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Sample records for reticulum membrane calcium

  1. Altered calcium pump and secondary deficiency of γ-sarcoglycan and microspan in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from δ-sarcoglycan knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Álvarez, Rocío; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Vega-Moreno, Jesús; Medina-Monares, Joel; Estrada, Francisco J.; Ortega, Alicia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoglycans (SGs) and sarcospan (SSPN) are transmembrane proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mutations in the genes encoding SGs cause many inherited forms of muscular dystrophy. In this study, using purified membranes of wild-type (WT) and δ-SG knockout (KO) mice, we found the specific localization of the SG-SSPN isoforms in transverse tubules (TT) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. Immunoblotting revealed that the absence of δ-SG isoforms in TT and SR results in a secondary deficiency of γ-SG and µSPN. Our results showed augmented ATP hydrolytic activity, ATP-dependent calcium uptake and passive calcium efflux, probably through SERCA1 in KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we found a conformational change in SERCA1 isolated from KO muscle as demonstrated by calorimetric analysis. Following these alterations with mechanical properties, we found an increase in force in KO muscle with the same rate of fatigue but with a decreased fatigue recovery compared to WT. Together our observations suggest, for the first time, that the δ-SG isoforms may stabilize the expression of γ-SG and µSPN in the TT and SR membranes and that this possible complex may play a role in the maintenance of a stable level of resting cytosolic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle. PMID:20638123

  2. Molecular cloning, expression, functional characterization, chromosomal localization, and gene structure of junctate, a novel integral calcium binding protein of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, S; Feriotto, G; Moccagatta, L; Gambari, R; Zorzato, F

    2000-12-15

    Screening a cDNA library from human skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle with a cDNA probe derived from junctin led to the isolation of two groups of cDNA clones. The first group displayed a deduced amino acid sequence that is 84% identical to that of dog heart junctin, whereas the second group had a single open reading frame that encoded a polypeptide with a predicted mass of 33 kDa, whose first 78 NH(2)-terminal residues are identical to junctin whereas its COOH terminus domain is identical to aspartyl beta-hydroxylase, a member of the alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. We named the latter amino acid sequence junctate. Northern blot analysis indicates that junctate is expressed in a variety of human tissues including heart, pancreas, brain, lung, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the genetic loci of junctin and junctate map to the same cytogenetic band on human chromosome 8. Analysis of intron/exon boundaries of the genomic BAC clones demonstrate that junctin, junctate, and aspartyl beta-hydroxylase result from alternative splicing of the same gene. The predicted lumenal portion of junctate is enriched in negatively charged residues and is able to bind calcium. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium (45)Ca(2+) binding in the presence of a physiological concentration of KCl demonstrate that junctate binds 21.0 mol of Ca(2+)/mol protein with a k(D) of 217 +/- 20 microm (n = 5). Tagging recombinant junctate with green fluorescent protein and expressing the chimeric polypeptide in COS-7-transfected cells indicates that junctate is located in endoplasmic reticulum membranes and that its presence increases the peak amplitude and transient calcium released by activation of surface membrane receptors coupled to InsP(3) receptor activation. Our study shows that alternative splicing of the same gene generates the following functionally distinct proteins: an enzyme (aspartyl beta-hydroxylase), a structural

  3. A membrane model for cytosolic calcium oscillations. A study using Xenopus oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jafri, M S; Vajda, S; Pasik, P; Gillo, B

    1992-01-01

    Cytosolic calcium oscillations occur in a wide variety of cells and are involved in different cellular functions. We describe these calcium oscillations by a mathematical model based on the putative electrophysiological properties of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The salient features of our membrane model are calcium-dependent calcium channels and calcium pumps in the ER membrane, constant entry of calcium into the cytosol, calcium dependent removal from the cytosol, and buffering ...

  4. Regulation of calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum by the serine hydrolase ABHD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Powell, Roger; Reisdorph, Nichole; Ewing, Heather; Gelb, Michael H; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Leslie, Christina C

    2017-09-02

    The serine hydrolase inhibitors pyrrophenone and KT195 inhibit cell death induced by A23187 and H 2 O 2 by blocking the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial calcium uptake. The effect of pyrrophenone and KT195 on these processes is not due to inhibition of their known targets, cytosolic phospholipase A 2 and α/β-hydrolase domain-containing (ABHD) 6, respectively, but represent off-target effects. To identify targets of KT195, fibroblasts were treated with KT195-alkyne to covalently label protein targets followed by click chemistry with biotin azide, enrichment on streptavidin beads and tryptic peptide analysis by mass spectrometry. Although several serine hydrolases were identified, α/β-hydrolase domain-containing 2 (ABHD2) was the only target in which both KT195 and pyrrophenone competed for binding to KT195-alkyne. ABHD2 is a serine hydrolase with a predicted transmembrane domain consistent with its pull-down from the membrane proteome. Subcellular fractionation showed localization of ABHD2 to the endoplasmic reticulum but not to mitochondria or mitochondrial-associated membranes. Knockdown of ABHD2 with shRNA attenuated calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial calcium uptake and cell death in fibroblasts stimulated with A23187. The results describe a novel mechanism for regulating calcium transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria that involves the serine hydrolase ABHD2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2017-06-20

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has a broad localization throughout the cell and forms direct physical contacts with all other classes of membranous organelles, including the plasma membrane (PM). A number of protein tethers that mediate these contacts have been identified, and study of these protein tethers has revealed a multiplicity of roles in cell physiology, including regulation of intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics and signaling as well as control of lipid traffic and homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the cross talk between the ER and the PM mediated by direct contacts. We review factors that tether the two membranes, their properties, and their dynamics in response to the functional state of the cell. We focus in particular on the role of ER-PM contacts in nonvesicular lipid transport between the two bilayers mediated by lipid transfer proteins.

  6. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  7. Altered sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase 2a content: Targets for heart failure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Si Qi; Hu, Ping Ping; Tong, Xiao Yong

    2018-05-01

    Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase is responsible for transporting cytosolic calcium into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and endoplasmic reticulum to maintain calcium homeostasis. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase is the dominant isoform expressed in cardiac tissue, which is regulated by endogenous protein inhibitors, post-translational modifications, hormones as well as microRNAs. Dysfunction of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase is associated with heart failure, which makes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase a promising target for heart failure therapy. This review summarizes current approaches to ameliorate sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase function and focuses on phospholamban, an endogenous inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase, pharmacological tools and gene therapies.

  8. Detection, Properties, and Frequency of Local Calcium Release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Teleost Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Llach, Anna; Molina, Cristina E.; Alvarez Lacalle, Enrique; Tort, Lluis; Benítez, Raul; Hove, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a central role in the regulation of cardiac contraction and rhythm in mammals and humans but its role is controversial in teleosts. Since the zebrafish is an emerging model for studies of cardiovascular function and regeneration we here sought to determine if basic features of SR calcium release are phylogenetically conserved. Confocal calcium imaging was used to detect spontaneous calcium release (calcium sparks and waves) from...

  9. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na + or K + (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer

  10. Porcine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: hypersensitive calcium-release mechanism of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P J

    1986-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from malignant hyperthermia swine had abnormal concentration-dependency on release modulators. Halothane stimulated half-maximal calcium-release at similar concentrations for malignant hyperthermia and control sarcoplasmic reticulum (0.10 +/- 0.04 mM). However, concentrations causing half-maximal calcium-release were lower for malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum (P less than 0.001) by an order of magnitude for Ca2+ (28.1 +/- 8.3 versus 1.23 +/- 0.45 nM), adenosine triphosphate (0.33 +/- 0.09 versus 0.023 +/- 0.014 mM) and caffeine (7.79 +/- 1.56 versus 0.80 +/- 0.44 mM). Half-maximal inhibition by Mg2+ occurred at threefold higher concentrations for malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum (0.23 +/- 0.02 versus 0.78 +/- 0.17 mM). The Ca2+-sensitivity curves for calcium-release by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from heterozygotes for the malignant hyperthermia-defect were indistinguishable from the averages of the curves for controls and malignant hyperthermia-homozygotes. Results of this study suggest that malignant hyperthermia is initiated due to a hypersensitive calcium-release mechanism which is inherited in an autosomal, codominant pattern and may be diagnosed using calcium-release sensitivity-tests on isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3742367

  11. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Sanvito, Rossella; Magni, Fulvio; Coccetti, Paola; Rocchetti, Marcella; Nielsen, Jens; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully regulated to safeguard the correct folding and processing of secretory proteins. By using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that calcium shortage leads to a slowdown of cell growth and met...

  12. Expanded polyglutamine embedded in the endoplasmic reticulum causes membrane distortion and coincides with Bax insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Masashi; Li, Shimo; Itoh, Masanori; Wang, Miao-xing; Hayakawa, Miki; Islam, Saiful; Tana; Nakagawa, Kiyomi [Department of Neurobiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Chen, Huayue [Department of Anatomy, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Nakagawa, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tnakagaw@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurobiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is important in various cellular functions, such as secretary and membrane protein biosynthesis, lipid synthesis, and calcium storage. ER stress, including membrane distortion, is associated with many diseases such as Huntington's disease. In particular, nuclear envelope distortion is related to neuronal cell death associated with polyglutamine. However, the mechanism by which polyglutamine causes ER membrane distortion remains unclear. We used electron microscopy, fluorescence protease protection assay, and alkaline treatment to analyze the localization of polyglutamine in cells. We characterized polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane and noted an effect on morphology, including the dilation of ER luminal space and elongation of ER-mitochondria contact sites, in addition to the distortion of the nuclear envelope. The polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane was observed at the same time as Bax insertion. These results demonstrated that the ER membrane may be a target of polyglutamine, which triggers cell death through Bax. -- Highlights: •We characterized polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane. •The polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane was observed at the same time as Bax insertion. •The ER membrane may be a target of polyglutamine, which triggers cell death.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Min Gui; Ming Zhao; Jie Ding

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate.Methods:A total of 120 diabetic retinopathy patients treated in our hospital from January 2010 to September 2015 were enrolled in this article. The serum endoplasmic reticulum stress protein and interleukin protein expression levels were analyzed before and after calcium dobesilate treatment. A total of 55 cases of healthy subjects receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were taken as control group.Results:Serum endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins PERK, CHOP and IRE as well as interleukin proteins IL1, IL2, IL6 and IL10 expression significantly increased, serum MDA level significantly increased while SOD, CAT and GSHpx levels significantly decreased in diabetic retinopathy patients, and compared with control group (P<0.01); after calcium dobesilate treatment, above factors were significantly restored (P<0.01).Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is closely related to endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium dobesilate treatment may improve diabetic retinopathy by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  14. Calcium pumps of plasma membrane and cell interior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strehler, Emanuel E; Treiman, Marek

    2004-01-01

    Calcium entering the cell from the outside or from intracellular organelles eventually must be returned to the extracellular milieu or to intracellular storage organelles. The two major systems capable of pumping Ca2+ against its large concentration gradient out of the cell or into the sarco....../endoplasmatic reticulum are the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases (PMCAs) and the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases (SERCAs), respectively. In mammals, multigene families code for these Ca2+ pumps and additional isoform subtypes are generated via alternative splicing. PMCA and SERCA isoforms show developmental-, tissue......- and cell type-specific patterns of expression. Different PMCA and SERCA isoforms are characterized by different regulatory and kinetic properties that likely are optimized for the distinct functional tasks fulfilled by each pump in setting resting cytosolic or intra-organellar Ca2+ levels, and in shaping...

  15. Dynamic measurement of the calcium buffering properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Carlo; Sztretye, Monika; Figueroa, Lourdes; Allen, Paul D; Ríos, Eduardo

    2013-01-15

    The buffering power, B, of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), ratio of the changes in total and free [Ca(2+)], was determined in fast-twitch mouse muscle cells subjected to depleting membrane depolarization. Changes in total SR [Ca(2+)] were measured integrating Ca(2+) release flux, determined with a cytosolic [Ca(2+)] monitor. Free [Ca(2+)](SR) was measured using the cameleon D4cpv-Casq1. In 34 wild-type (WT) cells average B during the depolarization (ON phase) was 157 (SEM 26), implying that of 157 ions released, 156 were bound inside the SR. B was significantly greater when BAPTA, which increases release flux, was present in the cytosol. B was greater early in the pulse - when flux was greatest - than at its end, and greater in the ON than in the OFF. In 29 Casq1-null cells, B was 40 (3.6). The difference suggests that 75% of the releasable calcium is normally bound to calsequestrin. In the nulls the difference in B between ON and OFF was less than in the WT but still significant. This difference and the associated decay in B during the ON were not artifacts of a slow SR monitor, as they were also found in the WT when [Ca(2+)](SR) was tracked with the fast dye fluo-5N. The calcium buffering power, binding capacity and non-linear binding properties of the SR measured here could be accounted for by calsequestrin at the concentration present in mammalian muscle, provided that its properties were substantially different from those found in solution. Its affinity should be higher, or K(D) lower than the conventionally accepted 1 mm; its cooperativity (n in a Hill fit) should be higher and the stoichiometry of binding should be at the higher end of the values derived in solution. The reduction in B during release might reflect changes in calsequestrin conformation upon calcium loss.

  16. Calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum in the presence of organophosphorus insecticide methyl-parathion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasiak, J.

    1995-01-01

    Using an isotope labelling technique it has been shown that an organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion (0,0-diethyl 0-4-nitrophenyl phosphorothionate) depressed calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from rabbit hind leg muscle. The effect was significant for insecticide concentrations of 50 and 100 μM and was dose-dependent. The insecticide exerted a more pronounced effect on calcium uptake in the presence of ATP in the reticulum environment than in the absence of ATP. The inhibitory action of methyl parathion on Ca 2+ accumulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum can cause a rise in myoplasmic free Ca 2+ , the essential prerequisite for contracture activation. Because methyl parathion, as well as other organophosphorus insecticides, is primarily neurotoxic, evidence of non-specific effect could be important for assessing its environmental safety. (author). 20 refs, 2 figs

  17. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E

    1996-01-01

    area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane....... The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein....

  18. STIM proteins and the endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Silvia; Meyer, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic organelles can interact with each other through stable junctions where the two membranes are kept in close apposition. The junction that connects the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane (ER-PM junction) is unique in providing a direct communication link between the ER and the PM. In a recently discovered signaling process, STIM (stromal-interacting molecule) proteins sense a drop in ER Ca(2+) levels and directly activate Orai PM Ca(2+) channels across the junction space. In an inverse process, a voltage-gated PM Ca(2+) channel can directly open ER ryanodine-receptor Ca(2+) channels in striated-muscle cells. Although ER-PM junctions were first described 50 years ago, their broad importance in Ca(2+) signaling, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol lipid transfer, has only recently been realized. Here, we discuss research from different fields to provide a broad perspective on the structures and unique roles of ER-PM junctions in controlling signaling and metabolic processes.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase expression during differentiation of colon cancer and leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Bela; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Gelebart, Pascal; Kovacs, Tuende; Chomienne, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The calcium homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is connected to a multitude of cell functions involved in intracellular signal transduction, control of proliferation, programmed cell death, or the synthesis of mature proteins. Calcium is accumulated in the ER by various biochemically distinct sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase isoenzymes (SERCA isoforms). Experimental data indicate that the SERCA composition of some carcinoma and leukaemia cell types undergoes significant changes during differentiation, and that this is accompanied by modifications of SERCA-dependent calcium accumulation in the ER. Because ER calcium homeostasis can also influence cell differentiation, we propose that the modulation of the expression of various SERCA isoforms, and in particular, the induction of the expression of SERCA3-type proteins, is an integral part of the differentiation program of some cancer and leukaemia cell types. The SERCA content of the ER may constitute a new parameter by which the calcium homeostatic characteristics of the organelle are adjusted. The cross-talk between ER calcium homeostasis and cell differentiation may have some implications for the better understanding of the signalling defects involved in the acquisition and maintenance of the malignant phenotype

  20. The plant membrane surrounding powdery mildew haustoria shares properties with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J; Nielsen, Mads Eggert; Böhlenius, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Many filamentous plant pathogens place specialized feeding structures, called haustoria, inside living host cells. As haustoria grow, they are believed to manipulate plant cells to generate a specialized, still enigmatic extrahaustorial membrane (EHM) around them. Here, we focused on revealing...... properties of the EHM. With the help of membranespecific dyes and transient expression of membrane-associated proteins fused to fluorescent tags, we studied the nature of the EHM generated by barley leaf epidermal cells around powdery mildew haustoria. Observations suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum (ER...... that it is not a continuum of the ER. Furthermore, GDP-locked Sar1 and a nucleotide-free RabD2a, which block ER to Golgi exit, did not hamper haustorium formation. These results indicated that the EHM shares features with the plant ER membrane, but that the EHM membrane is not dependent on conventional secretion...

  1. Methods for Creating and Animating a Computer Model Depicting the Structure and Function of the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alice Y.; McKee, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Describes the developmental process used to visualize the calcium ATPase enzyme of the sarcoplasmic reticulum which involves evaluating scientific information, consulting scientists, model making, storyboarding, and creating and editing in a computer medium. (Author/CCM)

  2. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S.

    1989-01-01

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar

  3. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida

    2016-01-01

    respiration. Calcium homeostasis, protein biosynthesis and the unfolded protein response are tightly intertwined and the consequences of facing calcium starvation are determined by whether cellular energy production is balanced with demands for anabolic functions. Our findings confirm that the connections...... reticulum (ER stress) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and generates a state of oxidative stress that decreases cell viability. These effects are severe during growth on rapidly fermentable carbon sources and can be mitigated by decreasing the protein synthesis rate or by inducing cellular...

  4. Membrane junctions in Xenopus eggs: their distribution suggests a role in calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, D M; Grey, R D

    1983-04-01

    We have observed the presence of membrane junctions formed between the plasma membrane and cortical endoplasmic reticulum of mature, unactivated eggs of xenopus laevis. The parallel, paired membranes of the junction are separated by a 10-mn gap within which electron-dense material is present. This material occurs in patches with an average center-to-center distance of approximately 30 nm. These junctions are rare in immature (but fully grown) oocytes (approximately 2 percent of the plasma membrane is associated with junctions) and increase dramatically during progesterone-induced maturation. Junctions in the mature, unactivated egg are two to three times more abundant in the animal hemisphere (25-30 percent of the plasma membrane associated with junction) as compared with the vegetal hemisphere (10-15 percent). Junction density decreases rapidly to values characteristic of immature oocytes in response to egg activation. The plasma membrane-ER junctions of xenopus eggs are strikingly similar in structure to membrane junctions in muscle cells thought to be essential in the triggering of intracellular calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition, the junctions' distinctive, animal-vegetal polarity of distribution, their dramatic appearance during maturation, and their disapperance during activation are correlated with previously documented patterns of calcium-mediated events in anuran eggs. We discuss several lines of evidence supporting the hypothesis that these junctions in xenopus eggs are sites that transduce extracellular events into intracellular calcium release during fertilization and activation of development.

  5. Calcium dysregulation, functional calpainopathy, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, David R; Pinal-Fernandez, Iago; Mázala, Davi A G; Lloyd, Thomas E; Corse, Andrea M; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Mammen, Andrew L; Chin, Eva R

    2017-03-22

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common primary myopathy in the elderly, but its pathoetiology is still unclear. Perturbed myocellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) homeostasis can exacerbate many of the factors proposed to mediate muscle degeneration in IBM, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, protein aggregation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Ca 2+ dysregulation may plausibly be initiated in IBM by immune-mediated membrane damage and/or abnormally accumulating proteins, but no studies to date have investigated Ca 2+ regulation in IBM patients. We first investigated protein expression via immunoblot in muscle biopsies from IBM, dermatomyositis, and non-myositis control patients, identifying several differentially expressed Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins in IBM. Next, we investigated the Ca 2+ -signaling transcriptome by RNA-seq, finding 54 of 183 (29.5%) genes from an unbiased list differentially expressed in IBM vs. controls. Using an established statistical approach to relate genes with causal transcription networks, Ca 2+ abundance was considered a significant upstream regulator of observed whole-transcriptome changes. Post-hoc analyses of Ca 2+ -regulatory mRNA and protein data indicated a lower protein to transcript ratio in IBM vs. controls, which we hypothesized may relate to increased Ca 2+ -dependent proteolysis and decreased protein translation. Supporting this hypothesis, we observed robust (4-fold) elevation in the autolytic activation of a Ca 2+ -activated protease, calpain-1, as well as increased signaling for translational attenuation (eIF2a phosphorylation) downstream of the unfolded protein response. Finally, in IBM samples we observed mRNA and protein under-expression of calpain-3, the skeletal muscle-specific calpain, which broadly supports proper Ca 2+ homeostasis. Together, these data provide novel insight into mechanisms by which intracellular Ca 2+ regulation is perturbed in IBM and offer evidence of pathological downstream effects.

  6. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application. PMID:26121477

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles but not SERCA ATP hydrolysis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Douglas; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Galina, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BrPA) is an antitumor agent that alkylates the thiol groups of enzymes and has been proposed as a treatment for neoplasias because of its specific reactivity with metabolic energy transducing enzymes in tumor cells. In this study, we show that the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) ATPase (SERCA) type 1 is one of the target enzymes of 3BrPA activity. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum vesicles (SRV) were incubated in the presence of 1mM 3BrPA, which was unable to inhibit the ATPase activity of SERCA. However, Ca(2+)-uptake activity was significantly inhibited by 80% with 150 μM 3BrPA. These results indicate that 3BrPA has the ability to uncouple the ATP hydrolysis from the calcium transport activities. In addition, we observed that the inclusion of 2mM reduced glutathione (GSH) in the reaction medium with different 3BrPA concentrations promoted an increase in 40% in ATPase activity and protects the inhibition promoted by 3BrPA in calcium uptake activity. This derivatization is accompanied by a decrease of reduced cysteine (Cys), suggesting that GSH and 3BrPA increases SERCA activity and transport by pyruvylation and/or S-glutathiolation mediated by GSH at a critical Cys residues of the SERCA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial enzymes and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores as targets of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Gary E; Huang, Hsueh-Meei

    2004-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative stress accompanies age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Specific mechanisms by which oxidative stress leads to neurodegeneration are unknown. Two targets of oxidative stress that are known to change in neurodegenerative diseases are the mitochondrial enzyme alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. KGDHC activities are diminished in all common neurodegenerative diseases and the changes are particularly well documented in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A second change that occurs in cells from AD patients is an exaggerated endoplasmic reticulum calcium store [i.e., bombesin-releasable calcium stores (BRCS)]. H(2)O(2), a general oxidant, changes both variables in the same direction as occurs in disease. Other oxidants selectively alter these variables. Various antioxidants were used to help define the critical oxidant species that modifies these responses. All of the antioxidants diminish the oxidant-induced carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (cDCF) detectable reactive oxygen species (ROS), but have diverse actions on these cellular processes. For example, alpha-keto-beta-methyl-n-valeric acid (KMV) diminishes the H(2)O(2) effects on BRCS, while trolox and DMSO exaggerate the response. Acute trolox treatment does not alter H(2)O(2)-induced changes in KGDHC, whereas chronic treatment with trolox increases KGDHC almost threefold. The results suggest that KGDHC and BRCS provide targets by which oxidative stress may induce neurodegeneration and a useful tool for selecting antioxidants for reversing age-related neurodegeneration.

  9. Structural role of lipids in mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes: freeze-fracture electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, L; Mehard, C W; Meissner, G; Zahler, W L; Fleischer, S

    1974-01-01

    The role of phospholipid in the structure of the membranes of beef heart mitochondria and of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes from rabbit skeletal muscle has been investigated by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Progressive removal of membrane phospholipids, by phospholipase A treatment or detergent treatment, or by organic solvent extraction, results in loss of the smooth background seen in membrane fracture faces and decreased ability of membrane to undergo freeze fracture to yield fracture faces. Instead cross-sections of vesicles or particle clusters are observed. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles have a 9 to 1 asymmetry in the distribution of particles between the convex and concave fracture faces. There is also a wide range of particle size distribution in both of these fracture faces with 85-A particles in greatest number. The removal of membrane associated proteins by detergent extraction does not appreciably change the distribution in particle size. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were dissolved with detergent and reassembled to form membrane vesicles containing mainly one protein (approx. 90%), i.e., the Ca/sup 2 +/ pump protein, and with a ratio of lipid to protein similar to the original membrane. The reconstituted vesicles readily underwent freeze fracture but the asymmetric particle distribution between the fracture faces was no longer observed. The size distribution of particles in the reconstituted membrane, consisting mainly of Ca/sup 2 +/ pump protein, and phospholipid, was similar in heterogeneity to the original sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. Thus the heterogeneity in particle size could reflect variation in the orientation of the Ca/sup 2 +/ pump protein within the membrane.

  10. Roles of phosphorylation and nucleotide binding domains in calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum adenosinetriphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruel, J.A.; Inesi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of the phosphorylation (phosphorylated enzyme intermediate) and nucleotide binding domains in calcium transport were studied by comparing acetyl phosphate and ATP as substrates for the Ca 2+ -ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The authors found that the maximal level of phosphoenzyme obtained with either substrate is approximately 4 nmol/mg of protein, corresponding to the stoichiometry of catalytic sites in their preparation. The initial burst of phosphoenzyme formation observed in the transient state, following addition of either substrate, is accompanied by internalization of 2 mol of calcium per mole of phosphoenzyme. The internalized calcium is then translocated with a sequential pattern, independent of the substrate used. Following a rate-limiting step, the phosphoenzyme undergoes hydrolytic cleavage and proceeds to the steady-state activity which is soon back inhibited by the rise of Ca 2+ concentration in the lumen of the vesicles. When the back inhibition is released by the addition of oxalate, substrate utilization and calcium transport occur with a ratio of 1:2, independent of the substrate and its concentration. When the nucleotide binding site is derivatized with FITP, the enzyme can still utilize acetyl phosphate (but not ATP) for calcium transport. These observations demonstrate that the basic coupling mechanism of catalysis and calcium transport involves the phosphorylation and calcium binding domains, and not the nucleotide binding domain. On the other hand, occupancy of the FITC-sensitive nucleotide site is involved in kinetic regulation not only with respect to utilization of substrate for the phosphoryl transfer reaction but also for subsequent steps related to calcium translocation and phosphoenzyme turnover

  11. Coxsackievirus protein 2B modifies endoplasmic reticulum membrane and plasma membrane permeability and facilitates virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kuppeveld, F J; Hoenderop, J G; Smeets, R L; Willems, P H; Dijkman, H B; Galama, J M; Melchers, W J

    1997-01-01

    Digital-imaging microscopy was performed to study the effect of Coxsackie B3 virus infection on the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and the Ca2+ content of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During the course of infection a gradual increase in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration was observed, due to the influx of extracellular Ca2+. The Ca2+ content of the ER decreased in time with kinetics inversely proportional to those of viral protein synthesis. Individual expression of protein 2B was sufficient to induce the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and to release Ca2+ from ER stores. Analysis of mutant 2B proteins showed that both a cationic amphipathic alpha-helix and a second hydrophobic domain in 2B were required for these activities. Consistent with a presumed ability of protein 2B to increase membrane permeability, viruses carrying a mutant 2B protein exhibited a defect in virus release. We propose that 2B gradually enhances membrane permeability, thereby disrupting the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and ultimately causing the membrane lesions that allow release of virus progeny. PMID:9218794

  12. Prion protein misfolding affects calcium homeostasis and sensitizes cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Torres

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prion-related disorders (PrDs are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive neuronal impairment as well as the accumulation of an abnormally folded and protease resistant form of the cellular prion protein, termed PrP(RES. Altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis is associated with the occurrence of neurodegeneration in sporadic, infectious and familial forms of PrDs. The ER operates as a major intracellular calcium store, playing a crucial role in pathological events related to neuronal dysfunction and death. Here we investigated the possible impact of PrP misfolding on ER calcium homeostasis in infectious and familial models of PrDs. Neuro2A cells chronically infected with scrapie prions showed decreased ER-calcium content that correlated with a stronger upregulation of UPR-inducible chaperones, and a higher sensitivity to ER stress-induced cell death. Overexpression of the calcium pump SERCA stimulated calcium release and increased the neurotoxicity observed after exposure of cells to brain-derived infectious PrP(RES. Furthermore, expression of PrP mutants that cause hereditary Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or fatal familial insomnia led to accumulation of PrP(RES and their partial retention at the ER, associated with a drastic decrease of ER calcium content and higher susceptibility to ER stress. Finally, similar results were observed when a transmembrane form of PrP was expressed, which is proposed as a neurotoxic intermediate. Our results suggest that alterations in calcium homeostasis and increased susceptibility to ER stress are common pathological features of both infectious and familial PrD models.

  13. High fat diet disrupts endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis in the rat liver.

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    Wires, Emily S; Trychta, Kathleen A; Bäck, Susanne; Sulima, Agnieszka; Rice, Kenner C; Harvey, Brandon K

    2017-11-01

    Disruption to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis has been implicated in obesity, however, the ability to longitudinally monitor ER calcium fluctuations has been challenging with prior methodologies. We recently described the development of a Gaussia luciferase (GLuc)-based reporter protein responsive to ER calcium depletion (GLuc-SERCaMP) and investigated the effect of a high fat diet on ER calcium homeostasis. A GLuc-based reporter cell line was treated with palmitate, a free fatty acid. Rats intrahepatically injected with GLuc-SERCaMP reporter were fed a cafeteria diet or high fat diet. The liver and plasma were examined for established markers of steatosis and compared to plasma levels of SERCaMP activity. Palmitate induced GLuc-SERCaMP release in vitro, indicating ER calcium depletion. Consumption of a cafeteria diet or high fat pellets correlated with alterations to hepatic ER calcium homeostasis in rats, shown by increased GLuc-SERCaMP release. Access to ad lib high fat pellets also led to a corresponding decrease in microsomal calcium ATPase activity and an increase in markers of hepatic steatosis. In addition to GLuc-SERCaMP, we have also identified endogenous proteins (endogenous SERCaMPs) with a similar response to ER calcium depletion. We demonstrated the release of an endogenous SERCaMP, thought to be a liver esterase, during access to a high fat diet. Attenuation of both GLuc-SERCaMP and endogenous SERCaMP was observed during dantrolene administration. Here we describe the use of a reporter for in vitro and in vivo models of high fat diet. Our results support the theory that dietary fat intake correlates with a decrease in ER calcium levels in the liver and suggest a high fat diet alters the ER proteome. Lay summary: ER calcium dysregulation was observed in rats fed a cafeteria diet or high fat pellets, with fluctuations in sensor release correlating with fat intake. Attenuation of sensor release, as well as food intake was observed during

  14. Investigation of function similarities between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and platelet calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases with the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, T.H.; Campbell, K.P.; White, G.C. II

    1987-01-01

    The platelet and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases (Ca 2+ -ATPases) were functionally compared with respect to substrate activation by steady-state kinetic methods using the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium. Quercetin inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activities in a dose-dependent manner with IC 50 values of 25 and 10 μM, respectively. Calmidazolium also inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activities, with half-maximal inhibition measured at 5 and 4 μM, respectively. Both inhibitors also affected the [ 45 Ca] calcium transport activity of intact platelet microsomes at concentrations similar to those which reduced Ca 2+ -ATPase activity. These inhibitors were then used to examine substrate ligation by the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump proteins. For both Ca 2+ -ATPase proteins, quercetin has an affinity for the E-Ca 2 (fully ligated with respect to calcium at the exterior high-affinity calcium binding sites, unligated with respect to ATP) conformational state of the protein that is approximately 10-fold grater than for other conformational states in the hydrolytic cycle. Quercetin can thus be considered a competitive inhibitor of the calcium pump proteins with respect to ATP. In contrast to the effect of quercetin, calmidazolium interacts with the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPases in an uncompetitive manner. The dissociation constants for this inhibitor for the different conformational states of the calcium pump proteins were similar, indicating that calmidazolium has equal affinity for all of the reaction intermediates probed. These observations indicate that the substrate ligation processes are similar for the two pump proteins. This supports the concept that the hydrolytic cycles of the two proteins are comparable

  15. Calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from hearts of septic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonough, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    Myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a critical role in the regulation of the cytosolic calcium fluctuations that occur during the cardiac cycle. One function of the SR is to lower the calcium concentration so that myocardial relaxation and thus ventricular filling can occur. The aim of the present study was to determine if hyperdynamic sepsis induced a decrease in the capacity of SR to take up calcium. This defect would result in decreased ventricular filling and thus decreased cardiac output, as has previously been shown in isolated perfused working hearts removed from septic rats. Therefore, rats were anesthetized with ether, and sepsis was induced by the injection of an aliquot of a fecal homogenate into the peritoneal cavity. Control animals either underwent surgery and received an aliquot of sterilized fecal inoculum (sham) or were untreated (no surgery). On day 2 after surgery, animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital, and hearts were removed, weighted, and SR isolated. The rate of uptake of 45 Ca 2+ by SR from septic rats was not depressed compared to controls but in fact was elevated. Maximum 45 Ca 2+ accumulated by the SR and Ca 2+ -stimulated ATPase activity were similar in SR from control and septic hearts. These results suggest that the contractile dysfunction noted in the myocardium in early sepsis is probably not due to inadequate SR removal of Ca 2+ during diastole

  16. Activation of endoplasmic reticulum calcium leak by 2-APB depends on the luminal calcium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Aparicio, Daniel; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin

    2017-07-01

    It has been shown that 2-APB is a nonspecific modulator of ion channel activity, while most of the channels are inhibited by this compound, there are few examples of channels that are activated by 2-APB. Additionally, it has been shown that, 2-APB leads to a reduction in the luminal endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ level ([Ca 2+ ] ER ) and we have carried out simultaneous recordings of both [Ca 2+ ] i and the [Ca 2+ ] ER in HeLa cell suspensions to assess the mechanism involved in this effect. This approach allowed us to determine that 2-APB induces a reduction in the [Ca 2+ ] ER by activating an ER-resident Ca 2+ permeable channel more than by inhibiting the activity of SERCA pumps. Interestingly, this effect of 2-APB of reducing the [Ca 2+ ] ER is auto-limited because depends on a replete ER Ca 2+ store; a condition that thapsigargin does not require to decrease the [Ca 2+ ] ER . Additionally, our data indicate that the ER Ca 2+ permeable channel activated by 2-APB does not seem to participate in the ER Ca 2+ leak revealed by inhibiting SERCA pump with thapsigargin. This work suggests that, prolonged incubations with even low concentrations of 2-APB (5μM) would lead to the reduction in the [Ca 2+ ] ER that might explain the inhibitory effect of this compound on those signals that require Ca 2+ release from the ER store. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

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    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  18. Effects of inorganic phosphate and ADP on calcium handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in rat skinned cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J Z; Kentish, J C

    1995-03-01

    The aim was to investigate whether, and how, increases in inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ADP, similar to those occurring intracellularly during early myocardial ischaemia, affect the calcium handling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Rat ventricular trabeculae were permeabilised with saponin. The physiological process of calcium induced calcium release (CICR) from the muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum was triggered via flash photolysis of the "caged Ca2+", nitr-5. Alternatively, calcium release was induced by rapid application of caffeine to give an estimate of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading. The initial rate of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium pumping was also assessed by photolysis of caged ATP at saturating [Ca2+]. Myoplasmic [Ca2+] (using fluo-3) and isometric force were measured. Pi (2-20 mM) significantly depressed the magnitude of CICR and the associated force transient. Sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading was inhibited even more than CICR by Pi, suggesting that reduced calcium loading could account for all of the inhibitory effect of Pi on CICR and that Pi may slightly activate the calcium release mechanism. The reduced sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading seemed to be due to a fall in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis (delta GATP) available for the calcium pump, since equal decreases in delta GATP produced by adding both Pi and ADP in various ratios caused similar falls in the calcium loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The caged ATP experiments indicated that Pi (20 mM) did not affect the rate constant of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium uptake. ADP (10 mM) alone, or with 1 mM Pi, inhibited calcium loading. In spite of this, ADP (10 mM) did not alter CICR and, when 1 mM Pi was added, ADP increased CICR above control. An increase in intracellular Pi reduces sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading and thus depresses the CICR. This could be an important contributing factor in the hypoxic or ischaemic contractile failure of the myocardium. However the

  19. Hofmeister effect of anions on calcium translocation by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Peruzzi, Niccolò; Ninham, Barry W.; Dei, Luigi; Nostro, Pierandrea Lo

    2015-10-01

    The occurrence of Hofmeister (specific ion) effects in various membrane-related physiological processes is well documented. For example the effect of anions on the transport activity of the ion pump Na+, K+-ATPase has been investigated. Here we report on specific anion effects on the ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Current measurements following ATP concentration jumps on SERCA-containing vesicles adsorbed on solid supported membranes were carried out in the presence of different potassium salts. We found that monovalent anions strongly interfere with ATP-induced Ca2+ translocation by SERCA, according to their increasing chaotropicity in the Hofmeister series. On the contrary, a significant increase in Ca2+ translocation was observed in the presence of sulphate. We suggest that the anions can affect the conformational transition between the phosphorylated intermediates E1P and E2P of the SERCA cycle. In particular, the stabilization of the E1P conformation by chaotropic anions seems to be related to their adsorption at the enzyme/water and/or at the membrane/water interface, while the more kosmotropic species affect SERCA conformation and functionality by modifying the hydration layers of the enzyme.

  20. Role of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium in development of secondary calcium rise and early afterdepolarizations in long QT syndrome rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Cheng Chang

    Full Text Available L-type calcium current reactivation plays an important role in development of early afterdepolarizations (EADs and torsades de pointes (TdP. Secondary intracellular calcium (Cai rise is associated with initiation of EADs.To test whether inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ cycling suppresses secondary Cai rise and genesis of EADs.Langendorff perfusion and dual voltage and Cai optical mapping were conducted in 10 rabbit hearts. Atrioventricular block (AVB was created by radiofrequency ablation. After baseline studies, E4031, SR Ca2+ cycling inhibitors (ryanodine plus thapsigargin and nifedipine were then administrated subsequently, and the protocols were repeated.At baseline, there was no spontaneous or pacing-induced TdP. After E4031 administration, action potential duration (APD was significantly prolonged and the amplitude of secondary Cai rise was enhanced, and 7 (70% rabbits developed spontaneous or pacing-induced TdP. In the presence of ryanodine plus thapsigargin, TdP inducibility was significantly reduced (2 hearts, 20%, p = 0.03. Although APD was significantly prolonged (from 298 ± 30 ms to 457 ± 75 ms at pacing cycle length of 1000 m, p = 0.007 by ryanodine plus thapsigargin, the secondary Cai rise was suppressed (from 8.8 ± 2.6% to 1.2 ± 0.9%, p = 0.02. Nifedipine inhibited TdP inducibility in all rabbit hearts.In this AVB and long QT rabbit model, inhibition of SR Ca2+ cycyling reduces the inducibility of TdP. The mechanism might be suppression of secondary Cai rise and genesis of EADs.

  1. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  2. Bell-shaped calcium-response curves of lns(l,4,5)P3- and calcium-gated channels from endoplasmic reticulum of cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezprozvanny, Llya; Watras, James; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    1991-06-01

    RELEASE of calcium from intracellular stores occurs by two pathways, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-gated channel1-3 and a calcium-gated channel (ryanodine receptor)4-6. Using specific antibodies, both receptors were found in Purkinje cells of cerebellum7,8. We have now compared the functional properties of the channels corresponding to the two receptors by incorporating endoplasmic reticulum vesicles from canine cerebellum into planar bilayers. InsP3-gated channels were observed most frequently. Another channel type was activated by adenine nucleotides or caffeine, inhibited by ruthenium red, and modified by ryanodine, characteristics of the ryanodine receptor/channel6. The open probability of both channel types displayed a bell-shaped curve for dependence on calcium. For the InsP3-gated channel, the maximum probability of opening occurred at 0.2 µM free calcium, with sharp decreases on either side of the maximum. Maximum activity for the ryanodine receptor/channel was maintained between 1 and 100 µM calcium. Thus, within the physiological range of cytoplasmic calcium, the InsP3-gated channel itself allows positive feed-back and then negative feedback for calcium release, whereas the ryanodine receptor/channel behaves solely as a calcium-activated channel. The existence in the same cell of two channels with different responses to calcium and different ligand sensitivities provides a basis for complex patterns of intracellular calcium regulation.

  3. Effect of triorganotin compounds on calcium transport mechanisms in rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.A.; Kodavanti, P.R.S.; Yallapragada, P.R.; Desaiah, D.

    1990-01-01

    Although organotin compounds, in general, are neurotoxicants, recent studies indicate that these tin compounds affect heme metabolism as well as cardiovascular system. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium pump together with phosphorylation of phospholamban has an important role in myocardial contraction and relaxation. Since organotin compounds interfere with cardiovascular system, we have studied the in vitro as well as in vivo effects of tributyltin bromide (TBT), triethyltin bromide (TET) and trimethyltin chloride (TMT) on cardiac SR Ca 2+ -pump activity, in order to know the relative potency of these tin compounds. SR was isolated from heart ventricles of male Sprague-Dawley rats and used for in vitro studies. For in vivo studies, rats were treated orally in corn oil for 6 days with different doses of TET (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg/d), TMT (0.75, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/kg/d) and TBT (0.75, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/kg/d). Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosage and cardiac SR was prepared. Cardiac SR Ca 2+ -ATPase and 45 Ca-uptake were measured. All the three tin compounds inhibited Ca 2+ -ATPase and 45 Ca-uptake in vitro in a concentration dependent manner. The order of potency for Ca 2+ -ATPase as determined IC 50 , is TBT (2 uM) > TET (63 uM) > TMT (280 uM). For 45 Ca-uptake, if followed the same order i.e., TBT (0.35 uM) > TET (10 uM) > TMT (440 uM). In agreement with in vitro results, both SR Ca 2+ -ATPase and 45 Ca-uptake were significantly inhibited in rats treated with these tin compounds. These studies indicate that triorganotin compounds affect Ca 2+ -pumping mechanisms and thereby alter cardiac contraction-relaxation process

  4. Plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) from Jurkat cells contain STIM1 protein is PAM involved in the capacitative calcium entry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozieł, Katarzyna; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Pinton, Paolo; Duszyński, Jerzy; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2009-12-01

    A proper cooperation between the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria seems to be essential for numerous cellular processes involved in Ca(2+) signalling and maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis. A presence of microsomal and mitochondrial proteins together with those characteristic for the plasma membrane in the fraction of the plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) indicates a formation of stabile interactions between these three structures. We isolated the plasma membrane associated membranes from Jurkat cells and found its significant enrichment in the plasma membrane markers including plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CD3 as well as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In addition, two proteins involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, Orai1 located in the plasma membrane and an endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 were found in this fraction. Furthermore, we observed a rearrangement of STIM1-containing protein complexes isolated from Jurkat cells undergoing stimulation by thapsigargin. We suggest that the inter-membrane compartment composed of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, and isolated as a stabile plasma membrane associated membranes fraction, might be involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and their formation and rebuilding have an important regulatory role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  5. From the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane: mechanisms of CFTR folding and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M; Canato, Sara

    2017-01-01

    CFTR biogenesis starts with its co-translational insertion into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and folding of the cytosolic domains, towards the acquisition of a fully folded compact native structure. Efficiency of this process is assessed by the ER quality control system that allows the exit of folded proteins but targets unfolded/misfolded CFTR to degradation. If allowed to leave the ER, CFTR is modified at the Golgi and reaches the post-Golgi compartments to be delivered to the plasma membrane where it functions as a cAMP- and phosphorylation-regulated chloride/bicarbonate channel. CFTR residence at the membrane is a balance of membrane delivery, endocytosis, and recycling. Several adaptors, motor, and scaffold proteins contribute to the regulation of CFTR stability and are involved in continuously assessing its structure through peripheral quality control systems. Regulation of CFTR biogenesis and traffic (and its dysregulation by mutations, such as the most common F508del) determine its overall activity and thus contribute to the fine modulation of chloride secretion and hydration of epithelial surfaces. This review covers old and recent knowledge on CFTR folding and trafficking from its synthesis to the regulation of its stability at the plasma membrane and highlights how several of these steps can be modulated to promote the rescue of mutant CFTR.

  6. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. ► The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM–mitochondria association is unknown. ► The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. ► Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP 3 receptor-mediated Ca 2+ influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas MβC saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. 14 C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with MβC decreases the level of de novo synthesized 14 C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of 14 C-phosphatidylethanolamine (PtEt). Apparently, cholesterol depletion increased the PtSer transport from MAMs to mitochondria. Our

  7. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Michiko [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Hayashi, Teruo, E-mail: thayashi@mail.nih.gov [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Su, Tsung-Ping, E-mail: tsu@intra.nida.nih.gov [Cellular Pathobiology Section, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of

  8. The protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation and increases sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Taj D.; Gandy, Johanna C.; Bijur, Gautam N.

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed protein glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is constitutively active, however its activity is markedly diminished following phosphorylation of Ser21 of GSK3α and Ser9 of GSK3β. Although several kinases are known to phosphorylate Ser21/9 of GSK3, for example Akt, relatively much less is known about the mechanisms that cause the dephosphorylation of GSK3 at Ser21/9. In the present study KCl-induced plasma membrane depolarization of SH-SY5Y cells, which increases intracellular calcium concentrations caused a transient decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473, and GSK3 at Ser21/9. Overexpression of the selective protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, inhibitor-2, increased basal GSK3 phosphorylation at Ser21/9 and significantly blocked the KCl-induced dephosphorylation of GSK3β, but not GSK3α. The phosphorylation of Akt was not affected by the overexpression of inhibitor-2. GSK3 activity is known to affect sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) levels. Overexpression of inhibitor-2 or treatment of cells with the GSK3 inhibitors lithium and SB216763 increased the levels of SERCA2. These results indicate that the protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation induced by KCl and that GSK3 activity regulates SERCA2 levels

  9. A conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC facilitates phospholipid transfer from the ER to mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Lahiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE. Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER-mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER-mitochondria encounter structure are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER-mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth.

  10. Induction of cortical endoplasmic reticulum by dimerization of a coatomer-binding peptide anchored to endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lavieu, Grégory; Orci, Lelio; Shi, Lei; Geiling, Michael; Ravazzola, Mariella; Wieland, Felix; Cosson, Pierre; Rothman, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) is a permanent feature of yeast cells but occurs transiently in most animal cell types. Ist2p is a transmembrane protein that permanently localizes to the cER in yeast. When Ist2 is expressed in mammalian cells, it induces abundant cER containing Ist2. Ist2 cytoplasmic C-terminal peptide is necessary and sufficient to induce cER. This peptide sequence resembles classic coat protein complex I (COPI) coatomer protein-binding KKXX signals, and indeed the dime...

  11. Molecular cloning and expression of cDNA encoding a lumenal calcium binding glycoprotein from sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leberer, E.; Charuk, J.H.M.; MacLennan, D.H.; Green, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody screening was used to isolate a cDNA encoding the 160-kDa glycoprotein of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. The cDNA is identical to that encoding the 53-kDa glycoprotein except that it contains an in-frame insertion of 1,308 nucleotides near its 5' end, apparently resulting from alternative splicing. The protein encoded by the cDNA would contain a 19-residue NH 2 -terminal signal sequence and a 453-residue COOH-terminal sequence identical to the 53-kDa glycoprotein. It would also contain a 436-amino acid insert between these sequences. This insert would be highly acidic, suggesting that it might bind Ca 2+ . The purified 160-kDa glycoprotein and the glycoprotein expressed in COS-1 cells transfected with cDNA encoding the 160-kDa glycoprotein were shown to bind 45 C 2+ in a gel overlay assay. The protein was shown to be located in the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and to be associated through Ca 2+ with the membrane. The authors propose that this lumenal Ca 2+ binding glycoprotein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum be designated sarcalumenin

  12. Overexpression of Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2a Promotes Cardiac Sympathetic Neurotransmission via Abnormal Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Ca2+ Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Julia; Herring, Neil; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Kun; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Reduced cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction coupling and downregulation of the SERCA2a (sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a) is associated with heart failure. This has led to viral transgene upregulation of SERCA2a in cardiomyocytes as a treatment. We hypothesized that SERCA2a gene therapy expressed under a similar promiscuous cytomegalovirus promoter could also affect the cardiac sympathetic neural axis and promote sympathoexcitation. Stellate neurons were isolated from 90 to 120 g male, Sprague–Dawley, Wistar Kyoto, and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Neurons were infected with Ad-mCherry or Ad-mCherry-hATP2Aa (SERCA2a). Intracellular Ca2+ changes were measured using fura-2AM in response to KCl, caffeine, thapsigargin, and carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazine to mobilize intracellular Ca2+ stores. The effect of SERCA2a on neurotransmitter release was measured using [3H]-norepinephrine overflow from 340 to 360 g Sprague–Dawley rat atria in response to right stellate ganglia stimulation. Upregulation of SERCA2a resulted in greater neurotransmitter release in response to stellate stimulation compared with control (empty: 98.7±20.5 cpm, n=7; SERCA: 186.5±28.41 cpm, n=8; Pneurons, SERCA2a overexpression facilitated greater depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients (empty: 0.64±0.03 au, n=57; SERCA: 0.75±0.03 au, n=68; Pneurons resulted in increased neurotransmission and increased Ca2+ loading into intracellular stores. Whether the increased Ca2+ transient and neurotransmission after SERCA2A overexpression contributes to enhanced sympathoexcitation in heart failure patients remains to be determined. PMID:28223472

  13. Plasma membrane calcium ATPases and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Marta; De Mario, Agnese; Scarlatti, Chiara; Primerano, Simona; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-03-01

    The plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCA pumps) cooperate with other transport systems in the plasma membrane and in the organelles in the regulation of cell Ca(2+). They have high Ca(2+) affinity and are thus the fine tuners of cytosolic Ca(2+). They belong to the superfamily of P-type ATPases: their four basic isoforms share the essential properties of the reaction cycle and the general membrane topography motif of 10 transmembrane domains and three large cytosolic units. However they also differ in other important properties, e.g., tissue distribution and regulatory mechanisms. Their chief regulator is calmodulin, that removes their C-terminal cytosolic tail from autoinhibitory binding sites next to the active site of the pump, restoring activity. The number of pump isoforms is increased to over 30 by alternative splicing of the transcripts at a N-terminal site (site A) and at site C within the C-terminal calmodulin binding domain: the splice variants are tissue specific and developmentally regulated. The importance of PMCAs in the maintenance of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis is underlined by the disease phenotypes, genetic or acquired, caused by their malfunction. Non-genetic PMCA deficiencies have long been considered possible causative factors in disease conditions as important as cancer, hypertension, or neurodegeneration. Those of genetic origin are better characterized: some have now been discovered in humans as well. They concern all four PMCA isoforms, and range from cardiac dysfunctions, to deafness, to hypertension, to cerebellar ataxia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium transport across the membrane of Paramecium caudatum (protozoa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinac, B.

