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Sample records for reticular region express

  1. Characterization of GABAergic neurons in rapid-eye-movement sleep controlling regions of the brainstem reticular formation in GAD67-green fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

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    Brown, Ritchie E; McKenna, James T; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Thakkar, Mahesh M; McCarley, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that brainstem GABAergic neurons may control rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, understanding their pharmacology/physiology has been hindered by difficulty in identification. Here we report that mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the GAD67 promoter (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) exhibit numerous GFP-positive neurons in the central gray and reticular formation, allowing on-line identification in vitro. Small (10-15 microm) or medium-sized (15-25 microm) GFP-positive perikarya surrounded larger serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and reticular neurons, and > 96% of neurons were double-labeled for GFP and GABA, confirming that GFP-positive neurons are GABAergic. Whole-cell recordings in brainstem regions important for promoting REM sleep [subcoeruleus (SubC) or pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) regions] revealed that GFP-positive neurons were spontaneously active at 3-12 Hz, fired tonically, and possessed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing steps. Many neurons also exhibited a small, low-threshold calcium spike. GFP-positive neurons were tested with pharmacological agents known to promote (carbachol) or inhibit (orexin A) REM sleep. SubC GFP-positive neurons were excited by the cholinergic agonist carbachol, whereas those in the PnO were either inhibited or excited. GFP-positive neurons in both areas were excited by orexins/hypocretins. These data are congruent with the hypothesis that carbachol-inhibited GABAergic PnO neurons project to, and inhibit, REM-on SubC reticular neurons during waking, whereas carbachol-excited SubC and PnO GABAergic neurons are involved in silencing locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe aminergic neurons during REM sleep. Orexinergic suppression of REM during waking is probably mediated in part via excitation of acetylcholine-inhibited GABAergic neurons.

  2. Reach-scale variation surface water quality in a reticular canal system in the lower Yangtze River Delta region, China.

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    Griffiths, James Andrew; Chan, Faith Ka Shun; Zhu, Fangfang; Wang, Vickie; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of surface water pollution within a reticular canal system typical of those found in the lower Yangtze River Delta (YRD). For this purpose, surface water quality data was collected from a drainage canal that bisected the southeast district of Ningbo Municipality (Zhejiang) from 2013 to 2015. The sampling transect was designed to represent the change in land-use from the agriculture dominated rural hinterland, to the predominantly urban city-centre. To calculate the representative land-use fraction of each sampling location, the contributing area was defined using an uni-directional 1 km vector line-buffer around the 'upstream' section of canal. The spatial and temporal variation of EC, DO, NH3 and turbidity indicated a measureable difference between the urban and rural sections of the channel. Water quality indicators were most sensitive to urban and parkland land-use types. The study yielded an increased spatial resolution to knowledge of water-quality variability in the urban environment compared to previous studies within the YRD region. The results were used to make recommendations for the development of an effective long-term strategy for the improvement in surface water quality in this region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cutting edge: JAM-C controls homeostatic chemokine secretion in lymph node fibroblastic reticular cells expressing thrombomodulin.

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    Frontera, Vincent; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Zimmerli, Claudia; Bardin, Florence; Obrados, Elodie; Audebert, Stéphane; Bajenoff, Marc; Borg, Jean-Paul; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2011-07-15

    The development and maintenance of secondary lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, occur in a highly coordinated manner involving lymphoid chemokine production by stromal cells. Although developmental pathways inducing lymphoid chemokine production during organogenesis are known, signals maintaining cytokine production in adults are still elusive. In this study, we show that thrombomodulin and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α identify a population of fibroblastic reticular cells in which chemokine secretion is controlled by JAM-C. We demonstrate that Jam-C-deficient mice and mice treated with Ab against JAM-C present significant decreases in stromal cell-derived factor 1α (CXCL12), CCL21, and CCL19 intranodal content. This effect is correlated with reduced naive T cell egress from lymph nodes of anti-JAM-C-treated mice.

  4. Human Lymph Node-Derived Fibroblastic and Double-Negative Reticular Cells Alter Their Chemokines and Cytokines Expression Profile Following Inflammatory Stimuli

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    Severino, Patricia; Palomino, Diana Torres; Alvarenga, Heliene; Almeida, Camila Bononi; Pasqualim, Denise Cunha; Cury, Adriano; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério; De Vasconcelos Macedo, Antonio Luiz; Andrade, Maria Claudina; Aloia, Thiago; Bromberg, Silvio; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Marti, Luciana C.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) is a secondary lymphoid organ with highly organized and compartmentalized structure. LNs harbor B, T, and other cells among fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs). FRCs are characterized by both podoplanin (PDPN/gp38) expression and by the lack of CD31 expression. FRCs are involved in several immune response processes but mechanisms underlying their function are still under investigation. Double-negative cells (DNCs), another cell population within LNs, are even less understood. They do not express PDPN or CD31, their localization within the LN is unknown, and their phenotype and function remain to be elucidated. This study evaluates the gene expression and cytokines and chemokines profile of human LN-derived FRCs and DNCs during homeostasis and following inflammatory stimuli. Cytokines and chemokines secreted by human FRCs and DNCs partially diverged from those identified in murine models that used similar stimulation. Cytokine and chemokine secretion and their receptors expression levels differed between stimulated DNCs and FRCs, with FRCs expressing a broader range of chemokines. Additionally, dendritic cells demonstrated increased migration toward FRCs, possibly due to chemokine-induced chemotaxis since migration was significantly decreased upon neutralization of secreted CCL2 and CCL20. Our study contributes to the understanding of the biology and functions of FRCs and DNCs and, accordingly, of the mechanisms involving them in immune cells activation and migration. PMID:28261205

  5. Effects of simvastatin on cardiac performance and expression of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia ZHENG; Shen-jiang HU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of simvastatin on the cardiac contractile function and the alteration of gene and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic calcium regulatory proteins, including sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA),phospholamban (PLB), and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) in rat hearts. Methods:Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were subjected to 60-min perfusion with different concentrations of simvastatin (1, 3, 10, 30, or 100 μmol/L), and the parameters of cardiac function such as left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), +dp/dtmax,and -dp/dtmax were determined. The cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were incubated with simvastatin (1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) for 1 h or 24 h.The levels of SERCA, PLB, and RyR2 expression were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Cytotoxic effect of simvastatin on ventricular cardiomyocytes was assessed by the MTT colorimetric assay.Results: LVDP, +dp/dtmax, and -dp/dtmax of hearts were increased significantly after treatment with simvastatin 3, 10, and 30 μmol/L. In simvastatin-treated isolated hearts, the levels of mRNA expression of SERCA and RyR2 were elevated compared with the control (P<0.05), while the mRNA expression of PLB did not change. After the cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were incubated with 3, 10, 30, and 100 μmol/L simvastatin for 1 h, SERCA and RyR2 mRNA expressions of cardiomyocytes rose, but there was no alteration in protein expressions. However, with the elongation of simvastatin treatment to 24 h, the protein expression of SERCA and RyR2 were also elevated. Additionally,simvastatin (1-30 μmol/L) had no influence on cell viability of cultured cardiac myocytes, but simvastatin 100 μmol/L inhibited the cell viability. Conclusion:Simvastatin improved cardiac performance accompanied by the elevation of SERCA and RyR2 gene and protein expression.

  6. Optimal reinforcing of reticular structures Optimal reinforcing of reticular structures

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    Juan Santiago Mejía

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an application of Genetic Algorithms (GA and Finite Element Analysis (FEA to solve a structural optimisation problem on reticular plastic structures. Structural optimisation is used to modify the original shape by placing reinforcements at optimum locations. As a result, a reduction in the maximum stress by 14,70% for a structure with a final volume increase of 8,36% was achieved. This procedure solves the structural optimisation problem by adjusting the original mold and thereby avoiding the re-construction of a new one.Este artículo presenta una aplicación de Algoritmos Genéticos (GA y Análisis por Elementos Finitos (FEA a la solución de un problema de optimización estructural en estructuras reticulares plásticas. Optimización estructurales usada para modificar la forma original colocando refuerzos en posiciones óptimas. Como resultado se obtuvo una reducción en el esfuerzo máximo de 14,70% para una estructura cuyo volumen original aumento en 8,36%. Este procedimiento soluciona el problema de optimización estructural ajustando el molde original y evitando la manufactura de un nuevo molde.

  7. Sleep Duration Varies as a Function of Glutamate and GABA in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation

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    Watson, Christopher J.; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2011-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) is a component of the ascending reticular activating system and plays a role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The PnO receives glutamatergic and GABAergic projections from many brain regions that regulate behavioral state. Indirect, pharmacological evidence has suggested that glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling within the PnO alters traits that characterize wakefulness and sleep. No previous studies have simultaneously measur...

  8. Regional brainstem expression of Fos associated with sexual behavior in male rats.

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    Hamson, Dwayne K; Watson, Neil V

    2004-05-01

    This study utilized Fos expression to map the distribution of activated cells in brainstem areas following masculine sexual behavior. Males displaying both appetitive and consumatory sexual behaviors (Cop) were compared to animals prevented from copulation (NC) and to socially isolated (SI) animals. Following copulation, Fos was preferentially augmented in the caudal ventral medulla (CVM), a region mediating descending inhibition of penile reflexes, and which may be regulated by a forebrain circuit that includes the medial preoptic area (MPOA). Copulation-induced Fos was observed in the medial divisions of both the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DC) and trapezoid bodies (Tz), areas which are part of a circuit processing auditory information. In addition, the medullary linear nucleus (Li) displayed comparable amounts of Fos in Cop and NC as compared to the SI animals. Other regions of the pontomedullary reticular system, which may mediate sleep and arousal, did not exhibit Fos expression associated with consumatory sexual behavior. We suggest that Fos is associated with the inhibition of sexual behavior following ejaculation in the CVM, and that auditory information arising from the DC and Tz is combined with copulation-related sensory information in the subparafasicular nucleus and projected to the hypothalamus. In addition, equal amounts of Fos expression observed in the Li in both the Cop and NC animals suggests that this region is involved in sexual arousal. Overall, the data suggest that processing by brainstem nuclei directly contributes to the regulation of mating behavior in male rats.

  9. A thalamic reticular networking model of consciousness

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    Min Byoung-Kyong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract [Background] It is reasonable to consider the thalamus a primary candidate for the location of consciousness, given that the thalamus has been referred to as the gateway of nearly all sensory inputs to the corresponding cortical areas. Interestingly, in an early stage of brain development, communicative innervations between the dorsal thalamus and telencephalon must pass through the ventral thalamus, the major derivative of which is the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN. The TRN occupies a striking control position in the brain, sending inhibitory axons back to the thalamus, roughly to the same region where they receive afferents. [Hypotheses] The present study hypothesizes that the TRN plays a pivotal role in dynamic attention by controlling thalamocortical synchronization. The TRN is thus viewed as a functional networking filter to regulate conscious perception, which is possibly embedded in thalamocortical networks. Based on the anatomical structures and connections, modality-specific sectors of the TRN and the thalamus appear to be responsible for modality-specific perceptual representation. Furthermore, the coarsely overlapped topographic maps of the TRN appear to be associated with cross-modal or unitary conscious awareness. Throughout the latticework structure of the TRN, conscious perception could be accomplished and elaborated through accumulating intercommunicative processing across the first-order input signal and the higher-order signals from its functionally associated cortices. As the higher-order relay signals run cumulatively through the relevant thalamocortical loops, conscious awareness becomes more refined and sophisticated. [Conclusions] I propose that the thalamocortical integrative communication across first- and higher-order information circuits and repeated feedback looping may account for our conscious awareness. This TRN-modulation hypothesis for conscious awareness provides a comprehensive rationale regarding

  10. Interactions between fibroblastic reticular cells and B cells promote mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis.

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    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Karempudi, Praneeth; Luther, Sanjiv A; Ludewig, Burkhard; Harris, Nicola L

    2017-08-28

    Lymphatic growth (lymphangiogenesis) within lymph nodes functions to promote dendritic cell entry and effector lymphocyte egress in response to infection or inflammation. Here we demonstrate a crucial role for lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR) signaling to fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) by lymphotoxin-expressing B cells in driving mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis following helminth infection. LTβR ligation on fibroblastic reticular cells leads to the production of B-cell-activating factor (BAFF), which synergized with interleukin-4 (IL-4) to promote the production of the lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A and VEGF-C, by B cells. In addition, the BAFF-IL-4 synergy augments expression of lymphotoxin by antigen-activated B cells, promoting further B cell-fibroblastic reticular cell interactions. These results underlie the importance of lymphotoxin-dependent B cell-FRC cross talk in driving the expansion of lymphatic networks that function to promote and maintain immune responsiveness.The growth of lymph nodes in response to infection requires lymphangiogenesis. Dubey et al. show that the mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis upon helminth infection depends on the signaling loop between the B and fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), whereby the FRCs respond to lymphotoxin secreted by B cells by releasing B cell activating factor.

  11. Preoptic hypnogenic area and reticular activating system.

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    Bremer, F

    1973-06-01

    The stimulation, in the encéphale isolé cat, of the basal preoptic hypnogenic area be brief electrical pulses evokes bilaterally an extracellular positive (P) field potential of 20 to 60 msec duration in the brain stem and thalamic activating ascending reticular system. The properties of this P wave have led to consider it as the extracellular and abbreviated counterpart of an hyperpolarizing postsynaptic inhibitory process which, by the functional depression it exerts on the arousal system, would be instrumental in the induction and maintenance of synchronized sleep. The positive field potential response of the reticular system shows the same recruiting build-up and amplitude modulation, and the same sensibility to amphetamine and to barbiturates, as the cortical potential of diffuse distribution which is evoked simultaneously. It is strychnine--and picrotoxin--resistant. Preoptic stimulation exerts, within a 100 msec interval, a strong suppressive effect on the excitatory response evoked in the n. centromedian by a mesencephalic reticular testing shock. On the other hand, the application of the latter as a conditioning stimulus results in a marked increase of the amplitude of the P wave response of the CM to a testing preoptic shock. A negative feedback interpretation of this interaction is suggested. No clear evidence of a tonic functioning of the preoptic hypnogenic structure could be found in experiments involving the production of small bilateral lesions in the basal preoptic area in the encéphale isolé cat. Reasons limiting the interpretation of this negative result are given. The functional significance, on the basis of experimental data, of the diffuse cortical synchronization produced by the low frequency stimulation of the basal preoptic area and of other hypnogenic structures is discussed.

  12. The Reticular Cell Network : A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During inf

  13. Foreign body-induced changes in the reticular contraction pattern of sheep observed with M-mode ultrasonography

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    Morgado, A.A.; Sucupira, M.C.A.; Nunes, G.R.; Hagen, S.C.F.

    2015-01-01

    In the pre-experimental period of a clinical trial, an apparently clinically healthy sheep fitted with ruminal and abomasal cannulas showed changes in the reticular contraction pattern visualized in M-mode ultrasonogram. Radiographic examination revealed a blunt metal screw in its reticulum. By the time change in the reticular motility through the ultrasound examination was detected, the animal had still not expressed any behavioral changes. A description of the clinical case, follow-up of the findings and laboratory data, like white blood cell count, serum pepsinogen and fibrinogen concentrations, were presented. The foreign body was removed through the ruminal cannula and reticular contraction tended to normal. An association of the contraction pattern with measured clinical data was possible, leading to the conclusion that use of M-mode ultrasonography has a potential application in similar clinical situations. PMID:26623361

  14. Foreign body-induced changes in the reticular contraction pattern of sheep observed with M-mode ultrasonography

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    A.A. Morgado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the pre-experimental period of a clinical trial, an apparently clinically healthy sheep fitted with ruminal and abomasal cannulas showed changes in the reticular contraction pattern visualized in M-mode ultrasonogram. Radiographic examination revealed a blunt metal screw in its reticulum. By the time change in the reticular motility through the ultrasound examination was detected, the animal had still not expressed any behavioral changes. A description of the clinical case, follow-up of the findings and laboratory data, like white blood cell count, serum pepsinogen and fibrinogen concentrations, were presented. The foreign body was removed through the ruminal cannula and reticular contraction tended to normal. An association of the contraction pattern with measured clinical data was possible, leading to the conclusion that use of M-mode ultrasonography has a potential application in similar clinical situations.

  15. Gamma band activity in the reticular activating system (RAS

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    Francisco J Urbano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf, and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep-wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem-thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep-wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by preconscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the

  16. Membrane Bistability in Thalamic Reticular Neurons During Spindle Oscillations

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    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Steriade, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a major source of inhibition in the thalamus. It plays a crucial role in regulating the excitability of thalamocortical networks and in generating some sleep rhythms. Current-clamp intracellular recordings of RE neurons in cats under barbiturate anesthesia revealed the presence of membrane bistability in ~20% of neurons. Bistability consisted of two alternate membrane potentials, separated by ~17–20 mV. While non-bistable (common) RE neurons fired rhythmic spike-bursts during spindles, bistable RE neurons fired tonically, with burst modulation, throughout spindle sequences. Bistability was strongly voltage dependent and only expressed under resting conditions (i.e. no current injection). The transition from the silent to the active state was a regenerative event that could be activated by brief depolarization, whereas brief hyperpolarizations could switch the membrane potential from the active to the silent state. These effects outlasted the current pulses. Corticothalamic stimulation could also switch the membrane potential from silent to active states. Addition of QX-314 in the recording micropipette either abolished or disrupted membrane bistability, suggesting INa(p) to be responsible for its generation. Thalamocortical cells presented various patterns of spindling that reflected the membrane bistability in RE neurons. Finally, experimental data and computer simulations predicted a role for RE neurons’ membrane bistability in inducing various patterns of spindling in target thalamocortical cells. We conclude that membrane bistability of RE neurons is an intrinsic property, likely generated by INa(p) and modulated by cortical influences, as well as a factor that determines different patterns of spindle rhythms in thalamocortical neurons. PMID:15331618

  17. Reproducible isolation of lymph node stromal cells reveals site-dependent differences in fibroblastic reticular cells

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    Anne L Fletcher

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Within lymph nodes, non-hematopoietic stromal cells organize and interact with leukocytes in an immunologically important manner. In addition to organizing T and B cell segregation and expressing lymphocyte survival factors, several recent studies have shown that lymph node stromal cells shape the naïve T cell repertoire, expressing self-antigens which delete self-reactive T cells in a unique and non-redundant fashion. A fundamental role in peripheral tolerance, in addition to an otherwise extensive functional portfolio, necessitates closer study of lymph node stromal cell subsets using modern immunological techniques; however this has not routinely been possible in the field, due to difficulties reproducibly isolating these rare subsets. Techniques were therefore developed for successful ex vivo and in vitro manipulation and characterization of lymph node stroma. Here we discuss and validate these techniques in mice and humans, and apply them to address several unanswered questions regarding lymph node composition. We explored the steady-state stromal composition of lymph nodes isolated from mice and humans, and found that marginal reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells required lymphocytes for their normal maturation in mice. We also report alterations in the proportion and number of fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs between skin-draining and mesenteric lymph nodes. Similarly, transcriptional profiling of FRCs revealed changes in cytokine production from these sites. Together, these methods permit highly reproducible stromal cell isolation, sorting, and culture.

  18. Reticular type parotid myoepithelial carcinoma: an intriguing variant and mimicker.

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    Azizun-Nisa; Kazi, Javed Iqbal; Jamal, Saba

    2013-05-01

    Myoepithelial carcinoma, the malignant counterpart of benign myoepithelioma, is one of the rarest salivary gland neoplasms. It is composed almost exclusively of tumour cells with myoepithelial differentiation, characterized by infiltrative growth and potential for metastasis. We herein, report a case of myoepithelial carcinoma in a 50 years old male with reticular morphology. Reticular variant of myoepithelial carcinoma may be mistaken for a variety of benign and malignant epithelial and mesenchymal tumours including mixed tumour (pleomorphic adenoma), adenoid cystic carcinoma, basal cell adenoma and epithelial myoepithelial carcinoma. Complete surgical excision is the mainstay of therapy. The role of radiation therapy and chemotherapy is not yet established. Awareness of this variant is emphasized to prevent misdiagnosis.

  19. Reticular pattern detection in dermoscopy: an approach using Curvelet Transform

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    Marlene Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dermoscopy is a non-invasive in vivo imaging technique, used in dermatology in feature identification, among pigmented melanocytic neoplasms, from suspicious skin lesions. Often, in the skin exam is possible to ascertain markers, whose identification and proper characterization is difficult, even when it is used a magnifying lens and a source of light. Dermoscopic images are thus a challenging source of a wide range of digital features, frequently with clinical correlation. Among these markers, one of particular interest to diagnosis in skin evaluation is the reticular pattern. Methods This paper presents a novel approach (avoiding pre-processing, e.g. segmentation and filtering for reticular pattern detection in dermoscopic images, using texture spectral analysis. The proposed methodology involves a Curvelet Transform procedure to identify features. Results Feature extraction is applied to identify a set of discriminant characteristics in the reticular pattern, and it is also employed in the automatic classification task. The results obtained are encouraging, presenting Sensitivity and Specificity of 82.35% and 76.79%, respectively. Conclusions These results highlight the use of automatic classification, in the context of artificial intelligence, within a computer-aided diagnosis strategy, as a strong tool to help the human decision making task in clinical practice. Moreover, the results were obtained using images from three different sources, without previous lesion segmentation, achieving to a rapid, robust and low complexity methodology. These properties boost the presented approach to be easily used in clinical practice as an aid to the diagnostic process.

  20. De novo engineering of reticular connective tissue in vivo by silk fibroin nonwoven materials.

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    Dal Pra, Ilaria; Freddi, Giuliano; Minic, Jasminka; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo

    2005-05-01

    Biologically tolerated biomaterials are the focus of intense research. In this work, we examined the biocompatibility of three-dimensional (3D) nonwovens of sericin-deprived, Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) in beta-sheet form implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of C57BL6 mice, using sham-operated mice as controls. Both groups of mice similarly healed with no residual problem. Macroarray analysis showed that an early (day 3) transient expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) mRNA, but not of the mRNAs encoding for 22 additional proinflammatory cytokines, occurred solely at SF-grafted places, where no remarkable infiltration of macrophages or lymphocytes subsequently happened. Even an enduring moderate increase in total cytokeratins without epidermal hyperkeratosis and a transient (days 10-15) upsurge of vimentin occurred exclusively at SF-grafted sites, whose content of collagen type-I, after a delayed (day 15) rise, ultimately fell considerably under that proper of sham-operated places. By day 180, the interstices amid and surfaces of the SF chords, which had not been appreciably biodegraded, were crammed with a newly produced tissue histologically akin to a vascularized reticular connective tissue, while some macrophages but no lymphocytic infiltrates or fibrous capsules occurred in the adjoining tissues. Therefore, SF nonwovens may be excellent candidates for clinical applications since they both enjoy a long-lasting biocompatibility, inducing a quite mild foreign body response, but no fibrosis, and efficiently guide reticular connective tissue engineering.

  1. Microstructural changes in memory and reticular formation neural pathway after simple concussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ouyang; Rongyue Shi; Yuhui Xiao; Jiarong Meng; Yihe Guo; Guangming Lu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with concussion often present with temporary disturbance of consciousness.The microstructural and functional changes in the brain associated with concussion,as well as the relationship with transient cognitive disorders,are currently unclear.In the present study,a rabbit model of simple concussion was established.Magnetic resonance-diffusion tensor imaging results revealed that the corona radiata and midbrain exhibited significantly decreased fractional anisotropy values in the neural pathways associated with memory and the reticular formation.In addition,the apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly increased following injury compared with those before injury.Following a 1-hour period of quiet rest,the fractional anisotropy values significantly increased,and apparent diffusion coefficient values significantly decreased,returning to normal pre-injury levels.In contrast,the fractional anisotropy values and apparent diffusion coefficient values in the corpus callosum,thalamus and hippocampus showed no statistical significant alterations following injury.These findings indicate that the neural pathways associated with memory and the reticular formation pathway exhibit reversible microstructural white matter changes when concussion occurs,and these changes are exhibited to a different extent in different regions.

  2. Sleep duration varies as a function of glutamate and GABA in rat pontine reticular formation.

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    Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2011-08-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) is a component of the ascending reticular activating system and plays a role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The PnO receives glutamatergic and GABAergic projections from many brain regions that regulate behavioral state. Indirect, pharmacological evidence has suggested that glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling within the PnO alters traits that characterize wakefulness and sleep. No previous studies have simultaneously measured endogenous glutamate and GABA from rat PnO in relation to sleep and wakefulness. The present study utilized in vivo microdialysis coupled on-line to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence to test the hypothesis that concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PnO vary across the sleep/wake cycle. Concentrations of glutamate and GABA were significantly higher during wakefulness than during non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Regression analysis revealed that decreases in glutamate and GABA accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the duration of non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep episodes. These data provide novel support for the hypothesis that endogenous glutamate and GABA in the PnO contribute to the regulation of sleep duration.

  3. The reticular network contributes to the staging of idiopathic lung fibrosis

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    Djeska Irina Stoia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aspect of reticular fibers is not considered in the current classifications of lung fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the distribution and the architecture of the reticular fibers for potential use as a tissue marker of fibrosis severity. We included in our study 25 pulmonary samples obtained by video-assisted thoracoscopy surgery (VATS from a number of 20 cases. The cases were subdivided according to four criteria into: degree II, III and IV. We noticed no significant changes in the reticular network from interalveolar septa to the cases scored with 0, an accumulation of reticular fibers in the interalveolar septa (stage II, the condensation and thick bundles with network disorganization in all areas affected by fibrosis (stage III, partial to full depletion of reticular fibers (stage IV. Depletion of reticular fibers was constantly associated with advanced fibrosis stages.

  4. Flexible expressed region analysis for RNA-seq with derfinder

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    Collado-Torres, Leonardo; Nellore, Abhinav; Frazee, Alyssa C.; Wilks, Christopher; Love, Michael I.; Langmead, Ben; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Leek, Jeffrey T.; Jaffe, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data typically relies on reconstructing transcripts or counting reads that overlap known gene structures. We previously introduced an intermediate statistical approach called differentially expressed region (DER) finder that seeks to identify contiguous regions of the genome showing differential expression signal at single base resolution without relying on existing annotation or potentially inaccurate transcript assembly. We present the derfinder software that improves our annotation-agnostic approach to RNA-seq analysis by: (i) implementing a computationally efficient bump-hunting approach to identify DERs that permits genome-scale analyses in a large number of samples, (ii) introducing a flexible statistical modeling framework, including multi-group and time-course analyses and (iii) introducing a new set of data visualizations for expressed region analysis. We apply this approach to public RNA-seq data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project and BrainSpan project to show that derfinder permits the analysis of hundreds of samples at base resolution in R, identifies expression outside of known gene boundaries and can be used to visualize expressed regions at base-resolution. In simulations, our base resolution approaches enable discovery in the presence of incomplete annotation and is nearly as powerful as feature-level methods when the annotation is complete. derfinder analysis using expressed region-level and single base-level approaches provides a compromise between full transcript reconstruction and feature-level analysis. The package is available from Bioconductor at www.bioconductor.org/packages/derfinder. PMID:27694310

  5. On Expression Patterns and Developmental Origin of Human Brain Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Lior; Chechik, Gal

    2016-08-01

    Anatomical substructures of the human brain have characteristic cell-types, connectivity and local circuitry, which are reflected in area-specific transcriptome signatures, but the principles governing area-specific transcription and their relation to brain development are still being studied. In adult rodents, areal transcriptome patterns agree with the embryonic origin of brain regions, but the processes and genes that preserve an embryonic signature in regional expression profiles were not quantified. Furthermore, it is not clear how embryonic-origin signatures of adult-brain expression interplay with changes in expression patterns during development. Here we first quantify which genes have regional expression-patterns related to the developmental origin of brain regions, using genome-wide mRNA expression from post-mortem adult human brains. We find that almost all human genes (92%) exhibit an expression pattern that agrees with developmental brain-region ontology, but that this agreement changes at multiple phases during development. Agreement is particularly strong in neuron-specific genes, but also in genes that are not spatially correlated with neuron-specific or glia-specific markers. Surprisingly, agreement is also stronger in early-evolved genes. We further find that pairs of similar genes having high agreement to developmental region ontology tend to be more strongly correlated or anti-correlated, and that the strength of spatial correlation changes more strongly in gene pairs with stronger embryonic signatures. These results suggest that transcription regulation of most genes in the adult human brain is spatially tuned in a way that changes through life, but in agreement with development-determined brain regions.

  6. Regional distribution of calretinin and calbindin-D28k expression in the brain of the urodele amphibian Pleurodeles waltl during embryonic and larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joven, Alberto; Morona, Ruth; Moreno, Nerea; González, Agustín

    2013-07-01

    The sequence of appearance of calretinin and calbindin-D28k immunoreactive (CRir and CBir, respectively) cells and fibers has been studied in the brain of the urodele amphibian Pleurodeles waltl. Embryonic, larval and juvenile stages were studied. The early expression and the dynamics of the distribution of CBir and CRir structures have been used as markers for developmental aspects of distinct neuronal populations, highlighting the accurate extent of many regions in the developing brain, not observed on the basis of cytoarchitecture alone. CR and, to a lesser extent, CB are expressed early in the central nervous system and show a progressively increasing expression from the embryonic stages throughout the larval life and, in general, the labeled structures in the developing brain retain their ability to express these proteins in the adult brain. The onset of CRir cells primarily served to follow the development of the olfactory bulbs, subpallium, thalamus, alar hypothalamus, mesencephalic tegmentum, and distinct cell populations in the rhombencephalic reticular formation. CBir cells highlighted the development of, among others, the pallidum, hypothalamus, dorsal habenula, midbrain tegmentum, cerebellum, and central gray of the rostral rhombencephalon. However, it was the relative and mostly segregated distribution of both proteins in distinct cell populations which evidenced the developing regionalization of the brain. The results have shown the usefulness in neuroanatomy of the analysis during development of the onset of CBir and CRir structures, but the comparison with previous data has shown extensive variability across vertebrate classes. Therefore, one should be cautious when comparing possible homologue structures across species only on the basis of the expression of these proteins, due to the variation of the content of calcium-binding proteins observed in well-established homologous regions in the brain of different vertebrates.

  7. Cloning and expression of the enzymatic region of Streptococcal hyaluronidase

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    Nafiseh Al-Sadat Mirjamali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Streptococcus pyogenes produces extracellular hyaluronidase enzyme. This enzyme is directly associated with the spread of the organism during infection. The objective of the present study was to clone and express the nucleotide sequence of the enzyme which is involved in hyaluronidase enzymatic activity. Materials and Methods: The enzymatic region of hyaluronidase gene was detected by bioinformatics method. The PCR method was used to amplify enzymatic region of hyaluronidase gene from chromosomal DNA of Streptococcus pyogenes. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a which was digested by BamHI and HindIII restriction endonuclease enzymes. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli. The bacteria including pET32a-hylA (hylA is abbreviation of Streptococcus pyogenes hyaluronidase gene and hylA is abbreviation of Streptococcus pyogenes hyaluronidase protein plasmids were induced by IPTG and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The enzymatic evaluation and antigenicity was finally studied. Results: Enzymes digestion analysis, sequencing results showed that the target gene (1296 base pair was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein (65 KDa was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data also indicated that enzymatic region of hyaluronidase protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was recognized in all 5 patient’s sera. Conclusion: In general, it is possible to produce the enzymatic regions of the Streptococcus pyogenes hyaluronidase in E. coli. The antigenic property of the produced protein is well retained. Considering the product's domestic demand and also low efficiency of production and pathogenicity of Streptococcus species, it is possible to produce it as recombinant product.

  8. Regions of KCNQ K+ Channels Controlling Functional Expression

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    Frank eChoveau

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available KCNQ1-5 α-subunits assemble to form K+ channels that play critical roles in the function of numerous tissues. The channels are tetramers of subunits containing six transmembrane domains. Each subunit consists of a pore region (S5-pore-S6 and a voltage sensor domain (S1-S4. Despite similar structures, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 homomers yield small current amplitudes compared to other KCNQ homomers and KCNQ2/3 heteromers. Two major mechanisms have been suggested as governing functional expression. The first involves control of channel trafficking to the plasma membrane by the distal part of the C-terminus, containing two coiled-coiled domains, required for channel trafficking and assembly. The proximal half of the C-terminus is the crucial region for channel modulation by signaling molecules such as calmodulin, which may mediate C- and N-terminal interactions. The N-terminus of KCNQ channels has also been postulated as critical for channel surface expression. The second mechanism suggests networks of interactions between the pore helix and the selectivity filter, and between the pore helix and the S6 domain that govern KCNQ current amplitudes. Here, we summarize the role of these different regions in expression of functional KCNQ channels.

  9. SLEEP AND GABA LEVELS IN THE ORAL PART OF RAT PONTINE RETICULAR FORMATION ARE DECREASED BY LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC ADMINISTRATION OF MORPHINE

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Christopher J.; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2006-01-01

    Morphine, a μ-opioid receptor agonist, is a commonly prescribed treatment for pain. Although highly efficacious, morphine has many unwanted side effects including disruption of sleep and obtundation of wakefulness. One mechanism by which morphine alters sleep and wakefulness may be by modulating GABAergic signaling in brain regions regulating arousal, including the oral pontine reticular formation (PnO). This study used in vivo microdialysis in unanesthetized Sprague-Dawley rat to test the hy...

  10. Genome-wide expression profiling of complex regional pain syndrome.

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    Eun-Heui Jin

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05. Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP, l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10(-4. The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression.

  11. Reticular Formation and Pain: The Past and the Future

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    Isabel Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the reticular formation (RF in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive information has been extensively studied. The brainstem RF contains several areas which are targeted by spinal cord afferents conveying nociceptive input. The arrival of nociceptive input to the RF may trigger alert reactions which generate a protective/defense reaction to pain. RF neurons located at the medulla oblongata and targeted by ascending nociceptive information are also involved in the control of vital functions that can be affected by pain, namely cardiovascular control. The RF contains centers that belong to the pain modulatory system, namely areas involved in bidirectional balance (decrease or enhancement of pain responses. It is currently accepted that the imbalance of pain modulation towards pain facilitation accounts for chronic pain. The medullary RF has the peculiarity of harboring areas involved in bidirectional pain control namely by the existence of specific neuronal populations involved in antinociceptive or pronociceptive behavioral responses, namely at the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM and the caudal ventrolateral medulla (VLM. Furthermore the dorsal reticular nucleus (also known as subnucleus reticularis dorsalis; DRt may enhance nociceptive responses, through a reverberative circuit established with spinal lamina I neurons and inhibit wide-dynamic range (WDR neurons of the deep dorsal horn. The components of the triad RVM-VLM-DRt are reciprocally connected and represent a key gateway for top-down pain modulation. The RVM-VLM-DRt triad also represents the neurobiological substrate for the emotional and cognitive modulation of pain, through pathways that involve the periaqueductal gray (PAG-RVM connection. Collectively, we propose that the RVM-VLM-DRt triad represents a key component of the “dynamic pain connectome” with special features to provide integrated and rapid responses in situations which are life

  12. Fibroblastic reticular cells from lymph nodes attenuate T cell expansion by producing nitric oxide.

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    Stefanie Siegert

    Full Text Available Adaptive immune responses are initiated when T cells encounter antigen on dendritic cells (DC in T zones of secondary lymphoid organs. T zones contain a 3-dimensional scaffold of fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC but currently it is unclear how FRC influence T cell activation. Here we report that FRC lines and ex vivo FRC inhibit T cell proliferation but not differentiation. FRC share this feature with fibroblasts from non-lymphoid tissues as well as mesenchymal stromal cells. We identified FRC as strong source of nitric oxide (NO thereby directly dampening T cell expansion as well as reducing the T cell priming capacity of DC. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was up-regulated in a subset of FRC by both DC-signals as well as interferon-γ produced by primed CD8+ T cells. Importantly, iNOS expression was induced during viral infection in vivo in both LN FRC and DC. As a consequence, the primary T cell response was found to be exaggerated in Inos(-/- mice. Our findings highlight that in addition to their established positive roles in T cell responses FRC and DC cooperate in a negative feedback loop to attenuate T cell expansion during acute inflammation.

  13. Dendritic cells control fibroblastic reticular network tension and lymph node expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Sophie E; Farrugia, Aaron J; Astarita, Jillian L; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Jenkins, Robert P; Nye, Emma; Hooper, Steven; van Blijswijk, Janneke; Rogers, Neil C; Snelgrove, Kathryn J; Rosewell, Ian; Moita, Luis F; Stamp, Gordon; Turley, Shannon J; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2014-10-23

    After immunogenic challenge, infiltrating and dividing lymphocytes markedly increase lymph node cellularity, leading to organ expansion. Here we report that the physical elasticity of lymph nodes is maintained in part by podoplanin (PDPN) signalling in stromal fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and its modulation by CLEC-2 expressed on dendritic cells. We show in mouse cells that PDPN induces actomyosin contractility in FRCs via activation of RhoA/C and downstream Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Engagement by CLEC-2 causes PDPN clustering and rapidly uncouples PDPN from RhoA/C activation, relaxing the actomyosin cytoskeleton and permitting FRC stretching. Notably, administration of CLEC-2 protein to immunized mice augments lymph node expansion. In contrast, lymph node expansion is significantly constrained in mice selectively lacking CLEC-2 expression in dendritic cells. Thus, the same dendritic cells that initiate immunity by presenting antigens to T lymphocytes also initiate remodelling of lymph nodes by delivering CLEC-2 to FRCs. CLEC-2 modulation of PDPN signalling permits FRC network stretching and allows for the rapid lymph node expansion--driven by lymphocyte influx and proliferation--that is the critical hallmark of adaptive immunity.

  14. Essential role of TNF-alpha in development of spleen fibroblastic reticular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lintao; Chen, Junying; Liu, Lina; Gao, Jianbao; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2015-02-01

    TNF-alpha plays an important role in the development of secondary lymphoid tissues. Earlier studies showed that fibroblastic reticular cells express TNF-alpha receptor, suggesting that TNF-alpha may affect the development of FRCs. To test this, we analyzed the development and function of FRCs in wild-type or TNF-alpha knockout mice. We found that GP38 expression was down-regulated in the spleen of TNF-alpha knockout mice. Chemokines, mainly secreted by GP38(+) FRCs, were also down-regulated. Additionally, we found that absence of TNF-alpha decreased the homing ability to direct T cells to the spleen. However, absence of TNF-alpha did not affect the development of lymph nodes FRCs. These data reveal that TNF-alpha plays an important role in the development of spleen FRCs. Absence of TNF-alpha could cause abnormality of spleen FRCs, thereby weakening the homing ability of T cells to localize to the spleen T cell zone.

  15. On the reticular construction concept of covalent organic frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binit Lukose

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The concept of reticular chemistry is investigated to explore the applicability of the formation of Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs from their defined individual building blocks. Thus, we have designed, optimized and investigated a set of reported and hypothetical 2D COFs using Density Functional Theory (DFT and the related Density Functional based tight-binding (DFTB method. Linear, trigonal and hexagonal building blocks have been selected for designing hexagonal COF layers. High-symmetry AA and AB stackings are considered, as well as low-symmetry serrated and inclined stackings of the layers. The latter ones are only slightly modified compared to the high-symmetry forms, but show higher energetic stability. Experimental XRD patterns found in literature also support stackings with highest formation energies. All stacking forms vary in their interlayer separations and band gaps; however, their electronic densities of states (DOS are similar and not significantly different from that of a monolayer. The band gaps are found to be in the range of 1.7–4.0 eV. COFs built of building blocks with a greater number of aromatic rings have smaller band gaps.

  16. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit (1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and (2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) (1) show electrical coupling, and (2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions.

  17. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

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    Fat-Moon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-(ATF- 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002 is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK, and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug.

  18. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  19. Role of endoplasmic reticular stress in aortic endothelial apoptosis induced by intermittent/persistent hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuan-yuan; SHANG Jin; LIU Hui-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence shows that hypoxia can induce endothelial apoptosis,however the mechanism is still unknown.We hypothesized whether intermittent or persistent hypoxia could induce endoplasmic reticular stress,leading to endothelial apoptosis.Methods Twenty-four 8-week male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups:normoxia (NC) group,intermittent hypoxia (IH) group and persistent hypoxia (PH) group.TUNEL staining was performed to detect aortic arch endotheliar apoptosis,and immunohistochemistry for BIP,CHOP and caspase12 to test protein expression;human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) of the line ECV304 were cultured (with or without taurodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) 10 mmol/L,100 mmol/L) and divided into four groups:NC group (20.8% O2 for 4 hours),PH1 group (5% O2 for 4 hours),PH2 group (5% O2 for 12 hours) and IH group (20.8% O2 and 5% O2 alternatively for 8 hours).Annexin V-fluorescein-isothiocyanate/propidium iodide flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis in each group.The expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12 were detected by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.Result Intermittent and persistent hypoxia could increase the rate of endothelium apoptosis and the expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12 compared with the control,induction by intermittent hypoxia was slightly higher than persistent hypoxia.In the HUVEC experiment,TUDCA significantly reduced apoptosis and the expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12.Conclusion Hypoxia,especially intermittent,can induce endothelial cell apoptosis possibly through endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway,which can be attenuated by taurodeoxycholic acid.

  20. Reticular dysgenesis: international survey on clinical presentation, transplantation, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, Manfred; Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Pannicke, Ulrich; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Porta, Fulvio; Gennery, Andrew R; Slatter, Mary; Cowan, Morton J; Stepensky, Polina; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Al-Zahrani, Daifulah; Pai, Sung-Yun; Al Herz, Waleed; Gaspar, Hubert B; Veys, Paul; Oshima, Koichi; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Hiromasa; Noroski, Lenora M; Wulffraat, Nico M; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Muramatsu, Hideki; Al Hilali, Mariam; Moshous, Despina; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Schuetz, Catharina; Jacobsen, Eva-Maria; Schulz, Ansgar S; Schwarz, Klaus; Fischer, Alain; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Cavazzana, Marina

    2017-05-25

    Reticular dysgenesis (RD) is a rare congenital disorder defined clinically by the combination of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), agranulocytosis, and sensorineural deafness. Mutations in the gene encoding adenylate kinase 2 were identified to cause the disorder. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only option to cure this otherwise fatal disease. Retrospective data on clinical presentation, genetics, and outcome of HSCT were collected from centers in Europe, Asia, and North America for a total of 32 patients born between 1982 and 2011. Age at presentation was <4 weeks in 30 of 32 patients (94%). Grafts originated from mismatched family donors in 17 patients (55%), from matched family donors in 6 patients (19%), and from unrelated marrow or umbilical cord blood donors in 8 patients (26%). Thirteen patients received secondary or tertiary transplants. After transplantation, 21 of 31 patients were reported alive at a mean follow-up of 7.9 years (range: 0.6-23.6 years). All patients who died beyond 6 months after HSCT had persistent or recurrent agranulocytosis due to failure of donor myeloid engraftment. In the absence of conditioning, HSCT was ineffective to overcome agranulocytosis, and inclusion of myeloablative components in the conditioning regimens was required to achieve stable lymphomyeloid engraftment. In comparison with other SCID entities, considerable differences were noted regarding age at presentation, onset, and type of infectious complications, as well as the requirement of conditioning prior to HSCT. Although long-term survival is possible in the presence of mixed chimerism, high-level donor myeloid engraftment should be targeted to avoid posttransplant neutropenia. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Thalamic reticular impairment underlies attention deficit in Ptchd1(Y/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Michael F; Wimmer, Ralf D; Schmitt, L Ian; Feng, Guoping; Halassa, Michael M

    2016-04-07

    Developmental disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability (ID), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), affect one in six children in the USA. Recently, gene mutations in patched domain containing 1 (PTCHD1) have been found in ~1% of patients with ID and ASD. Individuals with PTCHD1 deletion show symptoms of ADHD, sleep disruption, hypotonia, aggression, ASD, and ID. Although PTCHD1 is probably critical for normal development, the connection between its deletion and the ensuing behavioural defects is poorly understood. Here we report that during early post-natal development, mouse Ptchd1 is selectively expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a group of GABAergic neurons that regulate thalamocortical transmission, sleep rhythms, and attention. Ptchd1 deletion attenuates TRN activity through mechanisms involving small conductance calcium-dependent potassium currents (SK). TRN-restricted deletion of Ptchd1 leads to attention deficits and hyperactivity, both of which are rescued by pharmacological augmentation of SK channel activity. Global Ptchd1 deletion recapitulates learning impairment, hyper-aggression, and motor defects, all of which are insensitive to SK pharmacological targeting and not found in the TRN-restricted deletion mouse. This study maps clinically relevant behavioural phenotypes onto TRN dysfunction in a human disease model, while also identifying molecular and circuit targets for intervention.

  2. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  3. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus are selective for diverse and complex visual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal eVaingankar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available All visual signals the cortex receives are influenced by the perigeniculate sector of the thalamic reticular nucleus, which receives input from relay cells in the lateral geniculate and provides feedback inhibition in return. Relay cells have been studied in quantitative depth; they behave in a roughly linear fashion and have receptive fields with a stereotyped centre-surround structure. We know far less about reticular neurons. Qualitative studies indicate they simply pool ascending input to generate nonselective gain control. Yet the perigeniculate is complicated; local cells are densely interconnected and fire lengthy bursts. Thus, we employed quantitative methods to explore the perigeniculate, using relay cells as controls. By adapting methods of spike-triggered averaging and covariance analysis for bursts, we identified both first and second order features that build reticular receptive fields. The shapes of these spatiotemporal subunits varied widely; no stereotyped pattern emerged. Companion experiments showed that the shape of the first but not second order features could be explained by the overlap of On and Off inputs to a given cell. Moreover, we assessed the predictive power of the receptive field and how much information each component subunit conveyed. Linear-nonlinear models including multiple subunits performed better than those made with just one; further each subunit encoded different visual information. Model performance for reticular cells was always lesser than for relay cells, however, indicating that reticular cells process inputs nonlinearly. All told, our results suggest that the perigeniculate encodes diverse visual features to selectively modulate activity transmitted downstream

  4. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although it has long been known that microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) induces a state that resembles rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is likely that other transmitters contribute to mPRF regulation of behavioral states. A key...... candidate is the peptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), which innervates the mPRF and induces REM sleep when injected into this region of the brainstem. To begin understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we examined the effects of VIP on mPRF cells using whole-cell patch...... conclude that VIP excites mPRF neurons by activation of a sodium current. This effect is mediated at least in part by G-protein stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, and protein kinase A. These data suggest that VIP may play a physiological role in REM induction by its actions on mPRF neurons....

  5. The clinical utility of reticular basement membrane thickness measurements in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mastrigt, Esther; Vanlaeken, Leonie; Heida, Fardou; Caudri, Daan; de Jongste, Johan C.; Timens, Wim; Rottier, Bart L.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Pijnenburg, Marielle W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness is one of the pathological features of asthma and can be measured in endobronchial biopsies. We assessed the feasibility of endobronchial biopsies in a routine clinical setting and investigated the clinical value of RBM thickness measurements fo

  6. The nature and function of fibroblastoid reticular cells in the hemopoietic stroma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Piersma (Aldert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe experimental work of this thesis, described in the appendix papers, is aimed at characterization of the nature and function of fibroblastic reticular cells in the hemopoietic stroma. A number of experimental models was employed to elucidate different aspects of these cells. In the fi

  7. Impact of intake water temperatures on reticular temperatures of lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, J M; Grott, M W; Einstein, M E; Schutz, M M

    2008-10-01

    Automatic temperature recording may allow early detection of disease, estrus, heat stress, and the onset of calving. The phase IV Cattle Temperature Monitoring System (MaGiiX Inc., Post Falls, ID) utilizes a passive bolus equipped with a temperature sensor, a stationary panel reader to query the bolus, and software to collect, analyze, and display data. One potential limitation to collection of reticular temperatures is the effect of water temperature and consumption on recorded temperatures. Two replicated 3 x 3 Latin square experiments were conducted at the Purdue Dairy Research and Education Center to assess the impact of water intake on reticular temperatures using the Cattle Temperature Monitoring System. Nine high-producing, mid-lactation, second-parity cows with low somatic cell counts were selected. Before administering a water treatment, access to feed and water was restricted for at least 2 h. Baseline reticular temperatures were established from measurements before water intake. In experiment 1, treatments were 25.2 kg of hot water (34.3 degrees C +/- 1.0), warm water (18.2 degrees C +/- 0.4), or cold water (7.6 degrees C +/- 0.4). In experiment 2, treatments were 18.9 kg of body-temperature water (38.9 degrees C +/- 0.2), cold water (5.1 degrees C +/- 0.4), or control (no water). Following water intake, reticular temperatures were collected for 3 h. In experiment 1, an initial dramatic decrease in reticular temperature was observed followed by a gradual increase toward baseline. Least squares means for maximum drop in temperature were 8.5 +/- 0.5, 6.9 +/- 0.5, and 2.2 +/- 0.5 degrees C for cold, warm, and hot water treatments, respectively. Yet at 3 h, reticular temperatures did not return to the baseline. In experiment 2, control cows remained within the baseline confidence interval through the observation period, and cows receiving body temperature water experienced an initial decrease in temperature (0.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C) with a return to within the

  8. Regional registration for expression resistant 3-D face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alyuz, Nese; Gökberk, B.; Akarun, Lale

    Biometric identification from three-dimensional (3-D) facial surface characteristics has become popular, especially in high security applications. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic expression insensitive 3-D face recognition system. Surface deformations due to facial expressions are a

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation modulates hypnosis, immobility, and breathing during isoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2008-12-01

    Many general anesthetics are thought to produce a loss of wakefulness, in part, by enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission. However, GABAergic neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation promotes wakefulness. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) relative to wakefulness, isoflurane decreases GABA levels in the pontine reticular formation; and (2) pontine reticular formation administration of drugs that increase or decrease GABA levels increases or decreases, respectively, isoflurane induction time. To test hypothesis 1, cats (n = 5) received a craniotomy and permanent electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram. Dialysis samples were collected from the pontine reticular formation during isoflurane anesthesia and wakefulness. GABA levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. For hypothesis 2, rats (n = 10) were implanted with a guide cannula aimed for the pontine reticular formation. Each rat received microinjections of Ringer's (vehicle control), the GABA uptake inhibitor nipecotic acid, and the GABA synthesis inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Rats were then anesthetized with isoflurane, and induction time was quantified as loss of righting reflex. Breathing rate was also measured. Relative to wakefulness, GABA levels were significantly decreased by isoflurane. Increased power in the electroencephalogram and decreased activity in the electromyogram caused by isoflurane covaried with pontine reticular formation GABA levels. Nipecotic acid and 3-mercaptopropionic acid significantly increased and decreased, respectively, isoflurane induction time. Nipecotic acid also increased breathing rate. Decreasing pontine reticular formation GABA levels comprises one mechanism by which isoflurane causes loss of consciousness, altered cortical excitability, muscular hypotonia, and decreased respiratory rate.

  10. Effects of trunk-to-head rotation on the labyrinthine responses of rat reticular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, M; Grasso, C; Bruschini, L; Berrettini, S; Manzoni, D

    2012-11-08

    Vestibulospinal reflexes elicited by head displacement become appropriate for body stabilization owing to the integration of neck input by the cerebellar anterior vermis. Due to this integration, the preferred direction of spinal motoneurons' responses to animal tilt rotates by the same angle and by the same direction as the head over the body, which makes it dependent on the direction of body displacement rather than on head displacement. It is known that the cerebellar control of spinal motoneurons involves the reticular formation. Since the preferred directions of corticocerebellar units' responses to animal tilt are tuned by neck rotation, as occuring in spinal motoneurons, we investigated whether a similar tuning can be observed also in the intermediate station of reticular formation. In anaesthetized rats, the activity of neurons in the medullary reticular formation was recorded during wobble of the whole animal at 0.156 Hz, a stimulus that tilted the animal's head by a constant amplitude (5°), in a direction rotating clockwise or counter clockwise over the horizontal plane. The response gain and the direction of tilt eliciting the maximal activity were evaluated with the head and body axes aligned and during a maintained body-to-head displacement of 5-20° over the horizontal plane, in either direction. We found that the neck displacement modified the response gain and/or the average activity of most of the responsive neurons. Rotation of the response direction was observed only in a minor percentage of the recorded neurons. The modifications of reticular neurons' responses were different from those observed in the P-cells of the cerebellar anterior vermis, which rarely showed gain and activity changes and often exhibited a rotation of their response directions. In conclusion, reticular neurons take part in the neck tuning of vestibulospinal reflexes by transforming a head-driven sensory input into a body-centred postural response. The present findings

  11. An improved method for detecting and delineating genomic regions with altered gene expression in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Genomic regions with altered gene expression are a characteristic feature of cancer cells. We present a novel method for identifying such regions in gene expression maps. This method is based on total variation minimization, a classical signal restoration technique. In systematic evaluations, we show that our method combines top-notch detection performance with an ability to delineate relevant regions without excessive over-segmentation, making it a significant advance over existing methods. ...

  12. The ascending reticular activating system from pontine reticular formation to the hypothalamus in the human brain: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-03-17

    The ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is responsible for regulation of consciousness. Precise evaluation of the ARAS is important for diagnosis and management of patients with impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the portion of the ARAS from the pontine reticular formation (RF) to the hypothalamus in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A total of 31 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTI scanning was performed using 1.5-T, and the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus was reconstructed. Values of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract volume of the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus were measured. In all subjects, the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus originated from the RF at the level of the mid-pons, where the trigeminal nerve could be seen, ascended through the periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain anterolaterally to the anterior commissure level, and then terminated into the hypothalamus. No significant differences in DTI parameters were observed between the left and right hemispheres and between males and females (phypothalamus in normal subjects using DTI. We believe that the reconstruction methodology and the results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reticular synthesis of porous molecular 1D nanotubes and 3D networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, A. G.; Little, M. A.; Pulido, A.; Chong, S. Y.; Holden, D.; Chen, L.; Morgan, C.; Wu, X.; Cheng, G.; Clowes, R.; Briggs, M. E.; Hasell, T.; Jelfs, K. E.; Day, G. M.; Cooper, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic control over pore size and pore connectivity is the crowning achievement for porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The same level of control has not been achieved for molecular crystals, which are not defined by strong, directional intermolecular coordination bonds. Hence, molecular crystallization is inherently less controllable than framework crystallization, and there are fewer examples of 'reticular synthesis', in which multiple building blocks can be assembled according to a common assembly motif. Here we apply a chiral recognition strategy to a new family of tubular covalent cages to create both 1D porous nanotubes and 3D diamondoid pillared porous networks. The diamondoid networks are analogous to MOFs prepared from tetrahedral metal nodes and linear ditopic organic linkers. The crystal structures can be rationalized by computational lattice-energy searches, which provide an in silico screening method to evaluate candidate molecular building blocks. These results are a blueprint for applying the 'node and strut' principles of reticular synthesis to molecular crystals.

  14. A comparative analysis of reticular crack on ceramic plate driven by thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, XiangHong; Sheng, ShiLong; Tian, Cheng; Yuan, WenJun

    2016-07-01

    Reticular crack is generally found on the surface of ceramic material that has been subjected to a thermal-shock condition. In the present study, a quantitative effect of thermal shock and quench temperature has been studied and investigated. Experimental tests were carried out to characterize the reticular crack that has been found in the Ge Kiln, which is a famous art of the ancient Chinese culture. After comparative analysis between thermal-shock cracks and the glaze crack patterns of the Ge Kiln porcelain, it is found that this study is expected to provide a powerful tool for recurrence of the long-lost firing and cooling process of the Ge Kiln porcelain.

  15. Identifying Regulatory Patterns at the 3'end Regions of Over-expressed and Under-expressed Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Othoum, Ghofran K

    2013-05-01

    Promoters, neighboring regulatory regions and those extending further upstream of the 5’end of genes, are considered one of the main components affecting the expression status of genes in a specific phenotype. More recently research by Chen et al. (2006, 2012) and Mapendano et al. (2010) demonstrated that the 3’end regulatory regions of genes also influence gene expression. However, the association between the regulatory regions surrounding 3’end of genes and their over- or under-expression status in a particular phenotype has not been systematically studied. The aim of this study is to ascertain if regulatory regions surrounding the 3’end of genes contain sufficient regulatory information to correlate genes with their expression status in a particular phenotype. Over- and under-expressed ovarian cancer (OC) genes were used as a model. Exploratory analysis of the 3’end regions were performed by transforming the annotated regions using principal component analysis (PCA), followed by clustering the transformed data thereby achieving a clear separation of genes with different expression status. Additionally, several classification algorithms such as Naïve Bayes, Random Forest and Support Vector Machine (SVM) were tested with different parameter settings to analyze the discriminatory capacity of the 3’end regions of genes related to their gene expression status. The best performance was achieved using the SVM classification model with 10-fold cross-validation that yielded an accuracy of 98.4%, sensitivity of 99.5% and specificity of 92.5%. For gene expression status for newly available instances, based on information derived from the 3’end regions, an SVM predictive model was developed with 10-fold cross-validation that yielded an accuracy of 67.0%, sensitivity of 73.2% and specificity of 61.0%. Moreover, building an SVM with polynomial kernel model to PCA transformed data yielded an accuracy of 83.1%, sensitivity of 92.5% and specificity of 74.8% using

  16. Reticulospinal neurons in the pontomedullary reticular formation of the monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S T; Davidson, A G; Buford, J A

    2009-11-10

    Recent neurophysiological studies indicate a role for reticulospinal neurons of the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) in motor preparation and goal-directed reaching in the monkey. Although the macaque monkey is an important model for such investigations, little is known regarding the organization of the PMRF in the monkey. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of reticulospinal neurons in the macaque. Bilateral injections of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were made into the cervical spinal cord. A wide band of retrogradely labeled cells was found in the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (Gi) and labeled cells continued rostrally into the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC) and into the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO). Additional retrograde tracing studies following unilateral cervical spinal cord injections of cholera toxin subunit B revealed that there were more ipsilateral (60%) than contralateral (40%) projecting cells in Gi, while an approximately 50:50 ratio contralateral to ipsilateral split was found in PnC and more contralateral projections arose from PnO. Reticulospinal neurons in PMRF ranged widely in size from over 50 microm to under 25 microm across the major somatic axis. Labeled giant cells (soma diameters greater than 50 microm) comprised a small percentage of the neurons and were found in Gi, PnC and PnO. The present results define the origins of the reticulospinal system in the monkey and provide an important foundation for future investigations of the anatomy and physiology of this system in primates.

  17. Feed-forward and feedback projections of midbrain reticular formation neurons in the cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie ePerkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaze changes involving the eyes and head are orchestrated by brainstem gaze centers found within the superior colliculus (SC, paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF, and medullary reticular formation (MdRF. The mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF also plays a role in gaze. It receives a major input from the ipsilateral SC and contains cells that fire in relation to gaze changes. Moreover, it provides a feedback projection to the SC and feed-forward projections to the PPRF and MdRF. We sought to determine whether these MRF feedback and feed-forward projections originate from the same or different neuronal populations by utilizing paired fluorescent retrograde tracers in cats. Specifically, we tested: 1. whether MRF neurons that control eye movements form a single population by injecting the SC and PPRF with different tracers, and 2. whether MRF neurons that control head movements form a single population by injecting the SC and MdRF with different tracers. In neither case were double labeled neurons observed, indicating that feedback and feed-forward projections originate from separate MRF populations. In both cases, the labeled reticulotectal and reticuloreticular neurons were distributed bilaterally in the MRF. However, neurons projecting to the MdRF were generally constrained to the medial half of the MRF, while those projecting to the PPRF, like MRF reticulotectal neurons, were spread throughout the mediolateral axis. Thus, the medial MRF may be specialized for control of head movements, with control of eye movements being more widespread in this structure.

  18. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rei Ogawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency

  19. Regional differences in gene expression and promoter usage in aged human brains

    KAUST Repository

    Pardo, Luba M.

    2013-02-19

    To characterize the promoterome of caudate and putamen regions (striatum), frontal and temporal cortices, and hippocampi from aged human brains, we used high-throughput cap analysis of gene expression to profile the transcription start sites and to quantify the differences in gene expression across the 5 brain regions. We also analyzed the extent to which methylation influenced the observed expression profiles. We sequenced more than 71 million cap analysis of gene expression tags corresponding to 70,202 promoter regions and 16,888 genes. More than 7000 transcripts were differentially expressed, mainly because of differential alternative promoter usage. Unexpectedly, 7% of differentially expressed genes were neurodevelopmental transcription factors. Functional pathway analysis on the differentially expressed genes revealed an overrepresentation of several signaling pathways (e.g., fibroblast growth factor and wnt signaling) in hippocampus and striatum. We also found that although 73% of methylation signals mapped within genes, the influence of methylation on the expression profile was small. Our study underscores alternative promoter usage as an important mechanism for determining the regional differences in gene expression at old age.

