clinical researchers assessing the effect of interventions on pulmonary outcomes in DMD.

  13. Chaetomium retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Wedin, Keith; Al Haddab, Saad

    2010-01-01

    To report a case of Chaetomium atrobrunneum retinitis in a patient with Hodgkin lymphoma. We studied the ocular manifestations of an 11-year-old boy with retinitis. Biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, and fundus photography were done. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed. A vitreous biopsy was subjected to viral, bacterial, and fungal cultures. Vitreous culture grew C. atrobrunneum. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple cerebral lesions consistent with an infectious process. The patient was given intravenous voriconazole and showed improvement of the ocular and central nervous system lesions. We report a case of central nervous system and ocular lesions by C. atrobrunneum. The retinitis was initially misdiagnosed as cytomegaloviral retinitis. Vitreous biopsy helped in the early diagnosis and prompt treatment of a life- and vision-threatening infection.

  14. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have weakened immune systems as a result of: HIV/AIDS Bone marrow transplant Chemotherapy Drugs that suppress the immune system Organ transplant Symptoms Some people with CMV retinitis have no symptoms. ...

  15. Retinal Detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your brain. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving, and seeing fine detail. A retinal detachment lifts or pulls the retina from its normal position. It can occur at ...

  16. Prevalence of muscular dystrophy in patients with muscular disorders in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Hajinaghi Tehrani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy is a group of diseases that is characterized by progressive muscle wasting and the weakness of variable distribution and severity. On the basis of the distribution of predominant muscle weakness, there are many different kinds of muscular dystrophy. Some dystrophies are especially frequent in certain populations. There are no studies on the prevalence of muscular dystrophy in Iran. This study was aimed to survey the prevalence of muscular dystrophy among Iranian patients with muscular disorders. This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on 1000 patients with musculoskeletal disorders who visited the dystrophy association of Bou-Ali Hospital (Tehran from June 2014 to June 2016. Patients’ data were extracted using a checklist that included age, gender, age of onset, family history, findings from clinical diagnostic tests and types of muscular dystrophy. The clinical findings were the results of genetic tests; EMG-NCV; para-clinical findings, including LDH and CPK; and pathological findings. All data were analyzed by SPSS V.22 (IBM Inc., NY with Chi Square and One way ANOVA tests. All analyses were performed with P = 0.05 considered as the threshold of statistical significant. Out of the 337 patients studied, 262 (77.7% were male and 75 (22.3% were female. Subjects had a mean (± SD age of 26.08 (± 11.86 years with an age range of 3 to 59 years. The most common types of muscular dystrophy were found to be Duchenne dystrophy (131 cases, 38.9%, limb-girdle dystrophy (91 cases, 27%, Becker dystrophy (58 cases, 17.2%, FSHD dystrophy (31 cases, 9.2%, and SMA (26 cases, 7.7%, respectively. The results showed that a statistically significant relationship between dystrophy types and gender, age, family history, age of diagnosis, CPK and LDH levels (P < 0.001. There were no statistical relationship between dystrophy types and pathological findings (P = 0.57, EMG-NCV test results (P = 0.062, and genetic findings (P = 0

  17. Orocaecal transit time in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korman, S H; Bar-Oz, B; Granot, E; Meyer, S

    1991-01-01

    Smooth muscle degeneration may occur in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We measured fasting orocaecal transit time in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscular dystrophies and in healthy controls. No significant differences were found. In contrast to reports of gastric hypomotility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found no evidence of impaired small intestinal motility.

  18. Evolution of Cellular Inclusions in Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusato, Emiko; Cameron, J Douglas; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2010-03-09

    Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD) consists of small, yellow-white, glistening intraretinal crystals in the posterior pole, tapetoretinal degeneration with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and "sclerosis" of the choroid; in addition, sparking yellow crystals in the superficial marginal cornea are also found in many patients. BCD is inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait (4q35-tel) and usually has its onset in the third decade of life. This review focuses on the ultrastructure of cellular crystals and lipid inclusions of BCD.

  19. Retinal detachment in black South Africans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    low incidence of retinal detachment in black patients is not known. ... a retinal break. Predisposing factors include peripheral retinal degenerations, myopia, aphakia and trauma. Delay in presentation increases the difficulty in achieving adequate surgical ... On examination, note was taken of the visual acuity in both eyes, the ...

  20. A peculiar autosomal dominant macular dystrophy caused by an asparagine deletion at codon 169 in the peripherin/RDS gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; van den Helm, Bellinda; Deutman, August F.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and genetic findings in a family with a peculiar autosomal dominant macular dystrophy with peripheral deposits. Methods: All family members underwent an ophthalmic examination, and their genomic DNA was screened for mutations in the human retinal degeneration slow

  1. Large deletions of the KCNV2 gene are common in patients with cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissinger, Bernd; Schaich, Simone; Baumann, Britta

    2011-01-01

    KCNV2 gene and one also includes the adjacent VLDLR gene. Furthermore, we investigated N-terminal amino acid substitution mutations for its effect on interaction with Kv2.1 using yeast two-hybrid technology. We found that these mutations dramatically reduce or abolish this interaction suggesting a lack......Cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response (CDSRR) is considered to be a very rare autosomal recessive retinal disorder. CDSRR is associated with mutations in KCNV2, a gene that encodes a modulatory subunit (Kv8.2) of a voltage-gated potassium channel. In this study, we found that KCNV2 mutations...... are present in a substantial fraction (2.2-4.3%) of a sample of 367 independent patients with a variety of initial clinical diagnoses of cone malfunction, indicating that CDSRR is underdiagnosed and more common than previously thought. In total, we identified 20 different KCNV2 mutations; 15 of them are novel...

  2. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Arcinue

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls.Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness.Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior, the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308-6,872 cones/mm2. A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea. We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls.Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis.

  3. Elucidating the phenomenon of HESC-derived RPE: anatomy of cell genesis, expansion and retinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugler, Anthony; Carr, Amanda-Jayne; Lawrence, Jean; Chen, Li Li; Burrell, Kelly; Wright, Andrew; Lundh, Peter; Semo, Ma'ayan; Ahmado, Ahmad; Gias, Carlos; da Cruz, Lyndon; Moore, Harry; Andrews, Peter; Walsh, James; Coffey, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Healthy Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) cells are required for proper visual function and the phenomenon of RPE derivation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) holds great potential for the treatment of retinal diseases. However, little is known about formation, expansion and expression profile of RPE-like cells derived from HESC (HESC-RPE). By studying the genesis of pigmented foci we identified OTX1/2-positive cell types as potential HESC-RPE precursors. When pigmented foci were excised from culture, HESC-RPE expanded to form extensive monolayers, with pigmented cells at the leading edge assuming a precursor role: de-pigmenting, proliferating, expressing keratin 8 and subsequently re-differentiating. As they expanded and differentiated in vitro, HESC-RPE expressed markers of both developing and mature RPE cells which included OTX1/2, Pax6, PMEL17 and at low levels, RPE65. In vitro, without signals from a developing retinal environment, HESC-RPE could produce regular, polarised monolayers with developmentally important apical and basal features. Following transplantation of HESC-RPE into the degenerating retinal environment of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rats, the cells survived in the subretinal space, where they maintained low levels of RPE65 expression and remained out of the cell cycle. The HESC-RPE cells responded to the in vivo environment by downregulating Pax6, while maintaining expression of other markers. The presence of rhodopsin-positive material within grafted HESC-RPE indicates that in the future, homogenous transplants of this cell type may be capable of supporting visual function following retinal dystrophy.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... dystrophy occur almost exclusively in males. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies have similar signs and symptoms and are caused ...

  5. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:22275207

  6. Case of early pelviolumeral progressive muscular dystrophy associated with marked heart affection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gor'kova, N.B.; Starykh, L.M.; Karpova, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A case of early pelviolumeral progressive muscular dystrophy detected in childhood and associated with marked heart affection is described. Patient underwent multimodality examination, including ECG, ultrasonography, roentgenography. It is shown that patients with progressive muscular dystrophy should receive medical supervision and treatment of both neuropathologist and therapist

  7. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  8. Management of myocardial damage in muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a fatal complication in many muscular dystrophy cases and has become the most common cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) since 2001. HF deaths in DMD occur in young patients and increase, along with respiratory failure, in older patients. Managing HF, therefore, is the most important component of DMD treatment. Management of HF is necessary in DMD patients of all ages because myocardial damage progresses regardless of age and disability. Electrocardiography, echocardiography, myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and natriuretic peptides are used for the diagnosis of myocardial damage and chronic HF. Tissue Doppler echocardiography is in particularly useful for early detection of minute myocardial damage and dysfunction in DMD. The first-line drugs for chronic HF are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the prognosis of DMD patients has been improved using these drugs and beta-blockers. Diuretics are added in the presence of pulmonary congestion. Digoxin is most effective at a blood level of 0.5-0.8 ng/mL because of its pharmacokinetics in DMD. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases of intractable HF. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (biventricular pacing), a treatment with an artificial pacemaker, is indicated for cases that meet specific criteria, including HF with ventricular dyssynchrony. Applications of partial left ventriculectomy (Batista procedure) and left ventricular assist devices in muscular dystrophy are likely in the near future. (author)

  9. Muscular Dystrophy: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of muscular dystrophy appeared in 1830, when Sir Charles Bell wrote an essay about an illness that ... linked disorder to their sons but their daughters will be carriers of that disorder. Carrier females occasionally ...

  10. Computerized tomography in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellerich, I.; Mueller, D.; Koch, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Besides clinical symptoms, progress and electromyography computerized tomography improves the diagnostics of myotonic dystrophy. Even small changes in muscular structure are detectable and especially the musculus soleus exhibits early and pronounced alterations. By means of density distribution pattern an improved characterization of the disease is possible. Additional information is obtained by cerebral computerized tomography. Atrophy of brain tissue is to be expected in all patients with myotonic dystrophy. (author)

  11. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    muscle dystrophy with abnormal waddling gait at 4 weeks of age. At 10 weeks of age, double mutants exhibit skeletal muscle degeneration, necrosis... dystrophy (MCMD). Homozygous dyW mice are passive, small, and emaciated, and demonstrate partial hindleg weakness and clasping. Their muscles contain...was statistically significant for both single- treatment groups. Figure 4. Effect of GW and AICAR on body mass, muscle mass, and behavioral

  12. Atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy misdiagnosed as chronic central serous chorioretinopathy: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Young

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report two cases of atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy misdiagnosed as chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Case presentation Two patients with incidentally discovered abnormalities of the retina without specific symptoms were referred to our hospital for consultation. Bilateral macula atrophic lesions were observed and optical coherence tomography revealed serous retinal detachment in the macula. Fluorescein angiography showed multiple leakages around the central hypofluorescent area and indocyanine green angiography showed partially dilated choroidal vessels. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF showed a decreasing pattern of autofluorescence in the subretinal fluid area, and increasing autofluorescence at the border of the serous retinal detachment. Both patients were diagnosed with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Photodynamic therapy and intravitreal bevacizumab injection were administered for engorged choroidal vessels during follow-up, but neither patient showed improvement in symptoms or ophthalmologic findings. Based on re-evaluation by fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and comparison of the results of FAF with the first visit, vitelliform macular dystrophy was suspected and a definite diagnosis was made by electrooculography and genetic testing. Conclusion In patients with continuous serous retinal detachment without response to photodynamic therapy or intravitreal bevacizumab injection, careful fundus exam and FAF can be used to diagnose atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy.

  13. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick; Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  14. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick [CHU de Lille, Clinique neurologique, Lille (France); Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne [CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France); Stojkovic, Tanya [G-H Pitie-Salpetriere, Institut de Myologie, Paris (France)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  15. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, K.; Nakano, I.

    1989-01-01

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.)

  16. Limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of the study was to describe the clinical spectrum of limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs), the pitfalls of the current classification system for LGMDs, and emerging therapies for these conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Close to half of all LGMD subtypes have been...... or are registered in other classification systems for muscle disease. On the contrary, diseases that fulfill classical criteria for LGMD have found no place in the LGMD classification system. These shortcomings call for revision/creation of a new classification system for LGMD. The rapidly expanding gene sequencing...... capabilities have helped to speed up new LGMD discoveries, and unveiled pheno-/genotype relations. Parallel to this progress in identifying new LGMD subtypes, emerging therapies for LGMDs are under way, but no disease-specific treatment is yet available for nonexperimental use. SUMMARY: The field of LGMD...

  17. [Evaluation of fundus autofluorescence in hereditary retinal diseases using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côco, Monique; Baba, Natalia Tamie; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2007-01-01

    To define characteristics of the fundus autofluorescence examination, verifying usefulness in the diagnosis and care of hereditary retinal diseases. 28 patients, adults, divided equally into four groups with diagnoses of Stargardt macular dystrophy, cone dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa and healthy volunteers for the establishment of the normality pattern. An average of nine images with the filter for fluorescein angiography was obtained for the formation of the image autofluorescence using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2. The images of each group of patients were analyzed to verify common characteristics. The fundus autofluorescence of healthy volunteers showed the foveal area darker than the surrounding retina. The images of Stargardt macular dystrophy, in general, presented an oval central lesion, with reduced autofluorescence. The main alterations of the autofluorescence in patients with cone dystrophy were reduced foveal autofluorescence with a parafoveal ring of increased autofluorescence. In general, the images of retinitis pigmentosa showed outlying pigments with reduced autofluorescence, and of the foveal area, in some cases disorganization or reduced autofluorescence. The study showed the existence of patterns of fundus autofluorescence in the hereditary retinal diseases that allow the diagnosis and better interpretation of the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common cause of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy , accounting for 30 to 60 percent of cases. At ... dystrophy play essential roles in the structure and function of specialized light receptor cells (photoreceptors) in the ...

  19. Respiratory function in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Horlings, G.C.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Gilhuis, H.J.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Heijdra, Y.F.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that wheelchair dependency and (kypho-)scoliosis are risk factors for developing respiratory insufficiency in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, we examined 81 patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 1 of varying degrees of severity ranging from ambulatory

  20. Prevalence of cardiomyopathy in duchenne and becker's muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, A.; Fayaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac assessment was not done routinely in Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patients in Northern region of England while evidence was gathering on progressive cardiomyopathy in these patients. We wanted to find out the prevalence, progression and clinical features of cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. Methods: It is a retrospective review of clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessments. The notes of 52 Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients were reviewed out of which 32 had DMD, 6 had Intermediate muscular dystrophy (IMD) and 14 had BMD. Prevalence of preclinical and clinically evident cardiac involvement was 88.4% in DMD and BMD patients. Sixty nine% of patients had clinically evident cardiac involvement but only four patients had cardiac symptoms in the form of palpitations, out of which two were due to respiratory dysfunction and others was due to cardiac failure. Clinical examination of the rest of all of the patients was unremarkable. Electrocardiogram was abnormal in 88.4% of patients. Conduction defects were found in 19.4% of patients. Echocardiogram was abnormal in 80.7% of patients but all were poor echo subjects including those who had normal echocardiogram. Though most patients were asymptomatic, a high percentage had evidence of preclinical and clinically evident cardiac involvement. So in all patients with Xp21 linked muscular dystrophy a routine baseline cardiac assessment should be done at the age of 10 years and reviewed after intervals of one to two years. (author)

  1. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  2. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, José Mauricio; Mendonça, Luisa; Brant, Rodrigo; Abud, Murilo; Regatieri, Caio; Diniz, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledge about stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinal degeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell has been growth in culture for a long time, and started to be explored in the treatment of blinding conditions. The Food and Drug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trials using SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, as Stargardt’s dystrophy, and patients with geographic atrophy, providing good outcomes. This study’s intent is to overview the critical regeneration of the subretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epithelium transplantation, with the goal of reestablish important pathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of the brain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotent quiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationship with a primary retinal injury, different techniques of transplantation, management of immune rejection and tumorigenicity, its potential application in improving patients’ vision, and, finally, approaching future directions and challenges for the treatment of several conditions. PMID:25621115

  3. CERKL knockdown causes retinal degeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    Full Text Available The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration.

  4. Crystalline Subtype of Pre-Descemetic Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Dolz-Marco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report corneal findings in a familial case of the crystalline subtype of pre- Descemetic corneal dystrophy. Case Report: A 19-year-old girl and her 44-year-old mother were found to have asymptomatic, bilateral, punctiform and multi-colored crystalline opacities across the whole posterior layer of the corneas. Endothelial specular microscopy revealed the presence of white round flecks located at different levels anterior to the endothelium. No systemic abnormalities or medications could be related to account for these findings. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the third familial report of this rare corneal disorder. Differential diagnosis may include Schnyder corneal dystrophy, cystinosis, Bietti΄s dystrophy and monoclonal gammopathy.

  5. Crystalline Subtype of Pre-Descemetic Corneal Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Pinazo-Durán, María Dolores; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report corneal findings in a familial case of the crystalline subtype of pre-Descemetic corneal dystrophy. Case Report A 19-year-old girl and her 44-year-old mother were found to have asymptomatic, bilateral, punctiform and multi-colored crystalline opacities across the whole posterior layer of the corneas. Endothelial specular microscopy revealed the presence of white round flecks located at different levels anterior to the endothelium. No systemic abnormalities or medications could be related to account for these findings. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the third familial report of this rare corneal disorder. Differential diagnosis may include Schnyder corneal dystrophy, cystinosis, Bietti´s dystrophy and monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:25279130

  6. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Variation of clinical expression in patients with Stargardt dystrophy and sequence variations in the ABCR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G A; Stone, E M; Grover, S; Derlacki, D J; Haines, H L; Hockey, R R

    1999-04-01

    To report the spectrum of ophthalmic findings in patients with Stargardt dystrophy or fundus flavimaculatus who have a specific sequence variation in the ABCR gene. Twenty-nine patients with Stargardt dystrophy or fundus flavimaculatus from different pedigrees were identified with possible disease-causing sequence variations in the ABCR gene from a group of 66 patients who were screened for sequence variations in this gene. Patients underwent a routine ocular examination, including slitlamp biomicroscopy and a dilated fundus examination. Fluorescein angiography was performed on 22 patients, and electroretinographic measurements were obtained on 24 of 29 patients. Kinetic visual fields were measured with a Goldmann perimeter in 26 patients. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing were used to identify variations in coding sequences of the ABCR gene. Three clinical phenotypes were observed among these 29 patients. In phenotype I, 9 of 12 patients had a sequence change in exon 42 of the ABCR gene in which the amino acid glutamic acid was substituted for glycine (Gly1961Glu). In only 4 of these 9 patients was a second possible disease-causing mutation found on the other ABCR allele. In addition to an atrophic-appearing macular lesion, phenotype I was characterized by localized perifoveal yellowish white flecks, the absence of a dark choroid, and normal electroretinographic amplitudes. Phenotype II consisted of 10 patients who showed a dark choroid and more diffuse yellowish white flecks in the fundus. None exhibited the Gly1961Glu change. Phenotype III consisted of 7 patients who showed extensive atrophic-appearing changes of the retinal pigment epithelium. Electroretinographic cone and rod amplitudes were reduced. One patient showed the Gly1961Glu change. A wide variation in clinical phenotype can occur in patients with sequence changes in the ABCR gene. In individual patients, a certain phenotype seems to be associated with the presence of

  8. Isolation of a random cosmid clone, cX5, which defines a new polymorphic locus DXS148 near the locus for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, M. H.; Bergen, A. A.; Skraastad, M. I.; Bakker, E.; Francke, U.; Wieringa, B.; Bartley, J.; van Ommen, G. J.; Pearson, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated a random cosmid cX5 (DXS148), which maps into a small Xp21 deletion associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and McLeod syndrome, cX5 maps proximally outside several other deletions associated with DMD,

  9. Advances in Retinal Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiu Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Retinal imaging has undergone a revolution in the past 50 years to allow for better understanding of the eye in health and disease. Significant improvements have occurred both in hardware such as lasers and optics in addition to software image analysis. Optical imaging modalities include optical coherence tomography (OCT, OCT angiography (OCTA, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, adaptive optics (AO, fundus autofluorescence (FAF, and molecular imaging (MI. These imaging modalities have enabled improved visualization of retinal pathophysiology and have had a substantial impact on basic and translational medical research. These improvements in technology have translated into early disease detection, more accurate diagnosis, and improved management of numerous chorioretinal diseases. This article summarizes recent advances and applications of retinal optical imaging techniques, discusses current clinical challenges, and predicts future directions in retinal optical imaging.

  10. CT findings of muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    CT scans of muscles in patients with limb girdle type (LG), myotonic type (MYD) and Duchenne type (DMD) dystrophies were obtained at five different body levels: the neck, L3 vertebral body, pelvic girdle, thigh and lower leg. CT numbers, cross sectional areas (CSA) and %CSA of muscle or fat were evaluated in each muscle. The characteristic CT patterns for each type of muscular dystrophy were obtained. Compared with DMD, the gracilis and soleus were more severely damaged in LG and the biceps femoris remained relatively preserved among the hamstrings. In addition, the multifidus of the neck and sternocleidomastoid also were more severely damaged in MYD. This study suggests that CT scan will be useful in the differential diagnosis of these types of muscular dystrophy as well as in planning appropriate rehabilitation and detecting damaged muscles. (author)

  11. Merosin/laminin-2 and muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Engvall, E

    1996-01-01

    structural organization of domains, some of which have been assigned biological activities, including self-assembly and interactions with other proteins. The particular importance of laminins for the formation and stability of cell adhesion complexes is highlighted in severe inherited diseases of muscle...... and skin. Merosin is the collective name for laminins that share a common subunit, the laminin alpha 2 chain. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is caused by mutations in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene. The skin disease Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa is caused by mutations...

  12. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: High-resolution melting curve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy: High-resolution melting curve analysis as an affordable diagnostic mutation scanning tool in a South African cohort. ... Genetic screening for D/BMD in South Africa currently includes multiple ligase-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for exonic deletions and duplications and linkage ...

  13. Dysphagia in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Kalf, J.G.; Joosten, F.B.M.; Vliet, A.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dysphagia is not considered a symptom of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In this study, the authors found that dysphagia does occur in patients with advanced FSHD showing mild involvement of the jaw and lingual muscles. Dysphagia is seldom life threatening in these patients. The

  14. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  15. Glucocorticoids for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Dubowitz Neuromuscular Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and other centers in the UK, conducted a prospective longitudinal study across 17 neuromuscular centers in the UK of 360 boys aged 3-15 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who were treated with daily or intermittent (10 days on/10 days off prednisolone for a mean duration of 4 years.

  16. Prednisone Therapy for Duchenne Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of prednisone on muscle function and the extent of steroid-related adverse effects were studied in 17 ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD at University Hospital, Groningen; Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht; and Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands.

  17. Faecal incontinence in myotonic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Abercrombie, J; Rogers, J; Swash, M

    1998-01-01

    Two siblings with myotonic dystrophy presented for treatment of faecal incontinence. The pathophysiology of this functional disorder is described with the results of anorectal manometry, EMG, and biopsy of smooth and striated muscle of the anorectal sphincters. Both medical and surgical management of the incontinence was unsatisfactory in the long term. Involvement of gastrointestinal musculature is a characteristic feature the disease.



  18. Inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardamone, Michael; Darras, Basil T.; Ryan, Monique M.

    The inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of muscle diseases presenting with common complaints and physical signs: weakness, motor delay, and respiratory and bulbar dysfunction. The myopathies are caused by genetic defects in the contractile apparatus of muscle, and

  19. Early onset facioscapulohumeral dystrophy - a systematic review using individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goselink, Rianne J M; Voermans, Nicol C; Okkersen, Kees; Brouwer, Oebele F; Padberg, George W; Nikolic, Ana; Tupler, Rossella; Dorobek, Malgorzata; Mah, Jean K; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Schreuder, Tim H A; Erasmus, Corrie E

    2017-12-01

    Infantile or early onset is estimated to occur in around 10% of all facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) patients. Although small series of early onset FSHD patients have been reported, comprehensive data on the clinical phenotype is missing. We performed a systematic literature search on the clinical features of early onset FSHD comprising a total of 43 articles with individual data on 227 patients. Additional data from four cohorts was provided by the authors. Mean age at reporting was 18.8 years, and 40% of patients were wheelchair-dependent at that age. Half of the patients had systemic features, including hearing loss (40%), retinal abnormalities (37%) and developmental delay (8%). We found an inverse correlation between repeat size and disease severity, similar to adult-onset FSHD. De novo FSHD1 mutations were more prevalent than in adult-onset FSHD. Compared to adult FSHD, our findings indicate that early onset FSHD is overall characterized by a more severe muscle phenotype and a higher prevalence of systemic features. However, similar as in adults, a significant clinical heterogeneity was observed. Based on this, we consider early onset FSHD to be on the severe end of the FSHD disease spectrum. We found natural history studies and treatment studies to be very scarce in early onset FSHD, therefore longitudinal studies are needed to improve prognostication, clinical management and trial-readiness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dome-shaped macula associated with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Dome-shaped macula (DSM) has been described recently as an inward convexity of the macula typical of myopic eyes detectable on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of monolateral DSM associated with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). Case report. A 60-year-old man already diagnosed with VMD in vitelliruptive stage underwent SD-OCT that revealed the typical vitelliform material accumulation associated in the left eye with a convex elevation of the macula. No change was registered over a 1-year follow-up. This is the first report describing a monolateral DSM associated with VMD. Dome-shaped macula could be considered as a nonspecific scleral alteration, probably due to increased scleral thickness, which can accompany many retinal disorders.

  1. Sleep disturbances in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Paul; Lam, Erek M; St Louis, Erik K; Dominik, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are common and include sleep-disordered breathing, hypersomnia, and fatigue. Little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disturbance in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2). We hypothesized that DM2 patients may frequently harbor sleep disorders. We reviewed medical records of all genetically confirmed cases of DM2 seen at our sleep center between 1997 and 2010 for demographic, laboratory, overnight oximetry, and polysomnography (PSG) data. Eight patients (5 women, 3 men) with DM2 were identified. Excessive daytime sleepiness was seen in 6 patients (75%), insomnia in 5 (62.5%), and excessive fatigue in 4 (50%). Obstructive sleep apnea was diagnosed in 3 of 5 patients (60%) studied with PSG. Respiratory muscle weakness was present in all 6 patients (100%) who received pulmonary function testing. Four of 8 (50%) met criteria for diagnosis of restless legs syndrome. The clinical spectrum of DM2 may include a wide range of sleep disturbances. Although respiratory muscle weakness was frequent, sustained sleep-related hypoxia suggestive of hypoventilation was not seen in our patients. Further prospective studies are needed to examine the frequency and scope of sleep disturbances in DM2. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Long-term follow-up for efficacy and safety of treatment of retinitis pigmentosa with valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Sheena; Joshi, Deval; Bhullar, Shaminder; Kasuga, Daniel; Park, Yeonhee; Kay, Christine N

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of valproic acid (VPA) treatment in patients with pigmentary retinal dystrophies. A retrospective chart review was conducted on 31 patients with a diagnosis of pigmentary retinal dystrophy prescribed VPA at a single centre. Visual field (VF), visual acuity (VA), length of treatment, liver enzymes and side effects were analysed. VF areas were defined using Goldmann VF (GVF) tracings recorded before, during and after VPA treatment using the V4e isopter for each eye. Using custom software, planimetric areas of VF were calculated. Five of the patients (10 eyes) had two Goldmann VF tracings, allowing comparison between baseline and follow-up VF. After 9.8 months of VPA, VF decreased by 0.145 cm(2) (26.478%) (p=0.432). For 22 of the patients (41 eyes), VA data was available, and logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) score changed by 0.056 log units (representing a decline in VA) after 14.9 months on VPA (p=0.002). Twelve patients (38.7%) reported negative side effects related to VPA use. VPA plays a complex role in patients with pigmentary retinal dystrophies and may be associated with VA and field decline as well as adverse side effects. Physicians should use caution with using VPA for pigmentary retinal dystrophies.

  3. Involvement of the central nervous system in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Ritsuko; Tobimatsu, Shozo; Kuroiwa, Yoshigoro; Iwashita, Hiroshi; Kato, Motohiro.

    1985-01-01

    In order to evaluate the central nervous system involvement in myotonic dystrophy, intelligence quotient (IQ), brain CT scan, EEG and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) were analyzed in 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy. Impaired intelligence was observed in 9 out of 10 patients, abnormal brain CT in 7, and EEG abnormality in 7. The brain CT showed a diffuse cortical atrophy, a dilatation of the ventricles, and a periventricular lucency, mainly around the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle. The EEG findings showed a tendency toward generalized slowing of the background activity. These abnormal findings were well related to the clinical severity of MD, indicating that there is a diffuse cerebral involvement in the majority of the MD patients. VEP showed a prolonged P100 latency in 5 out of 10 patints, or 7 out of 19 eyes examined. These prolonged latency of the P100 component was considered to be due to dysfunctions of the visual pathway in the cerebral hemisphere, rather than due to cataracts and retinal dysfunctions because it was observed only in moderate and severe cases. These severe and moderate cases showed abnormalities in all four examinations. It was concluded that combination of different parameters might be useful to evaluate the central nervous system involvement in patients with MD. (author)

  4. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa de Hoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB, play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies.

  5. Defining the Human Macula Transcriptome and Candidate Retinal Disease Genes UsingEyeSAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Ebright, Jessica N.; Zavodni, Zachary J.; Yu, Ling; Wang, Tianyuan; Daiger, Stephen P.; Wistow, Graeme; Boon, Kathy; Hauser, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop large-scale, high-throughput annotation of the human macula transcriptome and to identify and prioritize candidate genes for inherited retinal dystrophies, based on ocular-expression profiles using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Methods Two human retina and two retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid SAGE libraries made from matched macula or midperipheral retina and adjacent RPE/choroid of morphologically normal 28- to 66-year-old donors and a human central retina longSAGE library made from 41- to 66-year-old donors were generated. Their transcription profiles were entered into a relational database, EyeSAGE, including microarray expression profiles of retina and publicly available normal human tissue SAGE libraries. EyeSAGE was used to identify retina- and RPE-specific and -associated genes, and candidate genes for retina and RPE disease loci. Differential and/or cell-type specific expression was validated by quantitative and single-cell RT-PCR. Results Cone photoreceptor-associated gene expression was elevated in the macula transcription profiles. Analysis of the longSAGE retina tags enhanced tag-to-gene mapping and revealed alternatively spliced genes. Analysis of candidate gene expression tables for the identified Bardet-Biedl syndrome disease gene (BBS5) in the BBS5 disease region table yielded BBS5 as the top candidate. Compelling candidates for inherited retina diseases were identified. Conclusions The EyeSAGE database, combining three different gene-profiling platforms including the authors’ multidonor-derived retina/RPE SAGE libraries and existing single-donor retina/RPE libraries, is a powerful resource for definition of the retina and RPE transcriptomes. It can be used to identify retina-specific genes, including alternatively spliced transcripts and to prioritize candidate genes within mapped retinal disease regions. PMID:16723438

  6. Retinal pigmentary changes in chronic uveitis mimicking retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevgi, D Damla; Davoudi, Samaneh; Comander, Jason; Sobrin, Lucia

    2017-09-01

    To present retinal pigmentary changes mimicking retinitis pigmentosa (RP) as a finding of advanced uveitis. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients without a family history of inherited retinal degenerations who presented with retinal pigment changes and signs of past or present intraocular inflammation. Comprehensive eye examination including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination and dilated fundus examination was performed on all patients in addition to color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography (FA), and full-field electroretinogram testing. We identified five patients with ages ranging from 33 to 66 years, who presented with RP-like retinal pigmentary changes which were eventually attributed to longstanding uveitis. The changes were bilateral in three cases and unilateral in two cases. Four of five cases presented with active inflammation, and the remaining case showed evidence of active intraocular inflammation during follow-up. This study highlights the overlapping features of advanced uveitis and RP including the extensive pigmentary changes. Careful review of possible past uveitis history, detailed examination of signs of past or present inflammation and ancillary testing, with FA often being most helpful, are required for the correct diagnosis. This is important, because intervention can prevent further damage if the cause of the pigmentary changes is destructive inflammation.

  7. Retinitis pigmentosa inversa with unilateral high myopia with fellow eye optic disc pitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Saumil; Rush, Ryan; Narayanan, Raja

    2011-01-01

    To report a possible rare association of bilateral retinitis pigmentosa inversa (RPI) with unilateral high myopia with fellow eye optic disc pitting. A 55-year-old man with a history of reduced vision in the right eye since childhood presented with gradually decreasing vision in the left eye. On examination, a -23.00 diopter refractive error and diffuse chorioretinal atrophy consistent with pathologic myopia was found in the right eye. An optic disc pit with posterior pole pigmentary alterations thought to be consequent to a previous neurosensory detachment was found in the left eye. Though the retinal arteriolar attenuation seen in both eyes with an inconsistent history of night blindness since childhood pointed towards the possibility of a concurrently existing rod or rod-cone dystrophy, the posterior pole pigmentary alterations characteristic of RPI were clearly masked by the above pathologies. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated prominent foveal atrophy and an optic disc pit in the left eye. Electroretinography (ERG) demonstrated moderately attenuated amplitudes with prolonged implicit times of rod and cone responses bilaterally. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral RPI and anisometropic amblyopia in the right eye. This report documents a unique constellation of findings which include bilateral RPI and unilateral high myopia with an optic disc pit in the fellow eye. An ERG confirmation of a dystrophic etiology should be sought in suspicious cases, especially when findings are masked by the concurrent presence of other pathologies.

  8. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15% creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2’-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy.

  9. Development of a molecular diagnostic test for Retinitis Pigmentosa in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akiko; Yoshida, Akiko; Kawai, Kanako; Arai, Yuki; Akiba, Ryutaro; Inaba, Akira; Takagi, Seiji; Fujiki, Ryoji; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Kurimoto, Yasuo; Ohara, Osamu; Takahashi, Masayo

    2018-05-21

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy caused by different genetic variants. More than 60 causative genes have been identified to date. The establishment of cost-effective molecular diagnostic tests with high sensitivity and specificity can be beneficial for patients and clinicians. Here, we developed a clinical diagnostic test for RP in the Japanese population. Evaluation of diagnostic technology, Prospective, Clinical and experimental study. A panel of 39 genes reported to cause RP in Japanese patients was established. Next generation sequence (NGS) technology was applied for the analyses of 94 probands with RP and RP-related diseases. After interpretation of detected genetic variants, molecular diagnosis based on a study of the genetic variants and a clinical phenotype was made by a multidisciplinary team including clinicians, researchers and genetic counselors. NGS analyses found 14,343 variants from 94 probands. Among them, 189 variants in 83 probands (88.3% of all cases) were selected as pathogenic variants and 64 probands (68.1%) have variants which can cause diseases. After the deliberation of these 64 cases, molecular diagnosis was made in 43 probands (45.7%). The final molecular diagnostic rate with the current system combining supplemental Sanger sequencing was 47.9% (45 of 94 cases). The RP panel provides the significant advantage of detecting genetic variants with a high molecular diagnostic rate. This type of race-specific high-throughput genotyping allows us to conduct a cost-effective and clinically useful genetic diagnostic test.