    1980-06-01

    Calcium transport across the membrane of Paramecium caudatum was studied by measuring calcium uptake and release by means of flow-through-technique, which was developed especially for this purpose. The method allows continuous flow of the cells suspension with radioactive and inactive solution, respectively, combined with simultaneous electrical stimulation of the cells by means of extracellular electrodes. The results obtained were compared to and interpreted according to behavioral patterns of Paramecium, which were registered by the time exposure dark-field macrophotographic technique under the same experimental conditions. (orig.) [de

  15. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  16. Inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin discriminate endoplasmic reticulum stores of calcium in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, A; Hirsch, D J; Hanley, M R

    1990-01-01

    ATP dependent Ca2+ accumulation into oxalate-loaded rat brain microsomes is potently inhibited by thapsigargin with an IC50 of 2 nM and maximal inhibition at 10 nM. Approximately 15% of the total A23187-releasable microsomal calcium store is insensitive to thapsigargin concentrations up to 100 mi...

  17. Function of endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase in innate immunity-mediated programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohong; Caplan, Jeffrey; Mamillapalli, Padmavathi; Czymmek, Kirk; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) initiated at the pathogen-infected sites during the plant innate immune response is thought to prevent the development of disease. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of an ER-localized type IIB Ca2+-ATPase (NbCA1) that function as a regulator of PCD. Silencing of NbCA1 accelerates viral immune receptor N- and fungal-immune receptor Cf9-mediated PCD, as well as non-host pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and the general elicitor cryptogein-induced cell death. The accelerated PCD rescues loss-of-resistance phenotype of Rar1, HSP90-silenced plants, but not SGT1-silenced plants. Using a genetically encoded calcium sensor, we show that downregulation of NbCA1 results in the modulation of intracellular calcium signalling in response to cryptogein elicitor. We further show that NbCAM1 and NbrbohB function as downstream calcium decoders in N-immune receptor-mediated PCD. Our results indicate that ER-Ca2+-ATPase is a component of the calcium efflux pathway that controls PCD during an innate immune response. PMID:20075858

  18. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH 2 -terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process

  19. Effect of ionizing radiation on catalytic properties of Ca2+-ATP-ase from sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagel', I.M.; Shafranovskaya, E.V.; Gorokh, G.A.; Markova, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    It was studied kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of Ca 2+ -ATP-ase of rat skeletal muscle (membranes of sarcoplasmic reticulum) after irradiation in doses 0,5, 4,0 and 8,0 Gy. It was shown that external gamma-irradiation at different doses changed kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the enzyme of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes of skeletal muscle. These alterations probably correlate with disbalance of hormonal regulation of intracellular calcium metabolism and changes in membrane structure and functions

  20. Binding of Signal Recognition Particle Gives Ribosome/Nascent Chain Complexes a Competitive Advantage in Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhof, Andrea; Rolls, Melissa M.; Jungnickel, Berit; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Rapoport, Tom A.

    1998-01-01

    Most secretory and membrane proteins are sorted by signal sequences to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane early during their synthesis. Targeting of the ribosome-nascent chain complex (RNC) involves the binding of the signal sequence to the signal recognition particle (SRP), followed by an interaction of ribosome-bound SRP with the SRP receptor. However, ribosomes can also independently bind to the ER translocation channel formed by the Sec61p complex. To explain the specificity of membrane targeting, it has therefore been proposed that nascent polypeptide-associated complex functions as a cytosolic inhibitor of signal sequence- and SRP-independent ribosome binding to the ER membrane. We report here that SRP-independent binding of RNCs to the ER membrane can occur in the presence of all cytosolic factors, including nascent polypeptide-associated complex. Nontranslating ribosomes competitively inhibit SRP-independent membrane binding of RNCs but have no effect when SRP is bound to the RNCs. The protective effect of SRP against ribosome competition depends on a functional signal sequence in the nascent chain and is also observed with reconstituted proteoliposomes containing only the Sec61p complex and the SRP receptor. We conclude that cytosolic factors do not prevent the membrane binding of ribosomes. Instead, specific ribosome targeting to the Sec61p complex is provided by the binding of SRP to RNCs, followed by an interaction with the SRP receptor, which gives RNC–SRP complexes a selective advantage in membrane targeting over nontranslating ribosomes. PMID:9436994

  1. Impact of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release on calcium dynamics and action potential morphology in human atrial myocytes: a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi T Koivumäki

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological studies of the human heart face the fundamental challenge that experimental data can be acquired only from patients with underlying heart disease. Regarding human atria, there exist sizable gaps in the understanding of the functional role of cellular Ca²+ dynamics, which differ crucially from that of ventricular cells, in the modulation of excitation-contraction coupling. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model of the human atrial myocyte that, in addition to the sarcolemmal (SL ion currents, accounts for the heterogeneity of intracellular Ca²+ dynamics emerging from a structurally detailed sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. Based on the simulation results, our model convincingly reproduces the principal characteristics of Ca²+ dynamics: 1 the biphasic increment during the upstroke of the Ca²+ transient resulting from the delay between the peripheral and central SR Ca²+ release, and 2 the relative contribution of SL Ca²+ current and SR Ca²+ release to the Ca²+ transient. In line with experimental findings, the model also replicates the strong impact of intracellular Ca²+ dynamics on the shape of the action potential. The simulation results suggest that the peripheral SR Ca²+ release sites define the interface between Ca²+ and AP, whereas the central release sites are important for the fire-diffuse-fire propagation of Ca²+ diffusion. Furthermore, our analysis predicts that the modulation of the action potential duration due to increasing heart rate is largely mediated by changes in the intracellular Na+ concentration. Finally, the results indicate that the SR Ca²+ release is a strong modulator of AP duration and, consequently, myocyte refractoriness/excitability. We conclude that the developed model is robust and reproduces many fundamental aspects of the tight coupling between SL ion currents and intracellular Ca²+ signaling. Thus, the model provides a useful framework for future

  2. The endoplasmic reticulum, not the pH gradient, drives calcium refilling of lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Wuyang; Collier, Crystal MD; Levey, Sara A; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of lysosomal Ca2+ causes lysosome dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), but the mechanisms by which lysosomes acquire and refill Ca2+ are not known. We developed a physiological assay to monitor lysosomal Ca2+ store refilling using specific activators of lysosomal Ca2+ channels to repeatedly induce lysosomal Ca2+ release. In contrast to the prevailing view that lysosomal acidification drives Ca2+ into the lysosome, inhibiting the V-ATPase H+ pump did not prevent Ca2+ refilling. Instead, pharmacological depletion or chelation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ca2+ prevented lysosomal Ca2+ stores from refilling. More specifically, antagonists of ER IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) rapidly and completely blocked Ca2+ refilling of lysosomes, but not in cells lacking IP3Rs. Furthermore, reducing ER Ca2+ or blocking IP3Rs caused a dramatic LSD-like lysosome storage phenotype. By closely apposing each other, the ER may serve as a direct and primary source of Ca2+for the lysosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15887.001 PMID:27213518

  3. Modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by calsequestrin in cardiac myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDOR GYÖRKE

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Calsequestrin (CASQ2 is a high capacity Ca-binding protein expressed inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. Mutations in the cardiac calsequestrin gene (CASQ2 have been linked to arrhythmias and sudden death induced by exercise and emotional stress. We have studied the function of CASQ2 and the consequences of arrhythmogenic CASQ2 mutations on intracellular Ca signalling using a combination of approaches of reverse genetics and cellular physiology in adult cardiac myocytes. We have found that CASQ2 is an essential determinant of the ability of the SR to store and release Ca2+ in cardiac muscle. CASQ2 serves as a reservoir for Ca2+ that is readily accessible for Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR and also as an active Ca2+ buffer that modulates the local luminal Ca-dependent closure of the SR Ca2+ release channels. At the same time, CASQ2 stabilizes the CICR process by slowing the functional recharging of SR Ca2+ stores. Abnormal restitution of the Ca2+ release channels from a luminal Ca-dependent refractory state could account for ventricular arrhythmias associated with mutations in the CASQ2 gene.

  4. Calcium Handling by Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria in a Cell Model of Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mario, Agnese; Scarlatti, Chiara; Costiniti, Veronica; Primerano, Simona; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Calì, Tito; Brini, Marisa; Giacomello, Marta; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the CAG (Q) expansion in exon 1 of the IT15 gene encoding a polyglutamine (poly-Q) stretch of the Huntingtin protein (Htt). In the wild type protein, the repeats specify a stretch of up 34 Q in the N-terminal portion of Htt. In the pathological protein (mHtt) the poly-Q tract is longer. Proteolytic cleavage of the protein liberates an N-terminal fragment containing the expanded poly-Q tract becomes harmful to cells, in particular to striatal neurons. The fragments cause the transcriptional dysfunction of genes that are essential for neuronal survival. Htt, however, could also have non-transcriptional effects, e.g. it could directly alter Ca2+ homeostasis and/or mitochondrial morphology and function. Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction are considered important in the molecular aetiology of the disease. Here we have analyzed the effect of the overexpression of Htt fragments (18Q, wild type form, wtHtt and 150Q mutated form, mHtt) on Ca2+ homeostasis in striatal neuronal precursor cells (Q7/7). We have found that the transient overexpression of the Htt fragments increases Ca2+ transients in the mitochondria of cells stimulated with Ca2+-mobilizing agonists. The bulk Ca2+ transients in the cytosol were unaffected, but the Ca2+ content of the endoplasmic reticulum was significantly decreased in the case of mHtt expression. To rule out possible transcriptional effects due to the presence of mHtt, we have measured the mRNA level of a subunit of the respiratory chain complex II, whose expression is commonly altered in many HD models. No effects on the mRNA level was found suggesting that, in our experimental condition, transcriptional action of Htt is not occurring and that the effects on Ca2+ homeostasis were dependent to non-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:26819834

  5. Calcium Handling by Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria in a Cell Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mario, Agnese; Scarlatti, Chiara; Costiniti, Veronica; Primerano, Simona; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Calì, Tito; Brini, Marisa; Giacomello, Marta; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2016-01-06

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the CAG (Q) expansion in exon 1 of the IT15 gene encoding a polyglutamine (poly-Q) stretch of the Huntingtin protein (Htt). In the wild type protein, the repeats specify a stretch of up 34 Q in the N-terminal portion of Htt. In the pathological protein (mHtt) the poly-Q tract is longer. Proteolytic cleavage of the protein liberates an N-terminal fragment containing the expanded poly-Q tract becomes harmful to cells, in particular to striatal neurons. The fragments cause the transcriptional dysfunction of genes that are essential for neuronal survival. Htt, however, could also have non-transcriptional effects, e.g. it could directly alter Ca2+ homeostasis and/or mitochondrial morphology and function. Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction are considered important in the molecular aetiology of the disease. Here we have analyzed the effect of the overexpression of Htt fragments (18Q, wild type form, wtHtt and 150Q mutated form, mHtt) on Ca2+ homeostasis in striatal neuronal precursor cells (Q7/7). We have found that the transient overexpression of the Htt fragments increases Ca2+ transients in the mitochondria of cells stimulated with Ca2+-mobilizing agonists. The bulk Ca2+ transients in the cytosol were unaffected, but the Ca2+ content of the endoplasmic reticulum was significantly decreased in the case of mHtt expression. To rule out possible transcriptional effects due to the presence of mHtt, we have measured the mRNA level of a subunit of the respiratory chain complex II, whose expression is commonly altered in many HD models. No effects on the mRNA level was found suggesting that, in our experimental condition, transcriptional action of Htt is not occurring and that the effects on Ca2+ homeostasis were dependent to non-transcriptional mechanisms.

  6. Inactivation of the host lipin gene accelerates RNA virus replication through viral exploitation of the expanded endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingkai Chuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses take advantage of cellular resources, such as membranes and lipids, to assemble viral replicase complexes (VRCs that drive viral replication. The host lipins (phosphatidate phosphatases are particularly interesting because these proteins play key roles in cellular decisions about membrane biogenesis versus lipid storage. Therefore, we examined the relationship between host lipins and tombusviruses, based on yeast model host. We show that deletion of PAH1 (phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, which is the single yeast homolog of the lipin gene family of phosphatidate phosphatases, whose inactivation is responsible for proliferation and expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane, facilitates robust RNA virus replication in yeast. We document increased tombusvirus replicase activity in pah1Δ yeast due to the efficient assembly of VRCs. We show that the ER membranes generated in pah1Δ yeast is efficiently subverted by this RNA virus, thus emphasizing the connection between host lipins and RNA viruses. Thus, instead of utilizing the peroxisomal membranes as observed in wt yeast and plants, TBSV readily switches to the vastly expanded ER membranes in lipin-deficient cells to build VRCs and support increased level of viral replication. Over-expression of the Arabidopsis Pah2p in Nicotiana benthamiana decreased tombusvirus accumulation, validating that our findings are also relevant in a plant host. Over-expression of AtPah2p also inhibited the ER-based replication of another plant RNA virus, suggesting that the role of lipins in RNA virus replication might include several more eukaryotic viruses.

  7. Calcium, membranes and accumulation of alkaloids in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovkova, M.Ya.; Buzuk, G.N.; Grinkevich, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    Ca 2+ effect upon metabolism of aporphines and protopines has been studied in Glaucium flavun, which alkaloids are of an essential interest for the medicine practice. It has been shown that calcium produces the inhibiting effect both on catabolitic splitting and metabolism of glaucine and protopine. It has been anticipated that calcuium introduced into an expert plant stabilizes membranes of intracellular structures and prevents 14 C alkaloid entering from an environment to metabolically active cell compartments, which contain ferments realizing transformations of the above compounds. The level of membrane permeability is probably the main mechanism, through which a control of metabolism processes occurs, and hence, a control of alkaloid accumulation processes under in vivo conditions

  8. Revisiting the Latency of Uridine Diphosphate-Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs—How Does the Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Influence Their Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejian Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs are phase 2 conjugation enzymes mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of the liver and many other tissues, and can be recovered in artificial ER membrane preparations (microsomes. They catalyze glucuronidation reactions in various aglycone substrates, contributing significantly to the body’s chemical defense mechanism. There has been controversy over the last 50 years in the UGT field with respect to the explanation for the phenomenon of latency: full UGT activity revealed by chemical or physical disruption of the microsomal membrane. Because latency can lead to inaccurate measurements of UGT activity in vitro, and subsequent underprediction of drug clearance in vivo, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Three major hypotheses have been advanced to explain UGT latency: compartmentation, conformation, and adenine nucleotide inhibition. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind each hypothesis in depth, and suggest some additional studies that may reveal more information on this intriguing phenomenon.

  9. Membrane junctions in xenopus eggs: their distribution suggests a role in calcium regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, DM; Grey, RD

    1983-01-01

    We have observed the presence of membrane junctions formed between the plasma membrane and cortical endoplasmic reticulum of mature, unactivated eggs of xenopus laevis. The parallel, paired membranes of the junction are separated by a 10-mn gap within which electron-dense material is present. This material occurs in patches with an average center-to-center distance of approximately 30 nm. These junctions are rare in immature (but fully grown) oocytes (approximately 2 percent of the plasma mem...

  10. Calcium regulates cell death in cancer: Roles of the mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Alberto; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Previati, Maurizio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Until 1972, the term 'apoptosis' was used to differentiate the programmed cell death that naturally occurs in organismal development from the acute tissue death referred to as necrosis. Many studies on cell death and programmed cell death have been published and most are, at least to some degree, related to cancer. Some key proteins and molecular pathways implicated in cell death have been analyzed, whereas others are still being actively researched; therefore, an increasing number of cellular compartments and organelles are being implicated in cell death and cancer. Here, we discuss the mitochondria and subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria, the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which have been identified as critical hubs in the regulation of cell death and tumor growth. MAMs-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) release from the ER allows selective Ca 2+ uptake by the mitochondria. The perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis in cancer cells is correlated with sustained cell proliferation and the inhibition of cell death through the modulation of Ca 2+ signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction between neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling and temperature influences sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak: role of nitroso-redox balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulce, Raul A; Mayo, Vera; Rangel, Erika B; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M

    2015-01-02

    Although nitric oxide (NO) signaling modulates cardiac function and excitation-contraction coupling, opposing results because of inconsistent experimental conditions, particularly with respect to temperature, confound the ability to elucidate NO signaling pathways. Here, we show that temperature significantly modulates NO effects. To test the hypothesis that temperature profoundly affects nitroso-redox equilibrium, thereby affecting sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium (Ca(2+)) leak. We measured SR Ca(2+) leak in cardiomyocytes from wild-type (WT), NO/redox imbalance (neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice-1 [NOS1(-/-)]), and hyper S-nitrosoglutathione reductase-deficient (GSNOR(-/-)) mice. In WT cardiomyocytes, SR Ca(2+) leak increased because temperature decreased from 37°C to 23°C, whereas in NOS1(-/-) cells, the leak suddenly increased when the temperature surpassed 30°C. GSNOR(-/-) cardiomyocytes exhibited low leak throughout the temperature range. Exogenously added NO had a biphasic effect on NOS1(-/-) cardiomyocytes; reducing leak at 37°C but increasing it at subphysiological temperatures. Oxypurinol and Tempol diminished the leak in NOS1(-/-) cardiomyocytes. Cooling from 37°C to 23°C increased reactive oxygen species generation in WT but decreased it in NOS1(-/-) cardiomyocytes. Oxypurinol further reduced reactive oxygen species generation. At 23°C in WT cells, leak was decreased by tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential NOS cofactor. Cooling significantly increased SR Ca(2+) content in NOS1(-/-) cells but had no effect in WT or GSNOR(-/-). Ca(2+) leak and temperature are normally inversely proportional, whereas NOS1 deficiency reverses this effect, increasing leak and elevating reactive oxygen species production because temperature increases. Reduced denitrosylation (GSNOR deficiency) eliminates the temperature dependence of leak. Thus, temperature regulates the balance between NO and reactive oxygen species which in turn has a major effect on SR

  12. TRPC1, STIM1, and ORAI influence signal-regulated intracellular and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics in human myometrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtazina, Dilyara A; Chung, Daesuk; Ulloa, Aida; Bryan, Emily; Galan, Henry L; Sanborn, Barbara M

    2011-08-01

    To explore the relationship between signal-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and depletion and refilling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores ([Ca(2+)](L)) in human myometrial cells, we measured simultaneous changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and [Ca(2+)](L) using Fura-2 and Mag-fluo-4, respectively, in PHM1-41 immortalized and primary cells derived from pregnant myometrium and in primary cells derived from nonpregnant tissue. Signal- and extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent increases in [Ca(2+)](i) (SRCE) and ER refilling stimulated by oxytocin and cyclopiazonic acid were not inhibited by voltage-operated channel blocker nifedipine or mibefradil, inhibition of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange with KB-R7943, or zero extracellular Na(+) in PHM1-41 cells. Gadolinium-inhibited oxytocin- and cyclopiazonic acid-induced SRCE and slowed ER store refilling. TRPC1 mRNA knockdown specifically inhibited oxytocin-stimulated SRCE but had no statistically significant effect on ER store refilling and no effect on either parameter following cyclopiazonic acid treatment. Dominant negative STIMΔERM expression attenuated oxytocin- and thapsigargin-stimulated SRCE. Both STIM1 and ORAI1-ORAI3 mRNA knockdowns significantly attenuated oxytocin- and cyclopiazonic acid-stimulated SRCE. The data also suggest that reduction in STIM1 or ORAI1-ORAI3 mRNA can impede the rate of ER store refilling following removal of SERCA inhibition. These data provide evidence for both distinct and overlapping influences of TRPC1, STIM1, and ORAI1-ORAI3 on SRCE and ER store refilling in human myometrial cells that may contribute to the regulation of myometrial Ca(2+) dynamics. These findings have important implications for understanding the control of myometrial Ca(2+) dynamics in relation to myometrial contractile function.

  13. Thioredoxin h regulates calcium dependent protein kinases in plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Sazuka, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Mori, Hitoshi; Hisabori, Toru

    2013-07-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a key player in redox homeostasis in various cells, modulating the functions of target proteins by catalyzing a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction. Target proteins of cytosolic Trx-h of higher plants were studied, particularly in the plasma membrane, because plant plasma membranes include various functionally important protein molecules such as transporters and signal receptors. Plasma membrane proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures were screened using a resin Trx-h1 mutant-immobilized, and a total of 48 candidate proteins obtained. These included two calcium-sensing proteins: a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase 2 (AtPLC2) and a calcium-dependent protein kinase 21 (AtCPK21). A redox-dependent change in AtCPK21 kinase activity was demonstrated in vitro. Oxidation of AtCPK21 resulted in a decrease in kinase activity to 19% of that of untreated AtCPK21, but Trx-h1 effectively restored the activity to 90%. An intramolecular disulfide bond (Cys97-Cys108) that is responsible for this redox modulation was then identified. In addition, endogenous AtCPK21 was shown to be oxidized in vivo when the culture cells were treated with H2 O2 . These results suggest that redox regulation of AtCPK21 by Trx-h in response to external stimuli is important for appropriate cellular responses. The relationship between the redox regulation system and Ca(2+) signaling pathways is discussed. © 2013 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  14. Multilayer network representation of membrane potential and cytosolic calcium concentration dynamics in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosak, Marko; Dolenšek, Jurij; Markovič, Rene; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Marhl, Marko; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Physiological processes within and among pancreatic beta cells are very complex. • We analyze the simultaneous recordings of membrane potential and calcium dynamics. • We represent the interaction patterns among beta cells as a multilayer network. • The nature of the intracellular dynamics is found to rely on the network structure. - Abstract: Modern theory of networks has been recognized as a very successful methodological concept for the description and analysis of complex systems. However, some complex systems are more complex than others. For instance, several real-life systems are constituted by interdependent subsystems and their elements are subjected to different types of interactions that can also change with time. Recently, the multilayer network formalism has been proposed as a general theoretical framework for the description and analysis of such multi-dimensional complex systems and is acquiring more and more prominence in terms of a new research direction. In the present study, we use this methodology for the description of functional connectivity patterns and signal propagation between pancreatic beta cells in an islet of Langerhans at the levels of membrane potential (MP) and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca"2"+]_c) dynamics to study the extent of overlap in the two networks and to clarify whether time lags between the two signals in individual cells are in any way dependent on the role these cells play in the functional networks. The two corresponding network layers are constructed on the basis of signal directions and pairwise correlations, whereas the interlayer connections represent the time lag between both measured signals. Our results confirm our previous finding that both MP and [Ca"2"+]_c change spread across an islet in the form of a depolarization and a [Ca"2"+]_c wave, respectively. Both types of waves follow nearly the same path and the networks in both layers have a similar but not entirely the same structure

  15. Targeting of OSBP-related protein 3 (ORP3) to endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane is controlled by multiple determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, Markku; Hynynen, Riikka; Karjalainen, Katja; Kuismanen, Esa; Hyvaerinen, Kati; Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2005-01-01

    The intracellular targeting determinants of oxysterol binding protein (OSBP)-related protein 3 (ORP3) were studied using a series of truncated and point mutated constructs. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of ORP3 binds the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) products, PI(3,4)P 2 and PI(3,4,5)P 3 . A functional PH domain and flanking sequences are crucial for the plasma membrane (PM) targeting of ORP3. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting of ORP3 is regulated the by a FFAT motif (EFFDAxE), which mediates interaction with VAMP-associated protein (VAP)-A. The targeting function of the FFAT motif dominates over that of the PH domain. In addition, the exon 10/11 region modulates interaction of ORP3 with the ER and the nuclear membrane. Analysis of a chimeric ORP3:OSBP protein suggests that ligand binding by the C-terminal domain of OSBP induces allosteric changes that activate the N-terminal targeting modules of ORP3. Notably, over-expression of ORP3 together with VAP-A induces stacked ER membrane structures also known as organized smooth ER (OSER). Moreover, lipid starvation promotes formation of dilated peripheral ER (DPER) structures dependent on the ORP3 protein. Based on the present data, we introduce a model for the inter-relationships of the functional domains of ORP3 in the membrane targeting of the protein

  16. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2A (PP-PP2A) pathway, induced mitochondria fission, and impaired respiration. Blocking MAM reduction counteracted glucose-induced mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, disruption of MAM integrity mimicked effects of glucose on mitochondria dynamics and function. This glucose-sensing system is deficient in the liver of insulin-resistant ob/ob and cyclophilin D-KO mice, both characterized by chronic disruption of MAM integrity, mitochondrial fission, and altered mitochondrial respiration. These data indicate that MAM contribute to the hepatic glucose-sensing system, allowing regulation of mitochondria dynamics and function during nutritional transition. Chronic disruption of MAM may participate in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Free and membrane-bound calcium in microgravity and microgravity effects at the membrane level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    The changes of [Ca^2+]_i controlled is known to play a key regulatory role in numerous cellular processes especially associated with membranes. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated an increase in calcium level in root cells of pea seedlings grown aboard orbital station ``Salyut 6'' /1/. These results: 1) indicate that observed Ca^2+-binding sites of membranes also consist in proteins and phospholipids; 2) suggest that such effects of space flight in membrane Ca-binding might be due to the enhancement of Ca^2+ influx through membranes. In model presented, I propose that Ca^2+-activated channels in plasma membrane in response to microgravity allow the movement of Ca^2+ into the root cells, causing a rise in cytoplasmic free Ca^2+ levels. The latter, in its turn, may induce the inhibition of a Ca^2+ efflux by Ca^2+-activated ATPases and through a Ca^2+/H^+ antiport. It is possible that increased cytosolic levels of Ca^2+ ions have stimulated hydrolysis and turnover of phosphatidylinositols, with a consequent elevation of cytosolic [Ca^2+]_i. Plant cell can response to such a Ca^2+ rise by an enhancement of membranous Ca^2+-binding activities to rescue thus a cell from an abundance of a cytotoxin. A Ca^2+-induced phase separation of membranous lipids assists to appear the structure nonstable zones with high energy level at the boundary of microdomains which are rich by some phospholipid components; there is mixing of molecules of the membranes contacted in these zones, the first stage of membranous fusion, which was found in plants exposed to microgravity. These results support the hypothesis that a target for microgravity effect is the flux mechanism of Ca^2+ to plant cell.

  19. Does Increased Expression of the Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase Isoform 2 Confer Resistance to Apoptosis on Breast Cancer Cells?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    VanHouten, Joshua N

    2008-01-01

    The plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform 2 (PMCA2) is highly expressed on the apical membrane of mammary epithelial cells during lactation, and is the predominant pump responsible for calcium transport into milk...

  20. MicroRNAs and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2 in human myocardial infarction: expression and bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boštjančič, Emanuela; Zidar, Nina; Glavač, Damjan

    2012-10-15

    Cardiac sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2 (SERCA2) plays one of the central roles in myocardial contractility. Both, SERCA2 mRNA and protein are reduced in myocardial infarction (MI), but the correlation has not been always observed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act by targeting 3'-UTR mRNA, causing translational repression in physiological and pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases. One of the aims of our study was to identify miRNAs that could influence SERCA2 expression in human MI. The protein SERCA2 was decreased and 43 miRNAs were deregulated in infarcted myocardium compared to corresponding remote myocardium, analyzed by western blot and microRNA microarrays, respectively. All the samples were stored as FFPE tissue and in RNAlater. miRNAs binding prediction to SERCA2 including four prediction algorithms (TargetScan, PicTar, miRanda and mirTarget2) identified 213 putative miRNAs. TAM and miRNApath annotation of deregulated miRNAs identified 18 functional and 21 diseased states related to heart diseases, and association of the half of the deregulated miRNAs to SERCA2. Free-energy of binding and flanking regions (RNA22, RNAfold) was calculated for 10 up-regulated miRNAs from microarray analysis (miR-122, miR-320a/b/c/d, miR-574-3p/-5p, miR-199a, miR-140, and miR-483), and nine miRNAs deregulated from microarray analysis were used for validation with qPCR (miR-21, miR-122, miR-126, miR-1, miR-133, miR-125a/b, and miR-98). Based on qPCR results, the comparison between FFPE and RNAlater stored tissue samples, between Sybr Green and TaqMan approaches, as well as between different reference genes were also performed. Combing all the results, we identified certain miRNAs as potential regulators of SERCA2; however, further functional studies are needed for verification. Using qPCR, we confirmed deregulation of nine miRNAs in human MI, and show that qPCR normalization strategy is important for the outcome of miRNA expression analysis in human MI.

  1. Cholesterol regulates the endoplasmic reticulum exit of the major membrane protein P0 required for peripheral myelin compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Quintes, Susanne; Möbius, Wiebke; Wehr, Michael C; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Brügger, Britta; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2009-05-13

    Rapid impulse conduction requires electrical insulation of axons by myelin, a cholesterol-rich extension of the glial cell membrane with a characteristic composition of proteins and lipids. Mutations in several myelin protein genes cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention and disease, presumably attributable to failure of misfolded proteins to pass the ER quality control. Because many myelin proteins partition into cholesterol-rich membrane rafts, their interaction with cholesterol could potentially be part of the ER quality control system. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that the major peripheral myelin protein P0 requires cholesterol for exiting the ER and reaching the myelin compartment. Cholesterol dependency of P0 trafficking in heterologous cells is mediated by a cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif. Mutant mice lacking cholesterol biosynthesis in Schwann cells suffer from severe hypomyelination with numerous uncompacted myelin stretches. This demonstrates that high-level cholesterol coordinates P0 export with myelin membrane synthesis, which is required for the correct stoichiometry of myelin components and for myelin compaction.

  2. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry and activation of CaMs and CDPKs leading to copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa eGómez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1 and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9 and 12 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF, HC-030031 (HC and capsazepin (CPZ, respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9 and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1 and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require CaMs and CDPKs activation. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8 and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating copper entry through TRP channels leading to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that CaMs and CDPKs are required in order to activate TRPs to allow copper entry. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1 and V1 promotes extracellular calcium entry leading to activation of CaMs and CDPKs which, in turn, promotes copper entry through these TRP channels leading to membrane depolarization.

  3. Glucagon effects on the membrane potential and calcium uptake rate of rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingrove, D.E.; Amatruda, J.M.; Gunter, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    It has been widely reported that the in vivo administration of glucagon to rats results in the stimulation of calcium influx in subsequently isolated liver mitochondria. The mechanism of this effect is investigated through simultaneous measurements of calcium uptake rate and mitochondrial membrane potential. This allows the measurement of the calcium uniporter conductance independent of hormonal effects on electron transport or respiration. Two experimental approaches are used. The first involves measuring the uptake of 40-50 nmol of Ca 2+ /mg of mitochondrial protein with the calcium dye antipyrylazo III; the second uses 45 Ca 2+ to follow uptake in the presence of 0.5 to 1.5 μM free calcium, buffered with HEDTA. In both cases a tetraphenyl phosphonium electrode is used to follow membrane potential, and membrane potential is varied using either malonate or butylmalonate in the presence of rotenone. The relative merits of these two approaches are discussed. The conductance of the calcium uniporter is found not to be stimulated by glucagon pretreatment. Also, the relative glucagon stimulation of both calcium influx and membrane potential is found to increase with increasing malonate concentration. These results imply that there is no direct stimulation of calcium uptake into liver mitochondria following glucagon treatment. The results are consistent with a glucagon stimulation of substrate transport, substrate oxidation, or a stimulation of electron transport resulting in an increased membrane potential and secondary stimulation of calcium uptake

  4. Cytosolic calcium homeostasis in fungi: Roles of plasma membrane transport and intracellular sequestration of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.J.; Vogg, G.; Sanders, D.

    1990-01-01

    Cytosolic free calcium ([Ca 2+ ] c ) has been measured in the mycelial fungus Neurospora crassa with Ca 2+ - selective microelectrodes. The mean value of [Ca 2+ ] c is 92 ± 15 nM and it is insensitive to external pH values between 5.8 and 8.4. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential enables the electrochemical potential difference for Ca 2+ across the plasma membrane to be estimated as about -60 kJmol -1 - a value that cannot be sustained either by a simple Ca 2+ - ATPase, or, in alkaline conditions, by straightforward H + /Ca 2+ exchange with a stoichiometric ratio of + /Ca 2+ . The authors propose that the most likely alternative mechanism of Ca 2+ efflux is ATP-driven H + /Ca 2+ exchange, with a stoichiometric ratio of at least 2 H + /Ca 2+ . The increase in [Ca 2+ ] c in the presence of CN - at pH 8.4 is compared with 45 Ca 2+ influx under the same conditions. The proportion of entering Ca 2+ remaining free in the cytosol is only 8 x 10 -5 , and since the concentration of available chelation sites on Ca 2+ binding proteins is unlikely to exceed 100 μM, a major role for the fungal vacuole in short-term Ca 2+ homeostasis is indicated. This notion is supported by the observation that cytosolic Ca 2+ homeostasis is disrupted by a protonophore, which rapidly abolishes the driving force for Ca 2+ uptake into fungal vacuoles

  5. Localization of ras antigenicity in rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and rough endoplasmic reticulum fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, J.M.; Lanoix, J.; Paiement, J.

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the antigenicity of plasma membrane (PM) and rough microsomal (RM) fractions from rat liver using anti-ras monoclonal antibodies 142-24EO5 and Y13-259 and immunochemistry as well as electron microscope immunocytochemistry. Proteins immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibody 142-24E05 were separated using single-dimensional gradient-gel electrophoresis. The separated proteins were then blotted onto nitrocellulose sheets and incubated with [alpha-32P]GTP. Radioautograms of blots indicated the presence of specific 21.5- and 22-kDa labeled proteins in the PM fraction. A 23.5-kDa [alpha- 32 P] GTP-binding protein was detected in immunoprecipitates of both PM and RM fractions. Monoclonal antibody Y13-259 reacted only with the 21.5-kDa [alpha- 32 P] GTP-binding protein in the plasma membrane fraction. When anti-ras monoclonal antibody 142-24E05 and the immunogold technique were applied to membrane fractions using a preembedding immunocytochemical method, specific labeling was observed in association with both vesicular structures and membrane sheets in the PM fraction but only with electron-dense vesicular structures in the RM fraction. Thus ras antigenicity is associated with hepatocyte plasma membranes and ras-like antigenicity is probably associated with vesicular (secretory/endocytic) elements in both plasma membrane and rough microsomal preparations

  6. Pentylenetetrazol modulates redox system by inducing addicsin translocation from endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane in NG108-15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsushi J. Ikemoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Addicsin (Arl6ip5 is a multifunctional physiological and pathophysiological regulator that exerts its effects by readily forming homo- and hetero-complexes with various functional factors. In particular, addicsin acts as a negative modulator of neural glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1 and participates in the regulation of intracellular glutathione (GSH content by negatively modulating EAAC1-mediated cysteine and glutamate uptake. Addicsin is considered to play a crucial role in the onset of neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy. However, the molecular dynamics of addicsin remains largely unknown. Here, we report the dynamics of addicsin in NG108-15 cells upon exposure to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, a representative epileptogenic agent acting on the gamma-Aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptor. Fluorescent immunostaining analysis demonstrated that addicsin drastically changed its localization from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the plasma membrane within 1 h of PTZ exposure in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, addicsin was co-localized with the plasma membrane markers EAAC1 and Na+/K+ ATPase alpha-3 upon PTZ stimulation. This translocation was significantly inhibited by a non-competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, picrotoxin, but not by a competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical-scavenging assay showed that PTZ-induced addicsin translocation was accompanied by a decrease of radical-scavenging activity and an increase of cytotoxicity in a PTZ dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that PTZ induces the translocation of addicsin from the ER to the plasma membrane and modulates the redox system by regulating EAAC1-mediated GSH synthesis, which leads to the activation of cell death signaling.

  7. Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins that facilitate ER-to-Golgi transport of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Walter, P

    1999-04-01

    Many eukaryotic cell surface proteins are anchored in the lipid bilayer through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). GPI anchors are covalently attached in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The modified proteins are then transported through the secretory pathway to the cell surface. We have identified two genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LAG1 and a novel gene termed DGT1 (for "delayed GPI-anchored protein transport"), encoding structurally related proteins with multiple membrane-spanning domains. Both proteins are localized to the ER, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Deletion of either gene caused no detectable phenotype, whereas lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells displayed growth defects and a significant delay in ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that LAG1 and DGT1 encode functionally redundant or overlapping proteins. The rate of GPI anchor attachment was not affected, nor was the transport rate of several non-GPI-anchored proteins. Consistent with a role of Lag1p and Dgt1p in GPI-anchored protein transport, lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells deposit abnormal, multilayered cell walls. Both proteins have significant sequence similarity to TRAM, a mammalian membrane protein thought to be involved in protein translocation across the ER membrane. In vivo translocation studies, however, did not detect any defects in protein translocation in lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells, suggesting that neither yeast gene plays a role in this process. Instead, we propose that Lag1p and Dgt1p facilitate efficient ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins.

  8. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  9. Ist2 in the yeast cortical endoplasmic reticulum promotes trafficking of the amino acid transporter Bap2 to the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendelin Wolf

    Full Text Available The equipment of the plasma membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with specific nutrient transporters is highly regulated by transcription, translation and protein trafficking allowing growth in changing environments. The activity of these transporters depends on a H(+ gradient across the plasma membrane generated by the H(+-ATPase Pma1. We found that the polytopic membrane protein Ist2 in the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER is required for efficient leucine uptake during the transition from fermentation to respiration. Experiments employing tandem fluorescence timer protein tag showed that Ist2 was necessary for efficient trafficking of newly synthesized leucine transporter Bap2 from the ER to the plasma membrane. This finding explains the growth defect of ist2Δ mutants during nutritional challenges and illustrates the important role of physical coupling between cortical ER and plasma membrane.

  10. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  11. Suppression of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium pump during zebrafish gastrulation affects left-right asymmetry of the heart and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiling, Jill A; Balantac, Zaneta L; Crawford, Andrew R; Ren, Yuexin; Toure, Jamal; Zchut, Sigalit; Kochilas, Lazaros; Creton, Robbert

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate embryos generate striking Ca(2+) patterns, which are unique regulators of dynamic developmental events. In the present study, we used zebrafish embryos as a model system to examine the developmental roles of Ca(2+) during gastrulation. We found that gastrula stage embryos maintain a distinct pattern of cytosolic Ca(2+) along the dorsal-ventral axis, with higher Ca(2+) concentrations in the ventral margin and lower Ca(2+) concentrations in the dorsal margin and dorsal forerunner cells. Suppression of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump with 0.5 microM thapsigargin elevates cytosolic Ca(2+) in all embryonic regions and induces a randomization of laterality in the heart and brain. Affected hearts, visualized in living embryos by a subtractive imaging technique, displayed either a reversal or loss of left-right asymmetry. Brain defects include a left-right reversal of pitx2 expression in the dorsal diencephalon and a left-right reversal of the prominent habenular nucleus in the brain. Embryos are sensitive to inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump during early and mid gastrulation and lose their sensitivity during late gastrulation and early segmentation. Suppression of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump during gastrulation inhibits expression of no tail (ntl) and left-right dynein related (lrdr) in the dorsal forerunner cells and affects development of Kupffer's vesicle, a ciliated organ that generates a counter-clockwise flow of fluid. Previous studies have shown that Ca(2+) plays a role in Kupffer's vesicle function, influencing ciliary motility and translating the vesicle's counter-clockwise flow into asymmetric patterns of gene expression. The present results suggest that Ca(2+) plays an additional role in the formation of Kupffer's vesicle.

  12. Calcium plays a key role in paraoxon-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells by regulating both endoplasmic reticulum- and mitochondria-associated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Du, Yi; Ju, Furong; Ma, Shunxiang; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxon (POX) is one of the most toxic organophosphorus pesticides, but its toxic mechanisms associated with apoptosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate calcium-associated mechanisms in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells. EL4 cells were exposed to POX for 0-16 h. EGTA was used to chelate Ca(2+ ) in extracellular medium, and heparin and procaine were used to inhibit Ca(2+ )efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Z-ATAD-FMK was used to inhibit caspase-12 activity. The apoptotic rate assay, western blotting and immunocytochemistry (ICC) were used to reveal the mechanisms of POX-induced apoptosis. POX significantly increased the expression and activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, enhanced expression of calpain 1 and calpain 2, and induced the release of cyt c, but did not change the expression of Grp 78. Inhibiting caspase-12 activity alleviated POX-induced upregulation of calpain 1 and caspase-3, promoted POX-induced upregulation of calpain 2, and reduced POX-induced cyt c release, suggesting that there was a cross-talk between the ER-associated pathway and mitochondria-associated apoptotic signals. Attenuating intracellular calcium concentration with EGTA, heparin or procaine decreased POX-induced upregulation of calpain 1, calpain 2, caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced POX-induced cyt c release. After pretreatment with EGTA or procaine, POX significantly promoted expression of Grp 78. Calcium played a key role in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells by regulating both ER- and mitochondria-associated pathways. The cross-talk of ER- and mitochondria-associated pathways was accomplished through calcium signal.

  13. Radioresistant Spodoptera frugiperda 9 insect cells display excessive resistance to 'endoplasmic reticulum' stress and calcium disturbances via pre-emptive activation of unfolded protein response pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guleria, Ayushi; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) performs multiple cellular functions such as proper folding of newly synthesized proteins and calcium homeostasis. ER stress triggers unfolded protein response (UPR) that attempts to restore normal ER function and resists damage-induced cell death. Lepidopteran Sf9 insect cells (derived from Spodoptera frugiperda) display 100-200 times higher radioresistance than mammalian cells. We have earlier reported that gamma-radiation doses <1000 Gy fail to trigger increase in cytosolic calcium in Sf9 cells, indicating resilience to calcium/ ER disturbances

  14. Three-dimensional organization of a transcellular tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of Reissner's membrane in the guinea-pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen

    1990-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the epithelial cells of Reissner's membrane (membrana vestibularis) in the guinea-pig is described following vascular perfusion with glutaraldehyde of live, anaesthetised and artificially respirated animals. Postfixation in a solution containing OsO4 and potassium ferricyanide...... revealed a well-developed tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, not previously described, the continuity of which has been mapped by serial sectioning and reconstruction. Large disc-shaped subsurface cisternae lining the cell membrane, but separated from it by a space approximately 10 nm wide...... is compared to other techniques used for preservation of Reissner's membrane. Each epithelial cell of Reissner's membrane is endowed with one kinocilium, one to four multivesicular bodies, and a number of intercalated bodies. The functional significance of the canalicular pathway is discussed....

  15. Disruption of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane (MAM) Integrity Contributes to Muscle Insulin Resistance in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Emily; Chanon, Stéphanie; Robert, Maud; Bendridi, Nadia; Bidaux, Gabriel; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Ji-Cao, Jingwei; Durand, Christine; Gauvrit-Ramette, Daphné; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    Modifications of the interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), were recently shown to be involved in the control of hepatic insulin action and glucose homeostasis, but with conflicting results. Whereas skeletal muscle is the primary site of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and the main target for alterations in insulin-resistant states, the relevance of MAM integrity in muscle insulin resistance is unknown. Deciphering the importance of MAMs on muscle insulin signaling could help to clarify this controversy. Here, we show in skeletal muscle of different mice models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) a marked disruption of ER-mitochondria interactions as an early event preceding mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Furthermore, in human myotubes, palmitate-induced insulin resistance is associated with a reduction of structural and functional ER-mitochondria interactions. Importantly, experimental increase of ER-mitochondria contacts in human myotubes prevents palmitate-induced alterations of insulin signaling and action, whereas disruption of MAM integrity alters the action of the hormone. Lastly, we found an association between altered insulin signaling and ER-mitochondria interactions in human myotubes from obese subjects with or without T2D compared with healthy lean subjects. Collectively, our data reveal a new role of MAM integrity in insulin action of skeletal muscle and highlight MAM disruption as an essential subcellular alteration associated with muscle insulin resistance in mice and humans. Therefore, reduced ER-mitochondria coupling could be a common alteration of several insulin-sensitive tissues playing a key role in altered glucose homeostasis in the context of obesity and T2D. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Characterization of transport of calcium by microsomal membranes from roots maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates calcium transport by membranes of roots of maize isolated by differential centrifugation. The preparation was determined to be enriched in plasma membrane using market enzyme and electron microscopy. Using the 45 Ca filtration technique and liquid scintillation counting, vesicular calcium uptake was shown to be stimulated by added calmodulin and specific for and dependent on ATP. Conditions for maximal calcium accumulation were found to be 30 min incubation in the presence of 5 mM ATP, 5 mM MgCl 2 , 50 μM CaCl 2 , at 23 0 C, and at pH 6.5. Calcium uptake was inhibited by the ionophores A23187, X-537A, and ionomycin. Sodium fluoride, ruthenium red, and p-chloromercuribenzoate completely inhibited transport: diamide and vanadate produced slight inhibition; caffeine, caffeic acid, oligomycin, and ouabain produced little or no inhibition. Chlorpromazine, W7, trifluoperazine, and R 24 571 inhibit calcium uptake irrespective of added calmodulin, while W5 showed little effect on uptake. Verapamil, nifedipine, cinnarizine, flunarizine, lidoflazine, and diltiazem decreased calcium uptake by 17%-50%. Electron microscopic localization of calcium by pyroantimonate showed vesicles incubated with calmodulin and ATP showed the greatest amount of precipitate. These results suggest that these vesicles accumulate calcium in an ATP-dependent, calmodulin-stimulated manner

  17. Rhein triggers apoptosis via induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, caspase-4 and intracellular calcium in primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KoraMagazi, Arouna [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Dandan [Department of Pharmacology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yousef, Bashir; Guerram, Mounia [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yu, Feng, E-mail: yufengcpu14@yahoo.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Pharmacology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-04-22

    Rhein is an active component of rhubarb; a traditional Chinese medicine reported to induce apoptosis and cause liver toxicity. However, rhein's apoptotic-inducing effects, as well as its molecular mechanisms of action on hepatic cells need to be further explored. In the present study, rhein was found to trigger apoptosis in primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells as showed by annexin V/PI double staining assay and nuclear morphological changes demonstrated by Hoechst 33258 staining. Moreover, it was observed that the mechanism implicated in rhein-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent, presumably via ER-stress associated pathways, as illustrated by up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP 78), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Meanwhile, caspase-4 as a hallmark of ER-stress, was also showed to be activated following by caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, rhein also promoted intracellular elevation of calcium that contributed in apoptosis induction. Interestingly, pre-treatment with calpain inhibitor I reduced the effects of rhein on apoptosis induction and JNK activation. These data suggested that rhein-induced apoptosis through ER-stress and elevated intracellular calcium level in HL-7702 cells. - Highlights: • Rhein triggers apoptotic cell death on primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells. • Rhein leads to caspase-4 activation in HL-7702 cells. • Rhein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways in HL-7702 cells. • Rhein causes elevation of intracellular calcium concentrations in HL-7702 cells.

  18. Determination of the separate lipid and protein profile structures derived from the total membrane profile structure or isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum via x-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbette, L.; Blasie, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes were prepared to contain biosynthetically deuterated SR phospholipids utilizing specific and general phospholipid exchange proteins (PLEP). Functional measurements and freeze fracture on SR dispersions and x-ray diffraction of hydrated oriented membrane multilayers revealed that the exchanged SR membranes were very similar to unexchanged SR membranes. Low resolution (28-A) neutron diffraction studies utilizing SR membranes exchanged with either protonated or perdeuterated SR phospholipids allowed direct determination of the lipid profile within the isolated SR membrane at two different unit cell repeat distances. These lipid profile structures were found to be highly asymmetric regarding the conformation of the fatty acid chain extents and compositional distribution of phospholipid molecules in the inner vs. outer monolayer of the SR membrane bilayer. The relatively high resolution (11-A) electron-density profile from x-ray diffraction was decomposed by utilizing the asymmetry in the number of phospholipid molecules residing in the inner vs. outer monolayer of the SR lipid bilayer as obtained from the neutron diffraction study. To our knowledge, this represents the first direct determination of a lipid bilayer profile structure within an isolated membrane system

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the world has seen an alarming increase in obesity and closely associated with insulin resistance which is a state of low-grade inflammation, the latter characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and tissues. A shift in energy balance alters systemic metabolic regulation and the important role that chronic inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) play in this process.Why obesity is so closely associated with insulin resistance and inflammation is not understood well. This suggests that there are probably other causes for obesity-related insulin resistance and inflammation. One of these appears to be endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.The ER is a vast membranous network responsible for the trafficking of a wide range of proteins and plays a central role in integrating multiple metabolic signals critical in cellular homeostasis. Conditions that may trigger unfolded protein response activation include increased protein synthesis, the presence of mutant or misfolded proteins, inhibition of protein glycosylation, imbalance of ER calcium levels, glucose and energy deprivation, hypoxia, pathogens or pathogen-associated components and toxins. Thus, characterizing the mechanisms contributing to obesity and identifying potential targets for its prevention and treatment will have a great impact on the control of associated conditions, particularly T2D.

  20. Membrane potential, serum calcium and serum selenium decrease in preeclampsia subjects in Owerri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnkennedy Nnodim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Pre-eclampsia is a serious hypertensive condition of pregnancy associated with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Women who have had pre-eclampsia have a greater risk of developing hypertension, stroke and ischemic heart disease in later life. The etiology of pre-eclampsia remains unclear. Placental insufficiency plays a key role in the progression of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine membrane potential, serum calcium and serum selenium levels in preeclampsia subjects in Owerri.   Methods A case control study involving 200 primigravida (100 preeclamptic and 100 apparently healthy between the ages of 20 and 32 years attending General Hospital Owerri. Fasting venous blood was collected for the determination of serum selenium and serum calcium while membrane potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. The serum calcium was estimated using Randox Kit and serum selenium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The Independent Student t test was used for statistical analysis.   Results The results revealed that membrane potential and serum selenium as well as serum calcium were significantly decreased in preeclampsia when compared with the controls, at p<0.05.   Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the decrease in membrane potential, serum calcium and serum selenium levels may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. There may be a need for increasing the dietary intake of these essential trace metals during pregnancy to prevent pre-eclampsia in Owerri.