  20. Increase of Expression Levels of Reporter Gene in Transgenic Tobaccos by Matrix Attachment Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix attachment region (MAR) located downstream of Plastocyanin gene was isolated from the genome of pea. To study the effect of MARs on foreign gene expression in transgenic plants, T-DNA vector was constructed in which MARs flanked bothβ-glucuronidase(GUS) gene and selectable marker neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT-II) gene. The plant expression vectors were transferred into leaf discs via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure. The result of GUS measurement showed that pea MAR could increase transgene expression level. The mean expression levels of GUS gene expression in population containing MARs could be increased twofold when compared with that of population without MARs.

  1. Tuning protein expression using synonymous codon libraries targeted to the 5' mRNA coding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Borch Jensen, Martin; Bentin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In bacteria, the 5' mRNA coding region plays an important role in determining translation output. Here, we report synthetic sequences that when placed in the 5'-mRNA coding region, leading to recombinant proteins containing short N-terminal extensions, virtually abolish, enhance or produce...... intermediate expression levels of green fluorescent protein in Escherichia coli. At least in one case, no apparent effect on protein stability was observed, pointing to RNA level effects as the principal reason for the observed expression differences. Targeting a synonymous codon library to the 5' coding...... and hence is important to recombinant and, most certainly, endogenous gene expression....

  2. Nonzonal Expressions of GAUSS-KRÜGER Projection in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongmei; Bian, Shaofeng; Liu, Qiang; Li, Houpu; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Yanfeng

    2016-06-01

    With conformal colatitude introduced, based on the mathematical relationship between exponential and logarithmic functions by complex numbers, strict equation of complex conformal colatitude is derived, and then theoretically strict nonzonal expressions of Gauss projection in polar regions are carried out. By means of the computer algebra system, correctness of these expressions is verified, and sketches of Gauss-krüger projection without bandwidth restriction in polar regions are charted. In the Arctic or Antarctic region, graticule of nonzonal Gauss projection complies with people's reading habit and reflects real ground-object distribution. Achievements in this paper could perfect mathematical basis of Gauss projection and provide reference frame for polar surveying and photogrammetry.

  3. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  4. Apoptosis and expression of argyrophilic nucleolus organizer regions in epithelial neoplasms of the larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Vargas Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Occurrence of apoptosis and expression of proliferative markers are powerful tools to establish a prognosis in the follow-up of cancer.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the growth fraction in papillomas and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas with three degrees of differentiation through apoptosis and the expression of nucleolus organizer regions.METHODS: Retrospective study from which paraffin material was submitted to microtomy and hematoxylin-eosin and silver staining. Stained slides were used to quantify the apoptotic index and the number of nucleolus organizer regions by morphometry.RESULTS: Apoptosis was significantly more frequent in well differentiated carcinomas and in papillomas, and a higher growth fraction of expressed nucleolus organizer regions and cells that expressed a greater than average number of nucleolus organizer regions were more frequently noted in undifferentiated carcinomas.CONCLUSIONS: Thus, it was possible to verify that a high apoptotic index was associated with a lower chance of tumor differentiation in carcinomas, while a greater number of total nucleolus organizer regions, cells expressing nucleolus organizer regions above average and a higher growth fraction were associated with greater likelihood of abnormal cell proliferation and increased tumor differentiation.

  5. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  6. Reticular basement membrane in asthma and COPD: Similar thickness, yet different composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen JW Liesker

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Jeroen JW Liesker1, Nick H Ten Hacken1, Mieke Zeinstra-Smith2, Steven R Rutgers1, Dirkje S Postma1, Wim Timens21Department of Pulmonology; 2Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands Background: Reticular basement membrane (RBM thickening has been variably associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Even if RBM thickness is similar in both diseases, its composition might still differ. Objective: To assess whether RBM thickness and composition differ between asthma and COPD. Methods: We investigated 24 allergic asthmatics (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 92% predicted, and 17 nonallergic COPD patients (FEV1 60% predicted, and for each group a control group of similar age and smoking habits (12 and 10 persons, respectively. Snap-frozen sections of bronchial biopsies were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and for collagen I, III, IV, V, laminin and tenascin. RBM thickening was assessed by digital image analysis. Relative staining intensity of each matrix component was determined.Results: Mean (SD RBM thickness was not significantly different between asthma and COPD 5.5 (1.3 vs 6.0 (1.8 μm, but significantly larger than in their healthy counterparts, ie, 4.7 (0.9 and 4.8 (1.2 μm, respectively. Collagen I and laminin stained significantly stronger in asthma than in COPD. Tenascin stained stronger in asthma than in healthy controls of similar age, and stronger in COPD controls than in asthma controls (p 0.05.Conclusion: RBM thickening occurs both in asthma and COPD. We provide supportive evidence that its composition differs in asthma and COPD. Keywords: reticular basement membrane thickness, reticular basement membrane composition, asthma, biopsy, COPD, remodeling

  7. Two classes of excitatory synaptic responses in rat thalamic reticular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Huguenard, John R

    2016-09-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRt), composed of GABAergic cells providing inhibition of relay neurons in the dorsal thalamus, receives excitation from the neocortex and thalamus. The two excitatory pathways promoting feedback or feedforward inhibition of thalamocortical neurons contribute to sensory processing and rhythm generation. While synaptic inhibition within the nRt has been carefully characterized, little is known regarding the biophysics of synaptic excitation. To characterize the functional properties of thalamocortical and corticothalamic connections to the nRt, we recorded minimal electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents from nRt cells in vitro. A hierarchical clustering algorithm distinguished two types of events. Type 1 events had larger amplitudes and faster kinetics, largely mediated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, whereas type 2 responses had more prominent N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor contribution. Type 1 responses showed subnormal axonal propagation and paired pulse depression, consistent with thalamocortical inputs. Furthermore, responses kinetically similar to type 1 events were evoked by glutamate-mediated activation of thalamic neurons. Type 2 responses, in contrast, likely arise from corticothalamic inputs, with larger NMDA conductance and weak Mg(2+)-dependent block, suggesting that NMDA receptors are critical for the cortical excitation of reticular neurons. The long-lasting action of NMDA receptors would promote reticular cell burst firing and produce powerful inhibitory output to relay neurons proposed to be important in triggering epilepsy. This work provides the first complete voltage-clamp analysis of the kinetics and voltage dependence of AMPA and NMDA responses of thalamocortical and corticothalamic synapses in the nRt and will be critical in optimizing biologically realistic neural network models of thalamocortical circuits relevant to sensory processing and

  8. Regional expression of aquaporin 1, 4, and 9 in the brain during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Marchien J; Bullinger, Lisa V; Kohlmeyer, Meghan M; Hunter, Timothy C; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2008-05-01

    Pregnancy is a state of physiologic adaptation, with significant changes in cardiovascular, renal, and hemodynamic systems. Aquaporins (AQPs) may play a role in facilitating these changes. While AQP expression has been assessed in several organs during pregnancy, little is known about its expression in the brain during pregnancy. Therefore, this study assesses the regional expression of AQP1, 4, and 9 during pregnancy and the postpartum period using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The authors show that AQP1, 4, and 9 are expressed in the anterior and posterior cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem of nonpregnant, midpregnant, late pregnant, and postpartum rats. The regional distribution pattern of AQP4 and 9 remained similar during gestation, whereas this pattern changed for AQP1. The expression levels of AQP1, 4, and 9 in the brainstem did not change with gestation, whereas changes were found in the anterior cerebrum for AQP4 and in the posterior cerebrum and cerebellum for all AQPs.

  9. Terminations of reticulospinal fibers originating from the gigantocellular reticular formation in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the projections of the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (Gi) and its neighbors--the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi), the alpha/ventral part of the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (GiA/V), and the lateral paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (LPGi)--to the mouse spinal cord by injecting the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the Gi, DPGi, GiA/GiV, and LPGi. The Gi projected to the entire spinal cord bilaterally with an ipsilateral predominance. Its fibers traveled in both the ventral and lateral funiculi with a greater presence in the ventral funiculus. As the fibers descended in the spinal cord, their density in the lateral funiculus increased. The terminals were present mainly in laminae 7-10 with a dorsolateral expansion caudally. In the lumbar and sacral cord, a considerable number of terminals were also present in laminae 5 and 6. Contralateral fibers shared a similar pattern to their ipsilateral counterparts and some fibers were seen to cross the midline. Fibers arising from the DPGi were similarly distributed in the spinal cord except that there was no dorsolateral expansion in the lumbar and sacral segments and there were fewer fiber terminals. Fibers arising from GiA/V predominantly traveled in the ventral and lateral funiculi ipsilaterally. Ipsilaterally, the density of fibers in the ventral funiculus decreased along the rostrocaudal axis, whereas the density of fibers in the lateral funiculus increased. They terminate mainly in the medial ventral horn and lamina 10 with a smaller number of fibers in the dorsal horn. Fibers arising from the LPGi traveled in both the ventral and lateral funiculi and the density of these fibers in the ventral and lateral funiculi decreased dramatically in the lumbar and sacral segments. Their terminals were present in the ventral horn with a large portion of them terminating in the motor neuron columns. The present study is the first demonstration

  10. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  11. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  12. Behavior of parasite-specific effector CD8+ T cells in the brain and visualization of a kinesis-associated system of reticular fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emma H; Harris, Tajie H; Mrass, Paulus; John, Beena; Tait, Elia D; Wu, Gregory F; Pepper, Marion; Wherry, E John; Dzierzinski, Florence; Roos, David; Haydon, Philip G; Laufer, Terri M; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hunter, Christopher A

    2009-02-20

    To understand lymphocyte behavior in the brain, we used two-photon microscopy to visualize effector CD8(+) T cells during toxoplasmic encephalitis. These cells displayed multiple behaviors with two distinct populations of cells apparent: one with a constrained pattern of migration and one with a highly migratory subset. The proportion of these populations varied over time associated with changes in antigen availability as well as T cell expression of the inhibitory receptor PD1. Unexpectedly, the movement of infiltrating cells was closely associated with an infection-induced reticular system of fibers. This observation suggests that, whereas in other tissues pre-existing scaffolds exist that guide lymphocyte migration, in the brain specialized structures are induced by inflammation that guide migration of T cells in this immune-privileged environment.

  13. Striatum and globus pallidus control the electrical activity of reticular thalamic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Nelson; Oviedo-Chávez, Aldo; Alatorre, Alberto; Ríos, Alain; Barrientos, Rafael; Delgado, Alfonso; Querejeta, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Through GABAergic fibers, globus pallidus (GP) coordinates basal ganglia global function. Electrical activity of GP neurons depends on their membrane properties and afferent fibers, including GABAergic fibers from striatum. In pathological conditions, abnormal electrical activity of GP neurons is associated with motor deficits. There is a GABAergic pathway from the GP to the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTn) whose contribution to RTn neurons electrical activity has received little attention. This fact called our attention because the RTn controls the overall information flow of thalamic nuclei to cerebral cortex. Here, we study the spontaneous electrical activity of RTn neurons recorded in vivo in anesthetized rats and under pharmacological activation or inhibition of the GP. We found that activation of GP predominantly diminishes the spontaneous RTn neurons firing rate and its inhibition increases their firing rate; however, both activation and inhibition of GP did not modified the burst index (BI) or the coefficient of variation (CV) of RTn neurons. Moreover, stimulation of striatum predominantly diminishes the spiking rate of GP cells and increases the spiking rate in RTn neurons without modifying the BI or CV in reticular neurons. Our data suggest a GP tight control over RTn spiking activity.

  14. Feature Extraction for Facial Expression Recognition based on Hybrid Face Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAJEVARDI, S.M.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Facial expression recognition has numerous applications, including psychological research, improved human computer interaction, and sign language translation. A novel facial expression recognition system based on hybrid face regions (HFR is investigated. The expression recognition system is fully automatic, and consists of the following modules: face detection, facial detection, feature extraction, optimal features selection, and classification. The features are extracted from both whole face image and face regions (eyes and mouth using log Gabor filters. Then, the most discriminate features are selected based on mutual information criteria. The system can automatically recognize six expressions: anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and surprise. The selected features are classified using the Naive Bayesian (NB classifier. The proposed method has been extensively assessed using Cohn-Kanade database and JAFFE database. The experiments have highlighted the efficiency of the proposed HFR method in enhancing the classification rate.

  15. Fluoxetine alters mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, María P; Zumalabe, José María; Macarulla, María T; Sáenz Del Burgo, Laura; Zarate, Jon; Echevarría, Enrique

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the effects of chronic fluoxetine on mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. Brain regional immunostaining for mu opioid receptor was carried out. An increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for mu opioid receptor in caudatus-putamen, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, amygdala, and frontal, parietal, and piriform cortices was observed. Increased mu opioid receptor expression in the central amygdaloid nuclei suggests a decreased opioidergic tone at this level that could be involved in fluoxetine anorectic action.

  16. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

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    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  17. The human SOX18 gene: Expression analysis and characterization of its 5’ flanking region

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    Petrović Isidora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish an adequate in vitro model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human SOX18 gene. The paper presents an analysis of expression of this gene in cultured cell lines and characterization of its 5' flanking region. Using RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated SOX18 expression in HeLa cells, indicating that this cell line provides a suitable model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the given gene. We also cloned, sequenced and for the first time characterized the human SOX18 5’ flanking region. It is shown that the region 892 bp in size immediately upstream from the start codone harbors regulatory elements sufficient for transcription and represents an SOX18 promoter region.

  18. Comparison of regional gene expression differences in the brains of the domestic dog and human

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    Kennerly Erin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comparison of the expression profiles of 2,721 genes in the cerebellum, cortex and pituitary gland of three American Staffordshire terriers, one beagle and one fox hound revealed regional expression differences in the brain but failed to reveal marked differences among breeds, or even individual dogs. Approximately 85 per cent (42 of 49 orthologue comparisons of the regional differences in the dog are similar to those that differentiate the analogous human brain regions. A smaller percentage of human differences were replicated in the dog, particularly in the cortex, which may generally be evolving more rapidly than other brain regions in mammals. This study lays the foundation for detailed analysis of the population structure of transcriptional variation as it relates to cognitive and neurological phenotypes in the domestic dog.

  19. Regional differences in expression of specific markers for human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steen B; Møllgård, Kjeld; Olesen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines derived from the inner cell masses of blastocysts generally includes expression analysis of markers such as OCT4, NANOG, SSEA3, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Expression is usually detected by immunocytochemical staining of entire colonies...... staining to weak or absent NANOG staining, and vice versa. SSEA4 staining was only observed in small clusters or single cells and not confined to the TRA territory. Co-expression of all markers was only detected in small areas. SSEA1 expression was found exclusively outside the TRA territory. In conclusion......, pronounced regional differences in the expression of markers considered specific for undifferentiated hESC may suggest the existence of different cell populations....

  20. Gene expression in the rodent brain is associated with its regional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lior; Goldberg, Chen; Manor, Nathan; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2011-05-01

    The putative link between gene expression of brain regions and their neural connectivity patterns is a fundamental question in neuroscience. Here this question is addressed in the first large scale study of a prototypical mammalian rodent brain, using a combination of rat brain regional connectivity data with gene expression of the mouse brain. Remarkably, even though this study uses data from two different rodent species (due to the data limitations), we still find that the connectivity of the majority of brain regions is highly predictable from their gene expression levels-the outgoing (incoming) connectivity is successfully predicted for 73% (56%) of brain regions, with an overall fairly marked accuracy level of 0.79 (0.83). Many genes are found to play a part in predicting both the incoming and outgoing connectivity (241 out of the 500 top selected genes, p-valueregional connectivity in the rodent is significantly correlated with the annotation profile of genes previously found to determine neural connectivity in C. elegans (Pearson correlation of 0.24, p<1e-6 for the outgoing connections and 0.27, p<1e-5 for the incoming). Overall, the association between connectivity and gene expression in a specific extant rodent species' brain is likely to be even stronger than found here, given the limitations of current data.

  1. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  2. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  3. Gene expression profiles in rat brain disclose CNS signature genes and regional patterns of functional specialisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breilid Harald

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian brain is divided into distinct regions with structural and neurophysiological differences. As a result, gene expression is likely to vary between regions in relation to their cellular composition and neuronal function. In order to improve our knowledge and understanding of regional patterns of gene expression in the CNS, we have generated a global map of gene expression in selected regions of the adult rat brain (frontomedial-, temporal- and occipital cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum; both right and left sides as well as in three major non-neural tissues (spleen, liver and kidney using the Applied Biosystems Rat Genome Survey Microarray. Results By unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we found that the transcriptome within a region was highly conserved among individual rats and that there were no systematic differences between the two hemispheres (right versus left side. Further, we identified distinct sets of genes showing significant regional enrichment. Functional annotation of each of these gene sets clearly reflected several important physiological features of the region in question, including synaptic transmission within the cortex, neurogenesis in hippocampus and G-protein-mediated signalling in striatum. In addition, we were able to reveal potentially new regional features, such as mRNA transcription- and neurogenesis-annotated activities in cerebellum and differential use of glutamate signalling between regions. Finally, we determined a set of 'CNS-signature' genes that uncover characteristics of several common neuronal processes in the CNS, with marked over-representation of specific features of synaptic transmission, ion transport and cell communication, as well as numerous novel unclassified genes. Conclusion We have generated a global map of gene expression in the rat brain and used this to determine functional processes and pathways that have a regional preference or ubiquitous

  4. Gene expression in the rodent brain is associated with its regional connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Wolf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The putative link between gene expression of brain regions and their neural connectivity patterns is a fundamental question in neuroscience. Here this question is addressed in the first large scale study of a prototypical mammalian rodent brain, using a combination of rat brain regional connectivity data with gene expression of the mouse brain. Remarkably, even though this study uses data from two different rodent species (due to the data limitations, we still find that the connectivity of the majority of brain regions is highly predictable from their gene expression levels-the outgoing (incoming connectivity is successfully predicted for 73% (56% of brain regions, with an overall fairly marked accuracy level of 0.79 (0.83. Many genes are found to play a part in predicting both the incoming and outgoing connectivity (241 out of the 500 top selected genes, p-value<1e-5. Reassuringly, the genes previously known from the literature to be involved in axon guidance do carry significant information about regional brain connectivity. Surveying the genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of several brain disorders, we find that those associated with schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit disorder are the most highly enriched in the connectivity-related genes identified here. Finally, we find that the profile of functional annotation groups that are associated with regional connectivity in the rodent is significantly correlated with the annotation profile of genes previously found to determine neural connectivity in C. elegans (Pearson correlation of 0.24, p<1e-6 for the outgoing connections and 0.27, p<1e-5 for the incoming. Overall, the association between connectivity and gene expression in a specific extant rodent species' brain is likely to be even stronger than found here, given the limitations of current data.

  5. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  6. Reticular and myxoid non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an unusual case mimicking a salivary gland carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Fredrik; Vijayadwaja, Desai; Loh, Kwok Seng; Tan, Kong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NK-NPC) with an unusual histopathological pattern. The neoplastic cells were arranged in anastomosing cords embedded in a stroma which contained a significant component of alcian blue-positive myxoid substance forming a reticular pattern. These histopathological features gave an initial impression of a salivary gland-type carcinoma. On immunohistochemistry the tumor cells were strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratins (AE1-3 and 5/6) and p63 and there was strong and diffuse nuclear positivity for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA on in situ hybridization. This case highlights the histomorphological variability of NK-NPC. Awareness of the histological spectrum of NK-NPC is important in clinical practice and this is not always adequately highlighted in currently used standard textbooks of Head and Neck Pathology.

  7. Hacia una perspectiva reticular de la teoría sociológica

    OpenAIRE

    Requena Santos, Félix

    2000-01-01

    En este artículo se propone un enfoque de explicación integrada e integradora de la teoría sociológica. Para ello, apoyándonos en el esquema conceptual de Ritze r, se ha const ruido un modelo que permite ver las diferentes teorías sociológicas desde el punto de vista de la influencia y de las carencias que tienen unas sobre otras. De esta forma, el resultado es una perspectiva reticular de la teoría sociológica. No es un modelo completo, sino un esquema para la incorporación sucesiva de las d...

  8. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V.; Turley, Shannon J.; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses. PMID:27415420

  9. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novkovic, Mario; Onder, Lucas; Cupovic, Jovana; Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V; Bocharov, Gennady; Turley, Shannon J; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses.

  10. Graph Theory-Based Analysis of the Lymph Node Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novkovic, Mario; Onder, Lucas; Bocharov, Gennady; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs have developed segregated niches that are able to initiate and maintain effective immune responses. Such global organization requires tight control of diverse cellular components, specifically those that regulate lymphocyte trafficking. Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form a densely interconnected network in lymph nodes and provide key factors necessary for T cell migration and retention, and foster subsequent interactions between T cells and dendritic cells. Development of integrative systems biology approaches has made it possible to elucidate this multilevel complexity of the immune system. Here, we present a graph theory-based analysis of the FRC network in murine lymph nodes, where generation of the network topology is performed using high-resolution confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction. This approach facilitates the analysis of physical cell-to-cell connectivity, and estimation of topological robustness and global behavior of the network when it is subjected to perturbation in silico.

  11. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Novkovic

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses.

  12. Projections from the oral pontine reticular nucleus to the spinal cord of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated projections of the mouse oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) to the spinal cord by (a) injecting a retrograde tracer fluoro-gold (FG) to the lumbar cord and (b) an anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) to PnO. We found that PnO projects to the entire spinal cord with an ipsilateral predominance. PnO fibers mainly travel in the ipsilateral ventral funiculus in the entire cord, terminating in laminae 7-10 with a lower density of fibers and boutons in lower segments. A small number of fibers travel in the contralateral ventral funiculus in the cervical cord with a similar terminating pattern to the ipsilateral counterpart. The present study is the first demonstration of PnO fiber terminals in the mouse spinal cord. This pathway might be responsible for muscle atonia during REM sleep, but needs physiological research to confirm this.

  13. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators.

  14. Choroidal structure determined by binarizing optical coherence tomography images in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen

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    Masuda N

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Naonori Masuda, Masashi Kojima, Mariko Yamashita, Tomo Nishi, Nahoko Ogata Department of Ophthalmology, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan Purpose: To compare the choroidal structure beneath the macular area in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen (RPD and age-matched controls.Methods: This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Twenty eyes of 14 patients (82.3±4.2 years, mean ± standard deviation with RPD and 35 eyes of 20 age-matched controls (81.5±6.0 years were studied. The choroidal structure was determined by binarizing the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in all patients and controls. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas were quantified by the binarization method.Results: The total choroidal area of the eyes with RPD was significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, unpaired t-test. Both the luminal and stromal areas in eyes with RPD were significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, paired t-test, but there was no significant difference in the luminal/stromal ratio between eyes with RPD and control eyes.Conclusion: The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas in eyes with RPD were smaller than those of the control eyes. The reduction of the choroidal luminal and stromal areas may be due to a loss of the oxygen demand of the choroid due to RPE dysfunction. Keywords: reticular pseudodrusen, age-related macular degeneration, choroidal structure, binarization method

  15. Volatile anesthetic action in a computational model of the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Allan; Miotke, Sam A

    2009-05-01

    Although volatile anesthetics (VAs) modulate the activity of multiple ion channels, the process whereby one or more of these effects are integrated to produce components of the general anesthetic state remains enigmatic. Computer models offer the opportunity to examine systems level effects of VA action at one or more sites. Motivated by the role of the thalamus in consciousness and sensory processing, a computational model of the thalamic reticular nucleus was used to determine the collective impact on model behavior of VA action at multiple sites. A computational model of the thalamic reticular nucleus was modified to permit VA modulation of its ion channels. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine how multiple sites interact. VA modulation of either T-type Ca(2+) channels or gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors led to increased network synchrony. VA modulation of both further increased network synchronization. VA-induced decrements in Ca(2+) current permitted greater impact of inhibitory currents on membrane potential, but at higher VA concentrations the decrease in Ca(2+) current led to a decreased number of spikes in the burst generating the inhibitory signal. MAC-awake (the minimum alveolar concentration at which 50% of subjects will recover consciousness) concentrations of both isoflurane and halothane led to similar levels of network synchrony in the model. Relatively modest VA effects at both T-type Ca(2+) channels and gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors can substantially alter network behavior in a computational model of a thalamic nucleus. The similarity of network behavior at MAC-awake concentrations of different VAs is consistent with a contribution of the thalamus to VA-induced unconsciousness through action at these channels.

  16. Region-specific differences in amyloid precursor protein expression in the mouse hippocampus

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    Domenico Del Turco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The physiological role of amyloid precursor protein (APP has been extensively investigated in the rodent hippocampus. Evidence suggests that APP plays a role in synaptic plasticity, dendritic and spine morphogenesis, neuroprotection and - at the behavioral level - hippocampus-dependent forms of learning and memory. Intriguingly, however, studies focusing on the role of APP in synaptic plasticity have reported diverging results and considerable differences in effect size between the dentate gyrus and area CA1 of the mouse hippocampus. We speculated that regional differences in APP expression could underlie these discrepancies and studied the expression of APP in both regions using immunostaining, in situ hybridization, and laser microdissection in combination with quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting. In sum, our results show that APP is approximately 1.7-fold higher expressed in pyramidal cells of Ammon´s horn than in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. This regional difference in APP expression may explain why loss-of-function approaches using APP-deficient mice revealed a role for APP in Hebbian plasticity in area CA1, whereas this could not be shown in the dentate gyrus of the same APP mutants.

  17. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes. PMID:28216629

  18. Module discovery by exhaustive search for densely connected, co-expressed regions in biomolecular interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Recep; Moser, Flavia; Chu, Jeffrey Shih-Chieh; Schönhuth, Alexander; Chen, Nansheng; Ester, Martin

    2010-10-25

    Computational prediction of functionally related groups of genes (functional modules) from large-scale data is an important issue in computational biology. Gene expression experiments and interaction networks are well studied large-scale data sources, available for many not yet exhaustively annotated organisms. It has been well established, when analyzing these two data sources jointly, modules are often reflected by highly interconnected (dense) regions in the interaction networks whose participating genes are co-expressed. However, the tractability of the problem had remained unclear and methods by which to exhaustively search for such constellations had not been presented. We provide an algorithmic framework, referred to as Densely Connected Biclustering (DECOB), by which the aforementioned search problem becomes tractable. To benchmark the predictive power inherent to the approach, we computed all co-expressed, dense regions in physical protein and genetic interaction networks from human and yeast. An automatized filtering procedure reduces our output which results in smaller collections of modules, comparable to state-of-the-art approaches. Our results performed favorably in a fair benchmarking competition which adheres to standard criteria. We demonstrate the usefulness of an exhaustive module search, by using the unreduced output to more quickly perform GO term related function prediction tasks. We point out the advantages of our exhaustive output by predicting functional relationships using two examples. We demonstrate that the computation of all densely connected and co-expressed regions in interaction networks is an approach to module discovery of considerable value. Beyond confirming the well settled hypothesis that such co-expressed, densely connected interaction network regions reflect functional modules, we open up novel computational ways to comprehensively analyze the modular organization of an organism based on prevalent and largely available large

  19. Module discovery by exhaustive search for densely connected, co-expressed regions in biomolecular interaction networks.

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    Recep Colak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computational prediction of functionally related groups of genes (functional modules from large-scale data is an important issue in computational biology. Gene expression experiments and interaction networks are well studied large-scale data sources, available for many not yet exhaustively annotated organisms. It has been well established, when analyzing these two data sources jointly, modules are often reflected by highly interconnected (dense regions in the interaction networks whose participating genes are co-expressed. However, the tractability of the problem had remained unclear and methods by which to exhaustively search for such constellations had not been presented. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We provide an algorithmic framework, referred to as Densely Connected Biclustering (DECOB, by which the aforementioned search problem becomes tractable. To benchmark the predictive power inherent to the approach, we computed all co-expressed, dense regions in physical protein and genetic interaction networks from human and yeast. An automatized filtering procedure reduces our output which results in smaller collections of modules, comparable to state-of-the-art approaches. Our results performed favorably in a fair benchmarking competition which adheres to standard criteria. We demonstrate the usefulness of an exhaustive module search, by using the unreduced output to more quickly perform GO term related function prediction tasks. We point out the advantages of our exhaustive output by predicting functional relationships using two examples. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the computation of all densely connected and co-expressed regions in interaction networks is an approach to module discovery of considerable value. Beyond confirming the well settled hypothesis that such co-expressed, densely connected interaction network regions reflect functional modules, we open up novel computational ways to comprehensively analyze

  20. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

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    Marra Marco A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters ( Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression.

  1. Amygdala kindling increases fear responses and decreases glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in hippocampal regions.

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    Kalynchuk, Lisa E; Meaney, Michael J

    2003-12-01

    Amygdala kindling dramatically increases fearful behavior in rats. Because kindling-induced fear increases in magnitude as rats receive more stimulations, kindling provides an excellent model for studying the nature and neural mechanisms of fear sensitization. In the present experiment, we studied whether the development of kindling-induced fear is related to changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression in various brain regions. Rats received 20, 60 or 100 amygdala kindling stimulations or 100 sham stimulations. One day after the final stimulation, their fearful behavior was assessed in an unfamiliar open field. Then, the rats were sacrificed and their brains were processed for in situ hybridization of GR mRNA expression. We found that compared with the sham-stimulated rats, the rats that received 60 or 100 kindling stimulations were significantly more fearful in the open field and also had significantly less GR mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Importantly, the changes in fearful behavior were significantly correlated with the changes in GR mRNA expression. These results suggest that alterations in GR mRNA expression in hippocampal regions may play a role in the development of kindling-induced fear.

  2. Expression of PGE2 EP3 receptor subtypes in the mouse preoptic region.

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    Vasilache, Ana Maria; Andersson, Josefin; Nilsberth, Camilla

    2007-08-23

    Inflammatory-induced fever is dependent on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) binding to its EP(3) receptor in the thermoregulatory region of the hypothalamus, but it is not known which EP(3) receptor isoform(s) that is/are involved. We identified the EP(3) receptor expression in the mouse preoptic region by in situ hybridization and isolated the corresponding area by laser capture microdissection. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of microdissected tissue revealed a predominant expression of the EP(3alpha) isoform, but there was also considerable expression of EP(3gamma), corresponding to approximately 15% of total EP(3) receptor expression, whereas EP(3beta) was sparsely expressed. This distribution was not changed by immune challenge induced by peripheral administration of LPS, indicating that EP(3) receptor splicing and distribution is not activity dependent. Considering that EP(3alpha) and EP(3gamma) are associated with inhibitory and stimulatory G-proteins, respectively, the present data demonstrate that the PGE(2) response of the target neurons is intricately regulated.

  3. Regional expression of Pax7 in the brain of Xenopus laevis during embryonic and larval development

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    Sandra eBandín

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pax7 is a member of the highly conserved Pax gene family that is expressed in restricted zones of the central nervous system during development, being involved in early brain regionalization and the maintenance of the regional identity. Using sensitive immunohistochemical techniques we have analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern of Pax7 expression in the brain of the anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis, during development. Pax7 expression was first detected in early embryos in the basal plate of prosomere 3, roof and alar plates of prosomere 1 and mesencephalon, and the alar plate of rhombomere 1. As development proceeded, Pax7 cells were observed in the hypothalamus close to the catecholaminergic population of the mammillary region. In the diencephalon, Pax7 was intensely expressed in a portion of the basal plate of prosomere 3, in the roof plate and in scattered cells of the thalamus in prosomere 2, throughout the roof of prosomere 1, and in the commissural and juxtacommissural domains of the pretectum. In the mesencephalon, Pax7 cells were localized in the optic tectum and, to a lesser extent, in the torus semicircularis. The rostral portion of the alar part of rhombomere 1, including the ventricular layer of the cerebellum, expressed Pax7 and, gradually, some of these dorsal cells were observed to populate ventrally the interpeduncular nucleus and the isthmus (rhombomere 0. Additionally, Pax7 positive cells were found in the ventricular zone of the ventral part of the alar plate along the rhombencephalon and the spinal cord. The findings show that the strongly conserved features of Pax7 expression through development shared by amniote vertebrates are also present in the anamniote amphibians as a common characteristic of the brain organization of tetrapods.

  4. Seasonal and regional differences in gene expression in the brain of a hibernating mammal.

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    Christine Schwartz

    Full Text Available Mammalian hibernation presents a unique opportunity to study naturally occurring neuroprotection. Hibernating ground squirrels undergo rapid and extreme physiological changes in body temperature, oxygen consumption, and heart rate without suffering neurological damage from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Different brain regions show markedly different activity during the torpor/arousal cycle: the cerebral cortex shows activity only during the periodic returns to normothermia, while the hypothalamus is active over the entire temperature range. Therefore, region-specific neuroprotective strategies must exist to permit this compartmentalized spectrum of activity. In this study, we use the Illumina HiSeq platform to compare the transcriptomes of these two brain regions at four collection points across the hibernation season: April Active, October Active, Torpor, and IBA. In the cerebral cortex, 1,085 genes were found to be differentially expressed across collection points, while 1,063 genes were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus. Comparison of these transcripts indicates that the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus implement very different strategies during hibernation, showing less than 20% of these differentially expressed genes in common. The cerebral cortex transcriptome shows evidence of remodeling and plasticity during hibernation, including transcripts for the presynaptic cytomatrix proteins bassoon and piccolo, and extracellular matrix components, including laminins and collagens. Conversely, the hypothalamic transcriptome displays upregulation of transcripts involved in damage response signaling and protein turnover during hibernation, including the DNA damage repair gene RAD50 and ubiquitin E3 ligases UBR1 and UBR5. Additionally, the hypothalamus transcriptome also provides evidence of potential mechanisms underlying the hibernation phenotype, including feeding and satiety signaling, seasonal timing mechanisms, and fuel

  5. SLC9A9 Co-expression modules in autism-associated brain regions.

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    Patak, Jameson; Hess, Jonathan L; Zhang-James, Yanli; Glatt, Stephen J; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-07-21

    SLC9A9 is a sodium hydrogen exchanger present in the recycling endosome and highly expressed in the brain. It is implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Little research concerning its gene expression patterns and biological pathways has been conducted. We sought to investigate its possible biological roles in autism-associated brain regions throughout development. We conducted a weighted gene co-expression network analysis on RNA-seq data downloaded from Brainspan. We compared prenatal and postnatal gene expression networks for three ASD-associated brain regions known to have high SLC9A9 gene expression. We also performed an ASD-associated single nucleotide polymorphism enrichment analysis and a cell signature enrichment analysis. The modules showed differences in gene constituents (membership), gene number, and connectivity throughout time. SLC9A9 was highly associated with immune system functions, metabolism, apoptosis, endocytosis, and signaling cascades. Gene list comparison with co-immunoprecipitation data was significant for multiple modules. We found a disproportionately high autism risk signal among genes constituting the prenatal hippocampal module. The modules were enriched with astrocyte and oligodendrocyte markers. SLC9A9 is potentially involved in the pathophysiology of ASDs. Our investigation confirmed proposed functions for SLC9A9, such as endocytosis and immune regulation, while also revealing potential roles in mTOR signaling and cell survival.. By providing a concise molecular map and interactions, evidence of cell type and implicated brain regions we hope this will guide future research on SLC9A9. Autism Res 2016. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Expression of tenascin and nucleolar organizer region in ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma.

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    Carnelio, Sunitha; Vij, Hitesh

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the expression, distribution and comparison of tenascin, a glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix in ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma, both odontogenic neoplasms with diverse biological behavior and to understand the proliferative activity by using the morphometric analysis. Paraffin embedded tissue from 25 cases of odontogenic tumors i.e., ameloblastoma (n = 15) and ameloblastic fibroma (n = 10) were used. The expression of tenascin was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Morphometric analysis of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) from ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma was carried out by silver staining. A heterogeneous expression of tenascin was found in ameloblastoma which was mainly localized at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface and a patchy distribution was observed in the stroma (80%), while strong positivity was observed in the stroma and at the basement membrane zone of ameloblastic fibroma (100%). argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) revealed higher mean counts in ameloblastoma (3.093 +/- 0.902) when compared with those of ameloblastic fibroma (1.553 +/- 0.250). Ameloblastoma presented more than two NORs (two to five) per nucleus in majority of the cells, while ameloblastic fibroma exhibited only one NORs per nucleus. Expression of tenascin in these neoplasms suggest that it could play a role in epithelial- mesenchymal interaction, while AgNORs reveal that ameloblastomas are more aggressive when compared with ameloblastic fibromas.

  7. A nonintrinsic regional basis for increased infrarenal aortic MMP-9 expression and activity.

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    Ailawadi, Gorav; Knipp, Brian S; Lu, Guanyi; Roelofs, Karen J; Ford, John W; Hannawa, Kevin K; Bishop, Keith; Thanaporn, Porama; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2003-05-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine whether intrinsic or regional factors at different anatomic sites of the aorta affect expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Aortas from Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 22) were divided into arch, descending thoracic, and infrarenal abdominal segments. Specimens were stimulated with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) (2 ng/mL) for 72 hours. In separate experiments, syngeneic aortic segments were transplanted from the thoracic or abdominal aortas of donor rats into the infrarenal aortic position of recipient rats (n = 12 each). At 4 weeks, aortas from rats who had received transplants were harvested, sectioned into arch, thoracic, and transplanted thoracic or transplanted abdominal segments, and stimulated with IL-1beta. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, zymography, and reverse zymography were performed to assess MMP-9, MMP-2, and TIMP-1 in all aortic segments. Differences were assessed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey test. In control rats, abdominal segments had significantly higher MMP-9 expression compared with arch and thoracic segments (P <.002). Total MMP-9 activity was also higher in abdominal segments (P <.02). In rats who received transplants, transplanted thoracic (P <.004) and transplanted abdominal (P <.05) segments demonstrated upregulation of MMP-9 expression, compared with control arch and thoracic segments. Zymography documented increased total MMP-9 activity in transplanted thoracic (P <.03) and transplanted abdominal (P <.04) segments versus arch and thoracic segments. No significant difference in MMP-9 expression was found between control abdominal, transplanted thoracic, or transplanted abdominal segments. No significant differences in MMP-2 or TIMP-1 expression or activity were demonstrated in either control or transplanted segments. These data demonstrate that variations in aortic MMP-9 expression and

  8. Atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica Electrocorticographic study of the rats's bram after lesioning of the midbrain reticular formation

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    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo foram utilizados 73 ratos em preparações agudas e crônicas, nas quais lesamos a formação reticular mesencefálica com corrente contínua (3,5 a 4,0 mA durante 5 a 10 segundos. O eletródio ativo era implantado estereotàxicamente segundo as coordenadas de König e Klippel. As lesões eram feitas parcial ou totalmente, uni ou bilateralmente, e em todos os animais procedeu-se ao controle histológico das áreas lesadas, usando-se o método de Weil. O registro da atividade elétrica cortical foi feito com polígrafo Beckman de 4 canais, utilizando-se derivações bipolares curtas (1mm com eletródios esféricos de platina. As experiências permitiram as seguintes conclusões: 1 — As características eletrofisiológicas dos fusos que ocorrem após lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica são muito semelhantes às dos fusos espontâneos e barbitúricos, inclusive quanto à projeção cortical. Quanto à duração dos potenciais que os constituem, contudo, notamos que a faixa de variação era mais centuada (20 a 80 ms, o que pode ser atribuído à maior complexidade dos potenciais do cérebro isolado, possivelmente pela falta de ação cronadora da formação reticular sobre o sistema sincronizador talâmico. 2 — Os mecanismos envolvidos na gênese dos fusos do sono barbitúrico ou espontâneo e os do cérebro isolado são, pelo menos em parte, dependentes do bloqueio da formação reticular mesencefálica. 3 — A formação reticular mesencefálica ativa preferencialmente o hemisfério cerebral homolateral; o contingente cruzado talvez seja mobilizado somente quando estímulos alertantes intensos atingem o tegmento mesencefálico. 4 — Além da formação reticular mesencefálica deve haver outros mecanismos ativadores corticais, visto que, em preparações agudas de cérebro isolado, observamos: a surtos de curta duração de atividade dessincronizada; b oscilações freqüentes do ECoG durante o registro

  9. Distinct cis-acting regions control six6 expression during eye field and optic cup stages of eye formation.

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    Ledford, Kelley L; Martinez-De Luna, Reyna I; Theisen, Matthew A; Rawlins, Karisa D; Viczian, Andrea S; Zuber, Michael E

    2017-06-15

    The eye field transcription factor, Six6, is essential for both the early (specification and proliferative growth) phase of eye formation, as well as for normal retinal progenitor cell differentiation. While genomic regions driving six6 optic cup expression have been described, the sequences controlling eye field and optic vesicle expression are unknown. Two evolutionary conserved regions 5' and a third 3' to the six6 coding region were identified, and together they faithfully replicate the endogenous X. laevis six6 expression pattern. Transgenic lines were generated and used to determine the onset and expression patterns controlled by the regulatory regions. The conserved 3' region was necessary and sufficient for eye field and optic vesicle expression. In contrast, the two conserved enhancer regions located 5' of the coding sequence were required together for normal optic cup and mature retinal expression. Gain-of-function experiments indicate endogenous six6 and GFP expression in F1 transgenic embryos are similarly regulated in response to candidate trans-acting factors. Importantly, CRISPR/CAS9-mediated deletion of the 3' eye field/optic vesicle enhancer in X. laevis, resulted in a reduction in optic vesicle size. These results identify the cis-acting regions, demonstrate the modular nature of the elements controlling early versus late retinal expression, and identify potential regulators of six6 expression during the early stages of eye formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Differential geometry expression and analysis of regionalized variables of typical pollutants concentration in terrestrial environment].

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    Ye, Han-Feng; Guo, Shu-Hai; Wu, Bo; Wang, Yan-Hu

    2009-10-01

    Based on the basic concepts of differential geometry in analyzing environmental data and establishing related models, the methodology for differential geometry expression and analysis of pollutants concentration in terrestrial environment was presented. As a kind of regionalized variables, the spatial distribution pattern of the pollutants concentration was transformed into 3-dimension form, and fitted with conicoid. This approach made it possible to analyze the quantitative relationships between the regionalized variables and their spatial structural attributes. For illustration purpose, several sorts of typical space fabrics, such as convexity, concavity, ridge, ravine, saddle, and slope, were calculated and characterized. It was suggested that this approach was feasible for analyzing the regionalized variables of pollutants concentration in terrestrial environment.

  11. Evidence that adrenergic ventrolateral medullary cells are activated whereas precerebellar lateral reticular nucleus neurons are suppressed during REM sleep.

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    Georg M Stettner

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS is generated in the brainstem by a distributed network of neurochemically distinct neurons. In the pons, the main subtypes are cholinergic and glutamatergic REMS-on cells and aminergic REMS-off cells. Pontine REMS-on cells send axons to the ventrolateral medulla (VLM, but little is known about REMS-related activity of VLM cells. In urethane-anesthetized rats, dorsomedial pontine injections of carbachol trigger REMS-like episodes that include cortical and hippocampal activation and suppression of motoneuronal activity; the episodes last 4-8 min and can be elicited repeatedly. We used this model to determine whether VLM catecholaminergic cells are silenced during REMS, as is typical of most aminergic neurons studied to date, and to investigate other REMS-related cells in this region. In 18 anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated rats, we obtained extracellular recordings from VLM cells when REMS-like episodes were elicited by pontine carbachol injections (10 mM, 10 nl. One major group were the cells that were activated during the episodes (n = 10. Their baseline firing rate of 3.7±2.1 (SD Hz increased to 9.7±2.1 Hz. Most were found in the adrenergic C1 region and at sites located less than 50 µm from dopamine β-hydroxylase-positive (DBH(+ neurons. Another major group were the silenced or suppressed cells (n = 35. Most were localized in the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN and distantly from any DBH(+ cells. Their baseline firing rates were 6.8±4.4 Hz and 15.8±7.1 Hz, respectively, with the activity of the latter reduced to 7.4±3.8 Hz. We conclude that, in contrast to the pontine noradrenergic cells that are silenced during REMS, medullary adrenergic C1 neurons, many of which drive the sympathetic output, are activated. Our data also show that afferent input transmitted to the cerebellum through the LRN is attenuated during REMS. This may distort the spatial representation of body position

  12. Heterologous expression of Translocated promoter region protein, Tpr, identified as a transcription factor from Rattus norvegicus.

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    Agarwal, Shivani; Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Dixit, Aparna

    2011-05-01

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated that the 35 kDa isoform of Translocated promoter region protein (Tpr) of Rattus norvegicus was able to augment c-jun transcription efficiently. Identification of direct targets that may in part downregulate c-jun transcription might prove to be an ideal target to curtail the proliferation of normal cells under pathophysiological conditions. In order to evaluate its potential as a pharmaceutical target, the protein must be produced and purified in sufficiently high yields. In the present study, we report the high level expression of Tpr protein of R. norvegicus employing heterologous host, Escherichia coli, to permit its structural characterization in great detail. We here demonstrate that the Tpr protein was expressed in soluble form and approximately 90 mg/L of the purified protein at the shake flask level could be achieved to near homogeneity using single step-metal chelate affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the protein was confirmed by mass spectroscopic analysis. The highly unstable and disordered Tpr protein was imparted structural and functional stability by the addition of glycerol and it has been shown that the natively unfolded Tpr protein retains DNA binding ability under these conditions only. Thus, the present study emphasizes the significance of an efficient prokaryotic system, which results in a high level soluble expression of a DNA binding protein of eukaryotic origin. Thus, the present strategy employed for purification of the R. norvegicus Tpr protein bypasses the need for the tedious expression strategies associated with the eukaryotic expression systems.

  13. Glycinergic Pathways of the Central Auditory System and Adjacent Reticular Formation of the Rat.

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    Hunter, Chyren

    The development of techniques to visualize and identify specific transmitters of neuronal circuits has stimulated work on the characterization of pathways in the rat central nervous system that utilize the inhibitory amino acid glycine as its neurotransmitter. Glycine is a major inhibitory transmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem of vertebrates where it satisfies the major criteria for neurotransmitter action. Some of these characteristics are: uneven distribution in brain, high affinity reuptake mechanisms, inhibitory neurophysiological actions on certain neuronal populations, uneven receptor distribution and the specific antagonism of its actions by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Behaviorally, antagonism of glycinergic neurotransmission in the medullary reticular formation is linked to the development of myoclonus and seizures which may be initiated by auditory as well as other stimuli. In the present study, decreases in the concentration of glycine as well as the density of glycine receptors in the medulla with aging were found and may be responsible for the lowered threshold for strychnine seizures observed in older rats. Neuroanatomical pathways in the central auditory system and medullary and pontine reticular formation (RF) were investigated using retrograde transport of tritiated glycine to identify glycinergic pathways; immunohistochemical techniques were used to corroborate the location of glycine neurons. Within the central auditory system, retrograde transport studies using tritiated glycine demonstrated an ipsilateral glycinergic pathway linking nuclei of the ascending auditory system. This pathway has its cell bodies in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and projects to the ventrocaudal division of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VLL). Collaterals of this glycinergic projection terminate in the ipsilateral lateral superior olive (LSO). Other glycinergic pathways found were afferent to the VLL and have their origin

  14. The Thatcher illusion reveals orientation dependence in brain regions involved in processing facial expressions.

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    Psalta, Lilia; Young, Andrew W; Thompson, Peter; Andrews, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Although the processing of facial identity is known to be sensitive to the orientation of the face, it is less clear whether orientation sensitivity extends to the processing of facial expressions. To address this issue, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to measure the neural response to the Thatcher illusion. This illusion involves a local inversion of the eyes and mouth in a smiling face-when the face is upright, the inverted features make it appear grotesque, but when the face is inverted, the inversion is no longer apparent. Using an fMRI-adaptation paradigm, we found a release from adaptation in the superior temporal sulcus-a region directly linked to the processing of facial expressions-when the images were upright and they changed from a normal to a Thatcherized configuration. However, this release from adaptation was not evident when the faces were inverted. These results show that regions involved in processing facial expressions display a pronounced orientation sensitivity.

  15. Electrically evoked reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in mice with alpha tectorin C1509G mutation

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    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical coupling between the tectorial membrane and the hair bundles of outer hair cells is crucial for stimulating mechanoelectrical transduction channels, which convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signal, and for transmitting outer hair cell-generated force back to the basilar membrane to boost hearing sensitivity. It has been demonstrated that the detached tectorial membrane in mice with C1509G alpha tectorin mutation caused hearing loss, but enhanced electrically evoked otoacoustic emissions. To understand how the mutated cochlea emits sounds, the reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations were measured in the electrically stimulated cochlea in this study. The results showed that the electrically evoked basilar membrane vibration decreased dramatically while the reticular lamina vibration and otoacoustic emissions exhibited no significant change in C1509G mutation mice. This result indicates that a functional cochlear amplifier and a normal basilar membrane vibration are not required for the outer hair cell-generated sound to exit the cochlea.

  16. Choroidal structure determined by binarizing optical coherence tomography images in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen

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    Masuda, Naonori; Kojima, Masashi; Yamashita, Mariko; Nishi, Tomo; Ogata, Nahoko

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the choroidal structure beneath the macular area in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and age-matched controls. Methods This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Twenty eyes of 14 patients (82.3±4.2 years, mean ± standard deviation) with RPD and 35 eyes of 20 age-matched controls (81.5±6.0 years) were studied. The choroidal structure was determined by binarizing the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in all patients and controls. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas were quantified by the binarization method. Results The total choroidal area of the eyes with RPD was significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, unpaired t-test). Both the luminal and stromal areas in eyes with RPD were significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, paired t-test), but there was no significant difference in the luminal/stromal ratio between eyes with RPD and control eyes. Conclusion The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas in eyes with RPD were smaller than those of the control eyes. The reduction of the choroidal luminal and stromal areas may be due to a loss of the oxygen demand of the choroid due to RPE dysfunction. PMID:28490860

  17. Post-implantation erythema in 3 patients and a review of reticular telangiectatic erythema.

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    Aneja, Savina; Taylor, James S; Billings, Steven D; Honari, Golara; Sood, Apra

    2011-05-01

    The appearance of erythematous, blanchable patches or plaques overlying an implant suggests possible reticular telangiectatic erythema (RTE). RTE is a benign reactive cutaneous manifestation that can present following the implantation of a cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or intrathecal infusion pump in an otherwise asymptomatic, non-infectious patient. To demonstrate the variety in clinical presentation of patients presenting with RTE or similar patch test-negative post-implantation erythema. After institutional board approval had been obtained, patient information was obtained from electronic medical record files, which included surgical reports, pathology reports, and notes from outpatient encounters. We report post-implantation erythema following insertion of an elbow prosthesis, a knee prosthesis, and a spinal cord stimulator, which have not previously been cited as aetiologies of RTE. Owing to the delayed onset and variable recovery, RTE remains a diagnostic challenge. RTE should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with erythema over the site of a previously implanted device. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. The mechanism of noradrenergic alpha 1 excitatory modulation of pontine reticular formation neurons.

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    Stevens, D R; McCarley, R W; Greene, R W

    1994-11-01

    The alpha 1 adrenergic receptor occurs in all major divisions of the CNS and is thought to play a role in all behaviors influenced by norepinephrine (NE). In the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), the proposed site of adrenergic enhancement of startle responses (Davis, 1984), alpha 1 agonists excite most neurons (Gerber et al., 1990). We here report that alpha 1 excitation results from a reduction of a voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current, not previously recognized as ligand-modulated. The calcium sensitivity is suggested by its antagonism with Mg2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, low concentrations of tetraethylammonium, and charybdotoxin. The voltage sensitivity of this conductance falls within the membrane potential range critical to action potential generation. Based on this voltage sensitivity, the change in repetitive firing characteristics may be predicted according to a mathematical model of the mPRF neuronal electrophysiology. The predicted response to a 50% decrease in the phenylephrine (PE)-sensitive conductance is similar to the observed responses, with respect to both the current response under voltage-clamp conditions and alterations of the AHP and frequency/current curve. In contrast, modeling a reduction of a voltage-insensitive leak current predicts none of these changes. Thus, the noradrenergic reduction of this current depolarizes the membrane, increases the likelihood of an initial response to depolarizing input, and increases firing rate during sustained depolarization in a manner consistent with an NE role as an excitatory neuromodulator of the mPRF.

  19. Choroidal structure determined by binarizing optical coherence tomography images in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naonori; Kojima, Masashi; Yamashita, Mariko; Nishi, Tomo; Ogata, Nahoko

    2017-01-01

    To compare the choroidal structure beneath the macular area in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and age-matched controls. This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Twenty eyes of 14 patients (82.3±4.2 years, mean ± standard deviation) with RPD and 35 eyes of 20 age-matched controls (81.5±6.0 years) were studied. The choroidal structure was determined by binarizing the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in all patients and controls. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas were quantified by the binarization method. The total choroidal area of the eyes with RPD was significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, unpaired t-test). Both the luminal and stromal areas in eyes with RPD were significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, paired t-test), but there was no significant difference in the luminal/stromal ratio between eyes with RPD and control eyes. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas in eyes with RPD were smaller than those of the control eyes. The reduction of the choroidal luminal and stromal areas may be due to a loss of the oxygen demand of the choroid due to RPE dysfunction.

  20. The Neuroanatomy of the Reticular Nucleus Locus Coeruleus in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Filippo S. Giorgi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s Disease (AD features the accumulation of β-amyloid and Tau aggregates, which deposit as extracellular plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, respectively. Neuronal Tau aggregates may appear early in life, in the absence of clinical symptoms. This occurs in the brainstem reticular formation and mostly within Locus Coeruleus (LC, which is consistently affected during AD. LC is the main source of forebrain norepinephrine (NE and it modulates a variety of functions including sleep-waking cycle, alertness, synaptic plasticity, and memory. The iso-dendritic nature of LC neurons allows their axons to spread NE throughout the whole forebrain. Likewise, a prion-like hypothesis suggests that Tau aggregates may travel along LC axons to reach out cortical neurons. Despite this timing is compatible with cross-sectional studies, there is no actual evidence for a causal relationship between these events. In the present mini-review, we dedicate special emphasis to those various mechanisms that may link degeneration of LC neurons to the onset of AD pathology. This includes the hypothesis that a damage to LC neurons contributes to the onset of dementia due to a loss of neuroprotective effects or, even the chance that, LC degenerates independently from cortical pathology. At the same time, since LC neurons are lost in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders we considered which molecular mechanism may render these brainstem neurons so vulnerable.

  1. The Construction of Metal-Organic Framework with Active Backbones by the Utilization of Reticular Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunwoo

    With the principles of reticular chemistry, metal-organic frameworks with ultra-high porosity, chiral-recognition unit as a chiral stationary phase, metalloporhyrins for enhanced hydrogen adsorption and an intrinsic conductivity to form porous conductors, have been prepared. This dissertation presents how the principles of reticular chemistry were utilized to achieve in the preparations of metal-organic frameworks with a large surface area and active backbones. Through the simple isoreticular (having the same framework topology) expansion from MOF-177 composed with 1,3,5-tris(4'-carboxyphenyl-)benzene (BTB3-) as the strut; MOF-200 was prepared with 4,4',4"-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diy1))tribenzoic acid an extension from BTB3- by a phenylene unit to yield one of the most porous MOFs with a Langmuir surface area of 10,400 m2. and the lowest density of 0.22 cm3.g-1. A successful thermal polymerization reaction at 325 °C inside of the pores of highly porous MOF, MOF-177, was performed and verified the integrity of the MOF structure even after the thermal reaction. 1,4-Diphenylbutadiyne that is known to polymerize upon heating to form a conjugated backbone was impregnated via solution-diffusion into MOF-177 and then subsequently polymerized by heat to form polymer impregnated MOF-177. Characterization was carried out using powder X-ray diffraction and volumetric sorption analyzer. MOF-1020 with a linear quaterphenyl dicarboxylate-based strut was designed to contain a chiral bisbinaphthyl crown-ether moiety for alkyl ammonium resolution was precisely placed into a Zn4O(CO2)6-based cubic MOF structure. Unfortunately, the chiral resolution was not achieved due to the sensitivity and the pore environment of MOF-1020. However, an interesting phenomenon was observed, where the loss of crystallinity occurs upon solvent removal while the crystallites remain shiny and crystalline, but it readily is restored upon re-solvation of the crystallites. This rare

  2. Dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus in vivo.

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    Fabián Muñoz

    Full Text Available Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold.

  3. Functional morphology of unguiculiform papillae of the reticular groove in the ruminant stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Althen F; Kühnel, Wolfgang; Vives, Patricia; Wedel, Thilo

    2009-11-01

    The arrangement of the ruminant stomach in four gastric compartments with specialized mucosal papillae along the gastric groove (GG) has been previously described. However, a debate remains about functional implications of these morphological pecularities. This study was aimed to elucidate the relation between the papillar morphology and its putative functions. The GG was obtained from adult bovine stomachs (n=10) and subdivided into (1) proximal, (2) middle, (3) distal portion of the reticular groove (RG) and (4) the area of the reticulo-omasal sphincter (ROS). The specimens were processed for scanning electron microscopy and stereomicroscopy to analyze the density, shape and location of the papillae. Whereas the proximal portion of the RG was characterized by small (1.5mm), conically shaped, smooth papillae, the middle portion exhibited larger papillae (4mm) with sharp borders covered by keratin. Towards the ROS the papillae further increased in size (3-11mm) and showed compound or single processes resembling the shape of arrows, twisted hooks or thorns (unguiculliform papillae). At the ROS the unguiculliform papillae were distributed in clusters groups and along the border of the sphincter. Due to their peculiar morphological features it is suggested that unguiculliform papillae functions as a filter barrier preventing the passage of large-sized food particles into the omasum and avoiding subsequent obstruction of both the RG and the ROS. The data give further evidence that unguiculliform papillae are actively involved in the complex mechanisms of food processing taking place within the ruminant pluricavity stomach.

  4. Expression of human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand extracellular region in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐蓓; HE; Fengtian; 等

    2002-01-01

    This study is conducted to clone the cDNA encoding human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL)extracellular region(amino acids 41-281,hTRAIL41-281)and to express it in E.coli.The hTRAIL41-281 cDNA is amplified by reverse transcription(RT)PCR from total RNA derived from human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60.After sequenced,the cDNA is cloned into the vector pQE-80L and transformed into E.coli DH5α to express the recombinant hTRAIL41-281(rhTRAIL41-281)induced by IPTG.The recombinant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE.The cloned cDNA is consistent with the cDNA sequence encoding hTRAIL41-281 reported in GenBankTM.After inducing.the hTRAIL41-281 protein is expressed,and the mass of the recombinant protein is about 30% of total bacteria protein,which demonstrates that the cDNA encoding hTRAIL41-281 is successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli.

  5. Regulation of noncoding region for expression of Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡建红; 齐义鹏

    1999-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein was expressed in COS-7 cells, indicating that the expression of HN protein driven by SRα promoter is higher than that driven by chicken β-actin promoter. Moreover, with 5’ noncoding region (NCR) of HN gene, the expression was enhanced. Northern blotting demonstrated that this phenomenon was caused by the difference of HN mRNA transcription. To know the regulatory function of 5’ NCR, HN gene 5’ NCR was replaced by 5’ NCR of keratin gene or cytochrome P-450 gene and the 3’ NCR was deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. By using CAT gene as a reporter, S1 nuclease assay was done to quantitate the HN mRNA transcript in the COS-7 cells co-transfected with the reporter and mutated plasmids, indicating that 5’ NCR is non-specific to the enhancement of HN protein expression, and the 3’ NCR also has a special regulatory function.