  10. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  11. Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    A Zimmerman, T Duong, J Florence and the CINRG Investigators. Pulmonary Function Characteristics of Boys with Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy ...designated CINRG site staff 1. Has the participant been clinically diagnosed with Limb-Girdle or Becker muscular dystrophy ? LGMD BMD 2. Was...Number: W81XWH-09-1-0592 TITLE: CINRG: Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Avital Cnaan, PhD

  12. Association of a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene with cone-rod dystrophy phenotype in an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Zernant, Jana; Nesti, Anna; Rossi, Settimio; Rinaldi, Ernesto; Allikmets, Rando

    2004-01-01

    Genetic variation in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene has been associated with several distinct retinal phenotypes, including Stargardt disease/fundus flavimaculatus (STGD/FFM), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration. The current model of genotype/phenotype association suggests that patients harboring deleterious mutations in both ABCR alleles would develop RP-like retinal pathology. Here we describe ABCA4-associated phenotypes, including a proband with a homozygous nonsense mutation in a family from Southern Italy. The proband had been originally diagnosed with STGD. Ophthalmologic examination included kinetic perimetry, electrophysiological studies and fluorescein angiography. DNA of the affected individual and family members was analyzed for variants in all 50 exons of the ABCA4 gene by screening on the ABCR400 microarray. A homozygous nonsense mutation 2971G>T (G991X) was detected in a patient initially diagnosed with STGD based on funduscopic evidence, including bull's eye depigmentation of the fovea and flecks at the posterior pole extending to the mid-peripheral retina. Since this novel nucleotide substitution results in a truncated, nonfunctional, ABCA4 protein, the patient was examined in-depth for the severity of the disease phenotype. Indeed, subsequent electrophysiological studies determined severely reduced cone amplitude as compared to the rod amplitude, suggesting the diagnosis of CRD. ABCR400 microarray is an efficient tool for determining causal genetic variation, including new mutations. A homozygous protein-truncating mutation in ABCA4 can cause a phenotype ranging from STGD to CRD as diagnosed at an early stage of the disease. Only a combination of comprehensive genotype/phenotype correlation studies will determine the proper diagnosis and prognosis of ABCA4-associated pathology. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  14. Retinal detachment in paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S. N.; Qureshi, N.; Azad, N.; Khan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the causes of retinal detachment in children and the various operative procedures requiring vitreoretinal surgical intervention for the same. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Ophthalmology, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2006 to May 2009. Methodology: A total of 281 eyes of 258 patients, (aged 0 - 18 years) who underwent vitreo-retinal surgical intervention for retinal detachment were included. Surgical log was searched for the type of retinal detachment and its causes. Frequencies of various interventions done in these patients viz. vitrectomy, scleral buckle, use of tamponading agents, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy were noted. Results were described as descriptive statistics. Results: Myopia was the cause in 62 (22.1%) and trauma in 51 (18.1%) of the eyes. Total retinal detachment (RD) was treated in 94 (33.5%) eyes, sub total RD in 36 (12.8%), recurrent RD in 32 (11.4%), giant retinal tear in 28 (10%), tractional RD in 15 (5.3%) and exudative RD in 2 (0.7%). Prophylactic laser or cryotherapy was applied in 74 (26.3%) of the eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was carried out in 159 (56.6%) eyes while scleral buckle procedure was done in 129 (45.9%) eyes. Silicon oil was used in 149 (53%), perfluorocarbon liquid in 32 (11.4%) and gas tamponade in 20 (7.1%) eyes. Conclusion: The most common cause of retinal detachment in paediatric patients was myopia, followed by trauma. Total RD was more common as compared to the other types. The most common procedure adopted was pars plana vitrectomy followed by scleral buckle procedure. (author)

  15. [Encopresis revealing myotonic dystrophy in 2 children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avez-Couturier, J; Michaud, L; Cuisset, J-M; Lamblin, M-D; Dolhem, P; Turck, D; Vallée, L; Gottrand, F

    2009-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are very frequent in myotonic dystrophy but largely unrecognized. They can be the revealing factors of the disease. We report 2 cases of 10 and 17-year-old children with persistent encopresis starting at the age of 3 and 5 years in spite of laxative treatment. Neurological examination and anorectal manometry provided the diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy. Procainamide treatment was introduced and the digestive symptoms improved. Any child with encopresis should have complete evaluation to rule out the diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy and physicians should look for upper and/or lower gastrointestinal symptoms in every patient with myotonic dystrophy.

  16. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  17. UTILIZATION OF FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE, SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY, AND ENHANCED DEPTH IMAGING IN THE CHARACTERIZATION OF BIETTI CRYSTALLINE DYSTROPHY IN DIFFERENT STAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Zhangxing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Ma, Kai; She, Haicheng; Peng, Xiaoyan

    2015-10-01

    To characterize Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) in different stages using multiple imaging modalities. Sixteen participants clinically diagnosed as BCD were included in the retrospective study and were categorized into 3 stages according to fundus photography. Eleven patients were genetically confirmed. Fundus autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and enhanced depth imaging features of BCD were analyzed. On fundus autofluorescence, the abnormal autofluorescence was shown to enlarge in area and decrease in intensity with stages. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography, the abnormalities in Stage 1 were observed to localize in outer retinal layers, whereas in Stage 2 and Stage 3, more extensive retinal atrophy was seen. In enhanced depth imaging, the subfoveal choroidal layers were delineated clearly in Stage 1; in Stage 2, destructions were primarily found in the choriocapillaris with associated alterations in the outer vessels; Stage 3 BCD displayed severe choroidal thinning. Choroidal neovascularization and macular edema were exhibited with high incidence. IVS6-8del17bp/inGC of the CYP4V2 gene was the most common mutant allele. Noninvasive fundus autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and enhanced depth imaging may help to characterize the chorioretinal pathology of BCD at different degrees, and therefore, we propose staging of BCD depending on those methods. Physicians should be cautious of the vision-threatening complications of the disease.

  18. Understanding the Function of Genes Involved in Inherited Retinal Degeneration-Insights into the Pathogenesis and Function of C8ORF37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Ali Sakawa

    Inherited retinal degenerative diseases (IRD) are a group of disorders that lead to progressive deterioration of mainly the photoreceptors. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) are two forms of IRDs. RP is the most common form of IRD and is due to rod photoreceptor degeneration followed by cone photoreceptor loss. CRD, on the other hand, is characterized by the loss of cones or the concurrent degeneration of both cones and rods. Both RP and CRD are presently incurable. More than 200 genes have been identified to cause IRDs and the functions of many of these genes remain unclear. Mutations in a novel gene, C8ORF37, were identified to cause recessive, severe, and early-onset RP and CRD. I, therefore, pioneered in characterizing the role of C8ORF37 in the retina. This dissertation is comprised of four chapters that is organized as follows: (1) summary of an ocular disorder (2) a genetic model of a retinal disorder (3) biochemical/proteomic analysis of C8ORF37 (4) potential clinical applications. A summary of ocular disorders is discussed in Chapter 1, with an emphasis on CRD. Chapter 2 focuses on the generation and characterization of C8orf37 mutant mouse models that recapitulate the retinal pathologies observed in human patients. In C8orf37 knockout retinas, the outer segment (OS) was nonuniform, swollen, and wider in width when compared to the controls. Moreover, many OS membrane proteins were reduced in the retina of C8orf37 knockout, including CNGB1 and RDS, proteins essential for OS disc morphogenesis and alignment. Our findings shed new light on the pathogenesis underlying retinal dysfunction and degeneration in C8ORF37-deficient patients. To determine the function of a novel protein, a powerful approach is by identifying its binding partners. In Chapter 3, I discuss GST pull-down using bovine retinal lysates, yeast-two-hybrid, and immunoprecipitation with mouse retinal lysate in order to identify C8ORF37-interacting proteins. Our pull

  19. Retinal Vessels Segmentation Techniques and Algorithms: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Almotiri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vessels identification and localization aim to separate the different retinal vasculature structure tissues, either wide or narrow ones, from the fundus image background and other retinal anatomical structures such as optic disc, macula, and abnormal lesions. Retinal vessels identification studies are attracting more and more attention in recent years due to non-invasive fundus imaging and the crucial information contained in vasculature structure which is helpful for the detection and diagnosis of a variety of retinal pathologies included but not limited to: Diabetic Retinopathy (DR, glaucoma, hypertension, and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD. With the development of almost two decades, the innovative approaches applying computer-aided techniques for segmenting retinal vessels are becoming more and more crucial and coming closer to routine clinical applications. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview for retinal vessels segmentation techniques. Firstly, a brief introduction to retinal fundus photography and imaging modalities of retinal images is given. Then, the preprocessing operations and the state of the art methods of retinal vessels identification are introduced. Moreover, the evaluation and validation of the results of retinal vessels segmentation are discussed. Finally, an objective assessment is presented and future developments and trends are addressed for retinal vessels identification techniques.

  20. Becker muscular dystrophy: an unusual presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Thakker, P B; Sharma, A

    1993-01-01

    A 15 year old boy who presented with passing painless dark urine was found to have myoglobinuria. His creatine phosphokinase was raised, and a muscle biopsy specimen showed non-specific dystrophic changes. Subsequent DNA analysis led to the diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. Myoglobinuria may be a presenting symptom of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  2. Dystrophin quantification and clinical correlations in Becker muscular dystrophy: implications for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Karen; Cirak, Sebahattin; Torelli, Silvia; Tasca, Giorgio; Feng, Lucy; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Armaroli, Annarita; Guglieri, Michela; Straathof, Chiara S; Verschuuren, Jan J; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Helderman-van den Enden, Paula; Bushby, Katherine; Straub, Volker; Sewry, Caroline; Ferlini, Alessandra; Ricci, Enzo; Morgan, Jennifer E; Muntoni, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that disrupt the open reading frame and prevent the full translation of its protein product, dystrophin. Restoration of the open reading frame and dystrophin production can be achieved by exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides targeted to splicing elements. This approach aims to transform the Duchenne muscular dystrophy phenotype to that of the milder disorder, Becker muscular dystrophy, typically caused by in-frame dystrophin deletions that allow the production of an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin. There is ongoing debate regarding the functional properties of the different internally deleted dystrophins produced by exon skipping for different mutations; more insight would be valuable to improve and better predict the outcome of exon skipping clinical trials. To this end, we have characterized the clinical phenotype of 17 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy harbouring in-frame deletions relevant to on-going or planned exon skipping clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and correlated it to the levels of dystrophin, and dystrophin-associated protein expression. The cohort of 17 patients, selected exclusively on the basis of their genotype, included 4 asymptomatic, 12 mild and 1 severe patient. All patients had dystrophin levels of >40% of control and significantly higher dystrophin (P = 0.013), β-dystroglycan (P = 0.025) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (P = 0.034) expression was observed in asymptomatic individuals versus symptomatic patients with Becker muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, grouping the patients by deletion, patients with Becker muscular dystrophy with deletions with an end-point of exon 51 (the skipping of which could rescue the largest group of Duchenne muscular dystrophy deletions) showed significantly higher dystrophin levels (P = 0.034) than those with deletions ending with exon 53. This is the first quantitative study on both

  3. Translation of CRISPR Genome Surgery to the Bedside for Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been accelerated growth of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR genome surgery techniques. Genome surgery holds promise for diseases for which a cure currently does not exist. In the field of ophthalmology, CRISPR offers possibilities for treating inherited retinal dystrophies. The retina has little regenerative potential, which makes treatment particularly difficult. For such conditions, CRISPR genome surgery methods have shown great potential for therapeutic applications in animal models of retinal dystrophies. Much anticipation surrounds the potential for CRISPR as a therapeutic, as clinical trials of ophthalmic genome surgery are expected to begin as early as 2018. This mini-review summarizes preclinical CRISPR applications in the retina and current CRISPR clinical trials.

  4. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing KE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosis and treatment exist significantly time delay now. In this study, we review the natural history of DMD, including motor, cognitive, respiratory and heart function, for improving DMD early recognition, diagnosis and treatment, so as to benefit DMD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.004

  5. An Overview of Recent Therapeutics Advances for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K

    2018-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. Mutations of the DMD gene destabilize the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex in the sarcolemma. Ongoing mechanical stress leads to unregulated influx of calcium ions into the sarcoplasm, with activation of proteases, release of proinflammatory cytokines, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cumulative damage and reparative failure leads to progressive muscle necrosis, fibrosis, and fatty replacement. Although there is presently no cure for DMD, scientific advances have led to many potential disease-modifying treatments, including dystrophin replacement therapies, upregulation of compensatory proteins, anti-inflammatory agents, and other cellular targets. Recently approved therapies include ataluren for stop codon read-through and eteplirsen for exon 51 skipping of eligible individuals. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical features of DMD, to describe current outcome measures used in clinical studies, and to highlight new emerging therapies for affected individuals.

  6. Duchenne muscular dystrophy with associated growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, T.; Mahmood, A.; Shams, S.

    2003-01-01

    A patient with duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and growth hormone (GH) deficiency is described who had no clinical evidence of muscular weakness before initiation of GH replacement therapy. Treatment with human GH resulted in appearance of symptoms of easy fatigability and muscle weakness. Thorough investigations including serum creating phosphokinase (CK) levels in recommended in every patient with GH deficiency before starting GH replacement therapy. (author)

  7. Muscular dystrophies: key elements for everyday diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palladino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that share similar clinical features and dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy, associated with progressive weakness. Weakness may be noted at birth or develop in late adult life. In recent years, cardiac involvement has been observed in a growing number of genetic muscle diseases, and considerable progress has been made in understanding the relationships between disease skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle disease. This review will focus on the skeletal muscle diseases most commonly associated with cardiac complications that can be diagnosed by echocardiography, such as dystrophinopathies including Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy of DMD/BMD carriers and X-L dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. Why short stature is beneficial in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; McDonald, Craig M

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a genetic defect resulting in absent dystrophin, yet children are able to walk when small and young but lose this ability as they grow. The mdx mouse has absent dystrophin yet does not exhibit significant disability. Allometric modeling of linearly increasing load per muscle fiber and stress on the sarcolemma with growth and exponential decline associated with loss of muscle fibers correlated with case studies and animal models of DMD. Smaller species or breeds are predictably less affected than large as follows: mdx mice muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs < large GRMD dogs < humans. Case reports of combined growth hormone and dystrophin deficiency show a relatively benign course of disease. Future therapeutic trials in DMD might include specific growth inhibitors in combination with standard of care treatments to delay the clinical onset and reduce the severity of disease and disability. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neuroaxonal Dystrophy and Cavitating Leukoencephalopathy of Chihuahua Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degl'Innocenti, Sara; Asiag, Nimrod; Zeira, Offer; Falzone, Cristian; Cantile, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    A novel form of neuroaxonal dystrophy is described in 3 Chihuahua pups, 2 of which were from the same litter. It was characterized not only by accumulation of numerous and widely distributed axonal swellings (spheroids) but also by a severe cavitating leukoencephalopathy. The dogs presented with progressive neurological signs, including gait abnormalities and postural reaction deficits. Magnetic resonance images and gross examination at necropsy revealed dilation of lateral ventricles and cerebral atrophy, accompanied by cavitation of the subcortical white matter. Histopathologically, severe axonal degeneration with formation of large spheroids was found in the cerebral and cerebellar white matter, thalamus, and brainstem nuclei. Small-caliber spheroids were observed in the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter. The telencephalic white matter had severe myelin loss and cavitation with relative sparing of the U-fibers. Different from previously reported cases of canine neuroaxonal dystrophy, in these Chihuahuas the spheroid distribution predominantly involved the white matter with secondary severe leukoencephalopathy.

  10. RETINAL NEOVASCULARIZATION FROM A PATIENT WITH CUTIS MARMORATA TELANGIECTATICA CONGENITA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassalos, Thérèse M; Fields, Taylor S; Levine, Robert; Gao, Hua

    2018-03-14

    To report a rare case of peripheral retinal neovascularization in a patient diagnosed with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (CMTC). Observational case report. A 16-year-old girl was referred to clinic for retinal evaluation. The patient had a clinical diagnosis of CMTC later confirmed by skin biopsy. Examination revealed temporal peripheral retinal sheathing, as well as lattice degeneration in both eyes. Wide-field fluorescein angiogram showed substantive peripheral retinal nonperfusion with evidence of vascular leakage from areas of presumed retinal neovascularization. The patient subsequently had pan retinal photocoagulation laser treatment to each eye without complication. Cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita is a rare vascular condition known to affect multiple organ systems including the eyes. Although ocular manifestations of CMTC are rare, instances of congenital glaucoma, suprachoroidal hemorrhage, and bilateral total retinal detachments resulting in secondary neovascular glaucoma have been reported. Our patient demonstrates the first reported findings of peripheral nonperfusion and retinal neovascularization related to CMTC in a 16-year-old girl. We propose early retinal examination, wide-field fluorescein angiogram, and early pan retinal photocoagulation laser treatment in patients with peripheral nonperfusion and retinal neovascularization from CMTC.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  11. Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network (MD STARnet): case definition in surveillance for childhood-onset Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Katherine D; Cunniff, Chris; Kantamneni, Jiji R; Ciafaloni, Emma; Miller, Timothy; Matthews, Dennis; Cwik, Valerie; Druschel, Charlotte; Miller, Lisa; Meaney, F John; Sladky, John; Romitti, Paul A

    2010-09-01

    The Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network (MD STARnet) is a multisite collaboration to determine the prevalence of childhood-onset Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy and to characterize health care and health outcomes in this population. MD STARnet uses medical record abstraction to identify patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy born January 1, 1982 or later who resided in 1 of the participating sites. Critical diagnostic elements of each abstracted record are reviewed independently by >4 clinicians and assigned to 1 of 6 case definition categories (definite, probable, possible, asymptomatic, female, not Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy) by consensus. As of November 2009, 815 potential cases were reviewed. Of the cases included in analysis, 674 (82%) were either ''definite'' or ''probable'' Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy. These data reflect a change in diagnostic testing, as case assignment based on genetic testing increased from 67% in the oldest cohort (born 1982-1987) to 94% in the cohort born 2004 to 2009.

  12. [New international classification of corneal dystrophies and clinical landmarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisch, W; Seitz, B

    2008-07-01

    The International Committee on Classification of Corneal Dystrophies, briefly IC (3)D, was founded with the sponsorship of the American Cornea Society and the American Academy of Ophthalmology in July 2005. This committee consists of 17 corneal experts (1) from USA, Asia and Europe. The goal of this group was to develop a new, internationally accepted classification of corneal dystrophies (CD) based on modern clinical, histological and genetical knowledge. The aim of the new classification should be to avoid wrong interpretations and misnomers of the different forms of CD. The IC (3)D extensive manuscript is in press as Supplement publication in the journal "Cornea". The 25 different CD are divided in four categories by clinical and genetical knowledge. Additionally, templates for each type of CD are included. Finally, many typical color slit-lamp photos are presented in the publication together with essential references and current genetical results in tabular form. As members of IC (3)D the authors present a clinical landmark survey of the different corneal dystrophies. The ophthalmologist is the first to examine and to diagnose a new patient with a probable CD at the slit-lamp. Our elaborated table of landmarks is supposed to be a "bridge" for the ophthalmologist to precisely define the corneal opacities of a presumed CD. This "bridge" makes it easier for them to study the IC (3)D Supplement publication and to get more information including adequate differential diagnosis.

  13. Retinitis pigmentosa, pigmentary retinopathies, and neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M Tariq

    2006-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal diseases with phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. The pathophysiologic basis of the progressive visual loss in patients with RP is not completely understood but is felt to be due to a primary retinal photoreceptor cell degenerative process mainly affecting the rods of the peripheral retina. In most cases RP is seen in isolation (nonsyndromic), but in some other cases it may be a part of a genetic, metabolic, or neurologic syndrome or disorder. Nyctalopia, or night blindness, is the most common symptom of RP. The classic fundus appearance of RP includes retinal pigment epithelial cell changes resulting in retinal hypo- or hyperpigmentation ("salt-and-pepper"), retinal granularity, and bone spicule formation. The retinal vessels are often narrowed or attenuated and there is a waxy pallor appearance of the optic nerve head. Electroretinography will demonstrate rod and cone photoreceptor cell dysfunction and is a helpful test in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with RP. A detailed history with pedigree analysis, a complete ocular examination, and the appropriate paraclinical testing should be performed in patients complaining of visual difficulties at night or in dim light. This review discusses the clinical manifestations of RP as well as describing the various systemic diseases, with a special emphasis on neurologic diseases, associated with a pigmentary retinopathy.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  15. [Surgical managment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritoglou, C; Wolf, A

    2015-05-01

    The detachment of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium can be related to breaks of the retina allowing vitreous fluid to gain access to the subretinal space, to exudative changes of the choroid such as tumours or inflammatory diseases or to excessive tractional forces exerted by interactions of the collagenous vitreous and the retina. Tractional retinal detachment is usually treated by vitrectomy and exudative detachment can be addressed by treatment of the underlying condition in many cases. In rhegmatogenous retinal detachment two different surgical procedures, vitrectomy and scleral buckling, can be applied for functional and anatomic rehabilitation of our patients. The choice of the surgical procedure is not really standardised and often depends on the experience of the surgeon and other more ocular factors including lens status, the number of retinal breaks, the extent of the detachment and the amount of preexisting PVR. Using both techniques, anatomic success rates of over 90 % can be achieved. Especially in young phakic patients scleral buckling offers the true advantage to prevent the progression of cataract formation requiring cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Therefore, scleral buckling should be considered in selected cases as an alternative surgical option in spite of the very important technical refinements in modern vitrectomy techniques. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Retinal detachment following endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, P T; Marcus, D A; Bovino, J A

    1985-08-01

    Fifty-five consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of bacterial endophthalmitis were reviewed. All patients were treated with systemic, periocular, topical, and intravitreal antibiotics. In addition, 33 of the patients underwent a pars plana vitrectomy. Nine retinal detachments occurred within six months of initial diagnosis. The higher frequency of retinal detachment in the vitrectomy group (21%) as compared to those patients managed without vitrectomy (9%) may be explained by a combination of surgical complications and the increased severity of endophthalmitis in the vitrectomy group. The two patients who developed retinal detachment during vitrectomy surgery rapidly progressed to no light perception. Conversely, the repair of retinal detachments diagnosed postoperatively had a good prognosis.

  17. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertus, Stanley; Bax, Nathalie M; Fakin, Ana; Groenewoud, Joannes M M; Klevering, B Jeroen; Moore, Anthony T; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Hoyng, Carel B

    2017-01-01

    Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options-including gene therapy-are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date) and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including variable rates of functional and structural progression, thereby potentially limiting the ability of phase I/II clinical trials to assess efficacy of novel therapies with few patients. To accommodate this problem, we developed and validated a sensitive and reliable composite clinical trial endpoint for disease progression based on structural measurements of retinal degeneration. We used longitudinal data from early-onset Stargardt patients from the Netherlands (development cohort, n = 14) and the United Kingdom (external validation cohort, n = 18). The composite endpoint was derived from best-corrected visual acuity, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Weighting optimization techniques excluded visual acuity from the composite endpoint. After optimization, the endpoint outperformed each univariable outcome, and showed an average progression of 0.41° retinal eccentricity per year (95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.52). Comparing with actual longitudinal values, the model accurately predicted progression (R2, 0.904). These properties were largely preserved in the validation cohort (0.43°/year [0.33-0.53]; prediction: R2, 0.872). We subsequently ran a two-year trial simulation with the composite endpoint, which detected a 25% decrease in disease progression with 80% statistical power using only 14 patients. These results suggest that a multimodal endpoint, reflecting structural macular changes, provides a sensitive measurement of disease progression in

  18. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Lambertus

    Full Text Available Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options-including gene therapy-are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including variable rates of functional and structural progression, thereby potentially limiting the ability of phase I/II clinical trials to assess efficacy of novel therapies with few patients. To accommodate this problem, we developed and validated a sensitive and reliable composite clinical trial endpoint for disease progression based on structural measurements of retinal degeneration.We used longitudinal data from early-onset Stargardt patients from the Netherlands (development cohort, n = 14 and the United Kingdom (external validation cohort, n = 18. The composite endpoint was derived from best-corrected visual acuity, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Weighting optimization techniques excluded visual acuity from the composite endpoint. After optimization, the endpoint outperformed each univariable outcome, and showed an average progression of 0.41° retinal eccentricity per year (95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.52. Comparing with actual longitudinal values, the model accurately predicted progression (R2, 0.904. These properties were largely preserved in the validation cohort (0.43°/year [0.33-0.53]; prediction: R2, 0.872. We subsequently ran a two-year trial simulation with the composite endpoint, which detected a 25% decrease in disease progression with 80% statistical power using only 14 patients.These results suggest that a multimodal endpoint, reflecting structural macular changes, provides a sensitive measurement of disease

  19. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Nathalie M.; Fakin, Ana; Groenewoud, Joannes M. M.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Moore, Anthony T.; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R.; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Hoyng, Carel B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options—including gene therapy—are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date) and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including variable rates of functional and structural progression, thereby potentially limiting the ability of phase I/II clinical trials to assess efficacy of novel therapies with few patients. To accommodate this problem, we developed and validated a sensitive and reliable composite clinical trial endpoint for disease progression based on structural measurements of retinal degeneration. Methods and findings We used longitudinal data from early-onset Stargardt patients from the Netherlands (development cohort, n = 14) and the United Kingdom (external validation cohort, n = 18). The composite endpoint was derived from best-corrected visual acuity, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Weighting optimization techniques excluded visual acuity from the composite endpoint. After optimization, the endpoint outperformed each univariable outcome, and showed an average progression of 0.41° retinal eccentricity per year (95% confidence interval, 0.30–0.52). Comparing with actual longitudinal values, the model accurately predicted progression (R2, 0.904). These properties were largely preserved in the validation cohort (0.43°/year [0.33–0.53]; prediction: R2, 0.872). We subsequently ran a two-year trial simulation with the composite endpoint, which detected a 25% decrease in disease progression with 80% statistical power using only 14 patients. Conclusions These results suggest that a multimodal endpoint, reflecting structural macular changes, provides a

  20. Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The health care provider will do a nervous system (neurological) and muscle exam. A careful medical history is also important, ... the legs and pelvis, then moves to the muscles of the shoulders, ... respiratory system Tests that may be done include: CPK blood ...

  1. Intraocular pressure, corneal thickness, and corneal hysteresis in Steinert's myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre de A. Garcia Filho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Low intraocular pressure (IOP measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT is one of the ocular manifestations of Steinert's myotonic dystrophy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the corneal-compensated IOP as well as corneal properties (central corneal thickness and corneal hysteresis in patients with myotonic dystrophy. METHODS: A total of 12 eyes of 6 patients with Steinert's myotonic dystrophy (dystrophy group and 12 eyes of 6 age-, race-, and gender-matched healthy volunteers (control group were included in the study. GAT, Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT-Pascal and Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA were used to assess the IOP. Central corneal thickness was obtained by ultrasound pachymetry, and corneal hysteresis was analyzed using the ORA device. In light of the multiplicity of tests performed, the significance level was set at 0.01 rather than 0.05. RESULTS: The mean (standard deviation [SD] GAT, DCT, and corneal-compensated ORA IOP in the dystrophy group were 5.4 (1.4 mmHg, 9.7 (1.5 mmHg, and 10.1 (2.6 mmHg, respectively. The mean (SD GAT, DCT, and corneal-compensated ORA IOP in the control group was 12.6 (2.9 mmHg, 15.5 (2.7 mmHg, and 15.8 (3.4 mmHg, respectively. There were significant differences in IOP values between dystrophy and control groups obtained by GAT (mean, -7.2 mmHg; 99% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -3.9 mmHg; P<0.001, DCT (mean, -5.9 mmHg; 99% CI, -8.9 to -2.8 mmHg; P<0.001, and corneal-compensated ORA measurements (mean, -5.7 mmHg; 99% CI, -10.4 to -1.0 mmHg; P=0.003. The mean (SD central corneal thickness was similar in the dystrophy (542 [31] µm and control (537 [11] µm groups (P=0.65. The mean (SD corneal hysteresis in the dystrophy and control groups were 11.2 (1.5 mmHg and 9.7 (1.2 mmHg, respectively (P=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Steinert's myotonic dystrophy showed lower Goldmann and corneal-compensated IOP in comparison with healthy individuals. Since central corneal thickness and

  2. Perifoveal function in patients with North Carolina macular dystrophy: the importance of accounting for fixation locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiple, William; Szlyk, Janet P; Paliga, Jennifer; Rabb, Maurice F

    2006-04-01

    To quantify the extent of visual function losses in patients with North Carolina Macular Dystrophy (NCMD) and to demonstrate the importance of accounting for eccentric fixation when making comparisons with normal data. Five patients with NCMD who were from a single family were examined. Multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs) and psychophysical assessments of acuity and luminance visual field sensitivities were measured throughout the central retina. Comparisons of responses from equivalent retinal areas were accomplished by shifting normal templates to be centered at the locus of fixation for each patient. Losses of psychophysically measured visual function in patients with NCMD extend to areas adjacent to the locations of visible lesions. The multifocal ERG amplitude was reduced only within the area of visible lesion. Multifocal ERG implicit times were delayed throughout the entire central retinal area assessed. ERG timing is a sensitive assay of retinal function, and our results indicate that NCMD has a widespread effect at the level of the mid and outer retina. The findings also demonstrated that it is necessary to account for fixation locus and to ensure that equivalent retinal areas are compared when testing patients with macular disease who have eccentric fixation.

  3. Retinal oxygen saturation in relation to retinal thickness in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    to retinal thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 18 patients with DME that all had central retinal thickness (CRT) >300 µm and were free of active proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Optical coherence tomography (Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain OCT) was used...... for paracentral edema, the oxygen saturation in the upper and lower temporal arcade branches were compared to the corresponding upper and lower subfield thickness. Spearman’s rank was used to calculate correlation coefficients between CRT and retinal oximetry. Results: Median age and duration of diabetes was 59....... 92.3%, p=0.52). We found no correlation between CRT and retinal oxygen saturation, even when accounting for paracentral edema (p>0.05). Furthermore, there was no difference in retinal oxygen saturation between the macular hemisphere that was more or less affected by DME (p>0.05). Conclusion: Patients...

  4. Paediatric retinal detachment: aetiology, characteristics and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth McElnea

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To provide contemporary data on the aetiology, clinical features and outcomes of paediatric retinal detachment. METHODS: A retrospective review of all those under 16y who underwent surgical repair for retinal detachment at a single centre between the years 2008 and 2015 inclusive was performed. In each case the cause of retinal detachment, the type of detachment, the presence or absence of macular involvement, the number and form of reparative surgeries undertaken, and the surgical outcome achieved was recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients, 15 (62.5% of whom were male and 9 (37.5% of whom were female, their mean age being 11.6y and range 2-16y developed retinal detachment over the eight year period studied. Trauma featured in the development of retinal detachment in 14 (50.0% cases. Retinal detachment was associated with other ocular and/or systemic conditions in 11 (39.3% cases. A mean of 3.0 procedures with a range of 1-9 procedures per patient were undertaken in the management of retinal detachment. Complex vitrectomy combined with scleral buckling or complex vitrectomy alone were those most frequently performed. Mean postoperative visual acuity was 1.2 logMAR with range 0.0-3.0 logMAR. In 22 of 26 (84.6% cases which underwent surgical repair the retina was attached at last follow-up. CONCLUSION: Aggressive management of paediatric retinal detachment including re-operation increases the likelihood of anatomical success. In cases where the retinal detachment can be repaired by an external approach alone there is a more favourable visual outcome.

  5. Paediatric retinal detachment: aetiology, characteristics and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElnea, Elizabeth; Stephenson, Kirk; Gilmore, Sarah; O'Keefe, Michael; Keegan, David

    2018-01-01

    To provide contemporary data on the aetiology, clinical features and outcomes of paediatric retinal detachment. A retrospective review of all those under 16y who underwent surgical repair for retinal detachment at a single centre between the years 2008 and 2015 inclusive was performed. In each case the cause of retinal detachment, the type of detachment, the presence or absence of macular involvement, the number and form of reparative surgeries undertaken, and the surgical outcome achieved was recorded. Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients, 15 (62.5%) of whom were male and 9 (37.5%) of whom were female, their mean age being 11.6y and range 2-16y developed retinal detachment over the eight year period studied. Trauma featured in the development of retinal detachment in 14 (50.0%) cases. Retinal detachment was associated with other ocular and/or systemic conditions in 11 (39.3%) cases. A mean of 3.0 procedures with a range of 1-9 procedures per patient were undertaken in the management of retinal detachment. Complex vitrectomy combined with scleral buckling or complex vitrectomy alone were those most frequently performed. Mean postoperative visual acuity was 1.2 logMAR with range 0.0-3.0 logMAR. In 22 of 26 (84.6%) cases which underwent surgical repair the retina was attached at last follow-up. Aggressive management of paediatric retinal detachment including re-operation increases the likelihood of anatomical success. In cases where the retinal detachment can be repaired by an external approach alone there is a more favourable visual outcome.

  6. Secondary Conditions Among Males With Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Rebecca; Street, Natalie; Conway, Kristin Caspers; James, Kathy; Cunniff, Christopher; Oleszek, Joyce; Fox, Deborah; Ciafaloni, Emma; Westfield, Christina; Paramsothy, Pangaja

    2017-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy are X-linked neuromuscular disorders characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Despite the involvement of multiple systems, secondary conditions among affected males have not been comprehensively described. Two hundred nine caregivers of affected males (aged 3-31 years) identified by the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network completed a mailed survey that included questions about secondary conditions impacting multiple body functions. The 5 most commonly reported conditions in males with Duchenne were cognitive deficits (38.4%), constipation (31.7%), anxiety (29.3%), depression (27.4%), and obesity (19.5%). Higher frequencies of anxiety, depression, and kidney stones were found among nonambulatory males compared to ambulatory males. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was more common in ambulatory than nonambulatory males. These data support clinical care recommendations for monitoring of patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy by a multidisciplinary team to prevent and treat conditions that may be secondary to the diagnosis.