  1. Size of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Neurospora crassa determined by radiation inactivation and comparison with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase from skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.J.; Berenski, C.J.; Jung, C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Using radiation inactivation, the authors have measured the size of the H + -ATPase in Neurospora crassa plasma membranes. Membranes were exposed to either high energy electrons from a Van de Graaff generator or to gamma irradiation from 60 Co. Both forms of radiation caused an exponential loss of ATPase activity in parallel with the physical destruction of the Mr = 104,000 polypeptide of which this enzyme is composed. By applying target theory, the size of the H + -ATPase in situ was found to be approximately 2.3 X 10(5) daltons. They also used radiation inactivation to measure the size of the Ca 2+ -ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and got a value of approximately 2.4 X 10(5) daltons, in agreement with previous reports. By irradiating a mixture of Neurospora plasma membranes and rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, they directly compared the sizes of these two ATPases and found them to be essentially the same. The authors conclude that both H + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase are oligomeric enzymes, most likely composed of two approximately 100,000-dalton polypeptides

  2. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  3. The amino-terminal 200 amino acids of the plasma membrane Na+,K+-ATPase alpha subunit confer ouabain sensitivity on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, T; Takeyasu, K

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides such as G-strophanthin (ouabain) bind to and inhibit the plasma membrane Na+,K(+)-ATPase but not the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase, whereas thapsigargin specifically blocks the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase. The chimera [n/c]CC, in which the amino-terminal amino acids Met1 to Asp162 of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1) were replaced with the corresponding portion of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit (Met1 to Asp200), retained thapsigargin- and Ca(2+)-sensitive ATPase activity,...

  4. Simulation of polyethylene glycol and calcium-mediated membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannuzzo, Martina; De Jong, Djurre H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Raudino, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of membrane fusion mediated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Ca 2+ by means of a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation approach. Our data provide a detailed view on the role of cations and polymer in modulating the interaction between negatively charged apposed membranes. The PEG chains cause a reduction of the inter-lamellar distance and cause an increase in concentration of divalent cations. When thermally driven fluctuations bring the membranes at close contact, a switch from cis to trans Ca 2+ -lipid complexes stabilizes a focal contact acting as a nucleation site for further expansion of the adhesion region. Flipping of lipid tails induces subsequent stalk formation. Together, our results provide a molecular explanation for the synergistic effect of Ca 2+ and PEG on membrane fusion

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Calcium Dysregulation and Altered Protein Translation: Intersection of Processes That Contribute to Cancer Cachexia Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Stephanie T; Tan, Timothy C; Polly, Patsie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating paraneoplastic wasting syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle depletion and unintentional weight loss. It affects up to 50-80% of patients with cancer and directly accounts for one-quarter of cancer-related deaths due to cardio-respiratory failure. Muscle weakness, one of the hallmarks of this syndrome, has been postulated to be due to a combination of muscle breakdown, dysfunction and decrease in the ability to repair, with effective treatment strategies presently limited. Excessive inflammatory cytokine levels due to the host-tumor interaction, such as Interleukin (IL)-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α, are hypothesised to drive this pathological process but the specific mechanisms by which these cytokines produce skeletal muscle dysfunction in cancer cachexia remain undefined. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress and the associated disruptions in calcium signaling have been implicated in cytokine-mediated disruptions in skeletal muscle and function. Disrupted ER stress-related processes such as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), calcium homeostasis and altered muscle protein synthesis have been reported in clinical and experimental cachexia and other inflammation-driven muscle diseases such as myositis, potentially suggesting a link between increased IL-6 and TNF-α and ER stress in skeletal muscle cells. As the concept of upregulated ER stress in skeletal muscle cells due to elevated cytokines is novel and potentially very relevant to our understanding of cancer cachexia, this review aims to examine the potential relationship between inflammatory cytokine mediated muscle breakdown and ER stress, in the context of cancer cachexia, and to discuss the molecular signaling pathways underpinning this pathology.

  6. Active calcium transport in plasma membrane vesicles from developing cotyledons of common bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianzhong; Chen Ziyuan

    1995-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles were prepared from the developing cotyledons of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L cv Diyundou) by aqueous two-phase partitioning and characterized as to their purity by assaying marker enzymes for other membranes. The putative plasma membrane fraction was minimally contaminated by membranes other than plasma membrane and hence was of high purity. It exhibited a Ca 2+ -dependent ATPase activity, which was inhibited by 1 μmol/L EB and promoted by calcium ionophore A23187. Such an activity was responsible for the observed ATP-dependent 45 Ca 2+ uptake into inside-out plasma membrane vesicles. This process was stimulated by 0.6 μmol/L CaM and 20 μmol/L IAA but inhibited by 2 μmol/L ABA and abolished by A23187. Possible role of cytoplasmic Ca 2+ in mediating phytohormones activity is discussed

  7. Physiological implications of seasonal variation in membrane-associated calcium in red spruce mesophyll cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.H. DeHayes; P.G. Schaberg; G.J. Hawley; C.H. Borer; J.R. Cumming; J.R. Strimbeck

    1997-01-01

    We examined the pattern of seasonal variation in total foliar calcium (Ca) pools and plasma membrane-associated Ca (mCa) in mesophyll cells of current-year and 1-year-old needles of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and the relationship between mCa and total foliar Ca on an individual plant and seasonal basis. Foliar samples were collected from...

  8. PIN6 auxin transporter at endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane mediates auxin homeostasis and organogenesis in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simon, S.; Skůpa, Petr; Viaene, T.; Zwiewka, M.; Tejos, R.; Klíma, Petr; Čarná, Mária; Rolčík, J.; De Rycke, R.; Moreno, I.; Dobrev, Petre; Orellana, A.; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 1 (2016), s. 65-74 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-10948S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : auxin * endoplasmic reticulum (ER) * lateral root Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 7.330, year: 2016

  9. Zinc oxide nanoparticles decrease the expression and activity of plasma membrane calcium ATPase, disrupt the intracellular calcium homeostasis in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dadong; Bi, Hongsheng; Wang, Daoguang; Wu, Qiuxin

    2013-08-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticle is one of the most important materials with diverse applications. However, it has been reported that zinc oxide nanoparticles are toxic to organisms, and that oxidative stress is often hypothesized to be an important factor in cytotoxicity mediated by zinc oxide nanoparticles. Nevertheless, the mechanism of toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles has not been completely understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles and the possible molecular mechanism involved in calcium homeostasis mediated by plasma membrane calcium ATPase in rat retinal ganglion cells. Real-time cell electronic sensing assay showed that zinc oxide nanoparticles could exert cytotoxic effect on rat retinal ganglion cells in a concentration-dependent manner; flow cytometric analysis indicated that zinc oxide nanoparticles could lead to cell damage by inducing the overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, zinc oxide nanoparticles could also apparently decrease the expression level and their activity of plasma membrane calcium ATPase, which finally disrupt the intracellular calcium homeostasis and result in cell death. Taken together, zinc oxide nanoparticles could apparently decrease the plasma membrane calcium ATPase expression, inhibit their activity, cause the elevated intracellular calcium ion level and disrupt the intracellular calcium homeostasis. Further, the disrupted calcium homeostasis will trigger mitochondrial dysfunction, generate excessive reactive oxygen species, and finally initiate cell death. Thus, the disrupted calcium homeostasis is involved in the zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced rat retinal ganglion cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased Binding of Calcium Ions at Positively Curved Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magarkar, Aniket; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Allolio, Christoph; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2017), s. 518-523 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1102 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : molecular dynamics * fluorescence spectroscopy * calcium * phospholipids Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  11. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)LY186126, an analogue of indolidan (LY195115), to cardiac membranes enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, R.F.; Utterback, B.G.; Robertson, D.W.

    1989-05-01

    LY186126 was found to be a potent inhibitor of type IV cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of canine cardiac muscle. This compound, a close structural analogue of indolidan (LY195115), was prepared in high specific activity, tritiated form to study the positive inotropic receptor(s) for cardiotonic phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as indolidan and milrinone. A high-affinity binding site for (/sup 3/H)LY186126 was observed (Kd = 4 nM) in purified preparations of canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Binding was proportional to vesicle protein, was inactivated by subjecting membranes to proteolysis or boiling, and was dependent on added Mg2+. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of a single class of binding sites in the membrane preparation. Indolidan, milrinone, and LY186126 (all at 1 microM) produced essentially complete displacement of bound (/sup 3/H)LY186126, while nifedipine, propranolol, and prazosin had little or no effect at this concentration. This represents the first reported use of a radioactive analogue to label the inotropic receptor for cardiotonic phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The results suggest that (/sup 3/H)LY186126 is a useful radioligand for examining the subcellular site(s) responsible for positive inotropic effects of these drugs.

  12. Specific binding of [3H]LY186126, an analogue of indolidan (LY195115), to cardiac membranes enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.F.; Utterback, B.G.; Robertson, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    LY186126 was found to be a potent inhibitor of type IV cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of canine cardiac muscle. This compound, a close structural analogue of indolidan (LY195115), was prepared in high specific activity, tritiated form to study the positive inotropic receptor(s) for cardiotonic phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as indolidan and milrinone. A high-affinity binding site for [ 3 H]LY186126 was observed (Kd = 4 nM) in purified preparations of canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Binding was proportional to vesicle protein, was inactivated by subjecting membranes to proteolysis or boiling, and was dependent on added Mg2+. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of a single class of binding sites in the membrane preparation. Indolidan, milrinone, and LY186126 (all at 1 microM) produced essentially complete displacement of bound [ 3 H]LY186126, while nifedipine, propranolol, and prazosin had little or no effect at this concentration. This represents the first reported use of a radioactive analogue to label the inotropic receptor for cardiotonic phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The results suggest that [ 3 H]LY186126 is a useful radioligand for examining the subcellular site(s) responsible for positive inotropic effects of these drugs

  13. Routine detection of calcium-binding proteins following their adsorption to nitrocellulose membrane filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hincke, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    A routine semiquantitative procedure which permits soluble calcium-binding proteins to be detected following their adsorption to nitrocellulose membrane filters by liquid scintillation counting of specifically bound 45 Ca is described. Proteins with high affinity for calcium such as calmodulin and troponin can be detected with a detection threshold of about 2 μg per 400 μl. Modifications to decrease this limit are feasible and are discussed. This technique should allow calcium-binding proteins of unknown function to be assayed during their purification. It was necessary to treat solutions containing 45 Ca with chelex-100 in order to prevent loss of calcium binding which occurred as the decay product (SC 3+ ) accumulated, suggesting that all studies utilizing 45 Ca as a tracer should evaluate possible interference by this ion

  14. Membrane properties involved in calcium-stimulated microparticle release from the plasma membranes of S49 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lauryl E; Nelson, Jennifer; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2014-01-01

    This study answered the question of whether biophysical mechanisms for microparticle shedding discovered in platelets and erythrocytes also apply to nucleated cells: cytoskeletal disruption, potassium efflux, transbilayer phospholipid migration, and membrane disordering. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, disrupted the actin cytoskeleton of S49 lymphoma cells and produced rapid release of microparticles. This release was significantly inhibited by interventions that impaired calcium-activated potassium current. Microparticle release was also greatly reduced in a lymphocyte cell line deficient in the expression of scramblase, the enzyme responsible for calcium-stimulated dismantling of the normal phospholipid transbilayer asymmetry. Rescue of the scrambling function at high ionophore concentration also resulted in enhanced particle shedding. The effect of membrane physical properties was addressed by varying the experimental temperature (32-42°C). A significant positive trend in the rate of microparticle release as a function of temperature was observed. Fluorescence experiments with trimethylammonium diphenylhexatriene and Patman revealed significant decrease in the level of apparent membrane order along that temperature range. These results demonstrated that biophysical mechanisms involved in microparticle release from platelets and erythrocytes apply also to lymphocytes.

  15. Sterol-induced Dislocation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase from Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes into the Cytosol through a Subcellular Compartment Resembling Lipid Droplets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Isamu Z.; Liu, Pingsheng; Zehmer, John K.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Jo, Youngah; Anderson, Richard G. W.; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-induced binding to Insigs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) allows for ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. This ubiquitination marks reductase for recognition by the ATPase VCP/p97, which mediates extraction and delivery of reductase from ER membranes to cytosolic 26 S proteasomes for degradation. Here, we report that reductase becomes dislocated from ER membranes into the cytosol of sterol-treated cells. This dislocation exhibits an absolute requirement for the actions of Insigs and VCP/p97. Reductase also appears in a buoyant fraction of sterol-treated cells that co-purifies with lipid droplets, cytosolic organelles traditionally regarded as storage depots for neutral lipids such as triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. Genetic, biochemical, and localization studies suggest a model in which reductase is dislodged into the cytosol from an ER subdomain closely associated with lipid droplets. PMID:20406816

  16. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release compared in slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres of mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    2003-08-15

    Experiments were carried out to compare the amplitude and time course of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in intact slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse fibres. Individual fibres within small bundles were injected with furaptra, a low-affinity, rapidly responding Ca2+ indicator. In response to a single action potential at 16 degrees C, the peak amplitude and half-duration of the change in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Delta[Ca2+]) differed significantly between fibre types (slow-twitch: peak amplitude, 9.4 +/- 1.0 microM (mean +/- S.E.M.); half-duration, 7.7 +/- 0.6 ms; fast-twitch: peak amplitude 18.5 +/- 0.5 microM; half-duration, 4.9 +/- 0.3 ms). SR Ca2+ release was estimated from Delta[Ca2+] with a computational model that calculated Ca2+ binding to the major myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers (troponin, ATP and parvalbumin); buffer concentrations and reaction rate constants were adjusted to reflect fibre-type differences. In response to an action potential, the total concentration of released Ca2+ (Delta[CaT]) and the peak rate of Ca2+ release ((d/dt)Delta[CaT]) differed about 3-fold between the fibre types (slow-twitch: Delta[CaT], 127 +/- 7 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 70 +/- 6 microM ms-1; fast-twitch: Delta[CaT], 346 +/- 6 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 212 +/- 4 microM ms-1). In contrast, the half-duration of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] was very similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 1.8 +/- 0.1 ms; fast-twitch, 1.6 +/- 0.0 ms). When fibres were stimulated with a 5-shock train at 67 Hz, the peaks of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] in response to the second and subsequent shocks were much smaller than that due to the first shock; the later peaks, expressed as a fraction of the amplitude of the first peak, were similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 0.2-0.3; fast-twitch, 0.1-0.3). The results support the conclusion that individual SR Ca2+ release units function similarly in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mammalian fibres.

  17. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as versatile carrier for small and large molecules across cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Rotan, Olga; Klesing, Jan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Nalbant, Perihan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Molecular Cell Biology (Germany); Buer, Jan; Knuschke, Torben; Westendorf, Astrid M. [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Medical Microbiology (Germany); Epple, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.epple@uni-due.de [University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The successful transport of molecules across the cell membrane is a key point in biology and medicine. In most cases, molecules alone cannot penetrate the cell membrane, therefore an efficient carrier is needed. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (diameter: 100-250 nm, depending on the functionalization) were loaded with fluorescent oligonucleotides, peptide, proteins, antibodies, polymers or porphyrins and characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Any excess of molecules was removed by ultracentrifugation, and the dissolved molecules at the same concentration were used as control. The uptake of such fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles into HeLa cells was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were able to transport all molecules across the cell membrane, whereas the dissolved molecules alone were taken up only to a very small extent or even not at all.

  18. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as versatile carrier for small and large molecules across cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Rotan, Olga; Klesing, Jan; Nalbant, Perihan; Buer, Jan; Knuschke, Torben; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Epple, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    The successful transport of molecules across the cell membrane is a key point in biology and medicine. In most cases, molecules alone cannot penetrate the cell membrane, therefore an efficient carrier is needed. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (diameter: 100-250 nm, depending on the functionalization) were loaded with fluorescent oligonucleotides, peptide, proteins, antibodies, polymers or porphyrins and characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Any excess of molecules was removed by ultracentrifugation, and the dissolved molecules at the same concentration were used as control. The uptake of such fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles into HeLa cells was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were able to transport all molecules across the cell membrane, whereas the dissolved molecules alone were taken up only to a very small extent or even not at all.

  19. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as versatile carrier for small and large molecules across cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Rotan, Olga; Klesing, Jan; Nalbant, Perihan; Buer, Jan; Knuschke, Torben; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Epple, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The successful transport of molecules across the cell membrane is a key point in biology and medicine. In most cases, molecules alone cannot penetrate the cell membrane, therefore an efficient carrier is needed. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (diameter: 100–250 nm, depending on the functionalization) were loaded with fluorescent oligonucleotides, peptide, proteins, antibodies, polymers or porphyrins and characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Any excess of molecules was removed by ultracentrifugation, and the dissolved molecules at the same concentration were used as control. The uptake of such fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles into HeLa cells was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were able to transport all molecules across the cell membrane, whereas the dissolved molecules alone were taken up only to a very small extent or even not at all.

  20. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, M.S.; Ambudkar, I.S.; Young, E.P.; Naseem, S.M.; Heald, F.P.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect on the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum of an atherogenic (1% cholesterol) diet fed during the neonatal vs the juvenile period of life was studied in Yorkshire swine. Male piglets were randomly assigned at birth to 1 of 4 groups: group I (control), group II (lactation feeding), group III (juvenile period feeding) and group IV (lactation and juvenile feeding). All animals were killed at 55 weeks of age and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) isolated for assay of calcium uptake, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ ATPase activity, and lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The amount of cholesterol/mg SR protein and the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were higher in the animals fed during lactation (groups II and IV) and lower in those fed only during the juvenile period (group III). Phospholipid fatty acid patterns as measured by gas chromatography were unaltered in any group. Calcium uptake was markedly diminished in all experimental conditions: group II 47%, group III 65% and group IV 96%. Compared to the observed changes in calcium transport, the ATP hydrolytic activity was relatively less affected. Only in group IV a significant decrease (41%) was seen. Groups II and III show no change in ATP hydrolytic activity. The decrease in calcium uptake and altered cholesterol/phospholipid ratio without effect on ATP hydrolytic activity is consistent with an uncoupling of calcium transport related to the atherogenic diet in early life. (author)

  1. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Binding to membrane proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum cannot explain the retention of the glucose-regulated protein GRP78 in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, A; Colman, A

    1988-03-01

    We have studied the compartmentation and movement of the rat 78-kd glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and other secretory and membrane proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Full length GRP78, normally found in the lumen of rat endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is localized to a membraneous compartment in oocytes and is not secreted. A truncated GRP78 lacking the C-terminal (KDEL) ER retention signal is secreted, although at a slow rate. When the synthesis of radioactive GRP78 is confined to a polar (animal or vegetal) region of the oocyte and the subsequent movement across the oocyte monitored, we find that both full-length and truncated GRP78 move at similar rates and only slightly slower than a secretory protein, chick ovalbumin. In contrast, a plasma membrane protein (influenza haemagglutinin) and two ER membrane proteins (rotavirus VP10 and a mutant haemagglutinin) remained confined to their site of synthesis. We conclude that the retention of GRP78 in the ER is not due to its tight binding to a membrane-bound receptor.

  3. Binding of [125I]iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.I.; Fitzpatrick, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with [125I] iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for [125I] iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited [125I] iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes

  4. Tributyltin induces apoptotic signaling in hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grondin, Melanie; Marion, Michel; Denizeau, Francine; Averill-Bates, Diana A.

    2007-01-01

    Tri-n-butyltin is a widespread environmental toxicant, which accumulates in the liver. This study investigates whether tri-n-butyltin induces pro-apoptotic signaling in rat liver hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Tri-n-butyltin activated the endoplasmic reticulum pathway of apoptosis, which was demonstrated by the activation of the protease calpain, its translocation to the plasma membrane, followed by cleavage of the calpain substrates, cytoskeletal protein vinculin, and caspase-12. Caspase-12 is localized to the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in apoptosis mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum. Tri-n-butyltin also caused translocation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, events which can activate the mitochondrial death pathway. Tri-n-butyltin induced downstream apoptotic events in rat hepatocytes at the nuclear level, detected by chromatin condensation and by confocal microscopy using acridine orange. We investigated whether the tri-n-butyltin-induced pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes could be linked to perturbation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, using confocal microscopy. Tri-n-butyltin caused changes in intracellular calcium distribution, which were similar to those induced by thapsigargin. Calcium was released from a subcellular compartment, which is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum, into the cytosol. Cytosolic acidification, which is known to trigger apoptosis, also occurred and involved the Cl - /HCO 3 - exchanger. Pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes were inhibited by the calcium chelator, Bapta-AM, and by a calpain inhibitor, which suggests that changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis are involved in tri-n-butyltin-induced apoptotic signaling in rat hepatocytes

  5. Ultrastructure of Reissner's membrane in the rabbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K.; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit......Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit...

  6. A role for protein kinase C in the regulation of membrane fluidity and Ca²(+) flux at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes of HEK293 and Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Meng, Qingli; Jing, Xian; Xu, Pingxiang; Luo, Dali

    2011-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a prominent role in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions, including Ca²(+) signalling. In HEK293 and Jurkat cells, the Ca²(+) release and Ca²(+) uptake stimulated by several different activators were attenuated by activation of PKC with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) and potentiated by PKC inhibition with Gö6983 or knockdown of PKCα or PKCβ using shRNA. Immunostaining and Western blotting analyses revealed that PKCα and PKCβII accumulated at the plasma membrane (PM) and that these isoforms, along with PKCβI, also translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) upon activation with PMA. Measurements of membrane fluidity showed that, like the cell membrane stabilizers bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ursodeoxycholate (UDCA), PMA and OAG significantly reduced the fluidity of both the PM and ER membranes; these effects were blocked in PKC-knockdown cells. Interestingly, both BSA and UDCA inhibited the Ca²(+) responses to agonists to the same extent as PMA, whereas Tween 20, which increases membrane fluidity, raised the internal Ca²(+) concentration. Thus, activation of PKC induces both translocation of PKC to the PM and ER membranes and downregulation of membrane fluidity, thereby negatively modulating Ca²(+) flux. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of membrane protection by 31P-NMR effects of lidocaine on calcium-paradox in myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hirosumi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Teragaki, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Takeda; Ikata, Mari; Ishikawa, Makoto; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    In studying calcium paradox, perfused rat hearts were used to investigate the myocardial protective effects of lidocaine. Intracellular contents of phosphates were measured using the 31 P-NMR method. In hearts reexposed to calcium, following 3 minute calcium-free perfusion, a rapid contracture occurred, followed by rapid and complete disappearance of intracellular phosphates with no resumption of cardiac function. In hearts where lidocaine was administered from the onset of the calcium-free perfusion until 2 minutes following the onset of reexposure to calcium, both intracellular phosphates and cardiac contractility were maintained. Therefore, it can be said that cell membranes were protected by lidocaine

  8. Erythrocyte membrane ATPase and calcium pumping activities in porcine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatte, H.S.; Mickelson, J.R.; Addis, P.B.; Louis, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate possible abnormalities in erythrocyte membrane enzyme activities in the pharmacogenetic disorder MH, membrane ATPase activities have been examined in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from red blood cells of MHS and normal swine. While no differences were noted in Mg2+-ATPase activities, the (Na+, K+)-ATPase activity of MHS erythrocyte ghosts was less than that of normal ghosts. Ca2+-ATPase activity exhibited low- and high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites in both types of erythrocyte ghost. While the Km for Ca2+ was greater for normal than for MHS erythrocyte ghosts at the high-affinity Ca2+-binding site, the reverse was true at the low-affinity Ca2+-binding site. Irrespective of the type of calcium binding site occupied, the Vmax for normal erythrocyte ghost Ca2+-ATPase activity was greater than that for MHS ghosts. In the presence of calmodulin, there was now no difference between MHS and normal erythrocyte ghosts in either the Km for Ca2+ or the Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase activity. To determine if the calcium pumping activity of intact MHS and normal pig erythrocytes differed, calcium efflux from the 45 Ca-loaded erythrocytes was determined; this activity was significantly greater for MHS than for normal erythrocytes. Thus, the present study confirms that there are abnormalities in the membranes of MHS pig red blood cells. However, we conclude that these abnormalities are unlikely to result in an impaired ability of MHS erythrocytes to regulate their cytosolic Ca2+ concentration

  9. Experimental study of fouling and cleaning of sintered stainless steel membrane in electro-microfiltration of calcium salt particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Frank G F; Mawson, John; Zeng, Xin An

    2011-05-30

    Sintered stainless steel (SSS) microfiltration membranes, which served as electrode directly, were used for the experiment of separating Alamin, a calcium salt and protein containing particles, found in dairy processing. Fouling and cleaning of the SSS membranes under the application of an external electric field were studied. The imposed electric field was found, diverging the pH of permeate and retentate. This in turn altered the solubility of the calcium salt and impacted the performance of electro microfiltration membrane. Using electric field as an enhanced cleaning-in-place (CIP) method in back flushing SSS membrane was also studied.

  10. Experimental Study of Fouling and Cleaning of Sintered Stainless Steel Membrane in Electro-Microfiltration of Calcium Salt Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank G. F. Qin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sintered stainless steel (SSS microfiltration membranes, which served as electrode directly, were used for the experiment of separating Alamin, a calcium salt and protein containing particles, found in dairy processing. Fouling and cleaning of the SSS membranes under the application of an external electric field were studied. The imposed electric field was found, diverging the pH of permeate and retentate. This in turn altered the solubility of the calcium salt and impacted the performance of electro microfiltration membrane. Using electric field as an enhanced cleaning-in-place (CIP method in back flushing SSS membrane was also studied.

  11. Contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content in type I and type II skeletal muscle fibres in active aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Dutka, T L; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2015-06-01

    Muscle weakness in old age is due in large part to an overall loss of skeletal muscle tissue, but it remains uncertain how much also stems from alterations in the properties of the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and amount of stored intracellular calcium in single muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) adults. The maximum level of force production (per unit cross-sectional area) in fast twitch fibres in Old subjects was lower than in Young subjects, and the fibres were also less sensitive to activation by calcium. The amount of calcium stored inside muscle fibres and available to trigger contraction was also lower in both fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres in the Old subjects. These findings indicate that muscle weakness in old age stems in part from an impaired capacity for force production in the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in mechanically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) humans to investigate whether changes in muscle fibre properties contribute to muscle weakness in old age. In type II fibres of Old subjects, specific force was reduced by ∼17% and Ca(2+) sensitivity was also reduced (pCa50 decreased ∼0.05 pCa units) relative to that in Young. S-Glutathionylation of fast troponin I (TnIf ) markedly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in type II fibres, but the increase was significantly smaller in Old versus Young (+0.136 and +0.164 pCa unit increases, respectively). Endogenous and maximal SR Ca(2+) content were significantly smaller in both type I and type II fibres in Old subjects. In fibres of Young, the SR could be nearly fully depleted of Ca(2+) by a combined caffeine and low Mg(2+) stimulus, whereas in fibres of Old the amount of non-releasable Ca(2+) was significantly increased (by > 12% of endogenous Ca(2+) content). Western

  12. Effects of ethanol on calcium transport across the liver cell plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.; Santacana, G.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on calcium transport by the liver cell was studied by using a rat liver slice preparation. Ethanol was shown to decrease by about 30% the rate constant for 45 Ca efflux from the intracellular compartment. This inhibitory effect of ethanol was not observed in the absence of Ca 2+ or Na + from the incubation medium. Ethanol was also shown to greatly increase non-insulin calcium uptake by liver slices. This effect of ethanol appeared to be dose dependent and was not observed in the absence of Na + from the incubation medium. The ability of ethanol to increase calcium uptake by the hepatocyte was completely blocked by 1 mM Amiloride. Amiloride, however, did not affect the increased entry of either Na + or Ca 2+ produced by 10 mM Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the sodium pump. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), a well known hepatotoxin, also increased calcium uptake by the hepatocyte. Amiloride, however, was not able to block the CCl 4 -induced calcium uptake. These results suggest that ethanol activates a Na + entry pathway, probably represented by a Na + /H + exchanger, which in turn stimulates an entry of Ca 2+ through a Na + /Ca 2+ exchange mechanism located in the plasma membrane of the hepatocyte

  13. Surface physical chemistry properties in coated bacterial cellulose membranes with calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Olyveira, Gabriel Molina; Basmaji, Pierre; Costa, Ligia Maria Manzine; Dos Santos, Márcio Luiz; Dos Santos Riccardi, Carla; Guastaldi, Fernando Pozzi Semeghini; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel Mantuaneli; de Oliveira Capote, Ticiana Sidorenko; Pizoni, Elisabeth; Guastaldi, Antônio Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose has become established as a new biomaterial, and it can be used for medical applications. In addition, it has called attention due to the increasing interest in tissue engineering materials for wound care. In this work, the bacterial cellulose fermentation process was modified by the addition of chondroitin sulfate to the culture medium before the inoculation of the bacteria. The biomimetic process with heterogeneous calcium phosphate precipitation of biological interest was studied for the guided regeneration purposes on bacterial cellulose. FTIR results showed the incorporation of the chondroitin sulfate in the bacterial cellulose, SEM images confirmed the deposition of the calcium phosphate on the bacterial cellulose surface, XPS analysis showed a selective chemical group influences which change calcium phosphate deposition, besides, the calcium phosphate phase with different Ca/P ratios on bacterial cellulose surface influences wettability. XTT results concluded that these materials did not affect significantly in the cell viability, being non-cytotoxic. Thus, it was produced one biomaterial with the surface charge changes for calcium phosphate deposition, besides different wettability which builds new membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANELA BELTRÁN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured the kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in solution or forming part of isolated junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by mixing calsequestrin equilibrated with calcium with calcium-free solutions in a stopped-flow system. In parallel, we measured the kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence changes that take place following calcium dissociation from calsequestrin. We found that at 25ºC calcium dissociation was 10-fold faster for calsequestrin attached to junctional membranes (k = 109 s-1 than in solution. These results imply that calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in vivo is not rate limiting during excitation-contraction coupling. In addition, we found that the intrinsic fluorescence decrease for calsequestrin in solution or forming part of junctional membranes was significantly slower than the rates of calcium dissociation. The kinetics of intrinsic fluorescence changes had two components for calsequestrin associated to junctional membranes and only one for calsequestrin in solution; the faster component was 8-fold faster (k = 54.1 s-1 than the slower component (k = 6.9 s-1, which had the same k value as for calsequestrin in solution. These combined results suggest that the presence of calsequestrin at high concentrations in a restricted space, such as when bound to the junctional membrane, accelerates calcium dissociation and the resulting structural changes, presumably as a result of cooperative molecular interactions.

  15. Calcium permeability of the T lymphocyte plasma membrane: counteraction of phorbol ester and A23187

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csermely, P.; Szamel, M.; Somogyi, J.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular calcium concentration (Ca/sub i/) of T lymphocytes was measured using the fluorescent indicator quin2. Different ionophores effectively enhanced the Ca permeability of the plasma membrane. The effective concentration of the ionophores required for permeabilization increased in the order of ionomycin, A23187 and X537-A (lasalocid-A). 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in submicromolar concentrations did not change Ca/sub i/. The addition of TPA immediately before the A23187-permeabilization did not alter the Ca ionophoretic effect of A23187. However, prolonged incubation with TPA decreased the efficiency of A23187 permeabilizing the plasma membrane for calcium ions. This effect was concentration and time dependent, being maximal at TPA concentrations higher than 10 nM with a preincubation time of 1.5 hours. TPA induced relative A23187 insensitivity is most probably not due to a direct effect of TPA on the ionophore as it is concentration and time dependent. Moreover the fluorescence and fluorescence polarization of A23187 as well as the energy transfer between the tryptophan groups of the membrane proteins and A23187 showed no significant change during incubation with TPA. These results indicate that membrane fluidity changes or A23187 immobilization also do not play a prominent role in the explanation of the phenomenon. However the supposed intracellular heavy metal content of T lymphocyte might be a possible source of the TPA induced relative insensitization towards A23187.

  16. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You can get decent amounts of calcium from baked beans, navy beans, white beans, and others. Canned fish. You're in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. Working Calcium Into Your ...

  17. Nitric oxide-dependent activation of CaMKII increases diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in cardiac myocytes in response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Tang, Lifei; Roof, Steve R; Velmurugan, Sathya; Millard, Ashley; Shonts, Stephen; Wang, Honglan; Santiago, Demetrio; Ahmad, Usama; Perryman, Matthew; Bers, Donald M; Mohler, Peter J; Ziolo, Mark T; Shannon, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium waves in cardiac myocytes are caused by diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum release (SR Ca(2+) leak) through ryanodine receptors. Beta-adrenergic (β-AR) tone is known to increase this leak through the activation of Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) and the subsequent phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. When β-AR drive is chronic, as observed in heart failure, this CaMKII-dependent effect is exaggerated and becomes potentially arrhythmogenic. Recent evidence has indicated that CaMKII activation can be regulated by cellular oxidizing agents, such as reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigate how the cellular second messenger, nitric oxide, mediates CaMKII activity downstream of the adrenergic signaling cascade and promotes the generation of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca(2+) waves in intact cardiomyocytes. Both SCaWs and SR Ca(2+) leak were measured in intact rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes loaded with the Ca-dependent fluorescent dye, fluo-4. CaMKII activity in vitro and immunoblotting for phosphorylated residues on CaMKII, nitric oxide synthase, and Akt were measured to confirm activity of these enzymes as part of the adrenergic cascade. We demonstrate that stimulation of the β-AR pathway by isoproterenol increased the CaMKII-dependent SR Ca(2+) leak. This increased leak was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase 1 but not nitric oxide synthase 3. In ventricular myocytes isolated from wild-type mice, isoproterenol stimulation also increased the CaMKII-dependent leak. Critically, in myocytes isolated from nitric oxide synthase 1 knock-out mice this effect is ablated. We show that isoproterenol stimulation leads to an increase in nitric oxide production, and nitric oxide alone is sufficient to activate CaMKII and increase SR Ca(2+) leak. Mechanistically, our data links Akt to nitric oxide synthase 1 activation downstream of β-AR stimulation. Collectively, this evidence supports the hypothesis that CaMKII is

  18. Nitric oxide stress and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase impair β-cell sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2b activity and protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X; Kono, T; Evans-Molina, C

    2015-06-18

    The sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2b (SERCA2b) pump maintains a steep Ca(2+) concentration gradient between the cytosol and ER lumen in the pancreatic β-cell, and the integrity of this gradient has a central role in regulated insulin production and secretion, maintenance of ER function and β-cell survival. We have previously demonstrated loss of β-cell SERCA2b expression under diabetic conditions. To define the mechanisms underlying this, INS-1 cells and rat islets were treated with the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) combined with or without cycloheximide or actinomycin D. IL-1β treatment led to increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene and protein expression, which occurred concurrently with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). IL-1β led to decreased SERCA2b mRNA and protein expression, whereas time-course experiments revealed a reduction in protein half-life with no change in mRNA stability. Moreover, SERCA2b protein but not mRNA levels were rescued by treatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NMMA (NG-monomethyl L-arginine), whereas the NO donor SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine) and the AMPK activator AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide) recapitulated the effects of IL-1β on SERCA2b protein stability. Similarly, IL-1β-induced reductions in SERCA2b expression were rescued by pharmacological inhibition of AMPK with compound C or by transduction of a dominant-negative form of AMPK, whereas β-cell death was prevented in parallel. Finally, to determine a functional relationship between NO and AMPK signaling and SERCA2b activity, fura-2/AM (fura-2-acetoxymethylester) Ca(2+) imaging experiments were performed in INS-1 cells. Consistent with observed changes in SERCA2b expression, IL-1β, SNAP and AICAR increased cytosolic Ca(2+) and decreased ER Ca(2+) levels, suggesting congruent modulation of SERCA activity under these conditions. In aggregate, these results show that SERCA2b

  19. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability of luminal membrane vesicles from toad bladder. Studies using a fast-reaction apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, H.S. Jr.; Al-Awqati, Q.

    1983-01-01

    Regulation of the sodium permeability of the luminal membrane is the major mechanism by which the net rate of sodium transport across tight epithelia is varied. Previous evidence has suggested that the permeability of the luminal membrane might be regulated by changes in intracellular sodium or calcium activities. To test this directly, we isolated a fraction of the plasma membrane from the toad urinary bladder, which contains a fast, amiloride-sensitive sodium flux with characteristics similar to those of the native luminal membrane. Using a flow-quench apparatus to measure the initial rate of sodium efflux from these vesicles in the millisecond time range, we have demonstrated that the isotope exchange permeability of these vesicles is very sensitive to calcium. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration is 0.5 microM, well within the range of calcium activity found in cells. Also, the permeability of the luminal membrane vesicles is little affected by the ambient sodium concentration. These results, when taken together with studies on whole tissue, suggest that cell calcium may be an important regulator of transepithelial sodium transport by its effect on luminal sodium permeability. The effect of cell sodium on permeability may be mediated by calcium rather than by sodium itself

  20. Effect of free calcium concentration and ionic strength on alginate fouling in cross-flow membrane filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Smith, G.; Temmink, B.G.; Loosdrecht, van M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are generally negatively charged polymers. Membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) by EPS is therefore influenced by the water chemistry of the mixed liquor (calcium concentration, foulant concentration and ionic strength). We used alginate as a model

  1. Organometallics and quaternary ammonium salts affect calcium ion desorption from lecithin liposome membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, T.E.; Kuczera, J.; Przestalski, S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to compare the effects of groups of tin and lead organometallic compounds and their mixtures with amphiphilic quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) on the process of calcium ion desorption from lecithin liposome membranes, as dependent on the properties of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts of QAS. In the investigations the method of radioactive labels was applied. Synergism and antagonism in the action of both groups of compounds were found. The effectiveness of the cooperation depended more on chain length of QAS compounds than on the size and polarity of their hydrophobic parts. The most effective of all compounds studied was a the mixture of benzyldimethylammonium chloride in a mixture with tripropyltin. Since the rate of calcium desorption proved to be a good measure of efficacy of biologically active surfactants, it seems that the conclusions reached in this paper may be useful for choosing compounds which are able to decontaminate the environment polluted with heavy metals. (orig.)

  2. [The influence of N-, S-containing chinasolone derivatives (NC-224) on the biochemical and physicochemical parameters of membrane endoplasmatic reticulum and nuclear chromatine fractions of rats liver cells in conditions of its injury by tetrachloromethane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubs'kyî, Iu I; Goriushko, G G; Belenichev, I F; Kovalenko, S I; Litvinova, N V; Marchenko, O M; Kurapova, T M; Babenko, L P; Velychko, O M

    2010-01-01

    Using biochemical and physicochemical methods of investigation in vivo, the effect of the substance NC-224, N-, S-chinasolone-derivative, on the lipoperoxidation activity in rat liver endoplasmatic reticulum membranes and nuclear chromatin fractions under tetrachloromethane intoxication have been studied. It was shown that NC-224 has pronounced antioxidant activity which is the biochemical basis of the substance membrane- and genome-protective effects and its ability to restore physicochemical properties of the surface and hydrophobic zones of hepatocyte membranes and structural parameter nuclear chromatin fractions in the conditions of chemical liver injury.

  3. Purification of the Membrane Compartment for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of Exogenous Antigens in Cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Jun; Otani, Mayu; Sakai, Takahiro; Hatta, Shinichi

    2017-08-21

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly capable of processing and presenting internalized exogenous antigens upon major histocompatibility class (MHC) I molecules also known as cross-presentation (CP). CP plays an important role not only in the stimulation of naïve CD8 + T cells and memory CD8 + T cells for infectious and tumor immunity but also in the inactivation of self-acting naïve T cells by T cell anergy or T cell deletion. Although the critical molecular mechanism of CP remains to be elucidated, accumulating evidence indicates that exogenous antigens are processed through endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) after export from non-classical endocytic compartments. Until recently, characterizations of these endocytic compartments were limited because there were no specific molecular markers other than exogenous antigens. The method described here is a new vesicle isolation protocol, which allows for the purification of these endocytic compartments. Using this purified microsome, we reconstituted the ERAD-like transport, ubiquitination, and processing of the exogenous antigen in vitro, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome system processed the exogenous antigen after export from this cellular compartment. This protocol can be further applied to other cell types to clarify the molecular mechanism of CP.

  4. SR calcium handling and calcium after-transients in a rabbit model of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees A.; Belterman, Charly N. W.; Coronel, Ruben; Fiolet, Jan W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: After-depolarization associated arrhythmias are frequently observed in heart failure and associated with spontaneous calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), calcium after-transients. We hypothesize that disturbed SR calcium handling underlies calcium after-transients in heart

  5. Localization of membrane-associated calcium in unpollinated and pollinated pistil of Petunia hybrida Hort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the pistil of Petunia hybrida, the transmitting tract and the ovules are the sites which give Ca2+-CTC fluorescence. In unpollinated pistil the level of membrane-associated Ca2+ decreases from the stigma to the base of the style. The renewed strong rise of Ca2+-CTC fluorescence appears on the placenta surface and in the ovule integuments. Following pollination, when the pollen tubes have grown through the pistil, the pattern of membrane-associated Ca2+ on the path stigma - ovary is reversed. The highest fluorescence is found in the base of the style. In pollinated ovules the Ca2+-CTC fluorescence increases markedly. In the transmitting cells membrane-associated Ca2+ occurs mainly in the polar regions of the cell. During cell degeneration following pollination the cytoplasmic clusters show Ca2+-CTC fluorescence. The used P. hybrida cultivar is self-fertile. The selection of pollen tubes occurs mainly in the upper part of the style. The rejected pollen tubes show a steady high level of membrane-associated calcium.

  6. Participation of the endoplasmic reticulum protein chaperone thio-oxidoreductase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor expression at the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lucca-Junior

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Chaperone members of the protein disulfide isomerase family can catalyze the thiol-disulfide exchange reaction with pairs of cysteines. There are 14 protein disulfide isomerase family members, but the ability to catalyze a thiol disulfide exchange reaction has not been demonstrated for all of them. Human endoplasmic reticulum protein chaperone thio-oxidoreductase (ERp18 shows partial oxidative activity as a protein disulfide isomerase. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the participation of ERp18 in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR expression at the plasma membrane. Cos-7 cells were cultured, plated, and transfected with 25 ng (unless indicated wild-type human GnRHR (hGnRHR or mutant GnRHR (Cys14Ala and Cys200Ala and pcDNA3.1 without insert (empty vector or ERp18 cDNA (75 ng/well, pre-loaded for 18 h with 1 µCi myo-[2-3H(N]-inositol in 0.25 mL DMEM and treated for 2 h with buserelin. We observed a decrease in maximal inositol phosphate (IP production in response to buserelin in the cells co-transfected with hGnRHR, and a decrease from 20 to 75 ng of ERp18 compared with cells co-transfected with hGnRHR and empty vector. The decrease in maximal IP was proportional to the amount of ERp18 DNA over the range examined. Mutants (Cys14Ala and Cys200Ala that could not form the Cys14-Cys200 bridge essential for plasma membrane routing of the hGnRHR did not modify maximal IP production when they were co-transfected with ERp18. These results suggest that ERp18 has a reduction role on disulfide bonds in wild-type hGnRHR folding.

  7. Quantitation of the calcium and membrane binding properties of the C2 domains of dysferlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nazish; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Marty, Naomi J; Johnson, Colin P

    2014-01-21

    Dysferlin is a large membrane protein involved in calcium-triggered resealing of the sarcolemma after injury. Although it is generally accepted that dysferlin is Ca(2+) sensitive, the Ca(2+) binding properties of dysferlin have not been characterized. In this study, we report an analysis of the Ca(2+) and membrane binding properties of all seven C2 domains of dysferlin as well as a multi-C2 domain construct. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that all seven dysferlin C2 domains interact with Ca(2+) with a wide range of binding affinities. The C2A and C2C domains were determined to be the most sensitive, with Kd values in the tens of micromolar, whereas the C2D domain was least sensitive, with a near millimolar Kd value. Mutagenesis of C2A demonstrates the requirement for negatively charged residues in the loop regions for divalent ion binding. Furthermore, dysferlin displayed significantly lower binding affinity for the divalent cations magnesium and strontium. Measurement of a multidomain construct indicates that the solution binding affinity does not change when C2 domains are linked. Finally, sedimentation assays suggest all seven C2 domains bind lipid membranes, and that Ca(2+) enhances but is not required for interaction. This report reveals for the first time, to our knowledge, that all dysferlin domains bind Ca(2+) albeit with varying affinity and stoichiometry. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Mg2+, ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. I. Structural organization and properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veklich, T O; Mazur, Iu Iu; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    Tight control of cytoplasm Ca2+ concentration is essential in cell functioning. Changing of Ca2+ concentration is thorough in smooth muscle cells, because it determines relaxation/constraint process. One of key proteins which control Ca2+ concentration in cytoplasm is Mg2+, ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump. Thus, it is important to find compoumds which allowed one to change Mg2+, ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump activity, as long as this topic is of current interest in biochemical research which regards energy and pharmacomechanical coupling mechanism of muscle excitation and contraction. In this article we generalized literatute and own data about properties of smooth muscle cell plasma membrane Ca(2+)-pump. Stuctural oganization, kinetical properties and molecular biology are considered.

  9. Silver ions increase plasma membrane permeability through modulation of intracellular calcium levels in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klíma, Petr; Laňková, Martina; Vandenbussche, Filip; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Petrášek, Jan

    2018-05-01

    Silver ions increase plasma membrane permeability for water and small organic compounds through their stimulatory effect on plasma membrane calcium channels, with subsequent modulation of intracellular calcium levels and ion homeostasis. The action of silver ions at the plant plasma membrane is largely connected with the inhibition of ethylene signalling thanks to the ability of silver ion to replace the copper cofactor in the ethylene receptor. A link coupling the action of silver ions and cellular auxin efflux has been suggested earlier by their possible direct interaction with auxin efflux carriers or by influencing plasma membrane permeability. Using tobacco BY-2 cells, we demonstrate here that besides a dramatic increase of efflux of synthetic auxins 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), treatment with AgNO 3 resulted in enhanced efflux of the cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ) as well as the auxin structural analogues tryptophan (Trp) and benzoic acid (BA). The application of AgNO 3 was accompanied by gradual water loss and plasmolysis. The observed effects were dependent on the availability of extracellular calcium ions (Ca 2+ ) as shown by comparison of transport assays in Ca 2+ -rich and Ca 2+ -free buffers and upon treatment with inhibitors of plasma membrane Ca 2+ -permeable channels Al 3+ and ruthenium red, both abolishing the effect of AgNO 3 . Confocal microscopy of Ca 2+ -sensitive fluorescence indicator Fluo-4FF, acetoxymethyl (AM) ester suggested that the extracellular Ca 2+ availability is necessary to trigger the response to silver ions and that the intracellular Ca 2+ pool alone is not sufficient for this effect. Altogether, our data suggest that in plant cells the effects of silver ions originate from the primal modification of the internal calcium levels, possibly by their interaction with Ca 2+ -permeable channels at the plasma membrane.

  10. The pepper Bs4C proteins are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and confer disease resistance to bacterial blight in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zeng, Xuan; Tian, Dongsheng; Yang, Xiaobei; Wang, Lanlan; Yin, Zhongchao

    2018-03-30

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-dependent dominant disease resistance (R) genes in plants, also referred to as executor R genes, are induced on infection by phytopathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas harbouring the corresponding TALE genes. Unlike the traditional R proteins, the executor R proteins do not determine the resistance specificity and may function broadly in different plant species. The executor R gene Bs4C-R in the resistant genotype PI 235047 of the pepper species Capsicum pubescens (CpBs4C-R) confers disease resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) harbouring the TALE genes avrBsP/avrBs4. In this study, the synthetic genes of CpBs4C-R and two other Bs4C-like genes, the susceptible allele in the genotype PI585270 of C. pubescens (CpBs4C-S) and the CaBs4C-R homologue gene in the cultivar 'CM334' of Capsicum annum (CaBs4C), were characterized in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) and rice (Oryza sativa). The Bs4C genes induced cell death in N. benthamiana. The functional Bs4C-eCFP fusion proteins were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane in the leaf epidermal cells of N. benthamiana. The Xa10 promoter-Bs4C fusion genes in transgenic rice conferred strain-specific disease resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal agent of bacterial blight in rice, and were specifically induced by the Xa10-incompatible Xoo strain PXO99 A (pHM1avrXa10). The results indicate that the Bs4C proteins from pepper species function broadly in rice and the Bs4C protein-mediated cell death from the ER is conserved between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants, which can be utilized to engineer novel and enhanced disease resistance in heterologous plants. © 2018 TEMASEK LIFE SCIENCES LABORATORY. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2018 JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. A model of propagating calcium-induced calcium release mediated by calcium diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, P. H.; de Tombe, P. P.; van Deen, J. H.; Mulder, B. J.; ter Keurs, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sudden local fluctuations of the free sarcoplasmic [Ca++]i in cardiac cells on calcium release and calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated with the aid of a simplified model of SR calcium handling. The model was used to evaluate whether propagation of calcium

  12. Effect of heat shock on ultrastructure and calcium distribution in Lavandula pinnata L. glandular trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S S; Kirchoff, B K; Liao, J P

    2013-02-01

    The effects of heat shock (HS) on the ultrastructure and calcium distribution of Lavandula pinnata secretory trichomes are examined using transmission electron microscopy and potassium antimonate precipitation. After 48-h HS at 40°C, plastids become distorted and lack stroma and osmiophilic deposits, the cristae of the mitochondria become indistinct, the endoplasmic reticulum acquires a chain-like appearance with ribosomes prominently attached to the lamellae, and the plasma and organelle membranes become distorted. Heat shock is associated with a decrease in calcium precipitates in the trichomes, while the number of precipitates increases in the mesophyll cells. Prolonged exposure to elevated calcium levels may be toxic to the mesophyll cells, while the lack of calcium in the glands cell may deprive them of the normal protective advantages of elevated calcium levels. The inequality in calcium distribution may result not only from uptake from the transpiration stream, but also from redistribution of calcium from the trichomes to the mesophyll cells.

  13. In Vivo Perturbation of Membrane-Associated Calcium by Freeze-Thaw Stress in Onion Bulb Cells 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rajeev; Palta, Jiwan P.