  6. ephrin ligands and Eph receptors show regionally restricted expression in the developing palate and tongue

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    Guilherme Machado Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Eph family receptor-interacting (ephrin ligands and erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma (Eph receptors constitute the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Ephrin ligands and their receptors form an important cell communication system with widespread roles in normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. In order to investigate potential roles of the ephrin-Eph system during palatogenesis and tongue development, we have characterized the cellular mRNA expression of family members EphrinA1-A3, EphA1–A8 and EphrinB2, EphB1, EphB4 during murine embryogenesis between embryonic day 13.5–16.5 using radioactive in situ hybridization. With the exception of EphA6 and ephrinA3, all genes were regionally expressed during the process of palatogenesis, with restricted and often overlapping domains. Transcripts were identified in the palate epithelium, localized at the tip of the palatal shelves, in the mesenchyme and also confined to the medial epithelium seam. Numerous Eph transcripts were also identified during tongue development. In particular, EphA1 and EphA2 demonstrated a highly restricted and specific expression in the tongue epithelium at all stages examined, whereas EphA3 was strongly expressed in the lateral tongue mesenchyme. These results suggest regulatory roles for ephrin-EphA signaling in development of the murine palate and tongue.

  7. Expression of Bcl-2 in adult human brain regions with special reference to neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, S; Javoy-Agid, F; Herrero, M T; Strada, O; Boissiere, F; Hibner, U; Agid, Y

    1997-07-01

    The expression of the protooncogene bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis in various cells, was examined in the adult human brain. Several experimental criteria were used to verify its presence; mRNA was analyzed by northern blot with parallel experiments in mouse tissues, by RNase protection, and by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Bcl-2 protein was detected by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Two bcl-2 mRNA species were identified in the human brain. The pattern of distribution of bcl-2 mRNA at the cellular level showed labeling in neurons but not glia. The in situ hybridization signal was stronger in the pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex and in the cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert than in the Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. Both melanized and nonmelanized neurons were labeled in the substantia nigra. In the striatum, bcl-2 mRNA was detected in some but not all neurons. In the regions examined for Bcl-2 protein, the expression pattern correlated with the mRNA results. In patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, quantification of bcl-2 mRNA in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and substantia nigra, respectively, showed that the expression was unaltered compared with controls, raising the possibility that the expression of other components of apoptosis is modulated.

  8. Expression of I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens on functional B cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, J A; Hibbler, F J; Hill, S W

    1978-12-01

    Ia antigens from specific subregions have been examined on functional B cell populations. Expression of both I-A and I-E,C region antigens was demonstrated on cells required for both lipopolysaccharide mitogenesis and polyclonal activation. Similar I-A and I-E,C subregion expression was found on cells required for response to the T-independent antigen, polyvinylpyrrolidone. TNP-specific IgM and hen egg lysozyme-specific IgG plaque-forming cells also express I-A and I-E,C region antigens. No evidence was found for an Ia- population responsive in the systems tested. Further, no evidence of preferential expression of I-A or I-E,C region antigens was observed in any system examined. Therefore, it appears that B cells express both I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens.

  9. The rs1024611 regulatory region polymorphism is associated with CCL2 allelic expression imbalance.

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    Minh-Hieu T Pham

    Full Text Available CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 is the most potent monocyte chemoattractant and inter-individual differences in its expression level have been associated with genetic variants mapping to the cis-regulatory regions of the gene. An A to G polymorphism in the CCL2 enhancer region at position -2578 (rs1024611; A>G, was found in most studies to be associated with higher serum CCL2 levels and increased susceptibility to a variety of diseases such as HIV-1 associated neurological disorders, tuberculosis, and atherosclerosis. However, the precise mechanism by which rs1024611influences CCL2 expression is not known. To address this knowledge gap, we tested the hypothesis that rs1024611G polymorphism is associated with allelic expression imbalance (AEI of CCL2. We used haplotype analysis and identified a transcribed SNP in the 3'UTR (rs13900; C>T can serve as a proxy for the rs1024611 and demonstrated that the rs1024611G allele displayed a perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs13900T allele. Allele-specific transcript quantification in lipopolysaccharide treated PBMCs obtained from heterozygous donors showed that rs13900T allele were expressed at higher levels when compared to rs13900C allele in all the donors examined suggesting that CCL2 is subjected to AEI and that that the allele containing rs1024611G is preferentially transcribed. We also found that AEI of CCL2 is a stable trait and could be detected in newly synthesized RNA. In contrast to these in vivo findings, in vitro assays with haplotype-specific reporter constructs indicated that the haplotype bearing rs1024611G had a lower or similar transcriptional activity when compared to the haplotype containing rs1024611A. This discordance between the in vivo and in vitro expression studies suggests that the CCL2 regulatory region polymorphisms may be functioning in a complex and context-dependent manner. In summary, our studies provide strong functional evidence and a rational explanation for the phenotypic

  10. Expression and purification of the complete PreS region of hepatitis B Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Deng; Yu-Ying Kong; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To express the complete PreS region of HBV in E.coli with good solubility and stability, and to establish an effective method for purification of the recombinant PreS protein.METHODS: The complete PreS region (PreS1 and PreS2) was fused into a series of tags including glutathione Stransferase (GST), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), maltose binding protein (MBP), 6x histidine, chitin binding domain (CBD), and thioredoxin, respectively. Expression of recombinant PreS fusion proteins was examined by SDS-PAGE analysis and confirmed by Western blot. Two fusion proteins, thio-PreS, and PreS-CBD, with desirable solubility and stability, were subjected to affinity purification and further characterization. RESULTS: Recombinant PreS fusion proteins could besynthesized with good yields in E.coli However, most of these proteins except for thio-PreS and PreS-CBD were vulnerable to degradation or insoluble as revealed by SDS PAGE and Western blot. Thio-PreS could be purified by affinity chromatography with nickel-chelating sepharose as the matrix. However, some impurities were also copurified. A simple freeze-thaw treatment yielded most of the thio-PreS proteins in solution while the impurities were in the precipitate. Purified thio-PreS protein was capable of inhibiting the binding of HBV virion to a specific monoclonal antibody against an epitope within the PreS1 domain. CONCLUSION: Increased solubility and stability of the complete PreS region synthesized in E.coli can be achievedby fusion with the thioredoxin or the CBD tag. A simple yet highly effective method has been established for the purification of the thio-PreS protein. Purified thio-PreS protein likely assumes a native conformation, which makes it an ideal candidate for studying the structure of the PreS region as well as for screening antivirals.

  11. Comparison of Different MARs(Matrix Attachment Regions)Effect on Transgene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Jin; LIU Shu-jun; YANG Wei; HU Yuan-lei; LIN Zhong-ping

    2004-01-01

    Three MARs(matrix attachment regions)fragments were cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)(MAR1),yeast(Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (MAR3)and kidney bean(Phaseolus vulgaris) (MAR5)which ranged 984,822 and 782 bp,respectively.Sequence analysis showed that all the fragments had fairly high A/T content (73,62 and 75%,respectively),harbored different number and different type of some characteristic motifs of MARs,such as A-box and T-box,etc.The results of in vitro binding assay showed that the three MARs fragments derived from different organisms could bind specifically to the matrix extracted from the tobacco nuclei with different strength,which also demonstrated that these MARs fragments are functionally conserved during evolution.By using these MARs fragments to flank the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and bialaphos resistance(bar) selectable marker gene,and then introducing the resulting plant expression vectors containing MARs-uidA-barMARs into tobacco through Agrobacteriummediated procedures,the effects of MARs sequences on the expression of transgenes in tobacco were investigated and compared.The GUS activity in individual transformants showed that,comparing to the controls without additional MARs,the overall transgene expression level in transformants with MARs had been greatly increased while the variations in transgene expression among transformants were decreased in different degrees.In accordance with the results of sequence analysis and in vitro binding assay in which MAR1 fragment showed the strongest binding strength,this MARs fragment also showed the greatest effect in increasing transgene overall expression level.

  12. ATRX promotes gene expression by facilitating transcriptional elongation through guanine-rich coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael A; Kernohan, Kristin D; Jiang, Yan; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2015-04-01

    ATRX is a chromatin remodeling protein involved in deposition of the histone variant H3.3 at telomeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin. It also influences the expression level of specific genes; however, deposition of H3.3 at transcribed genes is currently thought to occur independently of ATRX. We focused on a set of genes, including the autism susceptibility gene Neuroligin 4 (Nlgn4), that exhibit decreased expression in ATRX-null cells to investigate the mechanisms used by ATRX to promote gene transcription. Overall TERRA levels, as well as DNA methylation and histone modifications at ATRX target genes are not altered and thus cannot explain transcriptional dysregulation. We found that ATRX does not associate with the promoter of these genes, but rather binds within regions of the gene body corresponding to high H3.3 occupancy. These intragenic regions consist of guanine-rich DNA sequences predicted to form non-B DNA structures called G-quadruplexes during transcriptional elongation. We demonstrate that ATRX deficiency corresponds to reduced H3.3 incorporation and stalling of RNA polymerase II at these G-rich intragenic sites. These findings suggest that ATRX promotes the incorporation of histone H3.3 at particular transcribed genes and facilitates transcriptional elongation through G-rich sequences. The inability to transcribe genes such as Nlgn4 could cause deficits in neuronal connectivity and cognition associated with ATRX mutations in humans.

  13. Whole transcriptome sequencing reveals gene expression and splicing differences in brain regions affected by Alzheimer's disease.

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    Natalie A Twine

    Full Text Available Recent studies strongly indicate that aberrations in the control of gene expression might contribute to the initiation and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, alternative splicing has been suggested to play a role in spontaneous cases of AD. Previous transcriptome profiling of AD models and patient samples using microarrays delivered conflicting results. This study provides, for the first time, transcriptomic analysis for distinct regions of the AD brain using RNA-Seq next-generation sequencing technology. Illumina RNA-Seq analysis was used to survey transcriptome profiles from total brain, frontal and temporal lobe of healthy and AD post-mortem tissue. We quantified gene expression levels, splicing isoforms and alternative transcript start sites. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of genes associated with a neuron's cytological structure and synapse function in AD brain samples. Analysis of the temporal lobe with the Cufflinks tool revealed that transcriptional isoforms of the apolipoprotein E gene, APOE-001, -002 and -005, are under the control of different promoters in normal and AD brain tissue. We also observed differing expression levels of APOE-001 and -002 splice variants in the AD temporal lobe. Our results indicate that alternative splicing and promoter usage of the APOE gene in AD brain tissue might reflect the progression of neurodegeneration.

  14. Social Support Modulates Stress-Related Gene Expression in Various Brain Regions of Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitz, Ellen; Hameister, Theresa; Tuchscherer, Armin; Tuchscherer, Margret; Puppe, Birger

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an affiliative conspecific may alleviate an individual’s stress response in threatening conditions. However, the mechanisms and neural circuitry underlying the process of social buffering have not yet been elucidated. Using the domestic pig as an animal model, we examined the effect of a 4-h maternal and littermate deprivation on stress hormones and on mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11ß-HSD) types 1 and 2 and the immediate early gene c-fos in various brain regions of 7-, 21- and 35-day old piglets. The deprivation occurred either alone or with a familiar or unfamiliar age-matched piglet. Compared to piglets deprived alone, the presence of a conspecific animal significantly reduced free plasma cortisol concentrations and altered the MR/GR balance and 11ß-HSD2 and c-fos mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala and hypothalamus, but not in the hippocampus. The alterations in brain mRNA expression were particularly found in 21- or 35-day old piglets, which may reflect the species-specific postnatal ontogeny of the investigated brain regions. The buffering effects of social support were most pronounced in the amygdala, indicating its significance both for the assessment of social conspecifics as biologically relevant stimuli and for the processing of emotional states. In conclusion, the present findings provide further evidence for the importance of the cortico-limbic network underlying the abilities of individuals to cope with social stress and strongly emphasize the benefits of social partners in livestock with respect to positive welfare and health. PMID:27965550

  15. Short ultraconserved promoter regions delineate a class of preferentially expressed alternatively spliced transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Christian; Köhler, Sebastian; Schulz, Marcel H; Manke, Thomas; Bauer, Sebastian; Robinson, Peter N

    2009-11-01

    Ultraconservation has been variously defined to describe sequences that have remained identical or nearly so over long periods of evolution to a degree that is higher than expected for sequences under typical constraints associated with protein-coding sequences, splice sites, or transcription factor binding sites. Most intergenic ultraconserved elements (UCE) appear to be tissue-specific enhancers, whereas another class of intragenic UCEs is involved in regulation of gene expression by means of alternative splicing. In this study we define a set of 2827 short ultraconserved promoter regions (SUPR) in 5 kb upstream regions of 1268 human protein-coding genes using a definition of 98% identity for at least 30 bp in 7 mammalian species. Our analysis shows that SUPRs are enriched in genes playing a role in regulation and development. Many of the genes having a SUPR-containing promoter have additional alternative promoters that do not contain SUPRs. Comparison of such promoters by CAGE tag, EST, and Solexa read analysis revealed that SUPR-associated transcripts show a significantly higher mean expression than transcripts associated with non-SUPR-containing promoters. The same was true for the comparison between all SUPR-associated and non-SUPR-associated transcripts on a genome-wide basis. SUPR-associated genes show a highly significant tendency to occur in regions that are also enriched for intergenic short ultraconserved elements (SUE) in the vicinity of developmental genes. A number of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are overrepresented in SUPRs and SUEs, including those for transcription factors of the homeodomain family, but in contrast to SUEs, SUPRs are also enriched in core-promoter motifs. These observations suggest that SUPRs delineate a distinct class of ultraconserved sequences.

  16. Morphallactic regeneration as revealed by region-specific gene expression in the digestive tract of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Makoto; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Tochinai, Shin

    2008-05-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete, which primarily reproduces asexually by fragmentation and regeneration. For precise analysis of the pattern formation during regeneration, we isolated three region-specific genes (EjTuba, mino, and horu) expressed in the digestive tract. In growing worms, the expression of EjTuba in the head and mino in the trunk region just posterior to the head were observed in defined body segments, while the expression areas of EjTuba in the trunk and horu were proportional to the total number of body segments. In the regeneration process, expression of these genes disappeared once and recovered to their original pattern by day 7. In abnormal regeneration such as a bipolar head, mino was still expressed in the region next to both the normal and the ectopic heads. These results suggest that there is morphallactic as well as epimorphic or inductive regulation of the body patterning during regeneration of E. japonensis.

  17. Peripheral Reticular Pigmentary Degeneration and Choroidal Vascular Insufficiency, Studied by Ultra Wide-Field Fluorescein Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kunho; Cho, Kyuyeon; Kang, Se Woong; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Jong Min

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To explore the pathogenesis of peripheral reticular pigmentary degeneration (PRPD) and its clinical significance. Methods This cross-sectional, observational study (conducted between January 2010 and May 2015) enrolled 441 eyes of 229 subjects, including 35 eyes with PRPD and 406 eyes without PRPD, which was identified by ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiography (UWFA). The distribution and angiographic circulation time of PRPD were assessed by UWFA. The frequencies of systemic and ophthalmologic comorbidities were compared between groups. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimation equation methods were used to determine the risk factors for PRPD. Results The patients with PRPD had a mean age of 75.7 ± 8.5 years (range, 59–93 years), whereas the patients without PRPD had a mean age of 60.1 ± 14.9 years (range, 9–92 years). All eyes with PRPD manifested the lesion in the superior nasal periphery with or without circumferential extension. Among those, only 16 eyes (45.7%) in the PRPD group showed distinctive features in the same location on fundus photographs. There was significant choroidal filling delay in the PRPD group when compared with the control group (1.42±1.22 vs. -0.02±1.05 seconds, P < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that older age (P < 0.001), stroke (P = 0.018), ischemic optic neuropathy (P < 0.001), and age-related macular degeneration (P = 0.022) were significantly associated with PRPD. Conclusions UWFA may enhance the diagnostic sensitivity of PRPD. Choroidal vascular insufficiency with compromised systemic circulation in the elderly was related to the manifestation of PRPD. These results help to better understand the pathophysiology of PRPD. Co-existence of systemic and ophthalmic circulatory disorders should be considered in patients with PRPD. PMID:28114409

  18. Prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials precede spindle oscillations in the thalamic reticular nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2004-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a key structure in the generation of spindles, a hallmark bioelectrical oscillation during early stages of sleep. Intracellular recordings of RE neurons in vivo revealed the presence of prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials preceding spindles in a subgroup (30%) of neurons. These hyperpolarizations (6-10 mV) lasted for 200-300 ms and were present just before the onset of spontaneously occurring spindle waves. Corticothalamic volleys also were effective in generating such hyperpolarizations followed by spindles in RE neurons. A drop of up to 40% in the apparent input resistance (Rin) was associated with these hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting an active process rather than disfacilitation. Accordingly, the reversal potential was approximately -100 mV for both spontaneous and cortically elicited hyperpolarizations, consistent with the activation of slow K+ conductances. QX-314 in the recording pipettes decreased both the amplitude and incidence of prolonged hyperpolarizations, suggesting the participation of G protein-dependent K+ currents in the generation of hyperpolarizations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings in the RE nucleus demonstrated that some RE neurons discharged during the hyperpolarizations and, thus, may be implicated in their generation. The prolonged hyperpolarizations preceding spindles may play a role in the transition from tonic to bursting firing of RE neurons within a range of membrane potential (-60 to -65 mV) at which they set favorable conditions for the generation of low-threshold spike bursts that initiate spindle sequences. These data are further arguments for the generation of spindles within the thalamic RE nucleus. PMID:15210981

  19. Reticular Synthesis of HKUST-like tbo-MOFs with Enhanced CH4 Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanopoulos, Ioannis; Tsangarakis, Constantinos; Klontzas, Emmanuel; Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Froudakis, George; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Trikalitis, Pantelis N

    2016-02-10

    Successful implementation of reticular chemistry using a judiciously designed rigid octatopic carboxylate organic linker allowed the construction of expanded HKUST-1-like tbo-MOF series with intrinsic strong CH4 adsorption sites. The Cu-analogue displayed a concomitant enhancement of the gravimetric and volumetric surface area with the highest reported CH4 uptake among the tbo family, comparable to the best performing metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for CH4 storage. The corresponding gravimetric (BET) and volumetric surface areas of 3971 m(2) g(-1) and 2363 m(2) cm(-3) represent an increase of 115% and 47%, respectively, in comparison to the corresponding values for the prototypical HKUST-1 (tbo-MOF-1), and are 42% and 20% higher than that of tbo-MOF-2. High-pressure methane adsorption isotherms revealed a high total gravimetric and volumetric CH4 uptakes, reaching 372 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) and 221 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3), respectively, at 85 bar and 298 K. The corresponding working capacities between 5 and 80 bar were found to be 294 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) and 175 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) and are placed among the best performing MOFs for CH4 storage particularly at relatively low temperature. To gain insight on the mechanism accounting for the resultant enhanced CH4 storage capacity, molecular simulation study was performed and revealed the presence of very strong CH4 adsorption sites near the organic linker with similar adsorption energetics as the open metal sites. The present findings support the potential of tbo-MOFs based on the supermolecular building layer (SBL) approach as an ideal platform to further enhance the CH4 storage capacity via expansion and functionalization of the quadrangular pillars.

  20. Reticular synthesis of HKUST-like tbo MOFs with enhanced CH4 storage

    KAUST Repository

    Spanopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-22

    Successful implementation of reticular chemistry using a judiciously designed rigid octatopic carboxylate organic linker allowed the construction of expanded HKUST-1-like tbo-MOF series with intrinsic strong CH4 adsorption sites. The Cu-analogue displayed a concomitant enhancement of the gravimetric and volumetric surface area with the highest reported CH4 uptake among the tbo family, comparable to the best performing MOFs for CH4 storage. The corresponding gravimetric (BET) and volumetric surface area of 3971 m2 g-1 and 2363 m2 cm-3 represent an increase of respectively 115 % and 47 % in comparison to the corresponding values for the prototypical HKUST-1 (tbo-MOF-1), and 42 % and 20 % higher than tbo-MOF-2. High pressure methane adsorption isotherms revealed a high total gravimetric and volumetric CH4 uptakes, reaching 372 cm3 (STP) g-1 and 221 cm3 (STP) cm-3 respectively at 85 bar and 298 K. The corresponding working capacities between 5-80 bar were found to be 294 cm3 (STP) g-1 and 175 cm3 (STP) cm-3 and are placed among the best performing MOFs for CH4 storage particularly at relatively low temperature (e.g. 326 cm3 (STP) g-1 and 194 cm3 (STP) cm-3 at 258 K). To better understand the structure-property relationship and gain insight on the mechanism accounting for the resultant enhanced CH4 storage capacity, molecular simulation study was performed and revealed the presence of very strong CH4 adsorption sites at the vicinity of the organic linker with similar adsorption energetics as the open metal sites. The present findings supports the potential of tbo-MOFs based on the supermolecular building layer (SBL) approach as an ideal platform to further enhance the CH4 storage capacity via expansion and functionalization of the quadrangular pillars.

  1. An acute dose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid alters gene expression in multiple mouse brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, B J; Saini, U T; Robinson, B L; Ali, S F; Patterson, T A

    2010-10-13

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is normally found in the brain in low concentrations and may function as a neurotransmitter, although the mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. GHB has been used as a general anesthetic and is currently used to treat narcolepsy and alcoholism. Recreational use of GHB is primarily as a "club drug" and a "date rape drug," due to its amnesic effects. For this study, the hypothesis was that behavioral and neurochemical alterations may parallel gene expression changes in the brain after GHB administration. Adult male C57/B6N mice (n=5/group) were administered a single dose of 500 mg/kg GHB (i.p.) and were sacrificed 1, 2 and 4 h after treatment. Control mice were administered saline. Brains were removed and regionally dissected on ice. Total RNA from the hippocampus, cortex and striatum was extracted, amplified and labeled. Gene expression was evaluated using Agilent whole mouse genome 4x44K oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray data were analyzed by ArrayTrack and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using P or = 1.7 as the criteria for significance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) showed that samples from each time point clustered into distinct treatment groups with respect to sacrifice time. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was used to identify involved pathways. The results show that GHB induces gene expression alterations in hundreds of genes in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum, and the number of affected genes increases throughout a 4-h time course. Many of these DEGs are involved in neurological disease, apoptosis, and oxidative stress.

  2. α2-containing GABAA receptors expressed in hippocampal region CA3 control fast network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistek, Tim S; Ruiperez-Alonso, Marta; Timmerman, A Jaap; Brussaard, Arjen B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-02-15

    GABA(A) receptors are critically involved in hippocampal oscillations. GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunits are differentially expressed throughout the hippocampal circuitry and thereby may have distinct contributions to oscillations. It is unknown which GABA(A) receptor α subunit controls hippocampal oscillations and where these receptors are expressed. To address these questions we used transgenic mice expressing GABA(A) receptor α1 and/or α2 subunits with point mutations (H101R) that render these receptors insensitive to allosteric modulation at the benzodiazepine binding site, and tested how increased or decreased function of α subunits affects hippocampal oscillations. Positive allosteric modulation by zolpidem prolonged decay kinetics of hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission and reduced the frequency of cholinergically induced oscillations. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors in CA3 altered oscillation frequency in CA1, while modulation of GABA receptors in CA1 did not affect oscillations. In mice having a point mutation (H101R) at the GABA(A) receptor α2 subunit, zolpidem effects on cholinergically induced oscillations were strongly reduced compared to wild-type animals, while zolpidem modulation was still present in mice with the H101R mutation at the α1 subunit. Furthermore, genetic knockout of α2 subunits strongly reduced oscillations, whereas knockout of α1 subunits had no effect. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors was strongly reduced in unitary connections between fast spiking interneurons and pyramidal neurons in CA3 of α2H101R mice, but not of α1H101R mice, suggesting that fast spiking interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses in CA3 contain α2 subunits. These findings suggest that α2-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in the CA3 region provide the inhibition that controls hippocampal rhythm during cholinergically induced oscillations.

  3. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  4. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  5. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gajewski, Paula A.; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow t...

  6. Region-Specific Expression of Immunoregulatory Proteins on Microglia in the Healthy CNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALEXANDER H. DE HAAS; HENDRIKUS W. G. M. BODDEKE; KNUT BIBER

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with a high degree of spatial organization in the central nervous system (CNS),most CNS diseases display a regional distribution. Although microglia have been established as key players in va-rious CNS diseases, it is not yet clear whether microglia display region-specific properties. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the existence of distinct microglia phenotypes in various regions of the healthy, adult mouse CNS. Using ex vivo flow cytometric analysis surface expression of CD1 lb, CD40, CD45, CD80, CD86, F4/ 0,TREM-2b, MHCII, CXCR3, CCR9, and CCR7 were analyzed. Most of these immunoregulatory markers were found on microglia and showed significant region-specific differences in expression levels. These findings considerably corroborate the existence of immunological diversity among microglia in the healthy, unchallenged CNS of adult mice.%与中枢神经系统的空间结构高度一致,大部分的中枢神经系统疾病表现为区域性分布.虽然小胶质细胞已被公认在各种中枢神经系统疾病中发挥重要的作用.但是小胶质细胞是否表现为区域特异性目前还不清楚.因此,本研究目的是评估在健康成年小鼠的中枢神经系统的不同区域中小胶质细胞的不同表型.运用体外流式细胞仪分析CD11b,CD40,CD4 5,CD80,CD86,F4180,TREM-2b,MHCII,CXCR3,CCR9以及CCR7的表面表达.这些免疫调节标记物大部分均存在于小胶质细胞上并且在表达水平上有明显的区域特异性差异.这些发现在很大程度上证实了在健康成年小鼠中枢神经系统的小胶质细胞中存在着免疫多样性.

  7. A GENE FROM HUMAN-CHROMOSOME REGION-3P21 WITH REDUCED EXPRESSION IN SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CARRITT, B; KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; OSINGA, J; PILZ, A; HOFSTRA, RMW; DAVIS, MB; VANDERVEEN, AY; RABBITTS, PH; GULATI, K; BUYS, CHCM

    1992-01-01

    A combination of cytogenetic and molecular studies has implicated the p21 region of human chromosome 3 as the probable site of a gene the loss of which contributes to the development of small cell lung cancer. We report here the isolation of a gene from this region which is expressed in normal lung

  8. Expression, fermentation and purification of a predicted intrinsically disordered region of the transcription factor, NFAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMond, Jenna F; He, Yi; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2015-11-01

    Hypertonicity stimulates Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) nuclear localization and transactivating activity. Many transcription factors are known to contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) which become more structured with local environmental changes such as osmolality, temperature and tonicity. The transactivating domain of NFAT5 is predicted to be intrinsically disordered under normal tonicity, and under high NaCl, the activity of this domain is increased. To study the binding of co-regulatory proteins at IDRs a cDNA construct expressing the NFAT5 TAD was created and transformed into Escherichia coli cells. Transformed E. coli cells were mass produced by fermentation and extracted by cell lysis to release the NFAT5 TAD. The NFAT5 TAD was subsequently purified using a His-tag column, cation exchange chromatography as well as hydrophobic interaction chromatography and then characterized by mass spectrometry (MS). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The clinical impact of hypoxia-regulated gene expression in loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Tramm, T.

    2015-01-01

    squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) compared with adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction and the stomach (AC), and was a potential prognostic marker in patients with ESCC. The purpose of the present study was to confirm these results. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 152......Purpose/Objective: In a former study (1), the hypoxia gene expression classifier, developed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, was applied in 89 patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer (GC). Analysis of the 15 genes was indicative of hypoxia being more profound in esophagus...... were available in 135 patients; ESCC: 89 patients (66%), AC: 43 patients (32%) and other carcinomas: 3 patients (2%). Comparing the cohorts of the original and present study, patient characteristics were similar except for a significantly lower T- and N-stage in the present cohort. Tumor specimens were...

  10. A synthetic luciferin improves in vivo bioluminescence imaging of gene expression in cardiovascular brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Hayk; Hurr, Chansol; Young, Colin N

    2016-10-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is an effective tool for in vivo investigation of molecular processes. We have demonstrated the applicability of bioluminescence imaging to spatiotemporally monitor gene expression in cardioregulatory brain nuclei during the development of cardiovascular disease, via incorporation of firefly luciferase into living animals, combined with exogenous d-luciferin substrate administration. Nevertheless, d-luciferin uptake into the brain tissue is low, which decreases the sensitivity of bioluminescence detection, particularly when considering small changes in gene expression in tiny central areas. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a synthetic luciferin, cyclic alkylaminoluciferin (CycLuc1), would be superior to d-luciferin for in vivo bioluminescence imaging in cardiovascular brain regions. Male C57B1/6 mice underwent targeted delivery of an adenovirus encoding the luciferase gene downstream of the CMV promoter to the subfornical organ (SFO) or paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN), two crucial cardioregulatory neural regions. While bioluminescent signals could be obtained following d-luciferin injection (150 mg/kg), CycLuc1 administration resulted in a three- to fourfold greater bioluminescent emission from the SFO and PVN, at 10- to 20-fold lower substrate concentrations (7.5-15 mg/kg). This CycLuc1-mediated enhancement in bioluminescent emission was evident early following substrate administration (i.e., 6-10 min) and persisted for up to 1 h. When the exposure time was reduced from 60 s to 1,500 ms, minimal signal in the PVN was detectable with d-luciferin, whereas bioluminescent images could be reliably captured with CycLuc1. These findings demonstrate that bioluminescent imaging with the synthetic luciferin CycLuc1 provides an improved physiological genomics tool to investigate molecular events in discrete cardioregulatory brain nuclei.

  11. The myotonic dystrophy kinase 3{prime}-untranslated region and its effect on gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, C.W.Y.; Sabourin, L.A.; Narang, M.A. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease involving the expansion of an unstable CTG repeat in the 3{prime}-untranslated (3{prime}-UTR) region of the DM kinase (DMK) gene. Increased levels of mRNA in congenital compared to normal tissue have been shown, suggesting elevated DMK levels may be responsible for the disease phenotype. To study the effect of the DMK 3{prime}UTR on gene expression, a reporter gene system was constructed using the constitutive CMV promoter with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) open reading frame and the DMK 3{prime}UTR containing from 5 repeats up to 90 repeats. Transient transfection into a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line shows a three-fold increase in CAT activity from constructs containing a wildtype 3{prime}UTR (5 and 20 repeats) compared to a control construct containing only a poly(A) signal. Reporter constructs with repeats in the protomutation (50 repeats) and mutation (90 repeats) range show a greater than 10-fold increase over control CAT activity. These results suggest the presence of elements in the DMK 3{prime}UTR capable of conferring increased gene expression. We are currently investigating cell-specific activity of the constructs and conducting deletion mapping to identify regulatory elements in the 3{prime}-UTR.

  12. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells.

  13. Expression of the CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine axis predicts regional control in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Xavier; Diez, Santiago; García, Jacinto; Lop, Joan; Sumarroca, Anna; Quer, Miquel; Camacho, Mercedes

    2016-12-01

    Expression of the CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine axis has been related with the appearance of metastatic recurrence survival, including regional and distant recurrence, in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA expression levels of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in biopsy tumor samples in 111 patients with HNSCC. Five-year regional recurrence-free survival for patients with low CXCR4 expression (n = 39, 31.5 %) was 97.4 %, for patients with high CXCR4/high CXCL12 expression (n = 22, 19.8 %) it was 94.7 %, and for patients with high CXCR4/low CXCL12 expression (n = 50, 45.0 %) it was 63.3 %. We found significant differences in the regional recurrence-free survival according to CXCR4/CXCL12 expression values (P = 0.001). HNSCC patients with high CXCR4 and low CXCL12 expression values had a significantly higher risk of regional recurrence and could benefit from a more intense treatment of lymph node areas in the neck.

  14. Depletion of Shine-Dalgarno Sequences Within Bacterial Coding Regions Is Expression Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyue Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and accurate protein synthesis is crucial for organismal survival in competitive environments. Translation efficiency (the number of proteins translated from a single mRNA in a given time period is the combined result of differential translation initiation, elongation, and termination rates. Previous research identified the Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence as a modulator of translation initiation in bacterial genes, while codon usage biases are frequently implicated as a primary determinant of elongation rate variation. Recent studies have suggested that SD sequences within coding sequences may negatively affect translation elongation speed, but this claim remains controversial. Here, we present a metric to quantify the prevalence of SD sequences in coding regions. We analyze hundreds of bacterial genomes and find that the coding sequences of highly expressed genes systematically contain fewer SD sequences than expected, yielding a robust correlation between the normalized occurrence of SD sites and protein abundances across a range of bacterial taxa. We further show that depletion of SD sequences within ribosomal protein genes is correlated with organismal growth rates, supporting the hypothesis of strong selection against the presence of these sequences in coding regions and suggesting their association with translation efficiency in bacteria.

  15. Brain regions involved in processing facial identity and expression are differentially selective for surface and edge information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard J; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2014-08-15

    Although different brain regions are widely considered to be involved in the recognition of facial identity and expression, it remains unclear how these regions process different properties of the visual image. Here, we ask how surface-based reflectance information and edge-based shape cues contribute to the perception and neural representation of facial identity and expression. Contrast-reversal was used to generate images in which normal contrast relationships across the surface of the image were disrupted, but edge information was preserved. In a behavioural experiment, contrast-reversal significantly attenuated judgements of facial identity, but only had a marginal effect on judgements of expression. An fMR-adaptation paradigm was then used to ask how brain regions involved in the processing of identity and expression responded to blocks comprising all normal, all contrast-reversed, or a mixture of normal and contrast-reversed faces. Adaptation in the posterior superior temporal sulcus--a region directly linked with processing facial expression--was relatively unaffected by mixing normal with contrast-reversed faces. In contrast, the response of the fusiform face area--a region linked with processing facial identity--was significantly affected by contrast-reversal. These results offer a new perspective on the reasons underlying the neural segregation of facial identity and expression in which brain regions involved in processing invariant aspects of faces, such as identity, are very sensitive to surface-based cues, whereas regions involved in processing changes in faces, such as expression, are relatively dependent on edge-based cues.

  16. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  17. GABAergic Transmission in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation Regulates the Induction Phase of Anesthesia and Modulates Hyperalgesia Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia, and pain. The role of PnO GABA in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to Loss and time to Resumption of Righting Response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (1) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR, and nociception; (2) propof...

  18. Repetitive firing properties of medial pontine reticular formation neurones of the rat recorded in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Greene, R W; McCarley, R W

    1989-03-01

    1. Intracellularly recorded neurones in nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis of the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) in the in vitro slice preparation were analysed for repetitive firing properties in response to intracellularly applied constant-current pulses. 2. Three neuronal classes were defined by this procedure: (1) non-burst neurones, which had only a non-burst firing pattern; (2) low-threshold burst neurones, which had either a low-threshold burst pattern or a non-burst pattern; (3) high-threshold burst neurones, which had either a high-threshold burst pattern or a non-burst pattern. 3. Histological characterization of electrophysiologically identified mPRF neurones with carboxyfluorescein showed no definite morphological difference between the first two classes. There was a trend for low-threshold burst neurones to have larger somata. 4. The low-threshold burst was generated by a slow calcium-dependent low-threshold spike, revealed in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The size of the low-threshold spike and thus the number of fast action potentials in the low-threshold burst was controlled by at least five factors including: activation; inactivation; amplitude of low-threshold conductance available to be activated; delayed outward conductance; and early transient outward conductance. 5. The non-burst pattern examined in both non-burst and low-threshold burst neurones appeared to be controlled primarily by one or more calcium-dependent potassium conductances sensitive to the removal of calcium and tetraethyl-ammonium. In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), the addition of antagonists to calcium-dependent potassium current revealed a slow high-threshold calcium spike which was distinguished from the low-threshold spike by its threshold, lack of inactivation (at potentials negative to -40 mV) and insensitivity to Mg2+. A long-duration after-hyperpolarization (greater than 0.5 s) was not observed in any of these cells. 6. An early transient outward

  19. The pacemaker role of thalamic reticular nucleus in controlling spike-wave discharges and spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Liao, Fucheng; Wang, Qingyun

    2017-07-01

    Absence epilepsy, characterized by 2-4 Hz spike-wave discharges (SWDs), can be caused by pathological interactions within the thalamocortical system. Cortical spindling oscillations are also demonstrated to involve the oscillatory thalamocortical rhythms generated by the synaptic circuitry of the thalamus and cortex. This implies that SWDs and spindling oscillations can share the common thalamocortical mechanism. Additionally, the thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) is hypothesized to regulate the onsets and propagations of both the epileptic SWDs and sleep spindles. Based on the proposed single-compartment thalamocortical neural field model, we firstly investigate the stimulation effect of RE on the initiations, terminations, and transitions of SWDs. It is shown that the activations and deactivations of RE triggered by single-pulse stimuli can drive the cortical subsystem to behave as the experimentally observed onsets and self-abatements of SWDs, as well as the transitions from 2-spike and wave discharges (2-SWDs) to SWDs. In particular, with increasing inhibition from RE to the specific relay nucleus (TC), rich transition behaviors in cortex can be obtained through the upstream projection path, RE → TC → Cortex . Although some of the complex dynamical patterns can be expected from the earlier single compartment thalamocortical model, the effect of brain network topology on the emergence of SWDs and spindles, as well as the transitions between them, has not been fully investigated. We thereby develop a spatially extended 3-compartment coupled network model with open-/closed-end connective configurations, to investigate the spatiotemporal effect of RE on the SWDs and spindles. Results show that the degrees of activations of RE 1 can induce the rich spatiotemporal evolution properties including the propagations from SWDs to spindles within different compartments and the transitions between them, through the RE 1 → TC 1 → Cortex 1 and Cortex 1 → Cortex 2

  20. Expression of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Xin Zhang; Shen-Ying Zhang; Jing Liu; Zhi-Meng Lu; Yuan Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the properties of hypervariable region 1(HVR1) in the envelope 2 gene of hepatitis C virus by analyzing the reactivity of HVR1 fusion proteins from different Chinese HCV strains with sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C and by comparing their reactivity between interferon therapy responders and non-responders.METHODS: Gene fragments of HVR1 of four HCV strains (three genotype 1b and one genotype 2a) were amplified from pGEMT-E2 plasmids and sub-cloned into pQE40vectors respectively to construct recombinant expression plasmids which expressed HVR1 fused downstream to DHFR in Escherichia coli strain TG1. The purified DHFRHVR1 proteins were then used to detect the anti-HVR1antibodies in 70 serum samples of patients with chronic hepatitis C.RESULTS: Four DHFR- HVR1 fusion proteins were successfully expressed in E.coli (320-800 ug fusion proteins per 100 ml culture). Each fusion protein (SH1b, BJ1b,SD1b and SD2a) reacted with 72.8 % (51/70), 60 % (42/70), 48.6 % (34/70), and 58.6 % (41/70) of the anti-HCV positive patients' sera respectively by ELISA. 57.1% (4/7) of non responders reacted with all four HVR1 fusion proteins, while only 15.3 % (2/13) of responders reacted with all of them. The O.D. values of sera from IFN therapy responders were significantly higher than those of non responders (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The selected HVR1 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli can broadly react with HCV-infected patients' sera. The intensity and/or quality of the immune response against HCV may be a critical factor determining the response to interferon treatment. With the evolution of virus strains, anti-HVR1 antibodies can not neutralize all the quasispecies. A polyvalent and high immunogenic vaccine comprising a mixture of several HVR1 sequences that cover the reactivity of most HCV isolates may be useful.

  1. Brain region-specific expression of MeCP2 isoforms correlates with DNA methylation within Mecp2 regulatory elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl O Olson

    Full Text Available MeCP2 is a critical epigenetic regulator in brain and its abnormal expression or compromised function leads to a spectrum of neurological disorders including Rett Syndrome and autism. Altered expression of the two MeCP2 isoforms, MeCP2E1 and MeCP2E2 has been implicated in neurological complications. However, expression, regulation and functions of the two isoforms are largely uncharacterized. Previously, we showed the role of MeCP2E1 in neuronal maturation and reported MeCP2E1 as the major protein isoform in the adult mouse brain, embryonic neurons and astrocytes. Recently, we showed that DNA methylation at the regulatory elements (REs within the Mecp2 promoter and intron 1 impact the expression of Mecp2 isoforms in differentiating neural stem cells. This current study is aimed for a comparative analysis of temporal, regional and cell type-specific expression of MeCP2 isoforms in the developing and adult mouse brain. MeCP2E2 displayed a later expression onset than MeCP2E1 during mouse brain development. In the adult female and male brain hippocampus, both MeCP2 isoforms were detected in neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, MeCP2E1 expression was relatively uniform in different brain regions (olfactory bulb, striatum, cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem and cerebellum, whereas MeCP2E2 showed differential enrichment in these brain regions. Both MeCP2 isoforms showed relatively similar distribution in these brain regions, except for cerebellum. Lastly, a preferential correlation was observed between DNA methylation at specific CpG dinucleotides within the REs and Mecp2 isoform-specific expression in these brain regions. Taken together, we show that MeCP2 isoforms display differential expression patterns during brain development and in adult mouse brain regions. DNA methylation patterns at the Mecp2 REs may impact this differential expression of Mecp2/MeCP2 isoforms in brain regions. Our results significantly contribute

  2. Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region: Venus Express observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guicking

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate wave properties of low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region based on the measurements made on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The orbit geometry is very suitable to investigate the fluctuations in Venus' low-altitude magnetosheath and mid-magnetotail and provides an opportunity for a comparative study of low-frequency waves at Venus and Mars. The spatial distributions of the wave properties, in particular in the dayside and nightside magnetosheath as well as in the tail and mantle region, are similar to observations at Mars. As both planets do not have a global magnetic field, the interaction process of the solar wind with both planets is similar and leads to similar instabilities and wave structures. We focus on the spatial distribution of the wave intensity of the fluctuating magnetic field and detect an enhancement of the intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and a strong decrease towards the terminator. For a detailed investigation of the intensity distribution we adopt an analytical streamline model to describe the plasma flow around Venus. This allows displaying the evolution of the intensity along different streamlines. It is assumed that the waves are generated in the vicinity of the bow shock and are convected downstream with the turbulent magnetosheath flow. However, neither the different Mach numbers upstream and downstream of the bow shock, nor the variation of the cross sectional area and the flow velocity along the streamlines play probably an important role in order to explain the observed concentration of wave intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and the decay towards the nightside magnetosheath. But, the concept of freely evolving or decaying turbulence is in good qualitative agreement with the observations, as we observe a power law decay of the intensity along the streamlines. The observations support the assumption of wave convection through the magnetosheath, but

  3. A Novel Microtubule-Disrupting Agent Induces Endoplasmic Reticular Stress-Mediated Cell Death in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Te Ho

    Full Text Available Here, we present evidence of a novel microtubule-disrupting agent, N-deacetyl-N-(chromone-2-carbonyl-thiocolchicine (TCD, exhibiting potent antitumor activity (with IC50 values in the nanomolar range against hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Cell cycle analysis revealed that TCD induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both Hep-J5 and Mahlavu HCC cell lines. TCD also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and caused DNA damage. Mechanistically, TCD activated protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticular kinase and several transcription factors, including activating transcription factor (ATF 6, ATF4, ATF3, and the CCAAT-enhancer binding protein homologous protein. These data clearly demonstrate that the antitumor activity of TCD is mechanistically linked to its capacity to trigger both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cell death via endoplasmic reticular stress pathway. The potent antitumor activity of TCD was similarly demonstrated in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model, where 5 and 10 mg/kg doses of TCD significantly arrested Hep-J5 and Mahlavu tumor growth. Our finding suggests that TCD is a promising therapeutic agent against hepatocellular carcinoma; further translational assessment of its clinical usage is warranted.

  4. Atorvastatin increases dynamin 1 expression in hippocampal CA1 region in a rat model of vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Li; Wensheng Zhou

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined a rat model of vascular dementia. The model rats exhibited obvious morphological and ultrastructural changes in neurons in the brain, and significantly reduced dynamin 1 expression in hippocampal CA1 region along with decreased learning and memory performance. Following atorvastatin treatment, the morphology and ultrastructure of cells in the model rat brain were significantly improved, dynamin 1 expression in hippocampal CA1 region was significantly enhanced, and learning and memory ability was significantly improved. The results demonstrated that impaired learning and memory abilities in vascular dementia model rats were closely correlated with decreased dynamin 1 expression. These findings indicate that atorvastatin can protect model rats against cognitive impairment by increasing dynamin 1 expression.

  5. A Comparative Antibody Analysis of Pannexin1 Expression in Four Rat Brain Regions Reveals Varying Subcellular Localizations

    OpenAIRE

    Cone, Angela C.; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Maryann E. Martone; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding p...

  6. Identification and uniparental expression of a novel gene from the Prader-Willi region of chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wevrick, R.; Kerns, J.A.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder which occurs at a frequency of about 1/25,000. Most patients ({approximately}70%) have a cytogentic deletion of their paternal 15q11-q13 region, while {approximately}30% have uniparental maternal disomy. The parent of origin dependence of the phenotype is thought to be reflective of the uniparental pattern of expression of genes in the region, a phenomenon known as genomic imprinting. A small subset of PWS patient with a typical cytogenetic rearrangements has defined a critical region for genes involved in PWS. We have used STSs from the region to construct a YAC contig including the entire PWS critical region, which is about 350 kb considering presently characterized deletions. We are now using these YACs to isolate and characterize novel genes potentially involved in PWS. Overlapping YACs from the critical region were subjected to the technique of cDNA selection. Gel-purified YAC DNA was biotinylated during PCR amplification and annealed in solution to amplified cDNA. cDNAs remaining after hybridization washing, and denaturation of the hybrids were tested for localization within the YAC contig. One such cDNA mapped back to the YAC contig and was further analyzed. A full length cDNA clone was isolated from a fetal brain library and sequenced. The pattern of expression was determined in cell lines derived from Prader-Willi and Angelman patients and in normal individuals. The gene was found to have monoallelic, paternal expression in normal individuals and is marginally or not expressed in cell lines derived form Prader-Willi individuals. Expression in cell lines from Angelman patients, who are deleted for the same region on the maternal chromosome 15, was normal. Thus this apparently maternally imprinted gene is a candidate for involvement in the Prader-Willi phenotype.

  7. Association between SNP rs10569304 on the Second Expressed Region of Hole Gene and the Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚莉; 徐琳; 邱健; 李志梁; 李林海; 任广立; 董爱荣; 李炳玲; 葛明晓; 蒙仕仁; 王剑青

    2010-01-01

    The correlation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10569304 on the second expressed region of hole gene and congenital heart disease (CHD) of human being, and the effect of hole gene on CHD were investigated. 179 patients with CHD as CHD group and 183 healthy people as control group were selected in the case-control study. DNA was abstracted from the peripheral blood by phenol-chloroform method. Primer was designed for the flanking sequence of SNP rs10569304 on the second expressed region of hole gen...

  8. Whorl-specific expression of the SUPERMAN gene of Arabidopsis is mediated by cis elements in the transcribed region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiro; Sakai, Hajime; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2003-09-02

    The SUPERMAN (SUP) gene of Arabidopsis is involved in controlling cell proliferation in stamen and carpel primordia and in ovules during flower development. The SUP gene encodes a transcription factor with a C2H2-type zinc finger motif, a serine/proline-rich domain, a basic domain, and a leucine-zipper-like domain and is expressed in a very limited region in stamen primordia and in the developing ovary during flower development. The SUP gene is susceptible to methylation, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. To understand how the SUP gene is expressed spatially and temporally in its restricted domain, and why methylation of the transcribed region affects early-stage SUP expression, we have identified the SUP cis regulatory elements by characterizing SUP gene fusions. These studies show that the SUP gene has discrete upstream promoter elements required for expression in stamen primordia in early stages and in the ovary in later stages. The promoter activity for stamen primordia is modulated by several positive and negative elements located in the transcribed and translated regions. Several regulatory elements in the transcribed region correlate with the areas of the gene that are heavily methylated in epigenetic alleles; these data provide a possible explanation of how methylation of the transcribed region represses transcription.

  9. Expression of. Arabidopsis tryptophan biosynthetic pathway genes: effect of the 5’ coding region of phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何奕昆; 刘新仿; 李家洋

    1999-01-01

    There are three non-allelic isogenes encoding phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase (PAI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression plasmids were constructed by fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the three PAI promoters with or without the 5’ region encoding PAI N-terminal polypeptides and transferred into Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Analysis of GUS activity revealed that the PAI 5’ coding region was necessary for high expression of GUS activity. GUS activity in transgenic plants transformed with the expression plasmids containing the 5’ coding region of PAI1 or PAI3 was 60—100-fold higher than that without the corresponding 5’ region. However, the effect of 5’ coding region of PAI2 gene on the GUS activity was very small (only about 1 time difference). The GUS histochemical staining showed a similar result as revealed by GUS activity assay. It was expressed in the mesophyll cells and guard cells, but not in the epidermic cells, indicating that the N-terminal polypeptides encoded by t

  10. Is reticular temperature a useful indicator of heat stress in dairy cattle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, S; Lambertz, C; Gauly, M

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reticular temperature (RT) in dairy cattle is a useful indicator of heat stress considering the effects of milk yield and water intake (WI). In total, 28 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows raised on 3 farms in Lower Saxony, Germany, were studied from March to December 2013. During the study, RT and barn climate parameters (air temperature, relative humidity) were measured continuously and individual milk yield was recorded daily. Both the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) and the daily median RT per cow were calculated. Additionally, the individual WI (amount and frequency) of 10 cows during 100d of the study was recorded on 1 farm. Averaged over all farms, daily THI ranged between 35.4 and 78.9 with a mean (±standard deviation) of 60.2 (±8.7). Dairy cows were on average (±standard deviation) 110.9d in milk (±79.3) with a mean (±standard deviation) milk yield of 35.2kg/d (±9.1). The RT was affected by THI, milk yield, days in milk, and WI. Up to a THI threshold of 65, RT remained constant at 39.2°C. Above this threshold, RT increased to 39.3°C and further to 39.4°C when THI ≥70. The correlation between THI ≥70 and RT was 0.22, whereas the coefficient ranged between r=-0.08 to +0.06 when THI <70. With increasing milk yield, RT decreased slightly from 39.3°C (<30kg/d) to 39.2°C (≥40kg/d). For daily milk yields of ≥40kg, the median RT and daily milk yield were correlated at r=-0.18. The RT was greater when dairy cows yielded ≥30kg/d and THI ≥70 (39.5°C) compared with milk yields <30kg and THI <70 (39.3°C). The WI, which averaged (±standard deviation) 11.5 l (±5.7) per drinking bout, caused a mean decrease in RT of 3.2°C and was affected by the amount of WI (r=0.60). After WI, it took up to 2h until RT reached the initial level before drinking. In conclusion, RT increased when the THI threshold of 65 was exceeded. A further increase was noted when THI ≥70. Nevertheless, the effects of WI and milk yield

  11. The regulation of gene expression in transformed maize aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. Analysis of promoter activity, intron enhancement, and mRNA untranslated regions on expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, D R; Young, T E

    1994-11-01

    Gene expression in the aleurone and endosperm is highly regulated during both seed development and germination. Studies of alpha-amylase expression in the aleurone of barley (Hordeum vulgare) have generated the current paradigm for hormonal control of gene expression in germinating cereal grain. Gene expression studies in both the aleurone and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays) seed have been hampered because of a lack of an efficient transformation system. We report here the rapid isolation of protoplasts from maize aleurone and endosperm tissue, their transformation using polyethylene glycol or electroporation, and the regulation of gene expression in these cells. Adh1 promoter activity was reduced relative to the 35S promoter in aleurone and endosperm protoplasts compared to Black Mexican Sweet suspension cells in which it was nearly as strong as the 35S promoter. Intron-mediated stimulation of expression was substantially higher in transformed aleurone or endosperm protoplasts than in cell-suspension culture protoplasts, and the data suggest that the effect of an intron may be affected by cell type. To examine cytoplasmic regulation, the 5' and 3' untranslated regions from a barley alpha-amylase were fused to the firefly luciferase-coding region, and their effect on translation and mRNA stability was examined following the delivery of in vitro synthesized mRNA to aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. The alpha-amylase untranslated regions regulated translational efficiency in a tissue-specific manner, increasing translation in aleurone or endosperm protoplasts but not in maize or carrot cell-suspension protoplasts, in animal cells, or in in vitro translation lysates.

  12. A small intergenic region drives exclusive tissue-specific expression of the adjacent genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Estela M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II is unidirectional from most genes. In plants, divergent genes, defined as non-overlapping genes organized head-to-head, are highly represented in the Arabidopsis genome. Nevertheless, there is scarce evidence on functional analyses of these intergenic regions. The At5g06290 and At5g06280 loci are head-to-head oriented and encode a chloroplast-located 2-Cys peroxiredoxin B (2CPB and a protein of unknown function (PUF, respectively. The 2-Cys peroxiredoxins are proteins involved in redox processes, they are part of the plant antioxidant defence and also act as chaperons. In this study, the transcriptional activity of a small intergenic region (351 bp shared by At5g06290 and At5g06280 in Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized. Results Activity of the intergenic region in both orientations was analyzed by driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene during the development and growth of Arabidopsis plants under physiological and stressful conditions. Results have shown that this region drives expression either of 2cpb or puf in photosynthetic or vascular tissues, respectively. GUS expression driven by the promoter in 2cpb orientation was enhanced by heat stress. On the other hand, the promoter in both orientations has shown similar down-regulation of GUS expression under low temperatures and other stress conditions such as mannitol, oxidative stress, or fungal elicitor. Conclusion The results from this study account for the first evidence of an intergenic region that, in opposite orientation, directs GUS expression in different spatially-localized Arabidopsis tissues in a mutually exclusive manner. Additionally, this is the first demonstration of a small intergenic region that drives expression of a gene whose product is involved in the chloroplast antioxidant defence such as 2cpb. Furthermore, these results contribute to show that 2cpb is related to the heat stress defensive system

  13. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Silvia; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita L; Núñez, Angel; Garzón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins), mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus (contributing to wakefulness) and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) nucleus (contributing to REM sleep). Anatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC, and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  14. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eNunez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins, mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC nucleus (contributing to wakefulness and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO nucleus (contributing to REM sleepAnatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  15. Effects of olanzapine on regional C-Fos expression in rat forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G S; Fibiger, H C

    1996-02-01

    Compared to typical antipsychotic drugs, clozapine produces a unique pattern of Fos-like immunoreactive neurons in the rat forebrain. It has been proposed, therefore, that this approach may be useful in identifying other agents with clozapine's therapeutic profile. In the present study, we examined the ability of olanzapine to increase the number of Fos-like immunoreactive neurons in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, lateral septal nucleus, and prefrontal cortex. Olanzapine (5, 10 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent increases in the number of Fos-positive neurons in the nucleus accumbens and lateral septal nucleus, important components of the limbic system that may mediate some of the therapeutic actions of neuroleptics. Olanzapine also produced dose-dependent increases in the number of Fos-positive neurons in the dorsolateral striatum, an effect that correlates with the ability of neuroleptics to produce extrapyramidal side-effects. The effects of olanzapine on regional c-fos expression are not therefore identical to clozapine, which is without effect in the dorsolateral striatum. However, olanzapine-induced increases in the dorsolateral striatum were considerably smaller than those generated in the nucleus accumbens suggesting that at low, potentially therapeutic doses olanzapine may not generate significant extrapyramidal side effects. Olanzapine also increased the number of Fos-positive neurons in medical prefrontal cortex, an action unique to clozapine and a few other atypical antipsychotics. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic in the sense that it does not produce significant extrapyramidal side-effects at low therapeutic doses. However, extrapyramidal side-effects at higher doses can be predicted by these results. Finally, olanzapine's actions in the medial prefrontal cortex may be predictive of a clozapine-like profile with respect to actions on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Additional clinical

  16. TM6, a novel nuclear matrix attachment region, enhances its flanking gene expression through influencing their chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lusha; Xu, Rui; Lu, Longtao; Zhang, Jiedao; Yang, Guodong; Huang, Jinguang; Wu, Changai; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) regulate the higher-order organization of chromatin and affect the expression of their flanking genes. In this study, a tobacco MAR, TM6, was isolated and demonstrated to remarkably increase the expression of four different promoters that drive gusA gene and adjacent nptII gene. In turn, this expression enhanced the transformation frequency of transgenic tobacco. Deletion analysis of topoisomerase II-binding site, AT-rich element, and MAR recognition signature (MRS) showed that MRS has the highest contribution (61.7%) to the TM6 sequence-mediated transcription activation. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility assay showed that 35S and NOS promoter regions with TM6 are more sensitive than those without TM6. The analysis also revealed that TM6 reduces promoter DNA methylation which can affect the gusA expression. In addition, two tobacco chromatin-associated proteins, NtMBP1 and NtHMGB, isolated using a yeast one-hybrid system, specifically bound to the TM6II-1 region (761 bp to 870 bp) and to the MRS element in the TM6II-2 (934 bp to 1,021 bp) region, respectively. We thus suggested that TM6 mediated its chromatin opening and chromatin accessibility of its flanking promoters with consequent enhancement of transcription.

  17. Neuropsin Expression Correlates with Dendritic Marker MAP2c Level in Different Brain Regions of Aging Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Arpita; Thakur, M K

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsin (NP) is a serine protease, implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory acquisition through cleavage of synaptic adhesion molecule, L1CAM. However, NP has not been explored during brain aging that entails drastic deterioration of plasticity and memory with selective regional vulnerability. Therefore, we have analysed the expression of NP and correlated with its function via analysis of endogenous cleavage of L1CAM and level of dendritic marker MAP2c in different regions of the aging mouse brain. While NP expression gradually decreased in the cerebral cortex during aging, it showed a sharp rise in both olfactory bulb and hippocampus in adult and thereafter declined in old age. NP expression was moderate in young medulla, but undetectable in midbrain and cerebellum. It was positively correlated with L1CAM cleavage and MAP2c level in different brain regions during aging. Taken together, our study shows age-dependent regional variation in NP expression and its positive correlation with MAP2c level, suggesting the involvement of NP in MAP2c mediated alterations in dendritic morphology during aging.

  18. A conserved region in the 3' untranslated region of the human LIMK1 gene is critical for proper expression of LIMK1 at the post-transcriptional level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Fei Deng; Shu-Jing Liu; Xun-Sha Sun; Wei-Wen Sun; Qi-Hua Zhao; Wei-Ping Liao; Yong-Hong Yi

    2013-01-01

    LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1),a cytosolic serine/threonine kinase,regulates actin filament dynamics and reorganization and is involved in neuronal development and brain function.Abnormal expression of LIMK1 is associated with several neurological disorders.In this study,we performed a conservation analysis using Vector NTI (8.0) software.The dualluciferase reporter assay and real-time quantitative RT-PCR were used to assess the protein and mRNA levels of the reporter gene,respectively.We found that a region ranging from nt +884 to +966 in the human LIMK1 3' untranslated region (UTR) was highly conserved in the mouse Limk1 3' UTR and formed a structure containing several loops and stems.Luciferase assay showed that the relative luciferase activity of the mutated construct with the conserved region deleted,pGL4-hLIMK1-3U-M,in SH-SY5Y and HEK-293 cells was only ~60% of that of the wild-type construct pGL4-hLIMK1-3U,indicating that the conserved region is critical for the reporter gene expression.Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the relative Luc2 mRNA levels in SH-SY5Y and HEK293 cells transfected with pGL4-hLIMK1-3U-M decreased to ~50% of that in cells transfected with pGL4-hLIMK1-3U,suggesting an important role of the conserved region in maintaining Luc2 mRNA stability.Our study suggests that the conserved region in the LIMK1 3' UTR is involved in regulating LIMK1 expression at the post-transcriptional level,which may help reveal the mechanism underlying the regulation of LIMK1 expression in the central nervous system and explore the relationship between the 3'-UTR mutant and neurological disorders.