  7. Composite biomarkers for assessing Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an initial assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, Irina; Pasternak, Amy; Kapur, Kush; Darras, Basil T; Rutkove, Seward B

    2015-02-01

    Compared with individual parameters, composite biomarkers may provide a more effective means for monitoring disease progression and the effects of therapy in clinical trials than single measures. In this study, we built composite biomarkers for use in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by combining values from two objective measures of disease severity: electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound and evaluating how well they correlated to standard functional measures. Using data from an ongoing study of electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound in 31 Duchenne muscular dystrophy and 26 healthy boys aged 2-14 years, we combined data sets by first creating z scores based on the normal subject data and then using simple mathematical operations (addition and multiplication) to create composite measures. These composite scores were then correlated to age and standard measures of function including the 6-minute walk test, the North Star Ambulatory Assessment, and handheld dynamometry. Combining data sets resulted in stronger correlations with all four outcomes than for either electrical impedance myography or quantitative ultrasound alone in six of eight instances. These improvements reached statistical significance (P Duchenne muscular dystrophy clinical trials is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Muscle-Derived Proteins as Serum Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in Three Forms of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Peter M.; Pogoryelova, Oksana; Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Identifying translatable, non-invasive biomarkers of muscular dystrophy that better reflect the disease pathology than those currently available would aid the development of new therapies, the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapy. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a panel of serum protein biomarkers with the potential to specifically detect skeletal muscle injury. Method: Serum concentrations of skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) and muscle-type creatine kinase (CKM) proteins were measured in 74 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), 38 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and 49 Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) patients and 32 healthy controls. Results: All four proteins were significantly elevated in the serum of these three muscular dystrophy patient populations when compared to healthy controls, but, interestingly, displayed different profiles depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Additionally, the effects of patient age, ambulatory status, cardiac function and treatment status on the serum concentrations of the proteins were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed correlations between the serum concentrations and certain clinical endpoints including forced vital capacity in DMD patients and the time to walk ten meters in LGMD2B patients. Serum concentrations of these proteins were also elevated in two preclinical models of muscular dystrophy, the mdx mouse and the golden-retriever muscular dystrophy dog. Conclusions: These proteins, therefore, are potential muscular dystrophy biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26870665

  9. An unusual variant of Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Bakker, E.; Defesche, J. C.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on 5 brothers with slowly progressive limbgirdle weakness. Calf hypertrophy was absent. The levels of creatine kinase, electromyography, and findings from a muscle biopsy specimen were compatible with muscular dystrophy. The propositus's biopsy specimen also showed numerous rimmed

  10. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  11. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., Assistant ... Shree Pandya, P.T., M.S., Assistant Professor, Neurology & Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation A publication of the FSH ...

  12. 3-Methylhistidine excretion in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griggs, R.C.; Moxley, R.T. III; Forbes, G.B.

    1980-12-01

    3-Methylhistidine (3-MH) excretion reflects the rate of muscle protein catabolism, since 3-MH occurs almost exclusively in muscle actin and myosin and is not reutilized or catabolized. We studied 3-MH excretion in 9 patients with myotonic dystrophy, 8 normals, and 10 disease controls with Duchenne dystrophy and other disorders. 3-MH excretion was expressed relative to muscle mass as determined by both urinary creatinine and total body potassium (/sup 40/K method). Absolute 3-MH excretion was decreased in myotonic dystrophy patients but was normal when related to muscle mass. The finding of normal 3-MH excretion in myotonic dystrophy suggests that the muscle wasting in this disorder results from impaired anabolic processes rather than accelerated muscle destruction.

  13. 3-Methylhistidine excretion in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, R.C.; Moxley, R.T. III; Forbes, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    3-Methylhistidine (3-MH) excretion reflects the rate of muscle protein catabolism, since 3-MH occurs almost exclusively in muscle actin and myosin and is not reutilized or catabolized. We studied 3-MH excretion in 9 patients with myotonic dystrophy, 8 normals, and 10 disease controls with Duchenne dystrophy and other disorders. 3-MH excretion was expressed relative to muscle mass as determined by both urinary creatinine and total body potassium ( 40 K method). Absolute 3-MH excretion was decreased in myotonic dystrophy patients but was normal when related to muscle mass. The finding of normal 3-MH excretion in myotonic dystrophy suggests that the muscle wasting in this disorder results from impaired anabolic processes rather than accelerated muscle destruction

  14. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... topic are answered in this section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents ... improve health and quality of life. Almost all people with any form of MD experience a worsening ...

  15. Posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Lauro Augusto de [UNIFESP; Vieira, Luiz Antônio [UNIFESP; Freitas, Denise de [UNIFESP; Sousa, Luciene Barbosa de [UNIFESP

    2006-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho é alertar o oftalmologista da possibilidade de se deparar com casos raros de distrofias corneanas. Neste caso correlacionamos os achados clínicos da distrofia amorfa posterior com refração, topografia e biomicroscopia ultra-sônica.The purpose of this paper is to warn the ophthalmologist about the possibility of facing rare cases of corneal dystrophies. Clinical findings of a case of posterior amorphous dystrophy were correlated with refraction, topography, and ultras...

  16. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group. PMID:27757431

  17. Three novel serum biomarkers, miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206 for Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaka, Yasunari; Kishi, Soichiro; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Komaki, Hirofumi; Oya, Yasushi; Takeda, Shin-Ichi; Hashido, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited myogenic disorders. In clinical tests for these diseases, creatine kinase (CK) is generally used as diagnostic blood-based biomarker. However, because CK levels can be altered by various other factors, such as vigorous exercise, etc., false positive is observed. Therefore, three microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206, were previously reported as alternative biomarkers for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, no alternative biomarkers have been established for the other muscular dystrophies. We, therefore, evaluated whether these miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206 can be used as powerful biomarkers using the serum from muscular dystrophy patients including DMD, myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) by qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification assay. Statistical analysis indicated that all these miRNA levels in serum represented no significant differences between all muscle disorders examined in this study and controls by Bonferroni correction. However, some of these indicated significant differences without correction for testing multiple diseases (P < 0.05). The median values of miR-1 levels in the serum of patients with LGMD, FSHD, and BMD were approximately 5.5, 3.3 and 1.7 compared to that in controls, 0.68, respectively. Similarly, those of miR-133a and miR-206 levels in the serum of BMD patients were about 2.5 and 2.1 compared to those in controls, 1.03 and 1.32, respectively. Taken together, our data demonstrate that levels of miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206 in serum of BMD and miR-1 in sera of LGMD and FSHD patients showed no significant differences compared with those of controls by Bonferroni correction. However, the results might need increase in sample sizes to evaluate these three miRNAs as

  18. Dorzolamide increases retinal oxygen tension after branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Michael Hove; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Scherfig, Erik

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs.......To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs....

  19. Adaptive optics imaging of inherited retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michalis; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Patterson, Emily J; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-11-15

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy allows for non-invasive retinal phenotyping on a microscopic scale, thereby helping to improve our understanding of retinal diseases. An increasing number of natural history studies and ongoing/planned interventional clinical trials exploit AO ophthalmoscopy both for participant selection, stratification and monitoring treatment safety and efficacy. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolution of AO ophthalmoscopy, recent developments and its application to a broad range of inherited retinal diseases, including Stargardt disease, retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia. Finally, we describe the impact of this in vivo microscopic imaging on our understanding of disease pathogenesis, clinical trial design and outcome metrics, while recognising the limitation of the small cohorts reported to date. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob; Køber, Lars

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology...

  2. The heart in Becker muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and Bethlem myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; de Voogt, W. G.; la Rivière, G. V.

    1992-01-01

    We report a study, assessing involvement of the heart in 33 familial cases of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), 31 familiar cases of facioscapulohumeral (FSH) dystrophy, and 27 familial cases of Bethlem myopathy. In the patients with BMD, correlations of myocardial involvement with age and extent of

  3. Success Rates of Vitrectomy in Treatment of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Yasser Helmy; Ono, Kozue; Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Uematsu, Masafumi; Tsuiki, Eiko; Fujikawa, Azusa; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the anatomical success rates of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) after primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between December 2008 and October 2014 at Nagasaki University Hospital. The preoperative data recorded included the lens status, location of the retinal tear, whether a tear was visualized, presence of multiple tears, macula status, presence of peripheral lattice retinal degeneration, and best-corrected visual ac...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions APECED Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy ( APECED ) is an inherited condition that ...

  5. Disparities in the diagnostic process of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzer, Caleb; Meaney, F John; Andrews, Jennifer; Ciafaloni, Emma; Fox, Deborah J; James, Katherine A; Lu, Zhenqiang; Miller, Lisa; Pandya, Shree; Ouyang, Lijing; Cunniff, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    To determine whether sociodemographic factors are associated with delays at specific steps in the diagnostic process of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. We examined abstracted medical records for 540 males from population-based surveillance sites in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, and western New York. We used linear regressions to model the association of three sociodemographic characteristics with age at initial medical evaluation, first creatine kinase measurement, and earliest DNA analysis while controlling for changes in the diagnostic process over time. The analytical dataset included 375 males with information on family history of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy, neighborhood poverty levels, and race/ethnicity. Black and Hispanic race/ethnicity predicted older ages at initial evaluation, creatine kinase measurement, and DNA testing (P Becker muscular dystrophy predicted younger ages at initial evaluation, creatine kinase measurement and DNA testing (P Becker muscular dystrophy are evident even after adjustment for family history of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy and changes in the diagnostic process over time. Black and Hispanic children are initially evaluated at older ages than white children, and the gap widens at later steps in the diagnostic process.

  6. Peripheral nerve blocks as the sole anesthetic technique in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Yee Suk; Kwon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Mook; Kim, Soo Hyang

    2016-04-01

    General anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are associated with high risks of complications, including rhabdomyolysis, malignant hyperthermia, hemodynamic instability, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Here, we describe peripheral nerve blocks as a safe approach to anesthesia in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was scheduled to undergo surgery. A 22-year-old male patient was scheduled to undergo reduction and internal fixation of a left distal femur fracture. He had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 5 years of age, and had no locomotive capability except for that of the finger flexors and toe extensors. He had developed symptoms associated with dyspnea 5 years before and required intermittent ventilation. We blocked the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and parasacral plexus under ultrasound on the left leg. The patient underwent a successful operation using peripheral nerve blocks with no complications. In conclusion general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are unsafe approaches to anesthesia because of hemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. Peripheral nerve blocks are the best way to reduce the risks of critical complications, and are a safe and feasible approach to anesthesia in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  7. Bortezomib partially improves laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Zandra; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Holmberg, Johan; Carmignac, Virginie; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-05-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations in LAMA2 (the gene encoding laminin α2 chain), is a severe and incapacitating disease for which no therapy is yet available. We have recently demonstrated that proteasome activity is increased in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle and that treatment with the nonpharmaceutical proteasome inhibitor MG-132 reduces muscle pathology in laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. Here, we explore the use of the selective and therapeutic proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (currently used for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma) in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice and in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A muscle cells. Outcome measures included quantitative muscle morphology, gene and miRNA expression analyses, proteasome activity, motor activity, and survival. Bortezomib improved several histological hallmarks of disease, partially normalized miRNA expression (miR-1 and miR-133a), and enhanced body weight, locomotion, and survival of dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. In addition, bortezomib reduced proteasome activity in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A myoblasts and myotubes. These findings provide evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib partially reduces laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy. Investigation of the clinical efficacy of bortezomib administration in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A clinical trials may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An anti-angiogenic state in mice and humans with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahdenranta, J.; Pasqualini, R.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Hagedorn, M.; Stallcup, W. B.; Bucana, C. D.; Sidman, R. L.; Arap, W.

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal angiogenesis accompanies many pathological conditions including cancer, inflammation, and eye diseases. Proliferative retinopathy because of retinal neovascularization is a leading cause of blindness in developed countries. Another major cause of irreversible vision loss is retinitis

  9. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment. METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark...... was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...... (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]). CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other...

  10. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging. PMID:23271600

  11. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Kumar, Suresh; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-07-28

    The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  12. Retinal vascular calibres are significantly associated with cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Hanno, T.; Bertelsen, G.; Sjølie, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    . Association between retinal vessel calibre and the cardiovascular risk factors was assessed by multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses. Results: Retinal arteriolar calibre was independently associated with age, blood pressure, HbA1c and smoking in women and men, and with HDL cholesterol in men......Purpose: To describe the association between retinal vascular calibres and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: Population-based cross-sectional study including 6353 participants of the TromsO Eye Study in Norway aged 38-87years. Retinal arteriolar calibre (central retinal artery equivalent...... cardiovascular risk factors were independently associated with retinal vascular calibre, with stronger effect of HDL cholesterol and BMI in men than in women. Blood pressure and smoking contributed most to the explained variance....

  13. Differential diagnosis of retinal vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Herbort, Carl P; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2009-10-01

    Retinal vaculitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory eye condition that involves the retinal vessels. Detection of retinal vasculitis is made clinically, and confirmed with the help of fundus fluorescein angiography. Active vascular disease is characterized by exudates around retinal vessels resulting in white sheathing or cuffing of the affected vessels. In this review, a practical approach to the diagnosis of retinal vasculitis is discussed based on ophthalmoscopic and fundus fluorescein angiographic findings.

  14. [Prophylactic treatment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, S; Riss, B

    1981-08-01

    The indications for and results of prophylactic treatment of retinal detachment during a period of five years are reported and compared with the results in the literature. Half of the cases (3 out of 6 eyes) which developed a retinal detachment had been horse-shoe tears combined with a vitreous hemorrhage. For this reason a small buckle operation is recommended in these cases, to prevent further traction. Lattice degeneration should rather be observed than treated, except in special cases: This includes eyes where the fellow eye had a detachment from a lattice degeneration, cases in which one eye is blind from an uncured detachment or has no useful visual acuity, and eyes whose fellow eye has giant tears. In aphakic eyes treatment of lattice degeneration is recommended, because the incidence of detachment from these areas is high, especially in young aphakic cases. In one aphakic eye which had been photocoagulated several times the formation of a preretinal membrane was observed.

  15. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2014-09-05

    . We last searched the electronic databases on 19 February 2014. Textbooks regarding retinal detachment and the reference lists of relevant reports were reviewed for additional study reports. We contacted experts in the field for details of other published and unpublished studies. This review was designed to include randomized controlled trials in which one treatment for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration was compared with another treatment or no treatment. Initially, one author assessed the search results and collected relevant studies. Since no studies met the inclusion criteria, no studies were assessed for risk of bias. No data were extracted and no meta-analysis could be performed. No trials were found that met the inclusion criteria for this review. No conclusions could be reached about the effectiveness of surgical interventions to prevent retinal detachment in eyes with asymptomatic retinal breaks or lattice degeneration, or both. Current recommendations for treatment, based upon a consensus of expert opinion, should be assessed in a randomized controlled trial.

  16. Muscle pathology in myotonic dystrophy: light and electron microscopic investigation in eighteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadaj-Pakleza, A; Lusakowska, A; Sułek-Piątkowska, A; Krysa, W; Rajkiewicz, M; Kwieciński, H; Kamińska, A

    2011-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. Two known genetic subtypes include DM1 (myotonic dystrophy type 1) and DM2 (myotonic dystrophy type 2). Genetic testing is considered as the only reliable diagnostic criterion in myotonic dystrophies. Relatively little is known about DM1 and DM2 myopathology. Thus, the aim of our study was to characterise light and electron microscopic features of DM1 and DM2 in patients with genetically proven types of the disease. We studied 3 DM1 cases and 15 DM2 cases from which muscle biopsies were taken for diagnostic purposes during the period from 1973 to 2006, before genetic testing became available at our hospital. The DM1 group included 3 males (age at biopsy 15-19). The DM2 group included 15 patients (5 men and 10 women, age at biopsy 26-60). The preferential type 1 fibre atrophy was seen in all three DM1 cases in light microscopy, and substantial central nucleation was present in two biopsies. Electron microscopy revealed central nuclei in all three examined muscle biopsies. No other structural or degenerative changes were detected, probably due to the young age of our patients. Central nucleation, prevalence of type 2 muscle fibres, and the presence of pyknotic nuclear clumps were observed in DM2 patients in light microscopy. Among the ultrastructural abnormalities observed in our DM2 group, the presence of internal nuclei, severely atrophied muscle fibres, and lipofuscin accumulation were consistent findings. In addition, a variety of ultrastructural abnormalities were identified by us in DM2. It appears that no single ultrastructural abnormality is characteristic for the DM2 muscle pathology. It seems, however, that certain constellations of morphological changes might be indicative of certain types of myotonic dystrophy.

  17. Co-incidence of Turner syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy - an important problem for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowska, Ewa; Zimowski, Janusz; Cichoń-Kotek, Monika; Mrozińska, Agnieszka; Purzycka, Joanna; Wierzba, Jolanta; Limon, Janusz; Lipska-Ziętkiewicz, Beata S

    Turner syndrome is a relatively common chromosomal disorder which affects about one in 2000 live born females. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked recessive disorder affecting 1:3600 live born males. Considering the above, the coexistence of these two diseases may occur only anecdotally. Here, we report a 4 ½ year-old female with classical 45,X Turner syndrome who also had Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a point mutation in the dystrophin gene (c.9055delG). The patient showed the typical phenotype of Turner syndrome including distinctive dysmorphic features (short neck, low posterior hairline, wide position of nipples), aortic coarctation and feet lymphedema. Besides, she presented with an unusually early beginning of muscular dystrophy symptoms with infantile-onset motor developmental delay, intellectual disability and early calf muscular hypertrophy. The coexistence of an X-linked recessive disorder should be considered in women affected by Turner syndrome presenting with additional atypical clinical features.

  18. Mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) Gene Are the Major Cause of Autosomal Recessive Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Maugeri, Alessandra; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Blankenagel, Anita; Brunner, Han G.; Deutman, August F.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2000-01-01

    The photoreceptor cell–specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene (ABCA4; previously denoted “ABCR”) is mutated in most patients with autosomal recessive (AR) Stargardt disease (STGD1) or fundus flavimaculatus (FFM). In addition, a few cases with AR retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and AR cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) have been found to have ABCA4 mutations. To evaluate the importance of the ABCA4 gene as a cause of AR CRD, we selected 5 patients with AR CRD and 15 patients with isolated CRD, all fro...

  19. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feb 20, 2018 Gene Therapy May Be a Game-Changer for People With Inherited Retinal Disease Dec 19, 2017 ... the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  20. Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  1. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Buckner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA.

  2. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanie-Jahromi Fatemeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells with amniotic fluid (AF, RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Results Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1 confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  3. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanie-Jahromi, Fatemeh; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Davari, Maliheh; Ghaderi, Shima; Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Samiei, Shahram; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh; Pakravesh, Jalil; Bagheri, Abouzar

    2012-04-10

    Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers) during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells with amniotic fluid (AF), RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1) confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  4. Usher syndrome protein network functions in the retina and their relation to other retinal ciliopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorusch, Nasrin; Wunderlich, Kirsten; Bauss, Katharina; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined hereditary deaf-blindness. USH is genetically and clinically heterogeneous: 15 chromosomal loci assigned to 3 clinical types, USH1-3. All USH1 and 2 proteins are organized into protein networks by the scaffold proteins harmonin (USH1C), whirlin (USH2D) and SANS (USH1G). This has contributed essentially to our current understanding of the USH protein function in the eye and the ear and explains why defects in proteins of different families cause very similar phenotypes. Ongoing in depth analyses of USH protein networks in the eye indicated cytoskeletal functions as well as roles in molecular transport processes and ciliary cargo delivery in photoreceptor cells. The analysis of USH protein networks revealed molecular links of USH to other ciliopathies, including non-syndromic inner ear defects and isolated retinal dystrophies but also to kidney diseases and syndromes like the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. These findings provide emerging evidence that USH is a ciliopathy molecularly related to other ciliopathies, which opens an avenue for common therapy strategies to treat these diseases.

  5. Mitochondrial disorders in progressive muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kharlamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review gives data on the role of mitochondrial disorders in the pathogenesis of different progressive muscular dystrophies. It describes changes in Duchenne, limb-girdle, facial scapulohumeral (Landuzi—Degerina muscular dystrophies. The review is based on both clinical and experimental animal studies. Along with the implication of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of the diseases, it describes muscular dystrophy treatment options compensating for energy disorders and overcoming oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial studies in different muscle diseases hand physicians treatment modalities that fail to lead to recovery, but compensate for disorders caused by mutations in the genetic apparatus. 

  6. Multifocal electroretinogram and central visual field testing in central areolar choroidal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogan, Fatih Cakir; Dinç, Umut Asli; Erdem, Uzeyir; Ozge, Gokhan; Sobaci, Gungor

    2010-01-01

    To study multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) and its relation to retinal sensitivity assessed by Humphrey visual field (HVF) analysis in central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD). Seven eyes of 4 patients with CACD and 15 normal control subjects were examined. mfERG and central 30/2 HVF were tested for each participant. Ring analysis in mfERG was evaluated. HVF results were evaluated in 5 concentric rings in order to compare the results to concentric ring analysis in mfERG. The differences between control subjects and patients were evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test and the correlations were assessed by Spearman test. Mean Snellen acuity was 0.49+/-0.10 in patients. HVF revealed central scotoma in 6 of 7 eyes (85.7%), whereas a paracentral scotoma extending to fixation point was detected in 1 eye. The retinal sensitivities in 5 concentric rings in HVF were significantly lower (p<0.001 for ring 1 to ring 4, and p=0.017 in ring 5) in CACD patients. Similarly, CACD patients had lower P1/N1 amplitudes (p<0.05) and delayed P1/N1 implicit times (p<0.05). In CACD, in the areas of scotoma detected by HVF, mfERG values were depressed. However, both mfERG and HVF abnormalities were found outside the areas of ophthalmoscopically normal retinal areas.

  7. CERKL, a retinal disease gene, encodes an mRNA-binding protein that localizes in compact and untranslated mRNPs associated with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alihamze Fathinajafabadi

    Full Text Available The function of CERKL (CERamide Kinase Like, a causative gene of retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy, still awaits characterization. To approach its cellular role we have investigated the subcellular localization and interaction partners of the full length CERKL isoform, CERKLa of 532 amino acids, in different cell lines, including a photoreceptor-derived cell line. We demonstrate that CERKLa is a main component of compact and untranslated mRNPs and that associates with other RNP complexes such as stress granules, P-bodies and polysomes. CERKLa is a protein that binds through its N-terminus to mRNAs and interacts with other mRNA-binding proteins like eIF3B, PABP, HSP70 and RPS3. Except for eIF3B, these interactions depend on the integrity of mRNAs but not of ribosomes. Interestingly, the C125W CERKLa pathological mutant does not interact with eIF3B and is absent from these complexes. Compact mRNPs containing CERKLa also associate with microtubules and are found in neurites of neural differentiated cells. These localizations had not been reported previously for any member of the retinal disorders gene family and should be considered when investigating the pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutical approaches in these diseases.

  8. Prescreening whole exome sequencing results from patients with retinal degeneration for variants in genes associated with retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant L

    2017-12-01

    heterozygous mutation identified that would cause recessive disease and 13% had no obviously pathogenic variants and no family members available to perform segregation analysis. Eleven subjects are good candidates for novel gene discovery. Two de novo mutations were identified that resulted in dominant retinal degeneration.Conclusion: Whole exome sequencing allows for thorough genetic analysis of candidate genes as well as novel gene discovery. It allows for an unbiased analysis of genetic variants to reduce the chance that the pathogenic mutation will be missed due to incomplete or inaccurate family history or analysis at the early stage of a syndromic form of retinal degeneration. Keywords: retinal degeneration, genetic diagnosis, retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, cone–rod dystrophy, whole exome sequencing

  9. The surface morphology of retinal breaks and lattice retinal degeneration. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M R; Streeten, B W

    1986-02-01

    In 14 of 110 eye bank eyes, lesions characteristic of peripheral retinal surface pathology were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These included operculated and flap tears, trophic round holes, lattice degeneration with holes, and paravascular retinal "pitting" degeneration. By SEM, the edges of the retinal breaks were covered by smooth cellular membranes, merging peripherally with a meshwork of vitreous fibrils. The membrane cells had poorly defined borders, a pitted surface, and variable numbers of microvilli consistent with glia. Lattice surfaces and foci of paravascular retinal degeneration were covered by similar membrane, but showed characteristic differences. It appears that breaks in the internal limiting membrane always stimulate proliferation of preretinal glial membranes. Similar cellular morphology of the membranes associated with breaks is consistent with a common cell of origin. Limited proliferation of these membranes suggests that surface gliosis is normally inhibited when the cells contact either intact basement membrane or vitreous.

  10. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  12. Clinical and genetic spectrum in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semplicini, Claudio; Vissing, John; Dahlqvist, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical spectrum of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2E (LGMD2E) and to investigate whether genetic or biochemical features can predict the phenotype of the disease. METHODS: All LGMD2E patients followed in participating centers were included. A specific clinical protoc...

  13. Radiographic and ultrasonographic features of hypertrophic feline muscular dystrophy in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, C.R.; Gaschen, F.P.; Ackerman, N.

    1992-01-01

    Hypertrophic fellne musculer dystrophy has been reported as an X-linked inherited deficiency of a cytoskeletal myofiber protein called dystrophin. This report deserlbes the radiographic and ultrasonographic abnormalities of two male littermate domestic short-hair cats and reviews the previous reported findings assoclated with hypertrophic feline muscular dystrophy. The thoracic radiographic abnormalities included: progressive cardiomegaly, large convex, scalloped irregularities associated with the vetral aspect of the diaphragm, and variable degrees of esophageal dilation (megaesophagus) with associated cranioventral aspiration pneumonia. Echocardiographic features included: concentric left vetricular wall thickening, increased left ventricular and diastolic and systolic dimensions, and an increase in endocardial echogenicity. Abdominal radiographic abnormalities included: hepatosplenomegaly, peritoneal effusion, renomegaly, adrenal gland mineralization, and paralumbar and diaphragmatic musculature enlargement. Abdomlnal ultrasonographic abnormalities included: irregularly thickened muscular portion of the diaphragm; hypoechogenicity of the liver; peritoneal effusion; hepatosplenomegaly; renomegaly with hyperechoic cortex and medulla; and adrenal gland mineralization. The irregular scalloped appearance of the diaphragm (particularly along the ventral/sternal margin) was a consistenl radiographic abnormlity in the two cats with hypertrophic feline muscular dystrophy after the age of 7 months. This finding was confirmed by ultrasound as a thickened irregular, hyperechoic diaphragm. A diagnosis of hypertrophic feline muscular dystrophy should be strongly suspected if this abnormality is identified

  14. Cell membrane integrity in myotonic dystrophy type 1: implications for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, A.M.M.; Kranzen, J.; Croes, H.J.E.; Bijl, S.; Broek, W.J.A.A. van den; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Wieringa, B.; Mulders, S.A.; Wansink, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disease caused by toxic RNA from a DMPK gene carrying an expanded (CTG*CAG)n repeat. Promising strategies for treatment of DM1 patients are currently being tested. These include antisense oligonucleotides and drugs for elimination of expanded RNA or

  15. INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING-DEPENDENT RETINAL STRUCTURAL CHANGES AFTER VITRECTOMY IN RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Toshio; Tachibana, Takashi; Notomi, Shoji; Koyanagi, Yoshito; Murakami, Yusuke; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Enaida, Hiroshi; Murata, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Taiji; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2018-03-01

    To examine retinal changes after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, we used 3-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment cases. The 68 eyes from 67 patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were studied, including 35 detached macula cases (51%) and 33 attached macula cases. Internal limiting membrane peeling was performed with fine forceps after brilliant blue G staining. The 3D-OCT images were obtained with volume-rendering technologies from cross-sectional OCT images. The 3D-OCT detected 45 eyes (66%) with ILM peeling-dependent retinal changes, including dissociated optic nerve fiber layer appearance, dimple sign, temporal macular thinning, ILM peeling area thinning, or forceps-related retinal thinning. The ILM peeled area was detectable in only 9 eyes with 3D-OCT, whereas it was undetectable in other 59 eyes. The dissociated optic nerve fiber layer appearance was detected in 8 of the total cases (12%), and dimple signs were observed in 14 cases (21%). Forceps-related thinning was also noted in eight cases (24%) of attached macula cases and in four cases (11%) of detached macula cases. No postoperative macular pucker was noted in the observational period. The 3D-OCT clearly revealed spatial and time-dependent retinal changes after ILM peeling. The changes occurred in 2 months and remained thereafter.

  16. Retinal shows its true colours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coughlan, N. J.A.; Adamson, B. D.; Gamon, L.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal is one of Nature's most important and widespread chromophores, exhibiting remarkable versatility in its function and spectral response, depending on its protein environment. Reliable spectroscopic and photochemical data for the isolated retinal molecule are essential for calibrating theor...

  17. Retinal findings in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions and importance: Drusen remain the ocular stigmata for MPGN occuring at an early age. The retinal disease is progressive with gradual thickening of Bruch's membrane and occurrence of retinal pigment epithelium detachment.

  18. Delayed healing of corneal epithelium after phototherapeutic keratectomy for lattice dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sujata; Langenbucher, Achim; Seitz, Berthold

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the time period necessary for complete epithelial healing after phototherapeutic keratectomy (o-PTK) carried out for various superficial corneal opacities. A total of 197 eyes were divided into 9 groups: group 1, Cogan dystrophy including recurrences (n = 15); group 2, Reis Bucklers dystrophy including recurrences (n = 12); group 3, granular dystrophy including recurrences (n = 63); group 4, lattice dystrophy including recurrences (n = 19); group 5, macular dystrophy including recurrences (n = 10); group 6, herpetic scars (n = 5); group 7, corneal scars of nonherpetic origin (including scrofulous, traumatic, central keratoconus, post-pterygium surgery) (n = 31); group 8, Salzmann nodular degeneration (n = 22); and group 9, miscellaneous (such as bullous keratopathy, acute chemical burn, corneal degeneration) (n = 20). After o-PTK, patients were examined daily at the slit lamp using fluorescein and blue light. The time period necessary for complete healing of the epithelial defect was compared among these groups. Delayed healing was considered where the epithelium was not closed after 7 days. One hundred sixty-one eyes (95%) healed within 7 days. Overall, 63%, 80%, and 85% of epithelial defects were closed within 3, 4, and 5 days, respectively. Out of 9 eyes that had delayed healing, 6 eyes (67%) belonged to lattice dystrophy category. Mean time taken for healing in group 4 (8.6 +/- 8.4 days) was significantly longer than those in group 1 (3.0 +/- 1.5 days, P = 0.009), group 2 (3.7 +/- 3.1 days, P = 0.03), group 3 (3.1 +/- 1.5 days, P = 0.001), group 5 (2.7 +/- 0.8 days, P = 0.01), group 7 (3.6 +/- 2.4 days, P = 0.007), group 8 (3.3 +/- 1.3 days, P = 0.009), and group 9 (3.0 +/- 1.9 days, P = 0.011). Eyes with lattice corneal dystrophy suffered from delayed epithelial healing after o-PTK. In addition to adequate counseling, these patients should be followed up closely until complete closure of the epithelium to avoid ulceration, scarring, or even

  19. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed.

  20. Respiratory muscle training in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodillo, E; Noble-Jamieson, C M; Aber, V; Heckmatt, J Z; Muntoni, F; Dubowitz, V

    1989-01-01

    Twenty two boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were entered into a randomised double blind crossover trial to compare respiratory muscle training with a Triflow II inspirometer and 'placebo' training with a mini peak flow meter. Supine posture was associated with significantly impaired lung function, but respiratory muscle training showed no benefit.

  1. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  2. Duchenne muscular dystrophy models show their age

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of appropriate animal models has hampered efforts to develop therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A new mouse model lacking both dystrophin and telomerase (Sacco et al., 2010) closely mimics the pathological progression of human DMD and shows that muscle stem cell activity is a key determinant of disease severity.

  3. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Neurology Society. (2005). Practice parameter: Corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne dystrophy. Neurology, 64 , 13-20. Retrieved June 22, 2012, ... Statement. (2004). Respiratory care of the patient with Duchenne muscular ... American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 170, 456-465. ...

  4. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  5. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  6. Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a molecular service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1987 a carrier detection and prenatal diagnostic service for. Duchenne muscular dystrophy using molecular technology was instituted at the Department of Human Genetics, Uni- versity of Cape Town, to serve affe.cted families in southern. Africa. DNA samples from 100 affected male subjects and. 350 of their relatives ...