    1988-01-01

    Incipient freeze-thaw stress in onion bulb scale tissue is known to cause enhanced efflux of K+, along with small but significant loss of cellular Ca2+. During the post-thaw period, irreversibly injured cells undergo a cytological aberration, namely, `protoplasmic swelling.' This cellular symptom is thought to be caused by replacement of Ca2+ from membrane by extracellular K+ and subsequent perturbation of K+ transport properties of plasma membrane. In the present study, onion (Allium cepa L. cv Sweet Sandwich) bulbs were slowly frozen to either −8.5°C or −11.5°C and thawed over ice. Inner epidermal peels from bulb scales were treated with fluorescein diacetate for assessing viability. In these cells, membrane-associated calcium was determined using chlorotetracycline fluorescence microscopy combined with image analysis. Increased freezing stress and tissue infiltration (visual water-soaking) were paralleled by increased ion leakage. Freezing injury (−11.5°C; irreversible) caused a specific and substantial loss of membrane-associated Ca2+ compared to control. Loss of membrane-associated Ca2+ caused by moderate stress (−8.5°C; reversible) was much less relative to −11.5°C treatment. Ion efflux and Ca2+-chlorotetracycline fluorescence showed a negative relationship. Extracellular KCl treatment simulated freeze-thaw stress by causing a similar loss of membrane-associated calcium. This loss was dramatically reduced by presence of extracellular CaCl2. Our results suggest that the loss of membrane-associated Ca2+, in part, plays a role in initiation and progression of freezing injury. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16666196

  14. Calsequestrin 2 deletion causes sinoatrial node dysfunction and atrial arrhythmias associated with altered sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling and degenerative fibrosis within the mouse atrial pacemaker complex1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, Alexey V.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Lou, Qing; Hage, Lori T.; Hansen, Brian J.; Belevych, Andriy E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Knollmann, Björn C.; Periasamy, Muthu; Györke, Sandor; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Loss-of-function mutations in Calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2) are associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). CPVT patients also exhibit bradycardia and atrial arrhythmias for which the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We aimed to study the sinoatrial node (SAN) dysfunction due to loss of CASQ2. Methods and results In vivo electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring, in vitro high-resolution optical mapping, confocal imaging of intracellular Ca2+ cycling, and 3D atrial immunohistology were performed in wild-type (WT) and Casq2 null (Casq2−/−) mice. Casq2−/− mice exhibited bradycardia, SAN conduction abnormalities, and beat-to-beat heart rate variability due to enhanced atrial ectopic activity both at baseline and with autonomic stimulation. Loss of CASQ2 increased fibrosis within the pacemaker complex, depressed primary SAN activity, and conduction, but enhanced atrial ectopic activity and atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with macro- and micro-reentry during autonomic stimulation. In SAN myocytes, CASQ2 deficiency induced perturbations in intracellular Ca2+ cycling, including abnormal Ca2+ release, periods of significantly elevated diastolic Ca2+ levels leading to pauses and unstable pacemaker rate. Importantly, Ca2+ cycling dysfunction occurred not only at the SAN cellular level but was also globally manifested as an increased delay between action potential (AP) and Ca2+ transient upstrokes throughout the atrial pacemaker complex. Conclusions Loss of CASQ2 causes abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and selective interstitial fibrosis in the atrial pacemaker complex, which disrupt SAN pacemaking but enhance latent pacemaker activity, create conduction abnormalities and increase susceptibility to AF. These functional and extensive structural alterations could contribute to SAN dysfunction as well as AF in CPVT patients. PMID:24216388

  15. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  16. Evaluation of plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPase isoform 4 as a potential target for fertility control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Neyses, Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    The array of contraceptives currently available is clearly inadequate and does not meet consumer demands since it is estimated that up to a quarter of all pregnancies worldwide are unintended. There is, therefore, an overwhelming global need to develop new effective, safe, ideally non-hormonal contraceptives for both male and female use. The contraceptive field, unlike other areas such as cancer, has a dearth of new targets. We have addressed this issue and propose that isoform 4 of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase is a potentially exciting novel target for fertility control. The plasma membrane calcium ATPase is a ubiquitously expressed calcium pump whose primary function in the majority of cells is to extrude calcium to the extracellular milieu. Two isoforms of this gene family, PMCA1 and PMCA4, are expressed in spermatozoa, with PMCA4 being the predominant isoform. Although this gene is ubiquitously expressed, its function is highly tissue-specific. Genetic deletion of PMCA4, in PMCA4 knockout mice, led to 100% infertility specifically in the male mutant mice due to a selective defect in sperm motility. It is important to note that the gene deletion did not affect normal mating characteristics in these mice. This phenotype was mimicked in wild-type sperm treated with the non-specific PMCA inhibitor 5-(and 6-) carboxyeosin diacetate succinimidyl ester; a proof-of-principle that inhibition of PMCA4 has potential importance in the control of fertility. This review outlines the potential for PMCA4 to be a novel target for fertility control by acting to inhibit sperm motility. It will outline the characteristics that make this target drugable and will describe methodologies to identify and validate novel inhibitors of this target.

  17. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4b inhibits nitric oxide generation through calcium-induced dynamic interaction with neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenjuan; Zhou, Juefei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Teng; Chen, Qianqian; Yang, Fuyu; Wei, Taotao

    2013-04-01

    The activation and deactivation of Ca(2+)- and calmodulindependent neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the central nervous system must be tightly controlled to prevent excessive nitric oxide (NO) generation. Considering plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) is a key deactivator of nNOS, the present investigation aims to determine the key events involved in nNOS deactivation of by PMCA in living cells to maintain its cellular context. Using time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determined the occurrence of Ca(2+)-induced protein-protein interactions between plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4b (PMCA4b) and nNOS in living cells. PMCA activation significantly decreased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), which deactivates nNOS and slowdowns NO synthesis. Under the basal [Ca(2+)]i caused by PMCA activation, no protein-protein interactions were observed between PMCA4b and nNOS. Furthermore, both the PDZ domain of nNOS and the PDZ-binding motif of PMCA4b were essential for the protein-protein interaction. The involvement of lipid raft microdomains on the activity of PMCA4b and nNOS was also investigated. Unlike other PMCA isoforms, PMCA4 was relatively more concentrated in the raft fractions. Disruption of lipid rafts altered the intracellular localization of PMCA4b and affected the interaction between PMCA4b and nNOS, which suggest that the unique lipid raft distribution of PMCA4 may be responsible for its regulation of nNOS activity. In summary, lipid rafts may act as platforms for the PMCA4b regulation of nNOS activity and the transient tethering of nNOS to PMCA4b is responsible for rapid nNOS deactivation.

  18. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit leg muscle have been used in a study of chloride-induced calcium release. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that light sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the longitudinal reticulum and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP to amounts greater than 100 nmoles Ca/sup + +/ per mg of protein in less than one minute. Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles each had a biphasic time course of calcium uptake. The initial uptake was followed by a rapid release after approximately one minute, of 30 to 40% of the accumulated calcium, which was then followed by a slower phase of calcium accumulation. Results indicate that the chloride induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization. The release of calcium from the light SR vesicles is probably due to osmotic swelling and the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles is probably due to depolarization.

  19. LeCPK1, a Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase from Tomato. Plasma Membrane Targeting and Biochemical Characterization1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutschmann, Frank; Stalder, Urs; Piotrowski, Markus; Oecking, Claudia; Schaller, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The cDNA of LeCPK1, a calcium-dependent protein kinase, was cloned from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). LeCPK1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified from bacterial extracts. The recombinant protein was shown to be a functional protein kinase using a synthetic peptide as the substrate (syntide-2, Km = 85 μm). Autophosphorylation of LeCPK1 was observed on threonine and serine residues, one of which was identified as serine-439. Kinase activity was shown to be Ca2+ dependent and required the C-terminal, calmodulin-like domain of LeCPK1. Two classes of high- and low-affinity Ca2+-binding sites were observed, exhibiting dissociation constants of 0.6 and 55 μm, respectively. LeCPK1 was found to phosphorylate the regulatory C-terminal domain of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in vitro. A potential role in the regulation of proton pump activity is corroborated by the apparent colocalization of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase and LeCPK1 in vivo. Upon transient expression in suspension-cultured cells, a C-terminal fusion of LeCPK1 with the green fluorescent protein was targeted to the plasma membrane. Myristoylation of the LeCPK1 N terminus was found to be required for plasma membrane targeting. PMID:12011347

  20. Membrane Estrogen Receptor-α Interacts with Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 1a to Mobilize Intracellular Calcium in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, John; Hariri, Omid R.; Bondar, Galyna; Ogi, Julie; Micevych, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Estradiol, acting on a membrane-associated estrogen receptor-α (mERα), induces an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) needed for progesterone synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes. To determine whether rapid estradiol signaling involves an interaction of mERα with metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1a (mGluR1a), changes in [Ca2+]i were monitored with the calcium indicator, Fluo-4 AM, in primary cultures of female postpubertal hypothalamic astrocytes. 17β-Estradiol over a range of 1 nm to 100 nm induced a maximal increase in [Ca2+]i flux measured as a change in relative fluorescence [ΔF Ca2+ = 615 ± 36 to 641 ± 47 relative fluorescent units (RFU)], whereas 0.1 nm of estradiol stimulated a moderate [Ca2+]i increase (275 ± 16 RFU). The rapid estradiol-induced [Ca2+]i flux was blocked with 1 μm of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 (635 ± 24 vs. 102 ± 11 RFU, P estradiol-induced membrane signaling in astrocytes. PMID:18948402

  1. Translocation of cell penetrating peptides and calcium-induced membrane fusion share same mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magarkar, Aniket; Allolio, Christoph; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Baxová, Katarína; Šachl, Radek; Horinek, D.; Heinz, V.; Rachel, R.; Ziegler, C.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S386 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : membrane interactions * membrane fusion * cell penetration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. Mechanism and evolution of calcium transport across the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient, thus the influx of Ca(2+) into plant cells is a critical process. In addition, the efflux of Ca(2+) out of a cell is important to prevent toxicity resulting from Ca(2+) excess, and to modulate levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) required for signaling functions. Bioc...

  3. Channel formation in model membranes by the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis: Effect if Calcium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knapp, O.; Maier, E.; Polleichtner, G.; Mašín, Jiří; Šebo, Peter; Benz, R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2003), s. 8077-8084 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : bordetella pertussis * calcium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.922, year: 2003

  4. Networks of enzymatically oxidized membrane lipids support calcium-dependent coagulation factor binding to maintain hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauder, S.N.; Allen-Redpath, K.; Slatter, D.A.; Aldrovandi, M.; O'Connor, A.; Farewell, D.; Percy, C.L.; Molhoek, J.E.; Rannikko, S.; Tyrrell, V.J.; Ferla, S.; Milne, G.L.; Poole, A.W.; Thomas, C.P.; Obaji, S.; Taylor, P.R.; Jones, S.A.; Groot, P.G. de; Urbanus, R.T.; Horkko, S.; Uderhardt, S.; Ackermann, J.; Jenkins, P.V.; Brancale, A.; Kronke, G.; Collins, P.W.; O'Donnell, V.B.

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation functions as part of the innate immune system by preventing bacterial invasion, and it is critical to stopping blood loss (hemostasis). Coagulation involves the external membrane surface of activated platelets and leukocytes. Using lipidomic, genetic, biochemical, and mathematical

  5. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  6. Interplay of Plasma Membrane and Vacuolar Ion Channels, Together with BAK1, Elicits Rapid Cytosolic Calcium Elevations in Arabidopsis during Aphid Feeding[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Thomas R.; Avramova, Marieta; Canham, James; Higgins, Peter; Bilkey, Natasha; Mugford, Sam T.; Pitino, Marco; Toyota, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    A transient rise in cytosolic calcium ion concentration is one of the main signals used by plants in perception of their environment. The role of calcium in the detection of abiotic stress is well documented; however, its role during biotic interactions remains unclear. Here, we use a fluorescent calcium biosensor (GCaMP3) in combination with the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) as a tool to study Arabidopsis thaliana calcium dynamics in vivo and in real time during a live biotic interaction. We demonstrate rapid and highly localized plant calcium elevations around the feeding sites of M. persicae, and by monitoring aphid feeding behavior electrophysiologically, we demonstrate that these elevations correlate with aphid probing of epidermal and mesophyll cells. Furthermore, we dissect the molecular mechanisms involved, showing that interplay between the plant defense coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1), the plasma membrane ion channels GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR-LIKE 3.3 and 3.6 (GLR3.3 and GLR3.6), and the vacuolar ion channel TWO-PORE CHANNEL1 (TPC1) mediate these calcium elevations. Consequently, we identify a link between plant perception of biotic threats by BAK1, cellular calcium entry mediated by GLRs, and intracellular calcium release by TPC1 during a biologically relevant interaction. PMID:28559475

  7. Every day I'm rufflin': Calcium sensing and actin dynamics in the growth factor-independent membrane ruffling of professional phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlam, Daniel; Canton, Johnathan

    2017-04-03

    Professional phagocytes continuously extend dynamic, actin-driven membrane protrusions. These protrusions, often referred to as membrane ruffles, serve a critical role in the essential phagocyte processes of macropinocytosis and phagocytosis. Small GTPases, such as RAC1/2, spatially and temporally regulate membrane ruffle formation. We have recently shown that extracellular calcium regulates the elaboration of membrane ruffles primarily through the synthesis of phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) at the plasma membrane. RAC1/2 guanine nucleotide exchange factors harbouring polybasic stretches are recruited by PtdOH to sites of ruffle formation. Here we discuss our findings and offer perspectives on how the regulation of dynamic actin structures at the plasma membrane by small GTPases is a critical component of phagocyte function.

  8. The tissue-specific Rep8/UBXD6 tethers p97 to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for degradation of misfolded proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Madsen

    Full Text Available The protein known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast is a versatile ATPase complex involved in several biological functions including membrane fusion, protein folding, and activation of membrane-bound transcription factors. In addition, p97 plays a central role in degradation of misfolded secretory proteins via the ER-associated degradation pathway. This functional diversity of p97 depends on its association with various cofactors, and to further our understanding of p97 function it is important that these cofactors are identified and analyzed. Here, we isolate and characterize the human protein named Rep8 or Ubxd6 as a new cofactor of p97. Mouse Rep8 is highly tissue-specific and abundant in gonads. In testes, Rep8 is expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids, whereas in ovaries Rep8 is expressed in granulosa cells. Rep8 associates directly with p97 via its UBX domain. We show that Rep8 is a transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane with its UBX domain facing the cytoplasm. Knock-down of Rep8 expression in human cells leads to a decreased association of p97 with the ER membrane and concomitantly a retarded degradation of misfolded ER-derived proteasome substrates. Thus, Rep8 tethers p97 to the ER membrane for efficient ER-associated degradation.

  9. Melatonin and N-acetyl-serotonin cross the red blood cell membrane and evoke calcium mobilization in malarial parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotta C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The duration of the intraerythrocytic cycle of Plasmodium is a key factor in the pathogenicity of this parasite. The simultaneous attack of the host red blood cells by the parasites depends on the synchronicity of their development. Unraveling the signals at the basis of this synchronicity represents a challenging biological question and may be very important to develop alternative strategies for therapeutic approaches. Recently, we reported that the synchrony of Plasmodium is modulated by melatonin, a host hormone that is synthesized only during the dark phases. Here we report that N-acetyl-serotonin, a melatonin precursor, also releases Ca2+ from isolated P. chabaudi parasites at micro- and nanomolar concentrations and that the release is blocked by 250 mM luzindole, an antagonist of melatonin receptors, and 20 mM U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor. On the basis of confocal microscopy, we also report the ability of 0.1 µM melatonin and 0.1 µM N-acetyl-serotonin to cross the red blood cell membrane and to mobilize intracellular calcium in parasites previously loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-3 AM. The present data represent a step forward into the understanding of the signal transduction process in the host-parasite relationship by supporting the idea that the host hormone melatonin and N-acetyl-serotonin generate IP3 and therefore mobilize intracellular Ca2+ in Plasmodium inside red blood cells.

  10. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.M.; Keppler, L.D.; Orlandi, E.W.; Baker, C.J.; Mischke, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K + /H + response characterized by specific plasma membrane K + efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca 2+ influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from 45 Ca 2+ uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K + /H + response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca 2+ influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La 3+ , Co 2+ , and Cd 2+ but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K + /H + response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca 2+ influx is required for the K + /H + and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

  11. Simultaneous determination of free calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium ion concentrations in simulated milk ultrafiltrate and reconstituted skim milk using the Donnan Membrane Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, R.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Eisner, M.D.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on determination of free Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+ concentrations in a series of CaCl2 solutions, simulated milk ultrafiltrate and reconstituted skim milk using a recently developed Donnan Membrane Technique (DMT). A calcium ion selective electrode was used to compare the DMT

  12. Calcium-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Iborra, Cécile; Maulet, Yves; Lévêque, Christian; El Far, Oussama; Seagar, Michael

    2010-07-30

    Neuroexocytosis requires SNARE proteins, which assemble into trans complexes at the synaptic vesicle/plasma membrane interface and mediate bilayer fusion. Ca(2+) sensitivity is thought to be conferred by synaptotagmin, although the ubiquitous Ca(2+)-effector calmodulin has also been implicated in SNARE-dependent membrane fusion. To examine the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the direct action of calmodulin and synaptotagmin in vitro, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to assay lipid mixing between target- and vesicle-SNARE liposomes. Ca(2+)/calmodulin inhibited SNARE assembly and membrane fusion by binding to two distinct motifs located in the membrane-proximal regions of VAMP2 (K(D) = 500 nm) and syntaxin 1 (K(D) = 2 microm). In contrast, fusion was increased by full-length synaptotagmin 1 anchored in vesicle-SNARE liposomes. When synaptotagmin and calmodulin were combined, synaptotagmin overcame the inhibitory effects of calmodulin. Furthermore, synaptotagmin displaced calmodulin binding to target-SNAREs. These findings suggest that two distinct Ca(2+) sensors act antagonistically in SNARE-mediated fusion.

  13. The tissue-specific Rep8/UBXD6 tethers p97 to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for degradation of misfolded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise; Kriegenburg, Franziska; Lages Lino Vala, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    is a transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane with its UBX domain facing the cytoplasm. Knock-down of Rep8 expression in human cells leads to a decreased association of p97 with the ER membrane and concomitantly a retarded degradation of misfolded ER-derived proteasome substrates. Thus, Rep8 tethers p......The protein known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast is a versatile ATPase complex involved in several biological functions including membrane fusion, protein folding, and activation of membrane-bound transcription factors. In addition, p97 plays a central role in degradation of misfolded...... protein named Rep8 or Ubxd6 as a new cofactor of p97. Mouse Rep8 is highly tissue-specific and abundant in gonads. In testes, Rep8 is expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids, whereas in ovaries Rep8 is expressed in granulosa cells. Rep8 associates directly with p97 via its UBX domain. We show that Rep8...

  14. Comparative immunolocalization of the plasma membrane calcium pump and calbindin D28K in chicken retina during embryonic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tolosa de Talamoni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The immunolocalization of the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA was studied in 4-week-old chick retina in comparison with calbindin D28K (CaBP immunostaining. We have demonstrated that the monoclonal anti-PMCA antibody 5F10 from human erythrocyte plasma membrane crossreacts with a Ca2+ pump epitope of the cells from the neural retina. The immunolocalization of both proteins was also studied during the embryonic development of the chicken retina. At age 4.5 days, the cells of the retina were faintly immunoreactive to PMCA and CaBP antibodies, but the lack of cellular aggregation and differentiation did not allow discrimination between the two proteins. A clear difference in the localization was seen from the tenth day of development through post-hatching with slight variation. PMCA localized mainly in the outer and inner plexiform layers, in some cells in the ganglion layer, in the nerve fiber layer and slightly in the photoreceptor cells. CaBP was intensely stained in cones, cone pedicles and some amacrine cells. The number of CaBP positive amacrine cells declined after hatching. A few ganglion cells and several nerve fibers were CaBP 333 immunoreactive. The role of these proteins in the early stages of retinal development is unknown, but the results suggest that Ca2+ homeostasis in the retina is well regulated, probably to avoid excessive accumulation of Ca2+, which often leads to neurodegeneration.

  15. Presence of a Ca2+-sensitive CDPdiglyceride-inositol transferase in canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinathan, C.; Kirchberger, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and plasma membranes from canine left ventricle were used to evaluate the presence of the enzyme CDPdiglyceride-inositol transferase in these membranes. (K + ,-Ca 2+ )-ATPase activity, a marker for SR, was 79.2 +/- 5.0 (SE) and 11.2 +/- 2.0 μmol x mg -1 x h -1 in SR and plasma membrane preparations, respectively, and (Na + , K + )-ATPase activity, a marker for plasma membranes, was 5.6 +/- 1.2 and 99.2 +/- 8.0 μmol x mg -1 x h -1 , respectively. Contamination of SR and plasma membrane preparations by mitochondria was estimated to be 2% and 8%, respectively, and by Golgi membranes, 0.9% and 1.8%, respectively. The transferase activity detected in the plasma membrane preparation could be accounted for largely, but not entirely, by contaminating SR membranes. The pH optimum for the SR transferase activity was between 8.0 and 9.0. Ca 2+ inhibited the enzyme, half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 10 μM Ca 2+ . No loss of [ 3 H]PtdIns could be detected when membranes were incubated in the presence or absence of Ca 2+ . The Ca 2+ inhibition of the transferase was noncompetitive with respect to CDP-dipalmitin while that with respect to myo-inositol was slightly noncompetitive at low [Ca 2+ ] and became uncompetitive at higher [Ca 2+ ]. It is concluded that CDPdiglyceride-inositol transferase is present on SR membranes and is sensitive to micromolar Ca 2+ . The data are consistent with a putative role for the inhibition of the SR transferase by Ca 2+ and acidic pH in the protection of the SR against calcium overload in ischemic myocardium

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Maher Ali Zeeshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO-1, glutathione (GSH/glutathione disuphide (GSSG, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4, NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR, and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases.

  17. Calcium binding promotes prion protein fragment 90-231 conformational change toward a membrane destabilizing and cytotoxic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Sorrentino

    Full Text Available The pathological form of prion protein (PrP(Sc, as other amyloidogenic proteins, causes a marked increase of membrane permeability. PrP(Sc extracted from infected Syrian hamster brains induces a considerable change in membrane ionic conductance, although the contribution of this interaction to the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration process is still controversial. We previously showed that the human PrP fragment 90-231 (hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ increases ionic conductance across artificial lipid bilayer, in a calcium-dependent manner, producing an alteration similar to that observed for PrP(Sc. In the present study we demonstrate that hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁, pre-incubated with 10 mM Ca⁺⁺ and then re-suspended in physiological external solution increases not only membrane conductance but neurotoxicity as well. Furthermore we show the existence of a direct link between these two effects as demonstrated by a highly statistically significant correlation in several experimental conditions. A similar correlation between increased membrane conductance and cell degeneration has been observed assaying hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ bearing pathogenic mutations (D202N and E200K. We also report that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ induces a conformational change based on an alteration of secondary structure characterized by loss of alpha-helix content causing hydrophobic amino acid exposure and proteinase K resistance. These features, either acquired after controlled thermal denaturation or induced by D202N and E200K mutations were previously identified as responsible for hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ cytotoxicity. Finally, by in silico structural analysis, we propose that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ modifies amino acid orientation, in the same way induced by E200K mutation, thus suggesting a pathway for the structural alterations responsible of PrP neurotoxicity.

  18. Transcellular transport of calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terepka, A R; Coleman, J R; Armbrecht, H J; Gunter, T E

    1976-01-01

    Studies of two calcium transporting epithelia, embryonic chick chorioallantoic membrane and the small intestine of rat and chick, have strongly suggested that the transfer of calcium across a cell involves processes distinctly different from intracellular calcium ion regulation. In the proposed model, transcellular calcium transport is considered as a specialized process developed only by certain cells in those tissues charged with bulk transfer of calcium. The overall effect of the endocytotic mechanism is bulk calcium movement across a cell, protection of mitochondria from exposure to high concentrations of calcium, and the avoidance of wide and potentially toxic fluctuations in cytosol ionic calcium levels. (MFB)

  19. Mechanisms of Alcohol-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Organ Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is readily distributed throughout the body in the blood stream and crosses biological membranes, which affect virtually all biological processes inside the cell. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathological stress responses, part of which is endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response. ER stress, a condition under which unfolded/misfolded protein accumulates in the ER, contributes to alcoholic disorders of major organs such as liver, pancreas, heart, and brain. Potential mechanisms that trigger the alcoholic ER stress response are directly or indirectly related to alcohol metabolism, which includes toxic acetaldehyde and homocysteine, oxidative stress, perturbations of calcium or iron homeostasis, alterations of S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, and abnormal epigenetic modifications. Interruption of the ER stress triggers is anticipated to have therapeutic benefits for alcoholic disorders.

  20. Identification of the sodium-calcium exchanger as the major ricin-binding glycoprotein of bovine rod outer segments and its localization to the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, D.M.; Molday, R.S.; Friedel, U.; Cook, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    After neuraminidase treatment the Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger of bovine rod outer segments was found to specifically bind Ricinus communis agglutinin. SDS gel electrophoresis and Western blotting of ricin-binding proteins purified from rod outer segment membranes by lectin affinity chromatography revealed the existence of two major polypeptides of M r 215K and 103K, the former of which was found to specifically react with PMe 1B3, a monoclonal antibody specific for the 230-kDa non-neuraminidase-treated Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger. Reconstitution of the ricin affinity-purified exchanger into calcium-containing liposomes revealed that neuraminidase treatment had no significant effect on the kinetics of Na + /Ca 2+ exchange activation by sodium. The authors further investigated the density of the Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger in disk and plasma membrane preparations using Western blotting, radioimmunoassays, immunoelectron microscopy, and reconstitution procedures. The results indicate that the Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger is localized in the rod photoreceptor plasma membrane and is absent or present in extremely low concentrations in disk membranes, as they have previously shown to be the case for the cGMP-gated cation channel. Previous reports describing the existence of Na + /Ca 2+ exchange activity in rod outer segment disk membrane preparations may be due to the fusion of plasma membrane components and/or the presence of contaminating plasma membrane vesicles

  1. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate

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    Sarangan Ravichandran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC’s CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1 The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V820-P964. (2 It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3 It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V836-L857. (4 Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase’s catalytic activity. (5 In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn2+-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg2+-GTP substrate. (6 Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD to exhibit its major (∼92% catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7 the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca2+-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca2+-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  2. Zinc and calcium alter the relationship between mitochondrial respiration, ROS and membrane potential in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Mahmoud S; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins

    2017-08-01

    At excess levels, zinc (Zn) disrupts mitochondrial functional integrity and induces oxidative stress in aquatic organisms. Although much is known about the modulation of Zn toxicity by calcium (Ca) in fish, their interactions at the mitochondrial level have scarcely been investigated. Here we assessed the individual and combined effects of Zn and Ca on the relationship between mitochondrial respiration, ROS and membrane potential (ΔΨ mt ) in rainbow trout liver mitochondria. We tested if cation uptake through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a prerequisite for Zn- and/or Ca-induced alteration of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, using our recently developed real-time multi-parametric method, we investigated the changes in respiration, ΔΨ mt , and reactive oxygen species (ROS, as hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )) release associated with Ca-induced mitochondrial depolarization imposed by transient and permanent openings of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). We found that independent of the MCU, Zn precipitated an immediate depolarization of the ΔΨ mt that was associated with relatively slow enhancement of H 2 O 2 release, inhibition of respiration and reversal of the positive correlation between ROS and ΔΨ mt . In contrast, an equitoxic dose of Ca caused transient depolarization, and stimulation of both respiration and H 2 O 2 release, effects that were completely abolished when the MCU was blocked. Contrary to our expectation that mitochondrial transition ROS Spike (mTRS) would be sensitive to both Zn and Ca, only Ca suppressed it. Moreover, Zn and Ca in combination immediately depolarized the ΔΨ mt , and caused transient and sustained stimulation of respiration and H 2 O 2 release, respectively. Lastly, we uncovered and characterized an mPTP-independent Ca-induced depolarization spike that was associated with exposure to moderately elevated levels of Ca. Importantly, we showed the stimulation of ROS release associated with

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  4. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  5. 6-OHDA induced calcium influx through N-type calcium channel alters membrane properties via PKA pathway in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Li, Nan; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Qian; Gao, Guo-Dong; Wang, Xue-Lian

    2014-07-11

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) are sensitive to oxidative stress, and their activation or inactivation can impact cell death. Although these channels have been extensively studied in expression systems, their role in the brain, particularly in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), remain controversial. In this study, we assessed 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced transformation of firing pattern and functional changes of calcium channels in SNc dopaminergic neurons. Application of 6-OHDA (0.5-2mM) evoked a dose-dependent, desensitizing inward current and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) rise. In voltage clamp, ω-conotoxin-sensitive Ca(2+) current modulation mediated by 6-OHDA reflected an altered sensitivity. Furthermore, we found that 6-OHDA modulated Ca(2+) currents through PKA pathway. These results provided evidence for the potential role of VGCCs and PKA involved in oxidative stress in degeneration of SNc neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Homocystinuria Patients with Remethylation Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Martínez-Pizarro

    Full Text Available Proper function of endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria is crucial for cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction at either site as well as perturbation of mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs have been linked to neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Previously, we have observed an increase in ROS and apoptosis levels in patient-derived fibroblasts with remethylation disorders causing homocystinuria. Here we show increased mRNA and protein levels of Herp, Grp78, IP3R1, pPERK, ATF4, CHOP, asparagine synthase and GADD45 in patient-derived fibroblasts suggesting ER stress and calcium perturbations in homocystinuria. In addition, overexpressed MAM-associated proteins (Grp75, σ-1R and Mfn2 were found in these cells that could result in mitochondrial calcium overload and oxidative stress increase. Our results also show an activation of autophagy process and a substantial degradation of altered mitochondria by mitophagy in patient-derived fibroblasts. Moreover, we have observed that autophagy was partially abolished by antioxidants suggesting that ROS participate in this process that may have a protective role. Our findings argue that alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis and autophagy may contribute to the development of this metabolic disorder and suggest a therapeutic potential in homocystinuria for agents that stabilize calcium homeostasis and/or restore the proper function of ER-mitochondria communications.

  7. The reticulons: Guardians of the structure and function of the endoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Sano, Federica; Bernardoni, Paolo; Piacentini, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of the nuclear envelope and a peripheral network of tubules and membrane sheets. The tubules are shaped by a specific class of curvature stabilizing proteins, the reticulons and DP1; however it is still unclear how the sheets are assembled. The ER is the cellular compartment responsible for secretory and membrane protein synthesis. The reducing conditions of ER lead to the intra/inter-chain formation of new disulphide bonds into polypeptides during protein folding assessed by enzymatic or spontaneous reactions. Moreover, ER represents the main intracellular calcium storage site and it plays an important role in calcium signaling that impacts many cellular processes. Accordingly, the maintenance of ER function represents an essential condition for the cell, and ER morphology constitutes an important prerogative of it. Furthermore, it is well known that ER undergoes prominent shape transitions during events such as cell division and differentiation. Thus, maintaining the correct ER structure is an essential feature for cellular physiology. Now, it is known that proper ER-associated proteins play a fundamental role in ER tubules formation. Among these ER-shaping proteins are the reticulons (RTN), which are acquiring a relevant position. In fact, beyond the structural role of reticulons, in very recent years new and deeper functional implications of these proteins are emerging in relation to their involvement in several cellular processes.

  8. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  9. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue. II. Characterization of 45Ca2+ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannini, J.L.; Ruiz-Cristin, J.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using 45 Ca 2+ . Uptake of 45 Ca 2+ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of 45 Ca 2+ uptake to ATP utilization via ΔμH + , no evidence for a secondary H + /Ca 2+ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca 2+ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive 45 Ca 2+ uptake. Optimal uptake of 45 Ca 2+ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of 45 Ca 2+ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving 45 Ca 2+ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell

  10. Impact of high cholesterol and endoplasmic reticulum stress on metabolic diseases: An updated mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdi Sozen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the major site of protein folding and calcium storage. Beside the role of ER in protein homeostasis, it controls the cholesterol production and lipid-membrane biosynthesis as well as surviving and cell death signaling mechanisms in the cell. It is well-documented that elevated plasma cholesterol induces adverse effects in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, liver disorders, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatosis hepatitis (NASH, and metabolic diseases which are associated with oxidative and ER stress. Recent animal model and human studies have showed high cholesterol and ER stress as an emerging factors involved in the development of many metabolic diseases. In this review, we will summarize the crucial effects of hypercholesterolemia and ER stress response in the pathogenesis of CVDs, NAFLD/NASH, diabetes and obesity which are major health problems in western countries. Keywords: Endoplasmic reticulum stress, High cholesterol, Cardiovascular diseases, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Non-alcoholic steatosis hepatitis

  11. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  12. Histological Evaluation of Degradable Guided Bone Regeneration Membranes Prepared from Poly(trimethylene carbonate) and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  13. Histological evaluation of degradable guided bone regeneration membranes prepared from poly(trimethylene carbonate) and biphasic calcium phosphate composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in obesity and obesity-related disorders: An expanded view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliassotti, Michael J; Kim, Paul Y; Estrada, Andrea L; Stewart, Claire M; Gentile, Christopher L

    2016-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is most notable for its central roles in calcium ion storage, lipid biosynthesis, and protein sorting and processing. By virtue of its extensive membrane contact sites that connect the ER to most other organelles and to the plasma membrane, the ER can also regulate diverse cellular processes including inflammatory and insulin signaling, nutrient metabolism, and cell proliferation and death via a signaling pathway called the unfolded protein response (UPR). Chronic UPR activation has been observed in liver and/or adipose tissue of dietary and genetic murine models of obesity, and in human obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Activation of the UPR in obesity and obesity-related disorders likely has two origins. One linked to classic ER stress involving the ER lumen and one linked to alterations to the ER membrane environment. This review discusses both of these origins and also considers the role of post-translational protein modifications, such as acetylation and palmitoylation, and ER-mitochondrial interactions to obesity-mediated impairments in the ER and activation of the UPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. One Dimensional Finite Element Method Approach to Study Effect of Ryanodine Receptor and Serca Pump on Calcium Distribution in Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Parvaiz Ahmad; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2013-11-01

    Oocyte is a female gametocyte or germ cell involved in reproduction. Calcium ions (Ca2+) impact nearly all aspects of cellular life as they play an important role in a variety of cellular functions. Calcium ions contributes to egg activation upon fertilization. Since it is the internal stores which provide most of the calcium signal, much attention has been focused on the intracellular channels. There are mainly two types of calcium channels which release calcium from the internal stores to the cytoplasm in many cell types. These channels are IP3-Receptor and Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Further it is essential to maintain low cytosolic calcium concentration, the cell engages the Serco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases (SERCA) present on the ER or SR membrane for the re-uptake of cytosolic calcium at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. In view of above an attempt has been made to study the effect of the Ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the SERCA pump on the calcium distribution in oocytes. The main aim of this paper is to study the calcium concentration in absence and presence of these parameters. The FEM is used to solve the proposed Mathematical model under appreciate initial and boundary conditions. The program has been developed in MATLAB 7.10 for the entire problem to get numerical results.

  16. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.; Rüdiger, Sten; Erban, Radek

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While

  17. Two-layer membranes of calcium phosphate/collagen/PLGA nanofibres: in vitro biomineralisation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Nora; Schneider, Oliver D.; Mohn, Dirk; Luechinger, Norman A.; Koehler, Fabian M.; Hofmann, Sandra; Vetsch, Jolanda R.; Thimm, Benjamin W.; Müller, Ralph; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study evaluates the in vitro biomedical performance of an electrospun, flexible, anisotropic bilayer with one layer containing a collagen to mineral ratio similar to that in bone. The double membrane consists of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) layer and an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CaP)/collagen (Col)/PLGA layer. In vitro biomineralisation and a cell culture study with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were conducted to characterise such membranes for possible application as biomaterials. Nanofibres with different a-CaP/Col/PLGA compositions were synthesised by electrospinning to mimic the actual composition of bone tissue. Immersion in simulated body fluid and in cell culture medium resulted in the deposition of a hydroxyapatite layer. Incubation of hMSC for 4 weeks allowed for assessment of the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of the cells on both sides of the double membrane. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the proper adhesion of the cells. Calcium and collagen content was proven by Alizarin red S and Sirius red assays. Acute cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles or the chemicals used in the scaffold preparation could be excluded based on viability assays (alamarBlue and alkaline phosphatase activity). The findings suggest possible application of such double membranes is in treatment of bone defects with complex geometries as wound dressing material.The present study evaluates the in vitro biomedical performance of an electrospun, flexible, anisotropic bilayer with one layer containing a collagen to mineral ratio similar to that in bone. The double membrane consists of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) layer and an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CaP)/collagen (Col)/PLGA layer. In vitro biomineralisation and a cell culture study with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were conducted to characterise such membranes for possible application as biomaterials. Nanofibres with different a

  18. Cardiac Calcium ATPase Dimerization Measured by Cross-Linking and Fluorescence Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Daniel J; Zak, Taylor J; Robia, Seth L

    2016-09-20

    The cardiac sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) establishes the intracellular calcium gradient across the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. It has been proposed that SERCA forms homooligomers that increase the catalytic rate of calcium transport. We investigated SERCA dimerization in rabbit left ventricular myocytes using a photoactivatable cross-linker. Western blotting of cross-linked SERCA revealed higher-molecular-weight species consistent with SERCA oligomerization. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements in cells transiently transfected with fluorescently labeled SERCA2a revealed that SERCA readily forms homodimers. These dimers formed in the absence or presence of the SERCA regulatory partner, phospholamban (PLB) and were unaltered by PLB phosphorylation or changes in calcium or ATP. Fluorescence lifetime data are compatible with a model in which PLB interacts with a SERCA homodimer in a stoichiometry of 1:2. Together, these results suggest that SERCA forms constitutive homodimers in live cells and that dimer formation is not modulated by SERCA conformational poise, PLB binding, or PLB phosphorylation. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Calcium and energy: making the cake and eating it too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Douglas R; Wang, Ruoning

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial calcium ions promote a number of events that sustain ATP levels in the cell. Cardenas et al. (2010) now demonstrate that the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor at the endoplasmic reticulum constitutively provides calcium for mitochondria. In the absence of this calcium transfer, cells use autophagy to sustain survival. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of free fatty acid associated recombinant membrane receptor protein expression in HEK293 cells using Raman spectroscopy, calcium imaging, and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juqiang; Xu, Han; Wu, Yangzhe; Tang, Mingjie; McEwen, Gerald D; Liu, Pin; Hansen, Dane R; Gilbertson, Timothy A; Zhou, Anhong

    2013-02-05

    G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) is a previously orphaned G-protein-coupled receptor that apparently functions as a sensor for dietary fat in the gustatory and digestive systems. In this study, a cDNA sequence encoding a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible mature peptide of GPR120 was inserted into an expression vector and transfected in HEK293 cells. We measured Raman spectra of single HEK293 cells as well as GPR120-expressing HEK293-GPR120 cells at a 48 h period following the additions of Dox at several concentrations. We found that the spectral intensity of HEK293-GPR120 cells is dependent upon the dose of Dox, which correlates with the accumulation of GPR120 protein in the cells. However, the amount of the fatty acid activated changes in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) as measured by ratiometric calcium imaging was not correlated with Dox concentration. Principal components analysis (PCA) of Raman spectra reveals that the spectra from different treatments of HEK293-GPR120 cells form distinct, completely separated clusters with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area of 1, while those spectra for the HEK293 cells form small overlap clusters with the ROC area of 0.836. It was also found that expression of GPR120 altered the physiochemical and biomechanical properties of the parental cell membrane surface, which was quantitated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). These findings demonstrate that the combination of Raman spectroscopy, calcium imaging, and AFM may provide new tools in noninvasive and quantitative monitoring of membrane receptor expression induced alterations in the biophysical and signaling properties of single living cells.

  1. TRPP2 and TRPV4 form an EGF-activated calcium permeable channel at the apical membrane of renal collecting duct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ren Zhang

    Full Text Available Regulation of apical calcium entry is important for the function of principal cells of the collecting duct. However, the molecular identity and the regulators of the transporter/channel, which is responsible for apical calcium entry and what factors regulate the calcium conduction remain unclear.We report that endogenous TRPP2 and TRPV4 assemble to form a 23-pS divalent cation-permeable non-selective ion channel at the apical membrane of renal principal cells of the collecting duct. TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel complex was identified by patch-clamp, immunofluorescence and co-immunprecipitation studies in both principal cells that either possess normal cilia (cilia (+ or in which cilia are absent (cilia (-. This channel has distinct biophysical and pharmacological and regulatory profiles compared to either TRPP2 or TRPV4 channels. The rate of occurrence detected by patch clamp was higher in cilia (- compared to cilia (+ cells. In addition, shRNA knockdown of TRPP2 increased the prevalence of TRPV4 channel activity while knockdown of TRPV4 resulted in TRPP2 activity and knockdown of both proteins vastly decreased the 23-pS channel activity. Epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulated TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel through the EGF receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling. With loss of cilia, apical EGF treatment resulted in 64-fold increase in channel activity in cilia (- but not cilia (+ cells. In addition EGF increased cell proliferation in cilia (- cell that was dependent upon TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel mediated increase in intracellular calcium.We conclude that in the absence of cilia, an EGF activated TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel may play an important role in increased cell proliferation and cystogenesis.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of wheat calcium ATPases and potential role of selected ACAs and ECAs in calcium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Roohi; Williams, Lorraine E; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Virk, Nasar

    2017-10-27

    P 2 - type calcium ATPases (ACAs-auto inhibited calcium ATPases and ECAs-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases) belong to the P- type ATPase family of active membrane transporters and are significantly involved in maintaining accurate levels of Ca 2+ , Mn 2+ and Zn 2+ in the cytosol as well as playing a very important role in stress signaling, stomatal opening and closing and pollen tube growth. Here we report the identification and possible role of some of these ATPases from wheat. In this study, ACA and ECA sequences of six species (belonging to Poaceae) were retrieved from different databases and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. A high degree of evolutionary relatedness was observed among P 2 sequences characterized in this study. Members of the respective groups from different plant species were observed to fall under the same clade. This pattern highlights the common ancestry of P 2- type calcium ATPases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR was used to analyse the expression of selected ACAs and ECAs from Triticum aestivum (wheat) under calcium toxicity and calcium deficiency. The data indicated that expression of ECAs is enhanced under calcium stress, suggesting possible roles of these ATPases in calcium homeostasis in wheat. Similarly, the expression of ACAs was significantly different in plants grown under calcium stress as compared to plants grown under control conditions. This gives clues to the role of ACAs in signal transduction during calcium stress in wheat. Here we concluded that wheat genome consists of nine P 2B and three P 2A -type calcium ATPases. Moreover, gene loss events in wheat ancestors lead to the loss of a particular homoeolog of a gene in wheat. To elaborate the role of these wheat ATPases, qRT-PCR was performed. The results indicated that when plants are exposed to calcium stress, both P 2A and P 2B gene expression get enhanced. This further gives clues about the possible role of these ATPases in wheat in calcium management. These findings can be

  3. A novel interaction between calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand and Basigin regulates calcium signaling and matrix metalloproteinase activities in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tingting; Su, Juan; Tang, Wen; Luo, Zhongling; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhou, Honghao; Qi, Min; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhang, Jianglin; Chen, Xiang

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular free calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger regulating a multitude of normal and pathogenic cellular responses, including the development of melanoma. Upstream signaling pathways regulating the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) may therefore have a significant impact on melanoma growth and metastasis. In this study, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is bound to Basigin, a widely expressed integral plasma membrane glycoprotein and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, or CD147) implicated in melanoma proliferation, invasiveness, and metastasis. This interaction between CAML and Basigin was first identified using yeast two-hybrid screening and further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. In human A375 melanoma cells, CAML and Basigin were co-localized to the ER. Knockdown of Basigin in melanoma cells by siRNA significantly decreased resting [Ca2+]i and the [Ca2+]i increase induced by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin (TG), indicating that the interaction between CAML and Basigin regulates ER-dependent [Ca2+]i signaling. Meanwhile upregulating the [Ca2+]i either by TG or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) could stimulate the production of MMP-9 in A375 cells with the expression of Basigin. Our study has revealed a previously uncharacterized [Ca2+]i signaling pathway that may control melanoma invasion, and metastasis. Disruption of this pathway may be a novel therapeutic strategy for melanoma treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcium fluxes across the plasma membrane of Commelina communis L. assayed in a cell-free system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, B.; Graef, P.; Weiler, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    The inside-out fraction of plasma membrane-rich vesicles prepared from leaves of Commelina communis L. by aqueous two-phase partitioning was loaded with 45 Ca 2+ through the action of the plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase. Results suggest the presence of a Ca 2+ channel in the plasma membrane of C. communis. The channel is obtained in a Ca 2+ -inactivated state after preparation and Ca 2+ -loading of the vesicles. The inactivation is removed by TFP [trifluoperazine] or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], presumably due to the Ca 2+ -mobilizing effect of these compounds. The activated Ca 2+ channel is La 3+ sensitive and, in the cell, would allow for passage of Ca 2+ into the cell. The possibility that TFP or W-7 act independent of CM, or through CM tightly associated with the plasma membrane, is discussed

  5. The functions of store-operated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putney, James W; Steinckwich-Besançon, Natacha; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Davis, Felicity M; Desai, Pooja N; D'Agostin, Diane M; Wu, Shilan; Bird, Gary S

    2017-06-01

    Store-operated calcium channels provide calcium signals to the cytoplasm of a wide variety of cell types. The basic components of this signaling mechanism include a mechanism for discharging Ca 2+ stores (commonly but not exclusively phospholipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate), a sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum that also serves as an activator of the plasma membrane channel (STIM1 and STIM2), and the store-operated channel (Orai1, 2 or 3). The advent of mice genetically altered to reduce store-operated calcium entry globally or in specific cell types has provided important tools to understand the functions of these widely encountered channels in specific and clinically important physiological systems. This review briefly discusses the history and cellular properties of store-operated calcium channels, and summarizes selected studies of their physiological functions in specific physiological or pathological contexts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Silver ions increase plasma membrane permeability through modulation of intracellular calcium levels in tobacco BY-2 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, Petr; Laňková, Martina; Vandenbussche, F.; Van Der Straeten, D.; Petrášek, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 5 (2018), s. 809-818 ISSN 0721-7714 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-10948S Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21519 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Auxin * Calcium * Ethylene * Silver ions * Tobacco BY-2 cells * Transmembrane transport Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 2.869, year: 2016

  7. Observation of endoplasmic reticulum tubules via TOF-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry imaging of transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, Corryn E; Fisher, Gregory L; Johnson, Ben; Tamkun, Michael M; Kraft, Mary L

    2018-02-26

    Advances in three-dimensional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging have enabled visualizing the subcellular distributions of various lipid species within individual cells. However, the difficulty of locating organelles using SIMS limits efforts to study their lipid compositions. Here, the authors have assessed whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Tracker Blue White DPX ® , which is a commercially available stain for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum using fluorescence microscopy, produces distinctive ions that can be used to locate the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. Time-of-flight-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry (MS 2 ) imaging was used to identify positively and negatively charged ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain. Then, these ions were used to localize the stain and thus the endoplasmic reticulum, within individual human embryonic kidney cells that contained higher numbers of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions on their surfaces. By performing MS 2 imaging of selected ions in parallel with the precursor ion (MS 1 ) imaging, the authors detected a chemical interference native to the cell at the same nominal mass as the pentafluorophenyl fragment from the ER-Tracker stain. Nonetheless, the fluorine secondary ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain provided a distinctive signal that enabled locating the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. This simple strategy for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum in individual cells using SIMS could be combined with existing SIMS methodologies for imaging intracellular lipid distribution and to study the lipid composition within the endoplasmic reticulum.