  19. Effect of feeding fine maize particles on the reticular pH, milk yield and composition of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardi, R; Marchesini, G; Stefani, A-L; Barberio, A; Andrighetto, I; Segato, S

    2014-06-01

    The particle size of cereal grains has been found to modulate the rate of passage from the rumen and the digestibility of starch and neutral detergent fibre (NDF), but few studies have examined its impact on reticular pH. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of feeding finely ground maize on the risk of ruminal acidosis, milk yield and composition. Twelve Holstein-Friesian cows were assigned to one of two experimental groups and fed according to a cross-over design. Diets were isoenergetic and isonitrogenous and were characterised by the same NDF and ADF, differing only in maize particle size. In the control diet (Ct), the maize meal was ground to 1.0 mm, whereas in the experimental diet, it was finely ground (Fg) to 0.5 mm. The pH and temperature of the reticulum were continuously measured in eight cows throughout the trial using indwelling sensors. Dry matter intake was higher in cows offered Fg diet than in Ct (19.0 vs. 20.3 kg/day; p = 0.067). However, milk yield (p = 0.855) and the 3.5% fat-corrected milk (FCM) (p = 0.724) did not show any differences between the diets. Casein (2.48 vs. 2.57%; p = 0.035) and crude protein (CP) (3.18 vs. 3.31%; p = 0.021) resulted higher in Fg. Similarly, starch digestibility increased in animals offered Fg diet versus Ct (0.94 vs. 0.98; p = 0.078). Among the reticular parameters, the Fg-fed cows spent a significantly higher time below the 5.5 pH threshold (15 vs. 61 min/day; p = 0.047) and had an average daily variation in reticular pH characterised by a lower nadir pH (5.95 vs. 5.72; p < 0.001) and a higher pH range (0.79 vs. 0.94; p = 0.003). In this study, grain particle size affected the risk of the onset of ruminal acidosis. Therefore, it should be carefully considered when formulating rations. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Sleep and GABA levels in the oral part of rat pontine reticular formation are decreased by local and systemic administration of morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C J; Lydic, R; Baghdoyan, H A

    2007-01-05

    Morphine, a mu-opioid receptor agonist, is a commonly prescribed treatment for pain. Although highly efficacious, morphine has many unwanted side effects including disruption of sleep and obtundation of wakefulness. One mechanism by which morphine alters sleep and wakefulness may be by modulating GABAergic signaling in brain regions regulating arousal, including the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO). This study used in vivo microdialysis in unanesthetized Sprague-Dawley rat to test the hypothesis that mu-opioid receptors modulate PnO GABA levels. Validation of the high performance liquid chromatographic technique used to quantify GABA was obtained by dialyzing the PnO (n=4 rats) with the GABA reuptake inhibitor nipecotic acid (500 microM). Nipecotic acid caused a 185+/-20% increase in PnO GABA levels, confirming chromatographic detection of GABA and demonstrating the existence of functional GABA transporters in rat PnO. Morphine caused a concentration-dependent decrease in PnO GABA levels (n=25 rats). Coadministration of morphine (100 microM) with naloxone (1 microM), a mu-opioid receptor antagonist, blocked the morphine-induced decrease in PnO GABA levels (n=5 rats). These results show for the first time that mu-opioid receptors in rat PnO modulate GABA levels. A second group of rats (n=6) was used to test the hypothesis that systemically administered morphine also decreases PnO GABA levels. I.v. morphine caused a significant (PPnO GABA levels relative to control i.v. infusions of saline. Finally, microinjections followed by 2 h recordings of electroencephalogram and electromyogram tested the hypothesis that PnO morphine administration disrupts sleep (n=8 rats). Morphine significantly (PPnO.

  1. Imaging brain gene expression profiles by antipsychotics: region-specific action of amisulpride on postsynaptic density transcripts compared to haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Marmo, Federica; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Rossi, Rodolfo; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice

    2013-11-01

    Induction of motor disorders is considered the clinical landmark differentiating typical from atypical antipsychotics, and has been mainly correlated to dopamine D2 receptors blockade in striatum. This view is challenged by benzamides, such as amisulpride, which display low liability for motor side effects despite being D2/D3 receptors high-affinity blocking agents. These effects have been explained with the prominent presynaptic action of amisulpride or with the fast dissociation at D2 receptors, but there is scarce information on the effects of amisulpride on postsynaptic signaling. We carried out a molecular imaging study of gene expression after acute administration of haloperidol (0.8 mg/kg), amisulpride (10 or 35 mg/kg), or vehicle, focusing on postsynaptic genes that are key regulators of synaptic plasticity, such as Arc, c-fos, Zif-268, Norbin, Homer. The last one has been associated to schizophrenia both in clinical and preclinical studies, and is differentially induced by antipsychotics with different D2 receptors affinity. Topography of gene expression revealed that amisulpride, unlike haloperidol, triggers transcripts expression peak in medial striatal regions. Correlation analysis of gene expression revealed a prevalent correlated gene induction within motor corticostriatal regions by haloperidol and a more balanced gene induction within limbic and motor corticostriatal regions by amisulpride. Despite the selective dopaminergic profile of both compounds, our results demonstrated a differential modulation of postsynaptic molecules by amisulpride and haloperidol, the former impacting preferentially medial regions of striatum whereas the latter inducing strong gene expression in lateral regions. Thus, we provided a possible molecular profile of amisulpride, putatively explaining its "atypical atypicality".

  2. Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mike, Andrea; Strammer, Erzsebet; Aradi, Mihaly

    2013-01-01

    healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states...... and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right...... inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus). Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed), processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex) and socially...

  3. Improvement of foreign gene expression in transgenic rice ( Oryza sativa L. ) by matrix attachment regions (MARs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Matrix attachment regions or matrix associated regions (MARs) were special DNA sequences in chromatin of eukaryotic cells that tightly associated with the nuclear matrix or scaffold in vitro after a combination of nuclease digestion and extraction. They were also called scaffold attachment regions (SARs) .

  4. Improvement of foreign gene expression in transgenic rice ( Oryza sativa L. ) by matrix attachment regions (MARs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Matrix attachment regions or matrix associated regions (MARs) were special DNA sequences in chromatin of eukaryotic cells that tightly associated with the nuclear matrix or scaffold in vitro after a combination of nuclease digestion and extraction. They were also called scaffold attachment regions (SARs).

  5. Effect of acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein mRNA 5'-untranslated region on gene expression and protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, B; Remacha, M; Ortiz-Reyes, B; Santos, C; Ballesta, J P

    1994-02-11

    Constructions were made from genes encoding ribosomal acidic phosphoproteins YP1 beta (L44') and YP2 beta (L45) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which different parts of the 5'-untranslated regions were included. The constructs were inserted into centromeric plasmids under the control of the GAL1 promoter and expressed in yeast strains in which the genes coding for each acidic protein family, P1 and P2, had been disrupted. Deletions in the 5' region of the two genes have been found to oppositely affect their expression. Deletion of most of this region strongly stimulates the expression of YP2 beta (L45), increasing the translation efficiency of the mRNA, and generating a 6-fold excess of protein in the cell. A similar deletion in the rpYP1 beta gene represses the expression of the protein, reducing drastically the amount of the mRNA in the cell. The overexpression of rpYP2 beta affects the cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis at the level of initiation. Reduction of the YP2 beta(L45) overproduction by growing in controlled concentrations of glucose abolishes the inhibitory effect. The excess protein, probably as a high molecular weight complex, apparently interferes with the joining of the 60 S subunit to the initiation complex generating the accumulation of polysome half-mers. In addition, the results indicate the existence of a regulatory mechanism by which each one of the two acidic proteins controls the expression of the other polypeptide. YP1 beta(L44') represses the expression of YP2 beta(L45), while this protein stimulates the expression of YP1 beta(L44').

  6. Characterization of the Promoter Regions of Two Sheep Keratin-Associated Protein Genes for Hair Cortex-Specific Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhichao; Liu, Guangbin; Li, Xinyun; Huang, Ji; Xiao, Yujing; Du, Xiaoyong; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are the structural proteins of hair fibers and are thought to play an important role in determining the physical properties of hair fibers. These proteins are activated in a striking sequential and spatial pattern in the keratinocytes of hair fibers. Thus, it is important to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the specific transcriptional activity of these genes. In this study, sheep KRTAP 3-3 and KRTAP11-1 genes were found to be highly expressed in wool follicles in a tissue-specific manner. Subsequently, the promoter regions of the two genes that contained the 5' flanking/5' untranslated regions and the coding regions were cloned. Using an in vivo transgenic approach, we found that the promoter regions from the two genes exhibited transcriptional activity in hair fibers. A much stronger and more uniformly expressed green fluorescent signal was observed in the KRTAP11-1-ZsGreen1 transgenic mice. In situ hybridization revealed the symmetrical expression of sheep KRTAP11-1 in the entire wool cortex. Consistently, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the pattern of ZsGreen1 expression in the hair cortex of transgenic mice matches that of the endogenous KRTAP11-1 gene, indicating that the cloned promoter region contains elements that are sufficient to govern the wool cortex-specific transcription of KRTAP11-1. Furthermore, regulatory regions in the 5' upstream sequence of the sheep KRTAP11-1 gene that may regulate the observed hair keratinocyte specificity were identified using in vivo reporter assays.

  7. Ultrastructural localization of extracellular matrix proteins of the lymph node cortex: evidence supporting the reticular network as a pathway for lymphocyte migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobocinski Gregg P

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lymph node (LN is a crossroads of blood and lymphatic vessels allowing circulating lymphocytes to efficiently recognize foreign molecules displayed on antigen presenting cells. Increasing evidence indicates that after crossing high endothelial venules, lymphocytes migrate within the node along the reticular network (RN, a scaffold of fibers enwrapped by fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC. Light microscopy has shown that the RN contains specific extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, which are putative molecular "footholds" for migration, and are known ligands for lymphocyte integrin adhesion receptors. Results To investigate whether ECM proteins of the RN are present on the outer surface of the FRC and are thus accessible to migrating lymphocytes, ultrastructural immunohistochemical staining of cynomolgus monkey LN was performed using antibodies to human ECM proteins that were successfully employed at the light microscopic level. The fibrillar collagens I and III were observed primarily within the reticular network fibers themselves. In contrast, the matrix proteins laminin, fibronectin, collagen IV, and tenascin were observed within the reticular fibers and also on the outer membrane surface of the FRC. Conclusions These findings suggest a molecular basis for how the RN functions as a pathway for lymphocyte migration within the lymph node.

  8. Effects of the intra-arterial injection of bradykinin into the limbs, upon the activity of mesencephalic reticular units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, M C; Guilbaud, G; Besson, J M

    1975-02-01

    The changes in firing rate of mesencephalic reticular units after intra-arterial injection into the limbs of a potent nociceptive agent, bradykinin, were studied in cats (unanesthetized, immobilized with flaxedil and hyperventilated). 30 per cent of the d35 studied cells were affected, 56 per cent were excited, 23 per cent inhibited and 5 per cent had mixed effects. Among the 75 excited cells, the activation of 16 of them seemed to related to the arousa- processes (group A); for 56 cells the increase seemed dire-tly dependent on the nociceptive stimulation itself (group B). The changes of firing rate were repruducible; their latencies and durations were of the same order as the latencies and duration of the nociceptive reactions and painful sensation s, which have been obtained in animals and men after bradykinin injections. The modifications induced by bradykinin administration were suppressed by Ketamin and Thiopental.

  9. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker.

  10. Estimation of rumen outflow in dairy cows fed grass silage-based diets by use of reticular sampling as an alternative to sampling from the omasal canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizsan, S J; Ahvenjärvi, S; Volden, H; Broderick, G A

    2010-03-01

    A study was conducted to compare nutrient flows determined by a reticular sampling technique with those made by sampling digesta from the omasal canal. Six lactating dairy cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a design with a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and 4 periods. Treatments were 3 grass silages differing mainly in neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations: 412, 530, or 639 g/kg of dry matter, each combined with 1 of 2 levels of concentrate feed. Digesta was collected from the reticulum and the omasal canal to represent a 24-h feeding cycle. Nutrient flow was calculated using the reconstitution system based on 3 markers (Co, Yb, and indigestible NDF) and using (15)N as a microbial marker. Large and small particles and the fluid phase were recovered from digesta collected at both sampling sites. Bacterial samples from the reticulum and the omasum were separated into liquid- and particle-associated bacteria. Reticular samples were sieved through a 1-mm sieve before isolation of digesta phases and bacteria. Composition of the large particle phase differed mainly in fiber content of the digesta obtained from the 2 sampling sites. Sampling site did not affect marker concentration in any of the phases with which the markers were primarily associated. The (15)N enrichment of bacterial samples did not differ between sampling sites. The reticular and omasal canal sampling techniques gave similar estimates of marker concentrations in reconstituted digesta, estimates of ruminal flow, and ruminal digestibility values for dry matter, organic matter, starch, and N. Sampling site x diet interactions were also not significant. Concentration of NDF was 2.2% higher in reconstituted omasal digesta than in reconstituted reticular digesta. Ruminal NDF digestibility was 2.7% higher when estimated by sampling the reticulum than by sampling the omasal canal. The higher estimate of ruminal NDF digestibility with the reticular sampling technique was due to

  11. Role of region-distinctive expression of Rac1 in regulating fibronectin arrangement during palatal shelf elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinghuang; Li, Liwen; Jin, Chengri; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-09-01

    Palatal shelf elevation is a crucial process in palate development, with the contribution of various factors. Disturbances in any factor during this process result in cleft palate. Prior to palatal shelf elevation starting from embryonic day 12.5, the Rac1 expression level in the bend region of the mid-palatal shelf progressively increases and the cell densities in the bend and groove regions gradually become higher than those in the middle region. The comparative decrease of cell density in the middle region is correlated with a gradual alteration of the arrangement of fibronectin (FN) fibers, whereas the bend and groove regions with higher cell densities maintain ring-like FN arrangements. Rac1 overexpression alters the fibrillar FN arrangement in the middle region to the ring-like arrangement by increasing cell density. This alteration is sufficient to induce the failure of palatal shelf elevation, ultimately leading to cleft palate. Furthermore, the inhibition of FN delays palatal shelf elevation. Thus, the spatiotemporal expression of Rac1 plays an impressive role in palatal shelf elevation by regulating FN arrangement within the palatal shelf.

  12. The application of eigensymmetries of face forms to X-ray diffraction intensities of crystals twinned by 'reticular merohedry'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, H; Hahn, Th

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an extension of a previous treatment of `twins by merohedry' with full lattice coincidence [Σ = 1, Klapper & Hahn (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 327-346] to `twins by reticular merohedry' with partial lattice coincidence (Σ > 1). Again, the sets of symmetrically equivalent reflections {hkl} are considered as sets of equivalent faces (face forms) {hkl}, and the behaviour of the oriented eigensymmetries of these forms under the action of a twin operation is used to determine the X-ray reflection sets, the intensities of which are affected or not affected by the twinning. The following cases are treated: rhombohedral obverse/reverse Σ3 twins, cubic Σ3 (spinel) twins, tetragonal Σ5 twins (twin elements m'(120), 2'[ ̅210]) and hexagonal Σ7 twins (m'(12 ̅30), 2'[2 ̅10]). For each case the twin laws for all relevant point groups are defined, and the twin diffraction cases A (intensity of twin-related reflection sets not affected), B1 (intensity affected), B2 (intensity affected only by anomalous scattering) and S (single, i.e. non-coincident reflection sets) are derived for all twin laws. A special treatment is provided for the cubic Σ3 twins, where the cubic face forms first have to be split into up to four rhombohedral subforms with a threefold axis along one of the four cube directions, here [111]. These subforms exhibit different twin diffraction cases analogous to those derived for the rhombohedral obverse/reverse Σ3 twins. A complete list of the split forms and their diffraction cases for all cubic point groups and all Σ3 twin elements is given. The application to crystal structure determination of crystals twinned by reticular merohedry and to X-ray topographic mapping of twin domains is discussed.

  13. HTLV-1 integration into transcriptionally active genomic regions is associated with proviral expression and with HAM/TSP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran N Meekings

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 causes leukaemia or chronic inflammatory disease in approximately 5% of infected hosts. The level of proviral expression of HTLV-1 differs significantly among infected people, even at the same proviral load (proportion of infected mononuclear cells in the circulation. A high level of expression of the HTLV-1 provirus is associated with a high proviral load and a high risk of the inflammatory disease of the central nervous system known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. But the factors that control the rate of HTLV-1 proviral expression remain unknown. Here we show that proviral integration sites of HTLV-1 in vivo are not randomly distributed within the human genome but are associated with transcriptionally active regions. Comparison of proviral integration sites between individuals with high and low levels of proviral expression, and between provirus-expressing and provirus non-expressing cells from within an individual, demonstrated that frequent integration into transcription units was associated with an increased rate of proviral expression. An increased frequency of integration sites in transcription units in individuals with high proviral expression was also associated with the inflammatory disease HAM/TSP. By comparing the distribution of integration sites in human lymphocytes infected in short-term cell culture with those from persistent infection in vivo, we infer the action of two selective forces that shape the distribution of integration sites in vivo: positive selection for cells containing proviral integration sites in transcriptionally active regions of the genome, and negative selection against cells with proviral integration sites within transcription units.

  14. Analysis of genes differentially expressed during potato tuber life cycle and isolation of their promoter regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trindade, L.M.; Horvath, B.M.; Berloo, van R.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2004-01-01

    The potato tuber life cycle involves several developmental stages including tuberisation, tuber growth, dormancy and sprouting. Gene expression during the potato tuber life cycle has been monitored using a RNA fingerprinting technique termed cDNA-AFLP The expression profile of the nearly 2000 transc

  15. Stable and enhanced gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum using synthetic untranslated regions with a stem-loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-07-20

    Gene overexpression is one of the most basic strategies in metabolic engineering, but the factors determining gene expression levels have been poorly studied in Clostridium species. In this study, we found that a short single-stranded 5' untranslated region (UTR) sequence led to decreased gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Using an in vitro enzyme assay and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we found that addition of a small stem-loop at the 5' end of mRNA increased mRNA levels and thereby protein expression levels up to 4.6-fold, possibly protecting mRNA from exonuclease attack. Gene-expression levels were apparently independent of the stability of the added stem-loop; the existence of a stem-loop itself appears to be more important. Our results indicate that efficient expression cassettes can be designed by taking the 5' UTR into consideration, as the expression levels can vary even though the same promoter and RBS are used. These findings will be useful for developing a more reliable gene expression system for metabolic engineering of Clostridium strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Experiences of expressing and storing colostrum antenatally: A qualitative study of mothers in regional Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbane, Joanna M; Giglia, Roslyn C

    2015-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences and breastfeeding outcomes of a group of mothers who expressed colostrum in the antenatal period. In-depth interviews were conducted over the telephone with 12 women who had attended a unique antenatal lactation clinic appointment at 37 weeks' gestation. Seven main response themes were identified. Most women reflected positively upon their attendance and reported that the experience of expressing colostrum allowed them to become familiar with their breasts and gave them a sense of security by having a supply of colostrum stored for possible use after birth. The main negative emotions reported were a sense of embarrassment at expressing the colostrum, particularly in front of another person, the difficulties with expressing colostrum and in one instance, the physical pain associated with the process. Antenatal expression of colostrum may improve maternal breastfeeding confidence. Further research using long-term records will determine whether this practice improves breastfeeding outcomes.

  17. Widespread Differential Expression of Coding Region and 3' UTR Sequences in Neurons and Other Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Arif; Duarte, Terence; Kumar, Saranya; Hynes, Mary A

    2015-12-16

    Mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) consist of coding sequence (CDS) and 5' and 3' UTRs, typically expected to show similar abundance within a given neuron. Examining mRNA from defined neurons, we unexpectedly show extremely common unbalanced expression of cognate 3' UTR and CDS sequences; many genes show high 3' UTR relative to CDS, others show high CDS to 3' UTR. In situ hybridization (19 of 19 genes) shows a broad range of 3' UTR-to-CDS expression ratios across neurons and tissues. Ratios may be spatially graded or change with developmental age but are consistent across animals. Further, for two genes examined, a 3' UTR-to-CDS ratio above a particular threshold in any given neuron correlated with reduced or undetectable protein expression. Our findings raise questions about the role of isolated 3' UTR sequences in regulation of protein expression and highlight the importance of separately examining 3' UTR and CDS sequences in gene expression analyses.

  18. Comparative analyses of histological and material properties of reticular dermis derived from human, swine and rats%人、猪、大鼠来源网状层真皮组织学及材料学表征的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永虎; 宋国栋; 左海斌; 贾军; 马印东; 范春节; 李培龙

    2014-01-01

    背景:课题组以往研究证实,猪边腹部网状层真皮质地柔软,伸展性也较其他部位好,适合作为异种脱细胞真皮的制作材料,但将其与人网状层真皮和大鼠网状层真皮进行组织形态学和材料学表征的系统对比未见相关报道。目的:研究猪边腹部、大鼠背部与人网状层真皮在组织学、生物力学、分子结构和热稳定性等方面的差异。方法:取人、猪边腹部、Wistar大鼠背部网状层真皮标本并大体观察,石蜡切片后行苏木精-伊红染色、苦味酸-天狼星红染色,显微照相后用图像分析软件测量分析;样本真空干燥并复水后用电子拉伸机测量其力学性能并计算杨氏模量;真空干燥后的样品研碎后用傅里叶红外光谱仪及同步热分析仪分析测量。结果与结论:猪边腹部网状层真皮胶原纤维束直径与人网状层真皮无差异,大鼠背部胶原纤维束较人网状层真皮细(P 0.05)。3种网状层真皮杨氏模量差异无显著性意义。大鼠网状层真皮胶原蛋白分子有较多的氢键参与,人较少,猪介于两者之间;大鼠网状层真皮热稳定性较好,人和猪次之。%BACKGROUND:Previous studies of our research group have confirmed that the texture of porcine reticular dermis at lateral ventral part is softer and has more extensibility than other parts. Therefore, it may serve as the raw material of xenogenic aceluar dermal matrix. However, its comparison with human and rat reticular dermis has not been reported systematicaly in aspects of histomorphology and material characterization. OBJECTIVE:To compare the reticular dermis from the lateral region of porcine abdomen and rat dorsal part with the reticular dermis from human in histology, biomechanics, molecular structure, thermal stability and other properties. METHODS:The reticular dermis samples were taken from adult human, the lateral region of porcine abdomen, the back of rats

  19. High ambient temperature increases 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy")-induced Fos expression in a region-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, G A; Hunt, G E; Cornish, J L; McGregor, I S

    2007-03-16

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a popular drug that is often taken under hot conditions at dance clubs. High ambient temperature increases MDMA-induced hyperthermia and recent studies suggest that high temperatures may also enhance the rewarding and prosocial effects of MDMA in rats. The present study investigated whether ambient temperature influences MDMA-induced expression of Fos, a marker of neural activation. Male Wistar rats received either MDMA (10 mg/kg i.p.) or saline, and were placed in test chambers for 2 h at either 19 or 30 degrees C. MDMA caused significant hyperthermia at 30 degrees C and a modest hypothermia at 19 degrees C. The 30 degrees C ambient temperature had little effect on Fos expression in vehicle-treated rats. However MDMA-induced Fos expression was augmented in 15 of 30 brain regions at the high temperature. These regions included (1) sites associated with thermoregulation such as the median preoptic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and raphe pallidus, (2) the supraoptic nucleus, a region important for osmoregulation and a key mediator of oxytocin and vasopressin release, (3) the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala, important in the regulation of social and emotional behaviors, and (4) the shell of the nucleus accumbens and (anterior) ventral tegmental area, regions associated with the reinforcing effects of MDMA. MDMA-induced Fos expression was unaffected by ambient temperature at many other sites, and was diminished at high temperature at one site (the islands of Calleja), suggesting that the effect of temperature on MDMA-induced Fos expression was not a general pharmacokinetic effect. Overall, these results indicate that high temperatures accentuate key neural effects of MDMA and this may help explain the widespread use of the drug under hot conditions at dance parties as well as the more hazardous nature of MDMA taken under such conditions.

  20. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the hippocampal CA1 region of hyperlipidemic rats with chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Cheng; Ying Zhang; Hongmei Song; Jiachun Feng

    2012-01-01

    Chronic cerebral ischemia is a pathological process in many cerebrovascular diseases and it is induced by long-term hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. After being fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks, rats were subjected to permanent occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries to establish rat models of chronic cerebral ischemia with hyperlipidemia. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in rat hippocampal CA1 region was determined to better understand the mechanism underlying the effects of hyperlipidemia on chronic cerebral ischemia. Water maze test results showed that the cognitive function of rats with hyperlipidemia or chronic cerebral ischemia, particularly in rats with hyperlipidemia combined with chronic cerebral ischemia, gradually decreased between 1 and 4 months after occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries. This correlated with pathological changes in the hippocampal CA1 region as detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Immunohistochemical staining showed that intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the hippocampal CA1 region was noticeably increased in rats with hyperlipidemia or chronic cerebral ischemia, in particular in rats with hyperlipidemia combined with chronic cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that hyperlipidemia aggravates chronic cerebral ischemia-induced neurological damage and cognitive impairment in the rat hippocampal CA1 region, which may be mediated, at least in part, by up-regulated expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

  1. Chick homeobox gene cDlx expression demarcates the forebrain anlage, indicating the onset of forebrain regional specification at gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghjid, S; Siddiqui, M A

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a chick homeobox-containing gene, cDlx, which shows greater than 85% homology to the homeodomain of other vertebrate Distal-less genes. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies reveal that cDlx expression is developmentally regulated and is tissue specific. In particular, the developmental expression pattern is characterized by an early appearance of cDlx transcript in the prospective forebrain region of gastrulating embryos. During neurulation, cDlx is consistently expressed in a spatially restricted domain in the presumptive ventral forebrain region of the neural plate that will give rise to the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis. Our data support the notion that members of the Dlx gene family are part of a homeobox gene code in forebrain pattern formation and suggest that regional specification of the forebrain occurs at much earlier stages than previously thought. The homeobox gene cDlx may thus play a role in defining forebrain regional identity as early as gastrulation.

  2. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  3. Correlation between ECT2 gene expression and methylation change of ECT2 promoter region in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mang-Li Zhang; Sen Lu; Lin Zhou; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is closely related to epigenetic abnormality. The epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 gene (ECT2) plays a critical role in Rho activation during cytokinesis, and thus may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the relationships between aberrant expression and epigenetic changes of the ECT2 gene in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Four cell lines (PANC-1, Colo357, T3M-4 and PancTuⅠ) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues were used for mRNA detection. After restriction isoschizomer endonucleases (MspⅠ/HpaⅡ) were used to digest the DNA sequence (5'-CCGG-3'), PCR was made to amplify the product. And RT-PCR was applied to determine the expression of the gene. RESULTS: The mRNA expression of the ECT2 gene was higher in pancreatic tumor tissue than in normal tissue. The gene was also expressed in the 4 PDAC cell lines. The methylation states of the upstream regions of the ECT2 gene were almost identical in normal, tumor pancreatic tissues, and the 4 PDAC cell lines. Some of the 5'-CCGG-3' areas in the upstream region of ECT2 were methylated, while others were unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: The oncogene ECT2 is overexpressed in pancreatic tumor tissues as veriifed by RT-PCR detection. The methylation status of DNA in promoter areas is involved in the gene expression, along with other factors, in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Functional analysis of genes differentially expressed in the Drosophila wing disc: role of transcripts enriched in the wing region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas L; Cain, Donna; Paul, Litty; Justiniano, Steven; Alli, Anwar; Mullins, Jeremi S; Wang, Chun Ping; Butchar, Jon P; Simcox, Amanda

    2006-12-01

    Differential gene expression is the major mechanism underlying the development of specific body regions. Here we assessed the role of genes differentially expressed in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, which gives rise to two distinct adult structures: the body wall and the wing. Reverse genetics was used to test the function of uncharacterized genes first identified in a microarray screen as having high levels of expression in the presumptive wing. Such genes could participate in elaborating the specific morphological characteristics of the wing. The activity of the genes was modulated using misexpression and RNAi-mediated silencing. Misexpression of eight of nine genes tested caused phenotypes. Of 12 genes tested, 10 showed effective silencing with RNAi transgenes, but only 3 of these had resulting phenotypes. The wing phenotypes resulting from RNAi suggest that CG8780 is involved in patterning the veins in the proximal region of the wing blade and that CG17278 and CG30069 are required for adhesion of wing surfaces. Venation and apposition of the wing surfaces are processes specific to wing development providing a correlation between the expression and function of these genes. The results show that a combination of expression profiling and tissue-specific gene silencing has the potential to identify new genes involved in wing development and hence to contribute to our understanding of this process. However, there are both technical and biological limitations to this approach, including the efficacy of RNAi and the role that gene redundancy may play in masking phenotypes.

  5. MicroRNA Seed Region Length Impact on Target Messenger RNA Expression and Survival in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila E Mullany

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNA repress messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally through binding to the 3' UTR of the mRNA with the miRNA seed region. It has been purported that longer seed regions have a greater efficacy on mRNA repression. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating differential expression of miRNAs involved in regulating the immune response, an important mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC, by seed length category. We subsequently evaluated differential expression of these miRNAs' targets in colonic tissue and the impact of these miRNAs on CRC survival. We determined sequence complementarity between each miRNA seed region and the 3' UTR of each experimentally verified mRNA target gene. We classified miRNAs into groups based on seed regions matching perfectly to a mRNA UTR with six bases beginning at position two, seven bases beginning at position one, seven bases beginning at position two, or eight bases beginning at position one. We analyzed these groups in terms of miRNA differential expression between carcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa, differential colonic target mRNA expression, and risk of dying from CRC. After correction for multiple comparisons, the proportion of the miRNAs that were associated with differential mRNA expression was 0% for the 6-mer, 13.64% for the 7α-mer group, 12.82% for the 7β-mer group, and 8.70% for the 8-mer group. The proportion of miRNAs associated with survival was 20% for the 6-mer group, 27.27% for the 7α-mer group, 10.23% for the 7β-mer group, and 21.74% for the 8-mer group. We did not see a linear relationship between seed length and miRNA expression dysregulation, mRNA expression, or survival. Our findings do not support the hypothesis the seed region length alone influences mRNA repression.

  6. A distal region of the human TGM1 promoter is required for expression in transgenic mice and cultured keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ying

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGM1(transglutaminase 1 is an enzyme that crosslinks the cornified envelope of mature keratinocytes. Appropriate expression of the TGM1 gene is crucial for proper keratinocyte function as inactivating mutations lead to the debilitating skin disease, lamellar ichthyosis. TGM1 is also expressed in squamous metaplasia, a consequence in some epithelia of vitamin A deficiency or toxic insult that can lead to neoplasia. An understanding of the regulation of this gene in normal and abnormal differentiation states may contribute to better disease diagnosis and treatment. Methods In vivo requirements for expression of the TGM1 gene were studied by fusing various lengths of promoter DNA to a reporter and injecting the DNA into mouse embryos to generate transgenic animals. Expression of the reporter was ascertained by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Further delineation of a transcriptionally important distal region was determined by transfections of progressively shortened or mutated promoter DNA into cultured keratinocytes. Results In vivo analysis of a reporter transgene driven by the TGM1 promoter revealed that 1.6 kilobases, but not 1.1 kilobases, of DNA was sufficient to confer tissue-specific and cell layer-specific expression. This same region was responsible for reporter expression in tissues undergoing squamous metaplasia as a response to vitamin A deprivation. Mutation of a distal promoter AP1 site or proximal promoter CRE site, both identified as important transcriptional elements in transfection assays, did not prevent appropriate expression. Further searching for transcriptional elements using electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA and transfection assays in cultured keratinocytes identified two Sp1 elements in a transcriptionally active region between -1.6 and -1.4 kilobases. While mutation of either Sp1 site or the AP1 site singly had only a small effect, mutation of all three sites eliminated nearly all the

  7. The 3' region of Human Papillomavirus type 16 early mRNAs decrease expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, J.; Rosenstierne, M.W.; Kristiansen, Karen

    2005-01-01

    of the reporter mRNAs. The integrity of the reporter mRNAs were tested by northern blotting. Results: We show that the 3' region of the HPV-16 early mRNAs ( HPV-16 nucleotide (nt.) 2582 4214) act in cis to decrease both mRNA and protein levels. This region seems to affect transcription from the exogenous minimal...

  8. TrkAIII expression in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconelli, Antonella; Farina, Antonietta R; Cappabianca, Lucia; Cea, Gesilia; Panella, Sonia; Chioda, Antonella; Gallo, Rita; Cinque, Benedetta; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Campese, Antonio Francesco; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Mackay, Andrew R

    2007-02-01

    The alternative TrkAIII splice variant is expressed by murine and human thymus. Alternative TrkAIII splicing predominates in postembryonic day E13 (E17 and E18), postnatal murine (3 week and 3 month) and human thymuses, with TrkAIII mRNA expressed by selected thymocyte subsets and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and a 100 kDa immunoprecipitable TrkAIII-like protein detected in purified thymocyte and whole thymus extracts. FACS and immunohistochemical analysis indicate a non-cell surface localisation for the TrkAIII-like protein in cortical CD4+/CD8+ double positive and, to a lesser extent, single positive thymocyte subsets at the cortex/medulla boundary and in Hassle's corpuscles, reticular epithelial and dendritic cells of the thymic medulla. TrkA(I/II) expression, on the other hand, predominates in sub-capsular regions of the thymus. TrkAIII-like immunoreactivity at the cortex/medulla boundary associates with regions of thymocyte proliferation and not apoptosis. A potential role for thymic hypoxia in thymocyte alternative TrkAIII splicing is supported by reversal to TrkAI splicing by normoxic but not hypoxic culture and induction of Jurkat T cell alternative TrkAIII splicing by the hypoxia mimic CoCl2. In contrast, TEC expression of TrkAIII predominates in both normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. The data support a potential role for TrkAIII in thymic development and function, of particular relevance to intermediate stage CD4+/CD8+ thymocyte subsets and TECs, which potentially reflects a reversible thymocyte and more permanent TEC adaptation to thymic environment. Since intracellular TrkAIII neither binds nor responds to NGF and can impede regular NGF/TrkA signalling (Tacconelli et al., Cancer Cell, 2004), its expression would be expected to provide an alternative and/or impediment to regular NGF/TrkA signalling within the developing and developed thymus of potential functional importance.

  9. Gene cloning and expression of cadherin in midgut of Helicoverpa armigera and its Cry1A binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guirong; WU Kongming; LIANG Gemei; GUO Yuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Cadherins belong to one of the families of animal glycoproteins responsible for calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion. Recent literatures showed that the cadherin-like in midgut of several insects served as the receptor of Bt toxin Cry1A and the variation of cadherin-like is related to insect's resistance to Cry1A. The full-length cDNA encoding cadherin-like of Helicoverpa armigera is cloned by degenerate PCR and RACE techniques and the gene was designated as BtR-harm, which is 5581 bp in full-length, encoding 1730 amino acid residues (BtR-harm was deposited in GenBank and the accession number is AF519180). Its predicted molecular weight and isoelectric point were 195.39 kDa and 4.23, respectively. The inferred amino acid sequence includes a signal sequence, 11 cadherin repeats, a membrane-proximal region, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic region. Sequence analysis indicated that the deduced protein sequence was most similar to the cadherin-like from Heliothis virescens with 84.2% identity and highly similar to three other lepidopteran cadherin from Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Pectinophora gossypiella, with the sequence identities of 60.3.6%, 57.5% and 51.0%, respectively. The cDNA encoding cadherin gene was expressed successfully in E. coli and the recombinant proteins can bind with Cry1Ac. Truncation analysis and binding experiment of BtR-harm revealed that the Cry1A binding region was a contiguous 244-amino acid sequence, which located between amino acid 1217 and 1461. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BtR-harm was highly expressed in midgut of H. armigera, very low expressed in foregut and hindgut and was not expressed in other tissues. After H. armigera producing resistance to Cry1Ac, the expression quantity of BtR-harm significantly decreased in midgut of H. armigera. It is the first confirmation that BtR-harm can function as receptor of Cry1Ac in H. armigera and the binding region was located on a contiguous 244 amino acid sequence

  10. Expression of the secreted FAD-dependent sulfydryl oxidase (QSOX) in the guinea pig central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, C; Musard, J F; Hadjiyiassemis, M; Jouvenot, M; Fellmann, D; Risold, P Y; Adami, P

    2004-06-18

    cpQSOx1 is a member of the QSOx family of proteins, expressed in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) and ortholog of the rat rQSOx1. In this study, in vitro experiments were conducted and showed that, as other member of this family, cpQSOx1 has a sulfydryl oxidase activity, and is a secreted protein. Then, the expression of this enzyme was researched in the guinea pig brain, as very little information exists yet on the expression of QSOx family members in the central nervous system. By immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, cpQSOx1 is synthesized by neurons throughout the whole guinea pig central nervous system. Reticular structures as the basal forebrain, reticular thalamic nucleus and reticular nuclei of the brainstem contained the densest labeling. These results are discussed in terms of putative roles of this protein in synaptic strengthening and in redox activities.

  11. Altered mitochondria and Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampal CA3 region in a rat model of acute epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyan Cheng; Lina Wu; Qiaozhi Wang; Yanfeng Gan; Guangyi Liu; Hong Yu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the mitochondrial structure and function are damaged in animal models of epilepsy. In addition, the Bcl-2 protein is capable of regulating mitochondrial stability.OBJECTIVE: To observe and validate changes in mitochondrial structure and Bcl-2 expression, and to analyze these characteristics in the hippocampal CA3 region of rat models of epilepsy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Electron Microscopy and Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College between 2007 and 2008.MATERIALS: Coriamyrtin was provided by the Pharmacy Factory of West China University of Medical Sciences. The primary and secondary antibodies were provided by Zhongshan Goldenbridge Biotechnology, Beijing.METHODS: A total of 44 adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into control (n=11) and epilepsy (n=33) groups. Rats in the epilepsy group were induced by coriamyrtin (50μg/kg), which was injected into the lateral ventricles. The rats were then observed at 3, 6, and 24 hours after epilepsy induction, with 11 rats at each time point. Epilepsy was not induced in rats from the control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pathological changes in the hippocampal CA3 region were observed by light microscopy; Bcl-2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry; and mitochondrial changes in the hippocampus were observed under transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: (1) The control group displayed very little Bcl-2 protein expression in the hippocampal CA3 region. However, after 3 hours of epilepsy, expression was visible. By 6 hours, expression peaked and then subsequently decreased after 24 hours, but remained higher than the control group (P<0.05). (2) Mitochondria were damaged to varying degrees in the epilepsy groups. For example, mitochondria edema, cristae space increase, and disappearance of mitochondria were apparent. Moreover, mitochondrial damage

  12. Gene expression in distinct regions of rat tendons in response to jump training combined with anabolic androgenic steroid administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marqueti, Rita Cássia; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Heinemeier, Katja Maria;

    2012-01-01

    RNA levels of COL1A1, COL3A1, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, IGF-IEa, GAPDH, CTGF and TGF-ß-1 were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Our main results indicated that mRNA levels alter in different regions in each tendon of sedentary animals. The training did not alter the expression of COL1A1, COL3A, IGF-IEa and MMP-2...

  13. Role of DNA methylation in expression control of the IKZF3-GSDMA region in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussette, Sanny; Al Tuwaijri, Abeer; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Elzein, Samar; Farias, Raquel; Bérubé, Julie; Ho, Bianca; Laprise, Catherine; Goodyer, Cynthia G; Rousseau, Simon; Naumova, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal region 17q12-q21 is associated with asthma and harbors regulatory polymorphisms that influence expression levels of all five protein-coding genes in the region: IKAROS family zinc finger 3 (Aiolos) (IKZF3), zona pellucida binding protein 2 (ZPBP2), ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3 (ORMDL3), and gasdermins A and B (GSDMA, GSDMB). Furthermore, DNA methylation in this region has been implicated as a potential modifier of the genetic risk of asthma development. To further characterize the effect of DNA methylation, we examined the impact of treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) that causes DNA demethylation, on expression and promoter methylation of the five 17q12-q21 genes in the human airway epithelium cell line NuLi-1, embryonic kidney epithelium cell line 293T and human adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7. 5-aza-dC treatment led to upregulation of expression of GSDMA in all three cell lines. ZPBP2 was upregulated in NuLi-1, but remained repressed in 293T and MCF-7 cells, whereas ORMDL3 was upregulated in 293T and MCF-7 cells, but not NuLi-1. Upregulation of ZPBP2 and GSDMA was accompanied by a decrease in promoter methylation. Moreover, 5-aza-dC treatment modified allelic expression of ZPBP2 and ORMDL3 suggesting that different alleles may respond differently to treatment. We also identified a polymorphic CTCF-binding site in intron 1 of ORMDL3 carrying a CG SNP rs4065275 and determined its methylation level. The site's methylation was unaffected by 5-aza-dC treatment in NuLi-1 cells. We conclude that modest changes (8-13%) in promoter methylation levels of ZPBP2 and GSDMA may cause substantial changes in RNA levels and that allelic expression of ZPBP2 and ORMDL3 is mediated by DNA methylation.

  14. Deletions within the mouse beta-globin locus control region preferentially reduce beta(min) globin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, R; Bender, M A; Feng, Y Q; Fiering, S N; Hug, B A; Ley, T J; Groudine, M; Bouhassira, E E

    2000-02-01

    The mouse beta-globin gene cluster is regulated, at least in part, by a locus control region (LCR) composed of several developmentally stable DNase I hypersensitive sites located upstream of the genes. In this report, we examine the level of expression of the beta(min) and beta(maj) genes in adult mice in which HS2, HS3, or HS5,6 has been either deleted or replaced by a selectable marker via homologous recombination in ES cells. Primer extension analysis of RNA extracted from circulating reticulocytes and HPLC analysis of globin chains from peripheral red blood cells revealed that all mutations that reduce the overall output of the locus preferentially decrease beta(min) expression over beta(maj). The implications of these findings for the mechanism by which the LCR controls expression of the beta(maj) and beta(min) promoters are discussed.

  15. The influence of matrix attachment regions on transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and gene silencing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Miguel F C; Butaye, Katleen M J; Goderis, Inge J W M; Wouters, Piet F J; Jacobs, Anni; Delauré, Stijn L; Depicker, Ann; Cammue, Bruno P A

    2007-03-01

    Many studies in both animal and plant systems have shown that matrix attachment regions (MARs) can increase the expression of flanking transgenes. However, our previous studies revealed no effect of the chicken lysozyme MARs (chiMARs) on transgene expression in the first generation transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants transformed with a beta-glucuronidase gene (uidA) unless gene silencing mutants were used as genetic background for transformation. In the present study, we investigated why chiMARs do not influence transgene expression in transgenic wild-type Arabidopsis plants. We first studied the effect of chiMARs on transgene expression in the progeny of primary transformants harboring chiMAR-flanked T-DNAs. Our data indicate that chiMARs do not affect transgene expression in consecutive generations of wild-type A. thaliana plants. Next, we examined whether these observed results in A. thaliana transformants are influenced by the applied transformation method. The results from in vitro transformed A. thaliana plants are in accordance with those from in planta transformed A. thaliana plants and again reveal no influence of chiMARs on transgene expression in A. thaliana wild-type transformants. The effect of chi-MARs on transgene expression is also examined in in vitro transformed Nicotiana tabacum plants, but as for A. thaliana, the transgene expression in tobacco transformants is not altered by the presence of chi-MARs. Taken together, our results show that the applied method or the plant species used for transformation does not influence whether and how chiMARs have an effect on transgene expression. Finally, we studied the effect of MARs (tabMARs) of plant origin (tobacco) on the transgene expression in A. thaliana wild-type plants and suppressed gene silencing (sgs2) mutants. Our results clearly show that similar to chiMARs, the tobacco-derived MARs do not enhance transgene expression in a wild-type background but can be used to enhance transgene expression

  16. Gene expression analysis of canonical Wnt pathway transcriptional regulators during early morphogenesis of the facial region in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Victor; Summerhurst, Kristen; Sharpe, James; Davidson, Duncan; Murphy, Paula

    2009-06-01

    Structures and features of the face, throat and neck are formed from a series of branchial arches that grow out along the ventrolateral aspect of the embryonic head. Multiple signalling pathways have been implicated in patterning interactions that lead to species-specific growth and differentiation within the branchial region that sculpt these features. A direct role for Wnt signalling in particular has been shown. The spatial and temporal distribution of Wnt pathway components contributes to the operation of the signalling system. We present the precise distribution of gene expression of canonical Wnt pathway transcriptional regulators, Tcf1, Lef1, Tcf3, Tcf4 and beta-catenin between embryonic day (E) 9.5 and 11.5. In situ hybridization combined with Optical Projection Tomography was used to record and compare distribution of transcripts in 3D within the developing branchial arches. This shows widespread yet very specific expression of the gene set indicating that all genes contribute to proper patterning of the region. Tcf1 and Lef1 are more prominent in rostral arches, particularly at later ages, and Tcf3 and Tcf4 are in general expressed more deeply (medial/endodermal aspect) in the arches than Tcf1 and Lef1. Comparison with Wnt canonical pathway readout patterns shows that the relationship between the expression of individual transcription factors and activation of the pathway is not simple, indicating complexity and flexibility in the signalling system.

  17. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Paula A; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow to emerge. The transcription factor ΔFosB is induced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) of rodents in response to stress or cocaine, and its expression in these regions is thought to regulate their "top down" control of reward circuitry, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we use biochemistry to examine the expression of the FosB family of transcription factors and their potential gene targets in PFC and HPC postmortem samples from depressed patients and cocaine addicts. We demonstrate that ΔFosB and other FosB isoforms are downregulated in the HPC but not the PFC in the brains of both depressed and addicted individuals. Further, we show that potential ΔFosB transcriptional targets, including GluA2, are also downregulated in the HPC but not PFC of cocaine addicts. Thus, we provide the first evidence of FosB gene expression in human HPC and PFC in these psychiatric disorders, and in light of recent findings demonstrating the critical role of HPC ΔFosB in rodent models of learning and memory, these data suggest that reduced ΔFosB in HPC could potentially underlie cognitive deficits accompanying chronic cocaine abuse or depression.

  18. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells a...

  19. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-guo Jiang; Shi-li Jin; Gong-ying Li; Qing-qing Li; Zhi-ruo Li; Hong-xia Ma; Chuan-jun Zhuo; Rong-huan Jiang; Min-jie Ye

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry andin situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no signiifcant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our ifndings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  20. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-guo Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  1. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-Guo; Jin, Shi-Li; Li, Gong-Ying; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Zhi-Ruo; Ma, Hong-Xia; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Jiang, Rong-Huan; Ye, Min-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  2. Module discovery by exhaustive search for densely connected, co-expressed regions in biomolecular networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, R.; Moser, F.; Shu, J.; Schoenhuth, A.; Chen, N.; Ester, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Computational prediction of functionally related groups of genes (functional modules) from large-scale data is an important issue in computational biology. Gene expression experiments and interaction networks are well studied large-scale data sources, available for many not yet exhaustive

  3. Seasonal changes in patterns of gene expression in avian song control brain regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K Thompson

    Full Text Available Photoperiod and hormonal cues drive dramatic seasonal changes in structure and function of the avian song control system. Little is known, however, about the patterns of gene expression associated with seasonal changes. Here we address this issue by altering the hormonal and photoperiodic conditions in seasonally-breeding Gambel's white-crowned sparrows and extracting RNA from the telencephalic song control nuclei HVC and RA across multiple time points that capture different stages of growth and regression. We chose HVC and RA because while both nuclei change in volume across seasons, the cellular mechanisms underlying these changes differ. We thus hypothesized that different genes would be expressed between HVC and RA. We tested this by using the extracted RNA to perform a cDNA microarray hybridization developed by the SoNG initiative. We then validated these results using qRT-PCR. We found that 363 genes varied by more than 1.5 fold (>log(2 0.585 in expression in HVC and/or RA. Supporting our hypothesis, only 59 of these 363 genes were found to vary in both nuclei, while 132 gene expression changes were HVC specific and 172 were RA specific. We then assigned many of these genes to functional categories relevant to the different mechanisms underlying seasonal change in HVC and RA, including neurogenesis, apoptosis, cell growth, dendrite arborization and axonal growth, angiogenesis, endocrinology, growth factors, and electrophysiology. This revealed categorical differences in the kinds of genes regulated in HVC and RA. These results show that different molecular programs underlie seasonal changes in HVC and RA, and that gene expression is time specific across different reproductive conditions. Our results provide insights into the complex molecular pathways that underlie adult neural plasticity.

  4. Conserved Regional Patterns of GABA-Related Transcript Expression in the Neocortex of Subjects With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takanori; Bazmi, H. Holly; Mirnics, Karoly; Wu, Qiang; Sampson, Allan R.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit disturbances in a number of cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor functions that depend on the circuitry of different cortical areas. The cognitive deficits associated with dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex result, at least in part, from abnormalities in GABA neurotransmission, as reflected in a specific pattern of altered expression of GABA-related genes. Consequently, the authors sought to determine whether this pattern of altered gene expression is restricted to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or could also contribute to the dysfunction of other cortical areas in subjects with schizophrenia. Method Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the levels of eight GABA-related transcripts in four cortical areas (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and primary motor and primary visual cortices) of subjects (N=12) with schizophrenia and matched normal comparison subjects. Results Expression levels of seven transcripts were lower in subjects with schizophrenia, with the magnitude of reduction for each transcript comparable across the four areas. The largest reductions were detected for mRNA encoding somatostatin and parvalbumin, followed by moderate decreases in mRNA expression for the 67-kilodalton isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase, the GABA membrane transporter GAT-1, and the α1 and δ subunits of GABAA receptors. In contrast, the expression of calretinin mRNA did not differ between the subject groups in any of the four areas. Conclusions Because the areas examined represent the major functional domains (e.g., association, limbic, motor, and sensory) of the cerebral cortex, our findings suggest that a conserved set of molecular alterations affecting GABA neurotransmission contribute to the pathophysiology of different clinical features of schizophrenia. PMID:18281411

  5. Expression in Pichia pastoris and characterization of Rhizomucor miehei lipases containing a new propeptide region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Lv, Pengmei; Luo, Wen; Yuan, Zhenhong; He, Dong

    2016-01-01

    A large number of propeptide regions from various proteins have been identified which function as intramolecular chaperones and assist the folding of the respective functional domains. The same polypeptide can fold into an altered conformation because of a mutated intramolecular chaperone and can maintain the "memory" of the folding process (new physicochemical properties). Two new kinds of Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML) were constructed by replacing its propeptide region with that from either Rhizopus chinensis lipase (RCL) or Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL). The enzymatic properties were also analyzed and compared between wild-type RML and the mutants. The results indicated that the same polypeptide can fold into different conformations because of changes in the propeptide region.

  6. Stable high-level transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using gene silencing mutants and matrix attachment regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butaye, Katleen M J; Goderis, Inge J W M; Wouters, Piet F J; Pues, Jonathan M-T G; Delauré, Stijn L; Broekaert, Willem F; Depicker, Ann; Cammue, Bruno P A; De Bolle, Miguel F C

    2004-08-01

    Basic and applied research involving transgenic plants often requires consistent high-level expression of transgenes. However, high inter-transformant variability of transgene expression caused by various phenomena, including gene silencing, is frequently observed. Here, we show that stable, high-level transgene expression is obtained using Arabidopsis thaliana post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) sgs2 and sgs3 mutants. In populations of first generation (T1) A. thaliana plants transformed with a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (uidA) driven by the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter (p35S), the incidence of highly expressing transformants shifted from 20% in wild type background to 100% in sgs2 and sgs3 backgrounds. Likewise, when sgs2 mutants were transformed with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 6 gene under control of p35S, all transformants showed a clear phenotype typified by serrated leaves, whereas such phenotype was only observed in about one of five wild type transformants. p35S-driven uidA expression remained high and steady in T2 sgs2 and sgs3 transformants, in marked contrast to the variable expression patterns observed in wild type T2 populations. We further show that T-DNA constructs flanked by matrix attachment regions of the chicken lysozyme gene (chiMARs) cause a boost in GUS activity by fivefold in sgs2 and 12-fold in sgs3 plants, reaching up to 10% of the total soluble proteins, whereas no such boost is observed in the wild type background. MAR-based plant transformation vectors used in a PTGS mutant background might be of high value for efficient high-throughput screening of transgene-based phenotypes as well as for obtaining extremely high transgene expression in plants.

  7. Potential control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 asp expression by alternative splicing in the upstream untranslated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Michael S; Birch, Katherine E; Deacon, Nicholas J; Mosse, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    The negative-sense asp open reading frame (ORF) positioned opposite to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene encodes the 189 amino acid, membrane-associated ASP protein. Negative-sense transcription, regulated by long terminal repeat sequences, has been observed early in HIV-1 infection in vitro. All subtypes of HIV-1 were scanned to detect the negative-sense asp ORF and to identify potential regulatory sequences. A series of highly conserved upstream short open reading frames (sORFs) was identified. This potential control region from HIV-1(NL4-3), containing six sORFs, was cloned upstream of the reporter gene EGFP. Expression by transfection of HEK293 cells indicated that the introduction of this sORF region inhibits EGFP reporter expression; analysis of transcripts revealed no significant changes in levels of EGFP mRNA. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR) further demonstrated that the upstream sORF region undergoes alternative splicing in vitro. The most abundant product is spliced to remove sORFs I to V, leaving only the in-frame sORF VI upstream of asp. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of typical splice donor- and acceptor-site motifs. Mutation of the highly conserved splice donor and acceptor sites modulates, but does not fully relieve, inhibition of EGFP production. The strong conservation of asp and its sORFs across all HIV-1 subtypes suggests that the asp gene product may have a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. Alternative splicing of the upstream sORF region provides a potential mechanism for controlling expression of the asp gene.

  8. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Li; Qiong Xia; Hongping Kou; Dan Wang; Xiuyun Lin; Ying Wu; Chunming Xu; Shaochen Xing

    2011-01-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily.Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions,but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea,thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen.It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question.We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied.Surprisingly,induced expression of Pib by M.grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation,and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wildtype plants.Accordingly,the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5’-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type.In contrast,the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5’-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene,ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance.Taken together,our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M.grisea infection,and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  9. Matrix attachment regions (MARs) enhance transformation frequencies and reduce variance of transgene expression in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K.; Leah, R.; Knudsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) are defined as genomic DNA sequences, located at the physical boundaries of chromatin loops. They are suggested to play a role in the cis unfolding and folding of the chromatin fibre associated with the regulation of gene transcription. Inclusion of MARs i...

  10. Meiotic stability of transgene expression is unaffected by flanking matrix-associated regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conner, A.J.; Mlynarova, L.; Stiekema, W.J.; Nap, J.P.H.

    1998-01-01

    DNA repeats are associated with gene instability and silencing phenomena in plants. Therefore, the presence of a direct repeat of matrix-associated region (MAR) DNA, that considerably reduced position effects between independent transformants, may increase (epi)genetic instability. To investigate th

  11. Differential expression of inflammatory mediators in rat microglia cultured from different brain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, LQ; Lubrich, B; Biber, K; Gebicke-Haerter, PJ

    1999-01-01

    Microglial cells show a rather uniform distribution of cell numbers throughout the brain with only minor prevalences in some brain regions. Their in situ morphologies, however, may vary markedly from elongated forms observed in apposition with neuronal fibers to spherical cell bodies with sometimes

  12. Effects of different endocrine disruptor (EDC) mixtures on gene expression in neonatal rat brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtensteiger, Walter; Bassetti-Gaille, Catherine; Faass, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    EDC mixtures on gene expression in developing brain. Amix (8 anti-androgenic chemicals), Emix (4 estrogenic chemicals) and Tmix (Amix + Emix + paracetamol recently identified as anti-androgenic) were administered by oral gavage to rat dams from gestational day 7 until weaning, at doses corresponding...... to 450×, 200× and 100× high end human intakes (S. Christiansen et al., 2012. International Journal of Andrology 35, 303). At postnatal day 6, during the last part of sexual brain differentiation, exon microarray analyses were performed in medial preoptic area (MPO) in the highest dose group, and real...... of individual mRNAs demonstrated treatment- and sex-dependent differences between MPO and VMH. Effects were dose-dependent. Prominent are effects on the expression of genes involved in excitatory glutamatergic synapse formation and function. These data indicate that effects of complex EDC mixtures on developing...

  13. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  14. Linkage Analysis of Genomic Regions Contributing to the Expression of Type 1 Diabetes Microvascular Complications and Interaction with HLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettie M. Lipner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted linkage analysis to follow up earlier work on microvascular complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D. We analyzed 415 families (2,008 individuals previously genotyped for 402 SNP markers spanning chromosome 6. We did linkage analysis for the phenotypes of retinopathy and nephropathy. For retinopathy, two linkage peaks were mapped: one located at the HLA region and another novel locus telomeric to HLA. For nephropathy, a linkage peak centromeric to HLA was mapped, but the linkage peak telomeric to HLA seen in retinopathy was absent. Because of the strong association of T1D with DRB1*03:01 and DRB1*04:01, we stratified our analyses based on families whose probands were positive for DRB1*03:01 or DRB1*04:01. When analyzing the DRB1*03:01-positive retinopathy families, in addition to the novel telomeric locus, one centromeric to HLA was identified at the same location as the nephropathy peak. When we stratified on DRB1*04:01-positive families, the HLA telomeric peak strengthened but the centromeric peak disappeared. Our findings showed that HLA and non-HLA loci on chromosome 6 are involved in T1D complications’ expression. While the HLA region is a major contributor to the expression of T1D, our results suggest an interaction between specific HLA alleles and other loci that influence complications’ expression.

  15. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  16. Las representaciones fácticas y cognitivas del relato de entrevistas biográficas: un análisis reticular del discurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozares Colina, Carlos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to identify and to relate the factual to the cognitive dimensions of a biographical history understood as a narrative representation. It is constructed by the interviewed from the combination of both dimensions. This paper proposes reticular discourse analysis as an effective method for putting forward both dimensions in a related fashion. Through linguistics and ad hoc social network theories, the discourse from the biographical history is framed, analyzed and made relevant.

  17. A Fear-Inducing Odor Alters PER2 and c-Fos Expression in Brain Regions Involved in Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulos, Harry; Dolatshad, Hamid; Davis, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence demonstrates that rodents learn to associate a foot shock with time of day, indicating the formation of a fear related time-stamp memory, even in the absence of a functioning SCN. In addition, mice acquire and retain fear memory better during the early day compared to the early night. This type of memory may be regulated by circadian pacemakers outside of the SCN. As a first step in testing the hypothesis that clock genes are involved in the formation of a time-stamp fear memory, we exposed one group of mice to fox feces derived odor (TMT) at ZT 0 and one group at ZT 12 for 4 successive days. A separate group with no exposure to TMT was also included as a control. Animals were sacrificed one day after the last exposure to TMT, and PER2 and c-Fos protein were quantified in the SCN, amygdala, hippocampus, and piriform cortex. Exposure to TMT had a strong effect at ZT 0, decreasing PER2 expression at this time point in most regions except the SCN, and reversing the normal rhythm of PER2 expression in the amygdala and piriform cortex. These changes were accompanied by increased c-Fos expression at ZT0. In contrast, exposure to TMT at ZT 12 abolished the rhythm of PER2 expression in the amygdala. In addition, increased c-Fos expression at ZT 12 was only detected in the central nucleus of the amygdala in the TMT12 group. TMT exposure at either time point did not affect PER2 or c-Fos in the SCN, indicating that under a light-dark cycle, the SCN rhythm is stable in the presence of repeated exposure to a fear-inducing stimulus. Taken together, these results indicate that entrainment to a fear-inducing stimulus leads to changes in PER2 and c-Fos expression that are detected 24 hours following the last exposure to TMT, indicating entrainment of endogenous oscillators in these regions. The observed effects on PER2 expression and c-Fos were stronger during the early day than during the early night, possibly to prepare appropriate systems at ZT 0 to respond to a fear

  18. Identification of temporal and region-specific myocardial gene expression patterns in response to infarction in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Prat-Vidal

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms associated with pathophysiological changes in ventricular remodelling due to myocardial infarction (MI remain poorly understood. We analyzed changes in gene expression by microarray technology in porcine myocardial tissue at 1, 4, and 6 weeks post-MI.MI was induced by coronary artery ligation in 9 female pigs (30-40 kg. Animals were randomly sacrificed at 1, 4, or 6 weeks post-MI (n = 3 per group and 3 healthy animals were also included as control group. Total RNA from myocardial samples was hybridized to GeneChip® Porcine Genome Arrays. Functional analysis was obtained with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA online tool. Validation of microarray data was performed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR.More than 8,000 different probe sets showed altered expression in the remodelling myocardium at 1, 4, or 6 weeks post-MI. Ninety-seven percent of altered transcripts were detected in the infarct core and 255 probe sets were differentially expressed in the remote myocardium. Functional analysis revealed 28 genes de-regulated in the remote myocardial region in at least one of the three temporal analyzed stages, including genes associated with heart failure (HF, systemic sclerosis and coronary artery disease. In the infarct core tissue, eight major time-dependent gene expression patterns were recognized among 4,221 probe sets commonly altered over time. Altered gene expression of ACVR2B, BID, BMP2, BMPR1A, LMNA, NFKBIA, SMAD1, TGFB3, TNFRSF1A, and TP53 were further validated.The clustering of similar expression patterns for gene products with related function revealed molecular footprints, some of them described for the first time, which elucidate changes in biological processes at different stages after MI.