  7. Aberrant Myokine Signaling in Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Nakamori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1 and 2 (DM2 are dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by a toxic gain of function of expanded CUG and CCUG repeats, respectively. Although both disorders are clinically similar, congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM, a severe DM form, is found only in DM1. CDM is also characterized by muscle fiber immaturity not observed in adult DM, suggesting specific pathological mechanisms. Here, we revealed upregulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in CDM muscles. We also found a correlation between muscle immaturity and not only IL-6 expression but also expanded CTG repeat length and CpG methylation status upstream of the repeats. Aberrant CpG methylation was associated with transcriptional dysregulation at the repeat locus, increasing the toxic RNA burden that upregulates IL-6. Because the IL-6 pathway is involved in myocyte maturation and muscle atrophy, our results indicate that enhanced RNA toxicity contributes to severe CDM phenotypes through aberrant IL-6 signaling. : Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM manifests characteristic genetic (very large CTG repeat expansions, epigenetic (CpG hypermethylation upstream of the repeat, and phenotypic (muscle immaturity features not seen in adult DM. Nakamori et al. find phenotype-genotype and epigenotype correlation in CDM muscle and reveal involvement of the IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in the disease process. Keywords: CTCF, ER stress, IL-6, muscular dystrophy, NF-κB, trinucleotide, cytokine, splicing

  8. Hereditary muscular dystrophies and the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, M. C. E.; Pinto, Y. M.; Merkies, I. S. J.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; Crijns, H. J. G. M.; Faber, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a common clinical manifestation of neuromuscular disorders, particularly of muscular dystrophies. Heart muscle cells as well as specialized conducting myocardial fibres may be affected by the dystrophic process. The incidence and nature of cardiac involvement vary with different

  9. Clinical results from low-level laser therapy in patients with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koev, K.; Avramov, L.; Borissova, E.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine long-term effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (CRDs). A He-Ne Laser with continuous emission at 633 nm (01 mW/cm2) was used on five patients with autosomal dominant pedigree of Romani origin with non-syndromic CRDs. The laser radiation was applied transpupillary to the macula six times for three minutes every other day. The experiment was conducted for a period of three years. The clinical evaluation included best corrected visual acuity determination, funduscopy, Humphrey perimetry, Farnsworth Hue-28 color testing, fluorescein angiography, and full-field electroretinogram (ERG). All affected individuals presented reduced visual acuity (0.01 – 0.4) and photophobia. The funduscopic examination and fluorescein angiography revealed advanced changes including bone spicule-like pigment deposits in the midperiphery and the macular area, along with retinal atrophy, narrowing of the vessels, and waxy optic discs. The visual fields demonstrated central scotoma. The electrophysiologic examination of the patients detected an abnormal cone-rod ERG (20 – 30 μV) with photopic amplitudes more markedly reduced than the scotopic. Flicker responses were missing and Farnsworth Hue-28 test found protanopia. There was a statistically significant increase in the visual acuity (p<0.001, end of study versus baseline) for CRDs patients for the period of three years after the treatment with LLLT. Following the LLLT, the central absolute scotoma in CRDs was reduced, as was the prevalence of metamorphopsia in CRDs. This study shows that LLLT may prove be a novel long-lasting therapeutic option for both forms of CRDs. It is a highly effective treatment resulting in a long-term improvement of the visual acuity.

  10. A method for volumetric retinal tissue oxygen tension imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Anthony E; Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-Yu; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2018-01-01

    Inadequate retinal oxygenation occurs in many vision-threatening retinal diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal vascular occlusions, and age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, techniques that assess retinal oxygenation are necessary to understand retinal physiology in health and disease. The purpose of the current study is to report a method for the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of retinal tissue oxygen tension (tPO 2 ) in rats. Imaging was performed in Long Evans pigmented rats under systemic normoxia (N = 6) or hypoxia (N = 3). A vertical laser line was horizontally scanned on the retina and a series of optical section phase-delayed phosphorescence images were acquired. From these images, phosphorescence volumes at each phase delay were constructed and a 3D retinal tPO 2 volume was generated. Retinal tPO 2 volumes were quantitatively analyzed by generating retinal depth profiles of mean tPO 2 (M tPO2 ) and the spatial variation of tPO 2 (SV tPO2 ). The effects of systemic condition (normoxia/hypoxia) and retinal depth on M tPO2 and SV tPO2 were determined by mixed linear model. Each 3D retinal tPO 2 volume was approximately 500 × 750 × 200 μm (horizontal × vertical × depth) and consisted of 45 en face tPO 2 images through the retinal depth. M tPO2 at the chorioretinal interface was significantly correlated with systemic arterial oxygen tension (P = 0.007; N = 9). There were significant effects of both systemic condition and retinal depth on M tPO2 and SV tPO2 , such that both were lower under hypoxia than normoxia and higher in the outer retina than inner retina (P < 0.001). For the first time, 3D imaging of retinal tPO 2 was demonstrated, with potential future application for assessment of physiological alterations in animal models of retinal diseases.

  11. Identification of a Novel Homozygous Nonsense Mutation Confirms the Implication of GNAT1 in Rod-Cone Dystrophy.

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    Cécile Méjécase

    Full Text Available GNAT1, encoding the transducin subunit Gα, is an important element of the phototransduction cascade. Mutations in this gene have been associated with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness. Recently, a homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation was identified in a patient with late-onset rod-cone dystrophy. After exclusion of mutations in genes underlying progressive inherited retinal disorders, by targeted next generation sequencing, a 32 year-old male sporadic case with severe rod-cone dystrophy and his unaffected parents were investigated by whole exome sequencing. This led to the identification of a homozygous nonsense variant, c.963C>A p.(Cys321* in GNAT1, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was heterozygous for this variant whereas the variant was absent in the father. c.963C>A p.(Cys321* is predicted to produce a shorter protein that lacks critical sites for the phototransduction cascade. Our work confirms that the phenotype and the mode of inheritance associated with GNAT1 variants can vary from autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness to autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy.

  12. A gene for late-onset fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

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    Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Bonneau, D.; Souied, E.; Camuzat, A.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Dufier, J.L. [Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France); Amalric, P. [Consultation d`Ophtalmologie, Albi (France); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-02-01

    Fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease responsible for a progressive loss of visual acuity in adulthood, with pigmentary changes of the macula, perimacular flecks, and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Since this condition shares several clinical features with Stargardt disease, which has been mapped to chromosome 1p21-p13, we tested the disease for linkage to chromosome 1p. We report the mapping of the disease locus to chromosome 1p13-p21, in the genetic interval defined by loci D1S435 and D1S415, in four multiplex families (maximum lod score 4.79 at recombination fraction 0 for probe AFM217xb2 at locus D1S435). Thus, despite differences in the age at onset, clinical course, and severity, fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy and Stargardt disease are probably allelic disorders. This result supports the view that allelic mutations produce a continuum of macular dystrophies, with onset in early childhood to late adulthood. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  14. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  15. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

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    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  16. Clinical-Diagnostic Features of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Children

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    Umida T. Omonova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a severe, progressive disease that affects about 1 out of every 5,000 male infants; this is the most destructive of all muscular dystrophies, which worsens rapidly. In this study, we performed a clinical analysis of 37 children with DMD. They ranged in age from 3 to 15 years, mean age being 7.8±0.48 years. The mean age at onset was 4.3±0.36 years and ranged from birth to 8 years. The biochemical examination included the determination of the serum levels of the following enzymes, AST, ALT, CPK-MM, and LDH. A genealogical analysis was conducted among 240 first-degree relatives of children with DMD. Electroneuromyography examination included registration of the biopotentials of the hand and foot muscles, measurement of the muscle response (M-wave and the late-evoked responses. The clinical-diagnostic features of DMD in children were characterized.

  17. Emerging strategies for cell and gene therapy of the muscular dystrophies

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    Muir, Lindsey A.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of over 40 disorders that are characterised by muscle weakness and wasting. The most common are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy, which result from mutations within the gene encoding dystrophin; myotonic dystrophy type 1, which results from an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene; and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, which is associated with contractions in the subtelomeric region ...

  18. Exome sequencing identifies compound heterozygous mutations in CYP4V2 in a pedigree with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a heterogeneous group of progressive retinal degenerations characterized by pigmentation and atrophy in the mid-periphery of the retina. Twenty two subjects from a four-generation Chinese family with RP and thin cornea, congenital cataract and high myopia is reported in this study. All family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations. Patients of the family presented with bone spicule-shaped pigment deposits in retina, retinal vascular attenuation, retinal and choroidal dystrophy, as well as punctate opacity of the lens, reduced cornea thickness and high myopia. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from all patients and their family members for genetic analysis. After mutation analysis in a few known RP candidate genes, exome sequencing was used to analyze the exomes of 3 patients III2, III4, III6 and the unaffected mother II2. A total of 34,693 variations shared by 3 patients were subjected to several filtering steps against existing variation databases. Identified variations were verified in the rest family members by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Compound heterozygous c.802-8_810del17insGC and c.1091-2A>G mutations of the CYP4V2 gene, known as genetic defects for Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy, were identified as causative mutations for RP of this family.

  19. Mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene are the major cause of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, A; Klevering, B J; Rohrschneider, K; Blankenagel, A; Brunner, H G; Deutman, A F; Hoyng, C B; Cremers, F P

    2000-10-01

    The photoreceptor cell-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene (ABCA4; previously denoted "ABCR") is mutated, in most patients, with autosomal recessive (AR) Stargardt disease (STGD1) or fundus flavimaculatus (FFM). In addition, a few cases with AR retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and AR cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) have been found to have ABCA4 mutations. To evaluate the importance of the ABCA4 gene as a cause of AR CRD, we selected 5 patients with AR CRD and 15 patients from Germany and The Netherlands with isolated CRD. Single-strand conformation-polymorphism analysis and sequencing revealed 19 ABCA4 mutations in 13 (65%) of 20 patients. In six patients, mutations were identified in both ABCA4 alleles; in seven patients, mutations were detected in one allele. One complex ABCA4 allele (L541P;A1038V) was found exclusively in German patients with CRD; one patient carried this complex allele homozygously, and five others were compound heterozygous. These findings suggest that mutations in the ABCA4 gene are the major cause of AR CRD. A primary role of the ABCA4 gene in STGD1/FFM and AR CRD, together with the gene's involvement in an as-yet-unknown proportion of cases with AR RP, strengthens the idea that mutations in the ABCA4 gene could be the most frequent cause of inherited retinal dystrophy in humans.

  20. Distrofia em forma-de-borboleta: relato de caso Butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy: case report

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    David Leonardo Cruvinel Isaac

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de distrofia macular em forma-de-borboleta, diagnosticado em paciente do sexo masculino, apresentando concomitante atrofia do epitélio pigmentado da retina e perda visual central em um dos olhos. Os achados relatados contrariam conceitos inicialmente disponíveis de curso sempre benigno da doença. A lesão característica e bem delimitada no pólo posterior e a angiofluoresceinografia, permitiram estabelecer o diagnóstico. Descreve-se ainda, pela primeira vez, os achados da distrofia em forma-de-borboleta à tomografia de coerência óptica.The authors present a case of butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy diagnosed in a male patient, with retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and central visual acuity decrease in one of the eyes. The evolution of this case was not benign as described in previous reports. A well-defined lesion located in the posterior pole of both eyes associated with fluorescein angiography allowed the diagnosis of this pattern dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography was performed, showing the aspects of the pathology, for the first time.

  1. Spontaneous Regression of Choroidal Neovascularization in a Patient with Pattern Dystrophy

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    Anastasios Anastasakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a case of a patient with pattern dystrophy (PD associated choroidal neovascularization (CNV that resolved spontaneously without treatment. Methods. A 69-year-old male patient was referred to our unit, for evaluation of a recent visual loss (metamorphopsias in his left eye. Fundus examination, fundus autofluorescence imaging, and fluorescein angiography showed a choroidal neovascular membrane in his left eye. Since visual acuity was satisfactory the patient elected observation. Clinical examination and OCT testing were repeated at 6 and 12 months after presentation. Results. Visual acuity remained stable at the level of 0.9 (baseline BCVA during the follow-up period (12 months. Repeat OCT testing showed complete spontaneous regression of the choroidal neovascular membrane without evidence of intra- or subretinal fluid in both follow-up visits. Conclusions. Spontaneous regression of choroidal neovascularization can occur in patients with retinal dystrophies and associated choroidal neovascular membranes. The decision to treat or observe these patients relies strongly on the presenting visual acuity, since, in isolated instances, spontaneous resolution of choroidal neovascularization may occur.

  2. Nondiabetic retinal pathology - prevalence in diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Nathan; Jackson, Claire; Spurling, Geoffrey; Cranstoun, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of photographic signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology in Australian general practice patients with diabetes. Three hundred and seven patients with diabetes underwent retinal photography at two general practices, one of which was an indigenous health centre. The images were assessed for signs of pathology by an ophthalmologist. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were detected in 31% of subjects with adequate photographs. Features suspicious of glaucoma were detected in 7.7% of subjects. Other abnormalities detected included signs of age related macular degeneration (1.9%), epiretinal membranes (2.4%), vascular pathology (9.6%), chorioretinal lesions (2.9%), and congenital disc anomalies (2.9%). Indigenous Australian patients were more likely to have signs of retinal pathology and glaucoma. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were frequently encountered. In high risk groups, general practice based diabetic retinopathy screening may reduce the incidence of preventable visual impairment, beyond the benefits of detection of diabetic retinopathy alone.

  3. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Pozdeyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of optical coherence tomography («RTVue-100,» USA. The fundography was carried out using a Nikon NF505‑AF (Japan fundus camera. All patients were examined with a Goldmann lens.Results: Optical coherence tomography was used to evaluate different kinds of peripheral retinal degenerations, such as lattice and snail track degeneration, isolated retinal tears, cystoid retinal degeneration, pathological hyperpigmentation, retinoschisis and cobblestone degeneration. The following morphometric data were studied: dimensions of the lesion (average length, retinal thickness along the edge of the lesion, retinal thickness at the base of the lesion and the vitreoretinal interface.Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a promising in vivo visualization method which is useful in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions and tractions. It also provides a comprehensive protocolling system and monitoring. It will enable ophthalmologists to better define laser and surgical treatment indications and evaluate therapy effectiveness.

  4. Quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular characteristics and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol Y; Tay, Wan T; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie J; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong L; Lau, Qiangfeng P; Zhu, Ai L; Klein, Ronald; Saw, Seang M; Wong, Tien Y

    2011-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of blood pressure on a spectrum of quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular signs. Retinal photographs from the Singapore Malay Eye Study, a population-based cross-sectional study of 3280 (78.7% response) persons aged 40-80 years, were analyzed. Quantitative changes in the retinal vasculature (branching angle, vascular tortuosity, fractal dimension, and vascular caliber) were measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. Qualitative signs, including focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN), arteriovenous nicking (AVN), opacification of the arteriolar wall (OAW), and retinopathy (e.g., microaneurysms, retinal hemorrhages), were assessed from photographs by trained technicians. After excluding persons with diabetes and ungradable photographs, 1913 persons provided data for this analysis. In multivariable linear regression models controlling for age, sex, BMI, use of antihypertensive medication, and other factors, retinal arteriolar branching asymmetry ratio, arteriolar tortuosity, venular tortuosity, fractal dimension, arteriolar caliber, venular caliber, FAN, AVN, and retinopathy were independently associated with mean arterial blood pressure. In contrast, arteriolar/venular branching angle, venular branching asymmetry ratio and OAW were not related to blood pressure. Retinal arteriolar caliber (sβ = -0.277) and FAN (sβ = 0.170) had the strongest associations with mean arterial blood pressure, and higher blood pressure levels were associated with increasing number of both quantitative and qualitative retinal vascular signs (P trend qualitative retinal vascular signs, with the number of signs increasing with higher blood pressure levels.

  5. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis-A case report

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    Prasad Palimar

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42 year old man presented with acute bilateral uveitis and necrotizing retinitis. Systemic investigations including test for AIDS and CMV retinitis were negative. Despite oral Acyclovir, both eyes progressed rapidly to retinal detachment with loss of vision. Early recognition is necessary to diagnose the bilateral acute retinal necrosis syndrome and initiate treatment. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis (BARN is a term first coined by Young and Bird in 1978 although the syndrome had been originally described by Urayama et al as an unilateral condition. This syndrome is characterized by the triad of acute confluent peripheral necrotizing retinitis, moderate to severe vasculitis and vitritis in an otherwise healthy individual. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs within two to three months of the onset of the disease and the second eye is involved in 36% of patients, usually within 6 weeks. We herein report a patient who presented with simultaneous BARN leading to retinal detachment in a matter of days. Also, to our knowledge this is the first report of this condition in India.

  6. Retinal glia promote dorsal root ganglion axon regeneration.

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    Barbara Lorber

    Full Text Available Axon regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS is limited by several factors including a lack of neurotrophic support. Recent studies have shown that glia from the adult rat CNS, specifically retinal astrocytes and Müller glia, can promote regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons. In the present study we investigated whether retinal glia also exert a growth promoting effect outside the visual system. We found that retinal glial conditioned medium significantly enhanced neurite growth and branching of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG in culture. Furthermore, transplantation of retinal glia significantly enhanced regeneration of DRG axons past the dorsal root entry zone after root crush in adult rats. To identify the factors that mediate the growth promoting effects of retinal glia, mass spectrometric analysis of retinal glial conditioned medium was performed. Apolipoprotein E and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC were found to be present in high abundance, a finding further confirmed by western blotting. Inhibition of Apolipoprotein E and SPARC significantly reduced the neuritogenic effects of retinal glial conditioned medium on DRG in culture, suggesting that Apolipoprotein E and SPARC are the major mediators of this regenerative response.

  7. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Pozdeyeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of optical coherence tomography («RTVue-100,» USA. The fundography was carried out using a Nikon NF505‑AF (Japan fundus camera. All patients were examined with a Goldmann lens.Results: Optical coherence tomography was used to evaluate different kinds of peripheral retinal degenerations, such as lattice and snail track degeneration, isolated retinal tears, cystoid retinal degeneration, pathological hyperpigmentation, retinoschisis and cobblestone degeneration. The following morphometric data were studied: dimensions of the lesion (average length, retinal thickness along the edge of the lesion, retinal thickness at the base of the lesion and the vitreoretinal interface.Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a promising in vivo visualization method which is useful in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions and tractions. It also provides a comprehensive protocolling system and monitoring. It will enable ophthalmologists to better define laser and surgical treatment indications and evaluate therapy effectiveness.

  8. Late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Stargardt`s disease (MIM 248200), originally described in 1909, is an autosomal recessive condition of childhood, characterized by a sudden and bilateral loss of central vision. Typically, it has an early onset (7 to 12 years), a rapidly progressive course and a poor final outcome. The central area of the retina (macula) displays pigmentary changes in a ring form with depigmentation and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). Perimacular yellowish spots, termed fundus flavimaculatus, are observed in a high percentage of patients. We have recently reported the genetic mapping of Stargardt`s disease to chromosome 1p13. On the other hand, considering that fundus flavimaculatus (MIM 230100) is another form of fleck fundus disease, with a Stargardt-like retinal aspect but with a late-onset and a more progressive course, we decided to test the hypothesis of allelism between typical Stargardt`s disease and late-onset autosomal recessive fundus flavimaculatus. Significant pairwise lod scores were obtained in each of four multiplex families (11 affected individuals, 12 relatives) with four markers of the 1p13 region (Z = 4.79, 4.64, 3.07, 3.16 at loci D1S435, D1S424, D1S236, and D1S415, respectively at {theta} = 0). Multipoint analysis showed that the best estimate for location of the disease gene is between D1S424 and D1S236 (maximum lod score of 5.20) as also observed in Stargardt`s disease. Our results are consistent with the location of the gene responsible of the late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy in the 1p13 region and raise the hypothesis of either allelic mutational events or contiguous genes in this chromosomal region. The question of possible relationship with some age-related macular dystrophies in now open to debate.

  9. Mutations in CEP78 Cause Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Hearing Loss Associated with Primary-Cilia Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Farinelli, Pietro; Giangreco, Basilio; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Mbefo, Martial K; Bedoni, Nicola; Kjellström, Ulrika; El Zaoui, Ikram; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Balzano, Sara; Cisarova, Katarina; Messina, Andrea; Decembrini, Sarah; Plainis, Sotiris; Blazaki, Styliani V; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Moulin, Alexandre P; Cremers, Frans P M; Roepman, Ronald; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Andréasson, Sten; Rivolta, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Cone-rod degeneration (CRD) belongs to the disease spectrum of retinal degenerations, a group of hereditary disorders characterized by an extreme clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It mainly differentiates from other retinal dystrophies, and in particular from the more frequent disease retinitis pigmentosa, because cone photoreceptors degenerate at a higher rate than rod photoreceptors, causing severe deficiency of central vision. After exome analysis of a cohort of individuals with CRD, we identified biallelic mutations in the orphan gene CEP78 in three subjects from two families: one from Greece and another from Sweden. The Greek subject, from the island of Crete, was homozygous for the c.499+1G>T (IVS3+1G>T) mutation in intron 3. The Swedish subjects, two siblings, were compound heterozygotes for the nearby mutation c.499+5G>A (IVS3+5G>A) and for the frameshift-causing variant c.633delC (p.Trp212Glyfs(∗)18). In addition to CRD, these three individuals had hearing loss or hearing deficit. Immunostaining highlighted the presence of CEP78 in the inner segments of retinal photoreceptors, predominantly of cones, and at the base of the primary cilium of fibroblasts. Interaction studies also showed that CEP78 binds to FAM161A, another ciliary protein associated with retinal degeneration. Finally, analysis of skin fibroblasts derived from affected individuals revealed abnormal ciliary morphology, as compared to that of control cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that mutations in CEP78 cause a previously undescribed clinical entity of a ciliary nature characterized by blindness and deafness but clearly distinct from Usher syndrome, a condition for which visual impairment is due to retinitis pigmentosa. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Study of CAP-1002 in Ambulatory and Non-Ambulatory Patients With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-17

    Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  11. Confirmation of linkage of Best`s macular dystrophy to 11q13, and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

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    Mansergh, F.C.; Kenna, P.F.; Farrar, G.J. [Trinity College, Dublin (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Best`s macular dystrophy, also known as vitelliform macular degeneration, is an autosomal dominant, early onset form of macular degeneration. The disease is characterized by a roughly circular deposit of lipofuscin beneath the pigment epithelium of the retinal macula. Linkage studies were performed in two families, one Irish and one German, segregating typical Best`s macular dystrophy. In the Irish family (BTMD1), linkage analysis mapped the disease causing gene to chromosome 11q13, in a 10 cM region between the microsatellite markers PYGM and D11S871. Both markers showed different recombinants with the disease phenotype. This is a region that has previously shown linkage in families affected with Best`s macular dystrophy. Lod scores of 9.63, 9.12, 6.92, and 6.83 at zero recombination, were obtained with markers D11S1344, D11S1361, D11S1357 and D11S903, respectively. This data places the disease locus definitvely within the region between PYGM and D11S871. Linkage has been significantly excluded in this region in the German family (FamE), thereby providing evidence for genetic heterogeneity in this disease. The retinal specific gene, rod outer membrane protein 1 (ROM1), which maps to this region, has been screened for mutations in family BTMD1 by SSCPE analysis and by direct sequencing. Some of the promoter region, the three exons, and both introns have been sequenced; however, no mutations were found. It is likely that a gene other than ROM1 within this region may be responsible for causing the disease phenotype.

  12. Posterior vitreous detachment - prevalence of and risk factors for retinal tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond-Taylor M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin Bond-Taylor,1 Gunnar Jakobsson,1,2 Madeleine Zetterberg1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Ophthalmology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The present study aimed to describe clinical characteristics of patients with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD, to determine the prevalence of retinal tears in PVD patients, and to find predictors for retinal tears in this patient group. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records on patients diagnosed with PVD, retinal tears, or vitreous hemorrhage at the Department of Ophthalmology at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, a tertiary eye center. Results: Between February and July 2009, 365 patients consulted the Department of Ophthalmology for PVD-related symptoms. The incidence of retinal tears was 14.5% (n=53 and that of vitreous and/or retinal hemorrhage was 22.7% (n=83. For analysis of possible predictors for complications to PVD, patients diagnosed with retinal tears or vitreous hemorrhage between May and July 2009 were also included in the study, resulting in a total of 426 patients. Predictors of a retinal tear were symptoms of visual impairment (P=0.024, the presence of vitreous or retinal hemorrhage at examination (P<0.001, and a duration of symptoms for <24 hours (P=0.004. Symptoms of flashes did not constitute an extra risk of retinal tears (P=0.135. Subsequent retinal pathology (follow-up time 4.5 years, including vitreous detachment/hemorrhage or retinal tears/detachment, occurred more often in patients presenting with a retinal tear. For patients with a retinal tear, the relative risk of having a retinal detachment in the same eye during the follow-up time was 17.7 when compared to patients without a retinal tear (risk ratio 17.7, 95% confidence interval 2.2–145. Conclusion: Patients seeking care on the first day have a

  13. Measuring Disease Severity in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda F. Davis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical investigations use a wide variety of outcome indicators that are often not comparable. It can be challenging to integrate results across multiple studies that do not share a common metric. Some conditions such as Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy have a predictable course of disease progression. Severity can be inferred from a patient's medical history. This paper describes the development of a disease severity measure using common markers of disease progression. Rasch modeling was used to estimate severity using dichotomous events that indicate disease progression. Caregivers of 34 young men with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy completed structured interviews about their care and medical history. Interview questions included surgeries (tendon release, scoliosis, tracheostomy, respiratory equipment (assisted ventilation, cough assist devices, and the use of other medical equipment (e.g., braces, walkers, wheelchairs, transfer boards, hospital beds. The resulting measure had a reliability of .83. The correlation between the severity measure and the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS was .68. Preliminary results and item calibrations are provided for the severity measure that can be estimated from caregiver reports or administrative data. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v1i1.76

  14. Meretoja’s Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja’s syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients.

  15. Drugs in development and dietary approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrado Angelini, Elisabetta Tasca Neuromuscular Laboratory, Fondazione San Camillo Hospital IRCCS, Venice, Italy Abstract: Therapeutic trials studying Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD in Europe and the USA have been done using a protocol that includes manual muscle testing and functional testing, and have shown the efficacy of steroid drugs in various doses and regimens. Further, drisapersen and eteplirsen (exon skipping drugs and ataluren (a drug to overcome stop codon mutations have achieved some clinical improvement. Cardioprotective drugs are efficacious in DMD, and eplerenone, an aldosterone inhibitor and diuretic, is now being used to treat the disease. The dietary approach should be used in wheelchair-bound DMD children in combination with respiratory assistance. The importance of some of the treatments proposed is that they might also be useful in other genetic disorders where stop codon mutations are present; moreover, it is possible that these new treatments will improve quality of life for many patients. Keywords: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, steroids, ataluren, drisapersen, eplerenone, eteplirsen

  16. The Retinitis Pigmentosa Student: Selected Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Franklin N.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of RP (retinitis pigmentosa-an untreatable conditions usually resulting in night blindness) are discussed and functioning considerations in the classroom (including the use of protective devices and mobility aids) are noted. Classroom modifications such as darklined paper and black pens are suggested. (CL)

  17. Serum Osteopontin as a Novel Biomarker for Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Kimura, En; Nagata, Tetsuya; Okada, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Tachimori, Hisateru; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Imamura, Michihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked muscle disorder. We have already reported that osteopontin (OPN), an inflammatory cytokine and myogenic factor, is expressed in the early dystrophic phase in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan, a dystrophic dog model. To further explore the possibility of OPN as a new biomarker for disease activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we monitored serum OPN levels in dystrophic and wild-type dogs at different ages and compared the levels to other serum markers, such as serum creatine kinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Serum OPN levels in the dystrophic dogs were significantly elevated compared with those in wild-type dogs before and 1 hour after a cesarean section birth and at the age of 3 months. The serum OPN level was significantly correlated with the phenotypic severity of dystrophic dogs at the period corresponding to the onset of muscle weakness, whereas other serum markers including creatine kinase were not. Immunohistologically, OPN was up-regulated in infiltrating macrophages and developmental myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating muscle fibers in the dystrophic dogs, whereas serum OPN was highly elevated. OPN expression was also observed during the synergic muscle regeneration process induced by cardiotoxin injection. In conclusion, OPN is a promising biomarker for muscle regeneration in dystrophic dogs and can be applicable to boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sarcospan Regulates Cardiac Isoproterenol Response and Prevents Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy-Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatiyar, Michelle S; Marshall, Jamie L; Nguyen, Reginald T; Jordan, Maria C; Richardson, Vanitra A; Roos, Kenneth P; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2015-12-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal cardiac and skeletal muscle disease resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. We have previously demonstrated that a dystrophin-associated protein, sarcospan (SSPN), ameliorated Duchenne muscular dystrophy skeletal muscle degeneration by activating compensatory pathways that regulate muscle cell adhesion (laminin-binding) to the extracellular matrix. Conversely, loss of SSPN destabilized skeletal muscle adhesion, hampered muscle regeneration, and reduced force properties. Given the importance of SSPN to skeletal muscle, we investigated the consequences of SSPN ablation in cardiac muscle and determined whether overexpression of SSPN into mdx mice ameliorates cardiac disease symptoms associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy. SSPN-null mice exhibited cardiac enlargement, exacerbated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and increased fibrosis in response to β-adrenergic challenge (isoproterenol; 0.8 mg/day per 2 weeks). Biochemical analysis of SSPN-null cardiac muscle revealed reduced sarcolemma localization of many proteins with a known role in cardiomyopathy pathogenesis: dystrophin, the sarcoglycans (α-, δ-, and γ-subunits), and β1D integrin. Transgenic overexpression of SSPN in Duchenne muscular dystrophy mice (mdx(TG)) improved cardiomyofiber cell adhesion, sarcolemma integrity, cardiac functional parameters, as well as increased expression of compensatory transmembrane proteins that mediate attachment to the extracellular matrix. SSPN regulates sarcolemmal expression of laminin-binding complexes that are critical to cardiac muscle function and protects against transient and chronic injury, including inherited cardiomyopathy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  19. Muscular dystrophy in a family of Labrador Retrievers with no muscle dystrophin and a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Natassia M; Guo, Ling T; Estrela, Elicia; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-05-01

    Animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy, most notably canine X-linked muscular dystrophy, play an important role in developing new therapies for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Although the canine disease is a model of the human disease, the variable severity of clinical presentations in the canine may be problematic for pre-clinical trials, but also informative. Here we describe a family of Labrador Retrievers with three generations of male dogs having markedly increased serum creatine kinase activity, absence of membrane dystrophin, but with undetectable clinical signs of muscle weakness. Clinically normal young male Labrador Retriever puppies were evaluated prior to surgical neuter by screening laboratory blood work, including serum creatine kinase activity. Serum creatine kinase activities were markedly increased in the absence of clinical signs of muscle weakness. Evaluation of muscle biopsies confirmed a dystrophic phenotype with both degeneration and regeneration. Further evaluations by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed the absence of muscle dystrophin. Although dystrophin was not identified in the muscles, we did not find any detectable deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing is now ongoing to search for point mutations. Our findings in this family of Labrador Retriever dogs lend support to the hypothesis that, in exceptional situations, muscle with no dystrophin may be functional. Unlocking the secrets that protect these dogs from a severe clinical myopathy is a great challenge which may have important implications for future treatment of human muscular dystrophies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. SIRT1: A Novel Target for the Treatment of Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kuno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The treatment for DMD is limited to glucocorticoids, which are associated with multiple side effects. Thus, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently needed. SIRT1 is an NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylase that plays roles in diverse cellular processes, including stress resistance and cell survival. Studies have shown that SIRT1 activation provides beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, a model of DMD. SIRT1 activation leads to the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, a shift from the fast to slow myofiber phenotype, and the suppression of tissue fibrosis. Although further research is needed to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of SIRT1 in mdx mice, we propose SIRT1 as a novel therapeutic target for patients with muscular dystrophies.

  1. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoff, Frank T; Lamberts, Querin J; van den Biesen, Pieter R; Rothova, Aniki

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate the frequency, high-risk factors, and visual prognosis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in patients with uveitis. Retrospective case-control study. We included 1387 consecutive patients with uveitis who consulted our uveitis clinic from January 1990 through December 1997 of whom 43 patients (46 eyes) with RRD were identified. The retinal detachment (RD) controls were 212 consecutive patients with RRD (221 eyes, first occurrence of RD, not associated with uveitis) who were admitted for surgery in the period from April 1999 to April 2000. The uveitis control group consisted of 150 age-matched patients (210 eyes) selected from the entire uveitis series. Retrospective analysis of clinical data. The presence of RRD and eventual risk factors for RRD, such as myopia, retinal lattice degeneration, prior intraocular surgery, anatomic location of uveitis, its specific diagnosis, and clinical manifestations. Furthermore, the surgical and nonsurgical outcomes of RRD, as well as the results of various treatment regimens, were analyzed. RRD was identified in 3.1% of the patients with uveitis. RRD was most frequently associated with panuveitis (6.6%). RRD was associated more frequently with infectious (7.6%) than noninfectious uveitis (2.1%). At the onset of RRD, uveitis was active in most (46%) affected eyes. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy was present in 30% of the uveitic RRD eyes at presentation in contrast to 12% of the RRD control eyes. In uveitic RRD, the retina was reattached in 59% of eyes with a single operation; the final anatomic reattachment rate was 88%. Finally, a visual acuity of less than 20/200 was present in 71% of the uveitic RRD eyes, 10% of which had no light perception. We discovered a high prevalence of RRD in patients with active panuveitis and infectious uveitis and document that uveitis in itself is a risk factor for the development of RRD. The visual prognosis of RRD in uveitis was poor because of the uveitis itself and the

  2. CINRG: Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    monitoring visit to monitor this study, the PITT0908 clinical trial, a study on facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and PITT0112 Becker natural...height findings manuscript are currently in working stage and circulating among co-authors for editing. 2.3.6 Becker Muscular Dystrophy – A Natural...participants with Becker muscular dystrophy . The study period is 36 months per patient. This project is primarily funded by the National Institutes of

  3. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy in myotonic dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Timchenko, Lubov

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) are multisystemic diseases that primarily affect skeletal muscle, causing myotonia, muscle atrophy, and muscle weakness. DM1 and DM2 pathologies are caused by expansion of CTG and CCTG repeats in non-coding regions of the genes encoding myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and Zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) respectively. These expansions cause DM pathologies through accumulation of mutant RNAs that alter RNA metabolism in p...

  5. Hereditary retinal eye diseases in childhood and youth affecting the central retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Nentwich

    2013-01-01

    Classic examinations for patients suffering from hereditary retinal dystrophies of the central retina are funduscopy - also using red-free light - visual-field tests, electrophysiologic tests as electro-retinogram [ERG] and multifocal ERG and tests evaluating color vision. Recently, new imaging modalities have been introduced into the clinical practice. The significance of these new methods such as high-resolution spectral-domain optic coherence tomography [SD-OCT] and fundus autofluorescence will be discussed as well as "next generation sequencing" as a new method for the analysis of genetic mutations in a larger number of patients.