  8. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4) co-ordinates calcium and nitric oxide signaling in regulating murine sperm functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olli, Kristine E; Li, Kun; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2018-01-01

    Reduced sperm motility (asthenospermia) and resulting infertility arise from deletion of the Plasma Membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase 4 (Pmca4) gene which encodes the highly conserved Ca 2+ efflux pump, PMCA4. This is the major Ca 2+ clearance protein in murine sperm. Since the mechanism underlying asthenospermia in PMCA4's absence or reduced activity is unknown, we investigated if sperm PMCA4 negatively regulates nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) and when absent NO, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress levels are increased. Using co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we show an association of PMCA4 with the NOSs in elevated cytosolic [Ca 2+ ] in capacitated and Ca 2+ ionophore-treated sperm and with neuronal (nNOS) at basal [Ca 2+ ] (ucapacitated sperm). FRET efficiencies for PMCA4-eNOS were 35% and 23% in capacitated and uncapacitated sperm, significantly (p < 0.01) different, with the molecules being <10 nm apart. For PMCA4-nNOS, this interaction was seen only for capacitated sperm where FRET efficiency was 24%, significantly (p < 0.05) higher than in uncapacitated sperm (6%). PMCA4 and the NOSs were identified as interacting partners in a quaternary complex that includes Caveolin1, which co-immunoprecipitated with eNOS in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. In Pmca4 -/- sperm NOS activity was elevated twofold in capacitated/uncapacitated sperm (vs. wild-type), accompanied by a twofold increase in peroxynitrite levels and significantly (p < 0.001) increased numbers of apoptotic germ cells. The data support a quaternary complex model in which PMCA4 co-ordinates Ca 2+ and NO signaling to maintain motility, with increased NO levels resulting in asthenospermia in Pmca4 -/- males. They suggest the involvement of PMCA4 mutations in human asthenospermia, with diagnostic relevance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  10. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  11. Fatty acid fouling of forward osmosis membrane: Effects of pH, calcium, membrane orientation, initial permeate flux and foulant composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pin; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Liu, Pan; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2016-08-01

    Octanoic acid (OA) was selected to represent fatty acids in effluent organic matter (EOM). The effects of feed solution (FS) properties, membrane orientation and initial permeate flux on OA fouling in forward osmosis (FO) were investigated. The undissociated OA formed a cake layer quickly and caused the water flux to decline significantly in the initial 0.5hr at unadjusted pH3.56; while the fully dissociated OA behaved as an anionic surfactant and promoted the water permeation at an elevated pH of 9.00. Moreover, except at the initial stage, the sudden decline of water flux (meaning the occurrence of severe membrane fouling) occurred in two conditions: 1. 0.5mmol/L Ca(2+), active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) and 1.5mol/L NaCl (DS); 2. No Ca(2+), active layer-facing FS (AL-FS) and 4mol/L NaCl (DS). This demonstrated that cake layer compaction or pore blocking occurred only when enough foulants were absorbed into the membrane surface, and the water permeation was high enough to compact the deposit inside the porous substrate. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as a co-foulant. The water flux of both co-foulants was between the fluxes obtained separately for the two foulants at pH3.56, and larger than the two values at pH9.00. This manifested that, at pH3.56, BSA alleviated the effect of the cake layer caused by OA, and OA enhanced BSA fouling simultaneously; while at pH9.00, the mutual effects of OA and BSA eased the membrane fouling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Bi-polarized translation of ascidian maternal mRNA determinant pem-1 associated with regulators of the translation machinery on cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum (cER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paix, Alexandre; Le Nguyen, Phuong Ngan; Sardet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Polarized cortical mRNA determinants such as maternal macho-1 and pem-1 in ascidians, like budding yeast mating factor ASH1 reside on the cER-mRNA domain a subdomain of cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum(ER) and are translated in its vicinity. Using high resolution imaging and isolated cortical fragments prepared from eggs and embryos we now find that macho-1 and pem-1 RNAs co-localize with phospho-protein regulators of translation initiation (MnK/4EBP/S6K). Translation of cortical pem-1 RNA follows its bi-polarized relocalization. About 10 min after fertilization or artificial activation with a calcium ionophore, PEM1 protein is detected in the vegetal cortex in the vicinity of pem-1 RNA. About 40 min after fertilization-when pem-1 RNA and P-MnK move to the posterior pole-PEM1 protein remains in place forming a network of cortical patches anchored at the level of the zygote plasma membrane before disappearing. Cortical PEM1 protein is detected again at the 4 cell stage in the posterior centrosome attracting body (CAB) region where the cER-mRNA domain harboring pem-1/P-MnK/P-4EBP/P-S6K is concentrated. Bi-polarized PEM1 protein signals are not detected when pem-1 morpholinos are injected into eggs or zygotes or when MnK is inhibited. We propose that localized translation of the pem-1 RNA determinant is triggered by the fertilization/calcium wave and that the process is controlled by phospho-protein regulators of translation initiation co-localized with the RNA determinant on a sub-domain of the cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Autophagosomal membranes assemble at ER-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Codogno, Patrice; Morel, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    The biogenesis of autophagosome, the double membrane bound organelle related to macro-autophagy, is a complex event requiring numerous key-proteins and membrane remodeling events. Our recent findings identify the extended synaptotagmins, crucial tethers of Endoplasmic Reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, as key-regulators of this molecular sequence.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ariyasu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR, which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI, Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2 are discussed in this article.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article. PMID:28208663

  16. Altered Elementary Calcium Release Events and Enhanced Calcium Release by Thymol in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Szentesi, Péter; Szappanos, Henrietta; Szegedi, Csaba; Gönczi, Monika; Jona, István; Cseri, Julianna; Kovács, László; Csernoch, László

    2004-01-01

    The effects of thymol on steps of excitation-contraction coupling were studied on fast-twitch muscles of rodents. Thymol was found to increase the depolarization-induced release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which could not be attributed to a decreased calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors or altered intramembrane charge movement, but rather to a more efficient coupling of depolarization to channel opening. Thymol increased ryanodine bind...

  17. Structure of thrombospondin type 3 repeats in bacterial outer membrane protein A reveals its intra-repeat disulfide bond-dependent calcium-binding capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuyan; Sun, Cancan; Tan, Kemin; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2017-09-01

    Eukaryotic thrombospondin type 3 repeat (TT3R) is an efficient calcium ion (Ca2+) binding motif only found in mammalian thrombospondin family. TT3R has also been found in prokaryotic cellulase Cel5G, which was thought to forfeit the Ca2+-binding capability due to the formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, instead of the inter-repeat ones possessed by eukaryotic TT3Rs. In this study, we have identified an enormous number of prokaryotic TT3R-containing proteins belonging to several different protein families, including outer membrane protein A (OmpA), an important structural protein connecting the outer membrane and the periplasmic peptidoglycan layer in gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic region of OmpA from Capnocytophaga gingivalis, which contains a linker region comprising five consecutive TT3Rs. The structure of OmpA-TT3R exhibits a well-ordered architecture organized around two tightly-coordinated Ca2+ and confirms the presence of abnormal intra-repeat disulfide bonds. Further mutagenesis studies showed that the Ca2+-binding capability of OmpA-TT3R is indeed dependent on the proper formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, which help to fix a conserved glycine residue at its proper position for Ca2+ coordination. Additionally, despite lacking inter repeat disulfide bonds, the interfaces between adjacent OmpA-TT3Rs are enhanced by both hydrophobic and conserved aromatic-proline interactions.

  18. A lentivirally delivered photoactivatable GFP to assess continuity in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurones and glia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jones, V. C.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Jones, O. T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 458, č. 4 (2009), s. 809-818 ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/08/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : endoplasmic reticulum * calcium store * neurone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.695, year: 2009

  19. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca2+ and Mg2+, two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca2+ nor Mg2+ lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones.

  20. Mg(2+,ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. ІІ. Regulation of activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. О. Veklich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane Ca2+-pump is one of key proteins, which takes part in Ca2+ exchange in smooth muscle cells. It has a lot of diverse functions from control of basal cytoplasmal Ca2+ concentration to regulation of proteins involved in Ca2+-dependent signal pathway. Ca2+ pump function is often depen­dent on the isoform or even form of alternative splicing. Allowing for a variety of Ca2+-pump functions and properties, which were reviewed in detail in the first part of our review article cycle (Ukr. Biochem. J., 2015; 87(1, the precise control of the mentioned pump activity is very important for cell functioning­. The other part of this article is dedicated to different regulation factors of smooth muscle plasma membrane Ca2+-pump activity: endogenous and exo­genous, biotic and abiotic factors. Special attention is given to literature data and own results about design and the search of selective plasma membrane Ca2+-pump inhibitor which would allow examining its functioning in smooth muscle cells more meticulously.

  1. Mg(2+),ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. ІІ. Regulation of activity

    OpenAIRE

    T. О. Veklich; Iu. Iu. Mazur; S. О. Kosterin

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-pump is one of key proteins, which takes part in Ca2+ exchange in smooth muscle cells. It has a lot of diverse functions from control of basal cytoplasmal Ca2+ concentration to regulation of proteins involved in Ca2+-dependent signal pathway. Ca2+ pump function is often depen­dent on the isoform or even form of alternative splicing. Allowing for a variety of Ca2+-pump functions and properties, which were reviewed in detail in the first part of our review article cycle (U...

  2. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  3. Role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, and calcium homeostasis in human lymphocyte death induced by nickel carbonate hydroxide in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' Bemba-Meka, Prosper [Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, QC (Canada); University of Louisville, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Lemieux, Nicole [Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology and Cellular Biology, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada); Chakrabarti, Saroj K. [Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    When isolated human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with various concentrations of soluble form of nickel carbonate hydroxide (NiCH) (0-1 mM), at 37 C for 4 h, both concentration- and time-dependent effects of NiCH on lymphocyte death were observed. Increased generation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), superoxide anion (O{sub 2} {sup -}), depletion of both no protein (NP-) and protein (P-) sulfhydryl (SH) contents and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were induced by NiCH. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with either catalase (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenger), or deferoxamine (DFO) (iron chelator), or excess glutathione (GSH) (an antioxidant) not only significantly reduced the NiCH-induced generation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and LPO, but also increased the NP-SH and P-SH contents initially reduced by NiCH. NiCH-induced generation of excess O{sub 2} {sup -} but not excess LPO was significantly reduced by pretreatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD). NiCH-induced lymphocyte death was significantly prevented by pre-treatment with either catalase, or dimethylthiourea/mannitol (hydroxyl radical scavengers), or DFO, or excess GSH/N-acetylcysteine. NiCH-induced lymphocyte death was also significantly prevented by pretreatment with excess SOD. Thus, various types of oxidative stresses play an important role in NiCH-induced lymphocyte death. Cotreatment with cyclosporin A, a specific inhibitor of alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}), not only inhibited NiCH-induced alteration in {delta}{psi}{sub m}, but also significantly prevented Ni-compound-induced lymphocyte death. Furthermore, NiCH-induced destabilization of cellular calcium homeostasis. As such, NiCH-induced lymphocyte death was significantly prevented by modulating intracellular calcium fluxes such as Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} antagonist. Thus, the mechanism of NiCH (soluble form)-induced activation of lymphocyte death signalling pathways involves not only the excess

  4. Plasma membrane potential depolarization and cytosolic calcium flux are early events involved in tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) plant-to-plant communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebelo, Simon A; Matsui, Kenji; Ozawa, Rika; Maffei, Massimo E

    2012-11-01

    Tomato plants respond to herbivory by emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are released into the surrounding atmosphere. We analyzed the tomato herbivore-induced VOCs and tested the ability of tomato receiver plants to detect tomato donor volatiles by analyzing early responses, including plasma membrane potential (V(m)) variations and cytosolic calcium ([Ca²⁺](cyt)) fluxes. Receiver tomato plants responded within seconds to herbivore-induced VOCs with a strong V(m) depolarization, which was only partly recovered by fluxing receiver plants with clean air. Among emitted volatiles, we identified by GC-MS some green leaf volatiles (GLVs) such as (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, the monoterpene α-pinene, and the sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene. GLVs were found to exert the stronger V(m) depolarization, when compared to α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Furthermore, V(m) depolarization was found to increase with increasing GLVs concentration. GLVs were also found to induce a strong [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase, particularly when (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate was tested both in solution and with a gas. On the other hand, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene, which also induced a significant V(m) depolarization with respect to controls, did not exert any significant effect on [Ca²⁺](cyt) homeostasis. Our results show for the first time that plant perception of volatile cues (especially GLVs) from the surrounding environment is mediated by early events, occurring within seconds and involving the alteration of the plasma membrane potential and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) flux. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The pmr gene, encoding a Ca2+-ATPase, is required for calcium and manganese homeostasis and normal development of hyphae and conidia in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Barry J; Abreu, Stephen; Johl, Jessica K; Bowman, Emma Jean

    2012-11-01

    The pmr gene is predicted to encode a Ca(2+)-ATPase in the secretory pathway. We examined two strains of Neurospora crassa that lacked PMR: the Δpmr strain, in which pmr was completely deleted, and pmr(RIP), in which the gene was extensively mutated. Both strains had identical, complex phenotypes. Compared to the wild type, these strains required high concentrations of calcium or manganese for optimal growth and had highly branched, slow-growing hyphae. They conidiated poorly, and the shape and size of the conidia were abnormal. Calcium accumulated in the Δpmr strains to only 20% of the wild-type level. High concentrations of MnCl(2) (1 to 5 mM) in growth medium partially suppressed the morphological defects but did not alter the defect in calcium accumulation. The Δpmr Δnca-2 double mutant (nca-2 encodes a Ca(2+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane) accumulated 8-fold more calcium than the wild type, and the morphology of the hyphae was more similar to that of wild-type hyphae. Previous experiments failed to show a function for nca-1, which encodes a SERCA-type Ca(2+)-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum (B. J. Bowman, S. Abreu, E. Margolles-Clark, M. Draskovic, and E. J. Bowman, Eukaryot. Cell 10:654-661, 2011). The pmr(RIP) Δnca-1 double mutant accumulated small amounts of calcium, like the Δpmr strain, but exhibited even more extreme morphological defects. Thus, PMR can apparently replace NCA-1 in the endoplasmic reticulum, but NCA-1 cannot replace PMR. The morphological defects in the Δpmr strain are likely caused, in part, by insufficient concentrations of calcium and manganese in the Golgi compartment; however, PMR is also needed to accumulate normal levels of calcium in the whole cell.

  6. Deletion of the Intestinal Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump, Isoform 1, Atp2b1, in Mice is Associated with Decreased Bone Mineral Density and Impaired Responsiveness to 1, 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Zachary C.; Craig, Theodore A.; Filoteo, Adelaida G.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Neyses, Ludwig; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The physiological importance of the intestinal plasma membrane calcium pump, isoform 1, (Pmca1, Atp2b1), in calcium absorption and homeostasis has not been previously demonstrated in vivo. Since global germ-line deletion of the Pmca1 in mice is associated with embryonic lethality, we selectively deleted the Pmca1 in intestinal absorptive cells. Mice with loxP sites flanking exon 2 of the Pmca1 gene (Pmca1fl/fl) were crossed with mice expressing Cre recombinase in the intestine under control of the villin promoter to give mice in which the Pmca1 had been deleted in the intestine (Pmca1EKO mice). Pmca1EKO mice were born at a reduced frequency and were small at the time of birth when compared to wild-type (Wt) litter mates. At two months of age, Pmca1EKO mice fed a 0.81% calcium, 0.34% phosphorus, normal vitamin D diet had reduced whole body bone mineral density (P <0.037), and reduced femoral bone mineral density (P <0.015). There was a trend towards lower serum calcium and higher serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) concentrations in Pmca1EKO mice compared to Wt mice but the changes were not statistically significant. The urinary phosphorus/creatinine ratio was increased in Pmca1EKO mice (P <0.004). Following the administration of 200 ng of 1α,25(OH)2D3 intraperitoneally to Wt mice, active intestinal calcium transport increased ∼2-fold, whereas Pmca1EKO mice administered an equal amount of 1α,25(OH)2D3 failed to show an increase in active calcium transport. Deletion of the Pmca1 in the intestine is associated with reduced growth and bone mineralization, and a failure to up-regulate calcium absorption in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. PMID:26392310

  7. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Dual Role of Ancient Ubiquitous Protein 1 (AUP1) in Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Protein Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Klemm, Elizabeth J.; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2011-01-01

    Quality control of endoplasmic reticulum proteins involves the identification and engagement of misfolded proteins, dislocation of the misfolded protein across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, and ubiquitin-mediated targeting to the proteasome for degradation. Ancient ubiquitous protein 1 (AUP1) physically associates with the mammalian HRD1-SEL1L complex, and AUP1 depletion impairs degradation of misfolded ER proteins. One of the functions of AUP1 in ER quality control is to recruit t...

  10. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  11. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR,HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic zonal ultracentrifugation. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes whereas the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material, similar to that seen in the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sucrose HSR vesicles have an additional morphological feature which appears as membrane projections that resemble the SR feet. The freeze-fracture morphology of either type of SR reveals an asymmetric distribution of intramembraneous particles in the same orientation and distribution as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo. Biochemical studies were made on the content of Ca, Mg, ATPase, and protein of the vesicles and phosphorylation of the vesicles. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that the LSR is derived from the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and the HSR is derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contains junctional SR membrane and has three unique proteins (calsequestrin, an intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein and a 9000 dalton proteolipid).

  12. Mechanisms of mineral membrane fouling growth modulated by pulsed modes of current during electrodialysis: evidences of water splitting implications in the appearance of the amorphous phases of magnesium hydroxide and calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Araya, Nicolás; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Bazinet, Laurent

    2014-07-15

    Experiments revealed the fouling nature evolutions along different electrodialysis (ED) trials, and how it disappears when current pulsation acts repetitively on the interfaces of ion-exchange membranes (IEMs). Fouling was totally controlled on the diluate side of cation-exchange membrane (CEM) by the repetitive pulsation frequency of the higher on-duty ratios applied. They created steady water splitting proton-barriers that neutralized OH(-) leakage through the membrane, decreasing the interfacial pH, and fouling of the concentrate side. The anion-exchange membrane (AEM) on the diluate side was similarly protected, but it was fouled once water splitting OH(-) generation became either intense enough or excessively weak. Interestingly, amorphous magnesium hydroxide (AMH) stemmed on the CEM-diluate side from brucite under intense water splitting OH(-) generation, and/or strong OH(-) leakage electromigration through the membrane. Water dissociation and overlimiting current regimes triggered drastic water molecule removal from crystal lattices through an accelerated cascade water splitting reaction. Also, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) appeared on CEM under intense water splitting reaction, and disappeared once intense OH(-) leakage was allowed by the water splitting proton-barrier dissipation. Our findings have implications for membrane fouling control, as well as for the understanding of the growth behavior of CaCO3 and Mg(OH)2 species on electromembrane interfaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural insights into the T6SS effector protein Tse3 and the Tse3-Tsi3 complex from Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveal a calcium-dependent membrane-binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Defen; Shang, Guijun; Zhang, Heqiao; Yu, Qian; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Jupeng; He, Fengjuan; Zhu, Chunyuan; Zhao, Yanyu; Yin, Kun; Chen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Junqiang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Yuan, Zenglin; Xu, Sujuan; Hu, Wei; Cang, Huaixing; Gu, Lichuan

    2014-06-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses the type VI secretion system (T6SS) to deliver the muramidase Tse3 into the periplasm of rival bacteria to degrade their peptidoglycan (PG). Concomitantly, P. aeruginosa uses the periplasm-localized immunity protein Tsi3 to prevent potential self-intoxication caused by Tse3, and thus gains an edge over rival bacteria in fierce niche competition. Here, we report the crystal structures of Tse3 and the Tse3-Tsi3 complex. Tse3 contains an annexin repeat-like fold at the N-terminus and a G-type lysozyme fold at the C-terminus. One loop in the N-terminal domain (Loop 12) and one helix (α9) from the C-terminal domain together anchor Tse3 and the Tse3-Tsi3 complex to membrane in a calcium-dependent manner in vitro, and this membrane-binding ability is essential for Tse3's activity. In the C-terminal domain, a Y-shaped groove present on the surface likely serves as the PG binding site. Two calcium-binding motifs are also observed in the groove and these are necessary for Tse3 activity. In the Tse3-Tsi3 structure, three loops of Tsi3 insert into the substrate-binding groove of Tse3, and three calcium ions present at the interface of the complex are indispensable for the formation of the Tse3-Tsi3 complex. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  15. Calcium regulation and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Rapaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the neuron induces transient fluctuations in [Ca2+]i. This transient rise in [Ca2+]i is dependent on calcium entry via calcium channels and release of calcium from intracellular stores, finally resulting in increase in calcium levels, which activates calcium regulatory proteins to restore the resting calcium levels by binding to the calcium-binding proteins, sequestration into the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria, and finally extrusion of calcium spike potential from the cell by adenosine triphosphate-driven Ca2+ pumps and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Improper regulation of calcium signaling, sequentially, likely contributes to synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxic and/or apoptotic death of the vulnerable neuronal populations. The cognitive decline associated with normal aging is not only due to neuronal loss, but is fairly the result of synaptic connectivity. Many evidences support that Ca2+ dyshomeostasis is implicated in normal brain aging. Thus the chief factor associated with Alzheimer’s disease was found to be increase in the levels of free intracellular calcium, demonstrating that the excessive levels might lead to cell death, which provides a key target for the calcium channel blockers might be used as the neuroprotective agents in Alzheimer’s disease.

  16. Calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlmark, B.; Reizenstein, P.; Dudley, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The methods most commonly used to measure the absorption and retention of orally administered calcium are reviewed. Nearly all make use of calcium radioisotopes. The magnitude of calcium absorption and retention depends upon the chemical form and amount of calcium administered, and the clinical and nutritional status of the subject; these influences are briefly surveyed. (author)

  17. The calcium feedback loop and T cell activation: how cytoskeleton networks control intracellular calcium flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noah; Reicher, Barak; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2014-02-01

    During T cell activation, the engagement of a T cell with an antigen-presenting cell (APC) results in rapid cytoskeletal rearrangements and a dramatic increase of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration, downstream to T cell antigen receptor (TCR) ligation. These events facilitate the organization of an immunological synapse (IS), which supports the redistribution of receptors, signaling molecules and organelles towards the T cell-APC interface to induce downstream signaling events, ultimately supporting T cell effector functions. Thus, Ca(2+) signaling and cytoskeleton rearrangements are essential for T cell activation and T cell-dependent immune response. Rapid release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, e.g. the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggers the opening of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, residing in the plasma membrane. These channels facilitate a sustained influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane in a process termed store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Because CRAC channels are themselves inhibited by Ca(2+) ions, additional factors are suggested to enable the sustained Ca(2+) influx required for T cell function. Among these factors, we focus here on the contribution of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. The TCR-mediated increase in intracellular Ca(2+) evokes a rapid cytoskeleton-dependent polarization, which involves actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) reorientation. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+) flux and cytoskeletal rearrangements, and further describe the way by which the cytoskeletal networks feedback to Ca(2+) signaling by controlling the spatial and temporal distribution of Ca(2+) sources and sinks, modulating TCR-dependent Ca(2+) signals, which are required for an appropriate T cell response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters

  18. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. PMID:24549172

  19. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the ...

  20. Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçın, Belgin; Zhao, Lu; Stofanko, Martin; O'Sullivan, Niamh C; Kang, Zi Han; Roost, Annika; Thomas, Matthew R; Zaessinger, Sophie; Blard, Olivier; Patto, Alex L; Sohail, Anood; Baena, Valentina; Terasaki, Mark; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2017-07-25

    Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function.

  1. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. Effects of an atherogenic diet during the neonatal and juvenile period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, M S; Ambudkar, I S; Young, E P; Naseem, S M; Heald, F P; Shamoo, A E [Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). School of Medicine

    1985-04-01

    The effect on the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum of an atherogenic (1% cholesterol) diet fed during the neonatal vs the juvenile period of life was studied in Yorkshire swine. Male piglets were randomly assigned at birth to 1 of 4 groups: group I (control), group II (lactation feeding), group III (juvenile period feeding) and group IV (lactation and juvenile feeding). All animals were killed at 55 weeks of age and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) isolated for assay of calcium uptake, Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/ ATPase activity, and lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The amount of cholesterol/mg SR protein and the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were higher in the animals fed during lactation (groups II and IV) and lower in those fed only during the juvenile period (group III). Phospholipid fatty acid patterns as measured by gas chromatography were unaltered in any group. Calcium uptake was markedly diminished in all experimental conditions: group II 47%, group III 65% and group IV 96%. Compared to the observed changes in calcium transport, the ATP hydrolytic activity was relatively less affected. Only in group IV a significant decrease (41%) was seen. Groups II and III show no change in ATP hydrolytic activity. The decrease in calcium uptake and altered cholesterol/phospholipid ratio without effect on ATP hydrolytic activity is consistent with an uncoupling of calcium transport related to the atherogenic diet in early life.

  2. Cellular calcium mobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In vascular and other smooth muscles, occurrence of intracellular Ca stores which can be mobilized to support contraction may be a general phenomenon. The Ca stores are characterized by the requirement for release by high concentrations of agonists acting on plasma membrane receptors, by the failure of the released Ca2+ to recycle to the store, by the occurrence of rapid refilling of the store from the extracellular space, and by disappearance of the store when the plasma membrane is made leaky by saponin. In contrast to agonist-released Ca stores, those released by caffeine to support contraction in Ca2+-free solutions are more slowly lost and refilled, are not always emptied when the agonist-related store is emptied, and do not disappear after saponin treatment. Stores released by agonists have been suggested to be in the endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane or at the inner aspect of the plasma membrane related to high affinity, pH-dependent Ca-binding sites. Caffeine-released stores are assumed to be in endoplasmic reticulum. Continued exposure of some tissues to Ca2+-free solutions unmasks what is considered to be a recycling Ca store releasable by agonists. Release of Ca2+ and its reaccumulation in this store appear to be slower than at the nonrecycling store. The contractions which persist for many hours in Ca2+-free solution are inhibited temporarily by Ca2+ restoration. Existence of a recycling store of releasable Ca2+ requires occurrence of mechanisms to abolish Ca2+ extrusion or leak-out of the cell and to ensure recycling to the same store

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Marciniak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to inhaled pollutants, including fine particulates and cigarette smoke is a major cause of lung disease in Europe. While it is established that inhaled pollutants have devastating effects on the genome, it is now recognised that additional effects on protein folding also drive the development of lung disease. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum affects the pathogenesis of many diseases, ranging from pulmonary fibrosis to cancer. It is therefore important to understand how cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress and how this affects pulmonary tissues in disease. These insights may offer opportunities to manipulate such endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and thereby cure lung disease.

  4. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 Inhibitors Protect against Ischemic Toxicity through Attenuating Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uptake from Endoplasmic Reticulum Store in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium homeostasis disorder and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases, including ischemic brain injury. An imbalance in mitochondrial fission and fusion is one of the most important structural abnormalities found in a large number of mitochondrial dysfunction related diseases. Here, we investigated the effects of mitochondrial division inhibitor A (mdivi A and mdivi B, two small molecule inhibitors of mitochondrial fission protein dunamin-related protein 1 (Drp-1, in neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in PC12 cells. We found that mdivi A and mdivi B inhibited OGD-induced neuronal injury through attenuating apoptotic cell death. These two inhibitors also preserved mitochondrial function, as evidenced by reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and cytochrome c release, as well as prevented loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Moreover, mdivi A and mdivi B significantly suppressed mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, but had no effect on cytoplasmic Ca2+ after OGD injury. The results of calcium imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that Drp-1 inhibitors attenuated endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ release and prevented ER morphological changes induced by OGD. These results demonstrate that Drp-1 inhibitors protect against ischemic neuronal injury through inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake from the ER store and attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecí lia; Alexandre, Bruno M.; Rosa, Margarida T.G.; Sapeta, Helena; Leitã o, Antó nio E.; Ramalho, José C.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Negrã o, Só nia; Abreu, Isabel A.; Oliveira, M. Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here

  6. The Membrane-Associated Form of αs1-Casein Interacts with Cholesterol-Rich Detergent-Resistant Microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that αs1-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that αs1-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of αs1-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of αs1-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25549363

  7. The membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that α(s1)-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that α(s1)-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of α(s1)-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells.

  8. The membrane-associated form of α(s1-casein interacts with cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Le Parc

    Full Text Available Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that α(s1-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of α(s1-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that α(s1-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of α(s1-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of α(s1-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of α(s1-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of α(s1-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells.

  9. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca2+ mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  10. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca 2+ + Mg 2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca 2+ + Mg 2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca 2+ /mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization

  11. Simultaneous mapping of membrane voltage and calcium in zebrafish heart in vivo reveals chamber-specific developmental transitions in ionic currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac action potential (AP and the consequent cytosolic Ca2+ transient are key indicators of cardiac function. Natural developmental processes, as well as many drugs and pathologies change the waveform, propagation, or variability (between cells or over time of these parameters. Here we apply a genetically encoded dual-function calcium and voltage reporter (CaViar to study the development of the zebrafish heart in vivo between 1.5 and 4 days post fertilization (dpf. We developed a high-sensitivity spinning disk confocal microscope and associated software for simultaneous three-dimensional optical mapping of voltage and calcium. We produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing CaViar under control of the heart-specific cmlc2 promoter, and applied ion channel blockers at a series of developmental stages to map the maturation of the action potential in vivo. Early in development, the AP initiated via a calcium current through L-type calcium channels. Between 90 – 102 hours post fertilization (hpf, the ventricular AP switched to a sodium-driven upswing, while the atrial AP remained calcium driven. In the adult zebrafish heart, a sodium current drives the AP in both the atrium and ventricle. Simultaneous voltage and calcium imaging with genetically encoded reporters provides a new approach for monitoring cardiac development, and the effects of drugs on cardiac function.

  12. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Evan Quon; Christopher T. Beh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer...

  13. Sarcoplasmic reticulum function in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles from mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divet, Alexandra; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum function are involved in the abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis of skeletal muscle in mice with muscular dystrophy ( mdx). The properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile proteins of fast- and slow-twitch muscles were therefore investigated in chemically skinned fibres isolated from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles of normal (C57BL/10) and mdx mice at 4 and 11 weeks of development. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) uptake, estimated by the Ca(2+) release following exposure to caffeine, was significantly slower in mdx mice, while the maximal Ca(2+) quantity did not differ in either type of skeletal muscle at either stage of development. In 4-week-old mice spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) leakage was observed in EDL and soleus fibres and this was more pronounced in mdx mice. In addition, the maximal Ca(2+)-activated tension was smaller in mdx than in normal fibres, while the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus was not significantly different. These results indicate that mdx hindlimb muscles are affected differently by the disease process and suggest that a reduced ability of the Ca(2+)-ATPase to load Ca(2+) and a leaky sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane may be involved in the altered intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  14. Streptozotocin alters glucose transport, connexin expression and endoplasmic reticulum functions in neurons and astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Joyshree; Gupta, Sonam; Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Sarika

    2017-07-25

    The study was undertaken to explore the cell-specific streptozotocin (STZ)-induced mechanistic alterations. STZ-induced rodent model is a well-established experimental model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in our previous studies we have established it as an in vitro screening model of AD by employing N2A neuronal cells. Therefore, STZ was selected in the present study to understand the STZ-induced cell-specific alterations by utilizing neuronal N2A and astrocytes C6 cells. Both neuronal and astrocyte cells were treated with STZ at 10, 50, 100 and 1000μM concentrations for 48h. STZ exposure caused significant decline in cellular viability and augmented cytotoxicity of cells involving astrocytes activation. STZ treatment also disrupted the energy metabolism by altered glucose uptake and its transport in both cells as reflected with decreased expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1/3. The consequent decrease in ATP level and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was also observed in both the cells. STZ caused increased intracellular calcium which could cause the initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Significant upregulation of ER stress-related markers were observed in both cells after STZ treatment. The cellular communication of astrocytes and neurons was altered as reflected by increased expression of connexin 43 along with DNA fragmentation. STZ-induced apoptotic death was evaluated by elevated expression of caspase-3 and PI/Hoechst staining of cells. In conclusion, study showed that STZ exert alike biochemical alterations, ER stress and cellular apoptosis in both neuronal and astrocyte cells. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Behind the curtain: cellular mechanisms for allosteric modulation of calcium-sensing receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Alice; Huang, Ying; Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) are integral to regulation of systemic Ca2+ homeostasis. Altered expression levels or mutations in CaSR cause Ca2+ handling diseases. CaSR is regulated by both endogenous allosteric modulators and allosteric drugs, including the first Food and Drug Administration-approved allosteric agonist, Cinacalcet HCl (Sensipar®). Recent studies suggest that allosteric modulators not only alter function of plasma membrane-localized CaSR, but regulate CaSR stability at the endoplasmic reticulum. This brief review summarizes our current understanding of the role of membrane-permeant allosteric agonists in cotranslational stabilization of CaSR, and highlights additional, indirect, signalling-dependent role(s) for membrane-impermeant allosteric drugs. Overall, these studies suggest that allosteric drugs act at multiple cellular organelles to control receptor abundance and hence function, and that drug hydrophobicity can bias the relative contributions of plasma membrane and intracellular organelles to CaSR abundance and signalling. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-6. To view the 2010 themed section on the same topic visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2010.159.issue-5/issuetoc PMID:21470201

  16. Calcium - ionized

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diuretics Thrombocytosis (high platelet count) Tumors Vitamin A excess Vitamin D excess Lower-than-normal levels may be due to: Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Osteomalacia Pancreatitis Renal failure Rickets Vitamin D deficiency Alternative Names Free calcium; Ionized calcium ...

  17. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum-dependent redox reactions control endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and pathogen entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Christopher P; Bernardi, Kaleena M; Tsai, Billy

    2012-04-15

    Protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is managed by an ER quality control system that retro-translocates aberrant proteins into the cytosol for proteasomal destruction. This process, known as ER-associated degradation, utilizes the action of ER redox enzymes to accommodate the disulfide-bonded nature of misfolded proteins. Strikingly, various pathogenic viruses and toxins co-opt these redox components to reach the cytosol during entry. These redox factors thus regulate critical cellular homeostasis and host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies identify specific members of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family, which use their chaperone and catalytic activities, in engaging both misfolded ER proteins and pathogens. The precise molecular mechanism by which a dedicated PDI family member disrupts the disulfide bonds in the misfolded ER proteins and pathogens, as well as how they act to unfold these substrates to promote their ER-to-cytosol membrane transport, remain poorly characterized. How PDI family members distinguish folded versus misfolded ER substrates remains enigmatic. What physical characteristics surrounding a substrate's disulfide bond instruct PDI that it is mispaired or native? For the pathogens, as their disulfide bonds normally serve a critical role in providing physical support, what conformational changes experienced in the host enable their disulfide bonds to be disrupted? A combination of more rigorous biochemical and high-resolution structural studies should begin to address these questions.

  19. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  20. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the alpha1 pore-forming subunit of high voltage-activated calcium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eNeely

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Openings of high-voltage-activated calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, high-voltage-activated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1 associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels.

  1. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiong; Zhan Jinbiao; Chen Xinhong; Zheng Shu

    2006-01-01

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum

  2. Effect of Ultrasound on Calcium Carbonate Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagterveld, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Scaling comprises the formation of hard mineral deposits on process or membrane equipment and calcium carbonate is the most common scaling salt. Especially in reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems, scale formation has always been a serious limitation, causing flux decline, membrane degradation, loss

  3. Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in inferior olive neurons are dynamically regulated by P/Q- and T-type calcium channels: a study in mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Daesoo; Urbano, Francisco J; Makarenko, Vladimir; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2010-08-15

    The role of P/Q- and T-type calcium channels in the rhythmic oscillatory behaviour of inferior olive (IO) neurons was investigated in mutant mice. Mice lacking either the CaV2.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1A subunit for P/Q-type calcium channel, or the CaV3.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1G subunit for T-type calcium channel were used. In vitro intracellular recording from IO neurons reveals that the amplitude and frequency of sinusoidal subthreshold oscillations (SSTOs) were reduced in the CaV2.1-/- mice. In the CaV3.1-/- mice, IO neurons also showed altered patterns of SSTOs and the probability of SSTO generation was significantly lower (15%, 5 of 34 neurons) than that of wild-type (78%, 31 of 40 neurons) or CaV2.1-/- mice (73%, 22 of 30 neurons). In addition, the low-threshold calcium spike and the sustained endogenous oscillation following rebound potentials were absent in IO neurons from CaV3.1-/- mice. Moreover, the phase-reset dynamics of oscillatory properties of single neurons and neuronal clusters in IO were remarkably altered in both CaV2.1-/- and CaV3.1-/- mice. These results suggest that both alpha1A P/Q- and alpha1G T-type calcium channels are required for the dynamic control of neuronal oscillations in the IO. These findings were supported by results from a mathematical IO neuronal model that incorporated T and P/Q channel kinetics.

  4. GRP94: An HSP90-like protein specialized for protein folding and quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Eletto, Davide; Argon, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 94 is the HSP90-like protein in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore it chaperones secreted and membrane proteins. It has essential functions in development and physiology of multicellular organisms, at least in part because of this unique clientele. GRP94...

  5. Cholesterol modulates the cellular localization of Orai1 channels and its disposition among membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez-Hernández, A; Gratton, Enrico; Pacheco, Jonathan; Asanov, Alexander; Vaca, Luis

    2017-12-01

    Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) is one of the most important mechanisms for calcium mobilization in to the cell. Two main proteins sustain SOCE: STIM1 that acts as the calcium sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Orai1 responsible for calcium influx upon depletion of ER. There are many studies indicating that SOCE is modulated by the cholesterol content of the plasma membrane (PM). However, a myriad of questions remain unanswered concerning the precise molecular mechanism by which cholesterol modulates SOCE. In the present study we found that reducing PM cholesterol results in the internalization of Orai1 channels, which can be prevented by overexpressing caveolin 1 (Cav1). Furthermore, Cav1 and Orai1 associate upon SOCE activation as revealed by FRET and coimmunoprecipitation assays. The effects of reducing cholesterol were not limited to an increased rate of Orai1 internalization, but also, affects the lateral movement of Orai1, inducing movement in a linear pattern (unobstructed diffusion) opposite to basal cholesterol conditions were most of Orai1 channels moves in a confined space, as assessed by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Cav1 overexpression inhibited these alterations maintaining Orai1 into a confined and partially confined movement. These results not only highlight the complex effect of cholesterol regulation on SOCE, but also indicate a direct regulatory effect on Orai1 localization and compartmentalization by this lipid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipid Droplet Formation Is Dispensable for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation*

    OpenAIRE

    Olzmann, James A.; Kopito, Ron R.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins that fail to fold or assemble in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are destroyed by cytoplasmic proteasomes through a process known as ER-associated degradation. Substrates of this pathway are initially sequestered within the ER lumen and must therefore be dislocated across the ER membrane to be degraded. It has been proposed that generation of bicellar structures during lipid droplet formation may provide an “escape hatch” through which misfolded proteins, toxins, and viruses can exit ...

  7. 14-Deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide induces DDIT3-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D breast carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Heng Kean; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Tan, Mei Lan

    2016-01-01

    14-Deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (14-DDA), a major diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees, is known to be cytotoxic and elicits a non-apoptotic cell death in T-47D breast carcinoma cells. In this study, the mechanistic toxicology properties of 14-DDA in T-47D cells were further investigated. 14-DDA is found to induce the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) vacuoles and autophagosomes, with concurrent upregulation of LC3-II in the breast carcinoma cells. It stimulated an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration and caused a collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential in these cells. In addition, both DDIT3 and GADD45A, molecules implicated in ER stress pathway, were significantly upregulated. DDIT3 knockdown suppressed the formation of both ER vacuoles and autophagosomes, indicating that 14-DDA-induced ER stress and autophagy is dependent on this transcription factor. Collectively, it is possible that GADD45A/p38 MAPK/DDIT3 pathway is involved in the 14-DDA-induced ER-stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D cells. - Highlights: • The mechanistic toxicology properties of 14-DDA in T-47D breast carcinoma cells were investigated. • 14-DDA induces the formation of ER vacuoles and autophagosomes, with concurrent upregulation of LC3-II. • It stimulates an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration and causing collapse in the mitochondrial membrane potential. • Both DDIT3 and GADD45A, molecules implicated in ER stress pathway, were significantly upregulated. • 4-DDA induces ER stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D cells possibly via GADD45A/p38 MAPK/DDIT3 pathway.

  8. In vivo effect of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine on calcium uptake in several tissues in the rat: Evidence for a physiological role for calcium as the first messenger for the prompt action of thyroid hormone at the level of the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, J.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium has been shown in vitro to serve as the first messenger for the rapid effect of thyroid hormone at the level of the plasma membrane. In the present study the physiological relevance of this mechanism is examined in the whole animal. To this end, the effect of T3 on 45calcium uptake and sugar 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake, an effect that requires extracellular calcium, and the influence of calcium blockers thereon were measured in ventricles, atria, diaphragm, fat, and liver in the rat. In the first three tissues, T3 produced comparable changes in 45Ca uptake and 2-DG uptake (T3 increased 2-DG uptake in fat, where 45Ca uptake was undetected, and had no effect in liver); this activity was blocked by the calcium channel blocker cadmium. The effect of T3 on 45Ca uptake, like its effect on the in vivo uptake of 2-DG described previously, was biphasic and time related; at physiological doses of 0.01 and 0.1 micrograms/100 g BW, T3 increased 45Ca uptake, whereas at greater (pharmacological) doses of 1 and 100 micrograms/100 g BW, T3 was without effect or inhibited 45Ca uptake. In ventricles and atria, the stimulatory effect of T3 on 45Ca uptake was very rapid within 2 min, at which time it was at or near maximum (50-90% above control) and then declined gradually and was not seen after 10-20 min. Of the several calcium blockers employed, verapamil (organic) and cadmium (inorganic) were found to be the most effective. Verapamil and cadmium produced a rapid, transient, and dose-related inhibition of 45Ca uptake in the tissues examined (except fat tissue where, under the experimental conditions employed, 45Ca uptake was undetected). Verapamil, given iv (200 micrograms/100 g BW) or ip (1 mg/100 g BW), reduced tissue 45Ca uptake by 50-90% within 2 or 10 min, respectively, and then its inhibitory effect diminished rapidly and was not seen after 20-30 min

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transitions upon herpes virus infection [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 3 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wild

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpesvirus capsids are assembled in the nucleus, translocated to the perinuclear space by budding, acquiring tegument and envelope, or released to the cytoplasm via impaired nuclear envelope. One model proposes that envelopment, “de-envelopment” and “re-envelopment” is essential for production of infectious virus. Glycoproteins gB/gH were reported to be essential for de-envelopment, by fusion of the “primary” envelope with the outer nuclear membrane. Yet, a high proportion of enveloped virions generated from genomes with deleted gB/gH were found in the cytoplasm and extracellular space, suggesting the existence of alternative exit routes. Methods: We investigated the relatedness between the nuclear envelope and membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, in cells infected with either herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 or a Us3 deletion mutant thereof, or with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1 by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, employing freezing technique protocols. Results:  The Golgi complex is a compact entity in a juxtanuclear position covered by a membrane on the cis face. Golgi membranes merge with membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum forming an entity with the perinuclear space. All compartments contained enveloped virions. After treatment with brefeldin A, HSV-1 virions aggregated in the perinuclear space and endoplasmic reticulum, while infectious progeny virus was still produced. Conclusions: The data suggest that virions derived by budding at nuclear membranes are intraluminally transported from the perinuclear space via Golgi -endoplasmic reticulum transitions into Golgi cisternae for packaging. Virions derived by budding at nuclear membranes are infective like Us3 deletion mutants, which  accumulate in the perinuclear space. Therefore, i de-envelopment followed by re-envelopment is not essential for production of infective progeny virus, ii the process taking place at the outer nuclear

  10. Membrane defect in procine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) has been proposed to result from abnormal calcium-homeostasis in skeletal muscle. This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-sequestration or calcium-release by sarcoplasmic reticulum was abnormal in MH-susceptible swine. A heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction (HSR), enriched in terminal cisternae, was isolated from MH and control muscle using differential and density-gradient centrifugation. Calcium transport was studied using 45 Ca radioisotope and Millipore filtration. Enzymatic activities, cholesterol, phospholipid, and protein composition were determined using spectrophotometric techniques and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Properties of calcium-sequestration by MH and control HSR were indistinguishable, although Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin content were 100% increased in MH HSR. However when muscle homogenate pH was decreased due to MH, calcium-uptake activity was depressed to <5% of control values. Results of this study indicate a model for the etiopathogenesis of MH, and for the inheritance and diagnosis of susceptibility to MH. Malignant hyperthermia is initiated due to a hypersensitive HSR calcium-release mechanism and propagated by a loss of calcium-sequestering function as acidosis develops. Susceptibility is inherited in an autosomal, codominant pattern and may be diagnosed most definitively and sensitively on the basis of calcium-release sensitivity-tests, performed on isolated HSR

  11. Crosslink between calcium and sodium signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Trebak, Mohamed; Perocchi, Fabiana; Khananshvili, Daniel; Sekler, Israel

    2018-02-01

    What is the topic of this review? This paper overviews the links between Ca 2+ and Na + signalling in various types of cells. What advances does it highlight? This paper highlights the general importance of ionic signalling and overviews the molecular mechanisms linking Na + and Ca 2+ dynamics. In particular, the narrative focuses on the molecular physiology of plasmalemmal and mitochondrial Na + -Ca 2+ exchangers and plasmalemmal transient receptor potential channels. Functional consequences of Ca 2+ and Na + signalling for co-ordination of neuronal activity with astroglial homeostatic pathways fundamental for synaptic transmission are discussed. Transmembrane ionic gradients, which are an indispensable feature of life, are used for generation of cytosolic ionic signals that regulate a host of cellular functions. Intracellular signalling mediated by Ca 2+ and Na + is tightly linked through several molecular pathways that generate Ca 2+ and Na + fluxes and are in turn regulated by both ions. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels bridge endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ release with generation of Na + and Ca 2+ currents. The plasmalemmal Na + -Ca 2+ exchanger (NCX) flickers between forward and reverse mode to co-ordinate the influx and efflux of both ions with membrane polarization and cytosolic ion concentrations. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter channel (MCU) and mitochondrial Na + -Ca 2+ exchanger (NCLX) mediate Ca 2+ entry into and release from this organelle and couple cytosolic Ca 2+ and Na + fluctuations with cellular energetics. Cellular Ca 2+ and Na + signalling controls numerous functional responses and, in the CNS, provides for fast regulation of astroglial homeostatic cascades that are crucial for maintenance of synaptic transmission. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  12. Role of polyhydroxybutyrate in mitochondrial calcium uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithen, Matthew; Elustondo, Pia A.; Winkfein, Robert; Zakharian, Eleonora; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Pavlov, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a biological polymer which belongs to the class of polyesters and is ubiquitously present in all living organisms. Mammalian mitochondrial membranes contain PHB consisting of up to 120 hydroxybutyrate residues. Roles played by PHB in mammalian mitochondria remain obscure. It was previously demonstrated that PHB of the size similar to one found in mitochondria mediates calcium transport in lipid bilayer membranes. We hypothesized that the presence of PHB in mitochondrial membrane might play a significant role in mitochondrial calcium transport. To test this, we investigated how the induction of PHB hydrolysis affects mitochondrial calcium transport. Mitochondrial PHB was altered enzymatically by targeted expression of bacterial PHB hydrolyzing enzyme (PhaZ7) in mitochondria of mammalian cultured cells. The expression of PhaZ7 induced changes in mitochondrial metabolism resulting in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 but not in U87 and HeLa cells. Furthermore, it significantly inhibited mitochondrial calcium uptake in intact HepG2, U87 and HeLa cells stimulated by the ATP or by the application of increased concentrations of calcium to the digitonin permeabilized cells. Calcium uptake in PhaZ7 expressing cells was restored by mimicking calcium uniporter properties with natural electrogenic calcium ionophore - ferutinin. We propose that PHB is a previously unrecognized important component of the mitochondrial calcium uptake system. PMID:23702223

  13. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  14. The endoplasmic reticulum is a hub to sort proteins toward unconventional traffic pathways and endosymbiotic organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Michele; De Marchis, Francesca; Pompa, Andrea

    2017-12-18

    The discovery that much of the extracellular proteome in eukaryotic cells consists of proteins lacking a signal peptide, which cannot therefore enter the secretory pathway, has led to the identification of alternative protein secretion routes bypassing the Golgi apparatus. However, proteins harboring a signal peptide for translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum can also be transported along these alternative routes, which are still far from being well elucidated in terms of the molecular machineries and subcellular/intermediate compartments involved. In this review, we first try to provide a definition of all the unconventional protein secretion pathways in eukaryotic cells, as those pathways followed by proteins directed to an 'external space' bypassing the Golgi, where 'external space' refers to the extracellular space plus the lumen of the secretory route compartments and the inner space of mitochondria and plastids. Then, we discuss the role of the endoplasmic reticulum in sorting proteins toward unconventional traffic pathways in plants. In this regard, various unconventional pathways exporting proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole, plasma membrane, apoplast, mitochondria, and plastids are described, including the short routes followed by the proteins resident in the endoplasmic reticulum. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response in disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rafael Vincent M. Manalo

    2017-07-12

    Jul 12, 2017 ... Review. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response in disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology .... This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ... chain binding protein (BIP); however, ER stress permits the release, .... drugs designed to alleviate it often cause more harm long-term.

  16. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Dalrymple, Susan; Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Gurel, Bora; Demarzo, Angelo M; Wilding, George; Carducci, Michael A; Dionne, Craig A; Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Christensen, S Brøgger; Isaacs, John T

    2012-06-27

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host. On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer.

  17. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  18. [Changes induced by hypertonic solutions in the transportation of calcium by the cardiac reticular sarcoplasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, M; Holguín, J A

    1979-01-01

    In the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the myocardium, celular organell which function is to regulate the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium in contraction and relaxation, we have studied the effect of hypertonic solutions of sucrose between 1 and 6.96 times the normal tonicity in order to observe the behavior of the internal linked or free calcium of this structure, as well as to prove the hypothesis that hypertonic solutions encourage the calcium exit of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum with the resulting signs of contractures. The following results were obtained: 1. The ATP hydrolisis and calcium transport rate are 14% and 90% respectively of the maximum speeds of 10(-5) M in calcium, while for concentrations of 10(-7) M or ess of the said cation, the transport rates and the ATPase do not reach 5% of the maximum values. 2. Between 1 and 2.54 times of the normal tonicity the calcium uptake remains between 400 and 500 nmoles of calcium/mg protein/min, the transported amount of calcium varies between 14 and 16 nmoles/mg protein and the rate of the ATP hydrolysis increases a 37% to 0.4 M in sucrose. 3. Between 0.4 and 1.2 M in sucrose of 2.54 to 6.96 times the isotonicity, the calcium transport rate velocity as well as the ATP hydrolisis are strongly inhibited. The vesicles volume minimizes and the amount of linked calcium remains within the control values, proving that the capacity of linking this cathion is independent from sarcoplasmic reticulum volume. These results show that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is involved in the contractures induced by hypertonic solutions in intact cells, since the osmolarity increase produces changes of volume which results in a decrease of the calcium transportation velocity or in an increase of the exit of said cathion.

  19. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Unidirectional 45 Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J net Ca ) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J net Ca to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J net Ca was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J net Ca decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J net Ca was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue 45 Ca content was ≅30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca 2+ -ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na + -K + -ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa

  20. Effect of narcotics on membrane-bound mitochondrial processes in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Michiels, Ellen

    and endoplasmic reticulum membrane are known to closely interact with the cell membrane, we hypothesize that narcotics can be further partitioned into these organelle membranes where they can disrupt essential membrane-bound processes. The electron transport chain (ETC) is an example of a crucial mitochondrial...

  1. Inositol trisphosphate receptor mediated spatiotemporal calcium signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, S

    1995-04-01

    Spatiotemporal Ca2+ signalling in the cytoplasm is currently understood as an excitation phenomenon by analogy with electrical excitation in the plasma membrane. In many cell types, Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ oscillations are mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor/Ca2+ channels in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, with positive feedback between cytosolic Ca2+ and IP3-induced Ca2+ release creating a regenerative process. Remarkable advances have been made in the past year in the analysis of subcellular Ca2+ microdomains using confocal microscopy and of Ca2+ influx pathways that are functionally coupled to IP3-induced Ca2+ release. Ca2+ signals can be conveyed into the nucleus and mitochondria. Ca2+ entry from outside the cell allows repetitive Ca2+ release by providing Ca2+ to refill the endoplasmic reticulum stores, thus giving rise to frequency-encoded Ca2+ signals.