  19. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy infection alters endogenous retrovirus expression in distinct brain regions of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montag Judith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases which are presumably caused by an infectious conformational isoform of the cellular prion protein. Previous work has provided evidence that in murine prion disease the endogenous retrovirus (ERV expression is altered in the brain. To determine if prion-induced changes in ERV expression are a general phenomenon we used a non-human primate model for prion disease. Results Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fasicularis were infected intracerebrally with BSE-positive brain stem material from cattle and allowed to develop prion disease. Brain tissue from the basis pontis and vermis cerebelli of the six animals and the same regions from four healthy controls were subjected to ERV expression profiling using a retrovirus-specific microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. We could show that Class I gammaretroviruses HERV-E4-1, ERV-9, and MacERV-4 increase expression in BSE-infected macaques. In a second approach, we analysed ERV-K-(HML-2 RNA and protein expression in extracts from the same cynomolgus macaques. Here we found a significant downregulation of both, the macaque ERV-K-(HML-2 Gag protein and RNA in the frontal/parietal cortex of BSE-infected macaques. Conclusions We provide evidence that dysregulation of ERVs in response to BSE-infection can be detected on both, the RNA and the protein level. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the differential expression of ERV-derived structural proteins in prion disorders. Our findings suggest that endogenous retroviruses may induce or exacerbate the pathological consequences of prion-associated neurodegeneration.

  20. Regional and cellular gene expression changes in human Huntington's disease brain

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) pathology is well understood at a histological level but a comprehensive molecular analysis of the effect of the disease in the human brain has not previously been available. To elucidate the molecular phenotype of HD on a genome-wide scale, we compared mRNA profiles from 44 human HD brains with those from 36 unaffected controls using microarray analysis. Four brain regions were analyzed: caudate nucleus, cerebellum, prefrontal association cortex [Brodmann's area 9 (...

  1. Aging alters functionally human dermal papillary fibroblasts but not reticular fibroblasts: a new view of skin morphogenesis and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Mine

    Full Text Available Understanding the contribution of the dermis in skin aging is a key question, since this tissue is particularly important for skin integrity, and because its properties can affect the epidermis. Characteristics of matched pairs of dermal papillary and reticular fibroblasts (Fp and Fr were investigated throughout aging, comparing morphology, secretion of cytokines, MMPs/TIMPs, growth potential, and interaction with epidermal keratinocytes. We observed that Fp populations were characterized by a higher proportion of small cells with low granularity and a higher growth potential than Fr populations. However, these differences became less marked with increasing age of donors. Aging was also associated with changes in the secretion activity of both Fp and Fr. Using a reconstructed skin model, we evidenced that Fp and Fr cells do not possess equivalent capacities to sustain keratinopoiesis. Comparing Fp and Fr from young donors, we noticed that dermal equivalents containing Fp were more potent to promote epidermal morphogenesis than those containing Fr. These data emphasize the complexity of dermal fibroblast biology and document the specific functional properties of Fp and Fr. Our results suggest a new model of skin aging in which marked alterations of Fp may affect the histological characteristics of skin.

  2. Recovery of Hypersomnia Concurrent With Recovery of an Injured Ascending Reticular Activating System in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    We report on a stroke patient who showed recovery of hypersomnia concurrent with the recovery of an injured ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT).A 70-year-old female patient underwent coiling of the left ruptured posterior communicating artery after subarachnoid hemorrhage and both extraventricular drainage for management of an intraventricular hemorrhage. At 2 months after onset, when she started rehabilitation, she exhibited intact consciousness, with the full score on the Glasgow Coma Scale: 15. However, she showed severe hypersomnia: she always fell asleep without external stimulation and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (EPS) score was 24 (full score: 24, cut off for hypersomnia: 10). She underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including neurotropic drugs, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Her hypersomnia has shown improvement as 14 (3 months after onset), 11 (4 months after onset), 7 (12 months after onset), and 6 (24 months after onset), respectively.On 2-month DTT, narrowing of both lower dorsal and ventral ARASs was observed on both sides: in particular, among 4 neural tracts of the lower ARAS, the right lower ventral ARAS was the narrowest. By contrast, on 24-month DTT, the 4 narrowed neural tracts of both lower dorsal and ventral ARASs were thickened compared with those of 2-month DTT.Recovery of hypersomnia with recovery of an injured lower ARAS on DTT was observed in a stroke patient. Our results suggest that evaluation of the lower ARAS using DTT might be useful for stroke patients with hypersomnia.

  3. Experimental evidence and modeling studies support a synchronizing role for electrical coupling in the cat thalamic reticular neurons in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Crochet, Sylvain; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Steriade, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    Thalamic reticular (RE) neurons are crucially implicated in brain rhythms. Here, we report that RE neurons of adult cats, recorded and stained intracellularly in vivo, displayed spontaneously occurring spikelets, which are characteristic of central neurons that are coupled electrotonically via gap junctions. Spikelets occurred spontaneously during spindles, an oscillation in which RE neurons play a leading role, as well as during interspindle lulls. They were significantly different from excitatory postsynaptic potentials and also distinct from fast prepotentials that are presumably dendritic spikes generated synaptically. Spikelets were strongly reduced by halothane, a blocker of gap junctions. Multi-site extracellular recordings performed before, during and after administration of halothane demonstrated a role for electrical coupling in the synchronization of spindling activity within the RE nucleus. Finally, computational models of RE neurons predicted that gap junctions between these neurons could mediate the spread of low-frequency activity at great distances. These experimental and modeling data suggest that electrotonic coupling within the RE nucleus plays an important role in the generation and synchronization of low-frequency (spindling) activities in the thalamus. PMID:15245484

  4. Influence of inorganic phosphate and pH on sarcoplasmic reticular ATPase in skinned muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, G J; Papp, Z; Zaremba, R

    1999-08-01

    1. The influence of 30 mM inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH (6.2-7.4) on the rate of ATP utilization was determined in mechanically skinned bundles of myofibrils from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis at approximately 5 C. 2. BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime; 10 mM) depressed isometric force production and actomyosin (AM) ATPase activity equally. Therefore sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) ATPase activity could be determined by extrapolation of the total ATPase activity to zero force. 3. The SR ATPase activity without added Pi at pH 7.1 was 42 +/- 2 % of the total ATPase activity. Addition of 30 mM Pi reduced SR ATPase activity slightly, by 9 +/- 5 %, and depressed force by 62 +/- 2 % and AM ATPase activity by 21 +/- 6 %. 4. At pH 6.2, force, SR ATPase activity and AM ATPase activity were reduced by 21 +/- 5, 61 +/- 5 and 10 +/- 4 % of their respective values at pH 7.1. 5. The SR ATPase activity at 30 mM Pi and pH 6.2 was reduced markedly to 20 +/- 6 % of the value under control conditions, suggesting that the maximum rate of Ca2+ uptake during muscle fatigue was strongly depressed. This reduction was larger than expected on the basis of the effects of Pi and pH alone.

  5. Neuropeptide Y and nestin expression in the hippocampal CA3 region following restrained and inverted stress in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guogang Sun; Ailing Li; Bo Chen; Guangbi Fan; Hongwen Xiao; Yue Chen; Jie Xu; Ye Nie; Bing Zhang; Lin Gong

    2011-01-01

    Our preliminary study demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY)/nestin-positive cells exhibit a consistent spatial distribution in the hippocampus of normal adult rats. However, following severe acute and chronic stress-induced impaired learning and memory, synchronous decreased expression of nestin and NPY takes place in the hippocampus, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, acute and chronic stress rat models were established using combined restrained and inverted stress. Results showed that learning and memory significantly decreased in acute and chronic stress rats. In addition, hippocampal cells were damaged, in particular in the acute stress rats, and nestin and NPY expression, as well as the number of NPY/nestin-positive cells in the CA3 region, significantly decreased. Furthermore, mature neurofilament 200-positive neurons were absent in the chronic stress rats. The NPY and cytoskeletal protein system equally contributed to stress-induced early learning and memory deficits, as well as sustained cerebral injury in the adult hippocampus.

  6. [Effectiveness of expression of tdh gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus depends on two point mutations in promoter region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalu, O A; Pisanov, R V; Monakhova, E V

    2012-12-01

    A molecular-biological study of the clinical strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain genes of thermostable direct hemolysin Tdh) and Tdh-related hemolysin (Trh). Using Southern blot hybridization, it is shown that genomes of strains that carry determinants of both hemolysins (tdh(+)-trh+) represent a single copy, whereas in tdh2+RH+ strains, there are two copies (tdh1 and tdh2). All of the examined tdh+trh+ and some of the tdh+trh strains either did not express the tdh gene or did not express the tdh gene (Kanagawa negative or KP-) or expressed it weakly and not often (Kanagawa intermediate, KP+), unlike several Kanagawa positive tdh+trh- strains. To establish the reasons for KP -/+ phenotypes, tdh, tdh11, and tdh2 genes of 13 strains isolated in Russia and neighboring foreign countries were sequenced, followed by the biotransformation analysis of the obtained sequences, as well as a comparison with those of a number of strains presented in GenBank. The results revealed that the weak expression of the tdh gene depends, not only on one point mutation in the promoter region (substitution of A for G in the -35 region), as was thought previously, but also on the second substitution (G for A in the -3 position relative to the -10 sequence), which is quite sufficient when the former is absent. Therefore, the reversion of KP -/+ strains that contain one of these substitutions can take place as a result of a single reverse point mutation, and they should be considered potentially dangerous. Strains that contain both substitutions may revert with lesser probability because, in this case, both mutations are necessary.

  7. R region sequences in the long terminal repeat of a murine retrovirus specifically increase expression of unspliced RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, A M; Okenquist, S A; Lenz, J

    1999-04-01

    A stem-loop structure at the 5' end of the R region of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine leukemia virus SL3 and other type C mammalian retroviruses is important for maximum levels of expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR. This element, termed the R region stem-loop (RSL), has a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Its major effect is on posttranscriptional processing of LTR-driven transcripts. Here we tested whether the RSL affected the production of RNAs from a full-length SL3 genome. Mutation of the RSL in the 5' LTR of SL3 reduced the cytoplasmic levels of full-length viral transcripts but not those of spliced, env mRNA transcripts. Thus, the RSL specifically affected the cytoplasmic levels of the unspliced viral RNA. To test further whether the effect was specific for unspliced transcripts, a system was devised in which the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR was tested in the presence or absence of an intron. Mutation of the RSL resulted in only about a twofold decline in the level of reporter gene expression when the transcripts contained an intron. However, when the intron was removed, mutation of the RSL reduced expression of the reporter gene about 10- to 60-fold in various cell lines. The secondary structure of the RSL was essential for its activity on the intronless transcript. Thus, the RSL appears to be important for the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA and unspliced RNA from chimeric transcription units under the control of the viral LTR.

  8. Identification of putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of co-expressed functional groups of genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi NV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf remains poorly understood. While over half the genes are estimated to be regulated at the transcriptional level, few regulatory motifs and transcription regulators have been found. Results The study seeks to identify putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of 13 functional groups of genes expressed in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle of Pf. Three motif-discovery programs were used for the purpose, and motifs were searched for only on the gene coding strand. Four motifs – the 'G-rich', the 'C-rich', the 'TGTG' and the 'CACA' motifs – were identified, and zero to all four of these occur in the 13 sets of upstream regions. The 'CACA motif' was absent in functional groups expressed during the ring to early trophozoite transition. For functional groups expressed in each transition, the motifs tended to be similar. Upstream motifs in some functional groups showed 'positional conservation' by occurring at similar positions relative to the translational start site (TLS; this increases their significance as regulatory motifs. In the ribonucleotide synthesis, mitochondrial, proteasome and organellar translation machinery genes, G-rich, C-rich, CACA and TGTG motifs, respectively, occur with striking positional conservation. In the organellar translation machinery group, G-rich motifs occur close to the TLS. The same motifs were sometimes identified for multiple functional groups; differences in location and abundance of the motifs appear to ensure different modes of action. Conclusion The identification of positionally conserved over-represented upstream motifs throws light on putative regulatory elements for transcription in Pf.

  9. Methylation of Promoter Regions of Genes of the Human Intrauterine Renin Angiotensin System and Their Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane D. Sykes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrauterine renin angiotensin system (RAS is implicated in placentation and labour onset. Here we investigate whether promoter methylation of RAS genes changes with gestation or labour and if it affects gene expression. Early gestation amnion and placenta were studied, as were term amnion, decidua, and placenta collected before labour (at elective caesarean section or after spontaneous labour and delivery. The expression and degree of methylation of the prorenin receptor (ATP6AP2, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1, and two proteases that can activate prorenin (kallikrein, KLK1, and cathepsin D, CTSD were measured by qPCR and a DNA methylation array. There was no effect of gestation or labour on the methylation of RAS genes and CTSD. Amnion and decidua displayed strong correlations between the percent hypermethylation of RAS genes and CTSD, suggestive of global methylation. There were no correlations between the degree of methylation and mRNA abundance of any genes studied. KLK1 was the most methylated gene and the proportion of hypermethylated KLK1 alleles was lower in placenta than decidua. The presence of intermediate methylated alleles of KLK1 in early gestation placenta and in amnion after labour suggests that KLK1 methylation is uniquely dynamic in these tissues.

  10. Tissue fibrocytes in patients with mild asthma: A possible link to thickness of reticular basement membrane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjermer Leif

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibroblasts, proposed as being derived from circulating fibrocytes, are considered to be important cells in thickening of the basement membrane in patients with asthma. We have studied the correlation of tissue fibrocyte levels to basement membrane thickness and the presence of fibrocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF in steroid-naive patients with mild asthma and controls. Methods Patients with mild asthma (n = 9 were recruited and divided into two categories based on whether or not fibroblast-like cells could be established from BALF. Non-asthmatic healthy subjects (n = 5 were used as controls. Colocalization of the fibrocyte markers CD34, CD45RO, procollagen I, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were identified in bronchial biopsies from patients and controls by confocal microscopy. Kruskall-Wallis method was used to calculate statistical significance and Spearman coefficient of rank correlation was used to assess the degree of association. Results In patients with BALF fibroblasts, a 14-fold increase of tissue cells expressing CD34/CD45RO/α-SMA and a 16-fold increase of tissue cells expressing CD34/procollagen I was observed when compared to controls (p Conclusion These findings indicate a correlation between recruited fibrocytes in tissue and thickness of basement membrane. Fibroblast progenitor cells may therefore be important in airway remodeling in steroid-naive patients with mild asthma.

  11. The regional expression of architecture technology%建筑技术的地域性表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文艳; 李静薇; 郭立伟

    2011-01-01

    通过对建筑技术应用手段进行分析,从建筑材料、建筑节能等方面进行论述,提出地域性建筑技术表达方式,从而探索在地域自然生态意义上实现可持续发展的建筑理论和设计思想。%This paper through analysed applied means of architecture technology, it discussed from building materials, building energy efficien- cy, presented expression way of the regional architecture technology, thus explored architecture theory and design concepts of sustainable development based on regional natural ecological significance.

  12. Extended exposure to a palatable cafeteria diet alters gene expression in brain regions implicated in reward, and withdrawal from this diet alters gene expression in brain regions associated with stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Sarah I; Maniam, Jayanthi; South, Timothy; Holmes, Nathan; Westbrook, R Fred; Morris, Margaret J

    2014-05-15

    Like people, rodents exposed to energy-rich foods over-eat and become overweight. Removal of this diet activates stress systems, which may explain why people have difficulty dieting. We exposed rats to energy-rich foods in order to identify changes in the brain induced by that diet and by its removal. Sprague Dawley rats were fed lab-chow or an energy-rich cafeteria diet (plus chow). Following 6 or 15 weeks, half of each group was switched to the opposing diet. Rats were culled 48-h later. We measured fat mass, plasma hormones, and assessed brains for mRNA expression of several genes. Cafeteria-fed rats consumed more kilojoules, weighed more and had elevated leptin (plus reduced CORT at 15 weeks) relative to chow-fed rats. Fifteen weeks of cafeteria diet suppressed μ-opioid and CB1 receptor mRNA in the VTA, but elevated amygdala GR, and 6 weeks of cafeteria diet reduced BDNF, compared to chow-fed rats. Rats switched to the cafeteria diet ate similar amounts as rats maintained on the diet, and switching to cafeteria diet after 15 weeks reduced amygdala GR expression. Rats switched to chow ate less than rats maintained on chow, and switching to chow following 15 weeks of cafeteria diet increased hypothalamic CRH mRNA. Therefore, 15 weeks of cafeteria diet produced changes in brain regions implicated in reward processes. Switching these rats to chow activated the HPA axis, while switching chow-fed rats to the cafeteria diet decreased GR expression in the amygdala, a region associated with stress. These findings have implications for dieting in humans. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of fluoxetine administration on regional galanin expression in obese Zucker rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, María P; Gutiérreza, Arantza; Casis, Luis; Macarulla, María Teresa; Zarate, Jon; Echevarría, Enrique

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the potential involvement of hypothalamic galanin system in the anorectic mechanism of fluoxetine in obese Zucker rats. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. The control group was given 0.9% NaCl solution. Significant decreases in food intake, final body weight and total body fat were observed after fluoxetine treatment. Although fluoxetine-treated rats showed a decrease in urine elimination, this effect was not enough to compensate decreased water intake, leading to dehydration, as showed by decreased body water content. Chronic fluoxetine administration increased the numbers of galanin positively immunostained neural cells in medial and lateral preoptic areas, lateral hypothalamic area and paraventricular nucleus (rostral and magnocellular regions), without changes in dorsomedial, ventromedial, supraoptic, suprachiasmatic and arcuate nuclei. Taken into account that galanin stimulates appetite, these results could represent rather a compensatory response against reduced food intake than a direct anorectic mechanism. Changes in the magnocellular region of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus suggest a role for galanin neural circuits at this level in fluoxetine-induced hydro-osmotic impairment.

  14. Cytoskeletal protein translation and expression in the rat brain are stressor-dependent and region-specific.

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    Petra Sántha

    Full Text Available Stress is an integral component of life that can sometimes cause a critical overload, depending on the qualitative and quantitative natures of the stressors. The involvement of actin, the predominant component of dendritic integrity, is a plausible candidate factor in stress-induced neuronal cytoskeletal changes. The major aim of this study was to compare the effects of three different stress conditions on the transcription and translation of actin-related cytoskeletal genes in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were exposed to one or other of the frequently used models of physical stress, i.e. electric foot shock stress (EFSS, forced swimming stress (FSS, or psychosocial stress (PSS for periods of 3, 7, 14, or 21 days. The relative mRNA and protein expressions of β-actin, cofilin and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK-1 were determined by qRT- PCR and western blotting from hippocampus and frontal cortex samples. Stressor-specific alterations in both β-actin and cofilin expression levels were seen after stress. These alterations were most pronounced in response to EFSS, and exhibited a U-shaped time course. FSS led to a significant β-actin mRNA expression elevation in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex after 3 and 7 days, respectively, without any subsequent change. PSS did not cause any change in β-actin or cofilin mRNA or protein expression in the examined brain regions. EFSS, FSS and PSS had no effect on the expression of MAPK-1 mRNA at any tested time point. These findings indicate a very delicate, stress type-dependent regulation of neuronal cytoskeletal components in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex.

  15. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) expression and possible function in mouse tooth germ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kana; Wada, Hiroko; Nagata, Kengo; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Wada, Naohisa; Someya, Hirotaka; Mikami, Yurie; Sakai, Hidetaka; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal expression of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is involved in the pathogenesis of FSHD. FRG1 is also important for the normal muscular and vascular development. Our previous study showed that FRG1 is one of the highly expressed genes in the mandible on embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) than on E12.0. In this study, we investigated the temporospatial expression pattern of FRG1 mRNA and protein during the development of the mouse lower first molar, and also evaluated the subcellular localization of the FRG1 protein in mouse dental epithelial (mDE6) cells. The FRG1 expression was identified in the dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells at the initiation and bud stages. It was detected in the inner enamel epithelium at the cap and early bell stages. At the late bell and root formation stages, these signals were detected in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during the formation of enamel and dentin matrices, respectively. The FRG1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm in the mouse tooth germ in vivo, while FRG1 was detected predominantly in the nucleus and faintly in the cytoplasm in mDE6 cells in vitro. In mDE6 cells treated with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), the protein expression of FRG1 increased in cytoplasm, suggesting that FRG1 may translocate to the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that FRG1 is involved in the morphogenesis of the tooth germ, as well as in the formation of enamel and dentin matrices and that FRG1 may play a role in the odontogenesis in the mouse following BMP4 stimulation.

  16. Expression and function of variants of human catecholamine transporters lacking the fifth transmembrane region encoded by exon 6.

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    Chiharu Sogawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transporters for dopamine (DAT and norepinephrine (NET are members of the Na+- and Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporter family SLC6. There is a line of evidence that alternative splicing results in several isoforms of neurotransmitter transporters including NET. However, its relevance to the physiology and pathology of the neurotransmitter reuptake system has not been fully elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found novel isoforms of human DAT and NET produced by alternative splicing in human blood cells (DAT and placenta (NET, both of which lacked the region encoded by exon 6. RT-PCR analyses showed a difference in expression between the full length (FL and truncated isoforms in the brain and peripheral tissues, suggesting tissue-specific alternative splicing. Heterologous expression of the FL but not truncated isoforms of DAT and NET in COS-7 cells revealed transport activity. However, immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy and a cell surface biotinylation assay demonstrated that the truncated as well as FL isoform was expressed at least in part in the plasma membrane at the cell surface, although the truncated DAT was distributed to the cell surface slower than FL DAT. A specific antibody to the C-terminus of DAT labeled the variant but not FL DAT, when cells were not treated with Triton for permeabilization, suggesting the C-terminus of the variant to be located extracellulary. Co-expression of the FL isoform with the truncated isoform in COS-7 cells resulted in a reduced uptake of substrates, indicating a dominant negative effect of the variant. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation assay revealed physical interaction between the FL and truncated isoforms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unique expression and function and the proposed membrane topology of the variants suggest the importance of isoforms of catecholamine transporters in monoaminergic signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues.

  17. A reticular rhapsody: phylogenic evolution and nomenclature of the RTN/Nogo gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertle, Thomas; Klinger, Michael; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Schwab, Martin E

    2003-07-01

    Reticulon (RTN) genes code for a family of proteins relatively recently described in higher vertebrates. The four known mammalian paralogues (RTN1, -2, -3, and -4/Nogo) have homologous carboxyl termini with two characteristic large hydrophobic regions. Except for RTN4-A/Nogo-A, thought to be an inhibitor for neurite outgrowth, restricting the regenerative capabilities of the mammalian CNS after injury, the functions of other family members are largely unknown. The overall occurrence of RTNs in different phyla and the evolution of the RTN gene family have hitherto not been analyzed. Here we expound data showing that the RTN family has arisen during early eukaryotic evolution potentially concerted to the establishment of the endomembrane system. Over 250 reticulon-like (RTNL) genes were identified in deeply diverging eukaryotes, fungi, plants, and animals. A systematic nomenclature for all identified family members is introduced. The analysis of exon-intron arrangements and of protein homologies allowed us to isolate key steps in the history of these genes. Our data corroborate the hypothesis that present RTNs evolved from an intron-rich reticulon ancestor mainly by the loss of different introns in diverse phyla. We also present evidence that the exceptionally large RTN4-A-specific exon 3, which harbors a potent neurite growth inhibitory region, may have arisen de novo approximately 350 MYA during transition to land vertebrates. These data emphasize on the one hand the universal role of reticulons in the eukaryotic system and on the other hand the acquisition of putative new functions through acquirement of novel amino-terminal exons.

  18. A Proximal Promoter Region of Arabidopsis DREB2C Confers Tissue-specific Expression under Heat Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Chen; Jihyun Je; Chieun Song; Jung Eun Hwang; Chae Oh Lim

    2012-01-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding factor 2C (DREB2C) is a member of the CBF/DREB subfamily of proteins,which contains a single APETALA2/Ethylene responsive element-binding factor (AP2/ERF)domain.To identify the expression pattern of the DREB2C gene,which contains multiple transcription cis-regulatory elements in its promoter,an approximately 1.4 kb upstream DREB2C sequence was fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) and the recombinant p1244 construct was transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.The promoter of the gene directed prominent GUS activity in the vasculature in diverse young dividing tissues.Upon applying heat stress (HS),GUS staining was also enhanced in the vasculature of the growing tissues.Analysis of a series of 5'-deletions of the DREB2C promoter revealed that a proximal upstream sequence sufficient for the tissue-specific spatial and temporal induction of GUS expression by HS is localized in the promoter region between -204 and -34 bps relative to the transcriptional start site.Furthermore,electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that nuclear protein binding activities specific to a -120 to -32 bp promoter fragment increased after HS.These results indicate that the TATA-proximal region and some latent trans-acting factors may cooperate in HS-induced activation of the Arabidopsis DREB2C promoter.

  19. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  20. ON A RETICULAR DERIVATIVE FROM GOLGI BODIES IN THE MERISTEM OF Anthoceros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Irene

    1960-01-01

    Micrographs of dictyosomes in face view and in profile, together with serial sections representing both these planes, are reproduced from three sample cells at different developmental stages in the meristem of Anthoceros. The stages are: a vegetative cell at anaphase of a mitotic division, a vegetative cell in an early stage of postmitotic extension growth, and a young spore mother cell in the act of rounding up before the onset of meiosis. The observations suggest that proliferation of tubules from the edges of the dictyosomal cisternae into the cytoplasm is occurring with varying intensity and with slightly different morphological expression in all three cells. In all, the tubules are joined into a reticulum which exhibits local swellings at varying distances from the unfenestrated part of the subtending cisterna. A comparison is suggested between the observed reticulum and "smooth" endoplasmic reticulum of animals but it is not claimed that all the cytoplasmic tubules detectable in Anthoceros need have arisen in this way. Morphological differences discernible between tubules near their point of attachment to dictyosomes and others apparently involved in the formation of the new nuclear membrane at the end of a cell division could mean that more than one category of tube may exist in these cells. A plea is registered for restraint in the formulation of far reaching theories until more facts are available on unequivocal evidence. PMID:13766334

  1. Distinct Thalamic Reticular Cell Types Differentially Modulate Normal and Pathological Cortical Rhythms

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    Alexandra Clemente-Perez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrative brain functions depend on widely distributed, rhythmically coordinated computations. Through its long-ranging connections with cortex and most senses, the thalamus orchestrates the flow of cognitive and sensory information. Essential in this process, the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT gates different information streams through its extensive inhibition onto other thalamic nuclei, however, we lack an understanding of how different inhibitory neuron subpopulations in nRT function as gatekeepers. We dissociated the connectivity, physiology, and circuit functions of neurons within rodent nRT, based on parvalbumin (PV and somatostatin (SOM expression, and validated the existence of such populations in human nRT. We found that PV, but not SOM, cells are rhythmogenic, and that PV and SOM neurons are connected to and modulate distinct thalamocortical circuits. Notably, PV, but not SOM, neurons modulate somatosensory behavior and disrupt seizures. These results provide a conceptual framework for how nRT may gate incoming information to modulate brain-wide rhythms.

  2. A novel GABAergic afferent input to the pontine reticular formation: the mesopontine GABAergic column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2009-11-10

    Pharmacological manipulations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of the rat brainstem produce alterations in sleep/wake behavior. Local applications of GABA(A) receptor antagonists and agonists increase REM sleep and wake, respectively. These findings support a role for GABAergic mechanisms of the PnO in the control of arousal state. We have been investigating sources of GABA innervation of the PnO that may interact with local GABA(A) receptors in the control of state. Utilizing a retrograde tracer, cholera toxin-B subunit (CTb), injected into the PnO and dual-label immunohistochemistry with an antibody against glutamic acid decarboxalase-67 (GAD67), we report on a previously unidentified GABAergic neuronal population projecting to the contralateral PnO appearing as a column of cells, with long-axis in the sagittal plane, extending through the midbrain and pons. We refer to these neurons as the mesopontine GABAergic column (MPGC). The contiguous, columnar, anatomical distribution suggests operation as a functional neural system, which may influence expression of REM sleep, wake and other behaviors subserved by the PnO.

  3. Haloperidol induces higher Homer1a expression than risperidone, olanzapine and sulpiride in striatal sub-regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasevoli, Felice; Fiore, Germano; Cicale, Maria; Muscettola, Giovanni; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    Homer1a and Yotiao are two post-synaptic density proteins at the crossroad of dopamine-glutamate neurotransmission. Homer1a has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and is differentially induced by typical and atypical antipsychotics, perhaps according to their dopaminergic profile. Yotiao has been involved in glutamate and dopamine post-synaptic signalling. Here, we seek to determine whether Homer1a and Yotiao might be implicated in post-synaptic response to antipsychotics with affinity to different dopamine D(2) receptors: haloperidol (0.8mg kg(-1)), risperidone (3mg kg(-1)), olanzapine (2.5mg kg(-1)) and (-)-sulpiride (50mg kg(-1)). Homer1a expression was significantly induced by haloperidol compared to vehicle and to atypical antipsychotics in almost all striatal sub-regions. Atypical antipsychotics induced the gene in the lateral putamen and in the core of the accumbens only. All antipsychotics, with the exclusion of sulpiride, elicited a dorsolateral-to-ventromedial distribution pattern of Homer1a expression. No significant induction was detected for Yotiao. These results suggest that the quantitative and topographical pattern of Homer1a expression may putatively be related to antipsychotics affinity and/or occupancy at dopamine D(2) receptors.

  4. Constitutively expressed Protocadherin-α regulates the coalescence and elimination of homotypic olfactory axons through its cytoplasmic region

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    Sonoko eHasegawa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neuron (OSN axons coalesce into specific glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB according to their odorant receptor (OR expression. Several guidance molecules enhance the coalescence of homotypic OSN projections, in an OR-specific- and neural-activity-dependent manner. However, the mechanism by which homotypic OSN axons are organized into glomeruli is unsolved. We previously reported that the clustered protocadherin-α (Pcdh-α family of diverse cadherin-related molecules plays roles in the coalescence and elimination of homotypic OSN axons throughout development. Here we showed that the elimination of small ectopic homotypic glomeruli required the constitutive expression of a Pcdh-α isoform and Pcdh-α’s cytoplasmic region, but not OR specificity or neural activity. These results suggest that Pcdh-α proteins provide a cytoplasmic signal to regulate repulsive activity for homotypic OSN axons independently of OR expression and neural activity. The counterbalancing effect of Pcdh-α proteins for the axonal coalescence mechanisms mediated by other olfactory guidance molecules indicate a possible mechanism for the organization of homotypic OSN axons into glomeruli during development.

  5. Untranslated regions of mRNA and their role in regulation of gene expression in protozoan parasites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHILPA J RAO; SANGEETA CHATTERJEE; JAYANTA K PAL

    2017-03-01

    Protozoan parasites are one of the oldest living entities in this world that throughout their existence have shown excellentresilience to the odds of survival and have adapted beautifully to ever changing rigors of the environment. In view of thedynamic environment encountered by them throughout their life cycle, and in establishing pathogenesis, it is unsurprisingthat modulation of gene expression plays a fundamental role in their survival. In higher eukaryotes, untranslated regions(UTRs) of transcripts are one of the crucial regulators of gene expression (influencing mRNA stability and translationefficiency). Parasitic protozoan genome studies have led to the characterization (in silico, in vitro and in vivo) of a largenumber of their genes. Comparison of higher eukaryotic UTRs with parasitic protozoan UTRs reveals the existence ofseveral similar and dissimilar facets of the UTRs. This review focuses on the elements of UTRs of medically importantprotozoan parasites and their regulatory role in gene expression. Such information may be useful to researchers in designinggene targeting strategies linked with perturbation of host-parasite relationships leading to control of specific parasites.

  6. A comparative antibody analysis of Pannexin1 expression in four rat brain regions reveals varying subcellular localizations

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    Angela C Cone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pannexin1 (Panx1 channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide-field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on

  7. A Comparative Antibody Analysis of Pannexin1 Expression in Four Rat Brain Regions Reveals Varying Subcellular Localizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Angela C.; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2012-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  8. Interruption of env gene expression depending on the length of the SV40 early region used for the polyA signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Kei; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka; Watanabe, Rihito

    2005-12-01

    In order to invent a screening system to check in vivo gene function and the efficiency of gene transfer mediated by a retroviral vector system, we established a novel packaging cell, PacNIH/A8, based on the neuropathogenic retrovirus A8-V. To construct the expression vector, pA8(Psi-), which expresses the genes gag, pol and env derived from A8-V, the SV40 early region was used for the polyadenylation signal (polyA signal). When a 0.85 kbp fragment in the SV40 early region was employed for the expression vector (pA8(Psi-)beta), env expression was abolished. This abolition was rescued by shortening the SV40 early region to 0.14 kbp (pA8(Psi-)delta). The NHI3T3 cells transfected with pA8(Psi-)delta showed expressions of both env and gag genes.

  9. Differential spike timing and phase dynamics of reticular thalamic and prefrontal cortical neuronal populations during sleep spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Richard J; Hughes, Stuart W; Jones, Matthew W

    2013-11-20

    The 8-15 Hz thalamocortical oscillations known as sleep spindles are a universal feature of mammalian non-REM sleep, during which they are presumed to shape activity-dependent plasticity in neocortical networks. The cortex is hypothesized to contribute to initiation and termination of spindles, but the mechanisms by which it implements these roles are unknown. We used dual-site local field potential and multiple single-unit recordings in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely behaving rats at rest to investigate thalamocortical network dynamics during natural sleep spindles. During each spindle epoch, oscillatory activity in mPFC and TRN increased in frequency from onset to offset, accompanied by a consistent phase precession of TRN spike times relative to the cortical oscillation. In mPFC, the firing probability of putative pyramidal cells was highest at spindle initiation and termination times. We thus identified "early" and "late" cell subpopulations and found that they had distinct properties: early cells generally fired in synchrony with TRN spikes, whereas late cells fired in antiphase to TRN activity and also had higher firing rates than early cells. The accelerating and highly structured temporal pattern of thalamocortical network activity over the course of spindles therefore reflects the engagement of distinct subnetworks at specific times across spindle epochs. We propose that early cortical cells serve a synchronizing role in the initiation and propagation of spindle activity, whereas the subsequent recruitment of late cells actively antagonizes the thalamic spindle generator by providing asynchronous feedback.

  10. Different cardiovascular neuron groups in the ventral reticular formation of the rostral medulla in rabbits: single neurone studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, E; Ootsuka, Y; Terui, N

    2000-03-15

    To examine whether the cardiovascular neurons of the ventral medulla consist of functionally different kinds of neurons, single neuronal activity of the ventral medulla, activity of the renal sympathetic nerves (RSNA), blood flow of the ear (EarBF) and arterial pressure (AP) were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized and immobilized rabbits during electrical stimulation of the aortic nerve (AN, baroreceptor afferent fibers) and electrical stimulation of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) that reduced EarBF but less affected on AP and RSNA. The dorsolateral funiculus of the second cervical cord was stimulated to evoke antidromic spikes of medullary neurons. Two kinds of reticulo-spinal neurons were identified. Activities of one kind of neurons were facilitated by stimulation of DMH (latency 48.6+/-27.6 ms, n=11) but they did not respond to stimulation of the AN. Therefore, it was presumed that these neurons controlled vasomotion of the ear through the vasoconstrictor neurons in the spinal cord but did not participate in regulation of systemic AP. Activities of the other neurons were inhibited by stimulation of the AN (latency 47.8+/-8 4 ms, n=16) but they did not respond to the DMH stimulation. These neurons were identical to those reported previously as the RVLM neurons, and they contributed to regulate systemic AP but might not participate in control of cutaneous vascular movement. The former neurons were located medially to the latter in the reticular formation of the rostral ventral medulla. These results provided evidence at the single neuronal level that the cardiovascular neurons in the ventral medulla were consisted of functionally different sympatho-excitatory neurons and they were located at the different sites in the rostral ventral medulla.

  11. GABAergic transmission in rat pontine reticular formation regulates the induction phase of anesthesia and modulates hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia and pain. The role of PnO γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to loss and time to resumption of righting response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (i) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR and nociception; (ii) propofol decreases GABA levels in the PnO; and (iii) inhibiting GABA synthesis in the PnO blocks hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. Administering a GABA synthesis inhibitor [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA)] or a GABA uptake inhibitor [nipecotic acid (NPA)] into rat PnO significantly altered LoRR caused by propofol. 3-MPA significantly decreased LoRR for propofol (-18%). NPA significantly increased LoRR during administration of propofol (36%). Neither 3-MPA nor NPA altered RoRR following cessation of propofol or isoflurane delivery. The finding that LoRR was decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA is consistent with measures showing that extracellular GABA levels in the PnO were decreased (41%) by propofol. Thermal nociception was significantly decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA, and 3-MPA blocked the hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that GABA levels in the PnO regulate the time for loss of consciousness caused by propofol, extend the concept that anesthetic induction and emergence are not inverse processes, and suggest that GABAergic transmission in the PnO mediates hyperalgesia caused by sleep loss.

  12. Regional geophysical expression of a carbonatite terrane in the eastern Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, David A.; Denton, Kevin M.; Miller, David M.

    2013-01-01

    A world-class, rare earth element carbonatite deposit is located near Mountain Pass, in the eastern Mojave Desert of California and is hosted by Proterozoic rocks that extend along the eastern margins of the Clark Mountain Range, Mescal Range, and Ivanpah Mountains in a north-northwest trending fault-bounded block. This Proterozoic block is generally composed of a complex of 1.7 - 1.6 Ga gneisses and schists that are intruded by ~1.4 Ga carbonatite and ultrapotassic mafic dikes. In the latter suite, common intrusive rock types include shonkinite, syenite, and alkali granites that are associated with carbonatite dikes. Regional geophysical data reveal that the carbonatite deposit itself occurs along the northeast edge of a prominent magnetic high with an amplitude of 200 nanoteslas, which appears to be related to the surrounding Proterozoic block. More than 340 gravity stations and 155 physical property samples were collected to augment existing geophysical data to determine the geophysical and geologic setting of the eastern Mojave Desert carbonatite terrane. Physical properties of representative rock types in the area show that 23 samples of carbonatite ore have an average saturated bulk density of 2,866 with a range of 2,440 to 3,192 kg/m3 and a magnetic susceptibility of 0.22 with a range of 0.03 to 0.61x 10-3 SI units, 17 samples of syenite have an average saturated bulk density of 2,670 with a range of 2,555 to 2,788 kg/m3 and a magnetic susceptibility of 3.50 with a range of 0.19 to 11.46 x 10-3 SI units, 19 samples of shonkinite dike have an average saturated bulk density of 2,800 with a range of 2,603 to 3,000 kg/m3 and a magnetic susceptibility of 0.71 with a range of 0.00 to 4.44 x 10-3 SI units, and 28 samples of Proterozoic gneiss have an average saturated bulk density of 2,734 with a range of 2,574 to 3,086 kg/m3 and a magnetic susceptibility of 1.23 with a range of 0.01 to 7.48 x 10-3 SI units. In general, carbonatites have distinctive gravity

  13. Improved heterologous protein expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through promoter and 5' untranslated region optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasala, Beth A; Muto, Machiko; Sullivan, Joseph; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2011-08-01

    Microalgae have the potential to be a valuable biotechnological platform for the production of recombinant proteins. However, because of the complex regulatory network that tightly controls chloroplast gene expression, heterologous protein accumulation in a wild-type, photosynthetic-competent algal chloroplast remains low. High levels of heterologous protein accumulation have been achieved using the psbA promoter/5' untranslated region (UTR), but only in a psbA-deficient genetic background, because of psbA/D1-dependent auto-attenuation. Here, we examine the effect of fusing the strong 16S rRNA promoter to the 5' UTR of the psbA and atpA genes on transgene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that fusion of the 16S promoter had little impact on protein accumulation from the psbA 5' UTR in a psbA-deficient genetic background. Furthermore, the 16S/psbA promoter/UTR fusion was silenced in the presence of wild-type levels of D1 protein, confirming that the psbA 5' UTR is the primary target for D1-dependent auto-repression. However, fusion of the 16S promoter to the atpA 5' UTR significantly boosts mRNA levels and supports high levels of heterologous protein accumulation in photosynthetic-competent cells. The 16S/atpA promoter/UTR drove LUXCT protein accumulation to levels close to that of psbA in a psbA- background, and drove expression of a human therapeutic protein to levels only twofold lower than the psbA 5' UTR. The 16S/atpA promoter/UTR combination should have utility for heterologous protein production when expression from a photosynthetic-competent microalgal strain is required.

  14. A 17.6 kbp region located upstream of the rabbit WAP gene directs high level expression of a functional human protein variant in transgenic mouse milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, Rainer; Degryse, E.; Perraud, F.; Dalemans, W.; Ali-Hadji, D.; Thepot, D.; Devinoy, E.; Houdebine, L.M.; Pavirani, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated whether DNA regions present in the rabbit whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter/5' flanking sequence could potentially confer, in vivo, high level expression of reporter genes. Transgenic mice were generated expressing a variant of human alpha 1-antitrypsin, which has inhibitory ac

  15. Porcine SOX9 Gene Expression Is Influenced by an 18 bp Indel in the 5'-Untranslated Region.

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    Bertram Brenig

    Full Text Available Sex determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9 is an important regulator of sex and skeletal development and is expressed in a variety of embryonal and adult tissues. Loss or gain of function resulting from mutations within the coding region or chromosomal aberrations of the SOX9 locus lead to a plethora of detrimental phenotypes in humans and animals. One of these phenotypes is the so-called male-to-female or female-to-male sex-reversal which has been observed in several mammals including pig, dog, cat, goat, horse, and deer. In 38,XX sex-reversal French Large White pigs, a genome-wide association study suggested SOX9 as the causal gene, although no functional mutations were identified in affected animals. However, besides others an 18 bp indel had been detected in the 5'-untranslated region of the SOX9 gene by comparing affected animals and controls. We have identified the same indel (Δ18 between position +247 bp and +266 bp downstream the transcription start site of the porcine SOX9 gene in four other pig breeds; i.e., German Large White, Laiwu Black, Bamei, and Erhualian. These animals have been genotyped in an attempt to identify candidate genes for porcine inguinal and/or scrotal hernia. Because the 18 bp segment in the wild type 5'-UTR harbours a highly conserved cAMP-response element (CRE half-site, we analysed its role in SOX9 expression in vitro. Competition and immunodepletion electromobility shift assays demonstrate that the CRE half-site is specifically recognized by CREB. Both binding of CREB to the wild type as well as the absence of the CRE half-site in Δ18 reduced expression efficiency in HEK293T, PK-15, and ATDC5 cells significantly. Transfection experiments of wild type and Δ18 SOX9 promoter luciferase constructs show a significant reduction of RNA and protein levels depending on the presence or absence of the 18 bp segment. Hence, the data presented here demonstrate that the 18 bp indel in the porcine SOX9 5'-UTR is of functional

  16. Porcine SOX9 Gene Expression Is Influenced by an 18 bp Indel in the 5'-Untranslated Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenig, Bertram; Duan, Yanyu; Xing, Yuyun; Ding, Nengshui; Huang, Lusheng; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2015-01-01

    Sex determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) is an important regulator of sex and skeletal development and is expressed in a variety of embryonal and adult tissues. Loss or gain of function resulting from mutations within the coding region or chromosomal aberrations of the SOX9 locus lead to a plethora of detrimental phenotypes in humans and animals. One of these phenotypes is the so-called male-to-female or female-to-male sex-reversal which has been observed in several mammals including pig, dog, cat, goat, horse, and deer. In 38,XX sex-reversal French Large White pigs, a genome-wide association study suggested SOX9 as the causal gene, although no functional mutations were identified in affected animals. However, besides others an 18 bp indel had been detected in the 5'-untranslated region of the SOX9 gene by comparing affected animals and controls. We have identified the same indel (Δ18) between position +247 bp and +266 bp downstream the transcription start site of the porcine SOX9 gene in four other pig breeds; i.e., German Large White, Laiwu Black, Bamei, and Erhualian. These animals have been genotyped in an attempt to identify candidate genes for porcine inguinal and/or scrotal hernia. Because the 18 bp segment in the wild type 5'-UTR harbours a highly conserved cAMP-response element (CRE) half-site, we analysed its role in SOX9 expression in vitro. Competition and immunodepletion electromobility shift assays demonstrate that the CRE half-site is specifically recognized by CREB. Both binding of CREB to the wild type as well as the absence of the CRE half-site in Δ18 reduced expression efficiency in HEK293T, PK-15, and ATDC5 cells significantly. Transfection experiments of wild type and Δ18 SOX9 promoter luciferase constructs show a significant reduction of RNA and protein levels depending on the presence or absence of the 18 bp segment. Hence, the data presented here demonstrate that the 18 bp indel in the porcine SOX9 5'-UTR is of functional importance and may

  17. Prognostic impact of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR expression on loco-regional recurrence after preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

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    Ychou Marc

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR represents a major target for current radiosensitizing strategies. We wished to ascertain whether a correlation exists between the expression of EGFR and treatment outcome in a group of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone preoperative radiotherapy (RT. Methods Within a six-year period, 138 patients underwent preoperative radiotherapy and curative surgery for rectal cancer (UICC stages II-III at our institute. Among them, 77 pretherapeutic tumor biopsies were available for semi-quantitative immunohistochemical investigation evaluating the intensity and the number (extent of tumor stained cells. Statistical analyses included Cox regression for calculating risk ratios of survival endpoints and logistic regression for determining odds ratios for the development of loco-regional recurrences. Results Median age was 64 years (range: 30–88. Initial staging showed 75% and 25% stage II and III tumors, respectively. RT consisted of 44-Gy pelvic irradiation in 2-Gy fractions using 18-MV photons. In 25 very low-rectal-cancer patients the primary tumor received a boost dose of up to 16 Gy for a sphincter-preservation approach. Concomitant chemotherapy was used in 17% of the cases. All patients underwent complete total mesorectal resection. Positive staining (EGFR+ was observed in 43 patients (56%. Median follow-up was 36 months (range: 6–86. Locoregional recurrence rates were 7 and 20% for EGFR extent inferior and superior to 25%, respectively. The corresponding locoregional recurrence-free survival rate at two years was 94% (95% confidence interval, CI, 92–98% and 84% (CI 95%, 58–95%, respectively (P = 0.06. Multivariate analyses showed a significant correlation between the rate of loco-regional recurrence and three parameters: EGFR extent superior to 25% (hazard ratio = 7.18, CI 95%, 1.17–46, P = 0.037, rectal resection with microscopic residue (hazard ratio = 6.92, CI 95

  18. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, J.G. [Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Brinson, E.C.; Milner, P.M. [Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  19. [Prokaryotic expression and detective application of the main antigenic region of VP2 protein of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang-Wei; Hua, Yu-Ping; Liang, Dong-Ying

    2007-12-01

    To research safer diagnosis antigen for ADV, the main antigenic region VP2a and VP2b gene of ADV were obtained by restriction digestion of the recombinant plasmids pMD-VP2a and pMD-VP2b. Then the genes were respectively cloned into pMAL-c2 to get two prokaryotic recombinant plasmids pMAL-VPa and pMAL-VPb. The target genes were successfully expressed in the host cell TB1 when induced by IPTG. The Western blot analysis proved the recombinant proteins have good antigenic. The recombinant proteins were purified by KCL dyeing method, and were used as antigen to establish VP2-CIEP for AD diagnoses. The detection result shared 94.3% identity with that of CIEP. The results reported here show that VP2-CIEP is highly sensitive and specific and can benefit the research on the serodiagnosis to AD.

  20. The 5' flanking region of a barley B hordein gene controls tissue and developmental specific CAT expression in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marris, C; Gallois, P; Copley, J; Kreis, M

    1988-07-01

    The 549 base pairs of the 5' flanking region of a barley seed storage protein (B1 hordein) gene were linked to the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). The chimaeric gene was transferred into tobacco plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. CAT enzyme activity was detected in the seeds, but not in the leaves, of the transgenic plants. Furthermore, enzyme activity was found only in the endosperm, and only from fifteen days after pollination. In contrast, the constitutive 19S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) directed the expression of the CAT gene in the leaves as well as in both the endosperm and embryo and at all stages in seed development.

  1. Expression pattern and core region analysis of AtMPK3 promoter in response to environmental stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The protein kinase AtMPK3,a component of the MAP kinase cascade,plays an important role in stress signal transduction in plant cells. To clarify how AtMPK3 is regulated at the transcriptional level in response to various environmental factors, the 1016-bp promoter sequence upstream of the transcription start site of the AtMPK3 gene was isolated. Analyses of the promoter sequence using plant promoter databases revealed that the AtMPK3 promoter contains many potential cis-acting elements involved in environmental stress responses. We constructed four deletion mutants of the AtMPK3 promoter, and introduced the intact and truncated promoter sequences fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene into Arabidopsis. GUS histochemical staining and quantitative fluorometric GUS assays were performed to visualize and compare the expression patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. The region between-188 and-62 upstream of the transcription start site was identified as the essential DNA sequence of the AtMPK3 promoter for responses to drought, high salinity, low temperature, and wounding. These results advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling AtMPK3 expression in response to different environmental stimuli.

  2. Cholecystokinin in white sea bream: molecular cloning, regional expression, and immunohistochemical localization in the gut after feeding and fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Micale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK, secreted by the midgut, plays a key role in digestive physiology of vertebrates including teleosts, by stimulating pancreatic secretion, gut motility, and gallbladder contraction, as well as by delaying gastric emptying. Moreover, CCK is involved in the regulation of food intake and satiation. Secretion of CCK by the hindgut is controversial, and its biological activity remains to be elucidated. The present paper addresses the regional distribution of intestinal CCK in the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, as well as the possible involvement of hindgut CCK in digestive processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full-lengths mRNAs encoding two CCK isoforms (CCK-1 and CCK-2 were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. CCK gene and protein expression levels in the different gut segments were measured 3 h and 72 h after feeding, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Moreover, endocrine CCK cells were immunoistochemically detected. Fasting induced a significant decrease in CCK-2 in all intestinal segments, including the hindgut. On the other hand, no significant difference was induced by fasting on hindgut CCK-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrated two CCK isoforms in the hindgut of D.sargus, one of which (CCK-2 may be involved in the feedback control of uncompleted digestive processes. On the other hand, a functional role alternative to regulation of digestive processes may be inferred for D.sargus CCK-1, since its expression was unaffected by feeding or fasting.

  3. Atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo foram utilizados 73 ratos em preparações agudas e crônicas, nas quais lesamos a formação reticular mesencefálica com corrente contínua (3,5 a 4,0 mA durante 5 a 10 segundos. O eletródio ativo era implantado estereotàxicamente segundo as coordenadas de König e Klippel. As lesões eram feitas parcial ou totalmente, uni ou bilateralmente, e em todos os animais procedeu-se ao controle histológico das áreas lesadas, usando-se o método de Weil. O registro da atividade elétrica cortical foi feito com polígrafo Beckman de 4 canais, utilizando-se derivações bipolares curtas (1mm com eletródios esféricos de platina. As experiências permitiram as seguintes conclusões: 1 — As características eletrofisiológicas dos fusos que ocorrem após lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica são muito semelhantes às dos fusos espontâneos e barbitúricos, inclusive quanto à projeção cortical. Quanto à duração dos potenciais que os constituem, contudo, notamos que a faixa de variação era mais centuada (20 a 80 ms, o que pode ser atribuído à maior complexidade dos potenciais do cérebro isolado, possivelmente pela falta de ação cronadora da formação reticular sobre o sistema sincronizador talâmico. 2 — Os mecanismos envolvidos na gênese dos fusos do sono barbitúrico ou espontâneo e os do cérebro isolado são, pelo menos em parte, dependentes do bloqueio da formação reticular mesencefálica. 3 — A formação reticular mesencefálica ativa preferencialmente o hemisfério cerebral homolateral; o contingente cruzado talvez seja mobilizado somente quando estímulos alertantes intensos atingem o tegmento mesencefálico. 4 — Além da formação reticular mesencefálica deve haver outros mecanismos ativadores corticais, visto que, em preparações agudas de cérebro isolado, observamos: a surtos de curta duração de atividade dessincronizada; b oscilações freqüentes do ECoG durante o registro

  4. Temporal and regional regulation of gene expression by calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity during fear memory.

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    Lindsay Wieczorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (ACs, AC1 and AC8, are key components of long-term memory processing. AC1 and AC8 double knockout mice (Adcy1(-/-Adcy8(-/-; DKO display impaired fear memory processing; the mechanism of this impairment is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesize that the Ca2+-stimulated ACs modulate long-lasting transcriptional changes essential for fear memory consolidation and maintenance. Here, we report a genome-wide study of gene expression changes associated with conditioned fear (CF memory in wild-type and DKO mice to identify AC-dependent gene regulatory changes that occur in the amygdala and hippocampus at baseline and different time points after CF learning. We observed an overall decrease in transcriptional changes in DKO mice across all time points, but most strikingly, at periods when memory consolidation and retention should be occurring. Further, we identified a shared set of transcription factor binding sites in genes upregulated in wild-type mice that were associated with downregulated genes in DKO mice. To prove the temporal and regional importance of AC activity on different stages of memory processing, the tetracycline-off system was used to produce mice with forebrain-specific inducible expression of AC8 on a DKO background. CF behavioral results reveal that adult restoration of AC8 activity in the forebrain is sufficient for intact learning, while cessation of this expression at any time point across learning causes memory deficits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these studies demonstrate that the Ca2+-stimulated ACs contribute to the formation and maintenance of fear memory by a network of long-term transcriptional changes.

  5. The histaminergic system in human thalamus: correlation of innervation to receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C Y; Kalimo, H; Panula, Pertti

    2002-04-01

    The mRNA expression of three histamine receptors (H1, H2 and H3) and H1 and H3 receptor binding were mapped and quantified in normal human thalamus by in situ hybridization and receptor binding autoradiography, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was applied to study the distribution of histaminergic fibres and terminals in the normal human thalamus. mRNAs for all three histamine receptors were detected mainly in the dorsal thalamus, but the expression intensities were different. Briefly, H1 and H3 receptor mRNAs were relatively enriched in the anterior, medial, and part of the lateral nuclei regions; whereas the expression level was much lower in the ventral and posterior parts of the thalamus, and the reticular nucleus. H2 receptor mRNA displayed in general very low expression intensity with slightly higher expression level in the anterior and lateropolar regions. H1 receptor binding was mainly detected in the mediodorsal, ventroposterolateral nuclei, and the pulvinar. H3 receptor binding was detected mainly in the dorsal thalamus, predominantly the periventricular, mediodorsal, and posterior regions. Very high or high histaminergic fibre densities were observed in the midline nuclear region and other nuclei next to the third ventricle, ventroposterior lateral nucleus and medial geniculate nucleus. In most of the core structures of the thalamus, the fibre density was very low or absent. The results suggest that histamine in human brain regulates tactile and proprioceptory thalamocortical functions through multiple receptors. Also, other, e.g. visual areas and those not making cortical connections expressed histamine receptors and contained histaminergic nerve fibres.

  6. Recruitment of Language-, Emotion- and Speech-Timing Associated Brain Regions for Expressing Emotional Prosody: Investigation of Functional Neuroanatomy with fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel L. C.; Jazdzyk, Agnieszka; Stets, Manuela; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to progress understanding of prosodic emotion expression by establishing brain regions active when expressing specific emotions, those activated irrespective of the target emotion, and those whose activation intensity varied depending on individual performance. BOLD contrast data were acquired whilst participants spoke non-sense words in happy, angry or neutral tones, or performed jaw-movements. Emotion-specific analyses demonstrated that when expressing angry prosody, activated brain regions included the inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, the insula, and the basal ganglia. When expressing happy prosody, the activated brain regions also included the superior temporal gyrus, insula, and basal ganglia, with additional activation in the anterior cingulate. Conjunction analysis confirmed that the superior temporal gyrus and basal ganglia were activated regardless of the specific emotion concerned. Nevertheless, disjunctive comparisons between the expression of angry and happy prosody established that anterior cingulate activity was significantly higher for angry prosody than for happy prosody production. Degree of inferior frontal gyrus activity correlated with the ability to express the target emotion through prosody. We conclude that expressing prosodic emotions (vs. neutral intonation) requires generic brain regions involved in comprehending numerous aspects of language, emotion-related processes such as experiencing emotions, and in the time-critical integration of speech information. PMID:27803656

  7. Regional expression of the MAPT gene is associated with loss of hubs in brain networks and cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittman, Timothy; Rubinov, Mikail; Vértes, Petra E; Patel, Ameera X; Ginestet, Cedric E; Ghosh, Boyd C P; Barker, Roger A; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Bullmore, Edward T; Rowe, James B

    2016-12-01

    Abnormalities of tau protein are central to the pathogenesis of progressive supranuclear palsy, whereas haplotype variation of the tau gene MAPT influences the risk of Parkinson disease and Parkinson's disease dementia. We assessed whether regional MAPT expression might be associated with selective vulnerability of global brain networks to neurodegenerative pathology. Using task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson disease, and healthy subjects (n = 128), we examined functional brain networks and measured the connection strength between 471 gray matter regions. We obtained MAPT and SNCA microarray expression data in healthy subjects from the Allen brain atlas. Regional connectivity varied according to the normal expression of MAPT. The regional expression of MAPT correlated with the proportionate loss of regional connectivity in Parkinson's disease. Executive cognition was impaired in proportion to the loss of hub connectivity. These effects were not seen with SNCA, suggesting that alpha-synuclein pathology is not mediated through global network properties. The results establish a link between regional MAPT expression and selective vulnerability of functional brain networks to neurodegeneration.

  8. DNA methylation of the Fthl17 5’-upstream region regulates differential Fthl17 expression in lung cancer cells and germline stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Nana; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2017-01-01

    The Ferritin heavy polypeptide-like 17 (Fthl17) gene is a member of the cancer/testis antigen gene family, and is preferentially expressed in cancer cells and in testis. Although DNA methylation has been linked to the regulation of human FTHL17 gene expression, detailed epigenetic regulation of its expression has not been investigated. To address this, we assessed the epigenetic regulation of murine Fthl17 gene expression in cancer cells and germ cells. Fthl17 was more highly expressed in testis, a murine lung cancer cell line, KLN205, and in germline stem cells (GSCs) than in normal lung tissues. Furthermore, the Fthl17 expression level in GSCs was significantly higher than in KLN205 cells. We performed bisulfite-sequencing and luciferase (luc) reporter assays to examine the role of DNA methylation of the Fthl17 promoter in the regulation of Fthl17 expression. In KLN205 cells, testis, and GSCs, the Fthl17 5’-upstream region was hypo-methylated compared with normal lung tissues. Luc reporter assays indicated that hypo-methylation of the -0.6 kb to 0 kb region upstream from the transcription start site (TSS) was involved in the up-regulation of Fthl17 expression in KLN205 cells and GSCs. Because the -0.6 kb to -0.3 kb or the -0.3 kb to 0 kb region were relatively more hypo-methylated in KLN205 cells and in GSCs, respectively, compared with other regions between -0.6 kb to 0 kb, those regions may contribute to Fthl17 up-regulation in each cell type. Following treatment with 5-Azacytidine, the -0.3 kb to 0 kb region became hypo-methylated, and Fthl17 expression was up-regulated in KLN205 cells to a level comparable to that in GSCs. Together, the results suggest that hypo-methylation of different but adjacent regions immediately upstream of the Fthl17 gene contribute to differential expression levels in lung cancer cells and GSCs, and hypo-methylation of the TSS-proximal region may be critical for high level expression. PMID:28207785

  9. Correlation between synaptic protein expression and synaptic reorganization in the hippocampal CA3 region in a rat model of post-traumatic epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaolian Zhang; Jianmin Huang; Bang Zhao; Haineng Huang; Yuanyang Deng; Huadong Huang; Qirong He; Jianping Liang

    2010-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin participate in synaptic reorganization in the forebrain of epilepsy models.However,the time-effect relationship between dynamic synapsin expression in hippocampus and synaptic reorganization in the post-traumatic epilepsy model remains unclear.FeCl2 was injected into the hippocampal CA3 region of the right forebrain in rats to induce post-traumatic epilepsy.Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin expression was detected using immunohistochemistry.Epileptiform discharge induced by FeCl2 injection was determined in rat forebrain neurons,revealing decreased postsynaptic density protein-95expression at 24 hours and lowest levels at 7 days.Synaptophysin expression was markedly reduced at 24 hours,but increased at 7 days.Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin expression was consistent with abnormal mossy fiber sprouting and synaptic reorganization following neuronal injury in the hippocampal CA3 region of FeCl2-induced epilepsy models.