  6. Reading visual braille with a retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A; Dorn, Jessy D; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  7. Retinal vascular speed prematurity requiring treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans Pérez de Larraya, Ana M; Ortega Molina, José M; Fernández, José Uberos; Escudero Gómez, Júlia; Salgado Miranda, Andrés D; Chaves Samaniego, Maria J; García Serrano, José L

    2018-03-01

    To analyse the speed of temporal retinal vascularisation in preterm infants included in the screening programme for retinopathy of prematurity. A total of 185 premature infants were studied retrospectively between 2000 and 2017 in San Cecilio University Hospital of Granada, Spain. The method of binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy with indentation was used for the examination. The horizontal disc diameter was used as a unit of length. Speed of temporal retinal vascularisation (disc diameter/week) was calculated as the ratio between the extent of temporal retinal vascularisation (disc diameter) and the time in weeks. The weekly temporal retinal vascularisation (0-1.25 disc diameter/week, confidence interval) was significantly higher in no retinopathy of prematurity (0.73 ± 0.22 disc diameter/week) than in stage 1 retinopathy of prematurity (0.58 ± 0.22 disc diameter/week). It was also higher in stage 1 than in stages 2 (0.46 ± 0.14 disc diameter/week) and 3 of retinopathy of prematurity (0.36 ± 0.18 disc diameter/week). The rate of temporal retinal vascularisation (disc diameter/week) decreases when retinopathy of prematurity stage increases. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85 (95% confidence interval: 0.79-0.91) for retinopathy of prematurity requiring treatment versus not requiring treatment. The best discriminative cut-off point was a speed of retinal vascularisation prematurity may be required. However, before becoming a new standard of care for treatment, it requires careful documentation, with agreement between several ophthalmologists.

  8. Retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Pankaj Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to determine the prevalence of retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH and any association between the retinal changes and age, parity, blood pressure, proteinuria, and severity of the disease. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: All the patients admitted with a diagnosis of PIH were included in this study. Age, gravida, gestation period, blood pressure, and proteinuria were noted from the case records. Fundus examination was done with a direct ophthalmoscope. The findings were noted and were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: A total of 150 patients of PIH were examined. The mean age of patients was 25.1 years. The gestation period ranged from 27 weeks to 42 weeks; 76 (50.67% were the primi gravida. 92 (61.33% patients had gestational hypertension, 49 (32.67% patients had preeclampsia, and 9 (6% had eclampsia. Retinal changes (hypertensive retinopathy were noted in 18 (12% patients - Grade 1 in 12 (8% and Grade 2 in 6 (4%. Hemorrhages or exudates or retinal detachment were not seen in any patient. There was statistically significant positive association of retinal changes and blood pressure (P = 0.037, proteinuria (P = 0.0005, and severity of the PIH (P = 0.004. Conclusions: Retinal changes were seen in 12% of patients with PIH. Occurrence of hypertensive retinopathy in PIH cases has been decreased due to better antenatal care and early detection and treatment of PIH cases. There is a greater chance of developing retinopathy with increase in blood pressure, severity of PIH, and proteinuria in cases of PIH.

  9. Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy-Implications for Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydemann, Ahlke

    2018-06-20

    The interactions between nutrition and metabolism and skeletal muscle have long been known. Muscle is the major metabolic organ—it consumes more calories than other organs—and therefore, there is a clear need to discuss these interactions and provide some direction for future research areas regarding muscle pathologies. In addition, new experiments and manuscripts continually reveal additional highly intricate, reciprocal interactions between metabolism and muscle. These reciprocal interactions include exercise, age, sex, diet, and pathologies including atrophy, hypoxia, obesity, diabetes, and muscle myopathies. Central to this review are the metabolic changes that occur in the skeletal muscle cells of muscular dystrophy patients and mouse models. Many of these metabolic changes are pathogenic (inappropriate body mass changes, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, and increased Ca 2+ ) and others are compensatory (increased phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK), increased slow fiber numbers, and increased utrophin). Therefore, reversing or enhancing these changes with therapies will aid the patients. The multiple therapeutic targets to reverse or enhance the metabolic pathways will be discussed. Among the therapeutic targets are increasing pAMPK, utrophin, mitochondrial number and slow fiber characteristics, and inhibiting reactive oxygen species. Because new data reveals many additional intricate levels of interactions, new questions are rapidly arising. How does muscular dystrophy alter metabolism, and are the changes compensatory or pathogenic? How does metabolism affect muscular dystrophy? Of course, the most profound question is whether clinicians can therapeutically target nutrition and metabolism for muscular dystrophy patient benefit? Obtaining the answers to these questions will greatly aid patients with muscular dystrophy.

  10. CT finding and cerebrospinal fluid proteins in muscular dystrophy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirase, Tsutomu; Ide, Masami; Araki, Shukuro; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Shoichiro; Imamura, Shigehiro.

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the microcomponents of protein fractions in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. The degenerative pattern is characterized by an increase in the prealbumin and a decrease in the γ-globulin fraction is shown in the Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophy. The increase in CSF IgG, γ-globulin fraction is shown in the myotonic dystrophy. In addition to the abnormality of IQ, EEG, and brain CT, abnormal CSF proteins obviously suggest the presence of CNS involvement in muscular dystrophy. (author)

  11. CT finding and cerebrospinal fluid proteins in muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirase, Tsutomu; Ide, Masami; Araki, Shukuro; Okamoto, Hiroshi (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Kawasaki, Shoichiro; Imamura, Shigehiro

    1983-06-01

    We analyzed the microcomponents of protein fractions in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. The degenerative pattern is characterized by an increase in the prealbumin and a decrease in the ..gamma..-globulin fraction is shown in the Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophy. The increase in CSF IgG, ..gamma..-globulin fraction is shown in the myotonic dystrophy. In addition to the abnormality of IQ, EEG, and brain CT, abnormal CSF proteins obviously suggest the presence of CNS involvement in muscular dystrophy.

  12. Clinical aspects, molecular pathomechanisms and management of myotonic dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Meola, G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy, characterized by autosomal dominant progressive myopathy, myotonia and multiorgan involvement. To date two distinct forms caused by similar mutations have been identified. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, Steinert's disease) was described more than 100 years ago and is caused by a (CTG)n expansion in DMPK, while myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) was identified only 18 years ago and is caused by a (CCTG)n expansion in ZNF9/CNBP....

  13. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine; Tu, Hong Anh; Weir, Mark; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic disorders that involves the breakdown and loss of photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and eventual blindness. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the only currently available surgical implantable device approved by Health Canada. It has been shown to improve visual function in patients with severe visual loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of this analysis was to examine the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and safety of the Argus II system in improving visual function, as well as exploring patient experiences with the system. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on visual function, functional outcomes, quality of life, and adverse events. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care over a 10-year time horizon. We also conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. We used a qualitative design and an interview methodology to examine patients’ lived experience, and we used a modified grounded theory methodology to analyze information from interviews. Transcripts were coded, and themes were compared against one another. Results One multicentre international study and one single-centre study were included in the clinical review. In both studies, patients showed improved visual function with the Argus II system. However, the sight-threatening surgical complication rate was substantial. In the base-case analysis, the Argus II system was cost-effective compared with standard care only if willingness-to-pay was more than $207,616 per quality-adjusted life

  14. Scanning laser densitometry and color perimetry demonstrate reduced photopigment density and sensitivity in two patients with retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, R P; Stilling, R; Zrenner, E

    1999-10-01

    To test the feasibility of scanning laser densitometry with a modified Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) to measure the rod and cone photopigment distribution in patients with retinal diseases. Scanning laser densitometry was performed using a modified Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The distribution of the photopigments was calculated from dark adapted and bleached images taken with the 514 nm laser of the SLO. This wavelength is absorbed by rod and cone photopigments. Discrimination is possible due to their different spatial distribution. Additionally, to measure retinal sensitivity profiles, dark adapted two color static perimetry with a Tübinger manual perimeter was performed along the horizontal meridian with 1 degree spacing. A patient with retinitis pigmentosa had slightly reduced photopigment density within the central +/- 5 degrees but no detectable photopigment for eccentricities beyond 5 degrees. A patient with cone dystrophy had nearly normal pigment density beyond +/- 5 degrees, but considerably reduced photopigment density within the central +/- 5 degrees. Within the central +/- 5 degrees, the patient with retinitis pigmentosa had normal sensitivity for the red stimulus and reduced sensitivity for the green stimulus. There was no measurable function beyond 7 degrees. The patient with cone dystrophy had normal sensitivity for the green stimulus outside the foveal center and reduced sensitivity for the red stimulus at the foveal center. The results of color perimetry for this patient with a central scotoma were probably influenced by eccentric fixation. Scanning laser densitometry with a modified Rodenstock SLO is a useful method to assess the human photopigment distribution. Densitometry results were confirmed by dark adapted two color static perimetry. Photopigment distribution and retinal sensitivity profiles can be measured with high spatial resolution. This may help to measure exactly the temporal development of retinal

  15. Peripapillary retinal thermal coagulation following electrical injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjari Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have presented the case report of a 20 year old boy who suffered an electric injury shock, following which he showed peripapillary retinal opacification and increased retinal thickening that subsequently progressed to retinal atrophy. The fluorescein angiogram revealed normal retinal circulation, thus indicating thermal damage to retina without any compromise to retinal circulation.

  16. Eosinophilic myositis as first manifestation in a patient with type 2 myotonic dystrophy CCTG expansion mutation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Alain; Lannes, Béatrice; Carapito, Raphaël; Bahram, Seiamak; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Geny, Bernard; Sibilia, Jean; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric

    2015-02-01

    Eosinophilic myositis is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of skeletal muscles. In the absence of an identifiable causative factor or source (including parasitic infection, intake of drugs or L-tryptophan, certain systemic disorders as well as malignant diseases), the diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic myositis is usually retained. However, some muscular dystrophies have been recently identified in this subset of eosinophilic myositis. Here, we report a patient with an 8 kb CCTG expansion in intron 1 of the CNBP gene, a mutation characteristic of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), whose first manifestation was "idiopathic" eosinophilic myositis. This report suggests that in "idiopathic" eosinophilic myositis, clinicians should consider muscular dystrophies, including DM2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation Factor Analysis of Retinal Microvascular Changes in Patients With Essential Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Duru; Huang Zhongning

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate correlation between retinal microvascular signs and essential hypertension classification. Methods The retinal microvascular signs in patients with essential hypertension were assessed with the indirect biomicroscopy lens, the direct and the indirect ophthalmoscopes were used to determine the hypertensive retinopathy grades and retinal arteriosclerosis grades.The rank correlation analysis was used to analysis the correlation these grades with the risk factors concerned with hypertension. Results Of 72 cases with essential hypertension, 28 cases complicated with coronary disease, 20 cases diabetes, 41 cases stroke,17 cases renal malfunction. Varying extent retinal arterioscleroses were found in 71 cases, 1 case with retinal hemorrhage, 2 cases with retina edema, 4 cases with retinal hard exudation, 5 cases with retinal hemorrhage complicated by hard exudation, 2 cases with retinal hemorrhage complicated by hard exudation and cotton wool spot, 1 case with retinal hemorrhage complicated by hard exudation and microaneurysms,1 case with retinal edema and hard exudation, 1 case with retinal microaneurysms, 1 case with branch retinal vein occlusion. The rank correlation analysis showed that either hypertensive retinopathy grades or retinal arteriosclerosis grades were correlated with risk factor lamination of hypertension (r=0.25 or 0.31, P<0.05), other correlation factors included age and blood high density lipoprotein concerned about hypertensive retinopathy grades or retinal arteriosclerosis grades, but other parameters, namely systolic or diastolic pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood glucose,blood urea nitrogen and blood creatinine were not confirmed in this correlation analysis (P > 0.05).Conclusions Either hypertensive retinopathy grade or retinal arteriosclerosis grade is close with the hypertension risk factor lamination, suggesting that the fundus examination of patients with

  18. [Human myopathy and animal muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, G; Dreyfus, J C; Schapira, F

    1977-08-01

    Two hereditary muscular dystrophies similar to human progressive muscular dystrophy (P.M.D. Duchenne type) have been isolated in animals, one in mouse, the other in chicken. The decrease in the activity of glycogenolytic enzymes is similar to that observed in denervated muscle. Isozymic fetal types for several muscular enzymes have been observed as well in chicken as in man, but this fetal type may also be found in neurogenic atrophy. The release in circulation of muscle enzymes seems more specific. But the origin of the genetic lesion is still unknown. We describe here the three different theories about this problem: i.e. neurogenic, vascular, or myogenic. This last theory implies a trouble of membrane permeability.

  19. Early Vitrectomy for Vitreous Hemorrhage Associated With Retinal Tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. Stevie; Mura, Marco; Bijl, Heico M.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate outcome of early surgery in vitreous hemorrhage, presumably associated with retinal tears. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative interventional case series. METHODS: We included 40 consecutive cases in 39 patients treated with early vitrectomy for vitreous hemorrhage. Main

  20. Peripheral retinal degenerations and the risk of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Hilel

    2003-07-01

    To review the degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship with the risk to develop a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and to present recommendations for use in eyes at increased risk of developing a retinal detachment. Focused literature review and author's clinical experience. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina, and most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and, rarely, zonular traction tufts, can result in a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic therapy; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Well-designed, prospective, randomized clinical studies are necessary to determine the benefit-risk ratio of prophylactic treatment. In the meantime, the evidence available suggests that most of the peripheral retinal degenerations should not be treated except in rare, high-risk situations.

  1. Defective myoblasts identified in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Blau, H M; Webster, C; Pavlath, G K

    1983-01-01

    A defect in the proliferative capacity of satellite cells, mononucleated precursors of mature muscle fibers, was found in clonal analyses of cells cultured from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. The total yield of myoblasts per gram of muscle biopsy was decreased to 5% of normal. Of the DMD myoblast clones obtained, a large proportion contained a morphological class of flat distended cells that had an increased generation time and ceased to proliferate beyond 100-1,000 cells but cou...

  2. Urological manifestations of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Arlen, Angela M; Erickson, Bradley A; Mathews, Katherine D; Cooper, Christopher S

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a dystrophinopathy affecting males that is associated with multiple organ system complications. To our knowledge urological complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been described only anecdotally to date. We reviewed the medical charts of 135 patients with Duchenne or Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy for demographics and disease progression, urological diagnoses, intervention and followup. Of 135 patients 67 (50%) had at least 1 documented urological diagnosis and 38 (28%) had multiple manifestations. Lower urinary tract symptoms were the most common urological diagnosis (32% of patients). Survival analysis revealed a median age at onset of lower urinary tract symptoms of 23 years (95% CI 17.7-23.9). Intervention was required in 12 patients (9%), most commonly due to nephrolithiasis. Urological morbidity increased with Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression when stratified by clinical progression. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more common in nonambulatory patients (40.7% vs 19%, p = 0.007), those with a diagnosis of scoliosis (44% vs 19.7%, p = 0.003) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (60% vs 22%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (53% vs 29%, p = 0.046). Likewise, nephrolithiasis was more common in nonambulatory patients (10% vs 0%, p = 0.017), those with scoliosis (12% vs 0%, p = 0.004) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (20% vs 1%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (29% vs 3%, p <0.001). Only 28% of patients with a urological manifestation were referred to urology. As these patients transition into adolescence and adulthood, the increased prevalence of urological manifestations warrants increased awareness and referral to urologists. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Corneal elastosis within lattice dystrophy lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe'er, J; Fine, B S; Dixon, A; Rothberg, D S

    1988-01-01

    Corneal buttons of two patients with lattice corneal dystrophy were studied by light and electron microscopy. They showed elastotic degeneration within the amyloid deposits. The amyloid deposits displayed characteristic staining; the elastotic material (elastin) within the deposits stained positive with Verhoeff-van Gieson and Movat pentachrome stains and showed autofluorescence. The characteristic ultrastructural findings of amyloid and elastotic material were also demonstrated. The possibility of the associations of these two materials in the cornea is discussed. Images PMID:3258531

  4. Disability and Survival in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, M; Clarenbach, C F; Bahler, C; Brack, T; Russi, E W; Bloch, K E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive impairment of muscle function, respiratory failure and premature death. Longitudinal data on the course of physical disability and respiratory function are sparse. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively assess physical impairment and disability, respiratory function and survival in DMD patients over several years in order to describe the course of the disease with current care. METHODS: In 43 patients with DMD, aged 5-35 years, yearly a...

  5. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  6. Laser photocoagulation for retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion (RVO is one of the leading causes of permanent vision loss. In adults, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO occurs in 1.8% while branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO occurs in 0.2%. Treatment strategy and disease prognosis are determined by RVO type (ischemic/non-ischemic. Despite numerous studies and many current CRVO and BRVO treatment approaches, the management of these patients is still being debated. Intravitreal injections of steroids (triamcinolone acetate, dexamethasone and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitors (bevacizumab, ranibizumab were shown to be fairly effective. However, it is unclear whether anti-VEGF agents are reasonable in ischemic RVOs. Laser photocoagulation remains the only effective treatment of optic nerve head and/or retinal neovascularization. Laser photocoagulation is also indicated for the treatment of macular edema. Both threshold and sub-threshold photocoagulation may be performed. Photocoagulation performed with argon (514 nm, krypton (647 nm, or diode (810 nm laser for macular edema provides similar results (no significant differences. The treatment may be complex and include medication therapy and/or surgery. Medication therapy includes anti-aggregant agents and antioxidants, i.e., emoxypine which may be used in acute RVO as well as in post-thrombotic retinopathy. 

  7. Laser photocoagulation for retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion (RVO is one of the leading causes of permanent vision loss. In adults, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO occurs in 1.8% while branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO occurs in 0.2%. Treatment strategy and disease prognosis are determined by RVO type (ischemic/non-ischemic. Despite numerous studies and many current CRVO and BRVO treatment approaches, the management of these patients is still being debated. Intravitreal injections of steroids (triamcinolone acetate, dexamethasone and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitors (bevacizumab, ranibizumab were shown to be fairly effective. However, it is unclear whether anti-VEGF agents are reasonable in ischemic RVOs. Laser photocoagulation remains the only effective treatment of optic nerve head and/or retinal neovascularization. Laser photocoagulation is also indicated for the treatment of macular edema. Both threshold and sub-threshold photocoagulation may be performed. Photocoagulation performed with argon (514 nm, krypton (647 nm, or diode (810 nm laser for macular edema provides similar results (no significant differences. The treatment may be complex and include medication therapy and/or surgery. Medication therapy includes anti-aggregant agents and antioxidants, i.e., emoxypine which may be used in acute RVO as well as in post-thrombotic retinopathy. 

  8. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron H Fronk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included.

  9. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  10. Characteristics of Japanese Patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy and Intermediate Muscular Dystrophy in a Japanese National Registry of Muscular Dystrophy (Remudy): Heterogeneity and Clinical Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nakamura, Harumasa; Komaki, Hirofumi; Goto, Kanako; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Takeuchi, Fumi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Murata, Miho; Takahashi, Yuji; Nishino, Ichizo; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Kimura, En

    2018-01-01

    Obtaining an adequate number of patients to conduct a natural history study for rare diseases such as Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is difficult. The present study used data from Remudy, a national registry for neuromuscular diseases in Japan, to conduct a phenotypic analysis of BMD. We analyzed Remudy data of participants with dystrophinopathy. All participants who were aged 17 and older and were ambulant at age 13 were included in this study. Participants were divided into two groups: those with BMD who were ambulant at age 17, and those with intermediate muscular dystrophy (IMD) who lost ambulation by age 17. Frequent mutations were analyzed by age at ambulation, cardiopulmonary function, and genotype. For clinical comparisons, participants who were administered steroids were excluded. From July 2009 through September 2015, 192 participants had registered with Remudy. Mean participant age was 34.80±13.3 (range, 17-78) years, and 52.1% of participants were ambulant. Of the entire study population, 50.5% had cardiomyopathy and 35.9% had respiratory failure. Three participants required invasive ventilation and 30 required non-invasive ventilation. Nineteen of the 30 non-invasive ventilator users were part-time users. In total, 138 (71.9%) had BMD and 54 (28.1%) had IMD. The most frequent mutation was ex45_ex47del (36 participants). Among participants with frequent in-frame mutations, those with the ex45-49del mutation lost their ambulation earlier than those with the ex45_ex47del mutation. A total of 67 different exon deletions and duplications were identified in the study population. We clarified the clinical phenotypes of Japanese patients with BMD/IMD using data from Remudy. Our results suggest that not only IMD but also BMD are associated with risk of respiratory dysfunction.

  11. Retinitis pigmentosa and deafness.

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, R P; Calver, D M

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) have been investigated audiologically. Of 9 found to have a significant hearing loss, 6 were examples of Usher's syndrome; these patients had a cochlear pattern of hearing loss. The other 3 were examples of Senior's syndrome, Kearne-Sayre syndrome and Lawrence-Moon-Biedle syndrome respectively. Two of these patients had absent stapedius reflexes. It is suggested that patients with different RP-deafness syndromes may have lesions in different p...

  12. Unravelling the genetic basis of simplex Retinitis Pigmentosa cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; González-del Pozo, María; Martín-Sánchez, Marta; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) characterized ultimately by photoreceptors degeneration. Exhibiting great clinical and genetic heterogeneity, RP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (ad), autosomal recessive (ar) and X-linked (xl) disorder. Although the relative prevalence of each form varies somewhat between populations, a major proportion (41% in Spain) of patients represent simplex cases (sRP) in which the mode of inheritance is unknown. Molecular genetic diagnostic is crucial, but also challenging, for sRP patients because any of the 81 RP genes identified to date may be causative. Herein, we report the use of a customized targeted gene panel consisting of 68 IRD genes for the molecular characterization of 106 sRP cases. The diagnostic rate was 62.26% (66 of 106) with a proportion of clinical refinements of 30.3%, demonstrating the high efficiency of this genomic approach even for clinically ambiguous cases. The high number of patients diagnosed here has allowed us to study in detail the genetic basis of the sRP. The solved sRP cohort is composed of 62.1% of arRP cases, 24.2% of adRP and 13.6% of xlRP, which implies consequences for counselling of patients and families. PMID:28157192

  13. Preferred retinal locus in macular disease: characteristics and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Vivienne C; Santos, Rodrigo A V; Tsang, Stephen H; Smith, R Theodore; Barile, Gaetano R; Seiple, William

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the location and fixation stability of preferred retinal locations (PRLs) in patients with macular disease, and the relationship among areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence, the PRL and visual sensitivity. Fifteen patients (15 eyes) were studied. Seven had Stargardt disease, 1 bull's eye maculopathy, 5 age-related macular degeneration, 1 Best disease, and 1 pattern dystrophy. All tested eyes had areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence. The PRL was evaluated with fundus photography and the Nidek microperimeter. Visual field sensitivity was measured with the Nidek microperimeter. Of the 15 eyes, 4 had foveal and 11 had eccentric fixation. Eccentric PRLs were above the atrophic lesion and their stability did not depend on the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. Visual sensitivity was markedly decreased in locations corresponding to hypofluorescent areas. Sensitivity was not decreased in hyperfluorescent areas corresponding to flecks but was decreased if hyperfluorescence was in the form of dense annuli. Eccentric PRLs were in the superior retina in regions of normal fundus autofluorescence. Fixation stability was not correlated with the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. To assess the outcomes of treatment trials it is important to use methods that relate retinal morphology to visual function.

  14. Subclinical primary retinal pathology in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Hye; Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Nam-Hee; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Park, Choul Yong

    2016-07-01

    Foveal thickness may be a more sensitive indicator of primary retinal pathology than retinal nerve fiber layer thickness since the fovea contains no or sparse retinal nerve fiber layer, which coalesces into axons of the optic nerve. To our knowledge, few quantitative in vivo studies have investigated foveal thickness. By using optical coherence tomography, we measured foveal thickness to evaluate intrinsic retinal pathology. Seventy-two neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients (99 eyes with optic neuritis and 45 eyes without optic neuritis) and 34 age-matched controls were included. Foveal thinning was observed both in eyes with non-optic neuritis (185.1 µm, p optica spectrum disorder, foveal thickness correlated with 2.5 % low contrast visual acuity, while retinal nerve fiber layer thickness correlated with high or low contrast visual acuity, extended disability status scale, and disease duration. In this study, we observed foveal thinning irrespective of optic neuritis; thus, we believe that subclinical primary retinal pathology, prior to retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, may exist in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

  15. Genetic characterization and disease mechanism of retinitis pigmentosa; current scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Rahman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Cao, Jiang; Yuan, Ping Xi

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetically transmitted disorders affecting 1 in 3000-8000 individual people worldwide ultimately affecting the quality of life. Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized as a heterogeneous genetic disorder which leads by progressive devolution of the retina leading to a progressive visual loss. It can occur in syndromic (with Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome) as well as non-syndromic nature. The mode of inheritance can be X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. To date 58 genes have been reported to associate with retinitis pigmentosa most of them are either expressed in photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. This review focuses on the disease mechanisms and genetics of retinitis pigmentosa. As retinitis pigmentosa is tremendously heterogeneous disorder expressing a multiplicity of mutations; different variations in the same gene might induce different disorders. In recent years, latest technologies including whole-exome sequencing contributing effectively to uncover the hidden genesis of retinitis pigmentosa by reporting new genetic mutations. In future, these advancements will help in better understanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of disease and likely to develop new therapies.

  16. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz Guzmán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset.

  17. Upper limb function in adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Bartels (Bart); R.F. Pangalila (Robert); M.P. Bergen (Michael); N.A.M. Cobben (Nicolle); H.J. Stam (Henk); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTo determine upper limb function and associated factors in adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A sample of 70 men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (age range 20-43 years). Methods: General motor function and, in particular, upper limb distal

  18. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Ensink; Bert de Swart; J. van Vliet; A. Tieleman; Baziel van Engelen; S. Knuijt

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  19. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy due to mutations in POMT2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Sofie Thurø; Johnson, Katherine; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the gene coding for protein O-mannosyl-transferase 2 (POMT2) are known to cause severe congenital muscular dystrophy, and recently, mutations in POMT2 have also been linked to a milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype, named LGMD type 2N (LGMD2N). Only four...

  20. [Ocular findings in patients with Steinert myotonic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowska, Elzbieta; Zalewska, Renata; Mariak, Zofia; Wojnar, Małgorzata

    2006-01-01

    The authors present one of many myotonic dystrophies: Steinert myotonic dystrophy (Steinert disease), which is a disease occuring seldom, and causing a lot of problems during the diagnostic and treatment process. Genetic factors, results of the histopathology tests, main clinical symptoms, particularly ophtalmic manifestation are described in this article.

  1. Central areolar choroidal dystrophy with associated dominant drusen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Rodman

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Central areolar choroidal dystrophy normally presents without drusen. However, in patients manifesting a specific mutation, central areolar choridal dystrophy may present in conjunction with drusen. It appears that the Arg142Trp mutation is one of the factors predisposing to drusen formation.

  2. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  3. Resistance training in patients with limb-girdle and becker muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Søren P; Ingelsrud, Lina H

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD).......In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)....

  4. Outcomes in bullous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah P. Read

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions and importance: GRTs are an uncommon cause of retinal detachment. While pars plana vitrectomy with tamponade is standard in GRT management, there is variability in the use of scleral buckling and PFO in these cases. This is in contrast to retinal dialysis where scleral buckle alone can yield favorable results. Though a baseball ocular trauma is common, retinal involvement is rare compared to other sports injuries such as those occurring with tennis, soccer and golf. Sports trauma remains an important cause of retinal injury and patients should be counseled on the need for eye protection.

  5. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  6. Surgical management of retinal diseases: proliferative diabetic retinopathy and traction retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Iñigo, Yousef J; Acabá, Luis A; Berrocal, Maria H

    2014-01-01

    Current indications for pars plana vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) include vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment (TRD), combined tractional and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (CTRRD), diabetic macular edema associated with posterior hyaloidal traction, and anterior segment neovascularization with media opacities. This chapter will review the indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincision surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for PDR, TRD, and CTRRD. With the availability of new microincision vitrectomy technology, wide-angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from PDR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Retinal vessel diameter and estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in arterial hypertension: the Beijing Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Ya Xing; You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Hypertensive retinal microvascular abnormalities include an increased retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio. Because central retinal vein pressure depends on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we examined whether the retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio and other retinal hypertensive signs are associated with CSFP. Participants of the population-based Beijing Eye Study (n = 1,574 subjects) underwent measurement of the temporal inferior and superior retinal artery and vein diameter. CSFP was calculated as 0.44 × body mass index (kg/m(2)) + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mm Hg) - 0.18 × age (years) - 1.91. Larger retinal vein diameters and higher vein-to-artery diameter ratios were significantly associated with higher estimated CSFP (P = 0.001) in multivariable analysis. In contrast, temporal inferior retinal arterial diameter was marginally associated (P = 0.03) with estimated CSFP, and temporal superior artery diameter was not significantly associated (P = 0.10) with estimated CSFP; other microvascular abnormalities, such as arteriovenous crossing signs, were also not significantly associated with estimated CSFP. In a reverse manner, higher estimated CSFP as a dependent variable in the multivariable analysis was associated with wider retinal veins and higher vein-to-artery diameter ratio. In the same model, estimated CSFP was not significantly correlated with retinal artery diameters or other retinal microvascular abnormalities. Correspondingly, arterial hypertension was associated with retinal microvascular abnormalities such as arteriovenous crossing signs (P = 0.003), thinner temporal retinal arteries (P arterial hypertension, an increased retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio depends on elevated CSFP, which is correlated with blood pressure. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Rapid glutamate receptor 2 trafficking during retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yanhua

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal degenerations, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, are characterized by photoreceptor loss and anomalous remodeling of the surviving retina that corrupts visual processing and poses a barrier to late-stage therapeutic interventions in particular. However, the molecular events associated with retinal remodeling remain largely unknown. Given our prior evidence of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR reprogramming in retinal degenerations, we hypothesized that the edited glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2 subunit and its trafficking may be modulated in retinal degenerations. Results Adult albino Balb/C mice were exposed to intense light for 24 h to induce light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD. We found that prior to the onset of photoreceptor loss, protein levels of GluR2 and related trafficking proteins, including glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, were rapidly increased. LIRD triggered neuritogenesis in photoreceptor survival regions, where GluR2 and its trafficking proteins were expressed in the anomalous dendrites. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed interaction between KIF3A and GRIP1 as well as PSD-95, suggesting that KIF3A may mediate transport of GluR2 and its trafficking proteins to the novel dendrites. However, in areas of photoreceptor loss, GluR2 along with its trafficking proteins nearly vanished in retracted retinal neurites. Conclusions All together, LIRD rapidly triggers GluR2 plasticity, which is a potential mechanism behind functionally phenotypic revisions of retinal neurons and neuritogenesis during retinal degenerations.

  9. Retinal stem cells and regeneration of vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Henry K

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a well-characterized model for studying neurogenesis. Retinal neurons and glia are generated in a conserved order from a pool of mutlipotent progenitor cells. During retinal development, retinal stem/progenitor cells (RPC) change their competency over time under the influence of intrinsic (such as transcriptional factors) and extrinsic factors (such as growth factors). In this review, we summarize the roles of these factors, together with the understanding of the signaling pathways that regulate eye development. The information about the interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic factors for retinal cell fate specification is useful to regenerate specific retinal neurons from RPCs. Recent studies have identified RPCs in the retina, which may have important implications in health and disease. Despite the recent advances in stem cell biology, our understanding of many aspects of RPCs in the eye remains limited. PRCs are present in the developing eye of all vertebrates and remain active in lower vertebrates throughout life. In mammals, however, PRCs are quiescent and exhibit very little activity and thus have low capacity for retinal regeneration. A number of different cellular sources of RPCs have been identified in the vertebrate retina. These include PRCs at the retinal margin, pigmented cells in the ciliary body, iris, and retinal pigment epithelium, and Müller cells within the retina. Because PRCs can be isolated and expanded from immature and mature eyes, it is possible now to study these cells in culture and after transplantation in the degenerated retinal tissue. We also examine current knowledge of intrinsic RPCs, and human embryonic stems and induced pluripotent stem cells as potential sources for cell transplant therapy to regenerate the diseased retina. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A comparison of swallowing dysfunction in Becker muscular dystrophy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuka; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Wada, Ayako; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi; Muraoka, Kaori; Liu, Meigen

    2018-06-01

    Swallowing dysfunction has been reported in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but has not been studied in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The aims of this study were to report the characteristics of swallowing dysfunction in BMD compared with DMD. The study participants were 18 patients with BMD and 18 patients with DMD. All the patients were examined using videofluorography during swallowing of 5 mL of fluid. The penetration-aspiration scale (P-A scale) and the videofluorographic dysphagia scale (VDS) were used to evaluate dysphagia. Swinyard functional ability stage was not significantly different between the BMD and DMD groups. Rate of aspiration, P-A scale score, and total VDS score did not differ across groups, but the VDS item score for laryngeal elevation was lower in the BMD group than in the DMD group (median scores 4.5 and 9, respectively; p Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was not well known. Eighteen patients with BMD and 18 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were examined with videofluorography. Patients with BMD have swallowing problems similar to those observed in patients with DMD.

  11. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  12. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in The Netherlands: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; Leschot, N. J.; van Essen, A. J.; Brunner, H. G.; van der Wouw, P. A.; Wilde, A. A.; de Visser, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  13. Psychiatric disorders appear equally in patients with myotonic dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, J.S.; Schillings, M.L.; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Bleijenberg, G.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the presence of psychiatric comorbidity assessed by the use of a structured clinical interview and self-reported questionnaires in a large sample of patients with adult-onset myotonic dystrophy (DM), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and hereditary motor and sensory

  14. Human figure drawings by children with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Grattan, M M; Burnett, C N; Wolfe, C V

    1976-02-01

    Seventy-two human figure drawings by forty-three patients who had a diagnosis of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy were examined. The study includes a description of these human figure drawings according to eleven emotional indicators and according to directionality quadrants. When the human figure drawings were used as a projective tool, four personality traits of some of the children were identified: physical inadequacy, immaturity, body anxiety, and insecurity. Both the emotional indicators and the quadrant in which the figures appeared were examined in relation to stages of the disease process to see if the human figure drawings of the children might reflect more stress and anxiety at a particular stage of the disease. Suggestions for improvements and recommendations for future study are given.

  15. Clinical Manifestations and Overall Management Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder that causes progressive weakness and wasting of skeletal muscular and myocardium in boys due to mutation of dystrophin. The structural integrity of each individual skeletal and cardiac myocyte is significantly compromised upon physical stress due to the absence of dystrophin. The progressive destruction of systemic musculature and myocardium causes affected patients to develop multiple organ disabilities, including loss of ambulation, physical immobility, neuromuscular scoliosis, joint contracture, restrictive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and cardiomyopathy. There are some central nervous system-related medical problems, as dystrophin is also expressed in the neuronal tissues. Although principal management is to mainly delay the pathological process, an enhanced understanding of underlying pathological processes has significantly improved quality of life and longevity for DMD patients. Future research in novel molecular approach is warranted to answer unanswered questions.