  2. Fluorescence methods for analysis of interactions between Ca(2+) signaling, lysosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prole, David L; López-Sanjurjo, Cristina I; Tovey, Stephen C; Taylor, Colin W

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is both the major source of intracellular Ca(2+) for cell signaling and the organelle that forms the most extensive contacts with the plasma membrane and other organelles. Lysosomes fulfill important roles in degrading cellular materials and in cholesterol handling, but they also contribute to Ca(2+) signaling by both releasing and sequestering Ca(2+). Interactions between ER and other Ca(2+)-transporting membranes, notably mitochondria and the plasma membrane, often occur at sites where the two membranes are closely apposed, allowing local Ca(2+) signaling between them. These interactions are often facilitated by scaffold proteins. Recent evidence suggests similar local interactions between ER and lysosomes. We describe simple fluorescence-based methods that allow the interplay between Ca(2+) signals, the ER, and lysosomes to be examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phospholipid-binding protein EhC2A mediates calcium-dependent translocation of transcription factor URE3-BP to the plasma membrane of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Heriberto; Linford, Alicia S; Gilchrist, Carol A; Petri, William A

    2010-05-01

    The Entamoeba histolytica upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) is a transcription factor that binds DNA in a Ca(2+)-inhibitable manner. The protein is located in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm but has also been found to be enriched in the plasma membrane of amebic trophozoites. We investigated the reason for the unusual localization of URE3-BP at the amebic plasma membrane. Here we identify and characterize a 22-kDa Ca(2+)-dependent binding partner of URE3-BP, EhC2A, a novel member of the C2-domain superfamily. Immunoprecipitations of URE3-BP and EhC2A showed that the proteins interact and that such interaction was enhanced in the presence of Ca(2+). Recombinant and native EhC2A bound phospholipid liposomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, with half-maximal binding occurring at 3.4 muM free Ca(2+). A direct interaction between EhC2A and URE3-BP was demonstrated by the ability of recombinant EhC2A to recruit recombinant URE3-BP to phospholipid liposomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. URE3-BP and EhC2A were observed to translocate to the amebic plasma membrane upon an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of trophozoites, as revealed by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescent staining. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of EhC2A protein expression significantly modulated the mRNA levels of URE3-BP-regulated transcripts. Based on these results, we propose a model for EhC2A-mediated regulation of the transcriptional activities of URE3-BP via Ca(2+)-dependent anchoring of the transcription factor to the amebic plasma membrane.

  4. Microgravity effects during fertilization, cell division, development, and calcium metabolism in sea urchins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heide

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to explore the role of microgravity during fertilization, early development, cytoskeletal organization, and skeletal calcium deposition in a model development system: the sea urchin eggs and embryos. While pursuing these objectives, we have also helped to develop, test, and fly the Aquatic Research Facility (ARF) system. Cells were fixed at preselected time points to preserve the structures and organelles of interest with regards to cell biology events during development. The protocols used for the analysis of the results had been developed during the earlier part of this research and were applied for post-flight analysis using light and (immuno)fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The structures of interest are: microtubules during fertilization, cell division, and cilia movement; microfilaments during cell surface restructuring and cell division; centrosomes and centrioles during cell division, cell differentiation, and cilia formation and movement; membranes, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and chromosomes at all stages of development; and calcium deposits during spicule formation in late-stage embryos. In addition to further explore aspects important or living in space, several aspects of this research are also aimed at understanding diseases that affect humans on Earth which may be accelerated in space.

  5. Inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex alters mitochondrial function and cellular calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsueh-Meei; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Hui; Gibson, Gary E

    2003-01-20

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases. The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) catalyzes a key and arguably rate-limiting step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). A reduction in the activity of the KGDHC occurs in brains and cells of patients with many of these disorders and may underlie the abnormal mitochondrial function. Abnormalities in calcium homeostasis also occur in fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in cells bearing mutations that lead to AD. Thus, the present studies test whether the reduction of KGDHC activity can lead to the alterations in mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis. alpha-Keto-beta-methyl-n-valeric acid (KMV) inhibits KGDHC activity in living N2a cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Surprisingly, concentration of KMV that inhibit in situ KGDHC by 80% does not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). However, similar concentrations of KMV induce the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, reduce basal [Ca(2+)](i) by 23% (Pcalcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by 46% (P<0.005). This result suggests that diminished KGDHC activities do not lead to the Ca(2+) abnormalities in fibroblasts from AD patients or cells bearing PS-1 mutations. The increased release of cytochrome c with diminished KGDHC activities will be expected to activate other pathways including cell death cascades. Reductions in this key mitochondrial enzyme will likely make the cells more vulnerable to metabolic insults that promote cell death.

  6. Anticancer ruthenium(III) complex KP1019 interferes with ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadafi, Fabrizio-Zagros; Massai, Lara; Bartolommei, Gianluca; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Messori, Luigi; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), a P-type ATPase that sustains Ca2+ transport and plays a major role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, represents a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Here, we investigated whether ruthenium-based anticancer drugs, namely KP1019 (indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)]), NAMI-A (imidazolium [trans-tetrachloro(1H-imidazole)(S-dimethylsulfoxide)ruthenate(III)]) and RAPTA-C ([Ru(η6-p-cymene)dichloro(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)]), and cisplatin (cis-diammineplatinum(II) dichloride) might act as inhibitors of SERCA. Charge displacement by SERCA adsorbed on a solid-supported membrane was measured after ATP or Ca2+ concentration jumps. Our results show that KP1019, in contrast to the other metal compounds, is able to interfere with ATP-dependent translocation of Ca2+ ions. An IC50 value of 1 μM was determined for inhibition of calcium translocation by KP1019. Conversely, it appears that KP1019 does not significantly affect Ca2+ binding to the ATPase from the cytoplasmic side. Inhibition of SERCA at pharmacologically relevant concentrations may represent a crucial aspect in the overall pharmacological and toxicological profile of KP1019. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Arachidonoyl-specific diacylglycerol kinase ε and the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nakano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER comprises an interconnected membrane network, which is made up of lipid bilayer and associated proteins. This organelle plays a central role in the protein synthesis and sorting. In addition, it represents the synthetic machinery of phospholipids, the major constituents of the biological membrane. In this process, phosphatidic acid (PA serves as a precursor of all phospholipids, suggesting that PA synthetic activity is closely associated with the ER function. One enzyme responsible for PA synthesis is diacylglycerol kinase (DGK that phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG to PA. DGK is composed of a family of enzymes with distinct features assigned to each isozyme in terms of structure, enzymology and subcellular localization. Of DGKs, DGKε uniquely exhibits substrate specificity toward arachidonate-containing DG and is shown to reside in the ER. Arachidonic acid, a precursor of bioactive eicosanoids, is usually acylated at the sn-2 position of phospholipids, being especially enriched in phosphoinositide. In this review, we focus on arachidonoyl-specific DGKε with respect to the historical context, molecular basis of the substrate specificity and ER-targeting, and functional implications in the ER.

  8. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon...

  9. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  10. [3H]PN200-110 and [3H]ryanodine binding and reconstitution of ion channel activity with skeletal muscle membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.L.; Alvarez, R.M.; Fill, M.; Hawkes, M.J.; Brush, K.L.; Schilling, W.P.; Stefani, E.

    1989-01-01

    Skeletal muscle membranes derived either from the tubular (T) network or from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were characterized with respect to the binding of the dihydropyridine, [ 3 H]PN200-110, and the alkaloid, [ 3 H]ryanodine; polypeptide composition; and ion channel activity. Conditions for optimizing the binding of these radioligands are discussed. A bilayer pulsing technique is described and is used to examine the channels present in these membranes. Fusion of T-tubule membranes into bilayers revealed the presence of chloride channels and dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels with three distinct conductances. The dihydropyridine-sensitive channels were further characterized with respect to their voltage dependence. Pulsing experiments indicated that two different populations of dihydropyridine-sensitive channels existed. Fusion of heavy SR vesicles revealed three different ion channels; the putative calcium release channel, a potassium channel, and a chloride channel. Thus, this fractionation procedure provides T-tubules and SR membranes which, with radioligand binding and single channel recording techniques, provide a useful tool to study the characteristics of skeletal muscle ion channels and their possible role in excitation-contraction coupling

  11. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.; Rosendorff, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)...

  13. Cholesterol transfer at endosomal-organelle membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Zhao, Kexin

    2018-06-01

    Cholesterol is delivered to the limiting membrane of late endosomes by Niemann-Pick Type C1 and C2 proteins. This review summarizes recent evidence that cholesterol transfer from endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum and other organelles is mediated by lipid-binding proteins that localize to membrane contact sites (MCS). LDL-cholesterol in the late endosomal/lysosomes is exported to the plasma membrane, where most cholesterol resides, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which harbors the regulatory complexes and enzymes that control the synthesis and esterification of cholesterol. A major advance in dissecting these cholesterol transport pathways was identification of frequent and dynamic MCS between endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes and plasma membrane. Positioned at these MCS are members of the oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid-transfer family of lipid transfer proteins that bridge the opposing membranes and directly or indirectly mediate cholesterol transfer. OSBP-related protein 1L (ORP1L), ORP5 and ORP6 mediate cholesterol transfer to the endoplasmic reticulum that regulates cholesterol homeostasis. ORP1L and STARD3 also move cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum-to-late endosomal/lysosomes under low-cholesterol conditions to facilitate intraluminal vesicle formation. Cholesterol transport also occurs at MCS with peroxisomes and possibly the plasma membrane. Frequent contacts between organelles and the endo-lysosomal vesicles are sites for bidirectional transfer of cholesterol.

  14. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  15. Altered elementary calcium release events and enhanced calcium release by thymol in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentesi, Péter; Szappanos, Henrietta; Szegedi, Csaba; Gönczi, Monika; Jona, István; Cseri, Julianna; Kovács, László; Csernoch, László

    2004-03-01

    The effects of thymol on steps of excitation-contraction coupling were studied on fast-twitch muscles of rodents. Thymol was found to increase the depolarization-induced release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which could not be attributed to a decreased calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors or altered intramembrane charge movement, but rather to a more efficient coupling of depolarization to channel opening. Thymol increased ryanodine binding to heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, with a half-activating concentration of 144 micro M and a Hill coefficient of 1.89, and the open probability of the isolated and reconstituted ryanodine receptors, from 0.09 +/- 0.03 to 0.22 +/- 0.04 at 30 micro M. At higher concentrations the drug induced long-lasting open events on a full conducting state. Elementary calcium release events imaged using laser scanning confocal microscopy in the line-scan mode were reduced in size, 0.92 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.70 +/- 0.01, but increased in duration, 56 +/- 1 vs. 79 +/- 1 ms, by 30 micro M thymol, with an increase in the relative proportion of lone embers. Higher concentrations favored long events, resembling embers in control, with duration often exceeding 500 ms. These findings provide direct experimental evidence that the opening of a single release channel will generate an ember, rather than a spark, in mammalian skeletal muscle.

  16. Electrical control of calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells using microsecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Hanna; Andre, Franck M; Mir, Lluis M

    2017-04-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine due to their ability to differentiate into many cellular types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes amongst many other cell types. These cells present spontaneous calcium oscillations implicating calcium channels and pumps of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. These oscillations regulate many basic functions in the cell such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the possibility to mimic or regulate these oscillations might be useful to regulate mesenchymal stem cells biological functions. One or several electric pulses of 100 μs were used to induce Ca 2+ spikes caused by the penetration of Ca 2+ from the extracellular medium, through the transiently electropermeabilized plasma membrane, in human adipose mesenchymal stem cells from several donors. Attached cells were preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and exposed to the electric pulse(s) under the fluorescence microscope. Viability was also checked. According to the pulse(s) electric field amplitude, it is possible to generate a supplementary calcium spike with properties close to those of calcium spontaneous oscillations, or, on the contrary, to inhibit the spontaneous calcium oscillations for a very long time compared to the pulse duration. Through that inhibition of the oscillations, Ca 2+ oscillations of desired amplitude and frequency could then be imposed on the cells using subsequent electric pulses. None of the pulses used here, even those with the highest amplitude, caused a loss of cell viability. An easy way to control Ca 2+ oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells, through their cancellation or the addition of supplementary Ca 2+ spikes, is reported here. Indeed, the direct link between the microsecond electric pulse(s) delivery and the occurrence/cancellation of cytosolic Ca 2+ spikes allowed us to mimic and regulate the Ca 2+ oscillations in these cells. Since microsecond electric pulse delivery

  17. Long-chain α,ω-dioic acids as inducers of cyclosporin A-insensitive nonspecific permeability of the inner membrane of liver mitochondria loaded with calcium or strontium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, M V; Adakeeva, S I; Samartsev, V N

    2013-04-01

    Long-chain saturated monocarboxylic fatty acids can induce nonspecific permeability of the inner membrane (open pores) of liver mitochondria loaded with Ca2+ or Sr(2+) by the mechanism insensitive to cyclosporin A. In this work we investigated the effect of their metabolites - α,ω-dioic (dicarboxylic) acids - as potential inducers of pore opening by a similar mechanism. It was established that the addition of α,ω-hexadecanedioic acid (HDA) at a concentration of 10-30 µM to liver mitochondria loaded with Ca2+ or Sr(2+) leads to swelling of the organelles and release of these ions from the matrix. The maximum effect of HDA is observed at 50 µM Ca2+ concentration. Cyclosporin A at a concentration of 1 µM, previously added to the mitochondria, did not inhibit the observed processes. The calcium uniporter inhibitor ruthenium red, which blocks influx of Ca2+ and Sr(2+) to the matrix of mitochondria, prevented HDA-induced swelling. The effect of HDA as inducer of swelling of mitochondria was compared with similar effects of α,ω-tetradecanedioic and α,ω-dodecanedioic acids whose acyl chains are two and four carbon atoms shorter than HDA, respectively. It was found that the efficiency of these α,ω-dioic acids decreases with reducing number of carbon atoms in their acyl chains. It was concluded that in the presence of Ca2+ or Sr(2+) long-chain saturated α,ω-dioic acids can induce a cyclosporin A-insensitive permeability of the inner membrane (open pores) of liver mitochondria as well as their monocarboxylic analogs.

  18. Location matters: the endoplasmic reticulum and protein trafficking in dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A Ramírez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are highly polarized, but the trafficking mechanisms that operate in these cells and the topological organization of their secretory organelles are still poorly understood. Particularly incipient is our knowledge of the role of the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum. Here we review the current understanding of the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons, its structure, composition, dendritic distribution and dynamics. We also focus on the trafficking of proteins through the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum, emphasizing the relevance of transport, retention, assembly of multi-subunit protein complexes and export. We additionally discuss the roles of the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum in synaptic plasticity.

  19. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  20. Differential sensitivity of cellular membranes to peroxidative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijbers, W.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a morphological and cytochemical investigation into the effects of both vitamin E deficiency and X-irradiation on the ultrastructure and enzyme activities of several cellular membranes, particularly the plasma membrane and the membranes of lysosomes, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. In the vitamin E deficient situation, the radicals and peroxides only originate near mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, so that these membrane systems suffer from changes. After irradiation of the liver of both the control duckling and the deficient duckling, radicals originate in all parts of the cell. Due to their high content of lipids and cholesterols, peroxides will occur mainly in plasma membranes and lysosomal membranes. Moreover, in these membranes there is hardly any protection by vitamin E

  1. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  2. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Female urinary tract Male urinary tract Calcium urine test References Bringhurst FR, Demay MB, Kronenberg HM. Hormones and disorders of mineral metabolism. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  3. Identification of Oxa1 Homologs Operating in the Eukaryotic Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Andrei Anghel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the evolutionarily conserved Oxa1/Alb3/YidC family mediate membrane protein biogenesis at the mitochondrial inner membrane, chloroplast thylakoid membrane, and bacterial plasma membrane, respectively. Despite their broad phylogenetic distribution, no Oxa1/Alb3/YidC homologs are known to operate in eukaryotic cells outside the endosymbiotic organelles. Here, we present bioinformatic evidence that the tail-anchored protein insertion factor WRB/Get1, the “endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane complex” subunit EMC3, and TMCO1 are ER-resident homologs of the Oxa1/Alb3/YidC family. Topology mapping and co-evolution-based modeling demonstrate that Get1, EMC3, and TMCO1 share a conserved Oxa1-like architecture. Biochemical analysis of human TMCO1, the only homolog not previously linked to membrane protein biogenesis, shows that it associates with the Sec translocon and ribosomes. These findings suggest a specific biochemical function for TMCO1 and define a superfamily of proteins—the “Oxa1 superfamily”—whose shared function is to facilitate membrane protein biogenesis.

  4. Calcium Sensing Receptor Mutations Implicated in Pancreatitis and Idiopathic Epilepsy Syndrome Disrupt an Arginine-rich Retention Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanchick, Ann; McKenna, Jennifer; McGovern, Olivia; Huang, Ying; Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations implicated in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, pancreatitis and idiopathic epilepsy syndrome map to an extended arginine-rich region in the proximal carboxyl terminus. Arginine-rich motifs mediate endoplasmic reticulum retention and/or retrieval of multisubunit proteins so we asked whether these mutations, R886P, R896H or R898Q, altered CaSR targeting to the plasma membrane. Targeting was enhanced by all three mutations, and Ca2+-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased for R896H and R898Q. To define the role of the extended arginine-rich region in CaSR trafficking, we independently determined the contributions of R890/R891 and/or R896/K897/R898 motifs by mutation to alanine. Disruption of the motif(s) significantly increased surface expression and function relative to wt CaSR. The arginine-rich region is flanked by phosphorylation sites at S892 (protein kinase C) and S899 (protein kinase A). The phosphorylation state of S899 regulated recognition of the arginine-rich region; S899D showed increased surface localization. CaSR assembles in the endoplasmic reticulum as a covalent disulfide-linked dimer and we determined whether retention requires the presence of arginine-rich regions in both subunits. A single arginine-rich region within the dimer was sufficient to confer intracellular retention comparable to wt CaSR. We have identified an extended arginine-rich region in the proximal carboxyl terminus of CaSR (residues R890 - R898) which fosters intracellular retention of CaSR and is regulated by phosphorylation. Mutation(s) identified in chronic pancreatitis and idiopathic epilepsy syndrome therefore increase plasma membrane targeting of CaSR, likely contributing to the altered Ca2+ signaling characteristic of these diseases. PMID:20798521

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum in plant immunity and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Ruth; Schäfer, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a highly dynamic organelle in eukaryotic cells and a major production site of proteins destined for vacuoles, the plasma membrane, or apoplast in plants. At the ER, these secreted proteins undergo multiple processing steps, which are supervised and conducted by the ER quality control system. Notably, processing of secreted proteins can considerably elevate under stress conditions and exceed ER folding capacities. The resulting accumulation of unfolded proteins is defined as ER stress. The efficiency of cells to re-establish proper ER function is crucial for stress adaptation. Besides delivering proteins directly antagonizing and resolving stress conditions, the ER monitors synthesis of immune receptors. This indicates the significance of the ER for the establishment and function of the plant immune system. Recent studies point out the fragility of the entire system and highlight the ER as initiator of programed cell death (PCD) in plants as was reported for vertebrates. This review summarizes current knowledge on the impact of the ER on immune and PCD signaling. Understanding the integration of stress signals by the ER bears a considerable potential to optimize development and to enhance stress resistance of plants.

  6. The endoplasmic reticulum in plant immunity and cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSchäfer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a highly dynamic organelle in eukaryotic cells and a major production site of proteins destined for vacuoles, the plasma membrane or apoplast in plants. At the ER, these secreted proteins undergo multiple processing steps, which are supervised and conducted by the ER quality control system. Notably, processing of secreted proteins can considerably elevate under stress conditions and exceed ER folding capacities. The resulting accumulation of unfolded proteins is defined as ER stress. The efficiency of cells to re-establish proper ER function is crucial for stress adaptation. Besides delivering proteins directly antagonizing and resolving stress conditions, the ER monitors synthesis of immune receptors. This indicates the significance of the ER for the establishment and function of the plant immune system. Recent studies point out the fragility of the entire system and highlight the ER as initiator of programmed cell death (PCD in plants as was reported for vertebrates. This review summarizes current knowledge on the impact of the ER on immune and PCD signalling. Understanding the integration of stress signals by the ER bears a considerable potential to optimize development and to enhance stress resistance of plants.

  7. Calcium movements and the cellular basis of gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.; Hale, C. C.

    An early gravity-transduction event in oat coleoptiles which precedes any noticeable bending is the accumulation of calcium on their prospective slower-growing side. Sub-cellular calcium localization studies indicate that the gravity-stimulated redistribution of calcium results in an increased concentration of calcium in the walls of responding cells. Since calcium can inhibit the extension growth of plant cell walls, this selective accumulation of calcium in walls may play a role in inducing the asymmetry of growth which characterizes gravitropism. The active transport of calcium from cells into walls is performed by a calcium-dependent ATPase localized in the plasma membrane. Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that this calcium pump is regulated by a feed-back mechanism which includes the participation of calmodulin.

  8. Purification of a sarcoplasmic reticulum protein that binds Ca2+ and plasma lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, S.L.; Brown, M.S.; Lee, E.; Pathak, R.K.; Anderson, R.G.; Goldstein, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    A protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit skeletal and cardiac muscle was identified because of its ability to bind 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) with high affinity after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This protein, referred to as the 165-kDa protein, is restricted to striated muscle. It was not detected in 14 other tissues, including several that contain smooth muscle, but it appears in rat L6 myoblasts when they differentiate into myocytes. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopic studies revealed that the protein is present throughout the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the terminal cisternae. It binds 45Ca2+ on nitrocellulose blots and stains metachromatically with Stains-all, a cationic dye that stains Ca2+-binding proteins. It does not appear to be a glycoprotein, and it appears slightly larger than the 160-kDa glycoprotein previously described in sarcoplasmic reticulum. The 165-kDa protein binds LDL, beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein, and a cholesterol-induced high density lipoprotein particle that contains apoprotein E as its sole apoprotein with much higher affinity than it binds high density lipoprotein. The protein is stable to boiling and to treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate, but it becomes sensitive to these treatments when its cystine residues are reduced and alkylated. The protein was purified 1300-fold to apparent homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes. It differs from the cell surface LDL receptor in that (1) its apparent molecular weight is not changed by reduction and alkylation; (2) it is present in Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, which lack functional LDL receptors; (3) binding of lipoproteins is not inhibited by EDTA; and (4) it is located within the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum where it has no access to plasma lipoproteins

  9. Full-length Ebola glycoprotein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Suchita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Filoviridae family comprises of Ebola and Marburg viruses, which are known to cause lethal hemorrhagic fever. However, there is no effective anti-viral therapy or licensed vaccines currently available for these human pathogens. The envelope glycoprotein (GP of Ebola virus, which mediates entry into target cells, is cytotoxic and this effect maps to a highly glycosylated mucin-like region in the surface subunit of GP (GP1. However, the mechanism underlying this cytotoxic property of GP is unknown. To gain insight into the basis of this GP-induced cytotoxicity, HEK293T cells were transiently transfected with full-length and mucin-deleted (Δmucin Ebola GP plasmids and GP localization was examined relative to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi, early and late endosomes using deconvolution fluorescent microscopy. Full-length Ebola GP was observed to accumulate in the ER. In contrast, GPΔmucin was uniformly expressed throughout the cell and did not localize in the ER. The Ebola major matrix protein VP40 was also co-expressed with GP to investigate its influence on GP localization. GP and VP40 co-expression did not alter GP localization to the ER. Also, when VP40 was co-expressed with the nucleoprotein (NP, it localized to the plasma membrane while NP accumulated in distinct cytoplasmic structures lined with vimentin. These latter structures are consistent with aggresomes and may serve as assembly sites for filoviral nucleocapsids. Collectively, these data suggest that full-length GP, but not GPΔmucin, accumulates in the ER in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, which may underscore its cytotoxic property.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  11. CDIP1-BAP31 Complex Transduces Apoptotic Signals from Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mitochondria under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushi Namba

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Resolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response is essential for intracellular homeostatic balance, but unsettled ER stress can lead to apoptosis. Here, we show that a proapoptotic p53 target, CDIP1, acts as a key signal transducer of ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. We identify B-cell-receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31 as an interacting partner of CDIP1. Upon ER stress, CDIP1 is induced and enhances an association with BAP31 at the ER membrane. We also show that CDIP1 binding to BAP31 is required for BAP31 cleavage upon ER stress and for BAP31-Bcl-2 association. The recruitment of Bcl-2 to the BAP31-CDIP1 complex, as well as CDIP1-dependent truncated Bid (tBid and caspase-8 activation, contributes to BAX oligomerization. Genetic knockout of CDIP1 in mice leads to impaired response to ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the CDIP1/BAP31-mediated regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway represents a mechanism for establishing an ER-mitochondrial crosstalk for ER-stress-mediated apoptosis signaling.

  12. Divergent calcium signaling in RBCs from Tropidurus torquatus (Squamata – Tropiduridae strengthen classification in lizard evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Célia RS

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that a Teiid lizard red blood cells (RBCs such as Ameiva ameiva and Tupinambis merianae controls intracellular calcium levels by displaying multiple mechanisms. In these cells, calcium stores could be discharged not only by: thapsigargin, but also by the Na+/H+ ionophore monensin, K+/H+ ionophore nigericin and the H+ pump inhibitor bafilomycin as well as ionomycin. Moreover, these lizards possess a P2Y-type purinoceptors that mobilize Ca2+ from intracellular stores upon ATP addition. Results Here we report, that RBCs from the tropidurid lizard Tropidurus torquatus store Ca2+ in endoplasmic reticulum (ER pool but unlike in the referred Teiidae, these cells do not store calcium in monensin-nigericin sensitive pools. Moreover, mitochondria from T. torquatus RBCs accumulate Ca2+. Addition of ATP to a calcium-free medium does not increase the [Ca2+]c levels, however in a calcium medium we observe an increase in cytosolic calcium. This is an indication that purinergic receptors in these cells are P2X-like. Conclusion T. torquatus RBCs present different mechanisms from Teiid lizard red blood cells (RBCs, for controlling its intracellular calcium levels. At T. torquatus the ion is only stored at endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Moreover activation of purinergic receptor, P2X type, was able to induce an influx of calcium from extracelullar medium. These studies contribute to the understanding of the evolution of calcium homeostasis and signaling in nucleated RBCs.

  13. Calcium release-dependent inactivation precedes formation of the tubular system in developing rat cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macková, Katarina; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Hoťka, Matej; Hoffmannová, Barbora; Zahradník, Ivan; Zahradníková, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Developing cardiac myocytes undergo substantial structural and functional changes transforming the mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling from the embryonic form, based on calcium influx through sarcolemmal DHPR calcium channels, to the adult form, relying on local calcium release through RYR calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum stimulated by calcium influx. We characterized day-by-day the postnatal development of the structure of sarcolemma, using techniques of confocal fluorescence microscopy, and the development of the calcium current, measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. We characterized the appearance and expansion of the t-tubule system and compared it with the appearance and progress of the calcium current inactivation induced by the release of calcium ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum as structural and functional measures of direct DHPR-RYR interaction. The release-dependent inactivation of calcium current preceded the development of the t-tubular system by several days, indicating formation of the first DHPR-RYR couplons at the surface sarcolemma and their later spreading close to contractile myofibrils with the growing t-tubules. Large variability of both of the measured parameters among individual myocytes indicates uneven maturation of myocytes within the growing myocardium.

  14. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  15. Spontaneous, local diastolic subsarcolemmal calcium releases in single, isolated guinea-pig sinoatrial nodal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirenko, Syevda G; Yang, Dongmei; Maltseva, Larissa A; Kim, Mary S; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2017-01-01

    Uptake and release calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (dubbed "calcium clock"), in the form of spontaneous, rhythmic, local diastolic calcium releases (LCRs), together with voltage-sensitive ion channels (membrane clock) form a coupled system that regulates the action potential (AP) firing rate. LCRs activate Sodium/Calcium exchanger (NCX) that accelerates diastolic depolarization and thus participating in regulation of the time at which the next AP will occur. Previous studies in rabbit SA node cells (SANC) demonstrated that the basal AP cycle length (APCL) is tightly coupled to the basal LCR period (time from the prior AP-induced Ca2+ transient to the diastolic LCR occurrence), and that this coupling is further modulated by autonomic receptor stimulation. Although spontaneous LCRs during diastolic depolarization have been reported in SANC of various species (rabbit, cat, mouse, toad), prior studies have failed to detect LCRs in spontaneously beating SANC of guinea-pig, a species that has been traditionally used in studies of cardiac pacemaker cell function. We performed a detailed investigation of whether guinea-pig SANC generate LCRs and whether they play a similar key role in regulation of the AP firing rate. We used two different approaches, 2D high-speed camera and classical line-scan confocal imaging. Positioning the scan-line beneath sarcolemma, parallel to the long axis of the cell, we found that rhythmically beating guinea-pig SANC do, indeed, generate spontaneous, diastolic LCRs beneath the surface membrane. The average key LCR characteristics measured in confocal images in guinea-pig SANC were comparable to rabbit SANC, both in the basal state and in the presence of β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Moreover, the relationship between the LCR period and APCL was subtended by the same linear function. Thus, LCRs in guinea-pig SANC contribute to the diastolic depolarization and APCL regulation. Our findings indicate that coupled-clock system

  16. Arabidopsis calmodulin-like protein CML36 is a calcium (Ca2+) sensor that interacts with the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoform ACA8 and stimulates its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astegno, Alessandra; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Vallone, Rosario; La Verde, Valentina; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Luoni, Laura; Molesini, Barbara; Dominici, Paola

    2017-09-08

    Calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are major EF-hand-containing, calcium (Ca 2+ )-binding proteins with crucial roles in plant development and in coordinating plant stress tolerance. Given their abundance in plants, the properties of Ca 2+ sensors and identification of novel target proteins of CMLs deserve special attention. To this end, we recombinantly produced and biochemically characterized CML36 from Arabidopsis thaliana We analyzed Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ binding to the individual EF-hands, observed metal-induced conformational changes, and identified a physiologically relevant target. CML36 possesses two high-affinity Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ mixed binding sites and two low-affinity Ca 2+ -specific sites. Binding of Ca 2+ induced an increase in the α-helical content and a conformational change that lead to the exposure of hydrophobic regions responsible for target protein recognition. Cation binding, either Ca 2+ or Mg 2+ , stabilized the secondary and tertiary structures of CML36, guiding a large structural transition from a molten globule apo-state to a compact holoconformation. Importantly, through in vitro binding and activity assays, we showed that CML36 interacts directly with the regulative N terminus of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase isoform 8 (ACA8) and that this interaction stimulates ACA8 activity. Gene expression analysis revealed that CML36 and ACA8 are co-expressed mainly in inflorescences. Collectively, our results support a role for CML36 as a Ca 2+ sensor that binds to and modulates ACA8, uncovering a possible involvement of the CML protein family in the modulation of plant-autoinhibited Ca 2+ pumps. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Purification and reconstitution of the calcium antagonist receptor of the voltage-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment with digitonin solubilized the calcium antagonist receptor as a stable complex with [ 3 H]nitrendipine from rat brain membranes. The solubilized complex retains allosteric coupling to binding sites for diltiazem, verapamil, and inorganic calcium antagonist sites. The calcium antagonist receptor from cardiac sarcolemma and the transverse-tubule membrane of skeletal muscle is also efficiently solubilized with digitonin and the receptor in all three tissues is a large glycoprotein with a sedimentation coefficient of 20 S. The T-tubule calcium antagonist receptor complex was extensively purified by a combination of chromatography on WGA-Sepharose, ion exchange chromatography, and sedimentation on sucrose gradients to yield preparations estimated to be 41% homogeneous by specific activity and 63% homogeneous by SDS gel electrophoresis. Analysis of SDS gels detect three polypeptides termed α(Mr 135,000), β(Mr 50,000), and γ(Mr 32,000) as noncovalently associated subunits of the calcium antagonist receptor. The α and γ subunits are glycosylated polypeptides, and the molecular weight of the core polypeptides are 108,000 and 24,000 respectively. The calcium antagonist receptor was reconstituted into a phospholipid bilayer by adding CHAPS and exogeneous lipid to the purified receptor followed by rapid detergent removal. This procedure resulted in the incorporation of 45% of the calcium antagonist receptor into closed phospholipid vesicles. Data suggests that the α, β, and γ subunits of the T-tubule calcium antagonist receptor are sufficient to form a functional calcium channel

  18. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  19. Isolation of plasma membrane-associated membranes from rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Jan M; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Wojtala, Aleksandra; Duszynski, Jerzy; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic interplay between intracellular organelles requires a particular functional apposition of membrane structures. The organelles involved come into close contact, but do not fuse, thereby giving rise to notable microdomains; these microdomains allow rapid communication between the organelles. Plasma membrane-associated membranes (PAMs), which are microdomains of the plasma membrane (PM) interacting with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, are dynamic structures that mediate transport of proteins, lipids, ions and metabolites. These structures have gained much interest lately owing to their roles in many crucial cellular processes. Here we provide an optimized protocol for the isolation of PAM, PM and ER fractions from rat liver that is based on a series of differential centrifugations, followed by the fractionation of crude PM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The procedure requires ∼8-10 h, and it can be easily modified and adapted to other tissues and cell types.

  20. The ER in 3-D: a multifunctional dynamic membrane network

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, singular, membrane-bound organelle that has an elaborate 3-D structure with a diversity of structural domains. It contains regions that are flat and cisternal, ones that are highly curved and tubular, and others adapted to form contact with nearly every other organelle and with the plasma membrane. ER 3-D structure is determined by both integral ER membrane proteins and by interactions with the cytoskeleton. Here, we describe some of the factors that...

  1. The complex nature of calcium cation interactions with phospholipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcrová, Adéla; Pokorna, Sarka; Pullanchery, Saranya; Kohagen, Miriam; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Cremer, Paul S.; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding interactions of calcium with lipid membranes at the molecular level is of great importance in light of their involvement in calcium signaling, association of proteins with cellular membranes, and membrane fusion. We quantify these interactions in detail by employing a combination of spectroscopic methods with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Namely, time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy of lipid vesicles and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy of lipid monolayers are used to characterize local binding sites of calcium in zwitterionic and anionic model lipid assemblies, while dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements are employed for macroscopic characterization of lipid vesicles in calcium-containing environments. To gain additional atomic-level information, the experiments are complemented by molecular simulations that utilize an accurate force field for calcium ions with scaled charges effectively accounting for electronic polarization effects. We demonstrate that lipid membranes have substantial calcium-binding capacity, with several types of binding sites present. Significantly, the binding mode depends on calcium concentration with important implications for calcium buffering, synaptic plasticity, and protein-membrane association. PMID:27905555

  2. SARS-coronavirus replication is supported by a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kèvin Knoops

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses, a large group including human pathogens such as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, replicate in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Their replication complexes are commonly associated with modified host cell membranes. Membrane structures supporting viral RNA synthesis range from distinct spherular membrane invaginations to more elaborate webs of packed membranes and vesicles. Generally, their ultrastructure, morphogenesis, and exact role in viral replication remain to be defined. Poorly characterized double-membrane vesicles (DMVs were previously implicated in SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. We have now applied electron tomography of cryofixed infected cells for the three-dimensional imaging of coronavirus-induced membrane alterations at high resolution. Our analysis defines a unique reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum that integrates convoluted membranes, numerous interconnected DMVs (diameter 200-300 nm, and "vesicle packets" apparently arising from DMV merger. The convoluted membranes were most abundantly immunolabeled for viral replicase subunits. However, double-stranded RNA, presumably revealing the site of viral RNA synthesis, mainly localized to the DMV interior. Since we could not discern a connection between DMV interior and cytosol, our analysis raises several questions about the mechanism of DMV formation and the actual site of SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. Our data document the extensive virus-induced reorganization of host cell membranes into a network that is used to organize viral replication and possibly hide replicating RNA from antiviral defense mechanisms. Together with biochemical studies of the viral enzyme complex, our ultrastructural description of this "replication network" will aid to further dissect the early stages of the coronavirus life cycle and its virus-host interactions.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum involvement in yeast cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicanor Austriaco, O.

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cells undergo programed cell death (PCD) with characteristic markers associated with apoptosis in mammalian cells including chromatin breakage, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species generation, and metacaspase activation. Though significant research has focused on mitochondrial involvement in this phenomenon, more recent work with both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe has also implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast PCD. This minireview provides an overview of ER stress-associated cell death (ER-SAD) in yeast. It begins with a description of ER structure and function in yeast before moving to a discussion of ER-SAD in both mammalian and yeast cells. Three examples of yeast cell death associated with the ER will be highlighted here including inositol starvation, lipid toxicity, and the inhibition of N-glycosylation. It closes by suggesting ways to further examine the involvement of the ER in yeast cell death.

  4. Lipid Droplet Formation Is Dispensable for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olzmann, James A.; Kopito, Ron R.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins that fail to fold or assemble in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are destroyed by cytoplasmic proteasomes through a process known as ER-associated degradation. Substrates of this pathway are initially sequestered within the ER lumen and must therefore be dislocated across the ER membrane to be degraded. It has been proposed that generation of bicellar structures during lipid droplet formation may provide an “escape hatch” through which misfolded proteins, toxins, and viruses can exit the ER. We have directly tested this hypothesis by exploiting yeast strains defective in lipid droplet formation. Our data demonstrate that lipid droplet formation is dispensable for the dislocation of a plant toxin and the degradation of both soluble and integral membrane glycoproteins. PMID:21693705

  5. Contracture of Slow Striated Muscle during Calcium Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1963-01-01

    When deprived of calcium the slow striated muscle fibers of the frog develop reversible contractures in either hypertonic or isotonic solutions. While calcium deprivation continues because of a flowing calcium-free solution the muscles relax slowly and completely. Restoration of calcium during contracture relaxes the muscle promptly to initial tension. When relaxed during calcium lack the return of calcium does not change tension and the muscle stays relaxed. When contractures are induced by solutions containing small amounts of calcium relaxation does not occur or requires several hours. The rate of tension development depends upon the rate at which calcium moves outward since the contractures develop slower in low concentrations of calcium and are absent or greatly slowed in a stagnant calcium-free solution. Withdrawal of calcium prevents the contractile responses to ACh, KCl, or electrical stimulation through the nerve. Muscles return to their original excitability after calcium is restored. Origin of the contractures is unrelated to nerve activity since they are maximal during transmission failure from calcium lack, occur in denervated muscles, and are not blocked by high concentrations of d-tubocurarine, procaine, or atropine. The experiments also indicate that the contractures do not originate from repetitive activity of muscle membranes. The findings are most simply explained by relating the outward movement of calcium as a link for initiating contraction in slow type striated muscle. PMID:14065284

  6. Targeting Cellular Calcium Homeostasis to Prevent Cytokine-Mediated Beta Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy L; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Lavagnino, Zeno; Spears, Larry D; Abreu, Damien; Mahadevan, Jana; Yagi, Takuya; Semenkovich, Clay F; Piston, David W; Urano, Fumihiko

    2017-07-17

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of islet inflammation, leading to beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Although alterations in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosolic free calcium levels are known to play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death, there are currently no treatments targeting cellular calcium homeostasis to combat type 1 diabetes. Here we show that modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis can mitigate cytokine- and ER stress-mediated beta cell death. The calcium modulating compounds, dantrolene and sitagliptin, both prevent cytokine and ER stress-induced activation of the pro-apoptotic calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, and partly suppress beta cell death in INS1E cells and human primary islets. These agents are also able to restore cytokine-mediated suppression of functional ER calcium release. In addition, sitagliptin preserves function of the ER calcium pump, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA), and decreases levels of the pro-apoptotic protein thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Supporting the role of TXNIP in cytokine-mediated cell death, knock down of TXNIP in INS1-E cells prevents cytokine-mediated beta cell death. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of dynamic cellular calcium homeostasis and TXNIP suppression present viable pharmacologic targets to prevent cytokine-mediated beta cell loss in diabetes.

  7. C2-domain containing calcium sensors in neuroendocrine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Houy, Sébastien; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for calcium-triggered membrane fusion have long been sought for, and detailed models now exist that account for at least some of the functions of the many proteins involved in the process. Key players in the fusion reaction are a group of proteins that, upon binding...... to calcium, trigger the merger of cargo-filled vesicles with the plasma membrane. Low-affinity, fast-kinetics calcium sensors of the synaptotagmin family - especially synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-2 - are the main calcium sensors for fast exocytosis triggering in many cell types. Their functions extend...... beyond fusion triggering itself, having been implicated in the calcium-dependent vesicle recruitment during activity, docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane and priming, and even in post-fusion steps, such as fusion pore expansion and endocytosis. Furthermore, synaptotagmin diversity imparts distinct...

  8. Numerical Analysis of the Effect of T-tubule Location on Calcium Transient in Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Uduak Z.; Wang, Jun; Yu, Zeyun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signaling in cardiac myocytes is vital for proper functioning of the heart. Understanding the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics would give an insight into the functions of normal and diseased hearts. In the current study, spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics is investigated in ventricular myocytes by considering Ca2+ release and re-uptake via sarcolemma and transverse tubules (T-tubules), Ca2+ diffusion and buffering in the cytosol, and the blockade of Ca2+ activities associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study is carried out using a three dimensional (3D) geometric model of a branch of T-tubule extracted from the electron microscopy (EM) images of a partial ventricular myocyte. Mathematical modeling is done by using a system of partial differential equations involving Ca2+ , buffers, and membrane channels. Numerical simulation results suggest that a lack of T-tubule structure at the vicinity of the cell surface could increase the peak time of Ca2+ concentration in myocytes. The results also show that T-tubules and mobile buffers play an important role in the regulation of Ca2+ transient in ventricular myocytes. PMID:24212025

  9. Movement of calcium signals and calcium-binding proteins: firewalls, traps and tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, S L; Sherwood, M W; Dolman, N J; Gerasimenko, O V; Voronina, S G; Tepikin, A V

    2006-06-01

    In the board game 'Snakes and Ladders', placed on the image of a pancreatic acinar cell, calcium ions have to move from release sites in the secretory region to the nucleus. There is another important contraflow - from calcium entry channels in the basal part of the cell to ER (endoplasmic reticulum) terminals in the secretory granule region. Both transport routes are perilous as the messenger can disappear in any place on the game board. It can be grabbed by calcium ATPases of the ER (masquerading as a snake but functioning like a ladder) and tunnelled through its low buffering environment, it can be lured into the whirlpools of mitochondria uniporters and forced to regulate the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and it can be permanently placed inside the matrix of secretory granules and released only outside the cell. The organelles could trade calcium (e.g. from the ER to mitochondria and vice versa) almost depriving this ion the light of the cytosol and noble company of cytosolic calcium buffers. Altogether it is a rich and colourful story.

  10. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  11. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  12. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  13. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: Antacids (Tums, Chooz) Mineral supplements Hand lotions Vitamin and mineral supplements Other products may also contain ...

  14. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  15. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  16. Apoptosis-linked Gene-2 (ALG-2)/Sec31 Interactions Regulate Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jared R.; Bentley, Marvin; Thorsen, Kevin D.; Wang, Ting; Foltz, Lauren; Oorschot, Viola; Klumperman, Judith; Hay, Jesse C.

    2014-01-01

    Luminal calcium released from secretory organelles has been suggested to play a regulatory role in vesicle transport at several steps in the secretory pathway; however, its functional roles and effector pathways have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate for the first time that specific luminal calcium depletion leads to a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport rates in intact cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that luminal calcium depletion is accompanied by increased accumulation of intermediate compartment proteins in COPII buds and clusters of unfused COPII vesicles at ER exit sites. Furthermore, we present several lines of evidence suggesting that luminal calcium affected transport at least in part through calcium-dependent interactions between apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2) and the Sec31A proline-rich region: 1) targeted disruption of ALG-2/Sec31A interactions caused severe defects in ER-to-Golgi transport in intact cells; 2) effects of luminal calcium and ALG-2/Sec31A interactions on transport mutually required each other; and 3) Sec31A function in transport required luminal calcium. Morphological phenotypes of disrupted ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were characterized. We found that ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were not required for the localization of Sec31A to ER exit sites per se but appeared to acutely regulate the stability and trafficking of the cargo receptor p24 and the distribution of the vesicle tether protein p115. These results represent the first outline of a mechanism that connects luminal calcium to specific protein interactions regulating vesicle trafficking machinery. PMID:25006245

  17. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  18. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  19. Quantification of plasmodesmatal endoplasmic reticulum coupling between sieve elements and companion cells using fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Helle; Roberts, Alison G.; Oparka, Karl J.

    2006-01-01

    retrieval along the pathway is an integral component of phloem function. GFP fluorescence was limited to CCs where it was visualized as a well-developed ER network in close proximity to the plasma membrane. ER coupling between CC and SEs was tested in wild-type tobacco using an ER-specific fluorochrome......Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was studied to localize the activity of phloem loading during development and to establish whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the companion cell (CC) and the sieve element (SE) reticulum is continuous by using a SUC2 promoter-green fluorescent protein...... and fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP), and showed that the ER is continuous via pore-plasmodesma units. ER coupling between CC and SE was quantified by determining the mobile fraction and half-life of fluorescence redistribution and compared with that of other cell types. In all tissues...

  20. Calcium in Urine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Calcium, Serum; Calcium and Phosphates, Urine; ...

  1. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and

  2. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K.; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Huebner, Christian A.; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication(1). Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements

  3. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  4. Voltage-gated calcium flux mediates Escherichia coli mechanosensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Giancarlo N; Weekley, R Andrew; Dodd, Benjamin J T; Kralj, Joel M

    2017-08-29

    Electrically excitable cells harness voltage-coupled calcium influx to transmit intracellular signals, typically studied in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Despite intense study in higher organisms, investigations of voltage and calcium signaling in bacteria have lagged due to their small size and a lack of sensitive tools. Only recently were bacteria shown to modulate their membrane potential on the timescale of seconds, and little is known about the downstream effects from this modulation. In this paper, we report on the effects of electrophysiology in individual bacteria. A genetically encoded calcium sensor expressed in Escherichia coli revealed calcium transients in single cells. A fusion sensor that simultaneously reports voltage and calcium indicated that calcium influx is induced by voltage depolarizations, similar to metazoan action potentials. Cytoplasmic calcium levels and transients increased upon mechanical stimulation with a hydrogel, and single cells altered protein concentrations dependent on the mechanical environment. Blocking voltage and calcium flux altered mechanically induced changes in protein concentration, while inducing calcium flux reproduced these changes. Thus, voltage and calcium relay a bacterial sense of touch and alter cellular lifestyle. Although the calcium effectors remain unknown, these data open a host of new questions about E. coli , including the identity of the underlying molecular players, as well as other signals conveyed by voltage and calcium. These data also provide evidence that dynamic voltage and calcium exists as a signaling modality in the oldest domain of life, and therefore studying electrophysiology beyond canonical electrically excitable cells could yield exciting new findings.

  5. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-06-06

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd -/- ) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  6. Biogenesis of plasma membrane cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A striking feature of the molecular organization of eukaryotic cells is the singular enrichment of their plasma membranes in sterols. The authors studies are directed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying this inhomogeneous disposition. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of plasma membrane cholesterol in intact cells, leaving intracellular cholesterol pools untouched. With this technique, the plasma membrane was shown to contain 95% of the unesterified cholesterol of cultured human fibroblasts. Cholesterol synthesized from [ 3 H] acetate moved to the plasma membrane with a half-time of 1 h at 37 0 C. They used equilibrium gradient centrifugation of homogenates of biosynthetically labeled, cholesterol oxidase treated cells to examine the distribution of newly synthesized sterols among intracellular pools. Surprisingly, lanosterol, a major precursor of cholesterol, and intracellular cholesterol both peaked at much lower buoyant density than did 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. This suggests that cholesterol biosynthesis is not taken to completion in the endoplasmic reticulum. The cholesterol in the buoyant fraction eventually moved to the plasma membrane. Digitonin treatment increased the density of the newly synthesized cholesterol fractions, indicating that nascent cholesterol in transit is associated with cholesterol-rich membranes. The authors are testing the hypothesis that the pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis is spatially organized in various intracellular membranes such that the sequence of biosynthetic steps both concentrates the sterol and conveys it to the plasma membrane

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-sheng LIU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal folding requires that unique conditions should be maintained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER lumen, and nascent proteins are initially bound to Ca2+dependent chaperone proteins. Proteins synthesized in the ER are properly folded with the assistance of ER chaperones. misfolded proteins are disposed by ER-associated protein degradation. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive ER stress response, which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR, a conserved pathway that transmits signals to restore homeostasis or eliminate the irreparably damaged cells. It has been shown that ER stress involves in pathophysiological development of many diseases, including neurological diseases. However, nowadays, a few studies have begun to focus on the possibility that the accumulation of misfolded proteins can also contribute to reproductive diseases. In this article, we mainly introduced the involvement of ER stress response in preimplantation embryos, placental development, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR and testicular germ cells so as to provide important insights for the molecular mechanisms of ER stress-induced apoptosis in reproductive diseases.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis impairment in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Cabral-Miranda, Felipe; Vivar, Juan P; Hetz, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    Perturbed neuronal proteostasis is a salient feature shared by both aging and protein misfolding disorders. The proteostasis network controls the health of the proteome by integrating pathways involved in protein synthesis, folding, trafficking, secretion, and their degradation. A reduction in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network during aging may increase the risk to undergo neurodegeneration by enhancing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. As almost one-third of the proteome is synthetized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), maintenance of its proper function is fundamental to sustain neuronal function. In fact, ER stress is a common feature of most neurodegenerative diseases. The unfolded protein response (UPR) operates as central player to maintain ER homeostasis or the induction of cell death of chronically damaged cells. Here, we discuss recent evidence placing ER stress as a driver of brain aging, and the emerging impact of neuronal UPR in controlling global proteostasis at the whole organismal level. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic interventions to improve proteostasis and prevent pathological brain aging. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K; Rowe, David T; Wadowsky, Robert M; Rosendorff, Adam

    2011-11-17

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)-specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress-dependent and -independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress.

  10. Patterns of proteolytic cleavage and carbodiimide derivatization in sarcoplasmic reticulum adenosinetriphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Ancos, J.G.; Inesi, G.