  10. Cell apoptosis in perihematomal brain regions and expression of Caspase-3 protein in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinqing Zhang; Xiaoliang Yin; Kun Zhang; Zhimin Zhang; Hui Cai; Honglan Xu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), besides the space-occupying effect of hematoma, hematomal component also causes the pathological changes of perihematomal region, including the death of neurons and glial cells, vasogenic brain edema, the destruction of blood brain barrier and so on, which are the important factors to influence the prognosis of patients. Therefore, it is necessary to perform fur ther investigation and study on the pathological characteristics of injury and death of brain nerve cells. OBJECTIVE: To observe the pathological changes of apoptosis and Caspase-3 expression in perihe matomal brain regions in patients with hypertensive ICH (HICH) in different stages of onset, and analyze their relationship. DESIGN: Case-control observation. SETTING: Departments of Neurosurgery and Pathology of Beijing Chuiyangliu Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Totally 19 patients with HICH, including 12 male, 7 female, aged (58.3±12.8) ranging from 49 to 78 years, whose mean volume of hemorrhage was (48.6±16.4) mL, were involved . All the cases conformed to the diagnostic criteria of intracerebral hemorrhage formulated in the 4th National Cerebrovascular Dis eases Conference and were confirmed by skull CT scanning. Informed consents of operation and specimens were obtained from the patients and relatives.METHODS; ①Patients with HICH who had undergone surgical evacuation of an intracerebral hematoma by traverse temporal lobe approach in the Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Chuiyangliu Hospital from Jan uary 2004 to July 2005 were involved. Nineteen specimens of brain tissue from perihematomal region of HICH patients in different phases served as patient group. Five specimens were obtained from distant regions of patients in the super-early phase as the control group. According to the time from onset to operation, the 19 cases were divided into 3 groups: 6 cases in super-early phase(onset < 8 hours), 8 cases in early phase (onset about 8 to 24

  11. A pilot quantitative study of topographic correlation between reticular pseudodrusen and the choroidal vasculature using en face optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilraj S Grewal

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the topographic correlation between reticular pseudodrusen (RPD visualized on infrared reflectance (IR and choroidal vasculature using en-face volumetric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. METHODS: A masked observer marked individual RPD on IR images using ImageJ (NIH, Bethesda, MD. Using the macular volume scan (Cirrus, Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA, the RPE slab function was used to generate a C-scan of the most superficial choroidal vasculature. An independent masked grader created a topographic binary map of the choroidal vasculature by thresholding the en-face image, which was overlaid onto the IR map of RPD. For each IR image, ImageJ was used to generate a random set of dots as "control lesions". RESULTS: 17 eyes of 11 patients (78±13.7 years with RPD were analyzed. The average number of RPD lesions identified on IR images was 414±71.5, of which 49.6±4.3% were located overlying the choroidal vasculature, compared to 45.4±4.0% in controls (p = 0.014. 50.4±4.3% of lesions overlay the choroidal stroma, of which 76.5±3.1% were ≤3 pixels from the choroidal vessels. The percentage of RPD lesions located within ≤3 pixels from the choroidal vasculature was significantly greater than the percentage located ≥7 pixels away. (p<0.0001. Compared to controls (71.6±3.8%, RPD were more likely to be located ≤3 pixels away from choroidal vessels (p = 0.014. In contrast, control lesions were more likely to be ≥7 pixels away from choroidal vessels than RPD (9.1±1.9% vs. 4.8±1.2%, respectively, p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis shows that RPD lesions follow the underlying choroidal vasculature. Approximately half the RPD directly overlay the choroidal vessels and the majority of the remaining lesions were ≤3 pixels (≤30 microns from the vessel edge, supporting the hypothesis that RPD maybe related to pathologic changes at the choroidal level.

  12. Reticular Chemistry and Metal-Organic Frameworks: Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials for Clean Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal A.

    2017-06-01

    Gaining control over the assembly of crystalline solid-state materials has been significantly advanced through the field of reticular chemistry and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs have emerged as a unique modular class of porous materials amenable to a rational design with targeted properties for given applications. Several design approaches have been deployed to construct targeted functional MOFs, where desired structural and geometrical attributes are incorporated in preselected building units prior to the assembly process. This dissertation illustrates the merit of the molecular building block approach (MBB) for the rational construction and discovery of stable and highly porous MOFs, and their exploration as potential gas storage medium for sustainable and clean energy applications. Specifically, emphasis was placed on gaining insights into the structure-property relationships that impact the methane (CH4) storage in MOFs and its subsequent delivery. The foreseen gained understanding is essential for the design of new adsorbent materials or adjusting existing MOF platforms to encompass the desired features that subsequently afford meeting the challenging targets for methane storage in mobile and stationary applications.In this context, we report the successful use of the MBB approach for the design and deliberate construction of a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum based MOFs with the square-octahedral (soc) underlying net topology. From this platform, Al-soc-MOF-1, with more than 6000 m2/g apparent Langmuir specific surface area, exhibits outstanding gravimetric CH4 uptake (total and working capacities). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) challenging gravimetric and volumetric targets for the CH4 working capacity for on-board CH4 storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon

  13. Construction of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Strain expressing Helicobacter pylori conservative region of adhesin antigen and its immunogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang; Dian-Yuan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a non-resistant and attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) strain which expresses conservative region of adhesion AB of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and evaluate its immunogenicity.METHODS: The AB gene amplified by PCR was inserted into the expression vector pYA248 containing asd gene and through two transformations introduced into the delta Cya, delta Crp, delta Asd attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain, constructing balanced lethal attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strains X4072 (pYA248-AB). Bridged ELISA method was used to measure the expression of AB antigen in sonic ate and culture supernatant. According to the method described by Meacock, stability of the recombinant was evaluated. Semi-lethal capacity test was used to evaluate the safety of recombinant. The immunogenicity of recombinant was evaluated with animal experiments.RESULTS: The attenuated S. typhimurium X4072 (pYA248-AB) which expresses AB was successfully constructed.Furthermore, bridged ELISA assay showed that the content of AB in recombinant X4072 (pYA248- AB) culture supematant was higher than that was in thallus lyric liquor. And after recombinant X4072 (pYA248- AB) was cultured for 100generations without selection pressure, the entire recombinant bacteria selected randomly could grow, and the AB antigen was defected positive by ELISA. The growth curve of the recombinant bacteria showed that the growth states of X4072 (pYA248) and X4072 (pYA248-AB) were basically consistent. The survival rate of C57BL/6 was still 100%, at 30 d after mice taking X4072 (pYA248-AB) 1.0×1010 cfu orally. Oral immunization of mice with X4072 (pYA248-AB)induced a specific immune response.CONCLUSION: In vitro recombinant plasmid appears to be stable and experiments on animals showed that the recombinant strains were safe and immunogenic in vitro,which providing a new live oral vaccine candidate for protection and care of H pylori infection.

  14. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maren L; Lopez, Marcelo F; Archer, Kellie J; Wolen, Aaron R; Becker, Howard C; Miles, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA) was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC). In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a complex temporal

  15. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren L Smith

    Full Text Available Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD. Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC. In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a

  16. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

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    Horvath Steve

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that comparing gene expression profiles for specific brain regions in these strains might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of human neuropsychiatric traits. We performed a whole-genome gene expression experiment and applied a systems biology approach using weighted gene co-expression network analysis. Results We were able to identify modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish a strain or brain region. Analysis of the networks that are most informative for hippocampus and amygdala revealed enrichment in neurologically, genetically and psychologically related pathways. Close examination of the strain-specific gene expression profiles, however, revealed no functional relevance but a significant enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the probe sequences used for array hybridization. This artifact was not observed for the modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions The brain-region specific modules were found to be independent of genetic background and are therefore likely to represent biologically relevant molecular networks that can be studied to complement our knowledge about pathways in neuropsychiatric disease.

  17. Conserved cis-regulatory regions in a large genomic landscape control SHH and BMP-regulated Gremlin1 expression in mouse limb buds

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    Zuniga Aimée

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse limb bud is a prime model to study the regulatory interactions that control vertebrate organogenesis. Major aspects of limb bud development are controlled by feedback loops that define a self-regulatory signalling system. The SHH/GREM1/AER-FGF feedback loop forms the core of this signalling system that operates between the posterior mesenchymal organiser and the ectodermal signalling centre. The BMP antagonist Gremlin1 (GREM1 is a critical node in this system, whose dynamic expression is controlled by BMP, SHH, and FGF signalling and key to normal progression of limb bud development. Previous analysis identified a distant cis-regulatory landscape within the neighbouring Formin1 (Fmn1 locus that is required for Grem1 expression, reminiscent of the genomic landscapes controlling HoxD and Shh expression in limb buds. Results Three highly conserved regions (HMCO1-3 were identified within the previously defined critical genomic region and tested for their ability to regulate Grem1 expression in mouse limb buds. Using a combination of BAC and conventional transgenic approaches, a 9 kb region located ~70 kb downstream of the Grem1 transcription unit was identified. This region, termed Grem1 Regulatory Sequence 1 (GRS1, is able to recapitulate major aspects of Grem1 expression, as it drives expression of a LacZ reporter into the posterior and, to a lesser extent, in the distal-anterior mesenchyme. Crossing the GRS1 transgene into embryos with alterations in the SHH and BMP pathways established that GRS1 depends on SHH and is modulated by BMP signalling, i.e. integrates inputs from these pathways. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed interaction of endogenous GLI3 proteins with the core cis-regulatory elements in the GRS1 region. As GLI3 is a mediator of SHH signal transduction, these results indicated that SHH directly controls Grem1 expression through the GRS1 region. Finally, all cis-regulatory regions within the Grem1

  18. Opiate sensitization induces FosB/ΔFosB expression in prefrontal cortical, striatal and amygdala brain regions.

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    Gary B Kaplan

    Full Text Available Sensitization to the effects of drugs of abuse and associated stimuli contributes to drug craving, compulsive drug use, and relapse in addiction. Repeated opiate exposure produces behavioral sensitization that is hypothesized to result from neural plasticity in specific limbic, striatal and cortical systems. ΔFosB and FosB are members of the Fos family of transcription factors that are implicated in neural plasticity in addiction. This study examined the effects of intermittent morphine treatment, associated with motor sensitization, on FosB/ΔFosB levels using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Motor sensitization was tested in C57BL/6 mice that received six intermittent pre-treatments (on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 with either subcutaneous morphine (10 mg/kg or saline followed by a challenge injection of morphine or saline on day 16. Mice receiving repeated morphine injections demonstrated significant increases in locomotor activity on days 8, 10, and 12 of treatment (vs. day 1, consistent with development of locomotor sensitization. A morphine challenge on day 16 significantly increased locomotor activity of saline pre-treated mice and produced even larger increases in motor activity in the morphine pre-treated mice, consistent with the expression of opiate sensitization. Intermittent morphine pre-treatment on these six pre-treatment days produced a significant induction of FosB/ΔFosB, measured on day 16, in multiple brain regions including prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc core, dorsomedial caudate-putamen (CPU, basolateral amygdala (BLA and central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA but not in a motor cortex control region. Opiate induced sensitization may develop via Fos/ΔFosB plasticity in motivational pathways (NAc, motor outputs (CPU, and associative learning (PL, IL, BLA and stress pathways (CNA.

  19. Alteration in NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression in vulnerable and resistant regions of in vitro ischemic rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, D L; Poulter, M O; Buchan, A M; Morley, P

    1997-08-29

    Brain insults, including cerebral ischemia, can alter glutamate receptor subunit expression in vulnerable neurons. Understanding these post-ischemic changes in glutamate receptors could enhance our ability to identify specific, novel neuroprotective compounds. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification was used to quantify the altered expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) NR2A, NR2B and NR2C subunits relative to one another in rat hippocampal slices in resistant and vulnerable regions following in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation. Ninety minutes after re-oxygenation and return to 10 mM glucose, there was a significant increase in the expression of NR2C relative to NR2B and NR2A in the slice as a whole, as well as in the selectively vulnerable CA1 region and the resistant CA3 and dentate gyrus regions.

  20. Relaciones, redes y discurso: revisión y propuestas en torno al análisis reticular de datos textuales.

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    Lozares Colina, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo hace un repaso de las diferentes propuestas que dentro del ámbito de la sociología (o cercanos toman elementos de o se han inspirado en el Análisis de Redes Sociales para realizar el análisis de textos y/o discursos.A pesar de que la concepción relacionista tiene ya una cierta tradición en el análisis del discurso, no ha sido mas que a partir de la década de los ochenta que se han desarrollado propuestas que, con mayor o menor intensidad, aplican la idea y el instrumental de redes sociales al análisis de textos. No obstante, muchas propuestas no superan los problemas que llevan asociados los análisis de carácter atributivo y/o categorial. Sólo algunos procedimientos llegan a utilizar la aproximación reticular como forma de preservar la articulación, y con ello, la estructura semántica y sintáctica del texto. Al panorama de las escasas propuestas existentes que siguen esta orientación, el artículo incorpora los procedimientos (que denominados Análisis Reticular del Discurso que los autores vienen desarrollado sobre dicha perspectiva y que insisten además particularmente en el trabajo de interpretación y con-textualización del discurso.

  1. [Nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by the neutrophils of the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood and by the monocytic-reticular cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska-Demczuk, K

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of Park et al. the author studied spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by neutrophil granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood, and by monocytic-reticular cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis and meningismus. The author performed 333 investigations in 74 patients. Significantly higher mean values of the index of spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by the granulocytes and cerebrospinal fluid were observed in cases of bacterial meningitis as compared with the granulocytes of the peripheral blood in healthy subjects. It was demonstrated that in patients with bacterial meningitis blood and fluid granulocytes showed a similar phagocytic acitivty independent of the humoral environment. In the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis the monocytic-reticular cells the cerebrospinal fluid showed a similar, sometimes high, phagocytic activity depending on the phase and severity of the disease. On the otherhand, in most cases of meningismus these cells failed to manifest any phagocytic and bactericidal activity. In only few isolated cells in the fluid weak NBT reduction was observed. The obtained results of investigations showed the usefulness of the NBT test not only for the differential diagnosis of the aetiology of neuroinfections but also for the assessment of immune processes taking place in the nervous system.

  2. Independent and convergent signals from the pontomedullary reticular formation contribute to the control of posture and movement during reaching in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepens, Bénédicte; Drew, Trevor

    2004-10-01

    We have addressed the nature of the postural control signals contained within the discharge activity of neurons in the pontomedullary reticular formation, including reticulospinal neurons, during a reaching task in the cat. We recorded the activity of 142 neurons during ipsilateral reaching movements that required anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in the supporting limbs to maintain equilibrium. Discharge activity in 82/142 (58%) neurons was significantly increased before the onset of the reach. Most of these neurons discharged either in a phasic (22/82), tonic (10/82), or phasic/tonic (41/82) pattern. In each of these 3 groups, the onset of the discharge activity in some neurons was temporally related either to the go signal or to the onset of the movement. In many neurons, one component of the discharge sequence was better related to the go signal and another to the onset of the movement. Based on our previous behavioral study during the same task, we suggest that reticular neurons in which the discharge activity is better related to the go signal contribute to the initiation of the APAs that precede the movement. Neurons in which the discharge activity is better related to the movement signal might contribute to the initiation of the movement and to the production of the postural responses that accompany that movement. Together our results suggest the existence of neurons that signal posture and movement independently and others that encode a convergent signal that contributes to the control of both posture and movement.

  3. Blockade of GABA, type A, receptors in the rat pontine reticular formation induces rapid eye movement sleep that is dependent upon the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, G A; Sachs, O W; Birabil, C G

    2008-09-22

    The brainstem reticular formation is an area important to the control of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The antagonist of GABA-type A (GABA(A)) receptors, bicuculline methiodide (BMI), injected into the rat nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of the reticular formation resulted in a long-lasting increase in REM sleep. Thus, one factor controlling REM sleep appears to be the number of functional GABA(A) receptors in the PnO. The long-lasting effect produced by BMI may result from secondary influences on other neurotransmitter systems known to have long-lasting effects. To study this question, rats were surgically prepared for chronic sleep recording and additionally implanted with guide cannulas aimed at sites in the PnO. Multiple, 60 nl, unilateral injections were made either singly or in combination. GABA(A) receptor antagonists, BMI and gabazine (GBZ), produced dose-dependent increases in REM sleep with GBZ being approximately 35 times more potent than BMI. GBZ and the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, produced very similar results, both increasing REM sleep for about 8 h, mainly through increased period frequency, with little reduction in REM latency. Pre-injection of the muscarinic antagonist, atropine, completely blocked the REM sleep-increase by GBZ. GABAergic control of REM sleep in the PnO requires the cholinergic system and may be acting through presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release.

  4. Efeitos do pentobarbital sódico sobre a atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica Action of sodium pentobarbital on the cortical electrical activity of the rat after lesion of the midbrain reticular formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Para êste estudo foram empregados 35 ratos da raça Wistar em preparação aguda (24 com lesão bilateral e 11 com lesão unilateral da formação reticular mesencefálica e 18 preparações crônicas. O método empregado na obtenção das preparações foi descrito em trabalho anterior12. O objetivo desta série de experiências foi o de verificar de que maneira o pentobarbital interfere sobre as características da atividade elétrica cortical após lesão da formação reticular mesencefálica. Para tal, em animais preparados agudamente, foram feitas lesões progressivamente mais extensas e o barbitúrico injetado por via intravenosa em doses crescentes. A fim de testar a integridade do sistema reticular ativador ascendente, além de estímulos dolorosos intensos, aplicávamos pulsos de 5 a 10 V, 100 Hz, e 0,1 ms à formação reticular mesencefálica situada abaixo da região lesada. A ausência de reação de alerta cortical (dessincronização nos assegurava que tal sistema havia sido lesado completamente. Nas preparações crônicas o pentobarbital era injetado por via intraperitoneal. Dessas experiências concluimos o seguinte: 1. Aumento da sincronização do eletrocorticograma nos animais com lesões parciais ou totais da formação reticular mesencefálica. 2. Depressão acentuada e precoce da atividade elétrica cerebral nos ratos com lesão muito extensa (comprometendo também a porção ventrobasal do tálamo. 3. Isocronismo da atividade elétrica cortical nos dois hemisférios cerebrais. 4. O pentobarbital parece agir tanto sobre os sistemas ativadores como sobre o sincronizador do eletrocorticograma. As doses pequenas deprimem os primeiros, liberando o segundo, enquanto que as maiores bloqueiam também este último. Sòmente doses muito mais altas é que fazem desaparecer totalmente a atividade do córtex cerebral, que se mostra, portanto, mais resistente à ação da droga.This study was performed on 35 albino rats prepared for

  5. Brain region-specific alterations in the gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and cholinergic system components during peripheral endotoxin-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Harold A; Dancho, Meghan; Regnier-Golanov, Angelique; Nasim, Mansoor; Ochani, Mahendar; Olofsson, Peder S; Ahmed, Mohamed; Miller, Edmund J; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Golanov, Eugene; Metz, Christine N; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2015-03-11

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by excessive peripheral immune responses are associated with diverse alterations in brain function, and brain-derived neural pathways regulate peripheral inflammation. Important aspects of this bidirectional peripheral immune-brain communication, including the impact of peripheral inflammation on brain region-specific cytokine responses, and brain cholinergic signaling (which plays a role in controlling peripheral cytokine levels), remain unclear. To provide insight, we studied gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and brain cholinergic system components in the cortex, cerebellum, brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum and thalamus in mice after an intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide injection. Endotoxemia was accompanied by elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and other cytokines and brain region-specific increases in Il1b (the highest increase, relative to basal level, was in cortex; the lowest increase was in cerebellum) and Il6 (highest increase in cerebellum; lowest increase in striatum) mRNA expression. Gene expression of brain Gfap (astrocyte marker) was also differentially increased. However, Iba1 (microglia marker) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions in parallel with morphological changes, indicating microglia activation. Brain choline acetyltransferase (Chat ) mRNA expression was decreased in the striatum, acetylcholinesterase (Ache) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and increased in the hippocampus, and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (Chrm1) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and the brainstem. These results reveal a previously unrecognized regional specificity in brain immunoregulatory and cholinergic system gene expression in the context of peripheral inflammation and are of interest for designing future antiinflammatory approaches.

  6. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesentini, Nicoletta; Barsanti, Cristina; Martino, Alessandro; Kusmic, Claudia; Ripoli, Andrea; Rossi, AnnaMaria; L'Abbate, Antonio

    2012-02-29

    Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod) and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1) upon short (4 h) and long (72 h) reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV), and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR) and the remote region (RR) of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb), Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh), Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz), Beta-glucuronidase (gusb), Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt), TATA binding box protein (tbp), Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs), Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1). According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs) without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in each region.

  7. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesentini Nicoletta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. Results In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1 upon short (4 h and long (72 h reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV, and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR and the remote region (RR of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb, Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh, Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a, Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz, Beta-glucuronidase (gusb, Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt, TATA binding box protein (tbp, Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs, Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1. According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. Conclusions This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in

  8. Expressing activity of promoter elements of large intergenic region from cotton leaf curl virus in host plant*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a type of single-stranded DNAvirus, belonging to geminivirus of subgroup III. In order to determine the function of CLCuV large intergenic region (LIR), total DNA of CLCuV-infected cotton leaves was used as template, and fragment of LIR was obtained by PCR and inserted into clone vector. The fragment of LIR was fused with gus reporter gene and nos terminator in the orientation of transcription of virion sense and complementary sense respectively, and the plant expression vectors were constructed. GUS activity of Agrobacterium-mediated transgenic tobacco was measured. The result indicated that LIR showed strong promoter activity in complementary sense gene orientation. Average GUS activity of the complementary sense promoter was 5-6 times that of CaMV 35S promoter, and the highest GUS activity of individual plant was ten times of that of CaMV 35S promoter. Histochemical localization confirmed its activity in both mesophyll and vascular tissues. Activity of virion sense of LIR was rather low. Thus LIR isolated from CLCuV could be used as a novel strong promoter in plant genetic manipulation.

  9. Differential expressions of the alternatively spliced variant mRNAs of the µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, in brain regions of four inbred mouse strains.

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    Jin Xu

    Full Text Available The µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, undergoes extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing in rodents and humans, with dozens of alternatively spliced variants of the OPRM1 gene. The present studies establish a SYBR green quantitative PCR (qPCR assay to more accurately quantify mouse OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs. Using these qPCR assays, we examined the expression of OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs in selected brain regions of four inbred mouse strains displaying differences in µ opioid-induced tolerance and physical dependence: C56BL/6J, 129P3/J, SJL/J and SWR/J. The complete mRNA expression profiles of the OPRM1 splice variants reveal marked differences of the variant mRNA expression among the brain regions in each mouse strain, suggesting region-specific alternative splicing of the OPRM1 gene. The expression of many variants was also strain-specific, implying a genetic influence on OPRM1 alternative splicing. The expression levels of a number of the variant mRNAs in certain brain regions appear to correlate with strain sensitivities to morphine analgesia, tolerance and physical dependence in four mouse strains.

  10. Tissue-specific expression, hormonal regulation and 5'-flanking gene region of the rat Clara cell 10 kDa protein: comparison to rabbit uteroglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, G; Wolf, M; Katyal, S L; Singh, G; Beato, M; Suske, G

    1990-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of rat Clara Cell 10 kDa secretory protein (CC10) shows 55% identity to rabbit uteroglobin. In order to define the relationship between rat CC10 and rabbit uteroglobin in detail, the tissue-specific expression and hormonal regulation of rat CC10 mRNA was analyzed. We report that like rabbit uteroglobin, rat CC10 mRNA is expressed in lung and esophagus, as well as in uteri of estrogen- and progesterone-treated females. Expression of CC10 mRNA in lung is regulated by glucocorticoids. The similarity in expression pattern of rat CC10 mRNA and rabbit uteroglobin mRNA is reflected by a striking similarity in the 5'-flanking regions of the two genes. Despite this overall similarity, two regions of 0.3 kb and 2.1 kb are absent in the rat CC10 upstream gene region. The larger region includes a cluster of hormone receptor binding sites, believed to be responsible for differential regulation of rabbit uteroglobin by glucocorticoids and progesterone. Thus, while the sequence identities in the coding and 5'-flanking regions point towards a common ancestor for the uteroglobin and CC10 gene, later events (deletions/insertions) might have caused species-specific differences in their regulation. Images PMID:2349092

  11. Molecular cloning, expression and identification of the promoter regulatory region for the neuropeptide trissin in the nervous system of the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Ladislav; Čižmár, Daniel; Gáliková, Zuzana; Bednár, Branislav; Daubnerová, Ivana; Žitňan, Dušan

    2016-06-01

    Trissin has recently been identified as a conserved insect neuropeptide, but its cellular expression and function is unknown. We detected the presence of this neuropeptide in the silkworm Bombyx mori using in silico search and molecular cloning. In situ hybridisation was used to examine trissin expression in the entire central nervous system (CNS) and gut of larvae, pupae and adults. Surprisingly, its expression is restricted to only two pairs of small protocerebral interneurons and four to five large neurons in the frontal ganglion (FG). These neurons were further characterised by subsequent multiple staining with selected antibodies against insect neuropeptides. The brain interneurons innervate edges of the mushroom bodies and co-express trissin with myoinhibitory peptides (MIP) and CRF-like diuretic hormones (CRF-DH). In the FG, one pair of neurons co-express trissin with calcitonin-like diuretic hormone (CT-DH), short neuropeptide F (sNPF) and MIP. These neurons innervate the brain tritocerebrum and musculature of the anterior midgut. The other pair of trissin neurons in the FG co-express sNPF and project axons to the tritocerebrum and midgut. We also used the baculovirus expression system to identify the promoter regulatory region of the trissin gene for targeted expression of various molecular markers in these neurons. Dominant expression of trissin in the FG indicates its possible role in the regulation of foregut-midgut contractions and food intake.

  12. Ocular expression and distribution of products of the POAG-associated chromosome 9p21 gene region.

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    Glyn Chidlow

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that there are highly significant associations for common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs near the CDKN2B-AS1 gene region at the 9p21 locus with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. This gene region houses the CDKN2B/p15(INK4B , CDKN2A/p16(INK4A and p14ARF (rat equivalent, p19(ARF tumour suppressor genes and is adjacent to the S-methyl-5'-thioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP gene. In order to understand the ocular function of these genes and, therefore, how they may be involved in the pathogenesis of POAG, we studied the distribution patterns of each of their products within human and rat ocular tissues. MTAP mRNA was detected in the rat retina and optic nerve and its protein product was localised to the corneal epithelium, trabecular meshwork and retinal glial cells in both human and rat eyes. There was a very low level of p16(INK4A mRNA present within the rat retina and slightly more in the optic nerve, although no protein product could be detected in either rat or human eyes with any of the antibodies tested. P19(ARF mRNA was likewise only present at very low levels in rat retina and slightly higher levels in the optic nerve. However, no unambiguous evidence was found to indicate expression of specific P19(ARF/p14(ARF proteins in either rat or human eyes, respectively. In contrast, p15(INK4B mRNA was detected in much higher amounts in both retina and optic nerve compared with the other genes under analysis. Moreover, p15(INK4B protein was clearly localised to the retinal inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers and the corneal epithelium and trabecular meshwork in rat and human eyes. The presented data provide the basis for future studies that can explore the roles that these gene products may play in the pathogenesis of glaucoma and other models of optic nerve damage.

  13. Comparison of gene expression in segregating families identifies genes and genomic regions involved in a novel adaptation, zinc hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    One of the challenges of comparative genomics is to identify specific genetic changes associated with the evolution of a novel adaptation or trait. We need to be able to disassociate the genes involved with a particular character from all the other genetic changes that take place as lineages diverge. Here we show that by comparing the transcriptional profile of segregating families with that of parent species differing in a novel trait, it is possible to narrow down substantially the list of potential target genes. In addition, by assuming synteny with a related model organism for which the complete genome sequence is available, it is possible to use the cosegregation of markers differing in transcription level to identify regions of the genome which probably contain quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the character. This novel combination of genomics and classical genetics provides a very powerful tool to identify candidate genes. We use this methodology to investigate zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, the sister species to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare the transcriptional profile of A. halleri with that of its sister nonaccumulator species, Arabidopsis petraea, and between accumulator and nonaccumulator F(3)s derived from the cross between the two species. We identify eight genes which consistently show greater expression in accumulator phenotypes in both roots and shoots, including two metal transporter genes (NRAMP3 and ZIP6), and cytoplasmic aconitase, a gene involved in iron homeostasis in mammals. We also show that there appear to be two QTLs for zinc accumulation, on chromosomes 3 and 7.

  14. Tacit Citing : The Scarcity of Judicial Dialogue between the Global and the Regional Human Rights Mechanisms in Freedom of Expression Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buyse, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter delves into the issue of possible interactions concerning freedom of expression standards between the global and the regional levels. The continuing development and interpretation of human rights norms on these two levels poses questions of coherence. The chapter conducts a case study i

  15. Human antibody expression in transgenic rats: comparison of chimeric IgH loci with human VH, D and JH but bearing different rat C-gene regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Osborn, Michael J; Avis, Suzanne; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Ménoret, Séverine; Anegon, Ignacio; Buelow, Roland; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2013-12-31

    Expression of human antibody repertoires in transgenic animals has been accomplished by introducing large human Ig loci into mice and, more recently, a chimeric IgH locus into rats. With human VH, D and JH genes linked to the rat C-region antibody expression was significantly increased, similar to wild-type levels not found with fully human constructs. Here we compare four rat-lines containing the same human VH-region (comprising 22 VHs, all Ds and all JHs in natural configuration) but linked to different rat CH-genes and regulatory sequences. The endogenous IgH locus was silenced by zinc-finger nucleases. After breeding, all lines produced exclusively chimeric human H-chain with near normal IgM levels. However, in two lines poor IgG expression and inefficient immune responses were observed, implying that high expression, class-switching and hypermutation are linked to optimal enhancer function provided by the large regulatory region at the 3' end of the IgH locus. Furthermore, exclusion of Cδ and its downstream interval region may assist recombination. Highly diverse IgG and immune responses similar to normal rats were identified in two strains carrying diverse and differently spaced C-genes.

  16. The human β-globin locus control region confers an early embryonic erythroid-specific expression pattern to a basic promoter driving the bacterial β-galactosidase gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tewari (Rita); N. Gillemans (Nynke); A. Harper; M.G.J.M. Wijgerde (Mark); G. Zafarana (Gaetano); D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is contained on a 20 kb DNA fragment and is characterized by the presence of five DNaseI hypersensitive sites in erythroid cells, termed 5'HS1-5. A fully active 6.5 kb version of the LCR, called the muLCR, has been described. Expression of the

  17. The vasa regulatory region mediates germline expression and maternal transmission of proteins in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: a versatile tool for genetic control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt Austin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline specific promoters are an essential component of potential vector control strategies which function by genetic drive, however suitable promoters are not currently available for the main human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Results We have identified the Anopheles gambiae vasa-like gene and found its expression to be specifically localized to both the male and female gonads in adult mosquitoes. We have functionally characterised using transgenic reporter lines the regulatory regions required for driving transgene expression in a pattern mirroring that of the endogenous vasa locus. Two reporter constructs indicate the existence of distinct vasa regulatory elements within the 5' untranslated regions responsible not only for the spatial and temporal but also for the sex specific germline expression. vasa driven eGFP expression in the ovary of heterozygous mosquitoes resulted in the progressive accumulation of maternal protein and transcript in developing oocytes that were then detectable in all embryos and neonatal larvae. Conclusion We have characterized the vasa regulatory regions that are not only suited to drive transgenes in the early germline of both sexes but could also be utilized to manipulate the zygotic genome of developing embryos via maternal deposition of active molecules. We have used computational models to show that a homing endonuclease-based gene drive system can function in the presence of maternal deposition and describe a novel non-invasive control strategy based on early vasa driven homing endonuclease expression.

  18. Analysis of carbon source-regulated gene expression by the upstream region of the Candida tropicalis malate synthase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, K; Atomi, H; Izuta, M; Kanai, T; Takeshita, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-03

    We investigated the regulation of expression of a gene encoding malate synthase (MS) of an n-alkane-utilizable yeast Candida tropicalis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where its expression is highly induced by acetate. By comparing levels of gene expression in cells grown on glucose, acetate, lactate, and oleic acid, we found that the increase in gene expression was due to a glucose repression-derepression mechanism. In order to obtain information concerning the regulation of the gene expression, a fusion gene which consists of the 5'-upstream region of MS-2 (UPR-MS-2) and the lacZ gene (encoding Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase), was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and beta-galactosidase activities were measured with cells grown on glucose or acetate. Deletion analysis of UPR-MS-2 revealed that the region between -777 and -448 (against the translation initiation codon) enhanced the level of gene expression in both glucose- and acetate-grown cells. In this region, sequences which resemble binding sites of Rap1p/Grf1p/Tufp, a global transcription activator, were found at seven locations and one was found for another pleiotropic activator Abf1p. The result also suggested the presence of multiple upstream repression sequences (URSs), which function specifically in glucose-grown cells, in the region between -368 and -126. In the repressing region, there were three tandem C(A/T)CTCCC sequences and also a putative binding site of Mig1p, a transcriptional repressor which mediates glucose repression of several other genes. When MIG1 gene of S. cerevisiae was disrupted, the expression of the UPR-MS-2-lacZ gene in glucose-grown cells increased approx. 10-fold. Furthermore, the effect of deletion of a putative Mig1p binding site was abolished in the MIG1-disrupted strain, suggesting Mig1p binds to this site and brings about glucose repression. When the SNF1 gene was disrupted, the high level gene expression observed in acetate-grown cells bearing UPR-MS-2 was

  19. Regional differences in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, proBDNF and preproBDNF in the brain confer stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bangkun; Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Chen, Qian-Xue; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Using learned helplessness (LH) model of depression, we measured protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, BDNF precursors (proBDNF and preproBDNF) in the brain regions of LH (susceptible) and non-LH rats (resilience). Expression of preproBDNF, proBDNF and BDNF pro-peptide in the medial prefrontal cortex of LH rats, but not non-LH rats, was significantly higher than control rats, although expression of these proteins in the nucleus accumbens of LH rats was significantly lower than control rats. This study suggests that regional differences in conversion of BDNF precursors into BDNF and BDNF pro-peptide by proteolytic cleavage may contribute to stress resilience.

  20. Novel region within the V kappa gene promoter is responsible for tissue and stage-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes in human lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowska, A E; Urbanski, S J

    1989-03-01

    Immunoglobulin gene-specific transacting factors have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes. The role of these factors in B-cell differentiation and stage-specific expression of these genes is, however, not fully understood. We have used a model of human lymphoid neoplasia to address this question. Different fragments of unrearranged human variable region of immunoglobulin kappa gene (V kappa) were used for cell-free in vitro transcription and DNA mobility shift assays. Previously described enhancement of in vitro transcription that was only seen with nuclear extracts derived from B-cell neoplasms corresponding to the late stages of B-cell differentiation was shown to be dependent on the actions of these factor(s) on the DNA region within the V kappa gene promoter. This region is located within the 920 bp fragment located 210 bp upstream from the coding region and this fragment represents a possible novel DNA region, which plays a role in the stage- and tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes.

  1. Expression of Trypanosoma cruzi surface antigen FL-160 is controlled by elements in the 3' untranslated, the 3' intergenic, and the coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, D; La Flamme, A C; Van Voorhis, W C

    1999-07-30

    The FL-160 surface antigen gene family of T. cruzi consists of hundreds of members of 160 kDa glycoproteins expressed in trypomastigotes, but not in epimastigotes. Steady-state levels of FL-160 mRNA were 80 to 100-fold higher in trypomastigotes than in epimastigotes, yet transcription rates were equivalent between the lifecycle stages. Luciferase reporter constructs demonstrated that the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and intergenic region (IR) following the coding sequence of FL-160 was sufficient to generate 8-fold higher luciferase expression in trypomastigotes compared with epimastigotes. Transfection of 3' UTR/IR deletion constructs revealed cis-acting elements which conferred a trypomastigote-specific expression pattern similar to that of FL-160. Parasites treated with translation and transcription inhibitors, cyclohexamide and Actinomycin D, respectively, displayed a stage-specific pattern of FL-160 mRNA degradation. Epimastigotes, but not trypomastigotes, treated with the inhibitors accumulated a 1.4 Kb FL-160 cleavage product. The cleavage site mapped to a 31 base poly-purine tract in the FL-160 coding region. The first 526 aa of FL-160, containing the 31 base poly-purine tract and several smaller tracts, were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from the T. cruzi tubulin locus. Stable transformants expressed 4-fold more FL-160:GFP fusion mRNA and 12-fold more fusion protein in the trypomastigote stage than in the epimastigote stage suggesting post-transcriptional and translational control elements. These data reveal at least two distinct control mechanisms for trypomastigote-specific expression of FL-160 surface glycoproteins, one involving the 3' UTR/IR and one involving the coding region of FL-160.

  2. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression specifically identifies transformed cells in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Toth, Csaba; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Wagner, Steffen; Müller, Franziska; Wittekindt, Claus; Freier, Kolja; Plinkert, Peter; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Klussmann, Jens Peter; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Reuschenbach, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    p16(INK4a) immunohistochemical overexpression is an overall reliable surrogate marker of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, cases of ambiguous p16(INK4a) overexpression are regularly detected in the head and neck: p16(INK4a) expression can be observed in non-malignant tissue, such as tonsillar crypt epithelium and a proportion of branchial cleft cysts. Additionally, diverse patterns of p16(INK4) expression can complicate interpretation of "p16(INK4a) -positivity". These aspects impede the unrestricted application of p16(INK4a) as a diagnostic marker in the head and neck. We hypothesized that combined detection of p16(INK4a) and the proliferation marker Ki-67 could support clarification of ambiguous p16(INK4a) expression in the head and neck by specifically indicating p16(INK4a) -expressing cells with proliferative activity. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression in a combined staining procedure was correlated to distinct p16(INK4a) expression patterns and HPV status (HPV DNA followed by E6*I oncogene mRNA detection) in 147 HNSCC and 50 non-malignant head and neck samples. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression only occurred in transformed cells of the head and neck. Co-expression was never detected in non-transformed cells. Combined p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 expression was stringently associated with a diffuse p16(INK4a) expression pattern. All HPV oncogene-expressing HNSCC showed p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression. We demonstrate that p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression occurs exclusively in transformed cells of the head and neck. Our findings indicate a substantial impact of combined p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 expression in the assessment of ambiguous p16(INK4a) expression in the head and neck by specifically identifying p16(INK4a) -expressing cells with proliferative activity. This property will be of considerable significance for head and neck histo- and cytopathology.

  3. Projections from the cat posterior lateral hypothalamus to the ventral part of the oral pontine reticular nucleus contain a GABAergic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Roza, Carmen; Martínez-Mena, Juana; Sánchez-Valle, María Elena; Reinoso-Suárez, Fernando

    2004-09-10

    The posterior lateral hypothalamus (PLH) has long been considered crucial to normal wakefulness while the ventral part of the oral pontine reticular nucleus (vRPO) is involved in the generation and maintenance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. However, to date, there is no information on the ultrastructure or neurotransmitter content of the hypothalamo-reticular projection. In the present study, we examined the morphology and synaptic organization of PLH terminals in the vRPO using PLH injections of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) as well as of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP). Since some PLH neurons are GABAergic, we used a post-embedding immunogold technique to determine whether any anterogradely labeled terminals were GABA-immunopositive. Electron microscope analyses revealed a variety of ultrastructural features in the vRPO anterogradely labeled terminals. Although most labeled terminals (over 63%) formed symmetric synapses on vRPO somata and dendrites, others made asymmetric synapses on vRPO dendrites. The relative percentages of labeled terminals observed on large, medium and small diameter dendrites were 44.3 +/- 5.5%, 35.3 +/- 3.0% and 20.4 +/- 3.1%, respectively. Finally, post-embedding immunogold technique revealed that there are GABA-immunopositive and immunonegative components to this projection, indicating that GABA is one of the transmitters used by the PLH cells that project to the vRPO. Furthermore, most, if not all, of the GABA-labeled axon terminals formed symmetric synapsis. In conclusion, our results suggest that the PLH could modulate the physiological responses of vRPO neurons through a GABAergic pathway as well as by other inhibitory and/or excitatory pathways. Activation of the descending PLH GABAergic projection may inhibit the REM sleep-inducing neurons within the vRPO and thus contribute to the suppression of REM sleep activation during wakefulness.

  4. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  5. Regional gene expression of LOX-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 in aorta of HIV-1 transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2009-01-01

    was elevated in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls, but the ICAM-1 gene expression profile did not show any differences between the groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1Tg rats have gene expression patterns indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in aorta, suggesting that HIV...

  6. A TGACGT motif in the 5'-upstream region of alpha-amylase gene from Vigna mungo is a cis-element for expression in cotyledons of germinated seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, D

    2001-06-01

    Alpha-amylase is expressed at high levels in cotyledons of germinated seeds of Vigna mungo. The mRNA for alpha-amylase appeared in cotyledons of the seeds at 1 d after imbibition started (DAI). Two TGACGT motifs at -445 and at -125 in the promoter region of the gene interacted with nuclear proteins from cotyledons of dry seeds and the activities were detected until 3 DAI. A transient assay with particle bombardment showed that the downstream region from -135 in the promoter was required for high level expression in the cotyledons and the activity was reduced by mutation of the TGACGT motif at -125. The activities to bind the TGACGT motifs were detected in the axes of the seeds at 1 DAI but disappeared at 4 DAI, although the mRNA for alpha-amylase in the axes appeared at 4 DAI and increased in level by 6 DAI. A transient assay experiment showed that a positive regulatory element for the expression in the axes was located in the region from -630 to -453. These results indicated that the TGACGT motif at -125 was required for high level expression of the gene in the cotyledons of the germinated seeds.

  7. Gene co-expression analysis identifies brain regions and cell types involved in migraine pathophysiology: a GWAS-based study using the Allen Human Brain Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eising, Else; Huisman, Sjoerd M H; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Vijfhuizen, Lisanne S; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Kurth, Tobias; Ikram, M Arfan; Freilinger, Tobias; Kaprio, Jaakko; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta R; Zwart, John-Anker; Quaye, Lydia; Strachan, David P; Kubisch, Christian; Dichgans, Martin; Davey Smith, George; Stefansson, Kari; Palotie, Aarno; Chasman, Daniel I; Ferrari, Michel D; Terwindt, Gisela M; de Vries, Boukje; Nyholt, Dale R; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2016-04-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurovascular brain disorder typically characterised by attacks of severe headache and associated with autonomic and neurological symptoms. Migraine is caused by an interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over a dozen genetic loci associated with migraine. Here, we integrated migraine GWAS data with high-resolution spatial gene expression data of normal adult brains from the Allen Human Brain Atlas to identify specific brain regions and molecular pathways that are possibly involved in migraine pathophysiology. To this end, we used two complementary methods. In GWAS data from 23,285 migraine cases and 95,425 controls, we first studied modules of co-expressed genes that were calculated based on human brain expression data for enrichment of genes that showed association with migraine. Enrichment of a migraine GWAS signal was found for five modules that suggest involvement in migraine pathophysiology of: (i) neurotransmission, protein catabolism and mitochondria in the cortex; (ii) transcription regulation in the cortex and cerebellum; and (iii) oligodendrocytes and mitochondria in subcortical areas. Second, we used the high-confidence genes from the migraine GWAS as a basis to construct local migraine-related co-expression gene networks. Signatures of all brain regions and pathways that were prominent in the first method also surfaced in the second method, thus providing support that these brain regions and pathways are indeed involved in migraine pathophysiology.

  8. Reduced beta-globin gene expression in adult mice containing deletions of locus control region 5' HS-2 or 5' HS-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, T J; Hug, B; Fiering, S; Epner, E; Bender, M A; Groudine, M

    1998-06-30

    To gain insights into the functions of individual DNA'se hypersensitive sites within the beta globin locus control region (LCR), we deleted the endogenous 5' HS-2 and HS-3 regions from the mouse germline using homologous recombination techniques. We demonstrated that the deletion of either murine 5' HS-2 or 5' HS-3 reduced the expression of the embryonic epsilon y and beta h1 globin genes minimally in yolk sac-derived erythrocytes, but that both knockouts reduced the output of the adult beta (beta-Major + beta-Minor) globin genes by approximately 30% in adult erythrocytes. When the selectable marker PGK-Neo cassette was retained within either the HS-2 or HS-3 region, a much more severe reduction in globin gene expression was observed at all developmental stages. PGK-Neo was shown to be expressed in an erythroid-specific fashion when it was retained in the HS-3 position. These results show that neither 5' HS-2 nor HS-3 is required for the activity of embryonic globin genes, nor are these sites required for correct developmental switching. However, each site is required for approximately 30% of the total LCR activity associated with adult beta-globin gene expression in adult red blood cells. Each site therefore contains some non-redundant information that contributes to adult globin gene function.

  9. Astrocyte-targeted expression of interleukin-3 and interferon-alpha causes region-specific changes in metallothionein expression in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, M; Carrasco, J; Penkowa, M;

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing IL-3 and IFN-alpha under the regulatory control of the GFAP gene promoter (GFAP-IL3 and GFAP-IFNalpha mice) exhibit a cytokine-specific, late-onset chronic-progressive neurological disorder which resemble many of the features of human diseases such as multiple sclerosis...

  10. Characterization of the homeobox-containing gene GH6 identifies novel regions of homeobox gene expression in the developing chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H S; Solursh, M

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a major group of genes involved in regulating, embryogenesis. Here we describe the identification of GH6, a novel chicken homeobox-containing gene and its spatial and temporal expression pattern in the developing chick embryo. Identity comparisons of the GH6 homeodomain suggest that it is closely related to the human homeobox gene H6, with 93% amino acid conservation. Temporally, GH6 expression is highest between embryonic stages 23 and 26; however, some expression is also detectable as early as stage 13. In situ hybridization of stage 23 embryos indicates that GH6 expression occurs at high levels in discrete craniofacial regions including the second branchial arch, the neural retina, the lens epithelium, the optic nerve, and the infundibulum. GH6 expression was also seen in the developing ventricular myocardium, representing the first report of homeobox gene expression in the developing ventricle. GH6 is also expressed in sensory spinal and cranial ganglia, suggesting that GH6 plays several roles not only in the development of craniofacial structures such as the eye and ear, but also in formation of functionally defined ganglia and myocardial structures.

  11. Methylation and expression analyses of Pallister-Killian syndrome reveal partial dosage compensation of tetrasomy 12p and hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Josef; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-03-03

    To ascertain the epigenomic features, i.e., the methylation, non-coding RNA, and gene expression patterns, associated with gain of i(12p) in Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), we investigated single cell clones, harboring either disomy 12 or tetrasomy 12p, from a patient with PKS. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed a characteristic expression and methylation signature. Of all the genes on 12p, 13% were overexpressed, including the ATN1, COPS7A, and NECAP1 genes in 12p13.31, a region previously implicated in PKS. However, the median expression fold change (1.3) on 12p was lower than expected by tetrasomy 12p. Thus, partial dosage compensation occurs in cells with i(12p). The majority (89%) of the significantly deregulated genes were not situated on 12p, indicating that global perturbation of gene expression is a key pathogenetic event in PKS. Three genes-ATP6V1G1 in 9q32, GMPS in 3q25.31, and TBX5 in 12q24.21-exhibited concomitant hypermethylation and decreased expression. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed global hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p, a footprint previously associated with constitutional and acquired gains of whole chromosomes as well as with X-chromosome inactivation in females. We hypothesize that this non-genic hypomethylation is associated with chromatin processing that facilitates cellular adaptation to excess genetic material.

  12. TGF-β superfamily gene expression and induction of the Runx1 transcription factor in adult neurogenic regions after brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor T Logan

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI increases neurogenesis in the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ and the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily cytokines are important regulators of adult neurogenesis, but their involvement in the regulation of this process after brain injury is unclear. We subjected adult mice to controlled cortical impact (CCI injury, and isolated RNA from the SVZ and DG at different post-injury time points. qPCR array analysis showed that cortical injury caused significant alterations in the mRNA expression of components and targets of the TGF-β, BMP, and activin signaling pathways in the SVZ and DG after injury, suggesting that these pathways could regulate post-injury neurogenesis. In both neurogenic regions, the injury also induced expression of Runt-related transcription factor-1 (Runx1, which can interact with intracellular TGF-β Smad signaling pathways. CCI injury strongly induced Runx1 expression in activated and proliferating microglial cells throughout the neurogenic regions. Runx1 protein was also expressed in a subset of Nestin- and GFAP-expressing putative neural stem or progenitor cells in the DG and SVZ after injury. In the DG only, these Runx1+ progenitors proliferated. Our data suggest potential roles for Runx1 in the processes of microglial cell activation and proliferation and in neural stem cell proliferation after TBI.

  13. Expression of FoxA and GATA transcription factors correlates with regionalized gut development in two lophotrochozoan marine worms: Chaetopterus (Annelida and Themiste lageniformis (Sipuncula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Michael J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A through gut is present in almost all metazoans, and most likely represents an ancient innovation that enabled bilaterian animals to exploit a wide range of habitats. Molecular developmental studies indicate that Fox and GATA regulatory genes specify tissue regions along the gut tube in a broad diversity of taxa, although little is known about gut regionalization within the Lophotrochozoa. In this study, we isolated FoxA and GATA456 orthologs and used whole mount in situ hybridization during larval gut formation in two marine worms: the segmented, polychaete annelid Chaetopterus, which develops a planktotrophic larva with a tripartite gut, and the non-segmented sipunculan Themiste lageniformis, which develops a lecithotrophic larva with a U-shaped gut. Results FoxA and GATA456 transcripts are predominantly restricted to gut tissue, and together show regional expression spanning most of the alimentary canal in each of these lophotrochozoans, although neither FoxA nor GATA456 is expressed in the posterior intestine of Chaetopterus. In both species, FoxA is expressed at the blastula stage, transiently in presumptive endoderm before formation of a definitive gut tube, and throughout early larval development in discrete foregut and hindgut domains. GATA456 genes are expressed during endoderm formation, and in endoderm and mesoderm associated with the midgut in each species. Several species-specific differences were detected, including an overlap of FoxA and GATA456 expression in the intestinal system of Themiste, which is instead complimentary in Chaetopterus. Other differences include additional discrete expression domains of FoxA in ectodermal trunk cells in Themiste but not Chaetopterus, and expression of GATA456 in anterior ectoderm and midgut cells unique to Chaetopterus. Conclusions This study of gene expression in a sipunculan contributes new comparative developmental insights from lophotrochozoans, and shows that FoxA and

  14. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  15. The Role of the 3' Untranslated Region in the Post-Transcriptional Regulation of KLF6 Gene Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diab, Thoria; Hanoun, Naima [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France); Bureau, Christophe; Christol, Camille [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France); Department of Hepatology, Toulouse University Hospital Centre, Toulouse 31409 (France); Buscail, Louis [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France); Department of Gastroenterology, Toulouse University Hospital Centre, Toulouse 31409 (France); Cordelier, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.cordelier@inserm.fr; Torrisani, Jérôme [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France)

    2013-12-19

    KLF6 is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and regulates many pathways such as differentiation, development, cellular proliferation, growth-related signal transduction, and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that KLF6 expression is altered during liver carcinogenesis. More importantly, KLF6 invalidation results in cell cycle progression inhibition and apoptosis of liver cancer cells. On the other hand, enforced expression of KLF6 variant 2 (SV2) induces cancer cell death by apoptosis. Thus, we and others demonstrated that KLF6 and its splicing variants play a critical role in liver cancer. However, little is known on the mechanisms governing KLF6 expression in HCC. In the present work, we asked whether the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the KLF6 mRNA may be responsible for regulation of KLF6 expression in HCC. We found that KLF6 mRNA stability was altered in liver-derived cell lines as compared to cervical cancer-derived cell lines and human embryonic fibroblasts. Interestingly, KLF6 mRNA was highly unstable in liver cancer-derived cell lines as compared to normal hepatocytes. We next cloned the KLF6 mRNA 3'UTR into luciferase-expressing vectors and found that gene expression and activity were strongly impaired in all liver-derived cell lines tested. In addition, we found that most the KLF6 3'UTR destabilisation activity resides between nt 1,835 and nt 2,615 of the KLF6 gene. Taken together, we provide the first steps towards better understanding of the regulation of KLF6 expression in HCC. Further work is needed to identify the factors that bind to KLF6 3'UTR to regulate its expression in liver cancer-derived cell lines.

  16. Analysis of Alzheimer's disease severity across brain regions by topological analysis of gene co-expression networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weixiong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving variations in the transcriptome of many genes. AD does not affect all brain regions simultaneously. Identifying the differences among the affected regions may shed more light onto the disease progression. We developed a novel method involving the differential topology of gene coexpression networks to understand the association among affected regions and disease severity. Methods We analysed microarray data of four regions - entorhinal cortex (EC, hippocampus (HIP, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and middle temporal gyrus (MTG from AD affected and normal subjects. A coexpression network was built for each region and the topological overlap between them was examined. Genes with zero topological overlap between two region-specific networks were used to characterise the differences between the two regions. Results and conclusion Results indicate that MTG shows early AD pathology compared to the other regions. We postulate that if the MTG gets affected later in the disease, post-mortem analyses of individuals with end-stage AD will show signs of early AD in the MTG, while the EC, HIP and PCC will have severe pathology. Such knowledge is useful for data collection in clinical studies where sample selection is a limiting factor as well as highlighting the underlying biology of disease progression.

  17. Regional differences in expression of VEGF mRNA in rat gastrocnemius following 1 hr exercise or electrical stimulation

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    Tang Kechun

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mRNA levels increase in rat skeletal muscle after a single bout of acute exercise. We assessed regional differences in VEGF165 mRNA levels in rat gastrocnemius muscle using in situ hybridization after inducing upregulation of VEGF by treadmill running (1 hr or electrical stimulation (1 hr. Muscle functional regions were defined as oxidative (primarily oxidative fibers, I and IIa, or glycolytic (entirely IIb or IId/x fibers. Functional regions were visualized on muscle cross sections that were matched in series to slides processed through in situ hybridization with a VEGF165 probe. A greater upregulation in oxidative regions was hypothesized. Results Total muscle VEGF mRNA (via Northern blot was upregulated 3.5-fold with both exercise and with electrical stimulation (P = 0.015. Quantitative densitometry of the VEGF mRNA signal via in situ hybridization reveals significant regional differences (P ≤ 0.01 and protocol differences (treadmill, electrical stimulation, and control, P ≤ 0.05. Mean VEGF mRNA signal was higher in the oxidative region in both treadmill run (~7%, N = 4 muscles, P ≤ 0.05 and electrically stimulated muscles (~60%, N = 4, P ≤ 0.05. These regional differences were not significantly different from control muscle (non-exercised, non-stimulated, N = 2 muscles, although nearly so for electrically stimulated muscle (P = 0.056. Conclusions Moderately higher VEGF mRNA signal in oxidative muscle regions is consistent with regional differences in capillary density. However, it is not possible to determine if the VEGF mRNA signal difference is important in either the maintenance of regional capillarity differences or exercise induced angiogenesis.

  18. Transcription factor AP1 binds the functional region of the promoter and regulates gene expression of human PPARdelta in LoVo cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaogang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ gene (PPARδ) is correlated with carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer, but the regulation of its gene transcription remains unclear. We herein report that AP1 binds the promoter and regulates PPARδ gene expression. With a luciferase reporter system, we identified a functional promoter region of 30 bp of PPARδ gene by deletion and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using site-directed mutagenesis and decoy analyses, we demonstrated that AP1 bound the functional transcriptional factor binding site in a region extending from -176 to -73 of the PPARδ promoter, which was confirmed using EMSA and supershift assays. Consequently, inhibition of the AP1 binding site led to decreased PPARδ mRNA. Our study demonstrated that AP1 is the transcriptional factor that contributes to PPARδ expression in LoVo cells.

  19. The application of the human beta-globin gene locus control region and murine erythroleukemia cell system to the expression and pharmacological characterization of human endothelin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Whiting, E; Bath, C; Tang, E; Brennand, J

    1995-06-01

    The cDNAs encoding both A and B subtypes of the human endothelin receptor have been inserted into mammalian cell expression vectors that utilize the human globin gene, locus control region. These constructs have been introduced into murine erythroleukemia cells and inducible high level expression of the receptors has been achieved (approximately 1.5-pM/mg membrane protein and approximately 13,500 binding sites/cell for both receptor subtypes). Cell lines expressing these receptors were obtained on a rapid time scale (3-4 weeks), facilitated by the need for the analysis of only small numbers of cell clones/receptor (approximately 6). Competitive binding assays with endothelin-1 gave IC50s of 130 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-A receptor and 160 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-B receptor. Similar studies with the different isoforms of endothelin, sarafatoxin-S6b and -S6c, BQ123 and BQ3020, all gave the expected selectivity profiles. The IC50s for all compounds were in close agreement with those reported for native receptors. Thus, this expression system, which has several advantages over other described expression systems, is capable of rapidly providing large quantities of receptor for detailed pharmacological analyses or drug screening. In addition, the expressed receptors display the expected pharmacological profiles in the absence of any complicating, competing interactions from other subtypes or binding sites.

  20. Matrix attachment regions included in a bicistronic vector enhances and stabilizes follistatin gene expressions in both transgenic cells and transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming HU,Jing GUO,Chunling BAI,Zhuying WEI,Li GAO,Tingmao HU,Shorgan BOU,Guangpeng LI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, follistatin (FST gene expression vectors with either a bicistronic gene transfer cassette alone, or a bicistron gene cassette carrying a matrix attachment region (MAR were constructed and transfected to bovine fetal fibroblasts. Evaluations of both the integration and expression of exogenous FST indicated that the pMAR-CAG-FST-IRES-AcGFP1-polyA-MAR (pMAR-FST vector had higher capacity to form monoclonal transgenic cells than the vector without MAR, though transient transfection and integration efficiency were similar with either construct. Remarkably, protein expression in transgenic cells with the pMAR-FST vector was significantly higher than that from the bicistronic vector. Exogenous FST was expressed in all of the pMAR-FST transgenic mice at F0, F1 and F2. Total muscle growth in F0 mice was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, with larger muscles in fore and hind limbs of transgenic mice. pMAR-FST transgenic mice were also found with more evenly distributed muscle bundles and thinner spaces between sarcolemma, which suggests a correlation between transgene expression-associated muscle development and the trend of muscle growth. In conclusion, a pMAR-FST vector, which excluded the resistant genes and frame structure, enhances and stabilizes FST gene expressions in both transfected cells and transgenic mice.

  1. Effects of alcohol on brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in discrete regions of the rat hippocampus and hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Arancibia, L; Rage, F; Givalois, L; Dingeon, P; Arancibia, S; Beaugé, F

    2001-01-15

    Chronic alcohol consumption has adverse effects on the central nervous system, affecting some hippocampal and hypothalamic functions. In this study we tempted to demonstrate that some of these modifications could involve impairment of neurotrophic factors. Three experimental groups of male Sprague Dawley rats were studied: one control group, one chronically treated with alcohol vapor according to a well-established model that induces behavioral dependence, and a third group treated similarly but killed 12 hr after alcohol withdrawal. In all groups, changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression occurring in the hippocampus and supraoptic nucleus were first analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and then by in situ hybridization. In parallel, we used ribonuclease protection assay to measure mRNA levels encoding trkB in the two central nervous system regions. We showed that chronic alcohol intoxication decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in discrete regions of the rat hippocampus (CA1 region and dentate gyrus) and in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus. We also showed a global up-regulation of trkB mRNA expression encoding the high-affinity brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor (TrkB), after applying the same treatment. Following 12 hr of alcohol withdrawal, a significant increase in BDNF mRNA expression was observed in the dentate gyrus and CA3 region of hippocampus and in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus. These findings suggest that chronic alcohol intake may modify hippocampal and hypothalamic neuronal functions through modifications in growth factors and its receptors.