  16. Progress toward Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-05-03

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been a major target for gene therapy development for nearly 30 years. DMD is among the most common genetic diseases, and isolation of the defective gene (DMD, or dystrophin) was a landmark discovery, as it was the first time a human disease gene had been cloned without knowledge of the protein product. Despite tremendous obstacles, including the enormous size of the gene and the large volume of muscle tissue in the human body, efforts to devise a treatment based on gene replacement have advanced steadily through the combined efforts of dozens of labs and patient advocacy groups. Progress in the development of DMD gene therapy has been well documented in Molecular Therapy over the past 20 years and will be reviewed here to highlight prospects for success in the imminent human clinical trials planned by several groups. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding the Process of Fibrosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Kharraz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is the aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM components during tissue healing leading to loss of its architecture and function. Fibrotic diseases are often associated with chronic pathologies and occur in a large variety of vital organs and tissues, including skeletal muscle. In human muscle, fibrosis is most readily associated with the severe muscle wasting disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by loss of dystrophin gene function. In DMD, skeletal muscle degenerates and is infiltrated by inflammatory cells and the functions of the muscle stem cells (satellite cells become impeded and fibrogenic cells hyperproliferate and are overactivated, leading to the substitution of skeletal muscle with nonfunctional fibrotic tissue. Here, we review new developments in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to fibrosis in DMD and several recent advances towards reverting it, as potential treatments to attenuate disease progression.

  18. Progressive retinal atrophy in Shetland sheepdog is associated with a mutation in the CNGA1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiik, A C; Ropstad, E O; Ekesten, B; Karlstam, L; Wade, C M; Lingaas, F

    2015-10-01

    Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the collective name of a class of hereditary retinal dystrophies in the dog and is often described as the equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa in humans. PRA is characterized by visual impairment due to degeneration of the photoreceptors in the retina, usually leading to blindness. PRA has been reported in dogs from more than 100 breeds and can be genetically heterogeneous both between and within breeds. The disease can be subdivided by age at onset and rate of progression. Using genome-wide association with 15 Shetland Sheepdog (Sheltie) cases and 14 controls, we identified a novel PRA locus on CFA13 (Praw  = 8.55 × 10(-7) , Pgenome  = 1.7 × 10(-4) ). CNGA1, which is known to be involved in human cases of retinitis pigmentosa, was located within the associated region and was considered a likely candidate gene. Sequencing of this gene identified a 4-bp deletion in exon 9 (c.1752_1755delAACT), leading to a frameshift and a premature stop codon. The study indicated genetic heterogeneity as the mutation was present in all PRA-affected individuals in one large family of Shelties, whereas some other cases in the studied Sheltie population were not associated with this CNGA1 mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mutation in CNGA1 causing PRA in dogs. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  19. Optical coherent tomography in diagnoses of peripheral retinal degenarations

    OpenAIRE

    O. G. Pozdeyeva; T. B. Shaimov; A. Yu. Galin; R. B. Shaimov; T. A. Shaimova; A. V. Zolotova; A. V. Fomin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Studying the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (RTVue-100, OPTOVUE, USA) in evaluation of peripheral retinal degenerations, vitreoretinal adhesions, adjacent vitreous body as well as measurement of morphometric data.Methods: The study included 189 patients (239 eyes) with peripheral retinal degeneration. 77 men and 112 women aged 18 to 84 underwent an ophthalmologic examination since November 2012 until October 2013. The peripheral retina was visualized with the help of op...

  20. Cognitive profile in Duchenne muscular dystrophy boys without intellectual disability: The role of executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battini, R; Chieffo, D; Bulgheroni, S; Piccini, G; Pecini, C; Lucibello, S; Lenzi, S; Moriconi, F; Pane, M; Astrea, G; Baranello, G; Alfieri, P; Vicari, S; Riva, D; Cioni, G; Mercuri, E

    2018-02-01

    The aim of our prospective observational study was to assess profiles of cognitive function and a possible impairment of executive functions in a cohort of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy without intellectual and behavior disability. Forty Duchenne boys (range of age: 6 years to 11 years and 6 months) were assessed by Wechsler Intelligence scale and battery of tests including tasks assessing working memory and executive functions (inhibition and switching, problem solving and planning). In our cohort some aspects of cognitive function were often impaired. These included multitasking, problem solving, inhibition and working memory necessary to plan and direct goal oriented behavior. Our results support the suggestion that aspects of cognitive function could be impaired even in boys without intellectual disability and support the hypothesis that executive functions may play an important role in specific aspects of cognitive impairment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultra-Widefield Steering-Based SD-OCT Imaging of the Retinal Periphery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Golding, John; Manry, Matthew W.; Rao, Rajesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) features of peripheral retinal findings using an ultra-widefield (UWF) steering technique to image the retinal periphery. Design Observational study. Participants 68 patients (68 eyes) with 19 peripheral retinal features. Main Outcome Measures SD-OCT-based structural features. Methods Nineteen peripheral retinal features including: vortex vein, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), pars plana, ora serrata pearl, typical cystoid degeneration (TCD), cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degeneration, retinal hole, retinal tear, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), typical degenerative senile retinoschisis, peripheral laser coagulation scars, ora tooth, cryopexy scars (retinal tear and treated retinoblastoma scar), bone spicules, white without pressure, and peripheral drusen were identified by peripheral clinical examination. Near infrared (NIR) scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) images and SD-OCT of these entities were registered to UWF color photographs. Results SD-OCT resolved structural features of all peripheral findings. Dilated hyporeflective tubular structures within the choroid were observed in the vortex vein. Loss of retinal lamination, neural retinal attenuation, RPE loss or hypertrophy were seen in several entities including CHRPE, ora serrata pearl, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degenerations. Hyporeflective intraretinal spaces, indicating cystoid or schitic fluid, were seen in ora serrata pearl, ora tooth, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, retinal hole, and typical degenerative senile retinoschisis. The vitreoretinal interface, which often consisted of lamellae-like structures of the condensed cortical vitreous near or adherent to the neural retina, appeared clearly in most peripheral findings, confirming its association with many low-risk and vision-threatening pathologies

  2. Risk factors for retinal breaks in patients with symptom of floaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singalavanija, Apichart; Amornrattanapan, Chutiwan; Nitiruangjarus, Kanjanee; Tongsai, Sasima

    2010-06-01

    To identify the risk factors of retinal breaks in patients with the symptom of floaters, and to determine the association between those risk factors and retinal breaks. A retrospective analytic study of 184 patients (55 males and 129 females) that included 220 eyes was conducted. Patient information such as age, symptoms (multiple floaters, flashing), duration of symptom, refractive error, history of cataract surgery, family history of retinal detachment, and complete eye examination were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups, the first group (control group) had symptoms of floaters and no retinal breaks, the second group (retinal breaks group) had symptoms of floaters with retinal breaks. Chi-square test, and the multiple logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Two hundred twenty eyes, 175 eyes of the control group and 45 eyes of the retinal breaks group were examined and included in this study. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with multiple floaters, and floaters and flashing increased the risk of retinal breaks to 5.8 and 4.3 times, respectively, when compared to patients with single floater or floaters alone. Lattice degeneration increased the risk of retinal breaks to 5.9 times when compared to eyes that did not have lattice degeneration. Multiple floaters, flashing and lattice degeneration are risk factors of retinal breaks in patients with symptoms of floaters. Therefore, it is important for the ophthalmologists to be aware of these risk factors and the patients at risk should have follow-up examinations.

  3. Astrocytes and Müller cells changes during retinal degeneration in a transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eFernández-Sánchez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer of P23H versus SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina.

  4. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  5. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  6. Bone health measured using quantitative ultrasonography in adult males with muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, C.I.; Smith, J.; Denny, A.; Tweedale, J.; Searle, N.D.; Winwood, K.; Onambele-Pearson, G.L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare muscle and bone health markers in adult males (aged 20-59 yrs) with and without muscular dystrophy (MD). Methods: Participants included 11 Fascioscapulohumeral (FSH), 11 Becker?s (Be), 9 limb girdle (LG), 11 Duchenne (DMD), and 14 non-dystrophic controls (CTRL). Physical activity was assessed using Bone (BPAQ) and disability specific (PASIPD) questionnaires. Bone QUS provided T- and Z scores from the Distal Radius (DR) and Mid-shaft tibia (MST). Tibialis anterior cross ...

  7. Retinal astrocytoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Keiichi; Kice, Nathan; Ota-Kuroki, Juri

    2017-09-01

    A miniature schnauzer dog presenting with hyphema and glaucoma of the right eye had a retinal neoplasm. Neoplastic cells stained positively for glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and S-100 and largely negatively for oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 by immunohistochemistry. The clinical and histopathological features of canine retinal astrocytomas are discussed.

  8. Congenital muscular dystrophies--problems of classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenard, H G

    1991-04-01

    The classification of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD), based on perceived clinical and morphological similarities or differences, is controversial. CMD without cerebral involvement has sometimes been divided into a mild and a severe form. This distinction is, however, arbitrary and not uncontested. Whether Ullrich's disease, formerly called atonic-sclerotic dystrophy, is a disease entity and if so, whether it is a primary muscle disorder, is uncertain. CMD without cerebral involvement is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion in the great majority of cases. CMDs with cerebral involvement are usually classified into at least three forms: the Fukuyama type of CMD, occurring almost exclusively in Japanese patients; CMD with hypomyelination, sometimes also called the occidental type of cerebromuscular dystrophy; and Walker-Warburg syndrome. Muscle-eye-brain disease, described in a number of Finnish patients, may or may not belong in this last category. In CMD with cerebral involvement inheritance is also autosomal recessive. It is possible that single sporadic cases are phenocopies due to infectious or other exogenous causes. Reports of clinical and morphological findings from an increasing number of patients show a high degree of variability within and, on the other hand, certain similarities between the forms of CMD with cerebral involvement. In addition, neuroradiological changes are also found with increasing frequency in CMD patients without clinical neuropsychological abnormalities. It is not unreasonable to speculate that molecular genetic techniques will reveal in the near future a variable defect in one gene locus or defects in a few gene loci as the cause of the various clinical forms of CMDs.

  9. Spectrophotometric retinal oximetry in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Karlsson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the validity of spectrophotometric retinal oximetry, by comparison to blood gas analysis and intra-vitreal measurements of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). METHODS: Female domestic pigs were used for all experiments (n=8). Oxygen fraction in inspired air was changed using...... a mixture of room air, pure oxygen and pure nitrogen, ranging from 5% to 100% oxygen. Femoral arterial blood gas analysis and retinal oximetry was performed at each level of inspiratory oxygen fraction. Retinal oximetry was performed using a commercial instrument, the Oxymap Retinal Oximeter T1 (Oxymap ehf...... arterial oxygen saturation and the optical density ratio over retinal arteries revealed an approximately linear relationship (R(2) = 0.74, p = 3.4 x 10(-9)). In order to test the validity of applying the arterial calibration to veins, we compared non-invasive oximetry measurements to invasive pO2...

  10. A neonate with congenital myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itani, Yasufumi; Anbo, Kazutoshi; Kashiwagi, Sigeru; Yokoya, Susumu; Kato, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    A boy's neonate with congenital myotonic dystrophy who had difficulty in breathing immediately after birth was reported. A long-term management for artificial breathing was required because of a marked decrease of muscular tone, equinus and the difficulty in sucking milk. Myogenic pattern was seen on EMG and atrophied type I fibers and increased number of type 2 C fibers suggesting the prolongation of differentiation of muscle fibers were seen by muscle biopsy. Cranial CT revealed a marked atrophy of the cerebral cortex and low density area in the white matter, although the latter disappeared 4 months later. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. [Complete atrioventricular block in Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Satoshi; Tanahashi, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Shinjirou; Kitamura, Tetsuya; Konagaya, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of complete atrioventricular (AV) block in a 40-year-old patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While he was bed-ridden and required mechanical ventilation, his cardiac involvement was mild. He had the deletion of exon 45-52 in the dystrophin gene. He underwent transient complete AV block and came to require pacemaker implantation due to recurrence of complete AV block ten days after the first attack. Electrophysiological study revealed mild prolonged AH and HV interval. Although DMD patients with AV block have been rarely reported so far, attention should be paid to AV block for patients who prolonged their lives.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Retinal Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Luisa; Marchese, Alessandro; Gagliardi, Marco; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Retinal cavernous hemangioma is a rare, benign, retinal tumor characterized by angiomatous proliferation of vessels within the inner retina or the optic disc.1 Here we report a case of retinal cavernous hemangioma on the margin of the optic disc in the right eye of a 61-year-old asymptomatic female. The lesion was studied with multimodal imaging which included structural optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, blue fundus auto-fluorescence, optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) (DRI OCT Triton; Topcon, Tokyo, Japan) and visual field examination. Blood circulation inside retinal cavernous hemangioma lesion is typically low-stagnant.2 However, OCTA demonstrated blood flow inside the lesion, illustrating its vascular circulation.3 Visual field was within the normal limits, except from a slight enlargement of the blind spot. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:684-685.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy with unusual features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hideo; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Suzuki, Haruko; Fukuyama, Yukio

    1980-01-01

    The Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (F-CMD) has been generally recognized as a well delineated subgroup of progressive muscular dystrophy (PMD) with uniform clinical, pathological, and genetic features. However, there are still debate to be solved as to the etiology of the condition, because several neuropathological findings found in F-CMD brain allowed some investigators to hypothesize the intrauterine infection to be a primary causation. The authors reported here two families with two affected siblings in each. In the pedigree A, consanguineous parents produced two sisters, Case 1 (3-year-old) and Case 2 (14-month-old). Two patients in the pedigree B, the products of non-consanguineous parents, Case 3 (4-month-old male) and his elder sister already decreased, were affected with F-CMD and infantile spasms. In all cases, generalized weakness and hypotonia had been remarkable since their early infancy, and muscle atrophy, myopathic facies multiple joint contractures and mental dullness became evident gradually. The above-mentioned clinical features as well as laboratory findings including elevated serum CPK and myogenic EMG were compatible with those of typical F-CMD. However, they were characterized by the following three unusual features. 1. Muscle biopsy: In addition to an overwhelming myogenic change, there was a distinct inflammatory cell infiltration in all cases, and scattered small groups of atrophic fibers were present in Case 2. 2. Brain CT scanning: A symmetrical and extensive low density area was observed in the cerebral white matter in all cases. 3. A favorable response to prednisolone therapy was noted in all cases. (author)

  14. Prevalence and correlates of apathy in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Benjamin; Montreuil, Michèle; Gargiulo, Marcela; Eymard, Bruno; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc

    2015-08-22

    Apathy in DM1 has long been acknowledged in clinical practice. However, a major drawback is that the concept has been only sparsely explored in previous specific studies. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of apathy in myotonic dystrophy (DM1), to compare it with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) patients and normal healthy controls, and explore its relationship to psychopathological features and cognitive function. Levels of apathy in 38 DM1 patients with adult phenotypes were compared with 19 patients with FSHD and 20 matched controls. Patient participants were consecutively recruited, regarding their interdisciplinary annual evaluation at the neuromuscular pathology reference center (Institute of Myology, Paris, France), within an 18-month period. Additional measurements included motor disability, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and cognitive abilities. Inter-group comparisons were performed using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U Tests. Intra-group comparisons were carried out with the Wilcoxon Signed rank and Friedman tests. Also, Spearman's correlations were used to assess the strength of linear relationships between pairs of variables. The significance level was set at 0.05. Global score of apathy was significantly higher in DM1 patients than in FSHD patients (p fatigue, depression, and anxiety. Apathy is a frequent symptom in DM1 (almost 40 %). It is more prevalent than in a similarly disabled group of patients with FSHD and in controls. Results also show that apathy in DM1 is independent of the psychopathological domain, fatigue, age, and motor disability, but associated to general cognitive status. These results altogether could suggest a central cause for apathy in DM1 rather than an adjustment process to cope with the progressive and debilitating nature of the disease. Data emphasize the importance to evaluate this symptom in routine clinical management of DM1 patients.

  15. Involvement of LCA5 in Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa in the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corton, Marta; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Vallespín, Elena; López-Molina, María Isabel; Almoguera, Berta; Martín-Garrido, Esther; Tatu, Sorina D; Khan, M Imran; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Brión, María; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Cremers, Frans P M; Carracedo, Angel; Ayuso, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel genetic defects in the LCA5 gene underlying Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) in the Spanish population and to describe the associated phenotype. Case series. A cohort of 217 unrelated Spanish families affected by autosomal recessive or isolated retinal dystrophy, that is, 79 families with LCA and 138 families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (EORP). A total of 100 healthy, unrelated Spanish individuals were screened as controls. High-resolution homozygosity mapping was performed in 44 patients with LCA using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays. Direct sequencing of the LCA5 gene was performed in 5 patients who showed homozygous regions at chromosome 6 and in 173 unrelated individuals with LCA or EORP. The ophthalmic history of 8 patients carrying LCA5 mutations was reviewed and additional examinations were performed, including electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fundus photography. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, identity-by-descent (IBD) regions, LCA5 mutations, best-corrected visual acuity, visual field assessments, fundus appearance, ERG, and OCT findings. Four novel and 2 previously reported LCA5 mutations have been identified in 6 unrelated families with LCA by homozygosity mapping or Sanger sequencing. Thus, LCA5 mutations have a frequency of 7.6% in the Spanish population. However, no LCA5 mutations were found in 138 patients with EORP. Although most of the identified LCA5 mutations led to a truncated protein, a likely pathogenic missense variant was identified for the first time as a cause of LCA, segregating in 2 families. We also have characterized a novel splicing site mutation at the RNA level, demonstrating that the mutant LCA5 transcript was absent in a patient. All patients carrying LCA5 mutations presented nystagmus, night blindness, and progressive loss of visual acuity and visual field leading to blindness toward the third decade of life. Fundoscopy

  16. Survey of Canadian Myotonic Dystrophy Patients' Access to Computer Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climans, Seth A; Piechowicz, Christine; Koopman, Wilma J; Venance, Shannon L

    2017-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is an autosomal dominant condition affecting distal hand strength, energy, and cognition. Increasingly, patients and families are seeking information online. An online neuromuscular patient portal under development can help patients access resources and interact with each other regardless of location. It is unknown how individuals living with myotonic dystrophy interact with technology and whether barriers to access exist. We aimed to characterize technology use among participants with myotonic dystrophy and to determine whether there is interest in a patient portal. Surveys were mailed to 156 participants with myotonic dystrophy type 1 registered with the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry. Seventy-five participants (60% female) responded; almost half were younger than 46 years. Most (84%) used the internet; almost half of the responders (47%) used social media. The complexity and cost of technology were commonly cited reasons not to use technology. The majority of responders (76%) were interested in a myotonic dystrophy patient portal. Patients in a Canada-wide registry of myotonic dystrophy have access to and use technology such as computers and mobile phones. These patients expressed interest in a portal that would provide them with an opportunity to network with others with myotonic dystrophy and to access information about the disease.

  17. Complement-independent retinal pathology produced by intravitreal injection of neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Felix

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is often associated with retinal abnormalities including thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and microcystic changes. Here, we demonstrate that passive transfer of an anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody (AQP4-IgG produces primary retinal pathology. Methods AQP4-IgG was delivered to adult rat retinas by intravitreal injection. Rat retinas and retinal explant cultures were assessed by immunofluorescence. Results Immunofluorescence showed AQP4-IgG deposition on retinal Müller cells, with greatly reduced AQP4 expression and increased glial fibrillary acidic protein by 5 days. There was mild retinal inflammation with microglial activation but little leukocyte infiltration and loss of retinal ganglion cells by 30 days with thinning of the ganglion cell complex. Interestingly, the loss of AQP4 was complement independent as seen in cobra venom factor-treated rats and in normal rats administered a mutated AQP4-IgG lacking complement effector function. Exposure of ex vivo retinal cultures to AQP4-IgG produced a marked reduction in AQP4 expression by 24 h, which was largely prevented by inhibitors of endocytosis or lysosomal acidification. Conclusions Passive transfer of AQP4-IgG results in primary, complement-independent retinal pathology, which might contribute to retinal abnormalities seen in NMO patients.

  18. Ultra-Widefield Steering-Based Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Retinal Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Golding, John; Manry, Matthew W; Rao, Rajesh C

    2016-06-01

    To describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) features of peripheral retinal findings using an ultra-widefield (UWF) steering technique to image the retinal periphery. Observational study. A total of 68 patients (68 eyes) with 19 peripheral retinal features. Spectral-domain OCT-based structural features. Nineteen peripheral retinal features, including vortex vein, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, pars plana, ora serrata pearl, typical cystoid degeneration (TCD), cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degeneration, retinal hole, retinal tear, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, typical degenerative senile retinoschisis, peripheral laser coagulation scars, ora tooth, cryopexy scars (retinal tear and treated retinoblastoma scar), bone spicules, white without pressure, and peripheral drusen, were identified by peripheral clinical examination. Near-infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images and SD OCT of these entities were registered to UWF color photographs. Spectral-domain OCT resolved structural features of all peripheral findings. Dilated hyporeflective tubular structures within the choroid were observed in the vortex vein. Loss of retinal lamination, neural retinal attenuation, retinal pigment epithelium loss, or hypertrophy was seen in several entities, including congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, ora serrata pearl, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice, and cobblestone degenerations. Hyporeflective intraretinal spaces, indicating cystoid or schitic fluid, were seen in ora serrata pearl, ora tooth, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, retinal hole, and typical degenerative senile retinoschisis. The vitreoretinal interface, which often consisted of lamellae-like structures of the condensed cortical vitreous near or adherent to the neural retina, appeared clearly in most peripheral findings, confirming its association with many low-risk and vision

  19. COMPARISON OF RETINAL PATHOLOGY VISUALIZATION IN MULTISPECTRAL SCANNING LASER IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, Amit; Lin, Tiezhu; Dans, Kunny; Chen, Kevin C; Amador, Manuel; Hasenstab, Kyle; Muftuoglu, Ilkay Kilic; Nudleman, Eric; Chao, Daniel; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Freeman, William R

    2018-03-16

    To compare retinal pathology visualization in multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging between the Spectralis and Optos devices. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 42 eyes from 30 patients with age-related macular degeneration (19 eyes), diabetic retinopathy (10 eyes), and epiretinal membrane (13 eyes). All patients underwent retinal imaging with a color fundus camera (broad-spectrum white light), the Spectralis HRA-2 system (3-color monochromatic lasers), and the Optos P200 system (2-color monochromatic lasers). The Optos image was cropped to a similar size as the Spectralis image. Seven masked graders marked retinal pathologies in each image within a 5 × 5 grid that included the macula. The average area with detected retinal pathology in all eyes was larger in the Spectralis images compared with Optos images (32.4% larger, P < 0.0001), mainly because of better visualization of epiretinal membrane and retinal hemorrhage. The average detection rate of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy pathologies was similar across the three modalities, whereas epiretinal membrane detection rate was significantly higher in the Spectralis images. Spectralis tricolor multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging had higher rate of pathology detection primarily because of better epiretinal membrane and retinal hemorrhage visualization compared with Optos bicolor multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging.

  20. Deletion Analysis Of The Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy Gene Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastur R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD is mainly based on clinical profile, serum CPK values, muscle biopsy and immunostaining for dystrophin. Most recent and accurate method for diagnosing DMD/BMD is by detection of mutations in the DMD gene. This was done in 100 unrelated patients using 19 exons including the promoter region in two sets of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. These primers amplify most of the exons in the deletion prone ′hotspot′ regions allowing determination of deletion end point. Intragenic deletions were detected in 74 patients indicating that the use of PCR-based assays will allow deletion detection help in prenatal diagnosis for most of the DMD/BMD patients. The frequency of deletions observed in the present study was 74%.

  1. Toward a more personalized motor function rehabilitation in Myotonic dystrophy type 1: The role of neuroplasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Portaro

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is the most prevalent adult muscular dystrophy, often accompanied by impairments in attention, memory, visuospatial and executive functions. Given that DM1 is a multi-system disorder, it requires a multi-disciplinary approach, including effective rehabilitation programs, focusing on the central nervous system neuroplasticity, in order to develop patient-tailored rehabilitative procedures for motor function recovery. Herein, we performed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS study aimed at investigating central motor conduction time, sensory-motor plasticity, and cortical excitability in 7 genetically defined DM1 patients. As compared to healthy individuals, DM1 patients showed a delayed central motor conduction time and an abnormal sensory-motor plasticity, with no alteration of cortical excitability. These findings may be useful to define patient-tailored motor rehabilitative programs.

  2. A Comprehensive Review of Retinal Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Boye, Shannon E; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Hauswirth, William W

    2013-01-01

    Blindness, although not life threatening, is a debilitating disorder for which few, if any treatments exist. Ocular gene therapies have the potential to profoundly improve the quality of life in patients with inherited retinal disease. As such, tremendous focus has been given to develop such therapies. Several factors make the eye an ideal organ for gene-replacement therapy including its accessibility, immune privilege, small size, compartmentalization, and the existence of a contralateral co...

  3. Pericytes derived from adipose-derived stem cells protect against retinal vasculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Mendel

    Full Text Available Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR, threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy.We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR, ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area. ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction. Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection.ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of retinal vasculopathy. The pericyte phenotype demonstrated

  4. Simultaneous Mutation Detection in 90 Retinal Disease Genes in Multiple Patients Using a Custom-designed 300-kb Retinal Resequencing Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Judith C.; Bakker, Arne 1; Kulumbetova, Jamilia; Moutaoukil, Youssef; Smeets, Bert; Verheij, Joke; Kroes, Hester Y.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; van Schooneveld, Mary; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Florijn, Ralph J.

    Purpose: To develop a high-throughput, cost-effective diagnostic strategy for the identification of known and new mutations in 90 retinal disease genes. Design: Evidence-based study. Participants: Sixty patients with a variety of retinal disorders, including Leber's congenital amaurosis, ocular

  5. Genetics and emerging treatments for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Nicolas; Alfano, Lindsay; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene result in Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy due to absent or altered expression of the dystrophin protein. The more severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy typically presents around ages 2 to 5 with gait disturbance, and historically has led to the loss of ambulation by age 12. It is important for the practicing pediatrician, however, to be aware of other presenting signs, such as delayed motor or cognitive milestones, or elevated serum transaminases. Becker muscular dystrophy is milder, often presenting after age 5, with ambulation frequently preserved past 20 years and sometimes into late decades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MR imaging of fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy; a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Koo, Hae Soo; Park, Ki Deuk

    2000-01-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease and common in Japan. The typical clinical features are hypotonia with an early infantile onset and severe developmental delay. The diagnosis is based on pathologic evidence of muscular dystrophy revealed by biopsy or an increased serum creatine kinase levels. Involvement of the brain is characterized by abnormal cerebral cortical dysplasia, cerebellar dysplasia, and white matter changes. We encountered a case of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in which brain MRI findings were typical, and present this case together with a review of the literature

  7. Risk Factors for First Fractures Among Males With Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Katherine A; Cunniff, Christopher; Apkon, Susan D; Mathews, Katherine; Lu, Zhenqiang; Holtzer, Caleb; Pandya, Shree; Ciafaloni, Emma; Miller, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Fractures are a significant concern for individuals with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy with 21% to 44% of males experiencing a fracture. Factors that increase or decrease the risk for fracture have been suggested in past research, although statistical risk has not been determined. In this retrospective cohort study, we used the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking and Research Network cohort, a large, population-based sample to identify risk factors associated with first fractures in patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy. Our study cohort included males with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy born between 1982 and 2006 who resided in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, and Western New York, retrospectively identified and followed through 2010. We utilized a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model to determine hazard ratios for relevant factors associated with first fracture risk including race/ethnicity, surveillance site, ambulation status, calcium/vitamin D use and duration, bisphosphonate use and duration, and corticosteroid use and duration. Of 747 cases, 249 had at least 1 fracture (33.3%). Full-time wheelchair use increased the risk of first fracture by 75% for every 3 months of use (hazard ratio=1.75, 95% confidence interval, 1.14, 2.68), but corticosteroid use, bisphosphonate use, and calcium/vitamin D use did not significantly affect risk in the final adjusted model. In this cohort, first fractures were common and full-time wheelchair use, but not corticosteroid use, was identified as a risk factor. The impact of prevention measures should be more thoroughly assessed. Fractures are a significant concern for individuals with dystrophinopathies, but the contribution of various risk factors has not been consistently demonstrated.

  8. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Management and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cheryl A; Gutmann, Laurie

    2016-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy. It is a multisystem disorder with a complex pathophysiology. Although inheritance is autosomal dominant, disease variability is attributed to anticipation, a maternal expansion bias, variable penetrance, somatic mosaicism, and a multitude of aberrant pre-mRNA splicing events. Patient presentations range from asymptomatic or mild late onset adult to severe congenital forms. Multiple organ systems may be affected. Patients may experience early cataracts, myotonia, muscle weakness/atrophy, fatigue, excessive daytime sleepiness, central/obstructive apnea, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmia, insulin resistance, dysphagia, GI dysmotility, cognitive impairment, Cluster C personality traits, and/or mood disorders. At present, there is no curative or disease-modifying treatment, although clinical treatment trials have become more promising. Management focuses on genetic counseling, preserving function and independence, preventing cardiopulmonary complications, and symptomatic treatment (e.g., pain, myotonia, hypersomnolence, etc.). Currently, there is an increasing international consensus on monitoring and treatment options for these patients which necessitates a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive, coordinated clinical care.

  9. Hypoxia-ischemia and retinal ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanjit Kaur

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Charanjit Kaur1, Wallace S Foulds2, Eng-Ang Ling11Department of Anatomy, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore Eye Research Institute, SingaporeAbstract: Retinal hypoxia is the potentially blinding mechanism underlying a number of sight-threatening disorders including central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic central retinal vein thrombosis, complications of diabetic eye disease and some types of glaucoma. Hypoxia is implicated in loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs occurring in such conditions. RGC death occurs by apoptosis or necrosis. Hypoxia-ischemia induces the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and its target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Increased production of VEGF results in disruption of the blood retinal barrier leading to retinal edema. Enhanced expression of NOS results in increased production of nitric oxide which may be toxic to the cells resulting in their death. Excess glutamate release in hypoxic-ischemic conditions causes excitotoxic damage to the RGCs through activation of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Activation of glutamate receptors is thought to initiate damage in the retina by a cascade of biochemical effects such as neuronal NOS activation and increase in intracellular Ca2+ which has been described as a major contributing factor to RGC loss. Excess production of proinflammatory cytokines also mediates cell damage. Besides the above, free-radicals generated in hypoxic-ischemic conditions result in RGC loss because of an imbalance between antioxidant- and oxidant-generating systems. Although many advances have been made in understanding the mediators and mechanisms of injury, strategies to improve the damage are lacking. Measures to prevent neuronal injury have to be developed.Keywords: retinal hypoxia, retinal ganglion cells, glutamate receptors, neuronal injury, retina

  10. Proposed clinical case definition for cytomegalovirus-immune recovery retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cruz, Matilde; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2014-07-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis has been extensively described in patients with advanced or late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease under ineffective treatment of opportunistic infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure. However, there is limited information about patients who develop active cytomegalovirus retinitis as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after successful initiation of ART. Therefore, a case definition of cytomegalovirus-immune recovery retinitis (CMV-IRR) is proposed here. We reviewed medical records of 116 HIV-infected patients with CMV retinitis attending our institution during January 2003-June 2012. We retrospectively studied HIV-infected patients who had CMV retinitis on ART initiation or during the subsequent 6 months. Clinical and immunological characteristics of patients with active CMV retinitis were described. Of the 75 patients under successful ART included in the study, 20 had improvement of CMV retinitis. The remaining 55 patients experienced CMV-IRR; 35 of those developed CMV-IRR after ART initiation (unmasking CMV-IRR) and 20 experienced paradoxical clinical worsening of retinitis (paradoxical CMV-IRR). Nineteen patients with CMV-IRR had a CD4 count of ≥50 cells/µL. Six patients with CMV-IRR subsequently developed immune recovery uveitis. There is no case definition for CMV-IRR, although this condition is likely to occur after successful initiation of ART, even in patients with high CD4 T-cell counts. By consequence, we propose the case definitions for paradoxical and unmasking CMV-IRR. We recommend close follow-up of HIV-infected patients following ART initiation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Rickettsial retinitis: Direct bacterial infection or an immune-mediated response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Chawla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious retinitis postfebrile illness is known to be caused by chikungunya, dengue, West Nile virus, Bartonella, Lyme's disease, Rift Valley fever, rickettsia, Herpes viruses etc. Rickettsia is Gram-negative bacteria transmitted by arthropods vectors. Ocular involvement is common including conjunctivitis, keratitis, anterior uveitis, panuveitis, retinitis, retinal vascular changes, and optic nerve involvement. Retinitis lesions in rickettsia can occur because of an immunological response to the bacteria or because of direct invasion and proliferation of bacteria in the inner retina. We report such a case of bilateral rickettsial retinitis proven by serology which worsened on systemic steroids and responded dramatically to therapy with oral doxycycline and steroid taper. We thus believe that direct bacterial invasion plays a major role in the pathogenesis of rickettsial retinitis.

  12. Quantitative Fundus Autofluorescence in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: RPE Lipofuscin is not Increased in Non-Lesion Areas of Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Janet R; Duncker, Tobias; Woods, Russell; Delori, François C

    2016-01-01

    Since the lipofuscin of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, we quantified fundus autofluorescence (quantitative fundus autofluorescence, qAF) as an indirect measure of RPE lipofuscin levels. Mean non-lesion qAF was found to be within normal limits for age. By spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) vitelliform lesions presented as fluid-filled subretinal detachments containing reflective material. We discuss photoreceptor outer segment debris as the source of the intense fluorescence of these lesions and loss of anion channel functioning as an explanation for the bullous photoreceptor-RPE detachment. Unexplained is the propensity of the disease for central retina.