    1988-01-01

    Two series of experiments were carried out to characterize (a) peptide fragments of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) ATPase, based on proteolysis with different enzymes and distribution of known labels, and (b) specific labeling and functional inactivation patterns, following ATPase derivatization with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) under various conditions. Digestion with trypsin or chymotrypsin results in the initial cleavage of the SR ATPase in two fragments of similar size and then into smaller fragments, while subtilisin and thermolysin immediately yield smaller fragments. Peptide fragments were assigned to segments of the protein primary structure and to functionally relevant domains, such as those containing the 32 P at the active site and the fluorescein isothiocyanate at the nucleotide site. ATPase derivatization with [ 14 C]DCCD under mild conditions produced selective inhibition of ATPase hydrolytic catalysis without significant incorporation of the 14 C radioactive label. This effect is attributed to blockage of catalytically active residues by reaction of the initial DCCD adduct with endogenous or exogenous nucleophiles. ATPase derivatization with [ 14 C]DCCD under more drastic conditions produced inhibition of calcium binding, 14 C radioactive labeling of tryptic fragments A 1 and A 2 (but not of B), and extensive cross-linking. The presence of calcium during derivatization prevented functional inactivation, radioactive labeling of fragment A 2 , and internal cross-linking of fragment A 1 . It is proposed that both A 1 and A 2 fragments participate in formation of the calcium binding domain and that the labeled residues of fragment A 2 are directly involved in calcium complexation. A diagram is constructed, representing the relative positions of labels and functional domains within the ATPase protein

  11. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Dysfunction in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria crosstalk underlies SIGMAR1 loss of function mediated motor neuron degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Azzedine, Hamid; Chrast, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Sigma 1 receptor (SIGMAR1) have been previously identified in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and disruption of Sigmar1 in mouse leads to locomotor deficits. However, cellular mechanisms underlying motor phenotypes in human and mouse with disturbed SIGMAR1 function have not been described so far. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to investigate the role of SIGMAR1 in motor neuron biology. Characterization of Sigmar1(-/-) mice revealed that affected animals display locomotor deficits associated with muscle weakness, axonal degeneration and motor neuron loss. Using primary motor neuron cultures, we observed that pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIGMAR1 led to motor neuron axonal degeneration followed by cell death. Disruption of SIGMAR1 function in motor neurons disturbed endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts, affected intracellular calcium signalling and was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and defects in mitochondrial dynamics and transport. These defects were not observed in cultured sensory neurons, highlighting the exacerbated sensitivity of motor neurons to SIGMAR1 function. Interestingly, the inhibition of mitochondrial fission was sufficient to induce mitochondria axonal transport defects as well as axonal degeneration similar to the changes observed after SIGMAR1 inactivation or loss. Intracellular calcium scavenging and endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition were able to restore mitochondrial function and consequently prevent motor neuron degeneration. These results uncover the cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration mediated by loss of SIGMAR1 function and provide therapeutically relevant insight into motor neuronal diseases. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  14. Calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.W.; Nestor, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for producing large, single, oriented crystals of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) has been developed which overcomes the limitations of current growing methods. This process has been reduced to practice and has yielded oriented crystals 17.5 x 17.5 x 5 cm 3 . Currently nearing completion is a system for producing 35 x 35 x 7.5 cm 3 single crystals. A scale up to one-meter-square is considered feasible. This crystal growing process makes possible the fabrication of very large CaF 2 windows. Suitability for very high power lasers, however, requires attention to properties beyond mere size. A process to generate higher purity growth stock (starting material) was also developed. The additional purification of the growth stock contributes to lower bulk absorption, the absence of color centers and increased radiation hardness. Also identified were several specific impurities which correlate with radiation hardness. A correlation was found between color centers induced by laser radiation and ionizing radiation. Other CaF 2 crystal properties such as tensile strength, absorption and laser damage thresholds were studied and are discussed

  15. Effects of extracellular calcium on calcium transport during hyperthermia of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghileri, L J; Marcha, C; Crone-Escanyé, M C; Robert, J

    1985-08-01

    The effects of different concentrations of extracellular ion calcium on the transport of calcium by tumor cells have been studied by means of the uptake of radiocalcium. Tumor cells incubated at 45 degrees C take up 4-10 times the amount of radioactivity incorporated by cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The difference is still greater (up to 100 times) for the intracellular incorporation as assessed by elimination of the membrane-bound calcium by EGTA treatment. The possible mechanisms involved in this differential behavior are discussed.

  16. p53-inducible DHRS3 Is an Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Associated with Lipid Droplet Accumulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisenroth, Chad; Itahana, Yoko; Tollini, Laura; Jin, Aiwen; Zhang, Yanping

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis as it relates to cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. In an effort to identify novel p53 target genes, a microarray approach was utilized to identify DHRS3 (also known as retSDR1) as a robust candidate gene. DHRS3 is a highly conserved member of the short chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily with a reported role in lipid and retinoid metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that DHRS3 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein that is shuttled to the ER via an N-terminal endoplasmic reticulum targeting signal. One important function of the ER is synthesis of neutral lipids that are packaged into lipid droplets whose biogenesis occurs from ER-derived membranes. DHRS3 is enriched at focal points of lipid droplet budding where it also localizes to the phospholipid monolayer of ER-derived lipid droplets. p53 promotes lipid droplet accumulation in a manner consistent with DHRS3 enrichment in the ER. As a p53 target gene, the observations of Dhrs3 location and potential function provide novel insight into an unexpected role for p53 in lipid droplet dynamics with implications in cancer cell metabolism and obesity. PMID:21659514

  17. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Coat Protein II Transport Machinery Coordinates Cellular Lipid Secretion and Cholesterol Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Lee G. D.; Jones, Bethan; Duncan, Emma J.; Hutchison, Claire E.; Ozkan, Tozen; Williams, Paul A.; Alder, Olivia; Nieuwdorp, Max; Townley, Anna K.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Stephens, David J.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Shoulders, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    Triglycerides and cholesterol are essential for life in most organisms. Triglycerides serve as the principal energy storage depot and, where vascular systems exist, as a means of energy transport. Cholesterol is essential for the functional integrity of all cellular membrane systems. The endoplasmic reticulum is the site of secretory lipoprotein production and de novo cholesterol synthesis, yet little is known about how these activities are coordinated with each other or with the activity of the COPII machinery, which transports endoplasmic reticulum cargo to the Golgi. The Sar1B component of this machinery is mutated in chylomicron retention disorder, indicating that this Sar1 isoform secures delivery of dietary lipids into the circulation. However, it is not known why some patients with chylomicron retention disorder develop hepatic steatosis, despite impaired intestinal fat malabsorption, and why very severe hypocholesterolemia develops in this condition. Here, we show that Sar1B also promotes hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B lipoprotein secretion and that this promoting activity is coordinated with the processes regulating apoB expression and the transfer of triglycerides/cholesterol moieties onto this large lipid transport protein. We also show that although Sar1A antagonizes the lipoprotein secretion-promoting activity of Sar1B, both isoforms modulate the expression of genes encoding cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes and the synthesis of cholesterol de novo. These results not only establish that Sar1B promotes the secretion of hepatic lipids but also adds regulation of cholesterol synthesis to Sar1B's repertoire of transport functions. PMID:24338480

  18. Blocking variant surface glycoprotein synthesis alters endoplasmic reticulum exit sites/Golgi homeostasis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Smith, Terry K; Gluenz, Eva; Wand, Nadina Vasileva; Vaughan, Sue; Rudenko, Gloria

    2018-06-01

    The predominant secretory cargo of bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei is variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), comprising ~10% total protein and forming a dense protective layer. Blocking VSG translation using Morpholino oligonucleotides triggered a precise pre-cytokinesis arrest. We investigated the effect of blocking VSG synthesis on the secretory pathway. The number of Golgi decreased, particularly in post-mitotic cells, from 3.5 ± 0.6 to 2.0 ± 0.04 per cell. Similarly, the number of endoplasmic reticulum exit sites (ERES) in post-mitotic cells dropped from 3.9 ± 0.6 to 2.7 ± 0.1 eight hours after blocking VSG synthesis. The secretory pathway was still functional in these stalled cells, as monitored using Cathepsin L. Rates of phospholipid and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor biosynthesis remained relatively unaffected, except for the level of sphingomyelin which increased. However, both endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi morphology became distorted, with the Golgi cisternae becoming significantly dilated, particularly at the trans-face. Membrane accumulation in these structures is possibly caused by reduced budding of nascent vesicles due to the drastic reduction in the total amount of secretory cargo, that is, VSG. These data argue that the total flux of secretory cargo impacts upon the biogenesis and maintenance of secretory structures and organelles in T. brucei, including the ERES and Golgi. © 2018 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Methods for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  20. Methods for Monitoring Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Samali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR. The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  1. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca 2+ signalling instability and Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca 2+ ] i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca 2+ sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca 2+ waves remains low. Less Ca 2+ release per [Ca 2+ ] i transient, increased fast Ca 2+ buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca 2+ current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na + ]. These features of Ca 2+ signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca 2+ signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca 2+ signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca 2+ stabilizing (Ca 2+ signalling silencing) and Ca 2+ destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca 2+ signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  2. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  3. Baicalein Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains a disastrous disease and the treatment for HCC is rather limited. Separation and identification of active compounds from traditionally used herbs in HCC treatment may shed light on novel therapeutic drugs for HCC. Methods. Cell viability and colony forming assay were conducted to determine anti-HCC activity. Morphology of cells and activity of caspases were analyzed. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and JNK were also examined. Levels of unfolded protein response (UPR markers were determined and intracellular calcium was assayed. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs were used to investigate the role of UPR and autophagy in baicalein-induced cell death. Results. Among four studied flavonoids, only baicalein exhibited satisfactory inhibition of viability and colony formation of HCC cells within water-soluble concentration. Baicalein induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, possibly by downregulating prosurvival Bcl-2 family, increasing intracellular calcium, and activating JNK. CHOP was the executor of cell death during baicalein-induced ER stress while eIF2α and IRE1α played protective roles. Protective autophagy was also triggered by baicalein in HCC cells. Conclusion. Baicalein exhibits prominent anti-HCC activity. This flavonoid induces apoptosis and protective autophagy via ER stress. Combination of baicalein and autophagy inhibitors may represent a promising therapy against HCC.

  4. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the SR is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole-cell calcium oscillations. At the same time membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... onset of oscillations in membrane potential within the individual cell may underlie sudden intercellular synchronization and the appearance of vasomotion. Key words: Vasomotion, Chloride channel, cGMP, Mathematical model, Calcium waves....

  5. Regulation of intracellular calcium in resting and stimulated rat basophilic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular calcium regulation was studied in a cell line of mast cells, the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells with the purpose of determining (1) The properties of the plasma membrane calcium permeability pathway and (2) The role of intracellular calcium stores. The first set of experiments showed that depolarization did not induce calcium entry or secretion in resting cells and did inhibit antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and secretion. In the second set of experiments the ionic basis of antigen-induced depolarization was studied using the fluorescent potential-sensitive probe bis-oxonol. The properties of the calcium entry pathway were more consistent with a calcium channel than a calcium transport mechanism such as Na:Ca exchange. The third set of experiments examined the effects of the proton ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on RBL cells. CCCP inhibited antigen-stimulated 45 Ca uptake and secretion by depolarizing the plasma membrane

  6. The cargo receptor p24A facilitates calcium sensing receptor maturation and stabilization in the early secretory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanchick, Ann; Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    2010-01-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a Family 3/C G protein-coupled receptor with slow and partial targeting to the plasma membrane in both native and heterologous cells. We identified cargo receptor family member p24A in yeast two-hybrid screens with the CaSR carboxyl terminus. Interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitation of either p24A or CaSR in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Only the immaturely glycosylated form of CaSR interacts with p24A. Dissociation likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) or cis-Golgi, since only the uncleaved form of a CaSR mutant sensitive to the trans-Golgi enzyme furin was coimmunoprecipitated with p24A. p24A and p24A(ΔGOLD) significantly increased total and plasma membrane CaSR protein but p24A(FF/AA) did not. The CaSR carboxyl terminus distal to T868 is required for differential sensitivity to p24A and its mutants. Interaction with p24A therefore increases CaSR stability in the ER and enhances plasma membrane targeting. Neither wt Sar1p or the T39N mutant increased CaSR maturation or abundance while the H79G mutant increased abundance but prevented maturation of CaSR. These results suggest that p24A is the limiting factor in CaSR trafficking in the early secretory pathway, and that cycling between the ER and ERGIC protects CaSR from degradation. PMID:20361938

  7. The Highly Conserved COPII Coat Complex Sorts Cargo from the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Targets It to the Golgi

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, Christopher; Ferro-Novick, Susan; Miller, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein egress from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is driven by a conserved cytoplasmic coat complex called the COPII coat. The COPII coat complex contains an inner shell (Sec23/Sec24) that sorts cargo into ER-derived vesicles and an outer cage (Sec13/Sec31) that leads to coat polymerization. Once released from the ER, vesicles must tether to and fuse with the target membrane to deliver their protein and lipid contents. This delivery step also depends on the COPII coat, with coat proteins bin...

  8. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  9. Specific protein-protein interactions of calsequestrin with junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiani, E.; Margreth, A.

    1990-01-01

    Minor protein components of triads and of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) terminal cisternae (TC), i.e. 47 and 37 kDa peptides and 31-30 kDa and 26-25 kDa peptide doublets, were identified from their ability to bind 125 I calsequestrin (CS) in the presence of EGTA. The CS-binding peptides are specifically associated with the junctional membrane of TC, since they could not be detected in junctional transverse tubules and in longitudinal SR fragments. The 31-30 kDa peptide doublet, exclusively, did not bind CS in the presence of Ca 2+ . Thus, different types of protein-protein interactions appear to be involved in selective binding of CS to junctional TC

  10. The Acid Test: Calcium Signaling in the Skeletogenic Layer of Reef-Building Coral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florn, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Since the Industrial Revolution, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have increased more than 40%. This increased atmospheric CO2 drives ocean acidification and has potentially serious consequences for all marine life, especially calcifying organisms. The specific goal of this study was to examine calcium homeostasis and signaling dynamics within the skeletogenic tissue layers (calicodermal cells) of two coral species (Pavona maldivensis and Porites rus) at three pH treatments corresponding to present-future ocean acidification levels. Confocal microscopy techniques were used to analyze in vivo calcium dynamics of the calicodermal cells in Pavona maldivensis and Porites rus. The results show biological variation between the two reef-building coral species and their response to ocean acidification. Pavona maldivensis showed a significant difference (p < 0.01) in the ionomycin-induced calcium response among the pH treatments, but not among the microcolonies. Porites rus did not show a significant difference (p < 0.01) in the ionomycin-induced calcium response among the pH treatments or the microcolonies. Upon comparing the calcium response curves, the ionomycin-induced calcium response exhibited by Pavona maldivensis is phenomenologically similar to a calcium response that is commonly found in vertebrates. This well-studied phenomenon in vertebrate biology is known as store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and is closely associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (MAM) calcium stores. This study provides insight into the preliminary steps needed to understand in vivo calcium signaling in the calicodermis of reef-building coral and the associated consequences of ocean acidification.

  11. FGF-23 dysregulates calcium homeostasis and electrophysiological properties in HL-1 atrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Shiu, Rong-Jie; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2014-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 is a key regulator of phosphate homeostasis. Higher FGF-23 levels are correlated with poor outcomes in cardiovascular diseases. FGF-23 can produce cardiac hypertrophy and increase intracellular calcium, which can change cardiac electrical activity. However, it is not clear whether FGF-23 possesses arrhythmogenic potential through calcium dysregulation. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate the electrophysiological effects of FGF-23 and identify the underlying mechanisms. Patch clamp, confocal microscope with Fluo-4 fluorescence, and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics, calcium homeostasis and calcium regulatory proteins in HL-1 atrial myocytes with and without FGF-23 (10 and 25 ng/mL) incubation for 24 h. FGF-23 (25 ng/mL) increased L-type calcium currents, calcium transient and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) contents in HL-1 cells. FGF-23 (25 ng/mL)-treated cells (n = 14) had greater incidences (57%, 17% and 15%, P calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ and phospholamban (PLB) at threonine 17 but had similar phosphorylation extents of PLB at serine 16, total PLB and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase protein. Moreover, the FGF receptor inhibitor (PD173074, 10 nM), calmodulin inhibitor (W7, 5 μM) and phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122, 1 μM) attenuated the effects of FGF-23 on calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylation. FGF-23 increases HL-1 cells arrhythmogenesis with calcium dysregulation through modulating calcium-handling proteins. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  12. 3-Methylcholanthrene inhibits lymphocyte proliferation and increases intracellular calcium levels in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Duchiron, C.; Deschaux, P.

    2003-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important class of environmental pollutants that are known to be carcinogenic and immunotoxic. Many authors have focused on macrophage activities in fish exposed to PAHs. However, fewer studies have reported decrease in specific immunity in such fish. We investigated the intracellular mechanisms by which the 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) decreased lymphocyte proliferation in carp. T- and B-lymphocyte proliferation induced by Concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were inhibited by 3-MC (0.5-50 μM). 3-MC also produced a rapid and a sustained increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) (2 h minimum). However, the cytochrome P450 1A and Ah receptor inhibitor, α-naphtoflavone (a-NF), also inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and did not reverse the effects of 3-MC. Moreover, since a-NF and 3-MC increased [Ca 2+ ] i and inhibited lymphocyte proliferation it was possible that calcium release played a role in 3-MC-inhibited lymphocyte proliferation. The rise in [Ca 2+ ] i induced by 3-MC was potentiated by the inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases, thapsigargin. Treating cells with 3-MC decreased calcium mobilization caused by thapsigargin. These results suggest that 3-MC acts on the endoplasmic reticulum, perhaps directly on calcium ATPases, to increase intracellular calcium levels in carp leucocytes

  13. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores facilitates the influx of extracellular calcium in platelet derived growth factor stimulated A172 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereb, G; Szöllösi, J; Mátyus, L; Balázs, M; Hyun, W C; Feuerstein, B G

    1996-05-01

    Calcium signaling in non-excitable cells is the consequence of calcium release from intracellular stores, at times followed by entry of extracellular calcium through the plasma membrane. To study whether entry of calcium depends upon the level of saturation of intracellular stores, we measured calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane of single confluent A172 glioblastoma cells stimulated with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and/or bradykinin (BK). We monitored the entry of extracellular calcium by measuring manganese quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence. PDGF raised intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after a dose-dependent delay (tdel) and then opened calcium channels after a dose-independent delay (tch). At higher doses (> 3 nM), BK increased [Ca2+]i after a tdel approximately 0 s, and tch decreased inversely with both dose and peak [Ca2+]i. Experiments with thapsigargin (TG), BK, and PDGF indicated that BK and PDGF share intracellular Ca2+ pools that are sensitive to TG. When these stores were depleted by treatment with BK and intracellular BAPTA, tdel did not change, but tch fell to almost 0 s in PDGF stimulated cells, indicating that depletion of calcium stores affects calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane. Our data support the capacitative model for calcium channel opening and the steady-state model describing quantal Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  14. Orai3 channel is the 2-APB-induced endoplasmic reticulum calcium leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Aparicio, Daniel; Pacheco, Jonathan; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Galindo, Jose M; Valdes, Jesus; Vaca, Luis; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin

    2017-07-01

    We have studied in HeLa cells the molecular nature of the 2-APB induced ER Ca 2+ leak using synthetic Ca 2+ indicators that report changes in both the cytoplasmic ([Ca 2+ ] i ) and the luminal ER ([Ca 2+ ] ER ) Ca 2+ concentrations. We have tested the hypothesis that Orai channels participate in the 2-APB-induced ER Ca 2+ leak that was characterized in the companion paper. The expression of the dominant negative Orai1 E106A mutant, which has been reported to block the activity of all three types of Orai channels, inhibited the effect of 2-APB on the [Ca 2+ ] ER but did not decrease the ER Ca 2+ leak after thapsigargin (TG). Orai3 channel, but neither Orai1 nor Orai2, colocalizes with expressed IP 3 R and only Orai3 channel supported the 2-APB-induced ER Ca 2+ leak, while Orai1 and Orai2 inhibited this type of ER Ca 2+ leak. Decreasing the expression of Orai3 inhibited the 2-APB-induced ER Ca 2+ leak but did not modify the ER Ca 2+ leak revealed by inhibition of SERCA pumps with TG. However, reducing the expression of Orai3 channel resulted in larger [Ca 2+ ] i response after TG but only when the ER store had been overloaded with Ca 2+ by eliminating the acidic internal Ca 2+ store with bafilomycin. These data suggest that Orai3 channel does not participate in the TG-revealed ER Ca 2+ leak but forms an ER Ca 2+ leak channel that is limiting the overloading with Ca 2+ of the ER store. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  16. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  17. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... channels on the cell surface stimulating synchronized release of SR-calcium and inducing the shift from waves to whole-cell oscillations. The effect of the channel is therefore to couple the processes of the SR with those of the membrane. We hypothesize that the shift in oscillatory mode and the associated...

  18. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Lenormand

    Full Text Available Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs, the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER, with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These

  19. Calcium and magnesium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The roles of calcium and magnesium in human health and disease have been extensively studied. Calcium and magnesium have been determined in biological specimens by atomic absorption spectroscopy using stiochiometric nitrous oxide-acetylene flame

  20. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  1. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium-channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  3. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  4. Sigma-1 Receptor Plays a Negative Modulation on N-type Calcium Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The sigma-1 receptor is a 223 amino acids molecular chaperone with a single transmembrane domain. It is resident to eukaryotic mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes. By chaperone-mediated interactions with ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and cell-signaling molecules, the sigma-1 receptor performs broad physiological and pharmacological functions. Despite sigma-1 receptors have been confirmed to regulate various types of ion channels, the relationship between the sigma-1 receptor and N-type Ca2+ channel is still unclear. Considering both sigma-1 receptors and N-type Ca2+ channels are involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis and neurotransmission, we undertake studies to explore the possible interaction between these two proteins. In the experiment, we confirmed the expression of the sigma-1 receptors and the N-type calcium channels in the cholinergic interneurons (ChIs in rat striatum by using single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. N-type Ca2+ currents recorded from ChIs in the brain slice of rat striatum was depressed when sigma-1 receptor agonists (SKF-10047 and Pre-084 were administrated. The inhibition was completely abolished by sigma-1 receptor antagonist (BD-1063. Co-expression of the sigma-1 receptors and the N-type calcium channels in Xenopus oocytes presented a decrease of N-type Ca2+ current amplitude with an increase of sigma-1 receptor expression. SKF-10047 could further depress N-type Ca2+ currents recorded from oocytes. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assays and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP demonstrated that sigma-1 receptors and N-type Ca2+ channels formed a protein complex when they were co-expressed in HEK-293T (Human Embryonic Kidney -293T cells. Our results revealed that the sigma-1 receptors played a negative modulation on N-type Ca2+ channels. The mechanism for the inhibition of sigma-1 receptors on

  5. Plasma membrane—endoplasmic reticulum contact sites regulate phosphatidylcholine synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavassoli, S.; Chao, J.T.; Young, B.P.; Cox, R.C.; Prinz, W.A.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Loewen, C.I.R.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of phospholipids, sterols and sphingolipids is thought to occur at contact sites between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other organelles because many lipid-synthesizing enzymes are enriched in these contacts. In only a few cases have the enzymes been localized to contacts in vivo and

  6. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum of tobacco cells using confocal microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radochová, Barbora; Janáček, Jiří; Schwarzerová, K.; Demjénová, E.; Tomori, Z.; Karen, Petr; Kubínová, Lucie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 11 (2005), s. 181-185 ISSN 1580-3139 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6011309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal microscopy * endoplasmic reticulum * image analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  7. Characteristics of Solid-State Calcium Ion Sensors Based on Photocurable and Selfplasticising Polyacrylate Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yook Heng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available New membrane materials based on cross-linked poly(n-butyl acrylate (nBA, have been used successfully as calcium ion-selective membranes. These membrane materials possess selfplasticising property and hence do not require plasticisers. The photocurability and good adhesion characteristics of these polymer matrices enable workable solid-state calcium ion sensors to be fabricated by simple photocure procedures employing the calcium ionophore ETH5234 and a lipophilic additive as ion sensing components. The calcium ion-selectivity of the sensors can be controlled by varying the chemical composition of the photocured  membrane. An optimum amount of the cross-linker 2,2-hexanedioldiacrylate (HDDA and the incorporation of n-heptyl acrylate (nHA led to improvement in the calcium ion-selectivity. The best calcium ion-selectivity was obtained from a copolymer membrane with composition: nBA = 74 wt-%, nHA = 20 wt-% and HDDA = 0.1 wt-%. The selectivity coefficients of calcium over major cations were: LogKCaPot,Na= -4.4,  LogKCaPot,K = -3.6, LogKCa,PotLi = -5.9, LogKCaPot,Mg= -4.4 with a Nernstian slope (29.1 ± 0.8 mV/decade under buffered conditions. This potentiometric performance is comparable to other solid-state calcium ion sensors with various plasticised polymer membranes.

  8. Cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells are lipointoxicated by membrane palmitate accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie-Anne Payet

    Full Text Available The F508del-CFTR mutation, responsible for Cystic Fibrosis (CF, leads to the retention of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The mistrafficking of this mutant form can be corrected by pharmacological chaperones, but these molecules showed limitations in clinical trials. We therefore hypothesized that important factors in CF patients may have not been considered in the in vitro assays. CF has also been associated with an altered lipid homeostasis, i. e. a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in plasma and tissues. However, the precise fatty acyl content of membrane phospholipids from human CF bronchial epithelial cells had not been studied to date. Since the saturation level of phospholipids can modulate crucial membrane properties, with potential impacts on membrane protein folding/trafficking, we analyzed this parameter for freshly isolated bronchial epithelial cells from CF patients. Interestingly, we could show that Palmitate, a saturated fatty acid, accumulates within Phosphatidylcholine (PC in CF freshly isolated cells, in a process that could result from hypoxia. The observed PC pattern can be recapitulated in the CFBE41o(- cell line by incubation with 100 µM Palmitate. At this concentration, Palmitate induces an ER stress, impacts calcium homeostasis and leads to a decrease in the activity of the corrected F508del-CFTR. Overall, these data suggest that bronchial epithelial cells are lipointoxicated by hypoxia-related Palmitate accumulation in CF patients. We propose that this phenomenon could be an important bottleneck for F508del-CFTR trafficking correction by pharmacological agents in clinical trials.

  9. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation-contraction coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitake, Saumitra; Ochs, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation-contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca(2+) under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation-contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca(2+) was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca(2+) concentration in the media. Ca(2+) entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca(2+) entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca(2+) release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  10. Visualisation of an nsPEF induced calcium wave using the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP in U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2018-02-01

    Cytosolic, synthetic chemical calcium indicators are typically used to visualise the rapid increase in intracellular calcium ion concentration that follows nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) application. This study looks at the application of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) to investigate the spatiotemporal nature of nsPEF-induced calcium signals using fluorescent live cell imaging. Calcium responses to 44kV/cm, 10ns pulses were observed in U87-MG cells expressing either a plasma membrane targeted GECI (GCaMP5-G), or one cytosolically expressed (GCaMP6-S), and compared to the response of cells loaded with cytosolic or plasma membrane targeted chemical calcium indicators. Application of 100 pulses, to cells containing plasma membrane targeted indicators, revealed a wave of calcium across the cell initiating at the cathode side. A similar spatial wave was not observed with cytosolic indicators with mobile calcium buffering properties. The speed of the wave was related to pulse application frequency and it was not propagated by calcium induced calcium release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase pumps in muscle of patients with myotonic dystrophy and with hypothyroid myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, V; Oosterhof, A; Voermans, N C; Cardani, R; Molenaar, J P; van Kuppevelt, T H; Meola, G; van Engelen, B G; Tomelleri, G; Vattemi, G

    2016-06-01

    Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) pumps play the major role in lowering cytoplasmic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle by catalyzing the ATP-dependent transport of Ca(2+) from the cytosol to the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Although SERCA abnormalities have been hypothesized to contribute to the dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and signaling in muscle of patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM) and hypothyroid myopathy, the characterization of SERCA pumps remains elusive and their impairment is still unclear. We assessed the activity of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, expression levels and fiber distribution of SERCA1 and SERCA2, and oligomerization of SERCA1 protein in muscle of patients with DM type 1 and 2, and with hypothyroid myopathy. Our data provide evidence that SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity, protein levels and muscle fiber distribution of total SERCA1 and SERCA2, and SERCA1 oligomerization pattern are similar in patients with both DM1 and DM2, hypothyroid myopathy and in control subjects. We prove that SERCA1b, the neonatal isoform of SERCA1, is expressed at protein level in muscle of patients with DM2 and, in lower amount, of patients with DM1. Our present study demonstrates that SERCA function is not altered in muscle of patients with DM and with hypothyroid myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  13. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  14. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  15. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER Chaperones and Oxidoreductases: Critical Regulators of Tumor Cell Survival and Immunorecognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSimmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed bulk flow, ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER. However, solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response (UPR upregulate ER chaperones and oxidoreductases. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the production of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an eat-me signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  17. Ultrastructural and cytochemical study of membrane alterations in x-irradiated liver tissue from normal and vitamin E-deficient ducklings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijbers, W.A.R.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Meskendorp-Haarsma, T.J.; Hardonk, M.J.; Molenaar, I.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation into the differential susceptibility of liver cellular membranes to peroxidative processes has been performed, using x irradiation on the liver surface, resulting in a a 3-mm penetrating gradient of membrane damage. Ultrastructural, cytochemical, and histochemical findings in this area point to a differential sensitivity of cellular membranes to x irradiation. The plasma membrane and the lysosomal membrane, containing much lipid and cholesterol and little membrane and the lysosomal membrane, containing much lipid and cholesterol and little vitamin E, are highly susceptible to x irradiation. Less sensitive are the membranes of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, containing relatively much vitamin E and proteins and a lower amount of lipids and cholesterol

  18. Introducing Membrane Charge and Membrane Potential to T Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While membrane models now include the heterogeneous distribution of lipids, the impact of membrane charges on regulating the association of proteins with the plasma membrane is often overlooked. Charged lipids are asymmetrically distributed between the two leaflets of the plasma membrane, resulting in the inner leaflet being negatively charged and a surface potential that attracts and binds positively charged ions, proteins, and peptide motifs. These interactions not only create a transmembrane potential but they can also facilitate the formation of charged membrane domains. Here, we reference fields outside of immunology in which consequences of membrane charge are better characterized to highlight important mechanisms. We then focus on T cell receptor (TCR signaling, reviewing the evidence that membrane charges and membrane-associated calcium regulate phosphorylation of the TCR–CD3 complex and discuss how the immunological synapse exhibits distinct patterns of membrane charge distribution. We propose that charged lipids, ions in solution, and transient protein interactions form a dynamic equilibrium during T cell activation.

  19. ILDR2: an endoplasmic reticulum resident molecule mediating hepatic lipid homeostasis.

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    Kazuhisa Watanabe

    Full Text Available Ildr2, a modifier of diabetes susceptibility in obese mice, is expressed in most organs, including islets and hypothalamus, with reduced levels in livers of diabetes-susceptible B6.DBA mice congenic for a 1.8 Mb interval of Chromosome 1. In hepatoma and neuronal cells, ILDR2 is primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We used adenovirus vectors that express shRNA or are driven by the CMV promoter, respectively, to knockdown or overexpress Ildr2 in livers of wild type and ob/ob mice. Livers in knockdown mice were steatotic, with increased hepatic and circulating triglycerides and total cholesterol. Increased circulating VLDL, without reduction in triglyceride clearance suggests an effect of reduced hepatic ILDR2 on hepatic cholesterol clearance. In animals that overexpress Ildr2, hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were reduced, and strikingly so in ob/ob mice. There were no significant changes in body weight, energy expenditure or glucose/insulin homeostasis in knockdown or overexpressing mice. Knockdown mice showed reduced expression of genes mediating synthesis and oxidation of hepatic lipids, suggesting secondary suppression in response to increased hepatic lipid content. In Ildr2-overexpressing ob/ob mice, in association with reduced liver fat content, levels of transcripts related to neutral lipid synthesis and cholesterol were increased, suggesting "relief" of the secondary suppression imposed by lipid accumulation. Considering the fixed location of ILDR2 in the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the possible participation of ILDR2 in ER stress responses. In general, Ildr2 overexpression was associated with increases, and knockdown with decreases in levels of expression of molecular components of canonical ER stress pathways. We conclude that manipulation of Ildr2 expression in liver affects both lipid homeostasis and ER stress pathways. Given these reciprocal interactions, and the relatively extended time

  20. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

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    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  1. Calreticulin is required for calcium homeostasis and proper pollen tube tip growth in Petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwińska, Anna; Wasąg, Piotr; Zakrzewski, Przemysław; Lenartowska, Marta; Lenartowski, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Calreticulin is involved in stabilization of the tip-focused Ca 2+ gradient and the actin cytoskeleton arrangement and function that is required for several key processes driving Petunia pollen tube tip growth. Although the precise mechanism is unclear, stabilization of a tip-focused calcium (Ca 2+ ) gradient seems to be critical for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. We hypothesize that calreticulin (CRT), a Ca 2+ -binding/buffering chaperone typically residing in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells, is an excellent candidate to fulfill this role. We previously showed that in Petunia pollen tubes growing in vitro, CRT is translated on ER membrane-bound ribosomes that are abundant in the subapical zone of the tube, where CRT's Ca 2+ -buffering and chaperone activities might be particularly required. Here, we sought to determine the function of CRT using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to, for the first time in pollen tubes growing in vitro, knockdown expression of a gene. We demonstrate that siRNA-mediated post-transcriptional silencing of Petunia hybrida CRT gene (PhCRT) expression strongly impairs pollen tube growth, cytoplasmic zonation, actin cytoskeleton organization, and the tip-focused Ca 2+ gradient. Moreover, reduction of CRT alters the localization and disturbs the structure of the ER in abnormally elongating pollen tubes. Finally, cytoplasmic streaming is inhibited, and most of the pollen tubes rupture. Our data clearly show an interplay between CRT, Ca 2+ gradient, actin-dependent cytoplasmic streaming, organelle positioning, and vesicle trafficking during pollen tube elongation. Thus, we suggest that CRT functions in Petunia pollen tube growth by stabilizing Ca 2+ homeostasis and acting as a chaperone to assure quality control of glycoproteins passing through the ER.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-sensing mechanism is activated in Entamoeba histolytica upon treatment with nitric oxide.

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    Julien Santi-Rocca

    Full Text Available The Endoplasmic Reticulum stores calcium and is a site of protein synthesis and modification. Changes in ER homeostasis lead to stress responses with an activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR. The Entamoeba histolytica endomembrane system is simple compared to those of higher eukaryotes, as a canonical ER is not observed. During amoebiasis, an infection of the human intestine and liver by E. histolytica, nitric oxide (NO triggers an apoptotic-like event preceded by an impairment of energy production and a loss of important parasite pathogenic features. We address the question of how this ancient eukaryote responds to stress induced by immune components (i.e. NO and whether stress leads to ER changes and subsequently to an UPR. Gene expression analysis suggested that NO triggers stress responses marked by (i dramatic up-regulation of hsp genes although a bona fide UPR is absent; (ii induction of DNA repair and redox gene expression and iii up-regulation of glycolysis-related gene expression. Enzymology approaches demonstrate that NO directly inhibits glycolysis and enhance cysteine synthase activity. Using live imaging and confocal microscopy we found that NO dramatically provokes extensive ER fragmentation. ER fission in E. histolytica appears as a protective response against stress, as it has been recently proposed for neuron self-defense during neurologic disorders. Chronic ER stress is also involved in metabolic diseases including diabetes, where NO production reduces ER calcium levels and activates cell death. Our data highlighted unique cellular responses of interest to understand the mechanisms of parasite death during amoebiasis.

  3. [Modification of retinal photoreceptor membranes and Ca ion binding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagin, V P; Berman, A L; Shukoliukov, S A; Rychkova, M P; Etingof, R N

    1978-10-01

    Calcium binding by modified photoreceptor membranes of cattle retina has been studied. Ca2+-binding the membranes significantly changes after C-phospholipase treatment, displaying the initial growth (less than 65% of lipid phosphorus removed) with subsequent decrease (more than 65% of phosphorus removed). Liposomes of the photoreceptor membranes lipids were found to bind more calcium than do the native photoreceptor membranes. Proteolytic enzymes (papaine, pronase) splitting some rhodopsin fragments do not affect the ability of the membrane to bind Ca2+. The increase of light-induced Ca-binding is observed only after the outer segments preincubation under conditions providing for rhodopsin phosphorylation. This effect was observed also after the splitting of the rhodopsin fragment by papaine. It is concluded that calcium binding in the photoreceptor membranes is mainly due to the phosphate groups of phospholipids.

  4. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  5. Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certain calcium channel blockers interact with grapefruit products. Kaplan NM, et al. Treatment of hypertension: Drug therapy. In: Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Wolters Kluwer ...

  6. Multiple, disparate roles for calcium signaling in apoptosis of human prostate and cervical cancer cells exposed to diindolylmethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, John A; Evans, Jodi F; Rabinowitz, Dorianne; Auborn, Karen J; Carter, Timothy H

    2006-03-01

    Diindolylmethane (DIM), derived from indole-3-carbinol in cruciferous vegetables, causes growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro. DIM also induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and thapsigargin, a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum/ER calcium-dependent ATPase, enhances this effect. We asked whether elevated cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]i is required for cytotoxicity of DIM and thapsigargin in two cancer cells lines (C33A, from cervix, and DU145, from prostate). [Ca2+]i was measured in real-time by FURA-2 fluorescence. We tested whether DIM, thapsigargin, and DIM + thapsigargin cause apoptosis, measured by nucleosome release, under conditions that prevented elevation of [Ca2+]i, using both cell-permeable and cell-impermeable forms of the specific calcium chelator BAPTA. DIM, like thapsigargin, rapidly mobilized ER calcium. C33A and DU145 responded differently to perturbations in Ca2+ homeostasis, suggesting that DIM induces apoptosis by different mechanisms in these two cell lines and/or that calcium mobilization also activates different survival pathways in C33A and DU145. Apoptosis in C33A was independent of increased [Ca2+]i, suggesting that depletion of ER Ca2+ stores may be sufficient for cell killing, whereas apoptosis in DU145 required elevated [Ca2+]i for full response. Inhibitor studies using cyclosporin A and KN93 showed that Ca2+ signaling is important for cell survival but the characteristics of this response also differed in the two cell lines. Our results underscore the complex and variable nature of cellular responses to disrupted Ca2+ homeostasis and suggest that alteration Ca2+ homeostasis in the ER can induce cellular apoptosis by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent mechanisms.

  7. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities...... in chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of cartilage from OCD patients. Abnormal type II collagen heterofibrils in "bundles" and chondrocytes with abnormal accumulation of matrix proteins in distended rough endoplasmic reticulum were typical findings. Further, Von Kossa staining and TEM showed empty lacunae...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  8. Reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum content of releasable Ca2+ in rat soleus muscle fibres after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J S; Sahlin, K; Ørtenblad, N

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The purpose was to evaluate the effects of fatiguing eccentric contractions (EC) on calcium (Ca2+) handling properties in mammalian type I muscles. We hypothesized that EC reduces both endogenous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content of releasable Ca2+ (eSRCa2+) and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity....... METHODS: Isolated rat soleus muscles performed 30 EC bouts. Single fibres were isolated from the muscle and after mechanical removal of sarcolemma used to measure eSRCa2+, rate of SR Ca2+ loading and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. RESULTS: Following EC maximal force in whole muscle was reduced by 30......% and 16/100 Hz force ratio by 33%. The eSRCa2+ in fibres from non-stimulated muscles was 45 +/- 5% of the maximal loading capacity. After EC, eSRCa2+ per fibre CSA decreased by 38% (P = 0.05), and the maximal capacity of SR Ca2+ loading was depressed by 32%. There were no effects of EC on either...

  9. Naphthoquinone Derivative PPE8 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in p53 Null H1299 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cherng Lien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER plays a key role in synthesizing secretory proteins and sensing signal function in eukaryotic cells. Responding to calcium disturbance, oxidation state change, or pharmacological agents, ER transmembrane protein, inositol-regulating enzyme 1 (IRE1, senses the stress and triggers downstream signals. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 dissociates from IRE1 to assist protein folding and guard against cell death. In prolonged ER stress, IRE1 recruits and activates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 as well as downstream JNK for cell death. Naphthoquinones are widespread natural phenolic compounds. Vitamin K3, a derivative of naphthoquinone, inhibits variant tumor cell growth via oxygen uptake and oxygen stress. We synthesized a novel naphthoquinone derivative PPE8 and evaluated capacity to induce ER stress in p53 null H1299 and p53 wild-type A549 cells. In H1299 cells, PPE8 induced ER enlargement, GRP78 expression, and transient IER1 activation. Activated IRE1 recruited ASK1 for downstream JNK phosphorylation. IRE1 knockdown by siRNA attenuated PPE8-induced JNK phosphorylation and cytotoxicity. Prolonged JNK phosphorylation may be involved in PPE8-induced cytotoxicity. Such results did not arise in A549 cells, but p53 knockdown by siRNA restored PPE8-induced GRP78 expression and JNK phosphorylation. We offer a novel compound to induce ER stress and cytotoxicity in p53-deficient cancer cells, presenting an opportunity for treatment.

  10. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Chen-Ming; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Tzeng, Wen-Pei; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Liu, Shih-Chia; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  11. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  12. Arsenic induces cell apoptosis in cultured osteoblasts through endoplasmic reticulum stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C.-H.; Chiu, Y.-C.; Huang, C.-F.; Chen, Y.-W.; Chen, P.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass resulting from an imbalance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Therefore, decreased bone formation by osteoblasts may lead to the development of osteoporosis, and rate of apoptosis is responsible for the regulation of bone formation. Arsenic (As) exists ubiquitously in our environment and increases the risk of neurotoxicity, liver injury, peripheral vascular disease and cancer. However, the effect of As on apoptosis of osteoblasts is mostly unknown. Here, we found that As induced cell apoptosis in osteoblastic cell lines (including hFOB, MC3T3-E1 and MG-63) and mouse bone marrow stromal cells (M2-10B4). As also induced upregulation of Bax and Bak, downregulation of Bcl-2 and dysfunction of mitochondria in osteoblasts. As also triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as indicated by changes in cytosolic-calcium levels. We found that As increased the expression and activities of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and calpain. Transfection of cells with GRP78 or calpain siRNA reduced As-mediated cell apoptosis in osteoblasts. Therefore, our results suggest that As increased cell apoptosis in cultured osteoblasts and increased the risk of osteoporosis.

  13. Prediction of endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins using fragmented amino acid composition and support vector machine

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    Ravindra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The endoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in many cellular processes, which includes protein synthesis, folding and post-translational processing of newly synthesized proteins. It is also the site for quality control of misfolded proteins and entry point of extracellular proteins to the secretory pathway. Hence at any given point of time, endoplasmic reticulum contains two different cohorts of proteins, (i proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum-specific function, which reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, called as endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins and (ii proteins which are in process of moving to the extracellular space. Thus, endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins must somehow be distinguished from newly synthesized secretory proteins, which pass through the endoplasmic reticulum on their way out of the cell. Approximately only 50% of the proteins used in this study as training data had endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, which shows that these signals are not essentially present in all endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins. This also strongly indicates the role of additional factors in retention of endoplasmic reticulum-specific proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum. Methods This is a support vector machine based method, where we had used different forms of protein features as inputs for support vector machine to develop the prediction models. During training leave-one-out approach of cross-validation was used. Maximum performance was obtained with a combination of amino acid compositions of different part of proteins. Results In this study, we have reported a novel support vector machine based method for predicting endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins, named as ERPred. During training we achieved a maximum accuracy of 81.42% with leave-one-out approach of cross-validation. When evaluated on independent dataset, ERPred did prediction with sensitivity of 72.31% and specificity of 83

  14. Analysis of Membrane Protein Topology in the Plant Secretory Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinya; Miao, Yansong; Cai, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Topology of membrane proteins provides important information for the understanding of protein function and intermolecular associations. Integrate membrane proteins are generally transported from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi and downstream compartments in the plant secretory pathway. Here, we describe a simple method to study membrane protein topology along the plant secretory pathway by transiently coexpressing a fluorescent protein (XFP)-tagged membrane protein and an ER export inhibitor protein, ARF1 (T31N), in tobacco BY-2 protoplast. By fractionation, microsome isolation, and trypsin digestion, membrane protein topology could be easily detected by either direct confocal microscopy imaging or western-blot analysis using specific XFP antibodies. A similar strategy in determining membrane protein topology could be widely adopted and applied to protein analysis in a broad range of eukaryotic systems, including yeast cells and mammalian cells.

  15. Fouling control mechanisms of demineralized water backwash: Reduction of charge screening and calcium bridging effects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the ionic environment on the charge of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (charge screening effect) and the calcium adsorption/bridging on new and fouled membranes (calcium bridging effect) by measuring the zeta potentials of membranes and colloidal NOM. Fouling experiments were conducted with natural water to determine whether the reduction of the charge screening effect and/or calcium bridging effect by backwashing with demineralized water can explain the observed reduction in fouling. Results show that the charge of both membranes and NOM, as measured by the zeta potential, became more negative at a lower pH and a lower concentration of electrolytes, in particular, divalent electrolytes. In addition, calcium also adsorbed onto the membranes, and consequently bridged colloidal NOM and membranes via binding with functional groups. The charge screening effect could be eliminated by flushing NOM and membranes with demineralized water, since a cation-free environment was established. However, only a limited amount of the calcium bridging connection was removed with demineralized water backwashes, so the calcium bridging effect mostly could not be eliminated. As demineralized water backwash was found to be effective in fouling control, it can be concluded that the reduction of the charge screening is the dominant mechanism for this. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Intact calcium signaling in adrenergic-deficient embryonic mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Jessica N; Taylor, David G; Katchman, Alexander N; Ebert, Steven N

    2018-01-22

    Mouse embryos that lack the ability to produce the adrenergic hormones, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI), due to disruption of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Dbh -/- ) gene inevitably perish from heart failure during mid-gestation. Since adrenergic stimulation is well-known to enhance calcium signaling in developing as well as adult myocardium, and impairments in calcium signaling are typically associated with heart failure, we hypothesized that adrenergic-deficient embryonic hearts would display deficiencies in cardiac calcium signaling relative to adrenergic-competent controls at a developmental stage immediately preceding the onset of heart failure, which first appears beginning or shortly after mouse embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). To test this hypothesis, we used ratiometric fluorescent calcium imaging techniques to measure cytosolic calcium transients, [Ca 2+ ] i in isolated E10.5 mouse hearts. Our results show that spontaneous [Ca 2+ ] i oscillations were intact and robustly responded to a variety of stimuli including extracellular calcium (5 mM), caffeine (5 mM), and NE (100 nM) in a manner that was indistinguishable from controls. Further, we show similar patterns of distribution (via immunofluorescent histochemical staining) and activity (via patch-clamp recording techniques) for the major voltage-gated plasma membrane calcium channel responsible for the L-type calcium current, I Ca,L , in adrenergic-deficient and control embryonic cardiac cells. These results demonstrate that despite the absence of vital adrenergic hormones that consistently leads to embryonic lethality in vivo, intracellular and extracellular calcium signaling remain essentially intact and functional in embryonic mouse hearts through E10.5. These findings suggest that adrenergic stimulation is not required for the development of intracellular calcium oscillations or extracellular calcium signaling through I Ca,L and that aberrant calcium signaling does not likely contribute

  17. Geographic structuring of the Plasmodium falciparum sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (PfSERCA gene diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Jambou

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a thapsigargin-like sesquiterpene has been shown to inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase PfSERCA. To collect baseline pfserca sequence information before field deployment of Artemisinin-based Combination therapies that may select mutant parasites, we conducted a sequence analysis of 100 isolates from multiple sites in Africa, Asia and South America. Coding sequence diversity was large, with 29 mutated codons, including 32 SNPs (average of one SNP/115 bp, of which 19 were novel mutations. Most SNP detected in this study were clustered within a region in the cytosolic head of the protein. The PfSERCA functional domains were very well conserved, with non synonymous mutations located outside the functional domains, except for the S769N mutation associated in French Guiana with elevated IC(50 for artemether. The S769N mutation is located close to the hinge of the headpiece, which in other species modulates calcium affinity and in consequence efficacy of inhibitors, possibly linking calcium homeostasis to drug resistance. Genetic diversity was highest in Senegal, Brazil and French Guiana, and few mutations were identified in Asia. Population genetic analysis was conducted for a partial fragment of the gene encompassing nucleotide coordinates 87-2862 (unambiguous sequence available for 96 isolates. This supported a geographic clustering, with a separation between Old and New World samples and one dominant ancestral haplotype. Genetic drift alone cannot explain the observed polymorphism, suggesting that other evolutionary mechanisms are operating. One possible contributor could be the frequency of haemoglobinopathies that are associated with calcium dysregulation in the erythrocyte.

  18. Hesperidin inhibits HeLa cell proliferation through apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yaoxian; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Jin; Gao, Jing; Ge, Xin; Lou, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Hesperidin (30, 5, 9-dihydroxy-40-methoxy-7-orutinosyl flavanone) is a flavanone that is found mainly in citrus fruits and has been shown to have some anti-neoplastic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hesperidin on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and to identify the mechanism involved. Cells were treated with hesperidin (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 μM) for 24, 48, or 72 h and relative cell viability was assessed using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Hesperidin inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Hesperidin-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells was characterized by increased nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, increased levels of GADD153/CHOP and GRP78 indicated hesperidin-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells involved a caspase-dependent pathway, presumably downstream of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Both of these proteins are hallmarks of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Hesperidin also promoted the formation of reactive oxygen species, mobilization of intracellular Ca 2+ , loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and promoted capase-3 activation. It also arrested HeLa cells in the G0/G1 phase in the cell cycle by downregulating the expression of cyclinD1, cyclinE1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 at the protein level. The effect of hesperidin was also verified on the human colon cancer cell HT-29 cells. We concluded that hesperidin inhibited HeLa cell proliferation through apoptosis involving endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and cell cycle arrest

  19. Tympanic membrane changes in experimental acute otitis media and myringotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzbutiene, G.; Hermansson, A.; Caye-Thomasen, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present experimental study explored pathomorphological changes and calcium depositions in the tympanic membrane during experimental acute otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in myringotomized and nonmyringotomized ears. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A rat model of exp...