  2. Promoter region polymorphism & expression profile of toll like receptor-3 (TLR-3) gene in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients from India

    OpenAIRE

    Medhi, Subhash; Deka, Manab; Deka, Purabi; Swargiary, Shyam S.; Hazam, Rajib K.; Sharma, Manash P.; Gumma, Phani K.; Asim, Mohammad; Kar, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces an immune response of the host, manifested by the formation of anti-HCV antibodies mediated by adaptive and innate immunity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in innate immunity system. This study was aimed to investigate the promoter region polymorphism and expression of TLR3 gene in patients with chronic HCV infection. Methods: Patients with chronic HCV infection (N=180) and an equal number of age-sex matched controls wer...

  3. Regulatory Regions of smeDEF in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strains Expressing Different Amounts of the Multidrug Efflux Pump SmeDEF

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Patricia; Alonso, Ana; Martinez, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    The smeT-smeDEF region and the smeT gene, which encodes the smeDEF repressor, are highly polymorphic. Few changes in smeT might be associated with smeDEF overexpression. The results obtained with cellular extracts suggest that mutant SmeT proteins cannot bind to the operator and that other transcription factors besides SmeT are involved in the regulation of smeDEF expression.

  4. 基于特征区域自动分割的人脸表情识别%Facial Expression Recognition Based on Feature Regions Automatic Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张腾飞; 闵锐; 王保云

    2011-01-01

    针对目前三维人脸表情区域分割方法复杂、费时问题,提出一种人脸表情区域自动分割方法,通过投影、曲率计算的方法检测人脸的部分特征点,以上述特征点为基础进行人脸表情区域的自动分割.为得到更加丰富的表情特征,结合人脸表情识别编码规则对提取到的特征矩阵进行扩充,利用分类器进行人脸表情的识别.通过对三维人脸表情数据库部分样本的识别结果表明,该方法可以取得较高的识别率.%To improve 3D facial expression feature regions segmentation, an automatic feature regions segmentation method is presented.The facial feature points are detected by conducting projection and curvature calculation, and are used as the basis of facial expression feature regions automatic segmentation.To obtain more abundant facial expression information, the Facial Action Coding System(FACS) coding roles is introduced to extend the extracted characteristic matrix.And facial expressions can be recognized by combining classifiers.Experimental results of 3D facial expression samples show that the method is effective with high recognition rate.

  5. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  6. Expression of NAC1 up-stream regulatory region and its relationship to the lateral root initiation induced by gibberellins and auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youhua; Duan, Liusheng; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Zhaohu; Wang, Minjie; Zhai, Zhixi

    2006-10-01

    A 1050 bp up-stream regulatory fragment of the transcription factor gene NAC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques. The fragment was used to substitute the 35S promoter of the pBI121 plasmid to construct a beta-glucuronidase gene (GUS) expression system. The construct was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) plants by the Agrobacterium-mediated transferring method. GUS expression pattern was studied by using the transgenic lines. The results showed that the GUS driven by the NAC1 up-stream regulatory region was specifically expressed in the root meristem region, basal areas of the lateral root primordium and the lateral roots. The GUS expression was induced by 3-indolebutyric acid (IBA) and gibberellins (GA3 and GA4+7). The results indicated that the up-stream regulatory fragment of NAC1 responded to plant hormones. The fragment might be involved in both auxins and gibberellins signaling in promoting the development of lateral roots.

  7. Analysis of differences between Western and East-Asian faces based on facial region segmentation and PCA for facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Garcia, Gibran; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Kaneko, Masahide

    2017-01-01

    Darwin was the first one to assert that facial expressions are innate and universal, which are recognized across all cultures. However, recent some cross-cultural studies have questioned this assumed universality. Therefore, this paper presents an analysis of the differences between Western and East-Asian faces of the six basic expressions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and surprise) focused on three individual facial regions of eyes-eyebrows, nose and mouth. The analysis is conducted by applying PCA for two feature extraction methods: appearance-based by using the pixel intensities of facial parts, and geometric-based by handling 125 feature points from the face. Both methods are evaluated using 4 standard databases for both racial groups and the results are compared with a cross-cultural human study applied to 20 participants. Our analysis reveals that differences between Westerns and East-Asians exist mainly on the regions of eyes-eyebrows and mouth for expressions of fear and disgust respectively. This work presents important findings for a better design of automatic facial expression recognition systems based on the difference between two racial groups.

  8. Definition of the minimal requirements within the human beta-globin gene and the dominant control region for high level expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, P; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F

    1990-01-01

    The human beta-globin dominant control region (DCR) was previously identified as a region from the 5' end of the human beta-globin locus which directs high level, site of integration-independent, copy number-dependent expression on a linked human beta-globin gene in transgenic mice and stably transfected mouse erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells. We have now analysed the elements comprising the DCR by systematic deletion mutagenesis in stable MEL transfectants. We have identified two independent elements within the DNase I hypersensitive sites 2 and 3, containing fragments which direct strong transcriptional inducibility of a beta-globin gene. Whilst the remaining two hypersensitive sites do not direct significant transcriptional induction, our data suggest that all four sites may be necessary for the fully regulated expression conferred by the DCR. We have also tested a number of beta-globin minigene constructs under the control of the DCR to assess if any of the local sequences from the gene may be removed without loss of expression. We find that the 3' enhancer may be removed without affecting expression, but there is an absolute requirement for the presence of the second intron, not related to the enhancer present in that intron. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2295312

  9. Expression of NAC1 up-stream regulatory region and its relationship to the lateral root initiation induced by gibberellins and auxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Youhua; DUAN; Liusheng; LU; Mengzhu; LI; Zhaohu; WANG; Minjie; ZHAI; Zhixi

    2006-01-01

    A 1050 bp up-stream regulatory fragment of the transcription factor gene NAC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques. The fragment was used to substitute the 35S promoter of the pBI121 plasmid to construct a β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) expression system. The construct was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) plants by the Agrobacterium-mediated transferring method. GUS expression pattern was studied by using the transgenic lines. The results showed that the GUS driven by the NAC1up-stream regulatory region was specifically expressed in the root meristem region, basal areas of the lateral root primordium and the lateral roots. The GUS expression was induced by 3-indolebutyric acid (IBA) and gibberellins (GA3 and GA4+7). The results indicated that the up-stream regulatory fragment of NAC1 responded to plant hormones. The fragment might be involved in both auxins and gibberellins signaling in promoting the development of lateral roots.

  10. Exploring the 5'-UTR DNA region as a target for optimizing recombinant gene expression from the strong and inducible Pm promoter in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Laila; Kucharova, Veronika; Bakke, Ingrid; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2012-04-30

    By using the strong and inducible Pm promoter as a model, we recently reported that the β-lactamase production (encoded by bla) can be stimulated up to 20-fold in Escherichia coli by mutating the DNA region corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA (UTR). One striking observation was the unexpected large stimulatory effect some of these UTR variants had on the bla transcript production level. We here demonstrate that such UTR variants can also be used to improve the expression level of the alternative genes celB (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and inf-α2b (encoding human cytokine interferon α2b), which both can be expressed to high levels even with the wild-type Pm UTR DNA sequence. Our data indicated some degree of context dependency between the UTR DNA and concomitant recombinant gene sequences. By constructing and using a synthetic operon, we demonstrated that UTR variants optimized for high-level expression of probably any recombinant gene can be efficiently selected from large UTR mutant libraries. The stimulation affected both the transcript production and translational level, and such modified UTR sequences therefore clearly have a significant applied potential for improvement of recombinant gene expression processes.

  11. Effects of acute and chronic administration of MK-801 on c-Fos protein expression in mice brain regions implicated in schizophrenia and antagonistic action of clozapine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Dai-ying; CAO Yue; ZHANG Lan; WANG Hai-feng; WU Ying-liang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of acute and chronic administration of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801 on c-Fos protein expression in different brain regions of mice and antagonistic action of clozapine. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of c-Fos protein. Results MK-801 (0.6 mg·kg-1) acute administration produced a significant increase in the expression of c-Fos protein in the layers Ⅲ-Ⅳ of posterior cingulate and retrosplenial (PC/RS) cortex, which was consistent with the previous reports. Moreover, we presented a new finding that MK-801 (0.6 mg·kg-1) chronic administration for 8 days produced a significant increase of c-Fos protein expression in the PC/RS cortex, prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hypothalamus of mice. Among that, c-Fos protein expression in the PC/ RS cortex of mice was most significant. Compared acute administration with chronic administration, we found that MK-801 chronic administration significantly increased the expression of c-Fos protein in the PC/ RS cortex, PFC and hypothalamus. Furthermore, pretreatment of mice with clozapine significantly decreased the expression of c-Fos protein induced by MK-801 acute and chronic administration. Conclusions Marked expression of c-Fos protein induced by MK-801 is associated with neurotransmitters' change noted in our previous studies, and c-Fos protein, the marker of neuronal activation, might play an important role in the chronic pathophysiological process of schizophrenic model induced by NMDA receptor antagonist.

  12. Age-related protein and mRNA expression of glutathione peroxidases (GPx and Hsp-70 in different regions of rat kidney with and without stressor

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    Noor Riyadh Thiab

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small molecular weight oxygen free radical species (ROS involved in oxidative stress can cause damage to cellular macromolecules including proteins, DNA and lipids. One of the most important enzymes involved in ROS detoxification is glutathione peroxidase (GPx. Here we study the age-related expression of GPx isoenzymes in various parts of the rat kidney with and without exposure to external oxidative stress. These results are correlated to the age dependent changes in the expression of the chaperone, Hsp-70. Protein and mRNA expression of GPx1 and GPx4 was studied in different regions of the kidney in ageing rats in the presence and absence of the external stressor 0.2 mM H2O2. Protein levels were examined by Western blot analysis following detection with appropriate antibodies and mRNA levels were analysed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR using appropriate primer sequences. mRNA expression for the chaperone Hsp70 was investigated in parallel. After reaching a peak at maturity (12 weeks, GPx1 protein and mRNA levels decreased with age under both control and stress conditions, and were higher in the cortex than in the outer and inner medulla. GPx4 protein and mRNA levels showed few comparable age-related changes. By contrast with the observed age-related decrease in GPx1 expression, chaperone Hsp-70 mRNA expression greatly increased with age. These findings suggest that the age-related decline in GPx1 expression in the cortex may be partly offset by a reciprocal change in Hsp-70 expression. These results are consistent with the oxidative stress theory of ageing.

  13. Two regulators of Vibrio parahaemolyticus play important roles in enterotoxicity by controlling the expression of genes in the Vp-PAI region.

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    Toshio Kodama

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important pathogen causing food-borne disease worldwide. An 80-kb pathogenicity island (Vp-PAI, which contains two tdh (thermostable direct hemolysin genes and a set of genes for the type III secretion system (T3SS2, is closely related to the pathogenicity of this bacterium. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Vp-PAI's gene expression are poorly understood. Here we report that two novel ToxR-like transcriptional regulatory proteins (VtrA and VtrB regulate the expression of the genes encoded within the Vp-PAI region, including those for TDH and T3SS2-related proteins. Expression of vtrB was under control of the VtrA, as vector-expressed vtrB was able to recover a functional protein secretory capacity for T3SS2, independent of VtrA. Moreover, these regulatory proteins were essential for T3SS2-dependent biological activities, such as in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo enterotoxicity. Enterotoxic activities of vtrA and/or vtrB deletion strains derived from the wild-type strain were almost absent, showing fluid accumulation similar to non-infected control. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of vtrA or vtrB deletion strains revealed that the expression levels of over 60 genes were downregulated significantly in these deletion mutant strains and that such genes were almost exclusively located in the Vp-PAI region. These results strongly suggest that VtrA and VtrB are master regulators for virulence gene expression in the Vp-PAI and play critical roles in the pathogenicity of this bacterium.

  14. Recombination events near the immunoglobulin Cmu gene join variable and constant region genes, switch heavy-chain expression, or inactivate the locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, S; Webb, E; Gough, J; Adams, J M

    1981-04-28

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain expression is initiated by recombination between a variable region (VH) gene and one of several joining region (JH) genes located near the mu constant region (Cmu) gene, and the active VH gene can subsequently switch to another CH gene. That the general mechanism for CH switching involves recombination between sites within the JH-Cmu intervening sequence and the 5' flanking region of another CH gene is supported here by Southern blot hybridization analysis of eight IgG- and IgA-secreting plasmacytomas. An alternative model requiring successive VH linkage to similar JH clusters near each CH gene is shown to be very unlikely since the mouse genome appears to contain only one complement of the JH locus and no JH gene was detectable within large cloned sequences flanking germline C gamma 3 and C gamma 1 genes. Thus, VH-JH joining and CH switching are mediated by separate regions of "the joining-switch" or J-S element. In each plasmacytoma examined, the J-S element had undergone recombination within both the JH locus and the switch region and was shown to be linked to the functional CH gene in an IgG3, and IgG1, and three IgA secretors. Both JH joining and CH switching occurred by deletion of DNA. Switch recombination occurred at more than one site within the J-S element in different lines, even for recombination with the same CH gene. Significantly, although heavy-chain expression is restricted to one allele ("allelic exclusion"), all rearranged in each plasmacytoma. Some rearrangements were aberrant, involving, for example, deletion of all JH genes from the allele. Hence, an error-prone recombination machinery may account for allelic exclusion in many plasmacytomas.

  15. Regional gene expression of LOX-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 in aorta of HIV-1 transgenic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mette Fisker Hag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients has been observed. The cause of this accelerated atherosclerosis is a matter of controversy. As clinical studies are complicated by a multiplicity of risk-factors and a low incidence of hard endpoints, studies in animal models could be attractive alternatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated gene expression of lectin-like oxidized-low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 in HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rats; these genes are all thought to play important roles in early atherogenesis. Furthermore, the plasma level of sICAM-1 was measured. We found that gene expressions of LOX-1 and VCAM-1 were higher in the aortic arch of HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls. Also, the level of sICAM-1 was elevated in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls, but the ICAM-1 gene expression profile did not show any differences between the groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1Tg rats have gene expression patterns indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in aorta, suggesting that HIV-infection per se may cause atherosclerosis. This transgenic rat model may be a very promising model for further studies of the pathophysiology behind HIV-associated cardiovascular disease.

  16. Sex-specific effects of prenatal chronic mild stress on adult spatial learning capacity and regional glutamate receptor expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuchao; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Xinxin; Cheng, Wenwen; Jiang, Han; Li, Min; Ren, Jintao; Zhang, Xiaosong; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-07-01

    Both animal experiments and clinical studies have demonstrated that prenatal stress can cause cognitive disorders in offspring. To explore the scope of these deficits and identify potential underlying mechanisms, we examined the spatial learning and memory performance and glutamate receptor (GluR) expression patterns of adult rats exposed to prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to reveal the interrelationships among spatial learning indices and GluR expression changes. Female PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited markedly impaired spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) task compared to control females, while PCMS-exposed males showed better initial spatial learning in the MWM compared to control males. PCMS also altered basal and post-MWM glutamate receptor expression patterns, but these effects differed markedly between sexes. Male PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited elevated basal expression of NR1, mGluR5, and mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas females showed no basal expression changes. Following MWM training, PCMS-exposed males expressed higher NR1 in the PFC and mammillary body (MB), higher mGluR2/3 in PFC, and lower NR2B in the hippocampus (HIP), PFC, and MB compared to unstressed MWM-trained males. Female PCMS-exposed offspring showed strongly reduced NR1 in MB and NR2B in the HIP, PFC, and MB, and increased mGluR2/3 in PFC compared to unstressed MWM-trained females. This is the first report suggesting that NMDA subunits in the MB are involved in spatial learning. Additionally, PCA further suggests that the NR1-NR2B form is the most important for spatial memory formation. These results reveal long-term sex-specific effects of PCMS on spatial learning and memory performance in adulthood and implicate GluR expression changes within HIP, PFC, and MB as possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in offspring exposed to prenatal stress.

  17. Enhanced expression of HIV and SIV vaccine antigens in the structural gene region of live attenuated rubella viral vectors and their incorporation into virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virnik, Konstantin; Ni, Yisheng; Berkower, Ira

    2013-04-19

    Despite the urgent need for an HIV vaccine, its development has been hindered by virus variability, weak immunogenicity of conserved epitopes, and limited durability of the immune response. For other viruses, difficulties with immunogenicity were overcome by developing live attenuated vaccine strains. However, there is no reliable method of attenuation for HIV, and an attenuated strain would risk reversion to wild type. We have developed rubella viral vectors, based on the live attenuated vaccine strain RA27/3, which are capable of expressing important HIV and SIV vaccine antigens. The rubella vaccine strain has demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and long lasting protection in millions of children. Rubella vectors combine the growth and immunogenicity of live rubella vaccine with the antigenicity of HIV or SIV inserts. This is the first report showing that live attenuated rubella vectors can stably express HIV and SIV vaccine antigens at an insertion site located within the structural gene region. Unlike the Not I site described previously, the new site accommodates a broader range of vaccine antigens without interfering with essential viral functions. In addition, antigens expressed at the structural site were controlled by the strong subgenomic promoter, resulting in higher levels and longer duration of antigen expression. The inserts were expressed as part of the structural polyprotein, processed to free antigen, and incorporated into rubella virions. The rubella vaccine strain readily infects rhesus macaques, and these animals will be the model of choice for testing vector growth in vivo and immunogenicity.

  18. AID expression in peripheral blood of children living in a malaria endemic region is associated with changes in B cell subsets and Epstein-Barr virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, Joel R; Asito, Amolo S; Wei, Chungwen; Piriou, Erwan; Sumba, P. Odada; Sanz, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    The development of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) is closely associated with EBV infection and holoendemic malaria infections. The role of EBV in the development of malignancy has been studied in depth, but there is still little known about the mechanisms by which malaria affects Burkitt's lymphomagenesis. Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression is necessary for the introduction of c-myc translocations that are characteristic of BL, but a link between AID and EBV or malaria is unclear. To determine if frequency of malaria exposure leads to increased AID expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) we examined two cohorts of children in western Kenya with endemic and sporadic malaria transmission dynamics. High frequency of malaria exposure led to increased expression of AID, which coincided with decreases in the IgM+ memory B cells. In the children from the malaria endemic region, the presence of a detectible EBV viral load was associated with higher AID expression compared to children with undetectable EBV, but this effect was not seen in children with sporadic exposure to malaria. This study demonstrates that intensity of malaria transmission correlates with AID expression levels in the presence of EBV suggesting that malaria and EBV infection have a synergistic effect on the development of c-myc translocations and BL. PMID:25099163

  19. AID expression in peripheral blood of children living in a malaria holoendemic region is associated with changes in B cell subsets and Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, Joel R; Asito, Amolo S; Wei, Chungwen; Piriou, Erwan; Sumba, P Odada; Sanz, Iñaki; Rochford, Rosemary

    2015-03-15

    The development of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and holoendemic malaria infections. The role of EBV in the development of malignancy has been studied in depth, but there is still little known about the mechanisms by which malaria affects Burkitt's lymphomagenesis. Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression is necessary for the introduction of c-myc translocations that are characteristic of BL, but a link between AID and EBV or malaria is unclear. To determine whether frequency of malaria exposure leads to increased AID expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) we examined two cohorts of children in western Kenya with endemic and sporadic malaria transmission dynamics. High frequency of malaria exposure led to increased expression of AID, which coincided with decreases in the IgM(+) memory B cells. In the children from the malaria endemic region, the presence of a detectible EBV viral load was associated with higher AID expression compared to children with undetectable EBV, but this effect was not seen in children with sporadic exposure to malaria. This study demonstrates that intensity of malaria transmission correlates with AID expression levels in the presence of EBV suggesting that malaria and EBV infection have a synergistic effect on the development of c-myc translocations and BL.

  20. Inlfuence of DNA methyltransferase 3b on FHIT expression and DNA methylation of the FHIT promoter region in hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Xiang Wang; Yong-Gan Zhang; Long-Shuan Zhao

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alterations in DNA methylation occur during the pathogenesis of human tumors. In this study, we investigated the inlfuence of DNA methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) on fragile histidine trial (FHIT) expression and on DNA methylation of the FHIT promoter region in the hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721. METHODS: DNMT3b siRNA was used to down-regulate DNMT3b expression. DNMT3b and FHIT proteins were determined by Western blotting. Methylation-speciifc PCR was used to analyze the methylation status of the FHIT gene. RESULTS: After DNMT3b siRNA transfection, the expression of DNMT3b was inhibited in SMMC-7721 cells, and the expression of FHIT was signiifcantly higher than that in the control group. There was no signiifcant difference in methylation status between the DNMT3b siRNA transfected cells and control cells. CONCLUSION: DNMT3b may play an important role in regulation of FHIT expression in hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells, but not through methylation of the FHIT promoter.

  1. Expression of growth differentiation factor 6 in the human developing fetal spine retreats from vertebral ossifying regions and is restricted to cartilaginous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Aiqun; Shen, Bojiang; Williams, Lisa A; Bhargav, Divya; Gulati, Twishi; Fang, Zhimin; Pathmanandavel, Sarennya; Diwan, Ashish D

    2016-02-01

    During embryogenesis vertebral segmentation is initiated by sclerotomal cell migration and condensation around the notochord, forming anlagen of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs. The factors that govern the segmentation are not clear. Previous research demonstrated that mutations in growth differentiation factor 6 resulted in congenital vertebral fusion, suggesting this factor plays a role in development of vertebral column. In this study, we detected expression and localization of growth differentiation factor 6 in human fetal spinal column, especially in the period of early ossification of vertebrae and the developing intervertebral discs. The extracellular matrix proteins were also examined. Results showed that high levels of growth differentiation factor 6 were expressed in the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs and the hypertrophic chondrocytes adjacent to the ossification centre in vertebral bodies, where strong expression of proteoglycan and collagens was also detected. As fetal age increased, the expression of growth differentiation factor 6 was decreased correspondingly with the progress of ossification in vertebral bodies and restricted to cartilaginous regions. This expression pattern and the genetic link to vertebral fusion suggest that growth differentiation factor 6 may play an important role in suppression of ossification to ensure proper vertebral segmentation during spinal development.

  2. Differential regulation of hepatitis B virus core protein expression and genome replication by a small upstream open reading frame and naturally occurring mutations in the precore region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Li; Qin, Yanli; Jia, Haodi; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Jiming; Wands, Jack R; Tong, Shuping; Li, Jisu

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcribes two subsets of 3.5-kb RNAs: precore RNA for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression, and pregenomic RNA for core and P protein translation as well as genome replication. HBeAg expression could be prevented by mutations in the precore region, while an upstream open reading frame (uORF) has been proposed as a negative regulator of core protein translation. We employed replication competent HBV DNA constructs and transient transfection experiments in Huh7 cells to verify the uORF effect and to explore the alternative function of precore RNA. Optimized Kozak sequence for the uORF or extra ATG codons as present in some HBV genotypes reduced core protein expression. G1896A nonsense mutation promoted more efficient core protein expression than mutated precore ATG, while a +1 frameshift mutation was ineffective. In conclusion, various HBeAg-negative precore mutations and mutations affecting uORF differentially regulate core protein expression and genome replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Despite WT1 binding sites in the promoter region of human and mouse nucleoporin glycoprotein 210, WT1 does not influence expression of GP210

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licht Jonathan D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein 210 (GP210 is a transmembrane component of the nuclear pore complex of metazoans, with a short carboxyterminus protruding towards the cytoplasm. Its function is unknown, but it is considered to be a major structural component of metazoan nuclear pores. Yet, our previous findings showed pronounced differences in expression levels in embryonic mouse tissues and cell lines. In order to identify factors regulating GP210, the genomic organization of human GP210 was analyzed in silico. Results The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 and consists of 40 exons spread over 102 kb. The deduced 1887 amino acid showed a high degree of alignment homology to previously reported orthologues. Experimentally we defined two transcription initiation sites, 18 and 29 bp upstream of the ATG start codon. The promoter region is characterized by a CpG island and several consensus binding motifs for gene regulatory transcription factors, including clustered sites associated with Sp1 and the Wilms' tumor suppressor gene zinc finger protein (WT1. In addition, distal to the translation start we found a (GTn repetitive sequence, an element known for its ability to bind WT1. Homologies for these motifs could be identified in the corresponding mouse genomic region. However, experimental tetracycline dependent induction of WT1 in SAOS osteosarcoma cells did not influence GP210 transcription. Conclusion Although mouse GP210 was identified as an early response gene during induced metanephric kidney development, and WT1 binding sites were identified in the promoter region of the human GP210 gene, experimental modulation of WT1 expression did not influence expression of GP210. Therefore, WT1 is probably not regulating GP210 expression. Instead, we suggest that the identified Sp binding sites are involved.

  4. Human papillomavirus and p53 expression in cancer of unknown primary in the head and neck region in relation to clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivars, Lars; Näsman, Anders; Tertipis, Nikolaos; Vlastos, Andrea; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Nordemar, Sushma

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head neck region are generally treated with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy at times combined with chemotherapy, a treatment associated with considerable side effects. Some of these tumors may originate as human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with better clinical outcome than head neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in general, and could potentially do well with less treatment. Here, we therefore investigated whether HPV status and p53-expression correlated to clinical outcome in patients with CUP in the head neck region. Fifty metastases were analyzed for presence of HPV DNA, and expression of p16(INK4A) and p53 and the data were correlated to clinical outcome. Patients with HPV DNA-positive (HPVDNA+) metastases had significantly better 5-year overall survival (OS) compared to those with HPVDNA- metastases (80.0% vs. 36.7%, respectively; P = 0.004), with a similar tendency for disease-free survival (DFS). These survival rates showed excellent concordance with those of HPVDNA+ and HPVDNA- OSCC in Sweden during the same time period, strengthening the hypothesis that HPVDNA+ head and neck CUP may originate from HPVDNA+ OSCC. In addition, having absent/intermediary-low as compared to high expression of p53 correlated to a better prognosis with a 69% as compared to 14% 5-year OS, respectively (P p53 expression are valuable prognostic factors in patients with CUP in the head and neck region and should be further explored for clinical use.

  5. Distribution of type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing neurons in the septal-hypothalamic region of the mouse: colocalization with GABAergic and glutamatergic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovszky, Erik; Wittmann, Gábor; Kalló, Imre; Füzesi, Tamás; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2012-04-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the principal mediator of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling in the brain. In this study, we addressed the topographic distribution and amino acid neurotransmitter phenotype of endocannabinoid-sensitive hypothalamic neurons in mice. The in situ hybridization detection of CB1 mRNA revealed high levels of expression in the medial septum (MS) and the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), moderate levels in the preoptic area and the hypothalamic lateroanterior (LA), paraventricular (Pa), ventromedial (VMH), lateral mammillary (LM), and ventral premammillary (PMV) nuclei, and low levels in many other hypothalamic regions including the suprachiasmatic (SCh) and arcuate (Arc) nuclei. This regional distribution pattern was compared with location of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic cell groups, as identified by the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and type 2 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT2) mRNAs, respectively. The MS, DBB, and preoptic area showed overlaps between GABAergic and CB1-expressing neurons, whereas hypothalamic sites with moderate CB1 signals, including the LA, Pa, VMH, LM, and PMV, were dominated by glutamatergic neurons. Low CB1 mRNA levels were also present in other glutamatergic and GABAergic regions. Dual-label in situ hybridization experiments confirmed the cellular co-expression of CB1 with both glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. In this report we provide a detailed anatomical map of hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic systems whose neurotransmitter release is controlled by retrograde endocannabinoid signaling from hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic target neurons. This neuroanatomical information contributes to an understanding of the role that the endocannabinoid system plays in the regulation of endocrine and metabolic functions.

  6. Efficient replication and expression of murine leukemia virus with major deletions in the enhancer region of U3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K.; Lovmand, S.; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie;

    1992-01-01

    The effect of deletions within the enhancer region in the U3 part of the LTR derived from the murine retrovirus Akv was studied. The deletions were stably transmitted through normal virus replication as shown by sequence analysis of cloned polymerase chain reaction product of the cDNA copy...... level of virus with the deleted LTRs all reached the level of virus with the intact LTR. We propose that stimulatory cis-acting sequences either adjacent to the site of proviral integration or in the coding regions of the provirus may compensate for deletions in the LTR....

  7. Technical note: A comparison of reticular and ruminal pH monitored continuously with 2 measurement systems at different weeks of early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M; Münger, A; Dohme-Meier, F

    2016-03-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis is one of the most important digestive disorders in high-yielding dairy cows fed highly fermentable diets. Monitoring of forestomach pH has been suggested as a potentially valuable tool for diagnosing subacute ruminal acidosis. The objective of the present study was to compare continuously recorded measurements of an indwelling telemetric pH sensor inserted orally in the reticulum with those obtained from a measurement system placed in the ventral sac of the rumen through a cannula. The experiment was conducted with 6 ruminally cannulated Holstein cows kept in a freestall barn. Equal numbers of cows were assigned to 2 treatment groups based on their previous lactation milk yield. Cows in treatment CON- were offered a diet consisting of only fresh herbage cut once daily, and cows in treatment CON+ got fresh herbage plus a concentrate supplement according to the individual milk yield of each cow to meet their predicted nutrient requirements. The experiment lasted from 2 wk before the predicted calving date until wk 8 of lactation. During the whole experiment, a pH value was recorded every 10 min in the reticulum using a wireless telemetry bolus including a pH sensor (eBolus, eCow Ltd., Exeter, Devon, UK), which had been applied orally using a balling gun. Simultaneously, in wk 2, before the estimated calving date and in wk 2, 4, 6, and 8 of lactation, the ruminal pH was measured every 30 s for 48 h with the LRCpH measurement system (Dascor Inc., Escondido, CA) placed in the ventral sac of the rumen through the cannula. The readings of the LRCpH measurement system were summarized as an average over 10 min for statistical analysis. The recorded pH values were on average 0.24 pH units higher in the reticulum than in the rumen. The reticular pH also showed less fluctuation (overall SD 0.19 pH units) than pH profiles recorded in the rumen (overall SD 0.51 pH units). Regardless of measurement system, pH was not influenced by treatment, but varied

  8. The secondary structure of the R region of a murine leukemia virus is important for stimulation of long terminal repeat-driven gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupelli, L; Okenquist, S A; Trubetskoy, A; Lenz, J

    1998-10-01

    In addition to their role in reverse transcription, the R-region sequences of some retroviruses affect viral transcription. The first 28 nucleotides of the R region within the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine type C retrovirus SL3 were predicted to form a stem-loop structure. We tested whether this structure affected the transcriptional activity of the viral LTR. Mutations that altered either side of the stem and thus disrupted base pairing were generated. These decreased the level of expression of a reporter gene under the control of viral LTR sequences about 5-fold in transient expression assays and 10-fold in cells stably transformed with the LTR-reporter plasmids. We also generated a compensatory mutant in which both the ascending and descending sides of the stem were mutated such that the nucleotide sequence was different but the predicted secondary structure was maintained. Most of the activity of the wild-type SL3 element was restored in this mutant. Thus, the stem-loop structure was important for the maximum activity of the SL3 LTR. Primer extension analysis indicated that the stem-loop structure affected the levels of cytoplasmic RNA. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that deletion of the R region had a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Thus, the main effect of the R-region element was on one or more steps that occurred after the template was transcribed by RNA polymerase. This finding implied that the main function of the R-region element involved RNA processing. R-region sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or mouse mammary tumor virus could not replace the SL3 element. R-region sequences from an avian reticuloendotheliosis virus partially substituted for the SL3 sequences. R-region sequences from Moloney murine leukemia virus or feline leukemia virus did function in place of the SL3 element. Thus, the R region element appears to be a general feature of the mammalian type C genus of

  9. Organization and expression of genes in the genomic region surrounding the glutamine synthetase gene Gln1 from Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykjaer, T; Danielsen, D; She, Q

    1997-01-01

    a segment carrying two apparently non-functional, fragmented copia-like retroelements, dRtp1 and dRtp2, was identified. Sequence similarity to reverse transcriptase- and RNaseH-coding regions defined the defective retro-elements dRtp1 and dRtp2 within this segment. Terminal repeats were not found but three...

  10. Joint Binding of OTX2 and MYC in Promotor Regions Is Associated with High Gene Expression in Medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, J.; Hasselt, N.E.; Zwijnenburg, D.A.; Koster, J.; Versteeg, R.; Kool, M.

    2011-01-01

    Both OTX2 and MYC are important oncogenes in medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in childhood. Much is known about MYC binding to promoter regions, but OTX2 binding is hardly investigated. We used ChIP-on-chip data to analyze the binding patterns of both transcription factors in D

  11. TCGA: Increased oncoprotein coding region mutations correlate with a greater expression of apoptosis-effector genes and a positive outcome for stomach adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavorski, John M; Blanck, George

    2016-08-17

    Oncogene mutations are primarily thought to facilitate uncontrolled cell growth. However, overexpression of oncoproteins likely leads to apoptosis in a feed forward mechanism, whereby a certain level of oncoprotein leads to the activation of pro-proliferation effector genes and higher levels lead to activation of pro-apoptotic effector genes. TCGA STAD barcodes having no oncoprotein coding region mutations represented reduced expression of the apoptosis-effector genes compared with barcodes with multiple oncoprotein coding region mutations. Furthermore, STAD barcodes in a "no-subsequent tumor" group, representing 224 samples, and in a "positive outcome" group, had more oncoprotein coding regions mutated, on average, than barcodes of the new tumor and negative outcome groups, respectively. BRAF, CTNNB1, KRAS and MTOR coding region mutations (as a group) had the strongest association with the no-subsequent tumor group. Tumor suppressor coding region mutations were also correlated with no-subsequent tumor. These results are consistent with an oncoprotein-mediated, feed-forward mechanism of apoptosis in patients. Importantly, the no-subsequent tumor group also had more overall mutations. This result leads to considerations of unhealthy cells or cells with more neo-antigens for immune rejection. However, a probabilistic aspect of mutagenesis is also consistent with more oncoprotein and tumor suppressor protein mutations, in cases of more overall mutations, and thus a higher likelihood of activation of feed forward apoptosis pathways.

  12. Cloning,expression and purification of the ligand-binding region of human IL-6R in E.coli and its preliminary functional identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段聚宝; 王嘉玺; 韩家淮; 彭善云; 邹民吉; 苗继红; 赵春文; 马贤凯

    1995-01-01

    The ligand-binding region of human IL-6R is taken as the target gene fragment to be clonedand expressed.With pET-3b as expressing vector,two recombinants pET-6R(B)and pET-6R(B)4 have beenconstructed encoding the ligand-binding region(28 kD)of hIL-6R and its dimmer(53 kD),respectively.Afterinduction with IPTG,they produced two proteins rIL6R-28 of 28 kD and rIL6R-53 of 53 kD amounting to 50%and 30% of total bacteria proteins,respectively.The expressed products were mainly recovered as inclusionbodies.After purification and renaturation,both of them were capable of augmenting the growth-stimulatingeffect of IL-6 on 7TD1 cells,an IL-6 dependent cell line.The result of ELISA also revealed that bothrIL6R-28 and rIL6R-53 had the obvious ligand-binding activity.

  13. No benefit for regional control and survival by planned neck dissection in primary irradiated oropharyngeal cancer irrespective of p16 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquieira, R; Haerle, S K; Huber, G F; Soltermann, A; Haile, S R; Stoeckli, S J; Broglie, Martina A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess regional control and survival in primary irradiated oropharyngeal cancer patients with advanced neck disease (≥cN2a) receiving planned neck dissection (PND) irrespective of the nodal response compared to salvage neck dissection (SND) in case of regional persistence or reccurence in relation to tumoral p16 overexpression. 96 consecutive patients treated at the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland were included. Tissue microarray-based scoring of p16 expression was obtained. 5 years overall (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in the PND and SND cohort were 70 vs. 57 % (p = 0.20) and 80 vs. 65 % (p = 0.14), respectively. Regional control in PND and SND achieved 95 vs. 87 % (p = 0.29), respectively. There was no statistically significant impact of neck treatment (PND vs. SND) on regional control or survival among patients with p16-negative tumors (5 years OS 59 vs. 50 %, p = 0.66; 5 years DSS 59 vs. 57 %, p = 0.89) nor among patients with p16-positive tumors (5 years OS 84 vs. 67 %, p = 0.21; 5 years DSS 95 vs. 81 %, p = 0.24). The type of neck dissection after primary intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) had no impact on regional control and survival even in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease. Therefore we are convinced that based on the accuracy of newer diagnostic modalities the surveillance of a radiologically negative neck after primary chemoradiation (CRT) is oncologically safe irrespective of p16 expression of the tumor.

  14. [Analysis of the structure and expression of the cluster of Drosophila melanogaster genes DIP1, CG32500, CG32819, and CG14476 in the flamenco gene region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, M V; Nefedova, L N; Kim, A I

    2009-10-01

    The flamenco gene controlling transpositions of the gypsy retrovirus is localized in the 20A1-3 region, in which eight open reading frames organized in a cluster were discovered: DIP1, three repeats of CG32500 and CG32819, and CG14476. Analysis of the genes composing the cluster indicates that their transcription in Drosophila melanogaster is a stage-specific process. Comparison of the expression of these genes in the strains OreR, SS, and MS having the flamenco phenotype and in the strain 413 having the flamenco+ phenotype revealed differences only for the DIP1 gene, transcription of this gene being altered only in the OreR strain. Thus, mutant flamenco alleles are differently expressed in different strains. The structural organization of the flamenco gene region was studied in different Drosophila species: D. sechellia, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. erecta, D. virilis, D. ananassae, D. grimshawi, and D. pseudoobscura. The genes of the cluster were found to be highly conserved in genomes of different species, but in none of them, except D. sechellia, the structural organization of the region repeats the structure of the D. melanogaster cluster.

  15. Structure, variation and expression analysis of glutenin gene promoters from Triticum aestivum cultivar Chinese Spring shows the distal region of promoter 1Bx7 is key regulatory sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xue; Zhao, Ying; Chen, Fanguo; Xia, Guangmin

    2013-09-25

    In this study, ten glutenin gene promoters were isolated from model wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Chinese Spring) using a genomic PCR strategy with gene-specific primers. Six belonged to high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) gene promoters, and four to low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS). Sequence lengths varied from 1361 to 2,554 bp. We show that the glutenin gene promoter motifs are conserved in diverse sequences in this study, with HMW-GS and LMW-GS gene promoters characterized by distinct conserved motif combinations. Our findings show that HMW-GS promoters contain more functional motifs in the distal region of the glutenin gene promoter (> -700 bp) compared with LMW-GS. The y-type HMW-GS gene promoters possess unique motifs including RY repeat and as-2 box compared to the x-type. We also identified important motifs in the distal region of HMW-GS gene promoters including the 5'-UTR Py-rich stretch motif and the as-2 box motif. We found that cis-acting elements in the distal region of promoter 1Bx7 enhanced the expression of HMW-GS gene 1Bx7. Taken together, these data support efforts in designing molecular breeding strategies aiming to improve wheat quality. Our results offer insight into the regulatory mechanisms of glutenin gene expression.

  16. Specific Regional and Age-Related Small Noncoding RNA Expression Patterns Within Superior Temporal Gyrus of Typical Human Brains Are Less Distinct in Autism Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Boryana; Ander, Bradley P.; Barger, Nicole; Sharp, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs play a critical role in regulating messenger RNA throughout brain development and when altered could have profound effects leading to disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We assessed small noncoding RNAs, including microRNA and small nucleolar RNA, in superior temporal sulcus association cortex and primary auditory cortex in typical and ASD brains from early childhood to adulthood. Typical small noncoding RNA expression profiles were less distinct in ASD, both between regions and changes with age. Typical micro-RNA coexpression associations were absent in ASD brains. miR-132, miR-103, and miR-320 micro-RNAs were dysregulated in ASD and have previously been associated with autism spectrum disorders. These diminished region- and age-related micro-RNA expression profiles are in line with previously reported findings of attenuated messenger RNA and long noncoding RNA in ASD brain. This study demonstrates alterations in superior temporal sulcus in ASD, a region implicated in social impairment, and is the first to demonstrate molecular alterations in the primary auditory cortex. PMID:26350727

  17. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  18. Expression and purification of a novel ZNF191 zinc finger protein——ZNF191 protein and its truncated zinc finger region ZNF191 (243—368)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉奇; 余龙; 余文浩; 施少林; 孙炳耘; 吴国俊; 黄仲贤

    1999-01-01

    ZNF191 is a new zine finger gene whieh has a 1107 bp open reading frame (ORF) and eneodes a 368 amino avid protein including a putative DNA-binding domain of four Cys2 His2 zine finger motifs at its C-terminal region. The ZNF191 cDNA is loeated in the chromosome 18q12.1 region where it is known that a variety of hereditary diseases are related to. Probably, this protein has potential function of stimulating the gene franscription. In order to examine the function and structure of ZNF191 protein, the ORF of ZNF191 and its zine finger region ZNF191(243--368) genes were inserted into PTSA-18 expression vector by PCR amplification, then the constructed genes were expressed in the PTSA-18/B121 (DE3) system. The two proteins were purified by DEAE-52, CM-23 and Heparin-Sepharose 4B columns. The pooled proteins showed a single band as assayed by Coomasie Brillian Blue Staining of an SDS/polyacryamide gel.

  19. Análisis del fenónemo de las personas sin hogar en los medios de comunicación escrita mayoritarios. Una aproximación desde el análisis reticular del discurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz García Juan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación se propone examinar algunos medios de prensa escrita de masas, en busca de el/los marco/s culturales utilizados para orientar, percibir, racionalizar y comprender el fenómeno del sinhogarismo; organizando y analizando el contenido de esto/s marco/s (conceptos, estereotipos, problemáticas asociadas, etc, y las relaciones entre ellos en forma reticular.

  20. Effect of NPK Fertilization on Cassava Mosaic Disease (CMD) Expression in a Sub-Saharan African Region

    OpenAIRE

    Muengula-Manyi, M.; K.K. Nkongolo; Bragard, C.; Tshilenge-Djim, P.; Winter, S; Kalonji-Mbuyi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of NPK fertilizer on the incidence, severity and gravity of cassava mosaic disease (CMD) was investigated using eight genetically improved cassava varieties and eight local farmer’s varieties. The study was carried out in a savannah region (Gandajika) in D.R. Congo at two locations. The varieties were planted with and without NPK fertilization. Application of NPK fertilizer significantly (P<0.05) increased CMD incidence, severity (AUDPC) and gravity overtime compared to...

  1. Expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen gene containing the preS2 region in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida,Iwao

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a plasmid, pBH103-ME5, in which the region encoding the 10 preS2 amino acid residues and the S domain of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg were regulated by the promoter of the yeast repressible acid phosphatase gene. Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying pBH103-ME5 produced the HBs antigen (yHBsAg, when it was cultured in a medium containing a low concentration of phosphate. The antigen was purified to homogeneity. Its molecular weight was determined by Western blotting to be 24,000, and its amino acid composition agreed well with that deduced from the nucleotide sequence. The C-terminal amino acid sequence of yHBsAg was exactly the same as that predicted from the nucleotide sequence, while the N-terminal amino acid acetylserine, which was followed by 8 amino acid residues coded by the preS2 region. These results indicate that the recombinant yeast produced a single polypeptide consisting of the preS2 region and the subsequent S domain after being processed at the N-terminus

  2. Yeast expression and DNA immunization of hepatitis B virus S gene with second-loop deletion of α determinant region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Hu; Xiao-Mou Peng; Yang-Su Huang; Lin Gu; Qi-Feng Xie; Zhi-Liang Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Immune escape mutations of HBV often occur in the dominant epitope, the second-loop of the a determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). To let the hosts respond to the subdominant epitopes in HBsAg may be an effective way to decrease the prevalence of immune escape mutants. For this reason, a man-made clone of HBV S gene with the second-loop deletion was constructed. Its antigenicity was evaluated by yeast expression analysis and DNA immunization in mice.METHODS: HBV S gene with deleted second-loop, amino acids from 139 to 145, was generated using splicing by overlap extension. HBV deleted S gene was then cloned into the yeast expression vector pPIC9 and the mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 to generate pHB-SDY and pHB-SD,respectively. The complete S gene was cloned into the same vectors as controls. The deleted recombinant HBsAg expressed in yeasts was detected using Abbott IMx HBsAg test kits, enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA)and immune dot blotting to evaluate its antigenicity in vitro.The anti-HBs responses to DNA immunization in BALB/c mice were detected using Abbott IMx AUSAB test kits to evaluate the antigenicity of that recombinant protein in vivo.RESULTS: Both deleted and complete HBsAg were successfully expressed in yeasts. They were intracellular expressions. The deleted HBsAg could not be detected by ELISA, in which the monoclonal anti-HBs against the α determinant was used, but could be detected by Abbott IMx and immune dot blotting, in which multiple monoclonal antiHBs and polyclonal anti-HBs were used, respectively. The activity of the deleted HBsAg detected by Abbott IMx was much lower than that of complete HBsAg (the ratio of sample value/cut off value, 106±26.7 vs1 814.4±776.3, P<0.01,t = 5.02). The anti-HBs response of pHB-SD to DNA immunization was lower than that of complete HBV S gene vector pHB (the positive rate 2/10 vs6/10, 4.56±3.52 mIU/mL vs27.60±17.3 mIU/mL, P= 0.02, t= 2.7).CONCLUSIONS: HBsAg with deleted

  3. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan J John

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective 'framing' effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Short communication: Feeding linseed oil to dairy goats with competent reticular groove reflex greatly increases n-3 fatty acids in milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Marín, A L; Gómez-Cortés, P; Carrión Pardo, D; Núñez Sánchez, N; Gómez Castro, G; Juárez, M; Pérez Alba, L; Pérez Hernández, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2013-01-01

    A crossover experiment was designed to compare the effects of 2 ways of feeding linseed oil on milk fat fatty acid (FA) composition. Ten lactating goats, trained to keep competent their inborn reticular groove reflex, received a daily dose of linseed oil (38 g/d) either with their solid (concentrate) feed (CON) or emulsified in skim milk and bottle-fed (BOT). Two groups of 5 goats received alternative and successively each of the treatments in two 15-d periods. α-Linolenic acid in milk fat rose up to 13.7% in the BOT versus 1.34% in the CON treatment. The n-6 to n-3 FA ratio was significantly reduced in goats receiving bottle-fed linseed oil (1.49 vs. 0.49). Contents of rumen biohydrogenation intermediates of dietary unsaturated FA were high in milk fat of goats under the CON treatment but low in those in the BOT treatment. These results point to a clear rumen bypass of the bottle-fed linseed oil. This strategy allows obtaining milk fat naturally very rich in n-3 FA and very low in trans FA. Translating this approach into practical farm conditions could enable farmers to produce milk enriched in specific FA. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Yohan J; Zikopoulos, Basilis; Bullock, Daniel; Barbas, Helen

    2016-02-01

    In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective 'framing' effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. Reticular Chemistry at Its Best: Directed Assembly of Hexagonal Building Units into the Awaited Metal-Organic Framework with the Intricate Polybenzene Topology, pbz-MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alezi, Dalal; Spanopoulos, Ioannis; Tsangarakis, Constantinos; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; O Keeffe, Michael; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Trikalitis, Pantelis N

    2016-10-05

    The ability to direct the assembly of hexagonal building units offers great prospective to construct the awaited and looked-for hypothetical polybenzene (pbz) or "cubic graphite" structure, described 70 years ago. Here, we demonstrate the successful use of reticular chemistry as an appropriate strategy for the design and deliberate construction of a zirconium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) with the intricate pbz underlying net topology. The judicious selection of the perquisite hexagonal building units, six connected organic and inorganic building blocks, allowed the formation of the pbz-MOF-1, the first example of a Zr(IV)-based MOF with pbz topology. Prominently, pbz-MOF-1 is highly porous, with associated pore size and pore volume of 13 Å and 0.99 cm(3) g(-1), respectively, and offers high gravimetric and volumetric methane storage capacities (0.23 g g(-1) and 210.4 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) at 80 bar). Notably, the pbz-MOF-1 pore system permits the attainment of one of the highest CH4 adsorbed phase density enhancements at high pressures (0.15 and 0.21 g cm(-3) at 35 and 65 bar, respectively) as compared to benchmark microporous MOFs.

  7. Palmitic Acid-Induced Neuron Cell Cycle G2/M Arrest and Endoplasmic Reticular Stress through Protein Palmitoylation in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsuan Hsiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with elevated saturated fatty acids (SFAs in the brain. An increase in SFAs, especially palmitic acid (PA, triggers neuron cell apoptosis, causing cognitive function to deteriorate. In the present study, we focused on the specific mechanism by which PA triggers SH-SY5Y neuron cell apoptosis. We found that PA induces significant neuron cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase in SH-SY5Y cells. Our data further showed that G2/M arrest is involved in elevation of endoplasmic reticular (ER stress according to an increase in p-eukaryotic translation inhibition factor 2α, an ER stress marker. Chronic exposure to PA also accelerates beta-amyloid accumulation, a pathological characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, SFA-induced ER stress, G2/M arrest and cell apoptosis were reversed by treatment with 2-bromopalmitate, a protein palmitoylation inhibitor. These findings suggest that protein palmitoylation plays a crucial role in SFA-induced neuron cell cycle G2/M arrest, ER stress and apoptosis; this provides a novel strategy for preventing SFA-induced neuron cell dysfunction.

  8. Palmitic acid-induced neuron cell cycle G2/M arrest and endoplasmic reticular stress through protein palmitoylation in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yung-Hsuan; Lin, Ching-I; Liao, Hsiang; Chen, Yue-Hua; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2014-11-13

    Obesity-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with elevated saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in the brain. An increase in SFAs, especially palmitic acid (PA), triggers neuron cell apoptosis, causing cognitive function to deteriorate. In the present study, we focused on the specific mechanism by which PA triggers SH-SY5Y neuron cell apoptosis. We found that PA induces significant neuron cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase in SH-SY5Y cells. Our data further showed that G2/M arrest is involved in elevation of endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress according to an increase in p-eukaryotic translation inhibition factor 2α, an ER stress marker. Chronic exposure to PA also accelerates beta-amyloid accumulation, a pathological characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, SFA-induced ER stress, G2/M arrest and cell apoptosis were reversed by treatment with 2-bromopalmitate, a protein palmitoylation inhibitor. These findings suggest that protein palmitoylation plays a crucial role in SFA-induced neuron cell cycle G2/M arrest, ER stress and apoptosis; this provides a novel strategy for preventing SFA-induced neuron cell dysfunction.

  9. Vitamins C and E attenuate apoptosis, beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ ATPase downregulation after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fuzhong; Yan, Chen; Patel, Ravish; Liu, Weimin; Dong, Erdan

    2006-05-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in mediating ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in heart failure (HF), but its mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. In this study we determined whether a combination of antioxidant vitamins reduced myocyte apoptosis, beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) Ca2+ ATPase downregulation in HF after myocardial infarction (MI) and whether these effects were associated with amelioration of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction. Vitamins (vitamin C 300 mg and vitamin E 300 mg) were administered to rabbits 1 week after MI or sham operation for 11 weeks. The results showed that MI rabbits exhibited cardiac dilation and LV dysfunction measured by fractional shortening and the maximal rate of pressure rise (dP/dt), an index of contractility. These changes were associated with elevation of oxidative stress, decreases of mitochondrial Bcl-2 and cytochrome c proteins, increases of cytosolic Bax and cytochrome c proteins, caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and myocyte apoptosis, and downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity and SR Ca2+ ATPase. Combined treatment with vitamins C and E diminished oxidative stress, increased mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein, decreased cytosolic Bax, prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, reduced caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and myocyte apoptosis, blocked beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization and SR Ca2+ ATPase downregulation, and attenuated LV dilation and dysfunction in HF after MI. The results suggest that antioxidant therapy may be beneficial in HF.

  10. 15,16-Dihydrotanshinone I, a Compound of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress in Human Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Te Chuang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 5,16-dihydrotanshinone I (DHTS is extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (tanshen root and was found to be the most effective compound of tanshen extracts against breast cancer cells in our previous studies. However, whether DHTS can induce apoptosis through an endoplasmic reticular (ER stress pathway was examined herein. In this study, we found that DHTS significantly inhibited the proliferation of human prostate DU145 carcinoma cells and induced apoptosis. DHTS was able to induce ER stress as evidenced by the upregulation of glucose regulation protein 78 (GRP78/Bip and CAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein/growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (CHOP/GADD153, as well as increases in phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1 mRNA splicing forms. DHTS treatment also caused significant accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, indicating that DHTS might be a proteasome inhibitor that is known to induce ER stress or enhance apoptosis caused by the classic ER stress-dependent mechanism. Moreover, DHTS-induced apoptosis was reversed by salubrinal, an ER stress inhibitor. Results suggest that DHTS can induce apoptosis of prostate carcinoma cells via induction of ER stress and/or inhibition of proteasome activity, and may have therapeutic potential for prostate cancer patients.

  11. Reticular Chemistry at Its Best: Directed Assembly of Hexagonal Building Units into the Awaited Metal-Organic Framework with the Intricate Polybenzene Topology, pbz-MOF

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2016-10-05

    The ability to direct the assembly of hexagonal building units offers great prospective to construct the awaited and looked-for hypothetical polybenzene (pbz) or “cubic graphite” structure, described 70 years ago. Here, we demonstrate the successful use of reticular chemistry as an appropriate strategy for the design and deliberate construction of a zirconium-based metal–organic framework (MOF) with the intricate pbz underlying net topology. The judicious selection of the perquisite hexagonal building units, six connected organic and inorganic building blocks, allowed the formation of the pbz-MOF-1, the first example of a Zr(IV)-based MOF with pbz topology. Prominently, pbz-MOF-1 is highly porous, with associated pore size and pore volume of 13 Å and 0.99 cm3 g–1, respectively, and offers high gravimetric and volumetric methane storage capacities (0.23 g g–1 and 210.4 cm3 (STP) cm–3 at 80 bar). Notably, the pbz-MOF-1 pore system permits the attainment of one of the highest CH4 adsorbed phase density enhancements at high pressures (0.15 and 0.21 g cm–3 at 35 and 65 bar, respectively) as compared to benchmark microporous MOFs.

  12. SEROPOSITIVITY FOR ASCARIOSIS AND TOXOCARIOSIS AND CYTOKINE EXPRESSION AMONG THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN THE VENEZUELAN DELTA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Araujo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at measuring seropositivities for infection by Ascaris suum and Toxocara canis using the excretory/secretory (E/S antigens from Ascaris suum (AES and Toxocara canis (TES within an indigenous population. In addition, quantification of cytokine expressions in peripheral blood cells was determined. A total of 50 Warao indigenous were included; of which 43 were adults and seven children. In adults, 44.1% were seropositive for both parasites; whereas children had only seropositivity to one or the other helminth. For ascariosis, the percentage of AES seropositivity in adults and children was high; 23.3% and 57.1%, respectively. While that for toxocariosis, the percentage of TES seropositivity in adults and children was low; 9.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The percentage of seronegativity was comparable for AES and TES antigens in adults (27.9% and children (28.6%. When positive sera were analyzed by Western blotting technique using AES antigens; three bands of 97.2, 193.6 and 200.2 kDas were mostly recognized. When the TES antigens were used, nine major bands were mostly identified; 47.4, 52.2, 84.9, 98.2, 119.1, 131.3, 175.6, 184.4 and 193.6 kDas. Stool examinations showed that Blastocystis hominis, Hymenolepis nana and Entamoeba coli were the most commonly observed intestinal parasites. Quantification of cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, TGF-β, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-4 expressions showed that there was only a significant increased expression of IL-4 in indigenous with TES seropositivity (p < 0.002. Ascaris and Toxocara seropositivity was prevalent among Warao indigenous.

  13. Brain responses to chronic social defeat stress: effects on regional oxidative metabolism as a function of a hedonic trait, and gene expression in susceptible and resilient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarik, Margus; Alttoa, Aet; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Sharp, Trevor; Panksepp, Jaak; Harro, Jaanus

    2011-01-01

    Chronic social defeat stress, a depression model in rats, reduced struggling in the forced swimming test dependent on a hedonic trait-stressed rats with high sucrose intake struggled less. Social defeat reduced brain regional energy metabolism, and this effect was also more pronounced in rats with high sucrose intake. A number of changes in gene expression were identified after social defeat stress, most notably the down-regulation of Gsk3b and Map1b. The majority of differences were between stress-susceptible and resilient rats. Conclusively, correlates of inter-individual differences in stress resilience can be identified both at gene expression and oxidative metabolism levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. MHC II-β chain gene expression studies define the regional organization of the thymus in the developing bony fish Dicentrarchus labrax (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchietti, S; Abelli, L; Guerra, L; Randelli, E; Proietti Serafini, F; Belardinelli, M C; Buonocore, F; Bernini, C; Fausto, A M; Scapigliati, G

    2015-02-01

    MHC II-β chain gene transcripts were quantified by real-time PCR and localised by in situ hybridization in the developing thymus of the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax, regarding the specialization of the thymic compartments. MHC II-β expression significantly rose when the first lymphoid colonization of the thymus occurred, thereafter increased further when the organ progressively developed cortex and medulla regions. The evolving patterns of MHC II-β expression provided anatomical insights into some mechanisms of thymocyte selection. Among the stromal cells transcribing MHC II-β, scattered cortical epithelial cells appeared likely involved in the positive selection, while those abundant in the cortico-medullary border and medulla in the negative selection. These latter most represent dendritic cells, based on typical localization and phenotype. These findings provide further proofs that efficient mechanisms leading to maturation of naïve T cells are operative in teleosts, strongly reminiscent of the models conserved in more evolved gnathostomes.

  15. Molecular cloning and recombinant expression of the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region from a brazilian white spot syndrome virus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Braunig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fragment of the VP28 coding sequence from a Brazilian WSSV isolate (BrVP28 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 pLysS strain in order to produce the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression resulted in a protein of about 21 kDa, which was purified under denaturing conditions, resulting in a final highly purified BrVP28 preparation. The recombinant protein obtained can be used in several biotechnology applications, such as the production of monoclonal antibodies which could be used in the development of diagnostic tools as well as in the studies on the characterization of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV isolated in Brazil.

  16. Gene expression profile of brain regions reflecting aberrations in nervous system development targeting the process of neurite extension of rat offspring exposed developmentally to glycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akane, Hirotoshi; Saito, Fumiyo; Shiraki, Ayako; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Itahashi, Megu; Wang, Liyun; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    We previously found that exposure to glycidol at 1000 ppm in drinking water caused axonopathy in maternal rats and aberrations in late-stage hippocampal neurogenesis, targeting the process of neurite extension in offspring. To identify the profile of developmental neurotoxicity of glycidol, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given drinking water containing glycidol from gestational day 6 until weaning on day 21 after delivery, and offspring at 0, 300 and 1000 ppm were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling. Four brain regions were selected to represent both cerebral and cerebellar tissues, i.e., the cingulate cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampal dentate gyrus and cerebellar vermis. Downregulated genes in the dentate gyrus were related to axonogenesis (Nfasc), myelination (Mal, Mrf and Ugt8), and cell proliferation (Aurkb and Ndc80) at ≥ 300 ppm, and upregulated genes were related to neural development (Frzb and Fzd6) at 1000 ppm. Upregulation was observed for genes related to myelination (Kl, Igf2 and Igfbp2) in the corpus callosum and axonogenesis and neuritogenesis (Efnb3, Tnc and Cd44) in the cingulate cortex, whereas downregulation was observed for genes related to synaptic transmission (Thbs2 and Ccl2) in the cerebellar vermis; all of these changes were mostly observed at 1000 ppm. Altered gene expression of Cntn3, which functions on neurite outgrowth-promotion, was observed in all four brain regions at 1000 ppm. Gene expression profiles suggest that developmental exposure to glycidol affected plasticity of neuronal networks in the broad brain areas, and dentate gyrus neurogenesis may be the sensitive target of this type of toxicity.

  17. Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis: a structural MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mike

    Full Text Available Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others' mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus. Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed, processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex and socially relevant information (left temporal pole. Thus, both disconnection mechanism due to white matter lesions and cortical thinning of specific brain areas may result in cognitive deficit in multiple sclerosis affecting emotion and mental state processing from facial expressions and contributing to everyday and social life difficulties of these patients.

  18. Conjunction of Vocal Production and Perception Regulates Expression of the Immediate Early Gene ZENK in a Novel Cortical Region of Songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, Tanya L.; Chang, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The cortical nucleus LMAN (lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium) provides the output of a basal ganglia pathway that is necessary for acquisition of learned vocal behavior during development in songbirds. LMAN is composed of two subregions, a core and a surrounding shell, that give rise to independent pathways that traverse the forebrain in parallel. The LMANshell pathway forms a recurrent loop that includes a cortical region, the dorsal region of the caudolateral nidopallium (dNCL), hitherto unknown to be involved with learned vocal behavior. Here we show that vocal production strongly induces the IEG product ZENK in dNCL of zebra finches. Hearing tutor song while singing is more effective at inducing expression in dNCL of juvenile birds during the auditory–motor integration stage of vocal learning than is hearing conspecific song. In contrast, hearing conspecific song is relatively more effective at inducing expression in adult birds, regardless of whether they are producing song. Furthermore, ZENK+ neurons in dNCL include projection neurons that are part of the LMANshell recurrent loop and a high proportion of dNCL projection neurons express ZENK in singing juvenile birds that hear tutor song. Thus juvenile birds that are actively refining their vocal pattern to imitate a tutor song show high levels of ZENK induction in dNCL neurons when they are singing while hearing the song of their tutor and low levels when they hear a novel conspecific. This pattern indicates that dNCL is a novel brain region involved with vocal learning and that its function is developmentally regulated. PMID:20107119

  19. Anion-sensitive regions of L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Babai

    Full Text Available L-type calcium currents (I(Ca are influenced by changes in extracellular chloride, but sites of anion effects have not been identified. Our experiments showed that CaV1.2 currents expressed in HEK293 cells are strongly inhibited by replacing extracellular chloride with gluconate or perchlorate. Variance-mean analysis of I(Ca and cell-attached patch single channel recordings indicate that gluconate-induced inhibition is due to intracellular anion effects on Ca(2+ channel open probability, not conductance. Inhibition of CaV1.2 currents produced by replacing chloride with gluconate was reduced from approximately 75%-80% to approximately 50% by omitting beta subunits but unaffected by omitting alpha(2delta subunits. Similarly, gluconate inhibition was reduced to approximately 50% by deleting an alpha1 subunit N-terminal region of 15 residues critical for beta subunit interactions regulating open probability. Omitting beta subunits with this mutant alpha1 subunit did not further diminish inhibition. Gluconate inhibition was unchanged with expression of different beta subunits. Truncating the C terminus at AA1665 reduced gluconate inhibition from approximately 75%-80% to approximately 50% whereas truncating it at AA1700 had no effect. Neutralizing arginines at AA1696 and 1697 by replacement with glutamines reduced gluconate inhibition to approximately 60% indicating these residues are particularly important for anion effects. Expressing CaV1.2 channels that lacked both N and C termini reduced gluconate inhibition to approximately 25% consistent with additive interactions between the two tail regions. Our results suggest that modest changes in intracellular anion concentration can produce significant effects on CaV1.2 currents mediated by changes in channel open probability involving beta subunit interactions with the N terminus and a short C terminal region.

  20. Nucleotide sequence and transcript organization of a region of the vaccinia virus genome which encodes a constitutively expressed gene required for DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, N A; Hruby, D E

    1987-05-01

    A vaccinia virus (VV) gene required for DNA replication has been mapped to the left side of the 16-kilobase (kb) VV HindIII D DNA fragment by marker rescue of a DNA- temperature-sensitive mutant, ts17, using cloned fragments of the viral genome. The region of VV DNA containing the ts17 locus (3.6 kb) was sequenced. This nucleotide sequence contains one complete open reading frame (ORF) and two incomplete ORFs reading from left to right. Analysis of this region at early times revealed that transcription from the incomplete upstream ORF terminates coincidentally with the complete ORF encoding the ts17 gene product, which is directly downstream. The predicted proteins encoded by this region correlate well with polypeptides mapped by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected early mRNA. The nucleotide sequences of a 1.3-kb BglII fragment derived from ts17 and from two ts17 revertants were also determined, and the nature of the ts17 mutation was identified. S1 nuclease protection studies were carried out to determine the 5' and 3' ends of the transcripts and to examine the kinetics of expression of the ts17 gene during viral infection. The ts17 transcript is present at both early and late times postinfection, indicating that this gene is constitutively expressed. Surprisingly, the transcriptional start throughout infection occurs at the proposed late regulatory element TAA, which immediately precedes the putative initiation codon ATG. Although the biological activity of the ts17-encoded polypeptide was not identified, it was noted that in ts17-infected cells, expression of a nonlinked VV immediate-early gene (thymidine kinase) was deregulated at the nonpermissive temperature. This result may indicate that the ts17 gene product is functionally required at an early step of the VV replicative cycle.

  1. Human apolipoprotein E4 modulates the expression of Pin1, Sirtuin 1, and Presenilin 1 in brain regions of targeted replacement apoE mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, F; Carboni, L; Carretta, D; Rimondini, R; Candeletti, S; Romualdi, P

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) allele is consistently associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the molecular mechanism of this susceptibility by analyzing the levels of genes involved in AD pathogenesis in transgenic mice expressing human apoE3 or apoE4 isoforms. mRNA and protein levels of Pin1, Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), Presenilin 1 (PS1), and pro-Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) were analyzed in brain regions affected by neuropathological changes in AD. Pin1 mRNA was significantly higher in the hippocampus of apoE4 mice than in apoE3 controls, whereas lower expression was detected in the entorhinal and parietal cortices. Reduced Pin1 levels may increase neurofibrillary degeneration and amyloidogenic processes, while compensatory mechanisms may take place in the hippocampus to balance spatial memory deficits. Sirt1 levels were significantly reduced in the frontal cortex of apoE4 mice. Sirt1 reduction may hinder its protective role against the formation of plaques and tangles and diminish its anti-inflammatory actions. Sirt1 decrease may also play a role in apoE4-associated memory impairments. Moreover, in apoE4 mice PS1 mRNA levels were lower in the frontal cortex. Lower PS1 expression may hamper γ-secretase function, thus affecting amyloid precursor protein processing. Pro-BDNF mRNA levels did not differ between apoE3 and apoE4 mice in any region analyzed. This study showed dysregulated expression of Pin1, Sirt1, and PS1 genes in different cerebral areas of apoE4 mice, suggesting that these changes may play a role in the mechanism of AD vulnerability.

  2. Identification of new TSGA10 transcript variants in human testis with conserved regulatory RNA elements in 5'untranslated region and distinct expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour, Pouya; Nematzadeh, Mahsa; Mobasheri, Maryam Beigom; Afsharpad, Mandana; Mansouri, Kamran; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-09-01

    Testis specific gene antigen 10 (TSGA10) is a cancer testis antigen involved in the process of spermatogenesis. TSGA10 could also play an important role in the inhibition of angiogenesis by preventing nuclear localization of HIF-1α. Although it has been shown that TSGA10 messenger RNA (mRNA) is mainly expressed in testis and some tumors, the transcription pattern and regulatory mechanisms of this gene remain largely unknown. Here, we report that human TSGA10 comprises at least 22 exons and generates four different transcript variants. It was identified that using two distinct promoters and splicing of exons 4 and 7 produced these transcript variants, which have the same coding sequence, but the sequence of 5'untanslated region (5'UTR) is different between them. This is significant because conserved regulatory RNA elements like upstream open reading frame (uORF) and putative internal ribosome entry site (IRES) were found in this region which have different combinations in each transcript variant and it may influence translational efficiency of them in normal or unusual environmental conditions like hypoxia. To indicate the transcription pattern of TSGA10 in breast cancer, expression of identified transcript variants was analyzed in 62 breast cancer samples. We found that TSGA10 tends to express variants with shorter 5'UTR and fewer uORF elements in breast cancer tissues. Our study demonstrates for the first time the expression of different TSGA10 transcript variants in testis and breast cancer tissues and provides a first clue to a role of TSGA10 5'UTR in regulation of translation in unusual environmental conditions like hypoxia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Genome wide expression profiling of the mesodiencephalic region identifies novel factors involved in early and late dopaminergic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Chakrabarty

    2012-05-01

    Meso-diencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA neurons are critical for motor control and cognitive functioning and their loss or dysfunction is associated with disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD, schizophrenia and addiction. However, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying mdDA neuron development and maintenance. Here, we determined the spatiotemporal map of genes involved in the development of mdDA neurons to gain further insight into their molecular programming. Genome-wide gene expression profiles of the developing ventral mesencephalon (VM were compared at different developmental stages leading to the identification of novel regulatory roles of neuronal signaling through nicotinic acthylcholine receptors (Chrna6 and Chrnb3 subunits and the identification of novel transcription factors (Oc2 and 3 involved in the generation of the mdDA neuronal field. We show here that Pitx3, in cooperation with Nurr1, is the critical component in the activation of the Chrna6 and Chrnb3 subunits in mdDA neurons. Furthermore, we provide evidence of two divergent regulatory pathways resulting in the expression of Chrna6 and Chrnb3 respectively.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis have different beta-lactamase expression phenotypes but are homogeneous in the ampC-ampR genetic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, J I; Ciofu, O; Høiby, N

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from 1 of 17 cystic fibrosis patients produced secondary beta-lactamase in addition to the ampC beta-lactamase. Isolates were grouped into three beta-lactamase expression phenotypes: (i) beta-lactam sensitive, low basal levels and inducible beta-lactamase production......; (ii) beta-lactam resistant, moderate basal levels and hyperinducible beta-lactamase production; (iii) beta-lactam resistant, high basal levels and constitutive beta-lactamase production. Apart from a base substitution in the ampR-ampC intergenic region of an isolate with moderate...

  5. CBF2A-CBF4B genomic region copy numbers alongside the circadian clock play key regulatory mechanisms driving expression of FR-H2 CBFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Taniya; Morohashi, Kengo; Stockinger, Eric J

    2017-06-01

    The C-Repeat Binding Factors (CBFs) are DNA-binding transcriptional activators that were identified using Arabidopsis thaliana. In barley, Hordeum vulgare, a cluster of CBF genes reside at FROST RESISTANCE-H2, one of two loci having major effects on winter-hardiness. FR-H2 was revealed in a population derived from the winter barley 'Nure' and the spring barley 'Trèmois'. 'Nure' harbors two to three copies of CBF2A and CBF4B as a consequence of tandem iteration of the genomic region encompassing these genes whereas 'Trèmois' harbors single copies, and these copy number differences are associated with their transcript level differences. Here we explore further the relationship between FR-H2 CBF gene copy number and transcript levels using 'Admire', a winter barley accumulating FR-H2 CBF gene transcripts to very high levels, and a group of lines related to 'Admire' through descent. DNA blot hybridization indicated the CBF2A-CBF4B genomic region is present in 7-8 copies in 'Admire' and is highly variable in copy number across the lines related to 'Admire'. At normal growth temperatures transcript levels of CBF12, CBF14, and CBF16 were higher in lines having greater CBF2A-CBF4B genomic region copy numbers than in lines having fewer copy numbers at peak expression level time points controlled by the circadian clock. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated CBF2 was at the CBF12 and CBF16 promoters at normal growth temperatures. These data support a scenario in which CBF2A-CBF4B genomic region copy numbers affect expression of other FR-H2 CBFs through a mechansim in which these other FR-H2 CBFs are activated by those in the copy number variable unit.

  6. Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Developing Sexually Dimorphic Rat Brain Regions Exposed to Antiandrogenic, Estrogenic, or Complex Endocrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtensteiger, Walter; Bassetti-Gaille, Catherine; Faass, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The study addressed the question whether gene expression patterns induced by different mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) administered in a higher dose range, corresponding to 450×, 200×, and 100× high-end human exposure levels, could be characterized in developing brain with respect...... to endocrine activity of mixture components, and which developmental processes were preferentially targeted. Three EDC mixtures, A-Mix (anti-androgenic mixture) with 8 antiandrogenic chemicals (di-n-butylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, vinclozolin, prochloraz, procymidone, linuron, epoxiconazole, and DDE), E...... on genes encoding for components of excitatory glutamatergic synapses and genes controlling migration and pathfinding of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, as well as genes linked with increased risk of autism spectrum disorders. Because development of glutamatergic synapses is regulated by sex steroids...

  7. Number and regional distribution of GAD65 mRNA-expressing interneurons in the rat hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czéh, B; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Tahtakran, Siroun; Houser, Carolyn R; Seress, L

    2013-12-01

    In rodent models for neuropsychiatric disorders reduced number of hippocampal interneurons have been reported, but the total number of GABAergic neurons in the normal rat hippocampus is yet unknown. We used in situ hybridization method to label the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and counted the number of GAD65 mRNA-expressing neurons along the entire septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus. We found that 2/3 of the interneurons were in Ammon's horn (61,590) and 1/3 in the dentate gyrus (28,000). We observed the following numbers in Ammon's horn: CA3 area 33,400, CA2 area 4,190, CA1 area 24,000 and in the dentate gyrus: 6,000 in the molecular and 9,000 in the granule cell layers and 13,000 in the hilus. GAD65 mRNA-expressing neurons were significantly more numerous in dorsal than in ventral hippocampus. The ratio between interneurons and principal cells was lowest in the granule cell layer (0.9%) and highest in hilus (21%). In Ammon's horn this ratio was constant being 13% in CA3 and 8% in CA1-2 areas. In the entire hippocampal formation, the interneuron/principal cell ratio was 6%, with a significant difference between Ammon's horn (9.5%) and the dentate gyrus (2.8%) including the hilus. Such low ratios could suggest that even a limited loss of GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus may have a considerable functional impact.

  8. Efeitos do pentobarbital sódico sobre a atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Para êste estudo foram empregados 35 ratos da raça Wistar em preparação aguda (24 com lesão bilateral e 11 com lesão unilateral da formação reticular mesencefálica e 18 preparações crônicas. O método empregado na obtenção das preparações foi descrito em trabalho anterior12. O objetivo desta série de experiências foi o de verificar de que maneira o pentobarbital interfere sobre as características da atividade elétrica cortical após lesão da formação reticular mesencefálica. Para tal, em animais preparados agudamente, foram feitas lesões progressivamente mais extensas e o barbitúrico injetado por via intravenosa em doses crescentes. A fim de testar a integridade do sistema reticular ativador ascendente, além de estímulos dolorosos intensos, aplicávamos pulsos de 5 a 10 V, 100 Hz, e 0,1 ms à formação reticular mesencefálica situada abaixo da região lesada. A ausência de reação de alerta cortical (dessincronização nos assegurava que tal sistema havia sido lesado completamente. Nas preparações crônicas o pentobarbital era injetado por via intraperitoneal. Dessas experiências concluimos o seguinte: 1. Aumento da sincronização do eletrocorticograma nos animais com lesões parciais ou totais da formação reticular mesencefálica. 2. Depressão acentuada e precoce da atividade elétrica cerebral nos ratos com lesão muito extensa (comprometendo também a porção ventrobasal do tálamo. 3. Isocronismo da atividade elétrica cortical nos dois hemisférios cerebrais. 4. O pentobarbital parece agir tanto sobre os sistemas ativadores como sobre o sincronizador do eletrocorticograma. As doses pequenas deprimem os primeiros, liberando o segundo, enquanto que as maiores bloqueiam também este último. Sòmente doses muito mais altas é que fazem desaparecer totalmente a atividade do córtex cerebral, que se mostra, portanto, mais resistente à ação da droga.

  9. Region- or state-related differences in expression and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs in naïve and pain-experiencing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Xiu-Yu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, one member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK family, has been suggested to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions, including cell growth, differentiation, survival, as well as neuronal plasticity. Recent evidence indicates a role for ERKs in nociceptive processing in both dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord. However, little literature has been reported to examine the differential distribution and activation of ERK isoforms, ERK1 and ERK2, at different levels of pain-related pathways under both normal and pain states. In the present study, quantitative blot immunolabeling technique was used to determine the spatial and temporal expression of ERK1 and ERK2, as well as their activated forms, in the spinal cord, primary somatosensory cortex (SI area of cortex, and hippocampus under normal, transient pain and persistent pain states. Results In naïve rats, we detected regional differences in total expression of ERK1 and ERK2 across different areas. In the spinal cord, ERK1 was expressed more abundantly than ERK2, while in the SI area of cortex and hippocampus, there was a larger amount of ERK2 than ERK1. Moreover, phosphorylated ERK2 (pERK2, not phosphorylated ERK1 (pERK1, was normally expressed with a high level in the SI area and hippocampus, but both pERK1 and pERK2 were barely detectable in normal spinal cord. Intraplantar saline or bee venom injection, mimicking transient or persistent pain respectively, can equally initiate an intense and long-lasting activation of ERKs in all three areas examined. However, isoform-dependent differences existed among these areas, that is, pERK2 exhibited stronger response than pERK1 in the spinal cord, whereas ERK1 was more remarkably activated than ERK2 in the S1 area and hippocampus. Conclusion Taken these results together, we conclude that: (1 under normal state, while ERK immunoreactivity is broadly distributed in the rat

  10. Characterization of the bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein gene family – analysis of gene sequences, regulatory regions within the promoter and expression of selected genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs belong to a large family of aspartic peptidases expressed exclusively in the placenta of species in the Artiodactyla order. In cattle, the PAG gene family is comprised of at least 22 transcribed genes, as well as some variants. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that the PAG family segregates into 'ancient' and 'modern' groupings. Along with sequence differences between family members, there are clear distinctions in their spatio-temporal distribution and in their relative level of expression. In this report, 1 we performed an in silico analysis of the bovine genome to further characterize the PAG gene family, 2 we scrutinized proximal promoter sequences of the PAG genes to evaluate the evolution pressures operating on them and to identify putative regulatory regions, 3 we determined relative transcript abundance of selected PAGs during pregnancy and, 4 we performed preliminary characterization of the putative regulatory elements for one of the candidate PAGs, bovine (bo PAG-2. Results From our analysis of the bovine genome, we identified 18 distinct PAG genes and 14 pseudogenes. We observed that the first 500 base pairs upstream of the translational start site contained multiple regions that are conserved among all boPAGs. However, a preponderance of conserved regions, that harbor recognition sites for putative transcriptional factors (TFs, were found to be unique to the modern boPAG grouping, but not the ancient boPAGs. We gathered evidence by means of Q-PCR and screening of EST databases to show that boPAG-2 is the most abundant of all boPAG transcripts. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence for the role of ETS- and DDVL-related TFs in the regulation of the boPAG-2 gene. Conclusion PAGs represent a relatively large gene family in the bovine genome. The proximal promoter regions of these genes display differences in putative TF binding sites, likely contributing to observed

  11. Curcumin-mediated decrease in the expression of nucleolar organizer regions in cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Pajak, Justyna; Stoklosa, Sylwia; Kubis, Barbara; Pastuszek, Paulina; Slota, Ewa; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-09-01

    Curcumin, the major yellow-orange pigment of turmeric derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, is a highly pleiotropic molecule with the potential to modulate inflammation, oxidative stress, cell survival, cell secretion, homeostasis and proliferation. Curcumin, at relatively high concentrations, was repeatedly reported to be a potent inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells and thus considered a promising anticancer agent. In the present paper, the effects of low concentrations of curcumin on human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells were studied. We found curcumin-mediated decrease in the cell number and viability, and increase in apoptotic events and superoxide level. In contrast to previously shown curcumin cytotoxicity toward different cervical cancer lines, we observed toxic effects when even as low as 1 μM concentration of curcumin was used. Curcumin was not genotoxic to HeLa cells. Because argyrophilic nucleolar protein (AgNOR protein) expression is elevated in malignant cells compared to normal cells reflecting the rapidity of cancer cell proliferation, we evaluated curcumin-associated changes in size (area) and number of silver deposits. We showed curcumin-induced decrease in AgNOR protein pools, which may be mediated by global DNA hypermethylation observed after low concentration curcumin treatment. In summary, we have shown for the first time that curcumin at low micromolar range may be effective against HeLa cells, which may have implications for curcumin-based treatment of cervical cancer in humans.

  12. Chelerythrine down regulates expression of VEGFA, BCL2 and KRAS by arresting G-Quadruplex structures at their promoter regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Jagannath; Mondal, Soma; Bhattacharjee, Payel; Sengupta, Pallabi; Roychowdhury, Tanaya; Saha, Pranay; Kundu, Pallob; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu

    2017-01-01

    A putative anticancer plant alkaloid, Chelerythrine binds to G-quadruplexes at promoters of VEGFA, BCL2 and KRAS genes and down regulates their expression. The association of Chelerythrine to G-quadruplex at the promoters of these oncogenes were monitored using UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, CD melting, isothermal titration calorimetry, molecular dynamics simulation and quantitative RT-PCR technique. The pronounced hypochromism accompanied by red shifts in UV absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ethidium bromide displacement assay indicates end stacking mode of interaction of Chelerythrine with the corresponding G-quadruplex structures. An increase in fluorescence anisotropy and CD melting temperature of Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex revealed the formation of stable Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry data confirmed that Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex formation is thermodynamically favourable. Results of quantative RT-PCR experiment in combination with luciferase assay showed that Chelerythrine treatment to MCF7 breast cancer cells effectively down regulated transcript level of all three genes, suggesting that Chelerythrine efficiently binds to in cellulo quadruplex motifs. MD simulation provides the molecular picture showing interaction between Chelerythrine and G-quadruplex. Binding of Chelerythrine with BCL2, VEGFA and KRAS genes involved in evasion, angiogenesis and self sufficiency of cancer cells provides a new insight for the development of future therapeutics against cancer.

  13. The 5′ untranslated region of fruA mRNA in Myxococcus xanthus positively regulates the expression of its own gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qian; MAO Xiaohua

    2004-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus provides an excellent model organism for studying the mechanism of multicellular morphogenesis. The mRNA for FruA, a transcription factor essential for the development of M. xanthus, contains a very long 5′-UTR consisting of 235 nucleotides. Using lacZ as a reporter gene, two fruA-lacZ translational fusions retaining or lacking the fruA 5′-UTR were constructed and separately integrated at phage Mx8 attachment site (attB) in M. xanthus chromosome. Deletion in 5′-UTR between nucleotides from +4 to +220 abolished fruA-lacZ expression during development, indicating that the 5′-UTR is essential for the induction of fruA. Prediction of the RNA secondary structure of 5′-UTR shows that this region could form an extremely stable three-helix junction structure, which might be a binding site for a regulatory protein or contain a cis-acting element(s) to control fruA expression. Thus, the 5′-UTR of fruA mRNA positively regulates the expression of its own gene.

  14. High expression of human se-rum albumin in milk of trans-genic mice directed by the goat b-casein gene promoter region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed a mammary gland expression vector that contained the goat b-casein gene promoter, 5′upstream regulatory region, exons 1, 2, intron 1 as well as the human serum albumin (hALB) mini-gene (including the full-long sequences of hALB cDNA and its intron 1). Injec-tion of the vector into mouse tail veins showed that the re-combinant construct was expressed only in mammary glands. The vector was microinjected into the mouse fertilized eggs, followed by transferring the eggs into the foster mice. 33 F0 mice were obtained. Of the 33, 8 mice (5♀, 3♂) were trans-genic with hALB gene integration identified by PCR as well as Southern blot hybridization. The integration rate was 24.2% (8/33). Western blot analysis showed that 3 female transgenic mice had hALB expression in their milk. The hALB contents in milk reached 3.54, 0.21 and 3.03 g/L, re-spectively.

  15. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1 Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Yabuno

    Full Text Available Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1 carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1, a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2, the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity.

  16. Genome-wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA interactions are enriched in intergenic regions and gene promoters and correlate with infection-induced differential gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Stephen Dumler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: i intergenic regions predicted to be matrix attachment regions (MARs; ii within predicted lamina-associated domains; and iii at promoters ≤3,000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome re-organizer. AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity.

  17. Effects of Ganoderma lucidum spore powder on astrocyte expression and glutamine synthetase activity in the hippocampal region of epileptic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiling Zhang; Shuqiu Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that astrocyte dysfunction plays a central role in inhibiting epileptic seizures and that regulation of astrocyte function may be a new target for treatment of epilepsy.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of Ganoderma lucidum spore powder (GLSP) on astrocyte morphology and ghitamine synthetase (GS) activity in the hippocampal region of epileptic rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled animal experiment was performed at the Function Laboratory, College of Basic Medicine, Jiamusi University between October and December 2006.MATERIALS: A total of 30 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomized to three groups (n = 10): control,model, and GLSP. GLSP was sourced from Jiamusi Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Planting Base and prepared to 30 g/L with physiological saline before use. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) (10 g/L) was provided by Sigma Company, USA.METHODS: The control group received intraperitoneal (i.p.) and intragastric (i.g.) physiological saline.Following epilepsy induction by i.p. administration of PTZ (35 mg/kg), rats from the model and GLSP groups were ig injected with physiological saline and GLSP (300 mg/kg), respectively. Each compound was administered once per day, for a total of 28 successive days. Epileptic seizure convulsions were graded 0-5. A higher grade indicated more severe epilepsy. Only those rats showing stage 2 or higher convulsions at least 5 times successively were included in further experiments.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Immediately after injection, seizure activity was monitored for 30 minutes to determine the latent period and seizure duration; simultaneously, astrocyte numbers and GS activity in the hippocampal region of rats with epilepsy were detected by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: All 30 rats were included in the final analysis. On day 28, following PTZ administration epileptic seizures were not found in the control group. In the GLSP group, rats exhibited rhythmic head nodding or facial spasms

  18. The association of SNPs in Hsp90β gene 5' flanking region with thermo tolerance traits and tissue mRNA expression in two chicken breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo-Yu; Gan, Jian-Kang; Xiao, Xiong; Jiang, Li-Yan; Zhang, Xi-Quan; Luo, Qing-Bin

    2013-09-01

    Thermo stress induces heat shock proteins (HSPs) expression and HSP90 family is one of them that has been reported to involve in cellular protection against heat stress. But whether there is any association of genetic variation in the Hsp90β gene in chicken with thermo tolerance is still unknown. Direct sequencing was used to detect possible SNPs in Hsp90β gene 5' flanking region in 3 chicken breeds (n = 663). Six mutations, among which 2 SNPs were chosen and genotypes were analyzed with PCR-RFLP method, were found in Hsp90β gene in these 3 chicken breeds. Association analysis indicated that SNP of C.-141G>A in the 5' flanking region of the Hsp90β gene in chicken had some effect on thermo tolerance traits, which may be a potential molecular marker of thermo tolerance, and the genotype GG was the thermo tolerance genotype. Hsp90β gene mRNA expression in different tissues detected by quantitative real-time PCR assay were demonstrated to be tissue dependent, implying that different tissues have distinct sensibilities to thermo stress. Besides, it was shown time specific and varieties differences. The expression of Hsp90β mRNA in Lingshan chickens in some tissues including heart, liver, brain and spleen were significantly higher or lower than that of White Recessive Rock (WRR). In this study, we presume that these mutations could be used in marker assisted selection for anti-heat stress chickens in our breeding program, and WRR were vulnerable to tropical thermo stress whereas Lingshan chickens were well adapted.

  19. Spatio-temporal expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in and surrounding a region of rat frontal lobe damaged with a sharp instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixian He; Zhijun Zhang; Yulin Dong; Guangming Lü; Ting Wang; Hengjian Ni

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) cannot be detected in the neurons and glial cells of normal rats, but iNOS can be found in some neurons and glial cells of rats following ischemic, traumatic, neurotoxic or inflammatory damage.OBJECTIVE: To investigate iNOS expression and iNOS-positive cell types at various time points following damage to the rat frontal lobe using a sharp instrument.DESIGN: A nerve molecular biology, randomized, controlled study.TIME AND SETTING: This experiment was performed at the Department of Human Anatomy, Institute of Neurobiology, Medical School of Nantong University, between April 2006 and December 2007.MATERIALS: Rabbit anti-iNOS antibody (Santa Cruz, USA), biotin labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody (Sigma, USA), reverse transcription kit (Biouniquer, Hong Kong, China) and horseradish peroxidase labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody (Pierce, USA) were used for this study.METHODS: A total of 112 healthy rats aged 3 months were randomly assigned into a sham operation group (n = 28) and a damage group (n = 84). Rat models of frontal lobe damage were induced in the damage group using a sharp instrument to make an incision in the frontal lobe cortex. In the sham operation group, the rat bone window was opened but brain tissues were left intact.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Parameters were measured at 3, 6, 12, 24, 72, 120 and 168 hours following damage in both groups. Pathological changes were observed using Nissl staining and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Expression of iNOS mRNA, iNOS protein and iNOS-positive cells were examined by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively.RESULTS: A large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated the damaged region 12 and 24 hours following damage, iNOS mRNA and iNOS protein expression increased in and around the damaged region 3 hours following damage, reached a peak at 24 hours, and then gradually decreased. The changes in iNOS-positive cell number reflected the changes in i

  20. The effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells transplantation after mannitol pretreatment on behavioral performance and synaptophysin expression in the CA3 region in hippocampus of vascular dementia rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    农伟东

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) transplantation after mannitol pretreatment on behavioral performance and synaptophysin expression in the CA3region in hippocampus of vascular dementia (VD) rats.Methods The

  1. 45S rDNA regions are chromosome fragile sites expressed as gaps in vitro on metaphase chromosomes of root-tip meristematic cells in Lolium spp.

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    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In humans, chromosome fragile sites are regions that are especially prone to forming non-staining gaps, constrictions or breaks in one or both of the chromatids on metaphase chromosomes either spontaneously or following partial inhibition of DNA synthesis and have been well identified. So far, no plant chromosome fragile sites similar to those in human chromosomes have been reported. METHODS AND RESULTS: During the course of cytological mapping of rDNA on ryegrass chromosomes, we found that the number of chromosomes plus chromosome fragments was often more than the expected 14 in most cells for Lolium perenne L. cv. Player by close cytological examination using a routine chromosome preparation procedure. Further fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH using 45S rDNA as a probe indicated that the root-tip cells having more than a 14-chromosome plus chromosome fragment count were a result of chromosome breakage or gap formation in vitro (referred to as chromosome lesions at 45S rDNA sites, and 86% of the cells exhibited chromosome breaks or gaps and all occurred at the sites of 45S rDNA in Lolium perenne L. cv. Player, as well as in L. multiflorum Lam. cv. Top One. Chromatin depletion or decondensation occurred at various locations within the 45S rDNA regions, suggesting heterogeneity of lesions of 45S rDNA sites with respect to their position within the rDNA region. CONCLUSIONS: The chromosome lesions observed in this study are very similar cytologically to that of fragile sites observed in human chromosomes, and thus we conclude that the high frequency of chromosome lesions in vitro in Lolium species is the result of the expression of 45S rDNA fragile sites. Possible causes for the spontaneous expression of fragile sites and their potential biological significance are discussed.

  2. Mild stress induces brain region-specific alterations of selective ER stress markers' mRNA expression in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altperery, A; Raud, S; Sütt, S; Reimets, R; Visnapuu, T; Toots, M; Vasar, E

    2017-09-26

    In this work, the effect of mild stress (elevated plus maze test, EPM) on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers in different brain areas of wild type (WT) and Wfs1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice was investigated. The following ER stress markers were studied: activating transcription factor 6α (Atf6α), protein kinase-like ER kinase (Perk), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1) and its spliced form (Xbp1s), 78-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (Grp78), 94-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (Grp94), C/EBP homologous protein (Chop). Wfs1KO and WT mice, not exposed to EPM, had similar patterns of ER stress markers in the studied brain areas. The exploratory activity of Wfs1KO mice in the EPM was inhibited compared to WT mice, probably reflecting increased anxiety in genetically modified mice. In response to the EPM, activation of inositol-requiring transmembrane kinase and endonuclease 1α (Ire1α) ER stress pathway was seen in both genotypes, but in different brain areas. Such a brain region-specific Ire1α activation was linked with dominant behavioural trends in these mice as more anxious, neophobic Wfs1KO mice had increased ER stress markers expression in the temporal lobe, the brain region related to anxiety, and more curious WT mice had ER stress markers increased in the ventral striatum which is related to the exploratory drive. The molecular mechanism triggering respective changes in ER stress markers in these brain regions is likely related to altered levels of monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine) in Wfs1KO mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Specific variants in the MLH1 gene region may drive DNA methylation, loss of protein expression, and MSI-H colorectal cancer.

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    Miralem Mrkonjic

    Full Text Available We previously identified an association between a mismatch repair gene, MLH1, promoter SNP (rs1800734 and microsatellite unstable (MSI-H colorectal cancers (CRCs in two samples. The current study expanded on this finding as we explored the genetic basis of DNA methylation in this region of chromosome 3. We hypothesized that specific polymorphisms in the MLH1 gene region predispose it to DNA methylation, resulting in the loss of MLH1 gene expression, mismatch-repair function, and consequently to genome-wide microsatellite instability.We first tested our hypothesis in one sample from Ontario (901 cases, 1,097 controls and replicated major findings in two additional samples from Newfoundland and Labrador (479 cases, 336 controls and from Seattle (591 cases, 629 controls. Logistic regression was used to test for association between SNPs in the region of MLH1 and CRC, MSI-H CRC, MLH1 gene expression in CRC, and DNA methylation in CRC. The association between rs1800734 and MSI-H CRCs, previously reported in Ontario and Newfoundland, was replicated in the Seattle sample. Two additional SNPs, in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs1800734, showed strong associations with MLH1 promoter methylation, loss of MLH1 protein, and MSI-H CRC in all three samples. The logistic regression model of MSI-H CRC that included MLH1-promoter-methylation status and MLH1 immunohistochemistry status fit most parsimoniously in all three samples combined. When rs1800734 was added to this model, its effect was not statistically significant (P-value  = 0.72 vs. 2.3×10(-4 when the SNP was examined alone.The observed association of rs1800734 with MSI-H CRC occurs through its effect on the MLH1 promoter methylation, MLH1 IHC deficiency, or both.

  4. The 1908 Messina Earthquake and the Messina Straits Seismicity as Shallow Expression of Wide Depth-Range Regional Geodynamic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, G.; Orecchio, B.; Presti, D.

    2008-12-01

    New tomographic results in the Calabro-Peloritan Arc region show that the Messina Straits area delineates the transition between the only sector where the Ionian slab is in-depth continuous and therefore still capable to retreat (Southern Calabria) and the south-western boundary of the subduction system now interested by continental collision (central-western Sicily). This geodynamic framework produces the seismogenic stress field detected in the Straits crustal structure, characterised by ESE-oriented extension and by minor strike- slip component. Stress field and seismicity analyses performed in the area reveal that the 1908 earthquake source is characterised by normal faulting, is located in the Straits and it strikes about NNE-SSW with the top below Sicilian shoreline and dip toward east. Also, in spite of the very low seismicity levels recorded since the installation of local seismic network (late '70s), the analysis performed on historical catalogue data (CPTI, http://emidius.mi.ingv.it/CPTI/) for the period 1780-2002 highlights that the Messina Straits is one of the most active areas in Italy, also excluding phases of maximum destructive capability.

  5. Transmisión de cargas entre forjados y puntales en un edificio de forjado reticular de casetón perdido utilizando clareado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasch, I.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of tests carried out during the construction of a building of flats with cast-in-place girderless hollow floor slab in Sabadell, Spain, using the shoring, clearing and striking (SCS process. Loads on shores were recorded during the different construction stages of floor slabs 1 to 6. The two first floor slabs had geometry different than the rest. The experimental results were used to analyse load transmission between slabs and shores during the construction of the building with a SCS process. The experimental results were compared with those obtained applying simplified methods that consider the real stiffness of the shoring, obtaining that the method with a better fit was the New Simplified Procedure.En el presente artículo se presentan los resultados de la instrumentación llevada a cabo durante la construcción de un edificio de viviendas resuelto con forjados reticulares de casetón perdido situado en Sabadell (España, en el que se ha empleado un proceso de cimbrado, clareado, descimbrado (CCD. Se han registrado las cargas debidas a las operaciones constructivas de CCD en puntales de los seis primeros forjados. Dichos registros han permitido analizar la transmisión de cargas entre forjados y puntales durante la construcción de este edificio, teniendo un proceso de CCD. El análisis de las medidas experimentales ha permitido concluir que la transmisión de cargas entre forjados y puntales difiere según las condiciones de contorno del vano estudiado. Asimismo, se han comparado las medidas experimentales con diversos métodos simplificados que permiten simular la operación del clareado, obteniendo que el método que mejor se ajusta es el Nuevo Procedimiento Simplificado.

  6. Aggravation of excessive daytime sleepiness concurrent with aggravation of an injured ascending reticular activating system in a patient with mild traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report on a patient who developed aggravation of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) concurrent with aggravation of an injured ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), demonstrated by follow-up diffusion tensor tractographies (DTTs). Methods: A 42-year-old male patient experienced head trauma resulting from flexion-hyperextension injury after collision with another vehicle from behind while stopped at an intersection. The patient lost consciousness for approximately 10 seconds and experienced no post-traumatic amnesia following the accident. The patient's Glasgow Coma Scale score was 15. No specific lesion was observed on the conventional brain MRI performed at 10 weeks after onset. The patient complained of EDS after the head trauma and aggravation of EDS with passage of time. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale indicated abnormality with a score of 12 at 10 weeks after onset (cut-off: 10 points full mark: 24 score) and it was aggravated with a score of 18 at 16 months. Results: On 10-week DTT, decreased neural connectivity of the intralaminar thalamic nucleus to the prefrontal cortex and basal forebrain was observed in both hemispheres. However, no significant abnormality was observed in the dorsal and ventral lower ARAS. On 16-month DTT, the upper portion of the left dorsal lower ARAS showed partial tearing and the ventral lower ARAS showed thinning (both sides) and partial tearing (right side). Conclusions: Aggravation of EDS concurrent with aggravation of an injured ARAS was demonstrated in a patient with mild TBI using DTT. PMID:28121943

  7. Measuring the motor output of the pontomedullary reticular formation in the monkey: do stimulus-triggered averaging and stimulus trains produce comparable results in the upper limbs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Wendy J; Davidson, Adam G; Buford, John A

    2010-06-01

    The pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) of the monkey produces motor outputs to both upper limbs. EMG effects evoked from stimulus-triggered averaging (StimulusTA) were compared with effects from stimulus trains to determine whether both stimulation methods produced comparable results. Flexor and extensor muscles of scapulothoracic, shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints were studied bilaterally in two male M. fascicularis monkeys trained to perform a bilateral reaching task. The frequency of facilitation versus suppression responses evoked in the muscles was compared between methods. Stimulus trains were more efficient (94% of PMRF sites) in producing responses than StimulusTA (55%), and stimulus trains evoked responses from more muscles per site than from StimulusTA. Facilitation (72%) was more common from stimulus trains than StimulusTA (39%). In the overall results, a bilateral reciprocal activation pattern of ipsilateral flexor and contralateral extensor facilitation was evident for StimulusTA and stimulus trains. When the comparison was restricted to cases where both methods produced a response in a given muscle from the same site, agreement was very high, at 80%. For the remaining 20%, discrepancies were accounted for mainly by facilitation from stimulus trains when StimulusTA produced suppression, which was in agreement with the under-representation of suppression in the stimulus train data as a whole. To the extent that the stimulus train method may favor transmission through polysynaptic pathways, these results suggest that polysynaptic pathways from the PMRF more often produce facilitation in muscles that would typically demonstrate suppression with StimulusTA.

  8. Dopamine D4 receptor stimulation in GABAergic projections of the globus pallidus to the reticular thalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra reticulata of the rat decreases locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlij, David; Acosta-García, Jacqueline; Rojas-Márquez, Martín; González-Hernández, Brenda; Escartín-Perez, Erick; Aceves, Jorge; Florán, Benjamín

    2012-02-01

    Dopamine D4 receptors are localized in the GABAergic projections that globus pallidus (GP) neurons send to the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RTN), the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Deficient D4 function in this network could lead to hyperactivity and thus be important in generating some of the symptoms of ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), a condition associated with polymorphisms of dopamine D4 receptors. It is then, unexpected that systemic injections of D4 ligands have no significant effects on the motor activity of normal rats. We further examined this issue by microinjecting D4 ligands and psychostimulant drugs in relevant structures. Interstitial dopamine overflow in the RTN was increased by reverse microdialysis of both methylphenidate and methamphetamine. Intranuclear injections in the RTN of methylphenidate, methamphetamine and the selective D4 agonist PD 168,077 reduced motor activity. Intraperitoneal injection of the D4 antagonist L 745,870 blocked the effects of these intranuclear injections. Similarly, intranuclear injections of PD 168,077 in the SNr inhibited motor activity, an effect that was also blocked by intraperitoneal L 745,870. In rats with 6-OHDA induced hemiparkinsonism, intraperitoneal PD 168,077 produced ipsilateral turning behavior that was blocked by L 745,870. Our results suggest that diminished D4 signaling in GP projections could lead to increased traffic through the relay nuclei of the thalamus and hyperactivity. Hence this basal-ganglia-thalamus network may be one of the targets of the beneficial effects that psychostimulant drugs have in disorders associated with D4 receptor abnormalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'.

  9. GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse modulate neurochemical, electrographic, and behavioral phenotypes of wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, RaShonda R; Chang, Theresa; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-09-15

    Drugs that potentiate transmission at GABA(A) receptors are widely used to enhance sleep and to cause general anesthesia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) of mouse modulate five phenotypes of arousal: sleep and wakefulness, cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO, breathing, and recovery time from general anesthesia. Microinjections into the PnO of saline (vehicle control), the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, muscimol with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, and bicuculline alone were performed in male C57BL/6J mice (n = 33) implanted with EEG recording electrodes. Muscimol caused a significant increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. These effects were reversed by coadministration of bicuculline. Bicuculline administered alone caused a significant decrease in wakefulness and increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep. Muscimol significantly increased EEG power in the delta range (0.5-4 Hz) during wakefulness and in the theta range (4-9 Hz) during REM sleep. Dialysis delivery of bicuculline to the PnO of male mice (n = 18) anesthetized with isoflurane significantly increased ACh release in the PnO, decreased breathing rate, and increased anesthesia recovery time. All drug effects were concentration dependent. The effects on phenotypes of arousal support the conclusion that GABA(A) receptors in the PnO promote wakefulness and suggest that increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO may be one mechanism underlying the phenomenon of paradoxical behavioral activation by some benzodiazepines.

  10. Phase-dependent activity of neurons in the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus with saccharin intake in a cue-guided lever-manipulation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ryuhei; Kato, Risako; Fujita, Satoshi; Shimada, Jun; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Neurons in the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus (rTRN) receive somatosensory and motor information and regulate neural activities of the thalamic nuclei. Previous studies showed that when activity in visual TRN neurons is suppressed prior to the visual stimuli in a visual detection task, the performance of the task improves. However, little is known about such changes in the rTRN preceding certain events. In the present study, we performed unit recordings in the rTRN in alert rats during a cue-guided lever-manipulation task in which saccharin was provided as a reward. Changes in neural activity during saccharin intake were observed in 56% (51 of 91) of the recorded neurons; the firing rates increased in 21 neurons and decreased in 23 neurons. Seven neurons both increased and decreased their firing rates during saccharin intake. Changes in firing rates during the reward-waiting stage between task termination and saccharin intake were also observed in 73% (37 of 51) of the neurons that responded to saccharin intake. Increased activity during saccharin intake did not correlate with increased activity during lever-manipulation or activity during the reward-waiting stage. However, decreased activity during saccharin intake was correlated with activity during the reward-waiting stage. These results suggest that rTRN neurons have phase-dependent changes in their activity and regulate the thalamic activities. Furthermore, the decreased activity of rTRN neurons before reward may contribute to refine somatosensory and motor information processing in the thalamic nuclei depending on the status of mind such as expectation and attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A C-Terminal Coiled-Coil Region of CagL is Responsible for Helicobacter Pylori-Induced Il-8 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Hofbaur, Stefan; Loell, Eva; Rieder, Gabriele

    2016-09-29

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent neutrophil-activating chemokine which triggers the infiltration and migration of neutrophils into areas of bacterial infection. Helicobacter pylori-infected patient studies as well as animal models have revealed that H. pylori type I strains carrying an intact cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) with a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) induce IL-8 expression and secretion in gastric mucosa. This gastric mucosal IL-8 expression correlates with severe histological changes due to H. pylori infection. In the present study, we explored a new recognition pattern on the bacterial adhesion protein CagL inducing IL-8 expression in H. pylori-infected host cells. To analyze the secreted IL-8 concentration, we performed IL-8 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To investigate the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expression on the transcriptional level, we transiently transfected gastric epithelial cells (AGS) with a human IL-8 luciferase reporter construct. The results of this study demonstrate that specifically the C-terminal coiled-coil region of the H. pylori CagL protein, a protein described to be located on the tip of the T4SS-pilus, is responsible for several in vitro observations: 1) H. pylori-induced IL-8 secretion via the transforming growth factor (TGF)-α activated epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R) signaling pathway; 2) H. pylori-induced elongation of the cells, a typical CagA-induced phenotype; and 3) the bridging of the T4SS to its human target cells. This novel bacterial-host recognition sequence allows a new insight into how H. pylori induces the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells and facilitates the development of precancerous conditions.

  12. Fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies directed at human T cell receptor variable regions: comparison with oligonucleotide-driven amplification for evaluation of V beta expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Romagné, F; Genevée, C; Rocher, C; Bruneau, J M; David, A; Praz, F; Hercend, T

    1993-07-01

    Seven distinct anti-human T cell receptor (TcR) V region monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were generated by immunizing mice with either human T cell lines or transfected murine cells expressing human TcR V beta genes. The specificity of these reagents was determined as follows: T cells recognized by each mAb were purified from the peripheral blood of healthy donors and TcR transcripts expressed in these cells were analyzed using oligonucleotide-driven amplification and cDNA sequencing. Four mAb were found to delineate the V beta 3, V beta 8, V beta 17 and V beta 19 subfamilies, respectively. The remaining reagents recognize subsets within the V beta 2, V beta 5 and V beta 13 subfamilies. Reactivity of the mAb with circulating T cells from 18 unrelated healthy individuals was determined. Limited variability was found from an individual to another. In four donors, mAb staining was compared to oligonucleotide-driven amplification for evaluation of V beta 3, V beta 8, V beta 17 and V beta 19 subfamily expression in the peripheral blood. Although the V gene subfamily-specific oligonucleotides used in this study belong to a carefully controlled series, our results show that this method does not give an accurate estimate of the percentage of peripheral T cells expressing a given TcR beta chain. The present data confirm the necessity to establish a complete set of well-characterized monoclonal reagents to study human T cell responses.

  13. TAGLN expression is upregulated in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors by hypomethylation in its promoter and subpromoter regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun-Hoo; Lee, Su-Jin; Yim, Hyunee; Han, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyon J; Sohn, Young-Bae; Ko, Jung Min; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2014-10-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) caused by NF1 gene mutation is a commonly inherited autosomal dominant disorder. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), a type of aggressive sarcoma, are a major cause of mortality in NF1 patients. The malignant transformation of benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) to MPNSTs is a marked peculiarity in NF1 patients, yet the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. We found that an actin-associated protein transgelin (SM22) was highly expressed in NF1-deficient MPNST tissues compared to NF1-deficient PN tissues using immunohistological staining and primary cultured MPNST cells in western blot analysis. We further found that this transgelin upregulation was caused by increased transcriptional expression of the TAGLN gene encoding transgelin. Comparison of DNA methylation values in the promoter and subpromoter regions of the TAGLN gene in three types of NF1-deficient primary-cultured cells, derived from an NF1 patient's normal phenotype, a benign PN and MPNST tissues, revealed that the TAGLN gene was hypomethylated in the MPNST cells. Next, to determine the functional role of transgelin in MPNST pathogenesis, we manipulated the TAGLN gene expression and investigated the alteration of the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the normal-phenotypic and malignant tumor cells. The downregulation of TAGLN expression in NF1-deficient MPNST tumor cells through the treatment of the small interfering RNA resulted in a decrease in the RAS activation (GTP-RAS) and the downstream ERK1/2 activation (phosphorylated ERK1/2), while the overexpression of TAGLN in normal-phenotypic NF1-deficient cells caused an increase in RAS and ERK1/2 activation. These results indicate that upregulation of transgelin caused by hypomethylation of the TAGLN gene is closely involved in tumor progression in NF1.

  14. Protein restriction during gestation alters histone modifications at the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) promoter region and induces GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of female rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shasha; Rollet, Michelle; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy is an intrauterine factor that results in alteration of the offspring genome and associates with disease risk in the offspring. We investigated the impact of a maternal low-protein (LP) diet on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in offspring skeletal muscle. GLUT4 is an insulin-regulated glucose transporter involved in insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle cells. We observed sex-dependent GLUT4 mRNA expression and increased GLUT4 protein content in female pup skeletal muscle with maternal LP. Analysis of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of increased skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression in offspring rats revealed the regulatory mechanisms involved. The protein level of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which has been known as an activator of GLUT4 transcription via the ability to carry out specific binding to the GLUT4 MEF2 binding sequence, increased in female pups whose mothers were fed a LP diet. Modifications of chromatin structure, including acetylated histone H3, acetylated histone H4 and di-methylated histone H3 at lysine 4, were detected at a significantly increased level at the GLUT4 promoter region in female pup muscle following a maternal LP diet. Glycogen content was also detected as up-regulated, accompanied by increased glycogen synthase in LP female offspring muscle. These results document that maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces GLUT4 expression in female offspring skeletal muscle but not in males, which may indicate sex-dependent adaptation of glucose metabolism to a maternal LP diet.

  15. Mapping to mouse chromosome 3 of the gene encoding latexin (Lxn) expressed in neocortical neurons in a region-specific manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ming-hao; Uratani, Yoshihiko; Arimatsu, Yasuyoshi [Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Latexin was first found as a 29-kDa antigen expressed in a subset of neurons in infragranular layers of lateral, but not dorsal, neocortical areas in the rat using a monoclonal antibody PC3.1. It was found that the vast majority of latexin-expressing neurons in both layers V and VI within the lateral neocortex were generated concurrently at Embryonic Day 15, demonstrating a strict correlation between the molecular identity of neurons and the time of their generation. Since neurons expressing latexin are located in the restricted part of the neocortex, latexin has been used as a useful molecular marker to elucidate the mechanism underlying cortical regional specification. The latexin cDNA isolated from a cDNA library of the rat cerebral cortex encodes a protein composed of 223-amino-acid residues containing two potential Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase sites and one cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site. The absence of any signal peptide or potential transmembrane domain is consistent with the apparent cytosolic localization of latexin in the rat brain. The transcripts of latexin were expressed in not only neutral but also nonneural tissues (e.g., lung, spleen, kidney, heart, and digestive tracts). Recently, it has been demonstrated that latexin purified from the rat brain has inhibitory activity against carboxypeptidase A1, carboxypeptidase A2, and mast cell carboxypeptidase A, with less carboxypeptidase B-inhibiting activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from the rat latexin cDNA has no strict homology to any sequences so far known. Genomic Southern blot analysis using a cDNA probe of rat latexin suggested that the gene encoding latexin in the rat has homologues in other mammalian species and in the chicken, but not in the nematode, fly, or frog. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. A C-Terminal Coiled-Coil Region of CagL is Responsible for Helicobacter Pylori-Induced Il-8 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Hofbaur, Stefan; Loell, Eva; Rieder, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent neutrophil-activating chemokine which triggers the infiltration and migration of neutrophils into areas of bacterial infection. Helicobacter pylori-infected patient studies as well as animal models have revealed that H. pylori type I strains carrying an intact cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) with a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) induce IL-8 expression and secretion in gastric mucosa. This gastric mucosal IL-8 expression correlates with severe histological changes due to H. pylori infection. In the present study, we explored a new recognition pattern on the bacterial adhesion protein CagL inducing IL-8 expression in H. pylori-infected host cells. To analyze the secreted IL-8 concentration, we performed IL-8 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To investigate the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expression on the transcriptional level, we transiently transfected gastric epithelial cells (AGS) with a human IL-8 luciferase reporter construct. The results of this study demonstrate that specifically the C-terminal coiled-coil region of the H. pylori CagL protein, a protein described to be located on the tip of the T4SS-pilus, is responsible for several in vitro observations: 1) H. pylori-induced IL-8 secretion via the transforming growth factor (TGF)-α activated epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R) signaling pathway; 2) H. pylori-induced elongation of the cells, a typical CagA-induced phenotype; and 3) the bridging of the T4SS to its human target cells. This novel bacterial-host recognition sequence allows a new insight into how H. pylori induces the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells and facilitates the development of precancerous conditions. PMID:27766167

  17. Spatiotemporal expression patterns of Pax6 in the brain of embryonic, newborn, and adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Deyi; Fu, Yuhong; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-03-01

    The transcription factor Pax6 has been reported to specify neural progenitor cell fates during development and maintain neuronal commitments in the adult. The spatiotemporal patterns of Pax6 expression were examined in sagittal and horizontal sections of the embryonic, postnatal, and adult brains using immunohistochemistry and double immunolabeling. The proportion of Pax6-immunopositive cells in various parts of the adult brain was estimated using the isotropic fractionator methodology. It was shown that at embryonic day 11 (E11) Pax6 was robustly expressed in the proliferative neuroepithelia of the ventricular zone in the forebrain and hindbrain, and in the floor and the mesencephalic reticular formation (mRt) in the midbrain. At E12, its expression emerged in the nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in the rhombencephalon and disappeared from the floor of the midbrain. As neurodevelopment proceeds, the expression pattern of Pax6 changes from the mitotic germinal zone in the ventricular zone to become extensively distributed in cell groups in the forebrain and hindbrain, and the expression persisted in the mRt. The majority of Pax6-positive cell groups were maintained until adult life, but the intensity of Pax6 expression became much weaker. Pax6 expression was maintained in the mitotic subventricular zone in the adult brain, but not in the germinal region dentate gyrus in the adult hippocampus. There was no obvious colocalization of Pax6 and NeuN during embryonic development, suggesting Pax6 is found primarily in developing progenitor cells. In the adult brain, however, Pax6 maintains neuronal features of some subtypes of neurons, as indicated by 97.1% of Pax6-positive cells co-expressing NeuN in the cerebellum, 40.7% in the olfactory bulb, 38.3% in the cerebrum, and 73.9% in the remaining brain except the hippocampus. Differentiated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons were observed in the floor of the E11 midbrain where Pax6 was also expressed, but no obvious

  18. ENOD40 expression in the pericycle precedes cortical cell division in Rhizobium-legume interaction and the highly conserved internal region of the gene does not encode a peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaan, B.; Yang, W.C.; Bisseling, T.; Franssen, H.

    2001-01-01

    In situ expression studies show that MsENOD40 is expressed in pericycle cells of alfalfa roots within 3 hr after addition of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. This is about 15 hr before cortical cell divisions become apparent. All ENOD40 clones isolated so far share two conserved regions, box 1 and box 2

  19. Effects of electro-acupuncture on Noxa and caspase-3 expression in hippocampal CA1 region of a vascular dementia rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanzhen Zhu; Qiang Wu; Ling Lin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noxa, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family, has been shown to induce the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis and to mediate hypoxic cell death in a rat model of cerebral ischcmia.This suggests that Noxa could participate in apoptosis during vascular dementia (VD).OBJECTIVE,: To detect Noxa and caspase-3 expression after electro-acupuncture in VD rats to further validate the mechanism of electro-acupuncture-induced effects in the treatment of VD.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled study was performed at the Center for the Neurobiology of Fujian Medical University between January 2006 and March 2007.MATERIALS: A total of forty adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were included in this study. The following equipment was used: confocal laser scanning microscope (SpS, Leica, Germany), water matte (Bejing Suntendy Science and Technology Co., Ltd., China), and SDZ-Ⅱ electronic acupuncture treatment instruments (Suzhou Medical Appliance Factory, China).METHODS: Thirty-eight rats with sufficient learning and memory abilities were selected by Morris water maze criteria. Twelve rats received sham-surgery; the remaining 26 rats were used to establish a VD model by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. The rats that survived the occlusion procedure were randomly assigned into an electro-acupuncture group (n = 11) and a VD model group (n = 12).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neuropathological changes were observed with hematoxylin-eosin staining of the hippocampus and expression of Noxa and caspasc-3 in the hippocampal CAI region was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscope following immunofluorescence staining.RESULTS: Expressions of Noxa and caspase-3 in the electro-acupuncture group and sham-operated group were less than in the VD model group (P < 0.01). Electro-acupuncture reduced the amount of apoptotic neurons in hippocampal CA1 area of rats with VD. The average latency in the Morris water maze test was significantly shorter

  20. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Khaled, Hussein M; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30-40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease.

  1. Transient Structures and Stream Interaction Regions in the Solar Wind: Results from EISCAT Interplanetary Scintillation, STEREO HI and Venus Express ASPERA-4 Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dorrian, Gareth; Davies, Jackie; Rouillard, Alexi; Fallows, Richard; Whittaker, Ian; Brown, Daniel; Harrison, Richard; Davis, Chris; Grande, Manuel; 10.1007/s11207-010-9599-z

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the detection and evolution of a complex series of transient and quasi-static solar wind structures in the days following the well-known comet 2P / Encke tail disconnection event in April 2007. The evolution of transient solar wind structures ranging in size from 106 km was characterized using one-minute time resolution observation of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) made using the European Incoherent SCA Tter (EISCA T) radar system. Simultaneously, the global structure and evolution of these features was characterized by the Heliospheric Imagers (HI) on the Solar TERrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft, placing the IPS observations in context. Of particular interest was the observation of one transient in the slow wind apparently being swept up and entrained by a Stream Interaction Region (SIR). The SIR itself was later detected in-situ at Venus by the Analyser of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-4) instrument on the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft. The availability of such...

  2. Acute exercise increases brain region-specific expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, GLUT1, and COX IV proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Masaki; Hamada, Taku

    2014-05-01

    The brain is capable of oxidizing lactate and ketone bodies through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). We examined the protein expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), and cytochrome-c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) in the rat brain within 24 h after a single exercise session. Brain samples were obtained from sedentary controls and treadmill-exercised rats (20 m/min, 8% grade). Acute exercise resulted in an increase in lactate in the cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, but not the brainstem, and an increase in β-hydroxybutyrate in the cortex alone. After a 2-h exercise session MCT1 increased in the cortex and hippocampus 5 h postexercise, and the effect lasted in the cortex for 24 h postexercise. MCT2 increased in the cortex and hypothalamus 5-24 h postexercise, whereas MCT2 increased in the hippocampus immediately after exercise, and remained elevated for 10 h postexercise. Regional upregulation of MCT2 after exercise was associated with increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine-related kinase B proteins, but not insulin-like growth factor 1. MCT4 increased 5-10 h postexercise only in the hypothalamus, and was associated with increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. However, none of the MCT isoforms in the brainstem was affected by exercise. Whereas GLUT 1 in the cortex increased only at 18 h postexercise, COX IV in the hippocampus increased 10 h after exercise and remained elevated for 24 h postexercise. These results suggest that acute prolonged exercise induces the brain region-specific upregulation of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, GLUT1, and COX IV proteins.

  3. Deletion of Chromosomal Region 8p21 Confers Resistance to Bortezomib and Is Associated with Upregulated Decoy TRAIL Receptor Expression in Patients with Multiple Myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Doganay Duru

    Full Text Available Loss of the chromosomal region 8p21 negatively effects survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM that undergo autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. In this study, we aimed to identify the immunological and molecular consequences of del(8(p21 with regards to treatment response and bortezomib resistance. In patients receiving bortezomib as a single first line agent without any high-dose therapy, we have observed that patients with del(8(p21 responded poorly to bortezomib with 50% showing no response while patients without the deletion had a response rate of 90%. In vitro analysis revealed a higher resistance to bortezomib possibly due to an altered gene expression profile caused by del(8(p21 including genes such as TRAIL-R4, CCDC25, RHOBTB2, PTK2B, SCARA3, MYC, BCL2 and TP53. Furthermore, while bortezomib sensitized MM cells without del(8(p21 to TRAIL/APO2L mediated apoptosis, in cells with del(8(p21 bortezomib failed to upregulate the pro-apoptotic death receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 which are located on the 8p21 region. Also expressing higher levels of the decoy death receptor TRAIL-R4, these cells were largely resistant to TRAIL/APO2L mediated apoptosis. Corroborating the clinical outcome of the patients, our data provides a potential explanation regarding the poor response of MM patients with del(8(p21 to bortezomib treatment. Furthermore, our clinical analysis suggests that including immunomodulatory agents such as Lenalidomide in the treatment regimen may help to overcome this negative effect, providing an alternative consideration in treatment planning of MM patients with del(8(p21.

  4. Maxadilan-simile expre