  13. Bilateral Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment during External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Hidaka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a case of nontraumatic bilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD during external beam radiotherapy for nonocular tumor, presented as an observational case study in conjunction with a review of the relevant literature. A 65-year-old male was referred to our hospital due to bilateral RRD. He underwent a biopsy for a tumor of the left frontal lobe 4 months prior to presentation, and the tumor had been diagnosed as primary central nerve system B-cell type lymphoma. He received chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy for 1 month. There were no traumatic episodes. Bilateral retinal detachment occurred during a series of radiotherapies. Simultaneous nontraumatic bilateral retinal detachment is rare. The effects of radiotherapy on ocular functionality, particularly in cases involving retinal adhesion and vitreous contraction, may include RRD. Thus, it is necessary to closely monitor the eyes of patients undergoing radiotherapy, particularly those undergoing surgery for retinal detachment and those with a history of photocoagulation for retinal tears, a relevant family history, or risk factors known to be associated with RRD.

  14. [Factors related to intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, K; Ogino, N; Demizu, S; Atsumi, K; Kurihara, H; Iwaki, M; Ishigooka, H; Tachi, N

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the factors of intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery. This study included 558 eyes of 506 patients who underwent idiopathic macular hole surgery by one surgeon. Multiple regression was performed using the variables of gender, age, affected eye, lens status, stage, duration of symptoms, hole size, axial length, and lattice degeneration. The rate of retinal breaks was higher in stage 3 (16.0%) than in stage 4 (8.2%) (p = 0.014). In eyes with lattice degeneration intraoperative retinal breaks occurred in about 40% of the cases. Major factors were as follows: lattice degeneration (r = 0.24, p lattice degeneration, and gender (r = -0.18, p = 0.035) in eyes of stage 4 without lattice degeneration. The factors of intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery were lattice degeneration in all eyes and stage 3 in eyes without lattice degeneration. The high incidence of intraoperative retinal breaks in stage 3 was mainly due to the occurrence of posterior vitreous detachment. Male gender was a significant factor associated with intraoperative retinal breaks.

  15. Serum creatinine level: a supplemental index to distinguish Duchenne muscular dystrophy from Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huili; Zhu, Yuling; Sun, Yiming; Liang, Yingyin; Li, Yaqin; Zhang, Yu; Deng, Langhui; Wen, Xingxuan; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    To improve assessment of dystrophinopathy, the aim of this study was to identify whether serum creatinine (Crn) level reflects disease severity. Biochemical, Vignos score, and genetic data were collected on 212 boys with dystrophinopathy. Serum Crn level had a strong inverse correlation with Vignos score by simple correlation (r = -0.793) and partial correlation analysis after adjustment for age, height, and weight (r = -0.791; both P Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patients than Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients at ages 4, 5, 7, and 9 yr (all P < 0.0125). After adjusting for age, height, and weight, BMD patients still had a significantly higher serum Crn level than DMD patients (β = 7.140,  t = 6.277,  P < 0.01). Serum Crn level reflected disease severity and may serve as a supplemental index to distinguish DMD from BMD in clinical practice.

  16. Guidelines for the Perianesthesia Care of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy/Becker Muscular Dystrophy Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliod, Barbara A; Ash, Rebecca A

    2016-12-01

    More patients suffering with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are presenting to perianesthesia settings for emergent and nonemergent treatment and care. A group of collaborative health care providers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago developed a multidisciplinary DMD/BMD Task Force to study this disorder and create a set of guidelines to aid those engaging in the planning, execution of care, and recovery of this unique population in the perianesthesia setting. Attention to detail, well-executed preplanning, meticulous awareness of the patient, and prearranged implementation and intervention has proven to offset potential problems and complications and is the key to a successful perianesthesia period. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ethnic variation in rhegmatogenous retinal detachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, A; Banerjee, P; Davis, D; Charteris, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the clinical variation of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RD) in patients of different ethnicities. Methods Patients presenting with a primary RD from two ethnic groups were recruited from our tertiary referral hospital between August 2010 and December 2012. Patients who self-reported their ethnic origin either as European Caucasian (EC) or South Asian (SA) were included. Exclusion criteria included trauma, previous vitreoretinal procedures, age under 18 years, complicated cataract surgery and the presence of syndromes known to be associated with a high prevalence of RD. Detailed phenotypic data were collected. Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses were undertaken. Results 1269 Patients were recruited. 1173 (92.4%) were EC. Mean age of onset was 58.3 years (EC) and 54.5 years (SA) (P=0.006). 75.3% EC and 58.4% SA were phakic (Plattice retinal degeneration in the affected eye (P=0.003). Refractive myopia was greater in SA patients (mean: −6.1DS) than EC (−4.2DS) (P=0.032). Additionally, SA patients had a greater mean axial length (25.65 mm) than EC (25.06 mm) (P=0.014). No differences were demonstrated in laterality, family history, type of retinal break or macular status. Conclusions SA patients present with RD at an earlier age and have a more severe phenotype than ECs. Future management strategies for RD may need to reflect these differences. PMID:25853394

  18. Restoration of vision in the pde6β-deficient dog, a large animal model of rod-cone dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Lhériteau, Elsa; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Guihal, Caroline; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    Defects in the β subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6β) are associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a childhood blinding disease with early retinal degeneration and vision loss. To date, there is no treatment for this pathology. The aim of this preclinical study was to test recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene addition therapy in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency that strongly resembles the human pathology. A total of eight rcd1 dogs were injected subretinally with AAV2/5RK.cpde6β (n = 4) or AAV2/8RK.cpde6β (n = 4). In vivo and post-mortem morphological analysis showed a significant preservation of the retinal structure in transduced areas of both AAV2/5RK.cpde6β- and AAV2/8RK.cpde6β-treated retinas. Moreover, substantial rod-derived electroretinography (ERG) signals were recorded as soon as 1 month postinjection (35% of normal eyes) and remained stable for at least 18 months (the duration of the study) in treated eyes. Rod-responses were undetectable in untreated contralateral eyes. Most importantly, dim-light vision was restored in all treated rcd1 dogs. These results demonstrate for the first time that gene therapy effectively restores long-term retinal function and vision in a large animal model of autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy, and provide great promise for human treatment.

  19. Exudative Retinal Detachment Treatment in a Patient with Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Sampo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report a case of unilateral exudative retinal detachment in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP, without associated hypertension, successfully treated with plasmapheresis. Case Report: A 46-year-old woman with a medical history of TTP presented with unilateral exudative retinal detachment. Biological and radiological assessment eliminated other causes of exudative retinal detachment, including hypertension. Plasma exchange was performed, followed by a rapid improvement in visual acuity and total disappearance of serous detachment. Conclusion: Exudative unilateral retinal detachment is a rare complication of TTP and can be successfully treated by plasma exchange.

  20. Retinal vascular fractals predict long-term microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin L; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    : We included 180 patients with type 1 diabetes in a 16 year follow-up study. In baseline retinal photographs (from 1995), all vessels in a zone 0.5-2.0 disc diameters from the disc margin were traced using Singapore Institute Vessel Assessment-Fractal image analysis software. Artefacts were removed......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Fractal analysis of the retinal vasculature provides a global measure of the complexity and density of retinal vessels summarised as a single variable: the fractal dimension. We investigated fractal dimensions as long-term predictors of microvasculopathy in type 1 diabetes. METHODS....... Retinal fractal analysis therefore is a potential tool for risk stratification in type 1 diabetes....

  1. Retinal oximetry during treatment of retinal vein occlusion by ranibizumab in patients with high blood pressure and dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilani, C; Halalchi, A; Wakpi Djeugue, D; Regis, A; Abada, S

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we examined retinal vascular oxygen saturation in patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO), high blood pressure (HBP) and dyslipidemia, before and during intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injection (ranibizumab). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of six patients with visual acuity (VA) reduced by macular edema (ME) secondary to RVO with HBP and dyslipidemia, who underwent intravitreal anti-VEGF injection between October 2014 and February 2015 in the department of ophthalmology of François-Quesnay Hospital at Mantes-la-Jolie (France). The main inclusion criterion was the presence of RVO with ME and decreased VA. The primary endpoint was improvement of retinal venous oxygen saturation in patients with RVO before and 3 months after intravitreal ranibizumab injection. Secondary outcomes were improvement of retinal arterial oxygen saturation, improvement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale, regression of ME measured by the central macular thickness (CMT) in nm and studying the correlation between blood pressure (BP) and retinal venous oxygen saturation before and after ranibizumab. Six eyes of six patients were included. Before treatment, the mean (standard deviation [SD]) of the retinal venous saturation (%) was 38.1±14.2. Three months after the injections, the mean (SD) of the retinal venous saturation (%) increased statistically significantly 49.2±11 (P=0.03). In this study, retinal venous oxygen saturation in patients with RVO, HBP and dyslipidemia was partially normalized during intravitreal ranibizumab treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI for the demonstration of subclinical muscle involvement in muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sookhoo, S.; MacKinnon, I.; Bushby, K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Birchall, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with clinical examination for the detection of muscle abnormality in patients with muscular dystrophy. Methods: Muscle power in 20 patients with a variety of forms of muscular dystrophy was examined clinically using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading scale, and patients were subsequently imaged with MRI. MRI and clinical examination for the detection of muscle normality and abnormality were compared using a McNemar chi-squared test to examine differences between the two methods. Results: MRI demonstrated radiological evidence of muscle abnormality more often than clinical examination; 50% of movements assessed as normal on clinical examination were associated with muscle abnormalities on MRI, including a significant proportion where there was severe radiological abnormality, indicating that focally advanced disease may be undetectable clinically. Conclusion: The combination of clinical examination and MRI could improve the accuracy of phenotypic characterization of patients with muscular dystrophy, and this in turn could allow a more focussed molecular analysis through muscle biopsy or genetic investigation. This may also be very helpful in the assessment of the degree of muscle compromise not only in the early phases of the disease but especially during follow-up and can be used in therapeutic trials

  3. Dystrophin analysis in carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, Edo M.; Ginjaar, Ieke B.; Bakker, Egbert; de Visser, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Associations between clinical phenotype (muscle weakness, dilated cardiomyopathy) and dystrophin abnormalities in muscle tissue among definite carriers of Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) were investigated. No associations between dystrophin abnormalities and clinical variables in

  4. A new chart for weight control in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, R D; Edwards, R H

    1988-01-01

    Weight control is desirable in the muscle wasting conditions. A new chart is presented to allow the prediction of an ideal weight, free of excess fat, specifically for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  5. How Physicians Support Mothers of Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Haruo; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Saki; Iwata, Yuko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Shinno, Susumu; Imura, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Communicating about Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its prognosis can be difficult for affected children and their family. We focused on how physicians provide support to the mothers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have difficulty communicating about the condition with their child. The eligible participants were certified child neurologists of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Participants responded to questionnaires consisting of free descriptions of a vignette of a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a mother. We analyzed 263 responses of the participants. We found 4 themes on advising mothers, involving encouraging communication, family autonomy, supporting family, and considering the child's concerns. These results provide a better understanding of the communication between physicians and family members who need help sharing information with a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These findings will assist clinical practitioners in supporting families and the affected children throughout the course of their illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Predictive factors for masticatory performance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, H.W. van; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Steenks, M.H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Kalaykova, S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) report masticatory and swallowing problems. Such problems may cause complications such as choking, and feeling of food sticking in the throat. We investigated whether masticatory performance in DMD is objectively impaired, and explored predictive

  7. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, EL; Vogels, OJM; van Asseldonk, RJGP; Lindeman, E; Hendriks, JCM; Wohlgemuth, M; van der Maarel, SM; Padberg, GW

    2004-01-01

    Background: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of

  8. High glucose alters retinal astrocytes phenotype through increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Seok Shin

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are macroglial cells that have a crucial role in development of the retinal vasculature and maintenance of the blood-retina-barrier (BRB. Diabetes affects the physiology and function of retinal vascular cells including astrocytes (AC leading to breakdown of BRB. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms leading to retinal AC dysfunction under high glucose conditions remain unclear. Here we show that high glucose conditions did not induce the apoptosis of retinal AC, but instead increased their rate of DNA synthesis and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. These alterations were associated with changes in intracellular signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration and proliferation. High glucose conditions also affected the expression of inflammatory cytokines in retinal AC, activated NF-κB, and prevented their network formation on Matrigel. In addition, we showed that the attenuation of retinal AC migration under high glucose conditions, and capillary morphogenesis of retinal endothelial cells on Matrigel, was mediated through increased oxidative stress. Antioxidant proteins including heme oxygenase-1 and peroxiredoxin-2 levels were also increased in retinal AC under high glucose conditions through nuclear localization of transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2. Together our results demonstrated that high glucose conditions alter the function of retinal AC by increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress with significant impact on their proliferation, adhesion, and migration.

  9. Bilateral patching in retinal detachment: fluid mechanics and retinal "settling".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William J

    2011-07-20

    When a patient suffers a retinal detachment and surgery is delayed, it is known clinically that bilaterally patching the patient may allow the retina to partially reattach or "settle." Although this procedure has been performed since the 1860s, there is still debate as to how such a maneuver facilitates the reattachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using commercially available analysis software are used to elucidate the influence of reduction in eye movement caused by bilateral patching on the flow of subretinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. It was found that by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, a physically consistent explanation of increased retinal detachment with eye movements can be found in the case of traction on the retinal hole. Large eye movements increase vitreous traction and detachment forces on the edge of the retinal hole, creating a subretinal vacuum and facilitating increased subretinal fluid. Alternative models, in which intraocular fluid flow is redirected into the subretinal space, are not consistent with these simulations. The results of these simulations explain the physical principles behind bilateral patching and provide insight that can be used clinically. In particular, as is known clinically, bilateral patching may facilitate a decrease in the height of a retinal detachment. The results described here provide a description of a physical mechanism underlying this technique. The findings of this study may aid in deciding whether to bilaterally patch patients and in counseling patients on pre- and postoperative care.

  10. [Central aleolar choroidal dystrophy in sibilings coexisting with alopecia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Dróbecka-Brydak, Ewa; Paćkowska, Maria; Kecik, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    Central areolar choroidal dystrophy is localized in macular region and is characterized by atrophy of pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and choriocapillaris. This paper presents the history of two sibilings at the age of 23 and 30, with central aleolar choroidal dystrophy coexisting with alopecia. The results of erg, eog and fluorescein angiography are presented. The results of therapy for glaucoma associated with the Sturge-Weber syndrome are often disappointing.

  11. Prevalence and correlates of apathy in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Gallais, Benjamin; Montreuil, Mich?le; Gargiulo, Marcela; Eymard, Bruno; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background Apathy in DM1 has long been acknowledged in clinical practice. However, a major drawback is that the concept has been only sparsely explored in previous specific studies. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of apathy in myotonic dystrophy (DM1), to compare it with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) patients and normal healthy controls, and explore its relationship to psychopathological features and cognitive function. Methods Levels of apathy in 38 DM1 patients with adul...

  12. Concurrence of myotonic dystrophy and epilepsy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Worku, Dawit Kibru

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous multisystem disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 8000 in the general population. Case presentation A 25-year-old Ethiopian man presented with symptoms of myotonia, muscle wasting, gait problems, frontal baldness, and family history characterizing the hereditary disorder myotonic dystrophy. He had been on treatment for idiopathic generalized epilepsy for over 15 years. A needle electromyography showed insertional class...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... in known genes account for 58% of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008; ...

  14. Automated detection of retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmchen, Lorens A; Lehmann, Harold P; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2014-11-01

    Nearly 4 in 10 Americans with diabetes currently fail to undergo recommended annual retinal exams, resulting in tens of thousands of cases of blindness that could have been prevented. Advances in automated retinal disease detection could greatly reduce the burden of labor-intensive dilated retinal examinations by ophthalmologists and optometrists and deliver diagnostic services at lower cost. As the current availability of ophthalmologists and optometrists is inadequate to screen all patients at risk every year, automated screening systems deployed in primary care settings and even in patients' homes could fill the current gap in supply. Expanding screens to all patients at risk by switching to automated detection systems would in turn yield significantly higher rates of detecting and treating diabetic retinopathy per dilated retinal examination. Fewer diabetic patients would develop complications such as blindness, while ophthalmologists could focus on more complex cases.

  15. Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Grauslund, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks has been examined in several studies and reviews, but so far, no studies have successfully applied a systematic approach. In the present systematic review, we examined the need of follow-up after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) - diagnosed by slit...... published before 2012. Four levels of screening identified 13 studies suitable for inclusion in this systematic review. No meta-analysis was conducted as no data suitable for statistical analysis were identified. In total, the initial examination after symptomatic PVD identified 85-95% of subsequent retinal......-47% of cases, respectively. The cumulated incidence of RRD despite prophylactic treatment was 2.1-8.8%. The findings in this review suggest that follow-up after symptomatic PVD is only necessary in cases of incomplete retinal examination at presentation. Prophylactic treatment of symptomatic retinal breaks...

  16. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hao Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig.

  17. Concentric retinitis pigmentosa: clinicopathologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, A H; De Castro, E B; Smith, J E; Tang, W X; John, S K; Gorin, M B; Stone, E M; Aguirre, G D; Jacobson, S G

    2001-10-01

    Progressive concentric (centripetal) loss of vision is one pattern of visual field loss in retinitis pigmentosa. This study provides the first clinicopathologic correlations for this form of retinitis pigmentosa. A family with autosomal dominant concentric retinitis pigmentosa was examined clinically and with visual function tests. A post-mortem eye of an affected 94 year old family member was processed for histopathology and immunocytochemistry with retinal cell specific antibodies. Unrelated simplex/multiplex patients with concentric retinitis pigmentosa were also examined. Affected family members of the eye donor and patients from the other families had prominent peripheral pigmentary retinopathy with more normal appearing central retina, good visual acuity, concentric field loss, normal or near normal rod and cone sensitivity within the preserved visual field, and reduced rod and cone electroretinograms. The eye donor, at age 90, had good acuity and function in a central island. Grossly, the central region of the donor retina appeared thinned but otherwise normal, while the far periphery contained heavy bone spicule pigment. Microscopically the central retina showed photoreceptor outer segment shortening and some photoreceptor cell loss. The mid periphery had a sharp line of demarcation where more central photoreceptors were near normal except for very short outer segments and peripheral photoreceptors were absent. Rods and cones showed abrupt loss of outer segments and cell death at this interface. It is concluded that concentric retinitis pigmentosa is a rare but recognizable phenotype with slowly progressive photoreceptor death from the far periphery toward the central retina. The disease is retina-wide but shows regional variation in severity of degeneration; photoreceptor death is severe in the peripheral retina with an abrupt edge between viable and degenerate photoreceptors. Peripheral to central gradients of unknown retinal molecule(s) may be defective

  18. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, J T; Saxton, J; Hoffman, G

    1976-05-01

    A patient presented with unilateral findings of night blindness shown by impaired rod function and dark adaptation, constricted visual fields with good central acuity, a barely recordable electro-retinographic b-wave, and a unilaterally impaired electro-oculogram. There were none of the pigmentary changes usually associated with retinitis pigmentosa. The unaffected right eye was normal in all respects. Therefore the case is most probably one of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

  19. Light and inherited retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Paskowitz, D M; LaVail, M M; Duncan, J L

    2006-01-01

    Light deprivation has long been considered a potential treatment for patients with inherited retinal degenerative diseases, but no therapeutic benefit has been demonstrated to date. In the few clinical studies that have addressed this issue, the underlying mutations were unknown. Our rapidly expanding knowledge of the genes and mechanisms involved in retinal degeneration have made it possible to reconsider the potential value of light restriction in specific genetic contexts. This review summ...

  20. Orientation-Selective Retinal Circuits in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinucci, Paride; Hindges, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Visual information is already processed in the retina before it is transmitted to higher visual centers in the brain. This includes the extraction of salient features from visual scenes, such as motion directionality or contrast, through neurons belonging to distinct neural circuits. Some retinal neurons are tuned to the orientation of elongated visual stimuli. Such 'orientation-selective' neurons are present in the retinae of most, if not all, vertebrate species analyzed to date, with species-specific differences in frequency and degree of tuning. In some cases, orientation-selective neurons have very stereotyped functional and morphological properties suggesting that they represent distinct cell types. In this review, we describe the retinal cell types underlying orientation selectivity found in various vertebrate species, and highlight their commonalities and differences. In addition, we discuss recent studies that revealed the cellular, synaptic and circuit mechanisms at the basis of retinal orientation selectivity. Finally, we outline the significance of these findings in shaping our current understanding of how this fundamental neural computation is implemented in the visual systems of vertebrates.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Leow

    Full Text Available To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats.RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8 and placebo control group (n = 8. In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT. Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies.No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells.Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, S N; Luu, Chi D; Hairul Nizam, M H; Mok, P L; Ruhaslizan, R; Wong, H S; Wan Abdul Halim, Wan Haslina; Ng, M H; Ruszymah, B H I; Chowdhury, S R; Bastion, M L C; Then, K Y

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs) on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8) and placebo control group (n = 8). In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT). Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG) 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies. No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells. Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies.

  3. [The incidence of retinal tears in patients with posterior vitreous detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ksenija; Gverović-Antunica, Antonela; Bućan, Kajo; Znaor, Ljubo; Bulović, Dijana; Skelin, Sinia

    2006-01-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common finding in older patients, characterized by detachment of the posterior hyaloid membrane (PHM) from the retinal surface. The detachment of PHM normally occurs without complications, however, one has to be aware that retinal tear is its most common complication. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of retinal tears in eyes with PVD. A series of 40 patients (70 eyes) with PVD were included in this retrospective study. Eyes with a history of ocular trauma, surgery or intraocular inflammation were excluded. Patient charts were reviewed to collect the following information: age, sex, profession, type and duration of symptoms, best corrected visual acuity, refractive status, prior ocular disease, coincidental retinal pathology-lattice degeneration, number, type and location of retinal tears and treatment. Statistical analysis was done with the SPSS 11.0.3 software (SPSS Inc., USA). Besides descriptive statistics, Student's t-test and chi2-test were used. Among all study eyes with PVD, 34 (48.6%) were myopic, 24 (34.3%) hypermetropic and 12 (17.1%) emetropic; statistical analysis showed a significant difference (chi2 = 10.40, df=2, p lattice malignant degeneration of peripheral retinal was diagnosed. Thorough examination of the fundus periphery revealed 16 (22.8%) eyes with PVD were found to have retinal tears, 11 (15.7%) had only one retinal tear and 5 (7.1%) two retinal tears. All retinal tears were treated with argon laser photocoagulation. Superotemporal eye quadrant was the most common localization of retinal tears (56.25%). These results indicate that thorough fundus periphery examination should be done in all patients with PVD because it can cause rather rarely though retinal tears that represent a potentially sight threatening condition.

  4. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: MR imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masciocchi, C.; Fascetti, E.; Bonanni, G.; Calvisi, V.; Buoni, C.; Passariello, R.

    1987-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) is characterized by pain, swelling, and limitation of motion. The etiology and pathophysiology mechanism have not yet been identified. We considered eight patients with clinical signs of RSDS, in five cases located at the knee joint and in three cases in the hip. In all cases conventional radiography and radionuclide bone scanning were performed before MR imaging. Conventional radiography was negative in three cases while scintigraphy demonstrated the lesion in all patients. MR imaging showed an area of low intensity signal on T1-weighted scans and an increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. This area is located at the bone marrow and its regular and homogeneous. This specific finding on MR images is due to reflect edema by hyperemia of the bone marrow. The MR imaging diagnosis was confirmed on clinical and radiological follow-up. MR imaging can have a role in the differential diagnosis when other studies are nondiagnostic or nonspecific for RSDS

  5. Fibroblast cultures in duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionasescu, V.; Lara-Braud, C.; Zellweger, H.; Ionasescu, R.; Burmeister, L.

    1977-01-01

    Primary skin fibroblast cultures were grown from forearm pinch skin biopsies obtained from 24 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and ten normal controls matched for sex and age. The first subcultures were grown for 7 days and incubated with L-( 3 H)-proline for 24 hours. Intracellular collagen incoption was significantly decreased (2.2 X) and extracellular collagen incorporation significantly increased (1.8 X) in fibroblast cultures from patients with DMD by both collagenase assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The synthesis of noncollagen proteins showed low values from the DMD fibroblast cultures. The alterations in synthesis and secretion of collagen and noncollagen proteins were characteristic only for the log phase of DMD fibroblasts. (author)

  6. Intramuscular degeneration process in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsumra, Kiichiro; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tateno, Yukio.

    1992-01-01

    Intramuscular degeneration process of Duchenne dystrophy skeletal muscles was investigated by longitudinal skeletal muscle imaging with high-field-strength NMR-CT of 1.5 Tesla. Thigh muscles in 10 cases ranging in age from 4 to 19 years were examined by T 1 -weighted longitudinal images (TR=215∼505 ms, TE=19∼20 ms). The following results were obtained. Skeletal muscle degeneration was depicted as high signal intensity area reflecting its high fat contents. These high signal intensity areas had a longitudinally streaky appearance in parallel direction with myofibers. These findings were more prominent toward myotendon junction than muscle bellies. Skeletal muscle degeneration progressed rapidly between 7 to 10 years of age, and reached a plateau after that. (author)

  7. Retinal Protection and Distribution of Curcumin in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara B. M. Platania

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR, a secondary complication of diabetes, is a leading cause of irreversible blindness accounting for 5% of world blindness cases in working age. Oxidative stress and inflammation are considered causes of DR. Curcumin, a product with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is currently proposed as oral supplementation therapy for retinal degenerative diseases, including DR. In this study we predicted the pharmacodynamic profile of curcumin through an in silico approach. Furthermore, we tested the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin on human retinal pigmented epithelial cells exposed to oxidative stress, human retinal endothelial and human retinal pericytes (HRPCs cultured with high glucose. Because currently marketed curcumin nutraceutical products have not been so far evaluated for their ocular bioavailability; we assessed retinal distribution of curcumin, following oral administration, in rabbit eye. Curcumin (10 μM decreased significantly (p < 0.01 ROS concentration and TNF-α release in retinal pigmented epithelial cells and retinal endothelial cells, respectively. The same curcumin concentration significantly (p < 0.01 protected retinal pericytes from high glucose damage as assessed by cell viability and LDH release. Among the tested formulations, only that containing a hydrophilic carrier provided therapeutic levels of curcumin in rabbit retina. In conclusion, our data suggest that curcumin, when properly formulated, may be of value in clinical practice to manage retinal diseases.

  8. Association of ABO blood groups and Rh factor with retinal and choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teberik, Kuddusi; Eski, Mehmet Tahir

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate if ABO blood group and Rh factor have an effect on retinal and choroidal thickness. This study was designed prospectively. Retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal, and choroidal thicknesses were measured with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Retinal and choroidal thickness measurements (one subfoveal, three temporal, and three nasal) were obtained at 500-μm intervals up to 1500 μm with the caliper system. In this study, 109 male and 151 female, 260 individuals in total were included. There were 125 subjects in group A, 29 in group B, 34 in group AB, and 72 in group O. Rh factor was positive in 194 subjects and negative in 66. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding age (p = 0.667). The groups did not show any statistical difference in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. There was significant difference found for mean retinal thickness at temporal 1000 μm when four groups were compared (p = 0.037). No statistically significant difference was detected for the remaining retinal and choroidal sectoral regions. The groups did not statistically significantly differ concerning Rh factor (p > 0.05). Although we found a significant difference in retinal thickness in the temporal retina between group B with group A and group O, we suggest that both blood group and Rh factor have no effect on retinal and choroidal thickness.

  9. Clinical reference value of retinal microvascular changes in patients with cerebral microbleeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yuan Guo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study clinical reference value of retinal microvascular changes in patients with cerebral microbleeds(CMBsand discuss its clinical significance. METHODS:From January 2012 to December 2013, 125 hospitalized patients were collected, including 81 cases were male, 44 cases were female, mean age 76.3±11.2 years old. For all patients, functions of liver and kidney, blood-lipoids, blood sugar and blood biochemical examination were tested, and fundus photography and cerebral MR was done. According to the fundus camera eyes, retinal arteriolar equivalent(RAE, retinal venular equivalent(RVE, retinal vein diameter ratio(AVRand arteriovenous crossing sign(AVNwere identified, CMBs were classified with cerebral MRI. All the data were processed by SPSS statistical software. RESULTS: The central retinal arteriolar equivalent(CRAE, central retinal venular equivalent(CRVEand AVR values in the eyes were found no statistical difference(PPCOCLUSION: The results show that retinal microvascular changes, especially small retinal vein arteriovenous cross width, and arteriovenous crossing phenomenon, in which CMBs will happen more likely. After sex, age, hypertension and hyperglycemia in patients with traditional cardiovascular risk factors being ruled out, the retinal microvascular changes are still relatively factors of CMB's occurrence.

  10. Measurement of the Functional Status of Patients with Different Types of Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jing Lue

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy (MD comprises a group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle weakness that induces functional deterioration. Clinical management requires the use of a well-designed scale to measure patients' functional status. This study aimed to investigate the quality of the functional scales used to assess patients with different types of MD. The Brooke scale and the Vignos scale were used to grade arm and leg function, respectively. The Barthel Index was used to evaluate the function of daily living activity. We performed tests to assess the acceptability of these scales. The characteristics of the different types of MD are discussed. This was a multicenter study and included patients diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD (classified as severely progressive MD, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. BMD, LGMD, and FSHD were classified as slowly progressive MD. The results demonstrated that the Brooke scale was acceptable for grading arm function in DMD, but was unable to discriminate between differing levels of severity in slowly progressive MD. The floor effect was large for all types of slowly progressive MD (range, 20.0–61.9, and was especially high for BMD. The floor effect was also large for BMD (23.8% and FSHD (50.0% using the Vignos scale. Grades 6–8 of the Vignos scale were inapplicable because they included items involving the use of long leg braces for walking or standing, and some patients did not use long leg braces. In the Barthel Index, a ceiling effect was prominent for slowly progressive MD (58.9%, while a floor effect existed for DMD (17.9%. Among the slowly progressive MDs, FSHD patients had the best level of functioning; they had better leg function and their daily living activities were less affected than patients with other forms of slowly progressive MD. The results of this study demonstrate the acceptability of the

  11. Changes in retinal oxygen saturation after intravitreal aflibercept in patients with diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Design of study: Three months prospective interventional study. Purpose: To evaluate changes in retinal arterial and venous oxygen saturation after intravitreal aflibercept in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 17 patients with DME, central retinal thickness (CRT) >300...

  12. Brain gray matter structural network in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiko Sugiyama

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate abnormalities in structural covariance network constructed from gray matter volume in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 patients by using graph theoretical analysis for further clarification of the underlying mechanisms of central nervous system involvement. Twenty-eight DM1 patients (4 childhood onset, 10 juvenile onset, 14 adult onset, excluding three cases from 31 consecutive patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging in a certain period, and 28 age- and sex- matched healthy control subjects were included in this study. The normalized gray matter images of both groups were subjected to voxel based morphometry (VBM and Graph Analysis Toolbox for graph theoretical analysis. VBM revealed extensive gray matter atrophy in DM1 patients, including cortical and subcortical structures. On graph theoretical analysis, there were no significant differences between DM1 and control groups in terms of the global measures of connectivity. Betweenness centrality was increased in several regions including the left fusiform gyrus, whereas it was decreased in the right striatum. The absence of significant differences between the groups in global network measurements on graph theoretical analysis is consistent with the fact that the general cognitive function is preserved in DM1 patients. In DM1 patients, increased connectivity in the left fusiform gyrus and decreased connectivity in the right striatum might be associated with impairment in face perception and theory of mind, and schizotypal-paranoid personality traits, respectively.

  13. Determination of retinal surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagra, Manbir; Gilmartin, Bernard; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Logan, Nicola S

    2017-09-01

    Previous attempts at determining retinal surface area and surface area of the whole eye have been based upon mathematical calculations derived from retinal photographs, schematic eyes and retinal biopsies of donor eyes. 3-dimensional (3-D) ocular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a more direct measurement, it can be used to image the eye in vivo, and there is no risk of tissue shrinkage. The primary purpose of this study is to compare, using T2-weighted 3D MRI, retinal surface areas for superior-temporal (ST), inferior-temporal (IT), superior-nasal (SN) and inferior-nasal (IN) retinal quadrants. An ancillary aim is to examine whether inter-quadrant variations in area are concordant with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Seventy-three adult participants presenting without retinal pathology (mean age 26.25 ± 6.06 years) were scanned using a Siemens 3-Tesla MRI scanner to provide T2-weighted MR images that demarcate fluid-filled internal structures for the whole eye and provide high-contrast delineation of the vitreous-retina interface. Integrated MRI software generated total internal ocular surface area (TSA). The second nodal point was used to demarcate the origin of the peripheral retina in order to calculate total retinal surface area (RSA) and quadrant retinal surface areas (QRSA) for ST, IT, SN, and IN quadrants. Mean spherical error (MSE) was -2.50 ± 4.03D and mean axial length (AL) 24.51 ± 1.57 mm. Mean TSA and RSA for the RE were 2058 ± 189 and 1363 ± 160 mm 2 , respectively. Repeated measures anova for QRSA data indicated a significant difference within-quadrants (P area/mm increase in AL. Although the differences between QRSAs are relatively small, there was evidence of concordance with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with PVD. The data allow AL to be converted to QRSAs, which will assist further

  14. Creatine kinase response to high-intensity aerobic exercise in adult-onset muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren P; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Hansen, Regitze S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies.......We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies....

  15. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine; Tu, Hong Anh; Wells, David; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of inherited disorders characterized by the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive vision loss. The Argus II system is designed to restore partial functional vision in patients with profound vision loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. At present, it is the only treatment option approved by Health Canada for this patient population. In June 2016, Health Quality Ontario published a health technology assessment of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system for patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa. Based on that assessment, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee recommended against publicly funding the Argus II system for this population. It also recommended that Health Quality Ontario re-evaluate the evidence in 1 year. The objective of this report was to examine new evidence published since the 2016 health technology assessment. Methods We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences related to the Argus II system. We performed a systematic literature search for studies published since the 2016 Argus II health technology assessment. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care, and we calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios over a 20-year time horizon. We also conducted a five-year budget impact analysis. Finally, we interviewed people with retinitis pigmentosa about their lived experience with vision loss, and with the Argus II system. Results Four publications from one multicentre international study were included in the clinical review. Patients showed significant improvements in visual function and functional outcomes with the Argus II system, and these outcomes were sustained up to a 5-year follow-up (moderate quality of evidence). The safety profile was generally acceptable. In

  16. Retinal Layers Measurements following Silicone Oil Tamponade for Retinal Detachment Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurišić, Darija; Geber, Mia Zorić; Ćavar, Ivan; Utrobičić, Dobrila Karlica

    2017-12-19

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of silicone oil on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment who underwent vitreoretinal surgery. The study included 47 patients (eyes), who underwent a pars plana vitrectomy with the silicone oil tamponade. The control group included unoperated eye of all participants. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used for the measurements of peripapilar and macular RNFL thickness. The average peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly higher in the silicone oil filled eyes during endotamponade and after its removal. The eyes with elevated IOP had less thickening of the RNFL in comparison to the eyes with normal IOP. Central macular thickness and macular volume were decreased in the silicone oil filled eyes in comparison to the control eyes. In conclusion, silicone oil caused peripapilar RNFL thickening in the vitrectomized eyes during endotamponade and after silicone oil removal.

  17. Congenital Retinal Macrovessel and the Association of Retinal Venous Malformations With Venous Malformations of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Freund, K Bailey; Ciardella, Antonio; Morara, Mariachiara; Abboud, Emad B; Ghazi, Nicola; Dackiw, Christine; Choudhry, Netan; Souza, Eduardo Cunha; Cunha, Leonardo Provetti; Arevalo, J Fernando; Liu, T Y Alvin; Wenick, Adam; He, Lingmin; Villarreal, Guadalupe; Neri, Piergiorgio; Sarraf, David

    2018-04-01

    Congenital retinal macrovessel (CRM) is a rarely reported venous malformation of the retina that is associated with venous anomalies of the brain. To study the multimodal imaging findings of a series of eyes with congenital retinal macrovessel and describe the systemic associations. In this cross-sectional multicenter study, medical records were retrospectively reviewed from 7 different retina clinics worldwide over a 10-year period (2007-2017). Patients with CRM, defined as an abnormal, large, macular vessel with a vascular distribution above and below the horizontal raphe, were identified. Data were analyzed from December 2016 to August 2017. Clinical information and multimodal retinal imaging findings were collected and studied. Pertinent systemic information, including brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, was also noted if available. Of the 49 included patients, 32 (65%) were female, and the mean (SD) age at onset was 44.0 (20.9) years. A total of 49 eyes from 49 patients were studied. Macrovessel was unilateral in all patients. Color fundus photography illustrated a large aberrant dilated and tortuous retinal vein in all patients. Early-phase frames of fluorescein angiography further confirmed the venous nature of the macrovessel in 40 of 40 eyes. Optical coherence tomography angiography, available in 17 eyes (35%), displayed microvascular capillary abnormalities around the CRM, which were more evident in the deep capillary plexus. Of the 49 patients with CRM, 39 (80%) did not illustrate any evidence of ophthalmic complications. Ten patients (20%) presented with retinal complications, typically an incidental association with CRM. Twelve patients (24%) were noted to have venous malformations of the brain with associated magnetic resonance imaging. Of these, location of the venous anomaly in the brain was ipsilateral to the CRM in 10 patients (83%) and contralateral in 2 patients (17%), mainly located in the frontal lobe in 9 patients (75%). Our study has

  18. Stem cells in clinical trials for treatment of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    After decades of basic science research involving the testing of regenerative strategies in animal models of retinal degenerative diseases, a number of clinical trials are now underway, with additional trials set to begin shortly. These efforts will evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of cell-based products in the eyes of patients with a number of retinal conditions, notably including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt's disease. This review considers the scientific work and early trials with fetal cells and tissues that set the stage for the current clinical investigatory work, as well the trials themselves, specifically those either now completed, underway or close to initiation. The cells of interest include retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells, undifferentiated neural or retinal progenitors or cells from the vascular/bone marrow compartment or umbilical cord tissue. Degenerative diseases of the retina represent a popular target for emerging cell-based therapeutics and initial data from early stage clinical trials suggest that short-term safety objectives can be met in at least some cases. The question of efficacy will require additional time and testing to be adequately resolved.

  19. Hyperoxia-Induced Proliferative Retinopathy: Early Interruption of Retinal Vascular Development with Severe and Irreversible Neurovascular Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lajko

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is a major cause of neonatal morbidity in premature infants, occurring as a result of arrested lung development combined with multiple postnatal insults. Infants with BPD exposed to supplemental oxygen are at risk of retinopathy of prematurity as well. Thus, we studied the effects of hyperoxia on the retinal vasculature in a murine model of BPD. The retinal phenotype of this model, which we termed hyperoxia-induced proliferative retinopathy (HIPR, shows severe disruption of retinal vasculature and loss of vascular patterning, disorganized intra-retinal angiogenesis, inflammation and retinal detachment. Neonatal mice were subjected to 75% oxygen exposure from postnatal day (P0 to P14 to model BPD, then allowed to recover in room air for 1 (P15, 7 (P21, or 14 days (P28. We quantified retinal thickness, protein levels of HIF-1α, NOX2, and VEGF, and examined the cellular locations of these proteins by immunohistochemistry. We examined the retinal blood vessel integrity and inflammatory markers, including macrophages (F4/80 and lymphocytes (CD45R. Compared to controls, normal retinal vascular development was severely disrupted and replaced by a disorganized sheet of intra-retinal angiogenesis in the HIPR mice. At all time-points, HIPR showed persistent hyaloidal vasculature and a significantly thinner central retina compared to controls. HIF-1α protein levels were increased at P15, while VEGF levels continued to increase until P21. Intra-retinal fibrinogen was observed at P21 followed by sub-retinal deposition in at P28. Inflammatory lymphocytes and macrophages were observed at P21 and P28, respectively. This model presents a severe phenotype of disrupted retinal vascular development, intra-retinal angiogenesis inflammation and retinal detachment.

  20. T2 relaxometry of brain in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, A.; Bonavita, V.; Tedeschi, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, 2. Univ. of Naples (Italy); Di Salle, F. [Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy); Santoro, L. [Dept. of Neurological Sciences, University ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the nature and extent of brain involvement in myotonic dystrophy (DM), examining possible T2 relaxation abnormalities in the brain of 20 patients with adult-onset DM and 20 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Brain MRI was performed at 0.5 T, and T2 values were calculated from signal intensity in two echoes. Regions of interest included: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and callosal (rostral and splenial) normal-appearing white matter; frontal, occipital, insular and hippocampal cortex; caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. All white-matter and occipital and right frontal cortex regions showed a significantly longer T2 in the patients. Multiple regression analysis, including grey- and white-matter T2 as dependent variables, plus age at onset and at imaging, disease duration, muscular disability, brain atrophy and CTG trinucleotide repeats as independent variables, revealed that only white-matter T2 elongation and disease duration correlated positively. White-matter involvement in DM is more extensive than previously reported by MRI and neuropathological studies and seems to be progressive in the course of disease. (orig.)

  1. T2 relaxometry of brain in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Costanzo, A.; Bonavita, V.; Tedeschi, G.; Di Salle, F.; Santoro, L.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the nature and extent of brain involvement in myotonic dystrophy (DM), examining possible T2 relaxation abnormalities in the brain of 20 patients with adult-onset DM and 20 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Brain MRI was performed at 0.5 T, and T2 values were calculated from signal intensity in two echoes. Regions of interest included: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and callosal (rostral and splenial) normal-appearing white matter; frontal, occipital, insular and hippocampal cortex; caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. All white-matter and occipital and right frontal cortex regions showed a significantly longer T2 in the patients. Multiple regression analysis, including grey- and white-matter T2 as dependent variables, plus age at onset and at imaging, disease duration, muscular disability, brain atrophy and CTG trinucleotide repeats as independent variables, revealed that only white-matter T2 elongation and disease duration correlated positively. White-matter involvement in DM is more extensive than previously reported by MRI and neuropathological studies and seems to be progressive in the course of disease. (orig.)

  2. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and conventional surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovic, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to present the efficacy and indications for application of conventional surgical treatment of retinal detachment by using external implants, that is,application of encircling band and buckle. This study comprised patients from the University Eye Clinic in Skopje. A total of 33 patients were diagnosed and surgically treated in the period between May 2010 and August 2011. Conventional surgery was applied in smaller number of patients whose changes of the vitreous body were manifested by detachment of posterior hyaloid membrane, syneresis, with appearance of a small number of pigment cells in the vitreous body and synchysis, and the very retina was with fresh detachment without folds or epiretinal changes (that is, PVR A grade). There were a larger number of patients with more distinct proliferative changes of the vitreous body and of the retina, grades PVR B to C1-C2, and who also underwent the same surgical approach. Routine ophthalmologic examinations were performed, including: determination of visual acuity by Snellen's optotypes, determination of eye pressure with Schiotz's tonometer, examination of anterior segment on biomicroscopy, indirect biomicroscopy of posterior eye segment (vitreous body and retina) and examination on biomicroscopy with Goldmann prism, B scan echography of the eyes before and after surgical treatment. Conventional treatment was used by external application of buckle or application of buckle and encircling band. In case of one break, radial buckle was applied and in case of multiple breaks in one quadrant limbus parallel buckle was applied. Besides buckle, encircling band was applied in patients with total or subtotal retinal detachment with already present distinct changes in the vitreous body (PVR B or C1-C2) and degenerative changes in the vitreous body. Breaks were closed with cryopexy. The results obtained have shown that male gender was predominant and that the disease was manifested in younger male adults

  3. Retinal vascular oximetry during ranibizumab treatment of central retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; la Cour, Morten; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of intravitreal injections of the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor ranibizumab on retinal oxygenation in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). METHODS: Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with CRVO was analysed using the Oxymap Retin...

  4. Phenotypic spectrum of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophies caused by mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevering, B Jeroen; Blankenagel, Anita; Maugeri, Alessandra; Cremers, Frans P M; Hoyng, Carel B; Rohrschneider, Klaus

    2002-06-01

    To describe the phenotype of 12 patients with autosomal recessive or isolated cone-rod types of progressive retinal degeneration (CRD) caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. The charts of patients who had originally received a diagnosis of isolated or autosomal recessive CRD were reviewed after molecular analysis revealed mutations in the ABCA4 gene. In two of the patients both the photopic and scotopic electroretinogram were nonrecordable. In the remainder, the photopic cone b-wave amplitudes appeared to be more seriously affected than the scotopic rod b-wave amplitudes. Although the clinical presentation was heterogeneous, all patients experienced visual loss early in life, impaired color vision, and a central scotoma. Fundoscopy revealed evidence of early-onset maculopathy, sometimes accompanied by involvement of the retinal periphery in the later stages of the disease. Mutations in the ABCA4 gene are the pathologic cause of the CRD-like dystrophy in these patients, and the resultant clinical pictures are complex and heterogeneous. Given this wide clinical spectrum of CRD-like phenotypes associated with ABCA4 mutations, detailed clinical subclassifications are difficult and may not be very useful.

  5. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber...... and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only...... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. The Department of Ophthalmology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, has a strong tradition of studying the retinal microvasculature in diabetic retinopathy. In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the retinal vasculature not only as predictors of long...

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...

  7. Prosthetic vision: devices, patient outcomes and retinal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Meffin, Hamish; Maturana, Matias I; Cloherty, Shaun L; Ibbotson, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Retinal disease and its associated retinal degeneration can lead to the loss of photoreceptors and therefore, profound blindness. While retinal degeneration destroys the photoreceptors, the neural circuits that convey information from the eye to the brain are sufficiently preserved to make it possible to restore sight using prosthetic devices. Typically, these devices consist of a digital camera and an implantable neurostimulator. The image sensor in a digital camera has the same spatiotopic arrangement as the photoreceptors of the retina. Therefore, it is possible to extract meaningful spatial information from an image and deliver it via an array of stimulating electrodes directly to the surviving retinal circuits. Here, we review the structure and function of normal and degenerate retina. The different approaches to prosthetic implant design are described in the context of human and preclinical trials. In the last section, we review studies of electrical properties of the retina and its response to electrical stimulation. These types of investigation are currently assessing a number of key challenges identified in human trials, including stimulation efficacy, spatial localisation, desensitisation to repetitive stimulation and selective activation of retinal cell populations. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  8. Improvement of retinal blood vessel detection using morphological component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Elaheh; Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza

    2015-03-01

    Detection and quantitative measurement of variations in the retinal blood vessels can help diagnose several diseases including diabetic retinopathy. Intrinsic characteristics of abnormal retinal images make blood vessel detection difficult. The major problem with traditional vessel segmentation algorithms is producing false positive vessels in the presence of diabetic retinopathy lesions. To overcome this problem, a novel scheme for extracting retinal blood vessels based on morphological component analysis (MCA) algorithm is presented in this paper. MCA was developed based on sparse representation of signals. This algorithm assumes that each signal is a linear combination of several morphologically distinct components. In the proposed method, the MCA algorithm with appropriate transforms is adopted to separate vessels and lesions from each other. Afterwards, the Morlet Wavelet Transform is applied to enhance the retinal vessels. The final vessel map is obtained by adaptive thresholding. The performance of the proposed method is measured on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. An accuracy of 0.9523 and 0.9590 has been respectively achieved on the DRIVE and STARE datasets, which are not only greater than most methods, but are also superior to the second human observer's performance. The results show that the proposed method can achieve improved detection in abnormal retinal images and decrease false positive vessels in pathological regions compared to other methods. Also, the robustness of the method in the presence of noise is shown via experimental result. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anatomical success in patients after retinectomy for complex retinal detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, A.; Ishaq, M.; Islam, Q.U.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of primary and redo retinectomy in eyes with complex retinal detachment. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology Rawalpindi from Jan 2012 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: Fifty eight eyes (patients) underwent relaxing retinectomies for complex retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy or intrinsic retinal shortening. Operative technique included pars plana vitrectomy, proliferative vitreoretinopathy management, use of intraoperative perfluorocarbon liquid, retinectomy, endolaser and intraocular temponade. The main outcome was anatomic success, defined as complete retinal reattachment at four months follow up. Eighteen eyes out of the same primary group underwent second retinectomy because of anatomical failure. Results: Mean age of study population was 53.78 ± 15.11 years, 56.9% of patients were male(s). Anatomic success rate after 1st retinectomy was achieved in 68.96% (40 eyes out of 58). In eighteen eyes that underwent 2nd retinectomy, anatomic success rate was 72.22% (13 eyes out of 18). Overall success rate was 91.3% (53 eyes out of 58) in our study. Conclusions: Relaxing retinectomies for retinal shortening can improve the anatomical success rate in patients with complex RD. (author)

  10. Retinal vessels caliber assessment in patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Semenova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the diagnostic capability of automated retinal vessels (RV caliber estimation for hypertensive angiopathy.Methods: this study included 146 patients (292 eyes with arterial hypertension. All the subjects underwent fundus photography and RV caliber estimation. the latter was performed using newly developed computer-based method for automated vessel detection and central retinal arteriolar and venular equivalents determination (CRAE & CRVE. Sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the method were estimated.Results: the method of RV caliber assessment showed good reproducibility. the overall specificity and sensitivity were 74% and 80.77%, respectively. Computer-based method of retinal vascular caliber assessment revealed higher predictive value comparing with ophthalmoscopic assessment (AUC = 0.903 and 0.85, respectively. Retinal arteriolar and venular caliber and AVR tend to decrease with age. Higher blood pressure is associated with narrower retinal arterioles.Conclusion: Novel method of RV caliber estimation demonstrated high information value. these findings are in good agreementwith data from major population-based studies.

  11. Retinal vessels caliber assessment in patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Semenova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the diagnostic capability of automated retinal vessels (RV caliber estimation for hypertensive angiopathy.Methods: this study included 146 patients (292 eyes with arterial hypertension. All the subjects underwent fundus photography and RV caliber estimation. the latter was performed using newly developed computer-based method for automated vessel detection and central retinal arteriolar and venular equivalents determination (CRAE & CRVE. Sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the method were estimated.Results: the method of RV caliber assessment showed good reproducibility. the overall specificity and sensitivity were 74% and 80.77%, respectively. Computer-based method of retinal vascular caliber assessment revealed higher predictive value comparing with ophthalmoscopic assessment (AUC = 0.903 and 0.85, respectively. Retinal arteriolar and venular caliber and AVR tend to decrease with age. Higher blood pressure is associated with narrower retinal arterioles.Conclusion: Novel method of RV caliber estimation demonstrated high information value. these findings are in good agreementwith data from major population-based studies.

  12. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis associated to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Bianca; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Conceição, Gabriel Seixas; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscle disease found in male children. Currently, there is no effective therapy available for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Therefore, it is essential to make a prenatal diagnosis and provide genetic counseling to reduce the birth of such boys. We report a case of preimplantation genetic diagnosis associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The couple E.P.R., 38-year-old, symptomatic patient heterozygous for a 2 to 47 exon deletion mutation in DMD gene and G.T.S., 39-year-old, sought genetic counseling about preimplantation genetic diagnosis process. They have had a 6-year-old son who died due to Duchenne muscular dystrophy complications. The couple underwent four cycles of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and eight embryos biopsies were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for specific mutation analysis, followed by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) for aneuploidy analysis. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis revealed that two embryos had inherited the maternal DMD gene mutation, one embryo had a chromosomal alteration and five embryos were normal. One blastocyst was transferred and resulted in successful pregnancy. The other embryos remain vitrified. We concluded that embryo analysis using associated techniques of PCR and array CGH seems to be safe for embryo selection in cases of X-linked disorders, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  15. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Seok Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR. We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR.

  16. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality.

  17. Retinal image quality during accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gil, Norberto; Martin, Jesson; Liu, Tao; Bradley, Arthur; Díaz-Muñoz, David; Thibos, Larry N

    2013-07-01

    We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552 nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye's higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced visual function may be a useful

  18. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  19. Recombinant AAV-mediated BEST1 transfer to the retinal pigment epithelium: analysis of serotype-dependent retinal effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina E Guziewicz

    Full Text Available Mutations in the BEST1 gene constitute an underlying cause of juvenile macular dystrophies, a group of retinal disorders commonly referred to as bestrophinopathies and usually diagnosed in early childhood or adolescence. The disease primarily affects macular and paramacular regions of the eye leading to major declines in central vision later in life. Currently, there is no cure or surgical management for BEST1-associated disorders. The recently characterized human disease counterpart, canine multifocal retinopathy (cmr, recapitulates a full spectrum of clinical and molecular features observed in human bestrophinopathies and offers a valuable model system for development and testing of therapeutic strategies. In this study, the specificity, efficiency and safety of rAAV-mediated transgene expression driven by the human VMD2 promoter were assessed in wild-type canine retinae. While the subretinal delivery of rAAV2/1 vector serotype was associated with cone damage in the retina when BEST1 and GFP were co-expressed, the rAAV2/2 vector serotype carrying either GFP reporter or BEST1 transgene under control of human VMD2 promoter was safe, and enabled specific transduction of the RPE cell monolayer that was stable for up to 6 months post injection. These encouraging studies with the rAAV2/2 vector lay the groundwork for development of gene augmentation therapy for human bestrophinopathies.

  20. Serum Creatinine Level: A Supplemental Index to Distinguish Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy from Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To improve assessment of dystrophinopathy, the aim of this study was to identify whether serum creatinine (Crn level reflects disease severity. Methods. Biochemical, Vignos score, and genetic data were collected on 212 boys with dystrophinopathy. Results. Serum Crn level had a strong inverse correlation with Vignos score by simple correlation (r=-0.793 and partial correlation analysis after adjustment for age, height, and weight (r=-0.791; both P<0.01. Serum Crn level was significantly higher in patients with in-frame than out-of-frame mutations (Z=-4.716, P<0.01 and in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD patients than Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients at ages 4, 5, 7, and 9 yr (all P<0.0125. After adjusting for age, height, and weight, BMD patients still had a significantly higher serum Crn level than DMD patients (β=7.140, t=6.277, P<0.01. Conclusions. Serum Crn level reflected disease severity and may serve as a supplemental index to distinguish DMD from BMD in clinical practice.

  1. [Specific features of Becker Muscular Dystrophy patients and female carriers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magot, A; Mercier, S; Péréon, Y

    2015-12-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1955 and linked to the DMD gene in 1987. Compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), clinical onset of BMD usually occurs after the age of 12 and wheelchair is required after the age of 16. BMD is characterized by generalized weakness first affecting limb girdle muscles, hypertrophy of the calves and cardiomyopathy in males. Some patients have only mild symptoms such as cramps or elevated serum creatine kinases (SCK) throughout all their lives. SCK levels are usually elevated. Muscle biopsy (immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting) shows a dystrophic pattern with abnormal dystrophin staining. Diagnosis is confirmed by DMD gene sequencing. Deletions or duplications of one or several exons are identified in the majority of cases. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended for the care management of these patients with a particular attention to the cardiomyopathy, which is typically responsible for death but can be prevented by specific treatment. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathies linked to DMD gene are a phenotypic continuum of BMD. Some female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity, often milder and beginning later than in males. The cardiomyopathy is the most frequent feature that should be especially monitored in these patients. Genetic counselling should be systematically proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucocorticoid Steroid and Alendronate Treatment Alleviates Dystrophic Phenotype with Enhanced Functional Glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan in Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy with FKRPP448L Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Richardson, Stephanie M; Bollinger, Lauren E; Blaeser, Anthony; Madden, Kyle L; Sun, Yubo; Luckie, Taylor M; Cox, Michael D; Sparks, Susan; Harper, Amy D; Lu, Qi Long

    2016-06-01

    Fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy is characterized by defects in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan with variable clinical phenotypes, most commonly as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. There is no effective therapy available. Glucocorticoid steroids have become the standard treatment for Duchenne and other muscular dystrophies with serious adverse effects, including excessive weight gain, immune suppression, and bone loss. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy for prevention of osteoporosis. Herein, we evaluated prednisolone and alendronate for their therapeutic potential in the FKRPP448L-mutant mouse representing moderate limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. Mice were treated with prednisolone, alendronate, and both in combination for up to 6 months. Prednisolone improved muscle pathology with significant reduction in muscle degeneration, but had no effect on serum creatine kinase levels and muscle strength. Alendronate treatment did not ameliorate muscle degeneration, but demonstrated a limited enhancement on muscle function test. Combined treatment of prednisolone and alendronate provided best improvement in muscle pathology with normalized fiber size distribution and significantly reduced serum creatine kinase levels, but had limited effect on muscle force generation. The use of alendronate significantly mitigated the bone loss. Prednisolone alone and in combination with alendronate enhance functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of this alliance treatment of the two drugs for fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Retinal Lesion in Ebola Survivors, Sierra Leone, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Paul J; Scott, Janet T; Baxter, Julia M; Parkes, Craig K; Dwivedi, Rahul; Czanner, Gabriela; Vandy, Matthew J; Momorie, Fayiah; Fornah, Alimamy D; Komba, Patrick; Richards, Jade; Sahr, Foday; Beare, Nicholas A V; Semple, Malcolm G

    2017-07-01

    We conducted a case-control study in Freetown, Sierra Leone, to investigate ocular signs in Ebola virus disease (EVD) survivors. A total of 82 EVD survivors with ocular symptoms and 105 controls from asymptomatic civilian and military personnel and symptomatic eye clinic attendees underwent ophthalmic examination, including widefield retinal imaging. Snellen visual acuity was Ebola virus, permitting cataract surgery. A novel retinal lesion following the anatomic distribution of the optic nerve axons occurred in 14.6% (97.5% CI 7.1%-25.6%) of EVD survivors and no controls, suggesting neuronal transmission as a route of ocular entry.

  4. Progressive outer retinal necrosis after rituximab and cyclophosphamide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Dogra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN in a patient of microscopic polyangitis (MPA, being treated with immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide and rituximab. Her aqueous tap was positive for Varicella Zoster virus and she was treated with oral and intravitreal antivirals, along with discontinuation of one of the immunosuppressive agents, i.e. rituximab, which might have led to reactivation of the virus causing necrotizing retinitis lesions. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are extremely potent drugs, which are necessary to manage immunological disorders such as MPA. However, they may predispose the patient to serious complications like viral infections, including PORN.

  5. Progressive outer retinal necrosis after rituximab and cyclophosphamide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Mohit; Bajgai, Priya; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Aman

    2018-04-01

    We report a case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in a patient of microscopic polyangitis (MPA), being treated with immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide and rituximab. Her aqueous tap was positive for Varicella Zoster virus and she was treated with oral and intravitreal antivirals, along with discontinuation of one of the immunosuppressive agents, i.e. rituximab, which might have led to reactivation of the virus causing necrotizing retinitis lesions. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are extremely potent drugs, which are necessary to manage immunological disorders such as MPA. However, they may predispose the patient to serious complications like viral infections, including PORN.

  6. Bone mineral density in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghaphi, M.; Azarian, A.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) is a complex of symptoms that produce pain burning sensation, swelling, tenderness, autonomic and physical dysfunction in joint areas, particularly distal of a limb. Osteopenia or osteoporosis is an important finding that is produced gradually in involved limb. Three phase bone can scan help to diagnosis of RSD. The disease may be bilateral but is mostly unilateral. As it is believed that bone densitometry will show osteopenia more accurate than plain comparative radiographs of the involved limbs, we investigated in patients with RSD. Methods: During last three years, 8 patients with RSD were admitted. Bone mineral density was measured for 5 patients by DEXA method. The patients were 3 males and 2 females with age range of 20 to 48 years (mean 32 years). The involved areas were ankle and foot in 4, and wrist and hand in one patient. Results: Mean Bone Mineral Content (BMC) of 4 involved lower limbs were 475 +-73 grams comparing with 516+-72 grams of uninvolved limbs (p t h patient was not significant. conclusion: comparative bone mineral density in patients with RSD of the lower limbs contributes to more accurate diagnosis than plain radiographs

  7. Retinal Diseases Associated with Oxidative Stress and the Effects of a Free Radical Scavenger (Edaravone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Masuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in developing and accelerating retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR, and retinal vein occlusion (RVO. An excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS can lead to functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, endothelial cells, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Here we demonstrate that edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreased apoptotic cell death, oxidative damage to DNA and lipids, and angiogenesis through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in AMD, glaucoma, DR, and RVO animal models. These data suggest that the therapeutic strategy for targeting oxidative stress may be important for the treatment of these ocular diseases, and edaravone may be useful for treating retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  8. Retinal Diseases Associated with Oxidative Stress and the Effects of a Free Radical Scavenger (Edaravone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in developing and accelerating retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). An excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), endothelial cells, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Here we demonstrate that edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreased apoptotic cell death, oxidative damage to DNA and lipids, and angiogenesis through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in AMD, glaucoma, DR, and RVO animal models. These data suggest that the therapeutic strategy for targeting oxidative stress may be important for the treatment of these ocular diseases, and edaravone may be useful for treating retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:28194256

  9. The Rate of Vitamin A Dimerization in Lipofuscinogenesis, Fundus Autofluorescence, Retinal Senescence and Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Ilyas; Saad, Leonide

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest events preceding several forms of retinal degeneration is the formation and accumulation of vitamin A dimers in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and underlying Bruch's membrane (BM). Such degenerations include Stargardt disease, Best disease, forms of retinitis pigmentosa, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since their discovery in the 1990's, dimers of vitamin A, have been postulated as chemical triggers driving retinal senescence and degeneration. There is evidence to suggest that the rate at which vitamin A dimerizes and the eye's response to the dimerization products may dictate the retina's lifespan. Here, we present outstanding questions, finding the answers to which may help to elucidate the role of vitamin A dimerization in retinal degeneration.

  10. Straight versus tortuous retinal arteries in relation to blood pressure and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarnhøj, N C B B; Munch, I C; Sander, B

    2008-01-01

    dizygotic same-sex healthy twin pairs, aged 20 to 46 years, who were characterised by determination of retinal vessel diameters, arterial blood pressure, blood glucose, body mass index, smoking habits and retinal arterial tortuosity, using a three-level grading scale (straight, wavy, tortuous). Heritability......BACKGROUND/AIMS: To assess the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on retinal arterial tortuosity and the association between tortuosity and various health indices in healthy young to middle-aged persons. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 57 monozygotic and 52...... accounting for the remaining 18% (CI(95 )8, 36%). Increasing values of mean arterial blood pressure and body mass index were both associated with decreasing levels of retinal arterial tortuosity. CONCLUSION: There was a large variation in tortuosity of retinal arteries in these healthy subjects...

  11. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH VISUAL OUTCOME AFTER MACULA-OFF RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Hyun; Choi, Kyung Seek; Sun, Hae Jung; Lee, Sung Jin

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate preoperative factors influencing the visual outcome and postoperative factors associated with the changes in visual acuity, after reattachment surgery to treat macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. A total of 180 eyes of 180 patients who underwent reattachment surgery to treat macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and who were followed up for more than 12 months, were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative and postoperative characteristics, including optical coherence tomography findings, were comprehensively analyzed using univariate and multivariate models to evaluate preoperative factors influencing best-corrected visual acuity 12 months after macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery and postoperative factors associated with changes in best-corrected visual acuity after surgery. Preoperatively, the extent of detachment (P = 0.037), macula-off duration (P macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery were the extent of detachment, macula-off duration, and external limiting membrane integrity. Postoperatively, predictive factors were the outer retinal microstructures, particularly the photoreceptor outer segment layer.

  12. In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

  13. In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Abhishek; Narendran, V; Saravanan, V R

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

  14. [Posterior polymorphous dystrophy, case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Adam, G; Hernandez-Camarena, J C; Valdez-García, J E

    2015-09-01

    Posterior Polymorphous Dystrophy (DPP) is a rare posterior corneal dystrophy that is genetically transmitted as autosomal dominant. Corneal structures affected in this dystrophy are Descemet membrane and the endothelium. A case is presented on a 47 years old woman with no relevant history, with typical findings of DPP (vesicular and band lesions at the endothelium and posterior Descemet). To our knowledge there are no reported cases of DPP in Latin-American patients in the literature. The clinical manifestations in our patient were found to be very similar to the cases reported in other populations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Perspectives of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Age-Related Retinal Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holan, Vladimir; Hermankova, Barbora; Kossl, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, which include age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, mostly affect the elderly population and are the most common cause of decreased quality of vision or even blindness. So far, there is no satisfactory treatment protocol to prevent, stop, or cure these disorders. A great hope and promise for patients suffering from retinal diseases is represented by stem cell-based therapy that could replace diseased or missing retinal cells and support regeneration. In this respect, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be obtained from the particular patient and used as autologous cells have turned out to be a promising stem cell type for treatment. Here we show that MSCs can differentiate into cells expressing markers of retinal cells, inhibit production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by retinal tissue, and produce a number of growth and neuroprotective factors for retinal regeneration. All of these properties make MSCs a prospective cell type for cell-based therapy of age-related retinal degenerative diseases.

  16. Col4a1 mutations cause progressive retinal neovascular defects and retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Marcel V; Mao, Mao; Pawlikowski, Bradley T; Kvezereli, Manana; Duncan, Jacque L; Libby, Richard T; John, Simon W M; Gould, Douglas B

    2016-01-27

    Mutations in collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1), a major component of basement membranes, cause multisystem disorders in humans and mice. In the eye, these include anterior segment dysgenesis, optic nerve hypoplasia and retinal vascular tortuosity. Here we investigate the retinal pathology in mice carrying dominant-negative Col4a1 mutations. To this end, we examined retinas longitudinally in vivo using fluorescein angiography, funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. We assessed retinal function by electroretinography and studied the retinal ultrastructural pathology. Retinal examinations revealed serous chorioretinopathy, retinal hemorrhages, fibrosis or signs of pathogenic angiogenesis with chorioretinal anastomosis in up to approximately 90% of Col4a1 mutant eyes depending on age and the specific mutation. To identify the cell-type responsible for pathogenesis we generated a conditional Col4a1 mutation and determined that primary vascular defects underlie Col4a1-associated retinopathy. We also found focal activation of Müller cells and increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors in retinas from Col4a1(+/Δex41)mice. Together, our findings suggest that patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations may be at elevated risk of retinal hemorrhages and that retinal examinations may be useful for identifying patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations who are also at elevated risk of hemorrhagic strokes.

  17. Advances in Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Retinal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S.; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D.; Grant, Maria B.; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy. PMID:27784628

  18. Occupational Lifting Tasks and Retinal Detachment in Non-Myopics and Myopics: Extended Analysis of a Case-control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mattioli, Stefano; Curti, Stefania; De Fazio, Rocco; Cooke, Robin Mt; Zanardi, Francesca; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Farioli, Andrea; Violante, Francesco S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Lifting heavy weights involves the Valsalva manoeuvre, which leads to intraocular pressure spikes. We used data from a case-control study to further investigate the hypothesis that occupational lifting is a risk factor for retinal detachment. Methods: The study population included 48 cases (patients operated for retinal detachment) and 84 controls (outpatients attending an eye clinic). The odds ratios (OR) of idiopathic retinal detachment were estimated with a logistic regressi...

  19. Evaluation of Serial Casting for Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kate; de Valle, Katy; Kornberg, Andrew; Ryan, Monique; Kennedy, Rachel

    2018-02-01

    To report the effects of below-knee serial casting in two boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who presented with well-preserved strength and calf shortening. Bilateral below-knee serial casts were applied over two weeks with follow-up of daily stretching and wearing of customized night splints. Outcome measures were performed at baseline, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-casting. These included measures of calf length, leg strength, motor function, endurance, and spatio-temporal gait parameters. Both boys completed serial casting with gains in muscle length. No adverse effects on strength or motor function were observed over a 12-month follow-up period.

  20. Occurrence of two different intragenic deletions in two male relatives affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostacciuolo, M.L.; Miorin, M.; Vitiello, L.; Rampazzo, A.; Fanin, M.; Angelini, C.; Danieli, G.A. [Univ. of Padua (Italy)

    1994-03-01

    The occurrence of 2 different intragenic deletions (exons 10-44 and exon 45, respectively) is reported in 2 male relatives affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, both showing the same haplotype for DNA markers not included in the deleted segment. The 2 different deletions seem to have occurred independently in the same X chromosome. This finding, together with other reports, suggests possibly an increased predisposition to mutations within the DMD locus in some families. Therefore, when dealing with prenatal diagnosis, the investigation on fetal DNA cannot be restricted only to the region in which a mutation was previously identified in the family. 14 refs., 1 fig.