  20. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied

  1. TMBIM3/GRINA is a novel unfolded protein response (UPR) target gene that controls apoptosis through the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rivera, D; Armisén, R; Colombo, A; Martínez, G; Eguiguren, A L; Díaz, A; Kiviluoto, S; Rodríguez, D; Patron, M; Rizzuto, R; Bultynck, G; Concha, M L; Sierralta, J; Stutzin, A; Hetz, C

    2012-06-01

    Transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif-containing (TMBIM)-6, also known as BAX-inhibitor 1 (BI-1), is an anti-apoptotic protein that belongs to a putative family of highly conserved and poorly characterized genes. Here we report the function of TMBIM3/GRINA in the control of cell death by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Tmbim3 mRNA levels are strongly upregulated in cellular and animal models of ER stress, controlled by the PERK signaling branch of the unfolded protein response. TMBIM3/GRINA synergies with TMBIM6/BI-1 in the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis and apoptosis, associated with physical interactions with inositol trisphosphate receptors. Loss-of-function studies in D. melanogaster demonstrated that TMBIM3/GRINA and TMBIM6/BI-1 have synergistic activities against ER stress in vivo. Similarly, manipulation of TMBIM3/GRINA levels in zebrafish embryos revealed an essential role in the control of apoptosis during neuronal development and in experimental models of ER stress. These findings suggest the existence of a conserved group of functionally related cell death regulators across species beyond the BCL-2 family of proteins operating at the ER membrane.

  2. The Complex Role of Store Operated Calcium Entry Pathways and Related Proteins in the Function of Cardiac, Skeletal and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Avila-Medina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells shared the common feature of contraction in response to different stimuli. Agonist-induced muscle's contraction is triggered by a cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration increase due to a rapid Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and a transmembrane Ca2+ influx, mainly through L-type Ca2+ channels. Compelling evidences have demonstrated that Ca2+ might also enter through other cationic channels such as Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels (SOCCs, involved in several physiological functions and pathological conditions. The opening of SOCCs is regulated by the filling state of the intracellular Ca2+ store, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which communicates to the plasma membrane channels through the Stromal Interaction Molecule 1/2 (STIM1/2 protein. In muscle cells, SOCCs can be mainly non-selective cation channels formed by Orai1 and other members of the Transient Receptor Potential-Canonical (TRPC channels family, as well as highly selective Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ (CRAC channels, formed exclusively by subunits of Orai proteins likely organized in macromolecular complexes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the complex role of Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE pathways and related proteins in the function of cardiac, skeletal, and vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  4. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  5. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1972-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 5 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the Mössbauer effect in surface science; the surface functional groups on carbon and silica; and the wetting phenomena pertaining to adhesion. The text also describes the physical state of phospholipids and cholesterol in monolayers, bilayers, and membranes; the characteristics of heterocoagulation; and the effects of calcium on excitable membranes and neurotransmitter action. Chemists, physiologists, biophysicists, and civil engineers will find the book i

  6. Rescue of sarcoglycan mutations by inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum quality control is associated with minimal structural modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Tayebeh; Gicquel, Evelyne; Poupiot, Jérôme; N'Guyen, Luu; Le Roy, Florence; Bartoli, Marc; Richard, Isabelle

    2012-02-01

    Sarcoglycanopathies (SGP) are a group of autosomal recessive muscle disorders caused by primary mutations in one of the four sarcoglycan genes. The sarcoglycans (α-, β-, γ-, and δ-sarcoglycan) form a tetrameric complex at the muscle membrane that is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and plays an essential role for membrane integrity during muscle contractions. We previously showed that the most frequent missense mutation in α-sarcoglycan (p.R77C) leads to the absence of the protein at the cell membrane due to its blockade by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control. Moreover, we demonstrated that inhibition of the ER α-mannosidase I activity using kifunensine could rescue the mutant protein localization at the cell membrane. Here, we investigate 25 additional disease-causing missense mutations in the sarcoglycan genes with respect to intracellular fate and localization rescue of the mutated proteins by kifunensine. Our studies demonstrate that, similarly to p.R77C, 22 of 25 of the selected mutations lead to defective intracellular trafficking of the SGs proteins. Six of these were saved from ER retention upon kifunensine treatment. The trafficking of SGs mutants rescued by kifunensine was associated with mutations that have moderate structural impact on the protein. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Calcium metabolism in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is one of the most important plasma constituents in mammals and birds. It provides structural strength and support (bones and eggshell) and plays vital roles in many of the biochemical reactions in the body. The control of calcium metabolism in birds is highly efficient and closely regulated in a number of tissues, primarily parathyroid gland, intestine, kidney, and bone. The hormones with the greatest involvement in calcium regulation in birds are parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol), and estrogen, with calcitonin playing a minor and uncertain role. The special characteristics of calcium metabolism in birds, mainly associated with egg production, are discussed, along with common clinical disorders secondary to derangements in calcium homeostasis.

  8. Analysis of the effects of cerium on calcium ion in the protoplasts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 10(52), pp. ... Paper. Analysis of the effects of cerium on calcium ion in the .... plasma membrane (Zeng et al., 2003). Recently .... cerium on vegetable growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

  9. Characterization of branchial transepithelial calcium fluxes in freshwater trout, Salmo gairdneri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, S.F.; Flik, G.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether gill transepithelial calcium fluxes in the freshwater trout (Salmo gairdneri) are passive or require active transport and to characterize the mechanism involved. A comparison of the in vivo unidirectional flux ratios with the flux ratios calculated according to the transepithelial electrochemical gradients revealed that calcium uptake from the water requires active transport of Ca 2+ . The inhibition of calcium uptake by external lanthanum, the specific deposition of lanthanum on the apical surface of chloride cells, and the favorable electrochemical gradient for calcium across the apical membrane suggest that the initial step in branchial calcium uptake is the passive entry of calcium into the cytosol of chloride cells through apical channels that are permeable to calcium. The study of gill basolateral plasma membrane vesicles demonstrated the existence of a high-affinity calmodulin-dependent calcium-transporting system. This system actively transports calcium from the cytosol of chloride cells into the plasma against a sizeable electrochemical gradient, thereby completing the transepithelial uptake of calcium. Calcium efflux occurs passively through paracellular pathways between chloride cells and adjacent pavement cells or between neighboring pavement cells

  10. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)] in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with small ligand concentration

  11. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  12. Cell Calcium and the Control of Membrane Transport. Annual Symposium of the Society of General Physiologists (40th) Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on September 3-7, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    plasma membranes. Purification. reconstitution, and properties. BB. I Revie.s in Biocnergetics. 683:279-301. Enedi. A.. B. Sarkadi, 1. Szasz , G. Bot...Journal. 237:675- 683. Connolly, T. M.. W. J1. Lawing . Jr., and P. W. Majerus. 1986. Protein kinaseC phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5...in kinetics. selecti% it , and pharmacology. .Journal of (ism’ra/ I’lili vs/o~ 86:1-30. Bross n. A. L. 1 970. [The African C" law ~ed load .\\’nopuA

  13. Dual Role of Ancient Ubiquitous Protein 1 (AUP1) in Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Protein Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Elizabeth J.; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2011-01-01

    Quality control of endoplasmic reticulum proteins involves the identification and engagement of misfolded proteins, dislocation of the misfolded protein across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, and ubiquitin-mediated targeting to the proteasome for degradation. Ancient ubiquitous protein 1 (AUP1) physically associates with the mammalian HRD1-SEL1L complex, and AUP1 depletion impairs degradation of misfolded ER proteins. One of the functions of AUP1 in ER quality control is to recruit the soluble E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2G2. We further show that the CUE domain of AUP1 regulates polyubiquitylation and facilitates the interaction of AUP1 with the HRD1 complex and with dislocation substrates. AUP1 localizes both to the ER and to lipid droplets. The AUP1 expression level affects the abundance of cellular lipid droplets and as such represents the first protein with lipid droplet regulatory activity to be linked to ER quality control. These findings indicate a possible connection between ER protein quality control and lipid droplets. PMID:21857022

  14. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Biphasic decay of the Ca transient results from increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Rajiv; Li, Yatong; Greensmith, David J.; Eisner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Ca leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor (RyR) reduces the amplitude of the Ca transient and slows its rate of decay.In the presence of β‐adrenergic stimulation, RyR‐mediated Ca leak produces a biphasic decay of the Ca transient with a fast early phase and a slow late phase.Two forms of Ca leak have been studied, Ca‐sensitising (induced by caffeine) and non‐sensitising (induced by ryanodine) and both induce biphasic decay of the Ca transient.Only Ca‐sensitising leak can be reversed by traditional RyR inhibitors such as tetracaine.Ca leak can also induce Ca waves. At low levels of leak, waves occur. As leak is increased, first biphasic decay and then slowed monophasic decay is seen. The level of leak has major effects on the shape of the Ca transient. Abstract In heart failure, a reduction in Ca transient amplitude and contractile dysfunction can by caused by Ca leak through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) and/or decreased activity of the SR Ca ATPase (SERCA). We have characterised the effects of two forms of Ca leak (Ca‐sensitising and non‐sensitising) on calcium cycling and compared with those of SERCA inhibition. We measured [Ca2+]i with fluo‐3 in voltage‐clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Increasing SR leak with either caffeine (to sensitise the RyR to Ca activation) or ryanodine (non‐sensitising) had similar effects to SERCA inhibition: decreased systolic [Ca2+]i, increased diastolic [Ca2+]i and slowed decay. However, in the presence of isoproterenol, leak produced a biphasic decay of the Ca transient in the majority of cells while SERCA inhibition produced monophasic decay. Tetracaine reversed the effects of caffeine but not of ryanodine. When caffeine (1 mmol l−1) was added to a cell which displayed Ca waves, the wave frequency initially increased before waves disappeared and biphasic decay developed. Eventually (at higher caffeine concentrations), the

  16. The impact of mitochondrial endosymbiosis on the evolution of calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2015-03-01

    At high concentrations, calcium has detrimental effects on biological systems. Life likely arose in a low calcium environment, and the first cells evolved mechanisms to maintain this environment internally. Bursts of calcium influx followed by efflux or sequestration thus developed in a functional context. For example, in proto-cells with exterior energy-converting membranes, such bursts could be used to depolarize the membrane. In this way, proto-cells could maintain maximal phosphorylation (metabolic state 3) and moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while avoiding the resting state (metabolic state 4) and high levels of ROS. This trait is likely a shared primitive characteristic of prokaryotes. When eukaryotes evolved, the α-proteobacteria that gave rise to proto-mitochondria inhabited a novel environment, the interior of the proto-eukaryote that had a low calcium concentration. In this environment, metabolic homeostasis was difficult to maintain, and there were inherent risks from ROS, yet depolarizing the proto-mitochondrial membrane by calcium influx was challenging. To maintain metabolic state 3, proto-mitochondria were required to congregate near calcium influx points in the proto-eukaryotic membrane. This behavior, resulting in embryonic forms of calcium signaling, may have occurred immediately after the initiation of the endosymbiosis. Along with ROS, calcium may have served as one of the key forms of crosstalk among the community of prokaryotes that led to the eukaryotic cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SH Oxidation Stimulates Calcium Release Channels (Ryanodine Receptors From Excitable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA HIDALGO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of redox reagents on the activity of the intracellular calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors of skeletal and cardiac muscle, or brain cortex neurons, was examined. In lipid bilayer experiments, oxidizing agents (2,2'-dithiodipyridine or thimerosal modified the calcium dependence of all single channels studied. After controlled oxidation channels became active at sub µM calcium concentrations and were not inhibited by increasing the calcium concentration to 0.5 mM. Subsequent reduction reversed these effects. Channels purified from amphibian skeletal muscle exhibited the same behavior, indicating that the SH groups responsible for modifying the calcium dependence belong to the channel protein. Parallel experiments that measured calcium release through these channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles showed that following oxidation, the channels were no longer inhibited by sub mM concentrations of Mg2+. It is proposed that channel redox state controls the high affinity sites responsible for calcium activation as well as the low affinity sites involved in Mg2+ inhibition of channel activity. The possible physiological and pathological implications of these results are discussed

  18. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  19. Hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fetal mouse: An ultrastructural, morphometric, and autoradiographic investigation of the relationship between the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and glycogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslin, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Fetal rodent hepatocytes undergo a rapid and significant accumulation of glycogen prior to birth. The distinct association of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) with glycogen during glycogen synthesis documented in the adult hepatocyte has not been clearly demonstrated in the fetus. The experiments described in this dissertation tested the hypothesis that SER is present and functions in the synthesis of fetal hepatic glycogen. Biochemical analysis, light microscopic (LM) histochemistry and electron microscope (EM) morphometry demonstrated that fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis began on day 15, with maximum accumulation occurring between days 17-19. Glycogen accumulation began in a small population of cells. Both the number of cells containing glycogen and the quantity of glycogen per cell increased as glycogen accumulated. Smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was observed on day 14 of gestation and throughout fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis, primarily as dilated ribosome-free terminal extensions of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), frequently associated with glycogen. SER was in close proximity to isolated particles of glycogen and at the periphery of large compact glycogen deposits. Morphometry demonstrated that the membrane surface of SER in the average fetal hepatocyte increased as glycogen accumulated through day 18 and dropped significantly as glycogen levels peaked on day 19. Parallel alterations in RER membrane surface, indicated overall increases in ER membrane surface. Autoradiography following administration of 3 H-galactose demonstrated that newly synthesized glycogen was deposited near profiles of SER at day 16 and at day 18; however, at day 18 the majority of label was uniformly distributed over glycogen remote from profiles of SER

  20. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  1. Changes in the distribution of lens calcium during development of x-ray cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, K.R.; Giblin, F.J.; Reddy, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the possible role of calcium in the opacification of x-ray-induced cataract in rabbit. The results demonstrate that the concentration of calcium in x-rayed lenses, just prior to lens hydration (7.5 weeks postirradiation), was twice that present in contralateral control lenses. At this stage of immature cataract, the lens nucleus remained transparent and maintained a normal level of calcium, but the lens cortex, containing regions of subcapsular opacification, accumulated a level of calcium that was twice that of the control. In the completely opaque mature cataract, (8-9 weeks post x-ray), both the cortex and nucleus had gained significant amounts of calcium. As the concentration of total calcium increased in the immature x-ray cataract, the amount of the cation bound to membranes and insoluble proteins of the cytosol also increased comparably. However, the relative proportion of calcium in the various fractions remained unaltered in the immature cataract; in both control lenses and immature cataracts, 20% of the total calcium remained in the membrane pellet and 70% was located in the soluble protein fraction. Only in the mature stage of cataract was a shift in the distribution of calcium apparent, as the proportion of calcium in the soluble protein fraction increased to 90%. Although only 7% of the total calcium in a mature cataract was bound to membrane, the amount represented a fivefold increase over the control. The results of this study demonstrate that an elevation in lens calcium accompanies the opacification process in x-ray cataract. The work also suggests that changes in calcium levels are not likely to result from inactivation of Ca-ATPase

  2. The role of calcium utilization of intestinal flora on urinary calcium excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurt Lambrecht, F.; Uenak, P.; Kavukcu, S.; Soylu, A.; Tuerkmen, M.; Kasap, B.; Yucesoy, M.; Esen, N.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether calcium utilization of intestinal flora has any effect on urinary calcium excretion, like oxalate degrading effect of Oxalobacter formigenes. Materials and Methods: The data of urinary calcium excretion examinations were evaluated. 0.1 g/ml of feces samples were implanted in broths. 5 μL of 45 Ca solution was added to the samples and they were incubated for 24 hours at 37 degree C. The amount of bacteriae in the samples was determined as colony forming unit (CFU). 200 μL of the samples were filtrated by 0.45 μm membrane and rinsed by 200 μL pure water. 45 Ca activity ( 45 Ca) of bacteria in the membrane was counted by GM detector for 100 seconds. Then, activity per CFU ( 45 Ca/CFU) was calculated and compared in hypercalciuric (calciuria >4; mg/kg/hour and/or calcium/creatinine ratio>0.21; Group I) and normocalciuric (Group II) patients. Results: Samples of 29 patients with a mean age of 7.50±4.28 (1.5-16) years were evaluated. 11 of them were female (M/F: 18/11). There were 14 patients in Group I and 15 patients in Group II, 45 Ca/CFU was not different for neither aerobic nor anaerobic bacteries between the two groups (p:0.983, p:0.601, respectively). 24-hour urine calcium levels were negatively but not significantly correlated to aerobic and anaerobic 45 Ca/CFU (p:0.079, r:-0.145; p:0.260, r:-0.420, respectively) in hypercalciuric patients. Besides, in normocalciuric patients, 24-hour urine calcium levels were correlated positively to aerobic and negatively to anaerobic 45 Ca/CFU again in an insignificant manner (p:0.509, r: 0.223; p:0623, r:-0.257, respectively). Conclusion: In this, study, similar 45 Ca/CFU levels in both hypercalciuric and normocalciuric patients imply that calcium utilization of intestinal flora does not have a distinct effect on urinary calcium excretion but, although not significant, there was a negative correlation between urine calcium levels and bacterial 45 Ca/CFU levels especially in hypercalciuric

  3. Acrolein Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Causes Airspace Enlargement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Masayuki; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. Methods Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alveolar airspace area was measured by using light microscopy and imaging system software. TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for active caspase 3 and Western blot analysis for active caspase 3, and caspase 12 were performed to detect apoptosis. The ER-stress related gene expression in the lungs was determined by Quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Acrolein-protein adducts in the lung tissue were detected by IHC. Results Acute administration of acrolein caused a significant elevation of activated caspase 3, upregulation of VEGF expression and induced ER stress proteins in the lung tissue. The chronic administration of acrolein in rats led to emphysematous lung tissue remodeling. TUNEL staining and IHC for cleaved caspase 3 showed a large number of apoptotic septal cells in the acrolein-treated rat lungs. Chronic acrolein administration cause the endoplasmic reticulum stress response manifested by significant upregulation of ATF4, CHOP and GADd34 expression. In smokers with COPD there was a considerable accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the inflammatory, airway and vascular cells. Conclusions Systemic administration of acrolein causes endoplasmic reticulum stress response, lung cell apoptosis, and chronic administration leads to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces and emphysema in rats. The substantial accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the lungs of COPD patients suggest a role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of emphysema. PMID:22675432

  4. Data supporting characterization of CLIC1, CLIC4, CLIC5 and DmCLIC antibodies and localization of CLICs in endoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devasena Ponnalagu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chloride intracellular channel (CLICs proteins show 60–70% sequence identity to each other, and exclusively localize to the intracellular organelle membranes and cytosol. In support of our recent publication, “Molecular identity of cardiac mitochondrial chloride intracellular channel proteins” (Ponnalagu et al., 2016 [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of different CLIC paralogs/ortholog (CLIC1, CLIC4, CLIC5 and DmCLIC antibodies used to decipher their localization in cardiac cells. In addition, localization of CLICs in the other organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER of cardiomyocytes was established. This article also provides data on the different primers used to show the relative abundance of CLIC paralogs in cardiac tissue and the specificity of the various CLIC antibodies used. We demonstrate that the predominant CLICs in the heart, namely CLIC1, CLIC4 and CLIC5, show differential distribution in endoplasmic reticulum. CLIC1 and CLIC4 both show co-localization to the endoplasmic reticulum whereas CLIC5 does not.

  5. Met receptor inhibitor SU11274 localizes in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiest, Edwin J; Smith, Heather Jensen; Hollingsworth, Michael A

    2018-07-02

    We discovered that SU11274, a class I c-Met inhibitor, fluoresces when excited by 488 nm laser light and showed rapid specific accumulation in distinct subcellular compartments. Given that SU11274 reduces cancer cell viability, we exploited these newly identified spectral properties to determine SU11274 intracellular distribution and accumulation in human pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of the studies reported here was to identify organelle(s) to which SU11274 is trafficked. We conclude that SU11274 rapidly and predominantly accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Calcium-Responsive Liposomes via a Synthetic Lipid Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jinchao; Carr, Adam J; Watson, Alexa J; Mattern-Schain, Samuel I; Best, Michael D

    2018-03-07

    Liposomal drug delivery would benefit from enhanced control over content release. Here, we report a novel avenue for triggering release driven by chemical composition using liposomes sensitized to calcium-a target chosen due to its key roles in biology and disease. To demonstrate this principle, we synthesized calcium-responsive lipid switch 1, designed to undergo conformational changes upon calcium binding. The conformational change perturbs membrane integrity, thereby promoting cargo release. This was shown through fluorescence-based release assays via dose-dependent response depending on the percentage of 1 in liposomes, with minimal background leakage in controls. DLS experiments indicated dramatic changes in particle size upon treatment of liposomes containing 1 with calcium. In a comparison of ten naturally occurring metal cations, calcium provided the greatest release. Finally, STEM images showed significant changes in liposome morphology upon treatment of liposomes containing 1 with calcium. These results showcase lipid switches driven by molecular recognition principles as an exciting avenue for controlling membrane properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Organellar Calcium Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is an important intracellular messenger affecting many diverse processes. In eukaryotic cells, Ca2+ storage is achieved within specific intracellular organelles, especially the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum, in which Ca2+ is buffered by specific proteins known as Ca2+ buffers. Ca2+ buffers are a diverse group of proteins, varying in their affinities and capacities for Ca2+, but they typically also carry out other functions within the cell. The wide range of organelles containing Ca2+ and the evidence supporting cross-talk between these organelles suggest the existence of a dynamic network of organellar Ca2+ signaling, mediated by a variety of organellar Ca2+ buffers. PMID:21421925

  8. Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78, a good marker of ER stress, were assessed by Western ..... calcium homeostasis is disturbed, because ATP is needed to ... lum stress and insulin signalling proteins in diabetes-induced.

  9. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response following cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Gina; Neuhaus, Ain A; Couch, Yvonne; Beard, Daniel J; Adriaanse, Bryan A; Vekrellis, Kostas; DeLuca, Gabriele C; Papadakis, Michalis; Sutherland, Brad A; Buchan, Alastair M

    2018-06-01

    Background Cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) hippocampal neurons are resistant to global ischemia, whereas cornu ammonis (CA1) 1 neurons are vulnerable. Hamartin expression in CA3 neurons mediates this endogenous resistance via productive autophagy. Neurons lacking hamartin demonstrate exacerbated endoplasmic reticulum stress and increased cell death. We investigated endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in CA1 and CA3 regions following global cerebral ischemia, and whether pharmacological modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress or autophagy altered neuronal viability . Methods In vivo: male Wistar rats underwent sham or 10 min of transient global cerebral ischemia. CA1 and CA3 areas were microdissected and endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression quantified at 3 h and 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro: primary neuronal cultures (E18 Wistar rat embryos) were exposed to 2 h of oxygen and glucose deprivation or normoxia in the presence of an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer (thapsigargin or tunicamycin), an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor (salubrinal or 4-phenylbutyric acid), an autophagy inducer ([4'-(N-diethylamino) butyl]-2-chlorophenoxazine (10-NCP)) or autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine). Results In vivo, decreased endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression (phospho-eIF2α and ATF4) was observed at 3 h of reperfusion in CA3 neurons following ischemia, and increased in CA1 neurons at 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro, endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers and high doses of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors also increased cell death. Both induction and inhibition of autophagy also increased cell death. Conclusion Endoplasmic reticulum stress is associated with neuronal cell death following ischemia. Neither reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress nor induction of autophagy demonstrated neuroprotection in vitro, highlighting their complex role in neuronal biology following ischemia.

  10. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant–microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Leborgne-Castel,; Bouhidel, Karim

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM) proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic ...

  11. A lipid receptor sorts polyomavirus from the endolysosome to the endoplasmic reticulum to cause infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengding Qian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which receptors guide intracellular virus transport are poorly characterized. The murine polyomavirus (Py binds to the lipid receptor ganglioside GD1a and traffics to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER where it enters the cytosol and then the nucleus to initiate infection. How Py reaches the ER is unclear. We show that Py is transported initially to the endolysosome where the low pH imparts a conformational change that enhances its subsequent ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration. GD1a stimulates not viral binding or entry, but rather sorting of Py from late endosomes and/or lysosomes to the ER, suggesting that GD1a binding is responsible for ER targeting. Consistent with this, an artificial particle coated with a GD1a antibody is transported to the ER. Our results provide a rationale for transport of Py through the endolysosome, demonstrate a novel endolysosome-to-ER transport pathway that is regulated by a lipid, and implicate ganglioside binding as a general ER targeting mechanism.

  12. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in TULP1 Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn P Lobo

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal disorders (IRDs result in severe visual impairments in children and adults. A challenge in the field of retinal degenerations is identifying mechanisms of photoreceptor cell death related to specific genetic mutations. Mutations in the gene TULP1 have been associated with two forms of IRDs, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA. TULP1 is a cytoplasmic, membrane-associated protein shown to be involved in transportation of newly synthesized proteins destined for the outer segment compartment of photoreceptor cells; however, how mutant TULP1 causes cell death is not understood. In this study, we provide evidence that common missense mutations in TULP1 express as misfolded protein products that accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causing prolonged ER stress. In an effort to maintain protein homeostasis, photoreceptor cells then activate the unfolded protein response (UPR complex. Our results indicate that the two major apoptotic arms of the UPR pathway, PERK and IRE1, are activated. Additionally, we show that retinas expressing mutant TULP1 significantly upregulate the expression of CHOP, a UPR signaling protein promoting apoptosis, and undergo photoreceptor cell death. Our study demonstrates that the ER-UPR, a known mechanism of apoptosis secondary to an overwhelming accumulation of misfolded protein, is involved in photoreceptor degeneration caused by missense mutations in TULP1. These observations suggest that modulating the UPR pathways might be a strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Parallel analysis of tagged deletion mutants efficiently identifies genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Parrish, Mark L; Cadera, Emily; Larson, Lynnelle; Matson, Clinton K; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Armour, Chris; Lum, Pek Yee; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2003-07-30

    Increased levels of HMG-CoA reductase induce cell type- and isozyme-specific proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, the ER proliferations induced by Hmg1p consist of nuclear-associated stacks of smooth ER membranes known as karmellae. To identify genes required for karmellae assembly, we compared the composition of populations of homozygous diploid S. cerevisiae deletion mutants following 20 generations of growth with and without karmellae. Using an initial population of 1,557 deletion mutants, 120 potential mutants were identified as a result of three independent experiments. Each experiment produced a largely non-overlapping set of potential mutants, suggesting that differences in specific growth conditions could be used to maximize the comprehensiveness of similar parallel analysis screens. Only two genes, UBC7 and YAL011W, were identified in all three experiments. Subsequent analysis of individual mutant strains confirmed that each experiment was identifying valid mutations, based on the mutant's sensitivity to elevated HMG-CoA reductase and inability to assemble normal karmellae. The largest class of HMG-CoA reductase-sensitive mutations was a subset of genes that are involved in chromatin structure and transcriptional regulation, suggesting that karmellae assembly requires changes in transcription or that the presence of karmellae may interfere with normal transcriptional regulation. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Diabetic Kidney, the Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunard, Robyn

    2015-04-20

    Diabetic kidney disease is the leading worldwide cause of end stage kidney disease and a growing public health challenge. The diabetic kidney is exposed to many environmental stressors and each cell type has developed intricate signaling systems designed to restore optimal cellular function. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic pathway that regulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane structure and secretory function. Studies suggest that the UPR is activated in the diabetic kidney to restore normal ER function and viability. However, when the cell is continuously stressed in an environment that lies outside of its normal physiological range, then the UPR is known as the ER stress response. The UPR reduces protein synthesis, augments the ER folding capacity and downregulates mRNA expression of genes by multiple pathways. Aberrant activation of ER stress can also induce inflammation and cellular apoptosis, and modify signaling of protective processes such as autophagy and mTORC activation. The following review will discuss our current understanding of ER stress in the diabetic kidney and explore novel means of modulating ER stress and its interacting signaling cascades with the overall goal of identifying therapeutic strategies that will improve outcomes in diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and N-glycosylation modulate expression of WFS1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Suguru; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Tamura, Akira; Yamada, Takahiro; Takahashi, Rui; Takei, Daisuke; Katagiri, Hideki; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2004-01-01

    Mutations of the WFS1 gene are responsible for two hereditary diseases, Wolfram syndrome and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss. The WFS1 protein is a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane but its function is poorly understood. Herein we show WFS1 mRNA and protein levels in pancreatic islets to be increased with ER-stress inducers, thapsigargin and dithiothreitol. Another ER-stress inducer, the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, also raised WFS1 mRNA but not protein levels. Site-directed mutagenesis showed both Asn-663 and Asn-748 to be N-glycosylated in mouse WFS1 protein. The glycosylation-defective WFS1 protein, in which Asn-663 and Asn-748 had been substituted with aspartate, exhibited an increased protein turnover rate. Consistent with this, the WFS1 protein was more rapidly degraded in the presence of tunicamycin. These data indicate that ER-stress and N-glycosylation play important roles in WFS1 expression and stability, and also suggest regulatory roles for this protein in ER-stress induced cell death

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial crosstalk: a novel role for the mitochondrial peptide humanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswaran G Sreekumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the interactive mechanisms of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER are discussed with emphasis on the potential protective role of the mitochondria derived peptide humanin (HN in ER stress. The ER and mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of modifying their structure and function in response to changing environmental conditions. The ER and mitochondria join together at multiple sites and form mitochondria-ER associated membranes that participate in signal transduction pathways that are under active investigation. Our laboratory previously showed that HN protects cells from oxidative stress induced cell death and more recently, described the beneficial role of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium cells and the involvement of ER-mitochondrial cross-talk in cellular protection. The protection was achieved, in part, by the restoration of mitochondrial glutathione that was depleted by ER stress. Thus, HN may be a promising candidate for therapy for diseases that involve both oxidative and ER stress. Developing novel approaches for retinal delivery of HN, its analogues as well as small molecular weight ER stress inhibitors would prove to be a valuable approach in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

  17. ATAD3 proteins: brokers of a mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum connection in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudier, Jacques

    2018-05-01

    In yeast, a sequence of physical and genetic interactions termed the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria organizing network (ERMIONE) controls mitochondria-ER interactions and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several functions that characterize ERMIONE complexes are conserved in mammalian cells, suggesting that a similar tethering complex must exist in metazoans. Recent studies have identified a new family of nuclear-encoded ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA+-ATPase) mitochondrial membrane proteins specific to multicellular eukaryotes, called the ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 3 (ATAD3) proteins (ATAD3A and ATAD3B). These proteins are crucial for normal mitochondrial-ER interactions and lie at the heart of processes underlying mitochondrial biogenesis. ATAD3A orthologues have been studied in flies, worms, and mammals, highlighting the widespread importance of this gene during embryonic development and in adulthood. ATAD3A is a downstream effector of target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling in Drosophila and exhibits typical features of proteins from the ERMIONE-like complex in metazoans. In humans, mutations in the ATAD3A gene represent a new link between altered mitochondrial-ER interaction and recognizable neurological syndromes. The primate-specific ATAD3B protein is a biomarker of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. Through negative regulation of ATAD3A function, ATAD3B supports mitochondrial stemness properties. © 2017 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  18. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM- CHANNELBLOCKERSFOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, the controversy over the role of calci~-channel blockers as first-line ..... group trials while fully accounting for placebo effects as well as interindividual ..... Reducing calcium overload in the ischemic brain. N Engl JMed. 1999; 341 ...

  19. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium-set tofu edamame (soybeans) broccoli, collard greens, kale, chard, Chinese cabbage, and other leafy greens almonds ... more dark green, leafy vegetables (such as broccoli, kale, collard greens, or Chinese cabbage) with meals. Kids ...

  20. Comparative study the expression of calcium cycling genes in Bombay duck (Harpadon nehereus and beltfish (Trichiurus lepturus with different swimming activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The contraction and relaxation events of the muscle is mediated by the coordination of many important calcium cycling proteins of ryanodine receptor (RYR, troponin C (TNNC, parvalbumin (PVALB, sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (SERCA and calsequestrin (CASQ. In higher vertebrates, the expression level of calcium cycling proteins are positively correlated to the muscle contraction/relaxation ability of the cell. In this study, we used RNAseq to explore the expression profile of calcium cycling genes between two marine fish of Bombay duck (Harpadon nehereus and beltfish (Trichiurus lepturus with poor and robust swimming activities, respectively. We have studied the hypothesis whether the expression level of calcium cycling proteins are also positive correlated to swimming ability in fish. We used Illumina sequencing technology (NextSeq500 to sequence, assemble and annotate the muscle transcriptome of Bombay duck for the first time. A total of 47,752,240 cleaned reads (deposited in NCBI SRA database with accession number of SRX1706379 were obtained from RNA sequencing and 26,288 unigenes (with N50 of 486 bp were obtained after de novo assembling with Trinity software. BLASTX against NR, GO, KEGG and eggNOG databases show 100%, 65%, 26%, 94% and 88% annotation rate, respectively. Comparison of the dominantly expressed unigenes in fish muscle shows calcium cycling gene expression in beltfish (SRX1674471 is 1.4- to 51.6-fold higher than Bombay duck. Among five calcium cycling genes, the fold change results are very significant in CASQ (51.6 fold and PVALB (9.1 fold and both of them are responsive for calcium binding to reduce free calcium concentration in the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm. In conclusion, we confirmed that the high abundant expression rate of calcium cycling genes in robust swimming fish species. The current muscle transcriptome and identified calcium cycling gene data can provide more insights into the

  1. UDP-galactose: ceramide galactosyltransferase is a class I integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, H.; Kruithof, B.; Leijendekker, R.L.; Slot, J.W.; van Meer, G.; van der Sluijs, P.

    1998-01-01

    UDP-galactose:ceramide galactosyltransferase (CGalT) transfers UDP-galactose to ceramide to form the glycosphingolipid galactosylceramide. Galactosylceramide is the major constituent of myelin and is also highly enriched in many epithelial cells, where it is thought to play an important role in

  2. Bcl-2 overexpression: effects on transmembrane calcium movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaswami, Arun A.; Premack, Brett; Walleczek, Jan; Killoran, Pamela; Gardner, Phyllis; Knox, Susan J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: High levels of expression of the proto-oncogene bcl-2 and its 26 kD protein product Bcl-2 have been correlated with the inhibition of apoptosis and the increased resistance of tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs and ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, the specific mechanism of action of Bcl-2 remains poorly understood. In the studies described here, the role of intracellular calcium fluxes and plasma membrane calcium cycling in the induction of apoptosis, and the effect of Bcl-2 expression on the modulation of transmembrane calcium fluxes following treatment of cells with cytotoxic agents were studied. The relationship between intracellular calcium release, capacitive calcium entry, and the plasma membrane potential were also investigated. Materials and Methods: Human B-cell lymphoma (PW) and human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cell lines were transfected with Bcl-2 and a control vector. The Bcl-2 transfectants over expressed the Bcl-2 onco-protein and were more resistant to irradiation than the control cells. Cells were loaded with fluorescent indicators indo-1 and fura-2 AM to quantify the cytosolic calcium concentration and subsequent calcium responses to a variety of cytotoxic stimuli, including the microsomal ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, using fluorometric measurements. Comparisons of resting and stimulated cytosolic calcium concentrations were made between the parental, neomycin control, and bcl-2 transfected cells. In order to determine the actual calcium influx rate, cells were loaded with either indo-1 or fura-2 and then exposed to 0.1 mM extracellular manganese, which enters the cells through calcium influx channels and quenches the fluorescent signal in proportion to the calcium influx rate. In order to determine the role of the membrane potential in driving calcium influx, cells were treated with either 0.1 μM Valinomycin or isotonic potassium chloride to either hyper polarize or depolarize the resting membrane potential, and the

  3. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théophile Godfraind

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovered by Sidney Ringer who reported this fact in 1883. Interest in the intracellular role of calcium arose 60 years later out of Kamada (Japan and Heibrunn (USA experiments in the early 1940s. Studies on pharmacology of calcium function were initiated in the mid 1960s and their therapeutic applications globally occurred in the the 1980s. The first part of this report deals with basic pharmacology in the cardiovascular system particularly in isolated arteries. In the section entitled from calcium antagonists to calcium channel blockers, it is recalled that drugs of a series of diphenylpiperazines screened in vivo on coronary bed precontracted by angiotensin were initially named calcium antagonists on the basis of their effect in depolarized arteries contracted by calcium. Studies on arteries contracted by catecholamines showed that the vasorelaxation resulted from blockade of calcium entry. Radiochemical and electrophysiological studies performed with dihydropyridines allowed their cellular targets to be identified with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. The modulated receptor theory helped the understanding of their variation in affinity dependent on arterial cell membrane potential and promoted the terminology calcium channel blocker (CCB of which the various chemical families are introduced in the paper. In the section entitled tissue selectivity of CCBs, it is shown that characteristics of the drug, properties of the tissue, and of the stimuli are

  4. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  5. Three common GJB2 mutations causing nonsyndromic hearing loss in Chinese populations are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Ju; Li, Lina; Sun, Yurui; Feng, Bo

    2010-07-01

    The three most common GJB2 mutations found in the Chinese populations, c.235delC, c.299-300delAT, and c.176-191de1 (16) bp, cannot form gap junctons (GJs) in the plasma membrane. These mutant proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that ER stress (ERS) and subsequent ERS-induced cell death may be responsible for hearing loss caused by these GJB2 truncation mutations. The objective of this study was to investigate the subcellular location of the protein products of three GJB2 mutants (c.235de1C, c.299-300delAT, and c.176-191de1 (16) bp) and to explore the deafness mechanism caused by these GJB2 truncation mutations. Mutant-eGFP fusion protein vectors were constructed by PCR and TA cloning. HEK293 cells were transfected by a liposome-mediated method. Transfected cells were incubated with ER-Tracker and observed under a confocal microscope. Cells transfected with wild type gave characteristic punctuate patterns of GJs in the cell membrane. In contrast, c.235de1C, c.299-300delAT, and c.176-191de1 (16) bp mutant proteins were found to be trapped in the ER, and were therefore unable to form GJs in the plasma membrane.

  6. Ghrelin Ameliorates Asthma by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian; Wang, Lei; Zeng, Qingdi; Zhang, Yan; Sheng, Baowei; Han, Liping

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to confirm the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on asthma and investigate its mechanism. The murine model of asthma was induced by ovalbumin (OVA) treatment and assessed by histological pathology and airway responsiveness to methacholine. The total and differential leukocytes were counted. Tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were quantified by commercial kits. The protein levels in pulmonary tissues were measured by Western blot analysis. Ghrelin ameliorated the histological pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in the OVA-induced asthmatic mouse model. Consistently, OVA-increased total and differential leukocytes and levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly attenuated by ghrelin. Ghrelin prevented the increased protein levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers glucose regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein and reversed the reduced levels of p-Akt in asthmatic mice. Ghrelin might prevent endoplasmic reticulum stress activation by stimulating the Akt signaling pathway, which attenuated inflammation and ameliorated asthma in mice. Ghrelin might be a new target for asthma therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Variable Stars in Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Clusters. III. Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Dame, Kyra; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Márcio; Jeon, Young-Beom; Nemec, James M.; Walker, Alistair R.; Kunder, Andrea; Pritzl, Barton J.; De Lee, Nathan; Borissova, Jura

    2013-06-01

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the variable stars in old globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The primary goal of this series is to look at how the characteristics and behavior of RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to those of their counterparts in Oosterhoff-I/II systems. In this paper we present the results of our new time-series BVI photometric study of the globular cluster Reticulum. We found a total of 32 variables stars (22 RRab, 4 RRc, and 6 RRd stars) in our field of view. We present photometric parameters and light curves for these stars. We also present physical properties, derived from Fourier analysis of light curves, for some of the RR Lyrae stars. We discuss the Oosterhoff classification of Reticulum and use our results to re-derive the distance modulus and age of the cluster. Based on observations taken with the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium and observations taken at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  8. Compound K induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptor in human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Shin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress may initiate apoptotic pathways in cancer cells, and ER stress has been reported to possibly increase tumor death in cancer therapy. We previously reported that caspase-8 played an important role in compound K-induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3 directly or indirectly through Bid cleavage, cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 activation in HL-60 human leukemia cells. The mechanisms leading to apoptosis in A549 and SK-MES-1 human lung cancer cells and the role of ER stress have not yet been understood. Methods: The apoptotic effects of compound K were analyzed using flow cytometry, and the changes in protein levels were determined using Western blot analysis. The intracellular calcium levels were monitored by staining with Fura-2/AM and Fluo-3/AM. Results: Compound K-induced ER stress was confirmed through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α and protein levels of GRP78/BiP, XBP-1S, and IRE1α in human lung cancer cells. Moreover, compound-K led to the accumulation of intracellular calcium and an increase in m-calpain activities that were both significantly inhibited by pretreatment either with BAPTA-AM (an intracellular Ca2+ chelator or dantrolene (an RyR channel antagonist. These results were correlated with the outcome that compound K induced ER stress-related apoptosis through caspase-12, as z-ATAD-fmk (a specific inhibitor of caspase-12 partially ameliorated this effect. Interestingly, 4-PBA (ER stress inhibitor dramatically improved the compound K-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: Cell survival and intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis during ER stress in human lung cancer cells are important factors in the induction of the compound K-induced apoptotic pathway. Keywords: apoptosis, calcium, compound K, ER stress, lung cancer cells

  9. The role of calcium ions in cytological effects of hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Belyavskaya, N. A.; Nedukha, E. M.; Palladina, T. A.; Tarasenko, V. A.

    Electron-cytochemical and biochemical methods made it possible to reveal certain differences in ATPase activity stimulation by calcium ions in root apex cells of pea seedlings and moss protonema Funaria hygrometrica grown under stationary and slow clinostatic (2 rev/min) conditions. It was showed that under clinostatic conditions in comparison with the control variant the ATPase activity decreases in plasmalemma. The protein content in the plasmalemma fraction was also twice as low under these conditions. The root apex cells of the pea seedlings grown under spaceflight conditions were found to contain high concentrations of membrane-bound calcium. The data obtained are discussed in relation to problems of possible mechanisms of disturbance in calcium balance and the system of active calcium ion transport through plasmalemma under hypogravity.

  10. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  11. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-01-01

    Puffs are localized Ca 2+ signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ). They are the result of the liberation of Ca 2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP 3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca 2+ provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio–temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca 2+ signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP 3 R-Ca 2+ channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca 2+ buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff. (paper)

  12. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  13. L-Type Calcium Channels Modulation by Estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Vela, Nelson E; Osorio, Daniel; Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Gonzalez, Janneth; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2017-09-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are key regulators of brain function, and their dysfunction has been associated with multiple conditions and neurodegenerative diseases because they couple membrane depolarization to the influx of calcium-and other processes such as gene expression-in excitable cells. L-type calcium channels, one of the three major classes and probably the best characterized of the voltage-gated calcium channels, act as an essential calcium binding proteins with a significant biological relevance. It is well known that estradiol can activate rapidly brain signaling pathways and modulatory/regulatory proteins through non-genomic (or non-transcriptional) mechanisms, which lead to an increase of intracellular calcium that activate multiple kinases and signaling cascades, in the same way as L-type calcium channels responses. In this context, estrogens-L-type calcium channels signaling raises intracellular calcium levels and activates the same signaling cascades in the brain probably through estrogen receptor-independent modulatory mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the available literature on this area, which seems to suggest that estradiol exerts dual effects/modulation on these channels in a concentration-dependent manner (as a potentiator of these channels in pM concentrations and as an inhibitor in nM concentrations). Indeed, estradiol may orchestrate multiple neurotrophic responses, which open a new avenue for the development of novel estrogen-based therapies to alleviate different neuropathologies. We also highlight that it is essential to determine through computational and/or experimental approaches the interaction between estradiol and L-type calcium channels to assist these developments, which is an interesting area of research that deserves a closer look in future biomedical research.

  14. Calcium Transient and Sodium-Calcium Exchange Current in Human versus Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O. Verkerk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN cells, focusing on the relative importance of the “membrane clock” and the “Ca2+ clock” in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential threshold. Specifically, the debate centers around the question whether the membrane clock-driven hyperpolarization-activated current, If, which is also known as the “funny current” or “pacemaker current,” or the Ca2+ clock-driven sodium-calcium exchange current, INaCa, is the main contributor to diastolic depolarization. In our contribution to this journal’s “Special Issue on Cardiac Electrophysiology,” we present a numerical reconstruction of If and INaCa in isolated rabbit and human SAN pacemaker cells based on experimental data on action potentials, If, and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i that we have acquired from these cells. The human SAN pacemaker cells have a smaller If, a weaker [Ca2+]i transient, and a smaller INaCa than the rabbit cells. However, when compared to the diastolic net membrane current, INaCa is of similar size in human and rabbit SAN pacemaker cells, whereas If is smaller in human than in rabbit cells.

  15. Estimating the biophysical properties of neurons with intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jingxin; Rozdeba, Paul J; Morone, Uriel I; Daou, Arij; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a conductance-based neuron model coupled to a model of intracellular calcium uptake and release by the endoplasmic reticulum. The intracellular calcium dynamics occur on a time scale that is orders of magnitude slower than voltage spiking behavior. Coupling these mechanisms sets the stage for the appearance of chaotic dynamics, which we observe within certain ranges of model parameter values. We then explore the question of whether one can, using observed voltage data alone, estimate the states and parameters of the voltage plus calcium (V+Ca) dynamics model. We find the answer is negative. Indeed, we show that voltage plus another observed quantity must be known to allow the estimation to be accurate. We show that observing both the voltage time course V(t) and the intracellular Ca time course will permit accurate estimation, and from the estimated model state, accurate prediction after observations are completed. This sets the stage for how one will be able to use a more detailed model of V+Ca dynamics in neuron activity in the analysis of experimental data on individual neurons as well as functional networks in which the nodes (neurons) have these biophysical properties.

  16. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting...... in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal...... of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx...

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces different molecular structural alterations in human dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ortega

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a multifunctional organelle responsible for the synthesis and folding of proteins as well as for signalling and calcium storage, that has been linked to the contraction-relaxation process. Perturbations of its homeostasis activate a stress response in diseases such as heart failure (HF. To elucidate the alterations in ER molecular components, we analyze the levels of ER stress and structure proteins in human dilated (DCM and ischemic (ICM cardiomyopathies, and its relationship with patient's functional status. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined 52 explanted human hearts from DCM (n = 21 and ICM (n = 21 subjects and 10 non-failing hearts as controls. Our results showed specific changes in stress (IRE1, p<0.05; p-IRE1, p<0.05 and structural (Reticulon 1, p<0.01 protein levels. The stress proteins GRP78, XBP1 and ATF6 as well as the structural proteins RRBP1, kinectin, and Nogo A and B, were upregulated in both DCM and ICM patients. Immunofluorescence results were concordant with quantified Western blot levels. Moreover, we show a novel relationship between stress and structural proteins. RRBP1, involved in procollagen synthesis and remodeling, was related with left ventricular function. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we report the existence of alterations in ER stress response and shaping proteins. We show a plausible effect of the ER stress on ER structure in a suitable sample of DCM and ICM subjects. Patients with higher values of RRBP1 had worse left ventricular function.

  18. Fluorescence Dynamics in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of a Live Cell: Time-Resolved Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Nandi, Somen; Ghosh, Catherine; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-19

    Fluorescence dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a live non-cancer lung cell (WI38) and a lung cancer cell (A549) are studied by using time-resolved confocal microscopy. To selectively study the organelle, ER, we have used an ER-Tracker dye. From the emission maximum (λmaxem) of the ER-Tracker dye, polarity (i.e. dielectric constant, ϵ) in the ER region of the cells (≈500 nm in WI38 and ≈510 nm in A549) is estimated to be similar to that of chloroform (λmaxem =506 nm, ϵ≈5). The red shift by 10 nm in λmaxem in the cancer cell (A549) suggests a slightly higher polarity compared to the non-cancer cell (WI38). The fluorescence intensity of the ER-Tracker dye exhibits prolonged intermittent oscillations on a timescale of 2-6 seconds for the cancer cell (A549). For the non-cancer cell (WI38), such fluorescence oscillations are much less prominent. The marked fluorescence intensity oscillations in the cancer cell are attributed to enhanced calcium oscillations. The average solvent relaxation time () of the ER region in the lung cancer cell (A549, 250±50 ps) is about four times faster than that in the non-cancer cell (WI38, 1000±50 ps). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effect of ethionine on hepatic mitochondrial and microsomal calcium uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A.K.; Zinermon, W.D.; Latoni, L.

    1988-01-01

    Ethionine, an ethyl analog of methionine, produces a variety of physiological and pathological effects in animals. These range from acute effects in the liver, kidney, pancreas, and other organs to liver carcinogenesis. Female rats when injected with ethionine exhibit a rapid decrease in hepatic adenosine triphosphate levels followed by a marked inhibition of RNA and protein synthesis and accumulation of triglycerides. Since calcium transport in mitochondria and microsomes is ATP dependent, it becomes interesting to find out if ethionine administration has any effect on subcellular calcium transport. Calcium has recently gained an increased controversy regarding its role in chemical induced lethal cell damage. Certain groups believe that influx of extracellular calcium across the damaged plasma membrane might actually mediate the irreversible damage to the cell, whereas according to other, entry of calcium into the cell is secondary to the damage. The present study was carried out to investigate the calcium [ 45 Ca] transport in mitochondria and microsomes following ethionine administration. The effect of carbon tetrachloride on calcium uptake in ethionine treated rats was also studied

  20. Sigma-1 receptor agonist increases axon outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via voltage-gated calcium ions channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Shu-Zhuo; Yao, Yu-Hong; Xiang, Yun; Ma, Xiao-Yun; Wei, Xiao-Li; Yan, Hai-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2017-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that have been implicated in both neurodegenerative and ischemic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Accumulating evidence has suggested that Sig-1R plays a role in neuroprotection and axon outgrowth. The underlying mechanisms of Sig-1R-mediated neuroprotection have been well elucidated. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of Sig-1R on axon outgrowth are not fully understood. To clarify this issue, we utilized immunofluorescence to compare the axon lengths of cultured naïve hippocampal neurons before and after the application of the Sig-1R agonist, SA4503. Then, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence were used to examine voltage-gated calcium ion channel (VGCCs) currents in the cell membranes and growth cones. We found that Sig-1R activation dramatically enhanced the axonal length of the naïve hippocampal neurons. Application of the Sig-1R antagonist NE100 and gene knockdown techniques both demonstrated the effects of Sig-1R. The growth-promoting effect of SA4503 was accompanied by the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca 2+ influx and was recapitulated by incubating the neurons with the L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type VGCC blockers, nimodipine, MVIIA and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively. This effect was unrelated to glial cells. The application of SA4503 transformed the growth cone morphologies from complicated to simple, which favored axon outgrowth. Sig-1R activation can enhance axon outgrowth and may have a substantial influence on neurogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan; Srivatsa Bettahalli, N.M.; Fedoroff, Nina V.; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Leiknes, TorOve

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  2. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2018-01-31

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene